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Sample records for aerosol single-scattering albedo

  1. Assessing the measurement of aerosol single scattering albedo by Cavity Attenuated Phase-Shift Single Scattering Monitor (CAPS PMssa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perim de Faria, Julia; Bundke, Ulrich; Onasch, Timothy B.; Freedman, Andrew; Petzold, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The necessity to quantify the direct impact of aerosol particles on climate forcing is already well known; assessing this impact requires continuous and systematic measurements of the aerosol optical properties. Two of the main parameters that need to be accurately measured are the aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo (SSA, defined as the ratio of particulate scattering to extinction). The measurement of single scattering albedo commonly involves the measurement of two optical parameters, the scattering and the absorption coefficients. Although there are well established technologies to measure both of these parameters, the use of two separate instruments with different principles and uncertainties represents potential sources of significant errors and biases. Based on the recently developed cavity attenuated phase shift particle extinction monitor (CAPS PM_{ex) instrument, the CAPS PM_{ssa instrument combines the CAPS technology to measure particle extinction with an integrating sphere capable of simultaneously measuring the scattering coefficient of the same sample. The scattering channel is calibrated to the extinction channel, such that the accuracy of the single scattering albedo measurement is only a function of the accuracy of the extinction measurement and the nephelometer truncation losses. This gives the instrument an accurate and direct measurement of the single scattering albedo. In this study, we assess the measurements of both the extinction and scattering channels of the CAPS PM_{ssa through intercomparisons with Mie theory, as a fundamental comparison, and with proven technologies, such as integrating nephelometers and filter-based absorption monitors. For comparison, we use two nephelometers, a TSI 3563 and an Aurora 4000, and two measurements of the absorption coefficient, using a Particulate Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP). We also assess the indirect absorption coefficient

  2. Measurements and Modeling of Aerosol Absorption and Single Scattering Albedo at Ambient Relative Hum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hamill, P.

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainties in the aerosol single scattering albedo have been identified to be an important source of errors in current large-scale model estimates of the direct aerosol radiative forcing of climate. A number of investigators have obtained estimates of the single scattering albedo from a variety of remote sensing and in situ measurements during aerosol field experiments. During the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX, 1996) for example, estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo were obtained (1) as a best-fit parameter in comparing radiative flux changes measured by airborne pyranometer to those computed from independently measured aerosol properties; (2) from estimates of the aerosol complex index of refraction derived using a combination of airborne sunphotometer, lidar backscatter and in situ size distribution measurements; and (3) from airborne measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption using nephelometers and absorption photometers. In this paper, we briefly compare the results of the latter two methods for two TARFOX case studies, since those techniques provide height-resolved information about the aerosol single scattering albedo. Estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo from nephelometer and absorption photometer measurements require knowledge of the scattering and absorption humidification (i.e., the increase in these properties in response to an increase in ambient relative humidity), since both measurements are usually carried out at a relative humidity different from the ambient atmosphere. In principle, the scattering humidification factor can be measured, but there is currently no technique widely available to measure the absorption of an aerosol sample as a function of relative humidity. Frequently, for lack of better knowledge, the absorption humidification is assumed to be unity (meaning that there is no change in aerosol absorption due to an increase in ambient relative humidity). This

  3. Seasonal Trend of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo at Biomass Burning Sites in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Ward, D.; Mukelabai, M. M.; Piketh, S.; Hyer, E. J.; Dubovik, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2011-12-01

    A database of the optical properties of primarily biomass burning aerosols in Mongu, Zambia from multi-year monitoring at an AERONET sun-sky radiometer site was examined. For the biomass burning season months (July-November), we investigate the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distributions, and refractive indices from almucantar sky scan retrievals utilizing the algorithm of Dubovik and King (2000). The monthly mean single scattering albedo at 440 nm in Mongu was found to increase significantly from ~0.84 in July to ~0.93 in November (from 0.78 to 0.90 at 675 nm in these same months). There was no significant change in particle size, in either the dominant accumulation or secondary coarse modes during these months, nor any significant trend in the Angstrom Exponent (440-870 nm; r2=0.02). A significant downward seasonal trend in imaginary refractive index (r2=0.43) suggests a trend of decreasing black carbon content in the aerosol composition as the burning season progresses. Similarly, seasonal SSA retrievals for both the Etosha Pan, Namibia and Skukuza, South Africa AERONET sites also show increasing single scattering albedo values through the burning season. We show maps of satellite detected fire counts, which indicate that the regions of primary biomass burning in southern Africa shift significantly from July to October. Possible reasons for the seasonal changes in observed SSA include differences in biomass fuel types in different regions and seasons (fraction of woody biomass versus grasses), agricultural practices (Chitemene: in which woody fuels are burned at the end of the dry season), differences in fuel moisture content (as mid-October is the typical beginning of the rainy season) and differences in aging due to transport speed and distance from varying source regions. We also analyze the seasonality of SSA for sites in biomass burning regions of southern Amazonia, where no significant seasonal trend in SSA was detected.

  4. Aerosol Single-Scattering Albedo Derived from MODIS Reflectances over a Bright Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Martins, J.; Remer, L. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Stephens, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    The sign and magnitude of the aerosol radiative forcing over bright surfaces is highly dependent on the absorbing properties of the aerosol. Thus, the determination of aerosol forcing over desert regions requires accurate information about the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). However, the brightness of desert surfaces complicates the retrieval of aerosol optical properties using passive space-based measurements. The aerosol critical reflectance is one parameter that can be used to relate TOA reflectance changes over land to the aerosol absorption properties, without knowledge of the underlying surface properties or aerosol loading. Physically, the parameter represents the TOA reflectance at which increased aerosol scattering due to increased aerosol loading is balanced by increased absorption of the surface contribution to the TOA reflectance. It can be derived by comparing two satellite images with different aerosol loading, assuming that the surface reflectance and background aerosol is similar between the two days. In this work, we explore the utility of the critical reflectance method for routine monitoring of spectral aerosol absorption from space over North Africa, a region that is predominantly impacted by absorbing dust and biomass burning aerosol. We derive the critical reflectance from MODIS Level 1B reflectances in the vicinity of two AERONET stations: Tamanrasset, a site in the Algerian Sahara, and Banizoumbou, a Sahelian site in Niger. We examine the sensitivity of the critical reflectance parameter to aerosol physical and optical properties, as well as solar and viewing geometry, using the SBDART model, and apply our findings to retrieve SSA from the MODIS critical reflectance values. We compare our results to AERONET-retrieved estimates, as well as measurements of the TOA albedo and surface fluxes from GERB, ARM, and CERES data. Spectral SSA values retrieved at Banizoumbou result in TOA forcing estimates that agree with CERES measurements

  5. Using Single-Scattering Albedo Spectral Curvature to Characterize East Asian Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral dependence of aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) has been used to infer aerosol composition. In particular, aerosol mixtures dominated by dust absorption will have monotonically increasing SSA with wavelength while that dominated by black carbon absorption has monotonically decreasing SSA spectra. However, by analyzing SSA measured at four wavelengths, 440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm from the Aerosol Robotic Network data set, we find that the SSA spectra over East Asia are frequently peaked at 675 nm. In these cases, we suggest that SSA spectral curvature, defined as the negative of the second derivative of SSA as a function of wavelength, can provide additional information on the composition of these aerosol mixtures. Aerosol SSA spectral curvatures for East Asia during fall and winter are considerably larger than those found in places primarily dominated by biomass burning or dust aerosols. SSA curvature is found to increase as the SSA magnitude decreases. The curvature increases with coarse mode fraction (CMF) to a CMF value of about 0.4, then slightly decreases or remains constant at larger CMF. Mie calculations further verify that the strongest SSA curvature occurs at approx. 40% dust fraction, with 10% scattering aerosol fraction. The nonmonotonic SSA spectral dependence is likely associated with enhanced absorption in the shortwave by dust, absorption by black carbon at longer wavelengths, and also the flattened absorption optical depth spectral dependence due to the increased particle size.

  6. Characterization of the aerosol type using simultaneous measurements of the lidar ratio and estimations of the single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiridis, Vassilis; Balis, Dimitrios; Giannakaki, Eleni; Kazadzis, Stylianos; Arola, Antti; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos

    2011-07-01

    Lidar measurements of the vertical distribution of the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient and the corresponding extinction to backscatter ratio (so-called lidar ratio) at 355 nm have been performed at Thessaloniki, Greece using a Raman lidar system in the frame of the EARLINET for the period 2001-2005. Coincident spectral UV irradiance measurements, total ozone observations and aerosol optical depth estimates were available from a double Brewer spectroradiometer. The retrieval of single scattering albedo employed the Brewer global irradiance measurements and radiative transfer modeling. Vertically averaged values of the lidar ratio ranged from a minimum of 16 sr to a maximum value of 90 sr, while the effective single scattering albedo ranged from 0.78 to 1.00. The mean value of the lidar ratio for the dataset under study was 45.5 ± 21.0 sr while the average value of the single scattering albedo was 0.94 ± 0.05. For the majority of our measurements (80%) the single scattering albedo found to be greater than 0.90. Using additional information from backward trajectory calculations and lidar-derived free tropospheric contribution of aerosols in the columnar aerosol optical depth, it is shown that the combined use of the directly measured lidar ratio, and the indirectly estimated single scattering albedo, leads to a better characterization of the aerosol type probed.

  7. Aerosol single scattering albedo retrieval with various techniques in the UV and visible wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, A.; Krotkov, N.; Blumthaler, M.; Bais, A.; Kazadzis, S.; Balis, D.; Schmidhauser, R.; Kouremeti, N.; Giannakaki, E.; Arola, A.

    2009-08-01

    The most important aerosol properties for determining aerosol effect in the solar radiation reaching the earth's surface are the aerosol extinction optical depth and the single scattering albedo (SSA). Most of the latest studies, dealing with aerosol direct or indirect effects, are based on the analysis of aerosol optical depth in a regional or global scale, while SSA is typically assumed based on theoretical assumptions and not direct measurements. Especially for the retrieval of SSA in the UV wavelengths only limited work has been available in the literature. In the frame of SCOUT-O3 project, the variability of the aerosol SSA in the UV and visible range was investigated during an experimental campaign. The campaign took place in July 2006 at Thessaloniki, Greece, an urban environment with high temporal aerosol variability. SSA values were calculated using measured aerosol optical depth, direct and diffuse irradiance as input to radiative transfer models. The measurements were performed by co-located UV-MFRSR and AERONET CIMEL filter radiometers, as well as by two spectroradiometers. In addition, vertical aerosol profile measurements with LIDAR and in-situ information about the aerosol optical properties at ground level with a nephelometer and an aethalometer were available. The ground-based measurements revealed a strong diurnal cycle in the SSA measured in-situ at ground level (from 0.75 to 0.87 at 450nm), which could be related to the variability of the wind speed, the boundary layer height and the local aerosol emissions. The reasons for SSA differences obtained by different techniques are analyzed for the first time to provide recommendations for more accurate column SSA measurements.

  8. Quantifying organic aerosol single scattering albedo over the tropical biomass burning regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jung-Eun; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2016-12-01

    Despite growing evidence of light-absorbing organic aerosols (OAs), their contribution to the Earth's radiative budget is still poorly understood. In this study we derived a new empirical relationship that binds OA single scattering albedo (SSA), which is the ratio of light scattering to extinction, with sulfate + nitrate aerosol optical depth (AOD) and applied this method to estimate OA SSA over the tropical biomass burning regions. This method includes division of the attribution of black carbon (BC) and OA absorption aerosol optical depths from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observation and determination of the fine-mode ratio of sea-salt and dust AODs from several atmospheric chemistry models. Our best estimate of OA SSA over the tropical biomass burning regions is 0.91 at 550 nm. Uncertainties associated with observations and models permit a value range of 0.82-0.93. Furthermore, by using the estimated OA SSA and comprehensive observations including AERONET, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), we examined the first global estimate of sulfate + nitrate AOD through a semi-observational approach. The global mean sulfate + nitrate AOD of 0.017 is in the lower range of the values obtained from 21 models participated in AeroCom phase II. The results imply that most aerosol models as well as climate models, which commonly use OA SSA of 0.96-1.0, have so far ignored light absorption by OAs and have overestimated light scattering by sulfate + nitrate aerosols. This indicates that the actual aerosol direct radiative forcing should be less negative than currently believed.

  9. Aerosol single scattering albedo affected by chemical composition: An investigation using CRDS combined with MARGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Chen, Jianmin; Wang, Lin; Melluki, Wahid; Zhou, Hourong

    2013-04-01

    This work describes a field measurement of the aerosol optical properties and water-soluble inorganic (WSI) ion concentrations in aerosols at 1 h resolution from 2 April to 5 May 2010 in urban Shanghai. The average scattering coefficient at 532 nm (αs,532) is 102 ± 75 Mm- 1, much lower than values of Beijng and Guangzhou although four pollution events occurred during this field campaign. The single scattering albedo (ω) is 0.70 at 532 nm, which is considerably low, indicating higher relative abundance of light absorbing soot in Shanghai. The similar patterns of diurnal cycles of αs,532 and NH4+ concentration suggested that formation of secondary inorganic aerosol is one of dominant elements to decide diurnal cycles of optical properties of aerosol in Shanghai. Both αs,532 and absorption coefficient at 532 nm (αa,532) have linear relationship with mass concentration of SO42 -, NO3-, Cl- and NH4+. The concentration of NH4+ presents best linear relationship with αs,532. The mass scattering cross section is 15.7 m2 g- 1 for SO42 -. There is obvious dependence between the aerosol optical properties and the wind directions. The aerosol loading from west is much higher than those from Northeast (NE) and Southeast (SE) due to pollution parcels from Zhejiang and Jiangsu province. The decreasing rate of ω following the increase of αa,532 is highest during NE wind period, followed by that during SE and then West, suggesting a higher mass fraction of soot in aerosol during NE wind.

  10. Aerosol single-scattering albedo retrieval over North Africa using critical reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Kelley C.

    The sign and magnitude of the aerosol radiative forcing over bright surfaces is highly dependent on the absorbing properties of the aerosol. Thus, the determination of aerosol forcing over desert regions requires accurate information about the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). However, the brightness of desert surfaces complicates the retrieval of aerosol optical properties using passive space-based measurements. The aerosol critical reflectance is one parameter that can be used to relate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance changes over land to the aerosol absorption properties, without knowledge of the underlying surface properties or aerosol loading. Physically, the parameter represents the TOA reflectance at which increased aerosol scattering due to increased aerosol loading is balanced by increased absorption of the surface contribution to the TOA reflectance. It can be derived by comparing two satellite images with different aerosol loading, assuming that the surface reflectance and background aerosol are similar between the two days. In this work, we explore the utility of the critical reflectance method for routine monitoring of spectral aerosol absorption from space over North Africa, a region that is predominantly impacted by absorbing dust and biomass burning aerosol. We derive the critical reflectance from Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Level 1B reflectances in the vicinity of two Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations: Tamanrasset, a site in the Algerian Sahara, and Banizoumbou, a Sahelian site in Niger. We examine the sensitivity of the critical reflectance parameter to aerosol physical and optical properties, as well as solar and viewing geometry, using the Santa Barbara DISORT Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model, and apply our findings to retrieve SSA from the MODIS critical reflectance values. We compare our results to AERONET-retrieved estimates, as well as to measurements of the TOA albedo and surface fluxes from the

  11. Seasonal variation of vertical distribution of aerosol single scattering albedo over Indian sub-continent: RAWEX aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Babu, S.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the vertical distribution of aerosols and its seasonality (especially the single scattering albedo, SSA) extensive profiling of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients have been carried out using an instrumented aircraft from seven base stations spread across the Indian mainland during winter 2012 and spring/pre-monsoon 2013 under the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment (RAWEX). Spatial variation of the vertical profiles of the asymmetry parameter, the wavelength exponent of the absorption coefficient and the single scattering albedo, derived from the measurements, are used to infer the source characteristics of winter and pre-monsoon aerosols as well as the seasonality of free tropospheric aerosols. The relatively high value of the wavelength exponent of absorption coefficient over most of the regions indicates the contribution from biomass burning and dust aerosols up to lower free tropospheric altitudes. A clear enhancement in aerosol loading and its absorbing nature is seen at lower free troposphere levels (above the planetary boundary layer) over the entire mainland during spring/pre-monsoon season compared to winter, whereas concentration of aerosols within the boundary layer showed a decrease from winter to spring. This could have significant implications on the aerosol heating structure over the Indian region and hence the regional climate.

  12. Aerosol Single-Scattering Albedo and Asymmetry Parameter from MFRSR Observations during the ARM Aerosol IOP 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Barnard, James C.

    2007-06-15

    Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) provide routine measurements of the aerosol optical depth ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) at six wavelengths (0.415, 0.5, 0.615, 0.673, 0.870 and 0.94  << OLE Object: Picture (Metafile) >> ). The single-scattering albedo ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) is typically estimated from the MFRSR measurements by assuming the asymmetry parameter ( << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ). In most instances, however, it is not easy to set an appropriate value of << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> due to its strong temporal and spatial variability. Here, we introduce and validate an updated version of our retrieval technique that allows one to estimate simultaneously << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> and << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> for different types of aerosol. We use the aerosol and radiative properties obtained during the Atmospheric Science Program (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) to validate our retrieval in two ways. First, the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are compared with those obtained from independent surface, Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and aircraft measurements. The MFRSR-retrieved optical properties are in reasonable agreement with these independent measurements. Second, we perform radiative closure experiments using the MFRSR-retrieved optical properties. The calculated broadband values of the direct and diffuse fluxes are comparable (~ 5 << OLE Object: Microsoft Equation 3.0 >> ) to those obtained from measurements.

  13. Retrieval of the columnar aerosol phase function and single-scattering albedo from sky radiance over the ocean - Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Menghua; Gordon, Howard R.

    1993-01-01

    Based on the fact that the part of downward radiance that depends on the optical properties of the aerosol in the atmosphere can be extracted from the measured sky radiance, a new scheme for retrieval of the aerosol phase function and the single-scattering albedo over the ocean is developed. This retrieval algorithm is tested with simulations for several cases. It is found that the retrieved aerosol phase function and the single-scattering albedo are virtually error-free if the vertical structure of the atmosphere is known and if the sky radiance and the aerosol optical thickness can be measured accurately. The robustness of the algorithm in realistic situations, in which the measurements are contaminated by calibration errors or noise, is examined. It is found that the retrieved value of omega(0) is usually in error by less than about 10 percent, and the phase function is accurately retrieved for theta less than about 90 deg. However, as the aerosol optical thickness becomes small, e.g., less than about 0.1, errors in the sky radiance measurement can lead to serious problems with the retrieval algorithm, especially in the blue. The use of the retrieval scheme should be limited to the red and near IR when the aerosol optical thickness is small.

  14. Wavelength Dependence of the Absorption of Black Carbon Particles: Predictions and Results from the TARFOX Experiment and Implications for the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Hignett, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption coefficient taken during the Tropical Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) over the northern Atlantic. The data show an approximate lamda(exp -1) variation between 0.40 and 1.0 micrometers. The theoretical basis of the wavelength variation of the absorption of solar radiation by elemental carbon [or black carbon (BC)] is explored. For a wavelength independent refractive index the small particle absorption limit simplifies to a lambda(exp -1) variation in relatively good agreement with the data. This result implies that the refractive indices of BC were relatively constant in this wavelength region, in agreement with much of the data on refractive indices of BC. However, the result does not indicate the magnitude of the refractive indices. The implications of the wavelength dependence of BC absorption for the spectral behavior of the aerosol single scattering albedo are discussed. It is shown that the single scattering albedo for a mixture of BC and nonabsorbing material decreases with wavelength in the solar spectrum (i.e., the percentage amount of absorption increases). This decease in the single scattering albedo with wavelength for black carbon mixtures is different from the increase in single scattering allied for most mineral aerosols (dusts). This indicates that, if generally true, the spectral variation of the single- scattering albedo can be used to distinguish aerosol types. It also highlights the importance of measurements of the spectral variation of the aerosol absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo.

  15. Dependence of the spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio on aerosol spectral distribution and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Dumka, U. C.; Psiloglou, B. E.

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the modification of the clear-sky spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio (DDR) as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA), spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The solar spectrum under various atmospheric conditions is derived with Simple Model of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer of Sunshine (SMARTS) radiative transfer code, using the urban and continental aerosol models as inputs. The spectral DDR can be simulated with great accuracy by an exponentially decreasing curve, while the aerosol optical properties strongly affect the scattering processes in the atmosphere, thus modifying the DDR especially in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Furthermore, the correlation between spectral DDR and spectral AOD can be represented precisely by an exponential function and can give valuable information about the dominance of specific aerosol types. The influence of aerosols on spectral DDR increases with increasing SZA, while the simulations using the urban aerosol model as input in SMARTS are closer to the measurements taken in the Athens urban environment. The SMARTS simulations are interrelated with spectral measurements and can be used for indirect estimations of SSA. Overall, the current work provides some theoretical approximations and functions that help in understanding the dependence of DDR on astronomical and atmospheric parameters.

  16. Application of AERONET Single Scattering Albedo and Absorption Angstrom Exponent to Classify Dominant Aerosol Types during DRAGON Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Schafer, J.; Crawford, J. H.; Kim, J.; Sano, I.; Liew, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Lim, H.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, M.; Kenny, P.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols can have major implications on human health by inducing respiratory diseases due to inhalation of fine particles from biomass burning smoke or industrial pollution and on radiative forcing whereby the presence of absorbing aerosol particles (e.g., black carbon) increases atmospheric heating. Aerosol classification techniques have utilized aerosol loading and aerosol properties derived from multi-spectral and multi-angle observations by ground-based (e.g., AERONET) and satellite instrumentation (e.g., MISR). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data have been utilized to determine aerosol types by implementing various combinations of measured aerosol optical depth or retrieved size and absorption aerosol properties (e.g., Gobbi et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010). Giles et al. [2012] showed single scattering albedo (SSA) relationship with extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) can provide an estimate of the general classification of dominant aerosol types (i.e., desert dust, urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, and mixtures) based on data from ~20 AERONET sites located in known aerosol source regions. In addition, the absorption Angstrom exponent relationship with EAE can provide an indication of the dominant absorbing aerosol type such as dust, black carbon, brown carbon, or mixtures of them. These classification techniques are applied to the AERONET Level 2.0 quality assured data sets collected during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network (DRAGON) campaigns in Maryland (USA), Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Penang (Malaysia), and California (USA). An analysis of aerosol type classification for DRAGON sites is performed as well as an assessment of the spatial variability of the aerosol types for selected DRAGON campaigns. Giles, D. M., B. N. Holben, T. F. Eck, A. Sinyuk, A. Smirnov, I. Slutsker, R. R. Dickerson, A. M. Thompson, and J. S. Schafer (2012), An analysis of AERONET aerosol absorption properties and classifications

  17. Absorption, scattering and single scattering albedo of aerosols obtained from in situ measurements in the subarctic coastal region of Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, E.; Mogo, S.; Cachorro, V.; Lopez, J.; de Frutos, A.

    2011-01-01

    In situ measurements of aerosol optical properties were made in summer 2008 at the ALOMAR station facility (69°16 N, 16°00 E), located at a rural site in the North of the island of Andøya (Vesterålen archipelago), about 300 km north of the Arctic Circle. The extended three months campaign was part of the POLAR-CAT Project of the International Polar Year (IPY-2007-2008), and its goal was to characterize the aerosols of this sub-Arctic area which frequently transporte to the Arctic region. The ambient light-scattering coefficient, σs(550 nm), at ALOMAR had a hourly mean value of 5.412 Mm-1 (StD = 3.545 Mm-1) and the light-absorption coefficient, σa(550 nm), had an hourly mean value of 0.400 Mm-1 (StD = 0.273 Mm-1). The scattering/absorption Ångström exponents, αs,a, are used for detailed analysis of the variations of the spectral shape of σs,a. The single scattering albedo, &omega0, ranges from 0.622 to 0.985 (mean = 0.913, StD = 0.052) and the relation of this property to the absorption/scattering coefficients and the Ångström exponents is presented. The relationships between all the parameters analyzed, mainly those related to the single scattering albedo, allow us to describe the local atmosphere as extremely clean.

  18. Decadal changes in aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo estimated from ground-based broadband radiometers: A case study in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Sakami, Tomonori; Ijima, Osamu

    2011-02-01

    A method to estimate aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo from broadband direct and diffuse irradiances was developed. Using irradiances simulated with and without errors, the accuracies of estimated optical thickness from 0.7 to 0.8 μm and single scattering albedo in the visible wavelength region were determined to be about 0.02 and 0.05, respectively. Resulting time variations in optical thickness and single scattering albedo by broadband radiometers agreed well with sky radiometer retrievals. Long-term variations in optical thickness and single scattering albedo from 1975 to 2008 at Tsukuba, Japan, were estimated by the method described. Optical thickness increased until the mid-1980s, then decreased until the late 1990s, and was almost constant in the 2000s. The single scattering albedo was about 0.8 until the late 1980s, gradually increased, and has remained at approximately 0.9 since the mid-1990s. The surface global irradiance under clear sky conditions calculated from estimated aerosol optical properties showed an apparent transition from dimming to brightening around the mid-1980s. The magnitude of the brightening was about 12.7 W m-2; of this, 8.3 W m-2 was due to a decrease in optical thickness, and the remaining 4.4 W m-2 was due to an increase of single scattering albedo. On the other hand, the surface global irradiance measured under cloudy conditions increased by 2.6 W m-2. The dimming and brightening by aerosols were weakened by the changes in clouds. The method described could be useful in evaluating aerosol influences on long-term changes in the surface solar radiation at many sites around the world.

  19. Global Assessment of OMI Aerosol Single-scattering Albedo Using Ground-based AERONET and SKYNET Inversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo

    2014-01-01

    We compare the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the near-UV two-channel algorithm (OMAERUV) applied to the Aura-Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements with an equivalent inversion made by the ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). This work is the first comprehensive effort to globally compare the OMI-retrieved SSA with that of AERONET using all available sites spanning the regions of biomass burning, dust, and urban pollution. An analysis of the co-located retrievals over 269 sites reveals that about 46 percent (69 percent) of OMI-AERONET matchups agree within the absolute difference of plus or minus 0.03 (plus or minus 0.05) for all aerosol types. The comparison improves to 52 percent (77 percent) when only 'smoke' and 'dust' aerosol types were identified by the OMAERUV algorithm. Regionally, the agreement between the two inversions was robust over the biomass burning sites of South America, Sahel, Indian subcontinent, and oceanic-coastal sites followed by a reasonable agreement over north-east Asia. Over the desert regions, OMI tends to retrieve higher SSA, particularly over the Arabian Peninsula. Globally, the OMI-AERONET matchups agree mostly within plus or minus 0.03 for the aerosol optical depth (440 nanometers) and UV-aerosol index larger than 0.4 and 1.0, respectively. We also compare the OMAERUV SSA against the inversion made by an independent network of ground-based radiometer called SKYNET with its operating sites in Japan, China, South-East Asia, India, and Europe. The advantage of the SKYNET database over AERONET is that it performs retrieval at near-UV wavelengths which facilitate the direct comparison of OMI retrievals with the equivalent ground-based inversion. Comparison of OMI and SKYNET over currently available sites reveals a good agreement between the two where more than 70 percent of matchups agree within the absolute difference of 0.05.

  20. Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption and Single-Scattering Albedo On Ambient Relative Humidity for Sulfate Aerosols with Black Carbon Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Hamill, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols frequently contain hygroscopic sulfate species and black carbon (soot) inclusions. In this paper we report results of a modeling study to determine the change in aerosol absorption due to increases in ambient relative humidity (RH), for three common sulfate species, assuming that the soot mass fraction is present as a single concentric core within each particle. Because of the lack of detailed knowledge about various input parameters to models describing internally mixed aerosol particle optics, we focus on results that were aimed at determining the maximum effect that particle humidification may have on aerosol light absorption. In the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm, maximum absorption humidification factors (ratio of wet to 'dry=30% RH' absorption) for single aerosol particles are found to be as large as 1.75 when the RH changes from 30 to 99.5%. Upon lesser humidification from 30 to 80% RH, absorption humidification for single particles is only as much as 1.2, even for the most favorable combination of initial ('dry') soot mass fraction and particle size. Integrated over monomodal lognormal particle size distributions, maximum absorption humidification factors range between 1.07 and 1.15 for humidification from 30 to 80% and between 1.1 and 1.35 for humidification from 30 to 95% RH for all species considered. The largest humidification factors at a wavelength of 450 nm are obtained for 'dry' particle size distributions that peak at a radius of 0.05 microns, while the absorption humidification factors at 700 nm are largest for 'dry' size distributions that are dominated by particles in the radius range of 0.06 to 0.08 microns. Single-scattering albedo estimates at ambient conditions are often based on absorption measurements at low RH (approx. 30%) and the assumption that aerosol absorption does not change upon humidification (i.e., absorption humidification equal to unity). Our modeling study suggests that this assumption alone can

  1. Chemical Characterization and Single Scattering Albedo of Atmospheric Aerosols Measured at Amami-Oshima, Southwest Japan, During Spring Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, H.; Yabuki, M.; Takamura, T.; Sudo, S.; Yonemura, S.; Shirasuna, Y.; Hirano, K.; Sera, K.; Maeda, T.; Hayasaka, T.; Nakajima, T.

    2008-12-01

    An intensive field program was performed to measure atmospheric aerosols at Amami-Oshima, a small island located at southwest Japan, in the spring season of 2001, 2003, and 2005 under the ACE-Asia, APEX and ABC-EAREX2005 projects. Chemical analysis of the fine and coarse aerosols was made for elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon, water soluble ions, and trace elements. Single scattering albedo (SSA) of aerosols was independently estimated by two methods. The one (SSAc) is by chemical compositions assuming a half internal mixture between EC and non sea-salt sulfate, and the other (SSAo) is by optical measurements of scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient. The backward trajectory analysis showed that the aerosol concentrations in the air masses arrived at Amami, were much higher from the Asian Continent than from other regions, and two types of aerosol enhancement were observed. The one was caused by polluted air masses from the urban-industrial area of east-coast China, the other was by high mineral dusts due to large- scale dust storms in the desert regions of northwest China. The SSAc was in a range of 0.87-0.98, and in good agreement with the SSAo after some corrections for original scattering and absorption coefficients. The SSAc showed no significant difference between the air masses from the polluted area and the desert regions. The negative correlation between the SSAc and EC was divided into two groups depending on the concentration of non sea-salt sulfate, while the increase in mineral dusts did not show any correlation with the SSAc.

  2. Retrievals of Effective Aerosol Layer Height and Single Scattering Albedo for Biomass-Burning Smoke and Mineral Dust Aerosols from A-Train Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M.; Hsu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Launches of state-of-the-art satellite sensors dedicated to aerosol remote sensing in recent years marked the beginning of a new era in aerosol-related studies by virtue of the well-coordinated observing system consisting of an array of satellites flown in formation, so called A-Train (Afternoon satellites constellation). The capabilities of the individual sensors aboard the A-Train satellites are complementary and overlapping in terms of retrievable aerosol parameters, sensitivity, spatial resolution and coverage. Thus, there is a great potential to gain value-added information about aerosols by merging observations from the A-Train sensors. In this study, we introduce a new algorithm, which can be utilized to derive aerosol layer height (ALH) and single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass-burning smoke and airborne mineral dust aerosols by synthesizing observations from three A-Train satellite sensors: CALIOP, MODIS, and OMI. By using this algorithm, it is presented that ALH and SSA of biomass-burning smoke aerosols over North America, Southeast Asia, and Europe can be derived successfully. We show the retrieved values of SSA bear reasonable agreements with those from AERONET. The results of this study also reveal that the algorithm has a basic skill to estimate ALH by combining only MODIS and OMI observations, allowing us to separate smoke aerosols residing within the boundary layer from those elevated in the free troposphere. Currently, another version of the algorithm to be applicable for mineral dust aerosols is under development, and earlier results will be presented. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of transport and radiative effects of biomass-burning smoke and mineral dust aerosols.

  3. Using the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo and Angstrom Exponent from AERONET to Determine Aerosol Origins and Mixing States over the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Slutsker, I.; Smirnov, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Ghauri, B.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol mixtures—whether dominated by dust, carbon, sulfates, nitrates, sea salt, or mixtures of them—complicate the retrieval of remotely sensed aerosol properties from satellites and possibly increase the uncertainty of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Major aerosol source regions in South Asia include the Thar Desert as well as agricultural lands, Himalayan foothills, and large urban centers in and near the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Over India and Pakistan, seasonal changes in meteorology, including the monsoon (June-September), significantly affect the transport, lifetime, and type of aerosols. Strong monsoonal winds can promote long range transport of dust resulting in mixtures of dust and carbonaceous aerosols, while more stagnant synoptic conditions (e.g., November-January) can prolong the occurrence of urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, or mixtures of them over the IGP. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun/sky radiometer data are analyzed to show the aerosol optical depth (AOD) seasonality and aerosol dominant mixing states. The Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) relationship has been shown to provide sound clustering of dominant aerosol types using long term AERONET site data near known source regions [Giles et al., 2012]. In this study, aerosol type partitioning using the SSA (440 nm) and EAE (440-870 nm) relationship is further developed to quantify the occurrence of Dust, Mixed (e.g., dust and carbonaceous aerosols), Urban/Industrial (U/I) pollution, and Biomass Burning (BB) smoke. Based on EAE thresholds derived from the cluster analysis (for AOD440nm>0.4), preliminary results (2001-2010) for Kanpur, India, show the overall contributions of each dominant particle type (rounded to the nearest 10%): 10% for Dust (EAE≤0.25), 60% for Mixed (0.251.25). In the IGP, BB aerosols may have varying sizes (e.g., corresponding to 1.2

  4. Aerosol single-scattering albedo over the global oceans: Comparing PARASOL retrievals with AERONET, OMI, and AeroCom models estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Bian, Huisheng; Curci, Gabriele; Myhre, Gunnar; van Noije, Twan; Schulz, Michael; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Zhang, Kai

    2015-09-27

    The aerosol Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) over the global oceans is evaluated based on polarimetric measurements by the PARASOL satellite. The retrieved values for SSA and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) agree well with the ground-based measurements of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The global coverage provided by the PARASOL observations represents a unique opportunity to evaluate SSA and AOD simulated by atmospheric transport model runs, as performed in the AeroCom framework. The SSA estimate provided by the AeroCom models is generally higher than the SSA retrieved from both PARASOL and AERONET. On the other hand, the mean simulated AOD is about right or slightly underestimated compared with observations. An overestimate of the SSA by the models would suggest that these simulate an overly strong aerosol radiative cooling at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and underestimate it at surface. This implies that aerosols have a potential stronger impact within the atmosphere than currently simulated.

  5. Large atmospheric shortwave radiative forcing by Mediterranean aerosols derived from simultaneous ground-based and spaceborne observations and dependence on the aerosol type and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Biagio, Claudia; di Sarra, Alcide; Meloni, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties and shortwave irradiance measurements at the island of Lampedusa (central Mediterranean) during 2004-2007 are combined with Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System observations of the outgoing shortwave flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The measurements are used to estimate the surface (FES), the top of the atmosphere (FETOA), and the atmospheric (FEATM) shortwave aerosol forcing efficiencies for solar zenith angle (θ) between 15° and 55° for desert dust (DD), urban/industrial-biomass burning aerosols (UI-BB), and mixed aerosols (MA). The forcing efficiency at the different atmospheric levels is derived by applying the direct method, that is, as the derivative of the shortwave net flux versus the aerosol optical depth at fixed θ. The diurnal average forcing efficiency at the surface/TOA at the equinox is (-68.9 ± 4.0)/(-45.5 ± 5.4) W m-2 for DD, (-59.0 ± 4.3)/(-19.2 ± 3.3) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (-94.9 ± 5.1)/(-36.2 ± 1.7) W m-2 for MA. The diurnal average atmospheric radiative forcing at the equinox is (+7.3 ± 2.5) W m-2 for DD, (+8.4 ± 1.9) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (+8.2 ± 1.9) W m-2 for MA, suggesting that the mean atmospheric forcing is almost independent of the aerosol type. The largest values of the atmospheric forcing may reach +35 W m-2 for DD, +23 W m-2 for UI-BB, and +34 W m-2 for MA. FETOA is calculated for MA and 25° ≤ θ ≤ 35° for three classes of single scattering albedo (0.7 ≤ ω < 0.8, 0.8 ≤ ω < 0.9, and 0.9 ≤ ω ≤ 1) at 415.6 and 868.7 nm: FETOA increases, in absolute value, for increasing ω. A 0.1 increment in ω determines an increase in FETOA by 10-20 W m-2.

  6. The impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on the single-scattering albedo and its application on the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2016-04-01

    Hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles can significantly affect their single-scattering albedo (ω), and consequently alters the aerosol effect on tropospheric photochemistry. In this study, the impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on ω and its application to the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient (JNO2) are investigated for a typical aerosol particle population in the North China Plain (NCP). The variations of aerosol optical properties with relative humidity (RH) are calculated using a Mie theory aerosol optical model, on the basis of field measurements of number-size distribution and hygroscopic growth factor (at RH values above 90 %) from the 2009 HaChi (Haze in China) project. Results demonstrate that ambient ω has pronouncedly different diurnal patterns from ω measured at dry state, and is highly sensitive to the ambient RHs. Ambient ω in the NCP can be described by a dry state ω value of 0.863, increasing with the RH following a characteristic RH dependence curve. A Monte Carlo simulation shows that the uncertainty ofω from the propagation of uncertainties in the input parameters decreases from 0.03 (at dry state) to 0.015 (RHs > 90 %). The impact of hygroscopic growth on ω is further applied in the calculation of the radiative transfer process. Hygroscopic growth of the studied aerosol particle population generally inhibits the photolysis of NO2 at the ground level, whereas accelerates it above the moist planetary boundary layer. Compared with dry state, the calculated JNO2 at RH of 98 % at the height of 1 km increases by 30.4 %, because of the enhancement of ultraviolet radiation by the humidified scattering-dominant aerosol particles. The increase of JNO2 due to the aerosol hygroscopic growth above the upper boundary layer may affect the tropospheric photochemical processes and this needs to be taken into account in the atmospheric chemical models.

  7. North Atlantic Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos: TARFOX and ACE-2 Results and Their Relation to Radiative Effects Derived from Satellite Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Redemann, J.; Quinn, P. K.; Carrico, C. M.; Rood, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Bergstrom and Russell estimated direct solar radiative flux changes caused by atmospheric aerosols over the mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean under cloud-free and cloudy conditions. They excluded African dust aerosols, primarily by restricting calculations to latitudes 25-60 N. As inputs they used midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD) maps derived from AVHRR satellite measurements and aerosol intensive properties determined primarily in the 1996 IGAC Troposheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). Those aerosol intensive properties, which included optical depth wavelength dependence and spectra of single scattering albedo (SSA) and scattering asymmetry parameter, were also checked against initial properties from the 1997 North Atlantic Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 2). Bergstrom and Russell investigated the sensitivity of their derived flux changes to assumed input parameters, including midvisible AOD, SSA, and scattering asymmetry parameter. Although the sensitivity of net flux change at the tropopause to SSA was moderate over the ocean (e.g., a SSA uncertainty of 0.07 produced a flux-change uncertainty of 21%), the sensitivity over common land surfaces can be much larger. Also, flux changes within and below the aerosol layer, which affect atmospheric stability, heating rates, and cloud formation and persistence, are quite sensitive to aerosol SSA. Therefore, this paper focuses on the question: "What have we learned from TARFOX and ACE 2 regarding aerosol single scattering albedo?" Three techniques were used in TARFOX to determine midvisible SSA. One of these derived SSA as a best-fit parameter in comparing radiative flux changes measured by airborne pyranometer to those computed from aerosol properties. Another technique combined airborne measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption by nephelometer and absorption photometer. A third technique obtained SSA from best-fit complex refractive indices derived by comparing

  8. Continental pollution in the Western Mediterranean basin: large variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo and influence on the direct shortwave radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, Claudia; Formenti, Paola; Doppler, Lionel; Gaimoz, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Ancellet, Gerard; Attié, Jean-Luc; Bucci, Silvia; Dubuisson, Philippe; Fierli, Federico; Mallet, Marc; Ravetta, François

    2016-08-01

    Pollution aerosols strongly influence the composition of the Western Mediterranean basin, but at present little is known on their optical properties. We report in this study in situ observations of the single scattering albedo (ω) of pollution aerosol plumes measured over the Western Mediterranean basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity) airborne campaign in summer 2012. Cases of pollution export from different source regions around the basin and at different altitudes between ˜ 160 and 3500 m above sea level were sampled during the flights. Data from this study show a large variability of ω, with values between 0.84-0.98 at 370 nm and 0.70-0.99 at 950 nm. The single scattering albedo generally decreases with the wavelength, with some exception associated to the mixing of pollution with sea spray or dust particles over the sea surface. The lowest values of ω (0.84-0.70 between 370 and 950 nm) are measured in correspondence of a fresh plume possibly linked to ship emissions over the basin. The range of variability of ω observed in this study seems to be independent of the source region around the basin, as well as of the altitude and aging time of the plumes. The observed variability of ω reflects in a large variability for the complex refractive index of pollution aerosols, which is estimated to span in the large range 1.41-1.77 and 0.002-0.097 for the real and the imaginary parts, respectively, between 370 and 950 nm. Radiative calculations in clear-sky conditions were performed with the GAME radiative transfer model to test the sensitivity of the aerosol shortwave Direct Radiative Effect (DRE) to the variability of ω as observed in this study. Results from the calculations suggest up to a 50 and 30 % change of the forcing efficiency (FE), i.e. the DRE per unit of optical depth, at the surface (-160/-235 W m-2 τ-1 at 60° solar zenith angle) and at the Top-Of-Atmosphere (-137/-92 W m-2 τ-1) for ω varying between its maximum and minimum value

  9. Joint AOT-Single Scattering Albedo Retrieval in Algorithm MAIAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapustin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) is a new algorithm which uses time series analysis and processing of groups of pixels for advanced cloud detection and retrieval of aerosol and surface bidirectional reflectance properties. MAIAC C6+ re-processing of MODIS data record, scheduled to begin in November 2015, will create a suite of products MCD19. Due to high 1km resolution, MAIAC provides information about fine scale aerosol variability required in different applications such as urban air quality analysis. During the past year, we developed a new MAIAC capability to retrieve Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) from MODIS by adapting OMI heritage approach of O. Torres. We will describe MAIAC retrieval approach, AERONET AOT and SSA validation for different world biomass burning regions, and will compare MAIAC results with other sensors.

  10. Parameterization of single-scattering albedo (SSA) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) with EC / OC for aerosol emissions from biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Rudra P.; Wagner, Nick L.; Langridge, Justin M.; Lack, Daniel A.; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Murphy, Shane M.

    2016-08-01

    Single-scattering albedo (SSA) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) are two critical parameters in determining the impact of absorbing aerosol on the Earth's radiative balance. Aerosol emitted by biomass burning represent a significant fraction of absorbing aerosol globally, but it remains difficult to accurately predict SSA and AAE for biomass burning aerosol. Black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and non-absorbing coatings all make substantial contributions to the absorption coefficient of biomass burning aerosol. SSA and AAE cannot be directly predicted based on fuel type because they depend strongly on burn conditions. It has been suggested that SSA can be effectively parameterized via the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) of a biomass burning event and that this would be useful because emission factors for CO and CO2, from which MCE can be calculated, are available for a large number of fuels. Here we demonstrate, with data from the FLAME-4 experiment, that for a wide variety of globally relevant biomass fuels, over a range of combustion conditions, parameterizations of SSA and AAE based on the elemental carbon (EC) to organic carbon (OC) mass ratio are quantitatively superior to parameterizations based on MCE. We show that the EC / OC ratio and the ratio of EC / (EC + OC) both have significantly better correlations with SSA than MCE. Furthermore, the relationship of EC / (EC + OC) with SSA is linear. These improved parameterizations are significant because, similar to MCE, emission factors for EC (or black carbon) and OC are available for a wide range of biomass fuels. Fitting SSA with MCE yields correlation coefficients (Pearson's r) of ˜ 0.65 at the visible wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm while fitting SSA with EC / OC or EC / (EC + OC) yields a Pearson's r of 0.94-0.97 at these same wavelengths. The strong correlation coefficient at 405 nm (r = 0.97) suggests that parameterizations based on EC / OC or EC / (EC + OC) have good predictive

  11. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Backscattering. Report 2; Derivation of Aerosol Real Refractive Index, Single-Scattering Albedo, and Humidification Factor using Raman Lidar and Aircraft Size Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Poellot, M.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site during two nights in April 1994 are discussed. These profiles are shown to be consistent with the simultaneous aerosol size distribution measurements made by a PCASP (Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe) optical particle counter flown on the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft. We describe a technique which uses both lidar and PCASP measurements to derive the dependence of particle size on relative humidity, the aerosol real refractive index n, and estimate the effective single-scattering albedo Omega(sub 0). Values of n ranged between 1.4-1.5 (dry) and 1.37-1.47 (wet); Omega(sub 0) varied between 0.7 and 1.0. The single-scattering albedo derived from this technique is sensitive to the manner in which absorbing particles are represented in the aerosol mixture; representing the absorbing particles as an internal mixture rather than the external mixture assumed here results in generally higher values of Omega(sub 0). The lidar measurements indicate that the change in particle size with relative humidity as measured by the PCASP can be represented in the form discussed by Hattel with the exponent gamma = 0.3 + or - 0.05. The variations in aerosol optical and physical characteristics captured in the lidar and aircraft size distribution measurements are discussed in the context of the meteorological conditions observed during the experiment.

  12. Single-scattering albedo profiling of mixed Asian dust plumes with multiwavelength Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young M.

    2014-10-01

    albedo varied with height on each measurement day. These differences seem to be quantitatively related to the degree of mixing of dust with urban pollution and the light-absorption properties of the pollution (non-dust) particles in these plumes which traveled along different transport pathways to the lidar site. The layer-mean lidar-derived single-scattering albedos of the examples shown in this study were compared to single-scattering albedo derived from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) Sun/sky radiometer observations. This radiometer is located next to the lidar. The total layer-mean lidar-derived single-scattering albedos (at 532 nm) on 18 March and 2 April 2004, and on 24 February and 4 May 2005 were 0.91 ± 0.02, 0.90 ± 0.03, 0.91 ± 0.02, and 0.92 ± 0.02, respectively. The lidar-derived single-scattering albedos are similar to those based on the Sun/sky radiometer data if the different measurement wavelengths of the lidar and Sun/sky radiometer are taken account of.

  13. Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, and phase function calculations to assumptions on physical and chemical properties of aerosol

    EPA Science Inventory

    In coupled chemistry-meteorology simulations, the calculation of aerosol optical properties is an important task for the inclusion of the aerosol effects on the atmospheric radiative budget. However, the calculation of these properties from an aerosol profile is not uniquely defi...

  14. Vertical Profiles of Light Scattering, Light Absorption, and Single Scattering Albedo during the Dry, Biomass Burning Season in Southern Africa and Comparisons of In Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, Brian I.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Schmid, Beat; Redermann, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol light scattering, light absorption, and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0)) are presented for a number of locations in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season. Features of the profiles include haze layers, clean air slots, and marked decreases in light scattering in passing from the boundary layer into the free troposphere. Frequency distributions of omega (sub 0) reflect the strong influence of smoke from biomass burning. For example, during a period when heavy smoke was advected into the region from the north, the mean value of omega (sub 0) in the boundary layer was 0.81 +/- 0.02 compared to 0.89 +/- 0.03 prior to this intrusion. Comparisons of layer aerosol optical depths derived from the in situ measurements with those measured by a Sun photometer aboard the aircraft show excellent agreement.

  15. Spatial distribution of mineral dust single scattering albedo based on DREAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Ničković, Slobodan; Ilić, Luka

    2016-04-01

    Mineral dust comprises a significant part of global aerosol burden. There is a large uncertainty in estimating role of dust in Earth's climate system, partly due to poor characterization of its optical properties. Single scattering albedo is one of key optical properties determining radiative effects of dust particles. While it depends on dust particle sizes, it is also strongly influenced by dust mineral composition, particularly the content of light-absorbing iron oxides and the mixing state (external or internal). However, an assumption of uniform dust composition is typically used in models. To better represent single scattering albedo in dust atmospheric models, required to increase accuracy of dust radiative effect estimates, it is necessary to include information on particle mineral content. In this study, we present the spatial distribution of dust single scattering albedo based on the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) with incorporated particle mineral composition. The domain of the model covers Northern Africa, Middle East and the European continent, with horizontal resolution set to 1/5°. It uses eight particle size bins within the 0.1-10 μm radius range. Focusing on dust episode of June 2010, we analyze dust single scattering albedo spatial distribution over the model domain, based on particle sizes and mineral composition from model output; we discuss changes in this optical property after long-range transport. Furthermore, we examine how the AERONET-derived aerosol properties respond to dust mineralogy. Finally we use AERONET data to evaluate model-based single scattering albedo. Acknowledgement We would like to thank the AERONET network and the principal investigators, as well as their staff, for establishing and maintaining the AERONET sites used in this work.

  16. On Spectral Invariance of Single Scattering Albedo for Weakly Absorbing Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The single scattering albedo omega (sub 0 lambda) in atmospheric radiative transfer is the ratio of the scattering coefficient to the total extinction coefficient. For cloud water droplets both the scattering and absorption coefficients, thus the single scattering albedo, are functions of wavelength A and droplet size r. In this presentation we will show that for water droplets at weakly absorbing wavelengths, the ratio omega (sub 0 lambda)(r). The slope and intercept of the linear function are wavelength independent and sum to unity. This relationship allows for a representation of any single scattering albedo omega (sub 0 lambda) via one known spectrum omega (sub 0 lambda)(r(sub o)). We will provide a simple physical explanation of the discovered relationship. In addition to water droplets, similar linear relationships were found for the single scattering albedo of non-spherical ice crystals. The single scattering albedo $\\omega _ {0\\lambda }$ in atmospheric radiative transfer is the ratio of the scattering coefficient to the total extinction coefficient. For cloud water droplets both the scattering and absorption coefficients, and thus the single scattering albedo, are functions of wavelength $\\lambda $ and droplet size $r$. We show that for water droplets at weakly absorbing wavelengths, the ratio $\\omega _ {0\\lambda } (r)$/$\\omega _ {0\\lambda } (r_{0})$ of two single scattering albedo spectra for two different droplet sizes is a linear function of $\\omega _{0\\lambda }(r)$. The slope and intercept of the linear function are wavelength independent and sum to unity. This relationship allows for a representation of any single scattering albedo $\\omega_{0\\lambda }(r)$ via one known spectrum $\\omega_{0\\lambda }(r_{0})$. We provide a simple physical explanation of the discovered relationship. Similar linear relationships characterize the single scattering albedo of non-spherical ice crystals.

  17. Measurement of size-dependent single scattering albedo of fresh biomass burning aerosols using the extinction-minus-scattering technique with a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and nephelometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sujeeta; Fiddler, Marc N.; Bililign, Solomon

    2016-11-01

    Biomass burning (BB) aerosols have a significant effect on regional climate, and represent a significant uncertainty in our understanding of climate change. Using a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and integrating nephelometry, the single scattering albedo (SSA) and Ångstrom absorption exponent (AAE) were measured for several North American biomass fuels. This was done for several particle diameters for the smoldering and flaming stage of white pine, red oak, and cedar combustion. Measurements were done over a wider wavelength range than any previous direct measurement of BB particles. While the offline sampling system used in this work shows promise, some changes in particle size distribution were observed, and a thorough evaluation of this method is required. The uncertainty of SSA was 6 %, with the truncation angle correction of the nephelometer being the largest contributor to error. While scattering and extinction did show wavelength dependence, SSA did not. SSA values ranged from 0.46 to 0.74, and were not uniformly greater for the smoldering stage than the flaming stage. SSA values changed with particle size, and not systematically so, suggesting the proportion of tar balls to fractal black carbon change with fuel type/state and particle size. SSA differences of 0.15-0.4 or greater can be attributed to fuel type or fuel state for fresh soot. AAE values were quite high (1.59-5.57), despite SSA being lower than is typically observed in wildfires. The SSA and AAE values in this work do not fit well with current schemes that relate these factors to the modified combustion efficiency of a burn. Combustion stage, particle size, fuel type, and fuel condition were found to have the most significant effects on the intrinsic optical properties of fresh soot, though additional factors influence aged soot.

  18. The single scattering properties of the aerosol particles as aggregated spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Gu, X.; Cheng, T.; Xie, D.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.; Guo, J.

    2012-08-01

    The light scattering and absorption properties of anthropogenic aerosol particles such as soot aggregates are complicated in the temporal and spatial distribution, which introduce uncertainty of radiative forcing on global climate change. In order to study the single scattering properties of anthorpogenic aerosol particles, the structures of these aerosols such as soot paticles and soot-containing mixtures with the sulfate or organic matter, are simulated using the parallel diffusion limited aggregation algorithm (DLA) based on the transmission electron microscope images (TEM). Then, the single scattering properties of randomly oriented aerosols, such as scattering matrix, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP), are computed using the superposition T-matrix method. The comparisons of the single scattering properties of these specific types of clusters with different morphological and chemical factors such as fractal parameters, aspect ratio, monomer radius, mixture mode and refractive index, indicate that these different impact factors can respectively generate the significant influences on the single scattering properties of these aerosols. The results show that aspect ratio of circumscribed shape has relatively small effect on single scattering properties, for both differences of SSA and AP are less than 0.1. However, mixture modes of soot clusters with larger sulfate particles have remarkably important effects on the scattering and absorption properties of aggregated spheres, and SSA of those soot-containing mixtures are increased in proportion to the ratio of larger weakly absorbing attachments. Therefore, these complex aerosols come from man made pollution cannot be neglected in the aerosol retrievals. The study of the single scattering properties on these kinds of aggregated spheres is important and helpful in remote sensing observations and atmospheric radiation balance computations.

  19. Aerosol optical properties measurement by recently developed cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Xu, Xuezhe; Zhang, Qilei; Fang, Bo; Qian, Xiaodong; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    Development of appropriate and well-adapted measurement technologies for real-time in-situ measurement of aerosol optical properties is an important step towards a more accurate and quantitative understanding of aerosol impacts on climate and the environment. Aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, ω), the ratio between the scattering (αscat) and extinction (αext) coefficients, is an important optical parameter that governs the relative strength of the aerosol scattering and absorption capacity. Since the aerosol extinction coefficient is the sum of the absorption and scattering coefficients, a commonly used method for the determination of SSA is to separately measure two of the three optical parameters - absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients - with different instruments. However, as this method involves still different instruments for separate measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients under different sampling conditions, it might cause potential errors in the determination of SSA value, because aerosol optical properties are very sensitive to the sampling conditions such as temperature and relative humidity (RH). In this paper, we report on the development of a cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) and an integrating sphere (IS) for direct in-situ measurement of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients on the exact same sample volume. The cavity-enhanced albedometer holds great promise for high-sensitivity and high-precision measurement of ambient aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients (hence absorption coefficient and SSA determination) and for absorbing trace gas concentration. In addition, simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients enable a potential application for the retrieval of particle number size distribution and for faster retrieval of aerosols' complex RI. The albedometer was deployed to

  20. On Spectral Invariance of Single Scattering Albedo for Weakly Absorbing Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Chiu, J. Christine; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2011-01-01

    This note shows that for water droplets at weakly absorbing wavelengths, the ratio omega(sub O lambda(r))/omega(sub O lambda(r(sub O)) of two single scattering albedo spectra, omega(sub O lambda(r) and omega(sub O lambda(r (sub O)), is a linear function of omega(sub O lambda(r). The slope and intercept of the linear function are wavelength independent and sum to unity. This relationship allows for a representation of any single scattering albedo omega(sub O lambda(r) via one known spectrum omega(sub O lambda(r(sub O)). The note provides a simple physical explanation of the discovered relationship. In addition to water droplets, similar linear relationships were found for the single scattering albedo of non-spherical ice crystals.

  1. Wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent and single scattering albedo observed by skyradiometer in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja-Ho; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Jaehwa; Eck, Thomas F.; Lee, Yun Gon; Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Mijin; Jung, Ukkyo; Yoon, Jongmin; Mok, Jungbin; Cho, Hi-Ku

    2016-11-01

    Absorption and scattering characteristics of various aerosol events are investigated using 2-years of measurements from a skyradiometer at Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. Both transported dust and anthropogenic aerosols are observed at distinct geo-location of Seoul, a megacity located a few thousand kilometers away from dust source regions in China. We focus on the wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA), showing the characteristics of regional aerosols. The correlation between spectral SSAs and AEs calculated using different wavelength pairs generally indicates relatively weak absorption of fine-mode aerosols (urban pollution and/or biomass burning) and strong absorption of coarse-mode aerosols (desert dust) at this location. AE ratio (AER), a ratio of AEs calculated using wavelength pair between shorter (340-675 nm) and longer wavelength pair (675-1020 nm) correlates differently with SSA according to the dominant size of local aerosols. Correlations between SSA and AER show strong absorption of aerosols for AER < 1.0 and weak absorption for AER > 2.0. Based on the seasonal pattern of wavelength dependence of AER and SSA, this correlation difference looks to reveal the separated characteristics of transported dust and anthropogenic particles from urban pollution respectively. The seasonal characteristics of AER and SSAs also show that the skyradiometer measurement with multiple wavelengths may be able to detect the water soluble brown carbon, one of the important secondary organic aerosols in the summertime atmospheric composition.

  2. Numerical investigation of the single scattering albedo of radiant energy passing through polydisperse crystalline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shefer, O. V.; Shefer, V. A.; Sinyukova, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Studies of the role of atmospheric formations and cosmic dust clouds in the transmission of radiation is one of the most uncertain and difficult problems in astrophysics and climatology. One of the main tasks of practical astrophysics is the interpretation of the results of observations of space objects. There is a necessity of describing the propagation of electromagnetic waves in the environment. In this paper, applying the numerical methods, we study the optical characteristics of polydisperse media consisting of randomly oriented and preferentially oriented crystals, taking into account the distribution function of particle sizes. Particles of spherical shape and ensembles preferentially oriented plate crystals are considered as models. Mie theory and method of physical optics are used to calculate the scattering characteristics. Numerical study of the effects of extinction, scattering and absorption on the single scattering albedo of radiation allowed us to establish the basic patterns of the passage of radiant energy through a translucent medium. At the visible range of wavelengths, both for small and large particles, the single scattering albedo is almost equal to 1. The spectral course of this optical performance is mainly determined by the refractive index of the particles. Features of wave dependence of single scattering albedo are associated with microphysical parameters of the environment, which are more pronounced when the attenuation of the radiation is determined mainly by the scattering. Higher values of the absorption index and optical thickness of the crystal reduce the value of the single scattering albedo, smoothing the features of its spectral course. Values of the absorption index of substance, as value of the order of 0.1, do not lead to a decrease of the single scattering albedo as it is less than 0.5. This allows us to conclude that we should not neglect the microphysical characteristics of the crystals even by strong absorption of radiant

  3. On Spectral Invariance of Single Scattering Albedo for Water Droplets and Ice Crystals at Weakly Absorbing Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Chiu, J. Christine; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2012-01-01

    The single scattering albedo omega(sub O lambda) in atmospheric radiative transfer is the ratio of the scattering coefficient to the extinction coefficient. For cloud water droplets both the scattering and absorption coefficients, thus the single scattering albedo, are functions of wavelength lambda and droplet size r. This note shows that for water droplets at weakly absorbing wavelengths, the ratio omega(sub O lambda)(r)/omega(sub O lambda)(r (sub O)) of two single scattering albedo spectra is a linear function of omega(sub O lambda)(r). The slope and intercept of the linear function are wavelength independent and sum to unity. This relationship allows for a representation of any single scattering albedo spectrum omega(sub O lambda)(r) via one known spectrum omega(sub O lambda)(r (sub O)). We provide a simple physical explanation of the discovered relationship. Similar linear relationships were found for the single scattering albedo spectra of non-spherical ice crystals.

  4. Measurements of Nascent Soot Using a Cavity Attenauted Phase Shift (CAPS)-based Single Scattering Albedo Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Renbaum-Wollf, L.; Lambe, A. T.; Davidovits, P.; Kebabian, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate, as compared to precise, measurement of aerosol absorption has always posed a significant problem for the particle radiative properties community. Filter-based instruments do not actually measure absorption but rather light transmission through the filter; absorption must be derived from this data using multiple corrections. The potential for matrix-induced effects is also great for organic-laden aerosols. The introduction of true in situ measurement instruments using photoacoustic or photothermal interferometric techniques represents a significant advance in the state-of-the-art. However, measurement artifacts caused by changes in humidity still represent a significant hurdle as does the lack of a good calibration standard at most measurement wavelengths. And, in the absence of any particle-based absorption standard, there is no way to demonstrate any real level of accuracy. We, along with others, have proposed that under the circumstance of low single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption is best determined by difference using measurement of total extinction and scattering. We discuss a robust, compact, field deployable instrument (the CAPS PMssa) that simultaneously measures airborne particle light extinction and scattering coefficients and thus the single scattering albedo (SSA) on the same sample volume. The extinction measurement is based on cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) techniques as employed in the CAPS PMex particle extinction monitor; scattering is measured using integrating nephelometry by incorporating a Lambertian integrating sphere within the sample cell. The scattering measurement is calibrated using the extinction measurement of non-absorbing particles. For small particles and low SSA, absorption can be measured with an accuracy of 6-8% at absorption levels as low as a few Mm-1. We present new results of the measurement of the mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot generated by an inverted methane diffusion flame at 630 nm. A value

  5. Retrieval of the Single Scattering Albedo in the EL Paso-Juarez Airshed Using the Tuv Model and a Uv-Mfrsr Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina Calderon, R.; Environmental Physics At Utep

    2010-12-01

    A methodology to retrieve Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) values based in Direct to Diffuse Ratio (DDR) measurements was implemented for the El Paso-Juarez Airshed. The methodology used the TUV Model and has been applied to the measurements of a UV-MFRSR located in El Paso, Texas. The inferred SSAs at both 332 and 368 nm were higher in a clean day than in a dirty polluted day. Also, studies made about the asymmetric factor indicated that variation in the asymmetry parameter is the secondary effect on the retrievals of SSA. In summary, it was found that the TUV Model can be used as a diagnostic model to interpret UV-MFRSR Irradiance data and to successfully retrieve single scattering albedo. This methodology can be applied in any part of the country. However it is particularly useful for US Southwest cities that experience episodes of high PM concentrations.Retrieval values of SSA Values of SSA for Clean,and Dirty days with their corresponding values of Aerosol Optical Depth

  6. A Seasonal Trend of Single Scattering Albedo in Southern African Biomass-burning Particles: Implications for Satellite Products and Estimates of Emissions for the World's Largest Biomass-burning Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Mukelabai, M. M.; Piketh, S. J.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Hyer, E. J.; Ward, D. E.; Dubovik, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Sorokin, M.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-01-01

    As a representative site of the southern African biomass-burning region, sun-sky data from the 15 year Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) deployment at Mongu, Zambia, was analyzed. For the biomass-burning season months (July-November), we investigate seasonal trends in aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distributions, and refractive indices from almucantar sky scan retrievals. The monthly mean single scattering albedo at 440 nm in Mongu was found to increase significantly from approx.. 0.84 in July to approx. 0.93 in November (from 0.78 to 0.90 at 675 nm in these same months). There was no significant change in particle size, in either the dominant accumulation or secondary coarse modes during these months, nor any significant trend in the Angstrom exponent (440-870 nm; r(exp 2) = 0.02). A significant downward seasonal trend in imaginary refractive index (r(exp 2) = 0.43) suggests a trend of decreasing black carbon content in the aerosol composition as the burning season progresses. Similarly, burning season SSA retrievals for the Etosha Pan, Namibia AERONET site also show very similar increasing single scattering albedo values and decreasing imaginary refractive index as the season progresses. Furthermore, retrievals of SSA at 388 nm from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument satellite sensor show similar seasonal trends as observed by AERONET and suggest that this seasonal shift is widespread throughout much of southern Africa. A seasonal shift in the satellite retrieval bias of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer collection 5 dark target algorithm is consistent with this seasonal SSA trend since the algorithm assumes a constant value of SSA. Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, however, appears less sensitive to the absorption-induced bias.

  7. A seasonal trend of single scattering albedo in southern African biomass-burning particles: Implications for satellite products and estimates of emissions for the world's largest biomass-burning source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Mukelabai, M. M.; Piketh, S. J.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Hyer, E. J.; Ward, D. E.; Dubovik, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Sorokin, M.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-06-01

    As a representative site of the southern African biomass-burning region, sun-sky data from the 15 year Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) deployment at Mongu, Zambia, was analyzed. For the biomass-burning season months (July-November), we investigate seasonal trends in aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol size distributions, and refractive indices from almucantar sky scan retrievals. The monthly mean single scattering albedo at 440 nm in Mongu was found to increase significantly from ~0.84 in July to ~0.93 in November (from 0.78 to 0.90 at 675 nm in these same months). There was no significant change in particle size, in either the dominant accumulation or secondary coarse modes during these months, nor any significant trend in the Ångström exponent (440-870 nm; r2 = 0.02). A significant downward seasonal trend in imaginary refractive index (r2 = 0.43) suggests a trend of decreasing black carbon content in the aerosol composition as the burning season progresses. Similarly, burning season SSA retrievals for the Etosha Pan, Namibia AERONET site also show very similar increasing single scattering albedo values and decreasing imaginary refractive index as the season progresses. Furthermore, retrievals of SSA at 388 nm from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument satellite sensor show similar seasonal trends as observed by AERONET and suggest that this seasonal shift is widespread throughout much of southern Africa. A seasonal shift in the satellite retrieval bias of aerosol optical depth from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer collection 5 dark target algorithm is consistent with this seasonal SSA trend since the algorithm assumes a constant value of SSA. Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, however, appears less sensitive to the absorption-induced bias.

  8. On-road measurement of black carbon mass, absorption, and single-scattering albedo

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption and scattering of solar radiation by aerosols emitted from combustion sources can affect the earth’s radiative balance and may potentially affect local and regional climate. Optical properties of aerosols emitted from mobile sources have not been thoroughly characteri...

  9. Retrieval of the single scattering albedo in the El Paso-Juarez Airshed using the TUV model and a UV-MFRSR radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Richard; Fitzgerald, Rosa M.; Min, Qilong

    2012-01-01

    A methodology to retrieve Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) values employing the ratio of Direct to Diffuse Irradiances (DDR) is used and applied to the El Paso-Juarez Airshed, a challenging region where air masses interact. The TUV model was used to obtain the calculated DDR irradiances, and the experimental irradiances were obtained from a UV-MFRSR instrument located in the city of El Paso, Texas. The wavelengths used were 332 nm and 368 nm. The retrieved SSA values at both 332 nm and 368 nm were higher in a lightly polluted day (0.66-0.81 at 332 nm, and 0.61 to 0.80 at 368 nm) than in a heavier polluted day (0.56-0.70 at 332 nm and 0.53-0.66 at 368 nm). A sensitivity study of the ground albedo and the asymmetry parameter was performed, which indicated that the variation of the asymmetry parameter is a secondary effect in the retrievals of SSA. In addition, the variation of SSA values during the day was also analyzed for the El Paso-Juarez Airshed and linked to the flow of air masses into the region using HYSPLIT trajectories. A presence of absorptive aerosols was observed during the late morning and the middle of the day. This methodology can be applied in any area, and is particularly useful for cities that experience episodes of high PM concentrations.

  10. Single scattering solution for radiative transfer through Rayleigh and aerosol atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterman, J.

    1977-01-01

    A solution is presented to the radiative transfer of the solar irradiation through a turbid atmosphere, based on the single-scattering approximation, i.e., an assumption that a photon that underwent scattering either leaves the top of the atmosphere or strikes the surface. The solution depends on a special idealization of the scattering phase function of the aerosols. The equations developed are subsequently applied to analyze quantitatively the enhancement of the surface irradiation and the enhancement of the scattered radiant emittance as seen from above the atmosphere, caused by the surface reflectance and atmospheric back scattering. An order of magnitude error analysis is presented.

  11. Parameterization of Water and Ice Cloud Near-Infrared Single-Scattering Co-Albedo in Broadband Radiation Schemes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räisänen, Petri

    1999-02-01

    The parameterization of cloud shortwave absorption poses a difficult problem in broadband radiation schemes that treat the near-IR region as a single interval. This problem arises because the spectral variation of the single-scattering co-albedo 1 of cloud droplets and ice crystals is enormous in the near-IR region, and because the cloud particle absorption is overlapped by sharply varying water vapor absorption. In this paper, several parameterization methods of cloud near-IR (0.68-4.00 m) 1 are intercompared using a large set of atmospheric columns generated by a GCM. The methods include 1) linear averaging of 1 , weighting with the TOA solar flux; 2) `thick averaging' by Edwards and Slingo; 3) Fouquart's formula, which presents water cloud near-IR 1 as a function of optical thickness; and 4) the `correlated ' technique by Espinoza and Harshvardhan. An extension of the correlated technique to ice clouds is suggested. In addition, a new `adaptive ' broadband parameterization technique is developed and tested. In this method, the near-IR 1 of a cloud layer is parameterized in terms of the cloud properties (phase, optical thickness, and effective particle size) and the properties of the overlying atmosphere (slant vapor path and clouds). Two slightly different versions of the method are considered.The results of the intercomparison indicate that the adaptive method yields higher accuracy than the other broadband techniques tested. Linear averaging is by far the least accurate method; in particular, it is shown that linear averaging of near-IR 1 can lead to substantially overestimated absorption in ice clouds also. However, when the near-IR region is subdivided into three bands, the combination of thick averaging for water clouds and linear averaging for ice clouds provides results superior to those of all the broadband methods.

  12. Determination of microwave vegetation optical depth and single scattering albedo from large scale soil moisture and Nimbus/SMMR satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van De Griend, A. A.; Owe, M.

    1993-01-01

    The single scattering albedo and optical depth of typical savanna vegetation in Botswana (Africa) have been determined by inverse modelling using satellite observed microwave signatures and surface soil moisture. Soil emissivity was modelled using a multi-layer radiative transfer model. The study is based on large scale surface moisture data and Nimbus/SMMR 6-6 GHz and 37 GHz dual polarized brightness temperatures over a 3-year period. As compared to the optical depths, the derived single scattering albedos displayed only minor seasonal variations, whereas the values fit well within the range reported in the literature from laboratory and field experiments. Both 6-6 and 37GHz optical depths were found to be significantly related to NDVI-values derived from NOAA/AVHRR.

  13. The effect of aerosols on the earth-atmosphere albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B. M.; Browning, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents calculations of the change in reflected flux by the earth-atmosphere system in response to increases in the atmospheric aerosol loading for a range of complex indices of refraction, solar elevation angle and ground albedo. Results show that, for small values of ground albedo, the reflected solar flux may either increase or decrease with increasing aerosol loadings, depending upon the complex part of the index of refraction of the aerosols. For high ground albedos, an increase in aerosol levels always results in a decrease of reflected flux (i.e., a warming of the earth-atmosphere system).

  14. Measuring the influence of aerosols and albedo on sky polarization.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, A; Emde, C; Blumthaler, M

    2010-11-01

    All-sky distributions of the polarized radiance are measured using an automated fish-eye camera system with a rotating polarizer. For a large range of aerosol and surface albedo situations, the influence on the degree of polarization and sky radiance is investigated. The range of aerosol optical depth and albedo is 0.05-0.5 and 0.1-0.75, respectively. For this range of parameters, a reduction of the degree of polarization from about 0.7 to 0.4 was observed. The analysis is done for 90° scattering angle in the principal plane under clear sky conditions for a broadband channel of 450 ± 25 nm and solar zenith angles between 55° and 60°. Radiative transfer calculations considering three different aerosol mixtures are performed and and agree with the measurements within the statistical error.

  15. From Regional Cloud-Albedo to a Global Albedo Footprint - Studying Aerosol Effects on the Radiation Budget Using the Relation Between Albedo and Cloud Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, F.; Engström, A.; Karlsson, J.; Wood, R.; Charlson, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's albedo is the primary determinant of the amount of energy absorbed by the Earth-atmosphere system. The main factor controlling albedo is the amount of clouds present, but aerosols can affect and alter both clear-sky and cloudy-sky reflectance. How albedo depends on cloud fraction and how albedo varies at a given cloud fraction and a given cloud water content, reveals information about these aerosol effects on the radiation budget. Hence, the relation between total albedo and cloud fraction can be used for illustration and quantification of aerosol effects, and as a diagnostic tool, to test model performance. Here, we show examples of the utilisation of this relation focusing on satellite observations from CERES and MODIS on Aqua, as well as from Calipso and CloudSat, and performing comparisons with climate models on the way: In low-cloud regions in the subtropics, we find that climate models well represent a near-constant regional cloud albedo, and this representation has improved from CMIP3 to CMIP5. CMIP5 models indicate more reflective clouds in present-day climate than pre-industrial, as a result of increased aerosol burdens. On monthly mean time scale, models are found to over-estimate the regional cloud-brightening due to aerosols. On the global scale we find an increasing cloud albedo with increasing cloud fraction - a relation that is very well defined in observations, and less so in CMIP5 models. Cloud brightening from pre-industrial to present day is also seen on global scale. Further, controlling for both cloud fraction and cloud water content we can trace small variations in albedo, or perturbations of solar reflectivity, that create a near-global coherent geographical pattern that is consistent with aerosol impacts on climate, with albedo enhancement in regions dominant of known aerosol sources and suppression of albedo in regions associated with high rates of aerosol removal (deduced using CloudSat precipitation estimates). This mapping can be

  16. Contribution to polar albedo from a mesospheric aerosol layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummel, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    An examination is made of the impact of a layer of particulate matter, assumed to be ice crystals, on the albedo of the polar region. The model is time dependent, includes the growth of the layer, and incorporates the diffuse nature of radiation reflected from the surface and atmosphere. Although the magnitude of the effect is about an order of magnitude less than previous results, the impact is one of heating instead of cooling. It is also shown that ignoring the diffuse nature of the radiation reflected from the underlying earth-atmosphere system, as has been done in many previous simple models, can result in overestimation of the climatological impact of aerosols in sign and magnitude by a factor of up to 4-6.

  17. Influence of tropospheric aerosol on integral albedo of cloudy atmosphere. Underlying surface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasova, T. A.; Feygelson, Y. M.

    1984-05-01

    The integral albedo which is formed for the most part due to the albedo of clouds and the underlying surface, but aerosol outside the cloud can exert an influence is discussed. The four layer system was examined. Stimulated parameters for the individual layers and stipulated albedo of the underlying surface are used in computing the spectral albedo of the cloud layer of subsystem and transmission. The albedo for the system (a formula for Asys is derived) are determined. The method reduces the problem of determining the albedo of the four layer system to three independent problems, A sub 0, A sub I, A sub II, each of which is solved in the delta-Eddington two-flux approximation on the assumption of homogeneity of the individual layers. The effect of aerosol outside the cloud is indicated. In small absorption aerosol scattering in the layers outside the clouds increases the albedo of the system as a whole. The formula for Asys and other results evaluate the aerosol effect information of the integral albedo of the system.

  18. Effects of aerosol and horizontal inhomogeneity on the broadband albedo of marine stratus: Numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Duda, D.P.; Stephens, G.L.; Stevens, B.; Cotton, W.R.

    1996-12-15

    Recent estimates of the effect of increasing of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere have indicated that its impact may be comparable in magnitude to the effect from increases in CO{sub 2}. Much of this impact is expected from the effects of the aerosol on cloud microphysics and the subsequent impact on cloud albedo. A solar broadband version of a 2D radiative transfer model was used to quantify the impact of enhanced aerosol concentrations and horizontal inhomogeneity on the solar broadband albedo of marine stratus. The results of the radiative transfer calculations indicated that in unbroken marine stratus clouds the net horizontal transport of photons over a domain of a few kilometers was nearly zero, and the domain-average broadband albedo computed in a 2D cross section was nearly identical to the domain average calculated from a series of independent pixel approximation (IPA) calculations of the same cross section. However, the horizontal inhomogeneity does affect the cloud albedo compared to plane-parallel approximation (PPA) computations due to the nonlinear relationship between albedo and optical depth. The reduction in cloud albedo could be related to the variability of the distribution of log (cloud optical depth). These results extend the finding of Cahalan et al. to broadband solar albedos in a more realistic cloud model and suggest that accurate computation of domain-averaged broadband albedos in unbroken (or nearly unbroken) marine stratus can be made using IPA calculations with 1D radiative transfer models. Computations of the mean albedo over portions of the 3D RAMS domain show the relative increase in cloud albedo due to a 67% increase in the boundary-layer average CCN concentration was between 6% and 9%. The effects of cloud inhomogeneity on the broadband albedo as measured from the PPA bias ranged from 3% to 5%. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Natural aerosols explain seasonal and spatial patterns of Southern Ocean cloud albedo

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Daniel T.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Wood, Robert; Grosvenor, Daniel P.; Elliott, Scott M.; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Phillip J.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspended solid and liquid particles, act as nucleation sites for cloud drop formation, affecting clouds and cloud properties—ultimately influencing the cloud dynamics, lifetime, water path, and areal extent that determine the reflectivity (albedo) of clouds. The concentration Nd of droplets in clouds that influences planetary albedo is sensitive to the availability of aerosol particles on which the droplets form. Natural aerosol concentrations affect not only cloud properties themselves but also modulate the sensitivity of clouds to changes in anthropogenic aerosols. It is shown that modeled natural aerosols, principally marine biogenic primary and secondary aerosol sources, explain more than half of the spatiotemporal variability in satellite-observed Nd. Enhanced Nd is spatially correlated with regions of high chlorophyll a, and the spatiotemporal variability in Nd is found to be driven primarily by high concentrations of sulfate aerosol at lower Southern Ocean latitudes (35o to 45oS) and by organic matter in sea spray aerosol at higher latitudes (45o to 55oS). Biogenic sources are estimated to increase the summertime mean reflected solar radiation in excess of 10 W m–2 over parts of the Southern Ocean, which is comparable to the annual mean increases expected from anthropogenic aerosols over heavily polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere. PMID:26601216

  20. Natural aerosols explain seasonal and spatial patterns of Southern Ocean cloud albedo.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Daniel T; Burrows, Susannah M; Wood, Robert; Grosvenor, Daniel P; Elliott, Scott M; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Phillip J; Hartmann, Dennis L

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspended solid and liquid particles, act as nucleation sites for cloud drop formation, affecting clouds and cloud properties-ultimately influencing the cloud dynamics, lifetime, water path, and areal extent that determine the reflectivity (albedo) of clouds. The concentration N d of droplets in clouds that influences planetary albedo is sensitive to the availability of aerosol particles on which the droplets form. Natural aerosol concentrations affect not only cloud properties themselves but also modulate the sensitivity of clouds to changes in anthropogenic aerosols. It is shown that modeled natural aerosols, principally marine biogenic primary and secondary aerosol sources, explain more than half of the spatiotemporal variability in satellite-observed N d. Enhanced N d is spatially correlated with regions of high chlorophyll a, and the spatiotemporal variability in N d is found to be driven primarily by high concentrations of sulfate aerosol at lower Southern Ocean latitudes (35(o) to 45(o)S) and by organic matter in sea spray aerosol at higher latitudes (45(o) to 55(o)S). Biogenic sources are estimated to increase the summertime mean reflected solar radiation in excess of 10 W m(-2) over parts of the Southern Ocean, which is comparable to the annual mean increases expected from anthropogenic aerosols over heavily polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

  1. Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial Patterns of Southern Ocean Cloud Albedo

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Daniel; Burrows, Susannah M.; Wood, R.; Grosvenor, Daniel P.; Elliott, Scott; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2015-07-17

    Small particles called aerosols act as nucleation sites for cloud drop formation, affecting clouds and cloud properties – ultimately influencing the cloud dynamics, lifetime, water path and areal extent that determine the reflectivity (albedo) of clouds. The concentration Nd of droplets in clouds that influences planetary albedo is sensitive to the availability of aerosol particles on which the droplets form. Natural aerosol concentrations not only affect cloud properties themselves, but also modulate the sensitivity of clouds to changes in anthropogenic aerosols. Here, it is shown that modeled natural aerosols, principally marine biogenic primary and secondary aerosol sources, explain more than half of the spatiotemporal variability in satellite-observed Nd. Enhanced Nd over regions of high biological activity is found to be driven primarily by high concentrations of sulfate aerosol at lower Southern Ocean latitudes (35-45°S) and by organic matter in sea spray aerosol at higher latitudes (45-55°S). Biogenic sources are estimated to increase the summertime mean reflected solar radiation in excess of 10 W m-2 over parts of the Southern Ocean, which is comparable to the annual mean increases expected from anthropogenic aerosols over heavily polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

  2. Simultaneous observations of aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Ramana, M V; Corrigan, C; Kim, D; Ramanathan, V

    2008-05-27

    Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as -60 W m(-2) per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol-cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds.

  3. Disturbance of light-absorbing aerosols on the albedo in a winter snowpack of Central Tibet.

    PubMed

    Ming, Jing; Wang, Pengling; Zhao, Shuyu; Chen, Pengfei

    2013-08-01

    A field observation on the albedo of the snowpack in Central Tibet was conducted in the Nam Co region in the winter of 2011. Snow properties, including grain size and density, were measured in the field, and surface-layer snow samples (down to 5 cm) were collected. The average concentrations of black carbon and dust were 72 ppbm (close to that in the glaciers of Mt. Nyainqentanglha) and 120 ppmm, respectively. Inverse trends were found to exist between the albedo of the snowpack and light-absorbing aerosols (LAAs) as well as grain size growth. Modeling showed that black carbon, dust, and grain growth in the winter snowpack can reduce the broadband albedo by 11%, 28%, and 61%, respectively.

  4. SEAC4RS Aerosol Radiative Effects and Heating Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, S.; Schmidt, S.; Redemann, J.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; LeBlanc, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We will present (a) aerosol optical properties, (b) aerosol radiative forcing, (c) aerosol and gas absorption and heating rates, and (d) spectral surface albedo for cases from August 19th and 26th of the SEAC4RS mission. This analysis is based on irradiance data from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR), spectral aerosol optical depth from the Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR), and extinction profiles from the DIAL/High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). We derive spectrally resolved values of single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and surface albedo from the data, and determine profiles of absorption and heating rate segregated by absorber (aerosol and gas).

  5. Climatic influence of background and volcanic stratosphere aerosol models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Herman, M.; Lenoble, J.; Tanre, D.

    1982-01-01

    A simple modelization of the earth atmosphere system including tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols has been derived and tested. Analytical expressions are obtained for the albedo variation due to a thin stratospheric aerosol layer. Also outlined are the physical procedures and the respective influence of the main parameters: aerosol optical thickness, single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor, and sublayer albedo. The method is applied to compute the variation of the zonal and planetary albedos due to a stratospheric layer of background H2SO4 particles and of volcanic ash.

  6. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B

    2014-12-28

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects.

  7. Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

    2014-11-17

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

  8. Simultaneous Cartography of Aerosol Opacity and Surface Albedo of Titan by the Massive Inversion of the Cassini/VIMS Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Sotin, C.; Rannou, P.; Cornet, T.; Hirtzig, M.; Appéré, T.; Solomonidou, A.; Le Mouelic, S.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping Titan's surface albedo is a necessary step to give reliable constraints on its composition. However, surface albedo maps of Titan, especially over large regions, are still very rare, the surface windows being strongly affected by atmospheric effects (absorption, scattering). A full radiative transfer model is an essential tool to remove these effects, but too time-consuming to treat systematically the ~40000 hyperspectral images VIMS acquired since the beginning of the mission. We developed a massive inversion of VIMS data based on lookup tables computed from a state-of-the-art radiative transfer model (Hirtzig et al. 2013), updated with new aerosol properties coming from our analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation acquired recently by VIMS. Once the physical properties of gases, aerosols and surface are fixed, the lookup tables are built for the remaining free parameters: the incidence, emergence and azimuth angles, given by navigation; and two products (the aerosol opacity and the surface albedo at all wavelengths). The lookup table grid was carefully selected after thorough testing. The data inversion on these pre-computed spectra (opportunely interpolated) is more than 1000 times faster than recalling the full radiative transfer at each minimization step. We present here the results from selected flybys. We invert mosaics composed by couples of flybys observing the same area at two different times. The composite albedo maps do not show significant discontinuities in any of the surface windows, suggesting a robust correction of the effects of the geometry (and thus the aerosols) on the observations. Maps of aerosol and albedo uncertainties are also provided, with the absolute error on the albedo being approximately between 1 and 3% (depending on the surface window considered). We are thus able to provide for the first time ever reliable surface albedo maps at pixel scale for the whole VIMS spectral range.

  9. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol–cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects. PMID:25404677

  10. Radiative properties of the background aerosol: absorption component of extinction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A D; Charlson, R J

    1985-07-19

    The light-scattering and light-absorption coefficients of the global background aerosol define its single-scatter albedo. Continuous, simultaneous measurements of these optical coefficients were made on a daily basis for the remote marine mid-troposphere; such measurements are essential for assessment of the effects of aerosol on atmospheric radiative transfer. Measurements of light-absorption coefficients made at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii were higher than expected, and the single-scatter albedo was lower than the value often used in radiative transfer models. Soot appears to be the most likely primary absorber, and hemispheric dispersal of this combustion-derived material is suggested.

  11. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  12. Information Content of Aerosol Retrievals in the Sunglint Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Knobelspiesse, K.; Cairns, B.; Mishchenko, M.

    2013-01-01

    We exploit quantitative metrics to investigate the information content in retrievals of atmospheric aerosol parameters (with a focus on single-scattering albedo), contained in multi-angle and multi-spectral measurements with sufficient dynamical range in the sunglint region. The simulations are performed for two classes of maritime aerosols with optical and microphysical properties compiled from measurements of the Aerosol Robotic Network. The information content is assessed using the inverse formalism and is compared to that deriving from observations not affected by sunglint. We find that there indeed is additional information in measurements containing sunglint, not just for single-scattering albedo, but also for aerosol optical thickness and the complex refractive index of the fine aerosol size mode, although the amount of additional information varies with aerosol type.

  13. AEROSOL SINGLE SCATTERING ALBEDO RETRIEVED FROM MEASUREMENTS OF SURFACE UV IRRADIANCE AND A RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODEL - ART. NO. 4288. (R825248)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. Light Absorption in the Stratosphere: Trend, Soot Aerosol Concentration and Contribution by...

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Verma, S.; Strwwa, A. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Hamill, P.; Vay, S.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The light absorption coefficient, Beta(a) of the stratospheric aerosol is an important quantity that determines its radiative effects. When combined with the aerosol scattering coefficient, Beta(a) it becomes possible to evaluate the aerosol single scatter albedo, omega = Beta(s)/(Beta(s) + Beta(a)) which is essential for modeling the overall radiative effects of the stratospheric aerosol. Pollack1 determined that omega = 0.98 is a critical value that separates stratospheric cooling from warming.

  15. Retrieving the Height of Smoke and Dust Aerosols by Synergistic Use of Multiple Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, N. Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jeong, Myeong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    The Aerosol Single scattering albedo and Height Estimation (ASHE) algorithm was first introduced in Jeong and Hsu (2008) to provide aerosol layer height and single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass burning smoke aerosols. By using multiple satellite sensors synergistically, ASHE can provide the height information over much broader areas than lidar observations alone. The complete ASHE algorithm uses aerosol data from MODIS or VIIRS, OMI or OMPS, and CALIOP. A simplified algorithm also exists that does not require CALIOP data as long as the SSA of the aerosol layer is provided by another source. Several updates have recently been made: inclusion of dust layers in the retrieval process, better determination of the input aerosol layer height from CALIOP, improvement in aerosol optical depth (AOD) for nonspherical dust, development of quality assurance (QA) procedure, etc.

  16. Impacts of global open-fire aerosols on direct radiative, cloud and surface-albedo effects simulated with CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yiquan; Lu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yuhang; Yang, Xiu-Qun

    2016-11-01

    Aerosols from open-land fires could significantly perturb the global radiation balance and induce climate change. In this study, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with prescribed daily fire aerosol emissions is used to investigate the spatial and seasonal characteristics of radiative effects (REs, relative to the case of no fires) of open-fire aerosols including black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM) from 2003 to 2011. The global annual mean RE from aerosol-radiation interactions (REari) of all fire aerosols is 0.16 ± 0.01 W m-2 (1σ uncertainty), mainly due to the absorption of fire BC (0.25 ± 0.01 W m-2), while fire POM induces a small effect (-0.05 and 0.04 ± 0.01 W m-2 based on two different methods). Strong positive REari is found in the Arctic and in the oceanic regions west of southern Africa and South America as a result of amplified absorption of fire BC above low-level clouds, in general agreement with satellite observations. The global annual mean RE due to aerosol-cloud interactions (REaci) of all fire aerosols is -0.70 ± 0.05 W m-2, resulting mainly from the fire POM effect (-0.59 ± 0.03 W m-2). REari (0.43 ± 0.03 W m-2) and REaci (-1.38 ± 0.23 W m-2) in the Arctic are stronger than in the tropics (0.17 ± 0.02 and -0.82 ± 0.09 W m-2 for REari and REaci), although the fire aerosol burden is higher in the tropics. The large cloud liquid water path over land areas and low solar zenith angle of the Arctic favor the strong fire aerosol REaci (up to -15 W m-2) during the Arctic summer. Significant surface cooling, precipitation reduction and increasing amounts of low-level cloud are also found in the Arctic summer as a result of the fire aerosol REaci based on the atmosphere-only simulations. The global annual mean RE due to surface-albedo changes (REsac) over land areas (0.03 ± 0.10 W m-2) is small and statistically insignificant and is mainly due to the fire BC-in-snow effect (0.02 W m-2) with the maximum albedo effect

  17. Aerosol Retrieval Using Synthetic Polder Multi-Angular Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, K. S.; Weger, R. C.; Welch R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The POLarizations and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) instrument onboard the Japanese ADEOS satellite offers unique possibilities for the retrieval of aerosol parameters with its polarization and multi-angular capability. In this study we examine a technique that simultaneously retrieve multiple aerosol parameters, namely asymmetry factor, single scattering albedo, surface albedo, and optical thickness. using simulated POLDER reflectances. It is found that. over dark or bright surfaces, simultaneous retrieval of multiple parameters is indeed possible, but not over surfaces with intermediate reflectivity. Among the four parameters, the single-scattering albedo is retrieved with the best accuracy and is the least vulnerable when the reflectance value is subjected to a 0.1% white noise.

  18. Shortwave Radiative Fluxes, Solar-Beam Transmissions, and Aerosol Properties: TARFOX and ACE-2 Find More Absorption from Flux Radiometry than from Other Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) made simultaneous measurements of shortwave radiative fluxes, solar-beam transmissions, and the aerosols affecting those fluxes and transmissions. Besides the measured fluxes and transmissions, other obtained properties include aerosol scattering and absorption measured in situ at the surface and aloft; aerosol single scattering albedo retrieved from skylight radiances; and aerosol complex refractive index derived by combining profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution. These measurements of North Atlantic boundary layer aerosols impacted by anthropogenic pollution revealed the following characteristic results: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements of aerosols (e.g., optical depth, extinction, and backscattering from sunphotometers, satellites, and lidars) than between remote and in situ measurements; 2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements; (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from other measurements. When the measured relationships between downwelling flux and optical depth (or beam transmission) are used to derive best-fit single scattering albedos for the polluted boundary layer aerosol, both TARFOX and ACE-2 yield midvisible values of 0.90 +/- 0.04. The other techniques give larger single scattering albedos (i.e. less absorption) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of 0.95 +/- 0.04. Although the flux-based results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., unknown gas absorption). Current uncertainties in aerosol single scattering albedo are large in terms of climate effects. They also have an important influence on aerosol optical depths retrieved from satellite radiances

  19. The single scattering properties of hygroscopic soot aggregates with water coated monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, W.; Tianhai, C.; Hao, C.; Lijuan, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols, such as soot, have modified the Earth's radiation balance by scattering and absorbing solar and long-wave radiative transmission, which have largely influenced the global climate change since the industrial era. Based on transmission electron microscope images (TEM), soot particles are shown as the complex, fractal-like aggregate structures. In humid atmospheric environments, these soot aggregates tend to acquire a water coating, which introduces further complexity to the problem of determining the optical properties of the aggregates. The hygroscopic growth of soot aggregates is important for the aging of these absorbing aerosols, which can significantly influence the optical properties of these kinds of soot particles. In this paper, according to the specific volume fractions of soot core in the water coated soot particle, the monomers of fractal soot aggregates are modeled as semi-external mixtures (physical contact) with constant radius of soot core and variable size of water coating. The single scattering properties of these hygroscopic soot particles, such as phase function, the cross sections of extinction, absorption and scatting, single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (ASY), are calculated using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. The morphological effects are compared with different monomer numbers and fractal dimension of the soot aggregates, as well as different size of water coating for these spherical monomers. The results have shown that the extinction and absorption cross sections are decreased for the soot aggregates with more thick water coating on monomers, but the single scattering albedo is increased for the larger water coating. It is found that the SSA of aged soot aggregates with hygroscopic grown are remarkably (~50% for volume fraction of soot aggregates is 0.5) larger than fresh soot particles without the consideration of water coating, due to the size of water coating and the

  20. Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the

  1. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  2. Mixing of anthropogenic dust and carbonaceous aerosols in seasonal snow on snow albedo reduction in 2014 China survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Huang, Jianping; Pu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic dusts produced from the affected by human activities derived from the industrial areas and carbonaceous aerosols (black carbon and organic carbon) deposited into snow or ice core via wet and dry deposition play key roles to the regional and global climate. Recently, a China survey was performed to measure the concentrations of insoluble light-absorbing particles (ILAP) in seasonal snow across northern China in January and February of 2014. The results indicate that the higher concentration of NO3- and SO42- and heavy metals of Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Cu are likely to be attributed to enhanced local industrial emissions due to human activities. The emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning are likely to be important for the chemical elements in the seasonal snow with long-range transport, while medium enrichment factors of Mg, Ca, and Al were predominantly associated with soil dust, which is the most important natural source. There are large ranges of the BC and AD in seasonal snow over northeast China because of the anthropogenic emissions, which are caused by human activities. In addition, although the values of the snow albedo by model simulations are little higher in the visible to near-infrared wavelength than that during the China survey, the surface snow albedo by field campaign measurements have good agreement with the model simulations in the visible wavelength.

  3. Impacts of global open-fire aerosols on direct radiative, cloud and surface-albedo effects simulated with CAM5

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yiquan; Lu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yuhang; Yang, Xiu-Qun

    2016-11-29

    Aerosols from open-land fires could significantly perturb the global radiation balance and induce climate change. In this study, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with prescribed daily fire aerosol emissions is used to investigate the spatial and seasonal characteristics of radiative effects (REs, relative to the case of no fires) of open-fire aerosols including black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM) from 2003 to 2011. The global annual mean RE from aerosol–radiation interactions (REari) of all fire aerosols is 0.16 ± 0.01 W m-2 (1σ uncertainty), mainly due to the absorption of fire BC (0.25 ± 0.01 W m-2), while fire POM induces a small effect (-0.05 and 0.04 ± 0.01 W m-2 based on two different methods). Strong positive REari is found in the Arctic and in the oceanic regions west of southern Africa and South America as a result of amplified absorption of fire BC above low-level clouds, in general agreement with satellite observations. The global annual mean RE due to aerosol–cloud interactions (REaci) of all fire aerosols is -0.70 ± 0.05 W m-2, resulting mainly from the fire POM effect (-0.59 ± 0.03 W m-2). REari (0.43 ± 0.03 W m-2) and REaci (-1.38 ± 0.23 W m-2) in the Arctic are stronger than in the tropics (0.17 ± 0.02 and -0.82 ± 0.09 W m-2 for REari and REaci), although the fire aerosol burden is higher in the tropics. The large cloud liquid water path over land areas and low solar zenith angle of the Arctic favor the strong fire aerosol REaci (up to -15 Wm-2) during the Arctic summer. Significant surface cooling, precipitation reduction and increasing amounts of low-level cloud are also found in the Arctic summer as a result of the fire aerosol REaci based on the atmosphere-only simulations. The global annual mean RE due to surface-albedo changes (REsac) over land areas (0.03 ± 0.10 W m-2) is small

  4. Impacts of global open-fire aerosols on direct radiative, cloud and surface-albedo effects simulated with CAM5

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Yiquan; Lu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaohong; ...

    2016-11-29

    Aerosols from open-land fires could significantly perturb the global radiation balance and induce climate change. In this study, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with prescribed daily fire aerosol emissions is used to investigate the spatial and seasonal characteristics of radiative effects (REs, relative to the case of no fires) of open-fire aerosols including black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM) from 2003 to 2011. The global annual mean RE from aerosol–radiation interactions (REari) of all fire aerosols is 0.16 ± 0.01 W m−2 (1σ uncertainty), mainly due to the absorption of fire BC (0.25 ± 0.01 W m−2), while fire POM induces a small effect (−0.05 andmore » 0.04 ± 0.01 W m−2 based on two different methods). Strong positive REari is found in the Arctic and in the oceanic regions west of southern Africa and South America as a result of amplified absorption of fire BC above low-level clouds, in general agreement with satellite observations. The global annual mean RE due to aerosol–cloud interactions (REaci) of all fire aerosols is −0.70 ± 0.05 W m−2, resulting mainly from the fire POM effect (−0.59 ± 0.03 W m−2). REari (0.43 ± 0.03 W m−2) and REaci (−1.38 ± 0.23 W m−2) in the Arctic are stronger than in the tropics (0.17 ± 0.02 and −0.82 ± 0.09 W m−2 for REari and REaci), although the fire aerosol burden is higher in the tropics. The large cloud liquid water path over land areas and low solar zenith angle of the Arctic favor the strong fire aerosol REaci (up to −15 W m−2) during the Arctic summer. Significant surface cooling, precipitation reduction and increasing amounts of low-level cloud are also found in the Arctic summer as a result of the fire aerosol REaci based on the atmosphere-only simulations. The global annual mean RE due to surface-albedo changes (REsac) over land areas (0.03 ± 0.10 W m−2) is small

  5. Single scattering characteristics of volume elements in coal clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gouesbet, G.; Grehan, G.; Maheu, B.

    1983-07-01

    Single scattering characteristics of volume elements in coal clouds are discussed and computed, with the aim of developing laser diagnosis methods in dense particle-laden flows, where multiple scattering phenomena become predominant. Results are provided for extinction efficiency factors, single scattering albedos asymmetry parameters, forward scattering ratios, and phase functions (rigorous as well as modeled). Interest is focused on coal particles because of their present importance in connection with problems linked to the crisis of energy. Computations are carried out at three wavelengths covering 3 orders of magnitude (0.5145-..mu..m Ar-ion laser; 10.6-..mu..m CO/sub 2/ laser; 337-..mu..m HCN laser) for diameters ranging from approx.1 to approx.100 ..mu..m.

  6. Synergic use of TOMS and Aeronet Observations for Characterization of Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Siniuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  7. Albedo maps of Pluto and Charon - Initial mutual event results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Tholen, David J.; Horne, Keith

    1992-01-01

    By applying the technique of maximum entropy image reconstruction to invert observed lightcurves, surface maps of single-scattering albedo are obtained for the surfaces of Pluto and Charon from 1954 to 1986. The albedo features of the surface of Pluto are similar to those of the Buie and Tholen (1989) spot model maps; a south polar cap is evident. The map of Charon is somewhat darker, with single-scattering albedos as low as 0.03.

  8. Single scatter electron Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Svatos, M.M.

    1997-03-01

    A single scatter electron Monte Carlo code (SSMC), CREEP, has been written which bridges the gap between existing transport methods and modeling real physical processes. CREEP simulates ionization, elastic and bremsstrahlung events individually. Excitation events are treated with an excitation-only stopping power. The detailed nature of these simulations allows for calculation of backscatter and transmission coefficients, backscattered energy spectra, stopping powers, energy deposits, depth dose, and a variety of other associated quantities. Although computationally intense, the code relies on relatively few mathematical assumptions, unlike other charged particle Monte Carlo methods such as the commonly-used condensed history method. CREEP relies on sampling the Lawrence Livermore Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL) which has data for all elements with an atomic number between 1 and 100, over an energy range from approximately several eV (or the binding energy of the material) to 100 GeV. Compounds and mixtures may also be used by combining the appropriate element data via Bragg additivity.

  9. Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

    2010-10-01

    Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

  10. Aircraft measurements of biomass burning aerosol over West Africa during DABEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. T.; Osborne, S. R.; Haywood, J. M.; Harrison, M. A. J.

    2008-12-01

    This paper investigates the properties of biomass burning aerosols over West Africa using data from the UK FAAM aircraft during the Dust and Biomass-burning Experiment (DABEX). Aged biomass burning aerosols were widespread across the region, often at altitudes up to 4 km. Fresh biomass burning aerosols were observed at low altitudes by flying through smoke plumes from agricultural fires. The aircraft measured aerosol size distributions, optical properties, and vertical distributions. Single scattering albedo varied from 0.73 to 0.93 (at 0.55 μm) in aerosol layers dominated by biomass burning aerosol. We attribute much of this variation to the variable proportion of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol. We estimate the single scattering albedo of aged biomass burning aerosol to be around 0.81 with an instrumental uncertainty of ±0.05. External mixing, and possibly internal mixing, between the biomass burning aerosol and mineral dust presents an additional source of uncertainty in this estimate. The size distributions of biomass burning aerosols were dominated by particles with radii smaller than 0.35 μm. A 20% increase of count mean radius was observed when contrasting fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols, accompanied by changes in the shape of the size distribution. These changes suggest growth by coagulation and condensation. Extinction coefficients, asymmetry parameters, and Angstrom exponents are calculated from Mie theory, using the lognormal fits to the measured size distributions and assumed refractive indices.

  11. Aerosol Direct, Indirect, Semidirect, and Surface Albedo Effects from Sector Contributions Based on the IPCC AR5 Emissions for Preindustrial and Present-day Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi

    2012-01-01

    The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas-induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, with the hope that mitigation policies could be developed to target those emitters. Understanding the net effect of multisource emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is very challenging, and this paper will clarify forcing and feedback effects by separating direct, indirect, semidirect and surface albedo effects due to aerosols. To this end, we apply the Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model including detailed aerosol microphysics to examine aerosol impacts on climate by isolating single emission sector contributions as given by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) emission data sets developed for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5. For the modeled past 150 years, using the climate model and emissions from preindustrial times to present-day, the total global annual mean aerosol radiative forcing is -0.6 W/m(exp 2), with the largest contribution from the direct effect (-0.5 W/m(exp 2)). Aerosol-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only the cloud albedo effect with -0.17 W/m(exp 2)) and semidirect effects (-0.10 W/m(exp 2)) can be isolated on a regional scale, and they often have opposing forcing effects, leading to overall small forcing effects on a global scale. Although the surface albedo effects from aerosols are small (0.016 W/m(exp 2)), triggered feedbacks on top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing can be 10 times larger. Our results point out that each

  12. Retrieving the Height of Smoke and Dust Aerosols by Synergistic Use of VIIRS, OMPS, and CALIOP Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, N. Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jeong, Myeong-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol Single scattering albedo and Height Estimation (ASHE) algorithm was first introduced in Jeong and Hsu (2008) to provide aerosol layer height as well as single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass burning smoke aerosols. One of the advantages of this algorithm was that the aerosol layer height can be retrieved over broad areas, which had not been available from lidar observations only. The algorithm utilized aerosol properties from three different satellite sensors, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), UV aerosol index (UVAI) from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and aerosol layer height from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Here, we extend the application of the algorithm to Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) data. We also now include dust layers as well as smoke. Other updates include improvements in retrieving the AOD of nonspherical dust from VIIRS, better determination of the aerosol layer height from CALIOP, and more realistic input aerosol profiles in the forward model for better accuracy.

  13. Variability of Aerosol Optical Properties at Four North American Surface Monitoring Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delene, David J.; Ogren, John A.

    2002-03-01

    Aerosol optical properties measured over several years at surface monitoring stations located at Bondville, Illinois (BND); Lamont, Oklahoma (SGP); Sable Island, Nova Scotia (WSA); and Barrow, Alaska (BRW), have been analyzed to determine the importance of the variability in aerosol optical properties to direct aerosol radiative forcing calculations. The amount of aerosol present is of primary importance and the aerosol optical properties are of secondary importance to direct aerosol radiative forcing calculations. The mean aerosol light absorption coefficient (ap) is 10 times larger and the mean aerosol scattering coefficient (sp) is 5 times larger at the anthropogenically influenced site at BND than at BRW. The aerosol optical properties of single scattering albedo (o) and hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) have variability of approximately ±3% and ±8%, respectively, in mean values among the four stations. To assess the importance of the variability in o and b on top of the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing calculations, the aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (F/) is calculated. The F/ is defined as the aerosol forcing (F) per unit optical depth () and does not depend explicitly on the amount of aerosol present. Based on measurements at four North American stations, radiative transfer calculations that assume fixed aerosol properties can have errors of 1%-6% in the annual average forcing at the top of the atmosphere due to variations in average single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction among the sites studied. The errors increase when shorter-term variations in aerosol properties are considered; for monthly and hourly timescales, errors are expected to be greater than 8% and 15%, respectively, approximately one-third of the time. Systematic relationships exist between various aerosol optical properties [ap, o, b, F/, and Ångström exponent (å)] and the amount of aerosol present (measured by sp) that are qualitatively similar but quantitatively

  14. Poster 13: Large-scale simultaneous mapping of Titan's aerosol opacity and surface albedo by a new massive inversion method of Cassini/VIMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Sotin, Christophe; Rannou, Pascal; Bezard, Bruno; Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Appere, Thomas; Cornet, Thomas; Le Mouelic, Stephane%F. Aa(Aim Cea Saclay; Lesia Observatoire de Paris), Ab(Aim Cea Saclay; Universite Paris 7), Ac(Jpl; Lpg Nantes), Ad(Gsma Reims), Ae(Lesia Observatoire De Paris), Af(Jpl), Ag(Lesia Observatoire De Paris), Ah(Aim Cea Saclay), Ai(Esac/Esa), Aj(Lpg Nantes)

    2016-06-01

    We have still limited information on Titan's surface albedo in the near-infrared. Only few spectral windows exist in between the intense methane bands, and even those windows are strongly affected by atmospheric contributions (absorption, scattering). Yet, this part of the spectrum is important to determine the surface composition thanks to the wealth of absorption bands by minerals and ices present there. A radiative transfer model is an effective tool to take the atmospheric effects into consideration in the analysis (e.g. Rannou et al. 2010, Griffith et al 2012, Solomonidou et al. 2016,...), but it is too time-consuming to process the whole VIMS hyperspectral dataset (millions of spectra) and create large-scale maps of the surface albedo. To overcome this problem, we developed an inversion method of VIMS data that employs lookup tables of synthetic spectra produced by a state-of-the-art radiative transfer model (described in its original form in Hirtzig et al. 2013). The heavy computational part (calling the radiative transfer model) is thus done only once for all during the creation of the modeled spectra. We updated the model with new methane spectroscopy and the new aerosol parameters we found in our analysis of the VIMS Emission Phase Function (see the other Maltagliati et al. abstract in this workshop). We analyzed in detail the behavior of the spectra as a function of the free parameters of the model (three inputs, the incidence, emergence and azimuth angles; and two products: the aerosol opacity and the surface albedo) in order to create an optimized grid for the lookup table. The lookup tables were then grafted onto an ad-hoc inversion model. Our method can process a whole 64x64 VIMS datacube in few minutes, with a gain in computational time of a factor of more than one thousand with respect to the standard method. This will consent for the first time a truly massive inversion of VIMS data and large-scale acquisition of Titan's surface albedo, paving the

  15. Calculation of aerosol optical properties under different assumptions on mixing state, refractive index, density and hygroscopicity: uncertainties and importance of representation of aerosol mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curci, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. We used the FlexAOD post-processing tool to calculate the optical properties (aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (g)) from chemistry-transport model aerosol profiles, using a wide range of assumptions on aerosol chemical and physical properties. We calculated that the most important factor of uncertainty is the assumption about the mixing state, for which we estimate an uncertainty of 30-35% on the simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The choice of the core composition in the core-shell representation is of minor importance for calculation of AOD, while it is critical for the SSA. Other factors of uncertainty tested here have a maximum average impact of 10% each on calculated AOD, and an impact of a few percent on SSA and g. We then tested simple parameterizations of the aerosol mixing state, expressed as a function of the aerosol aging, and verified that they may be helpful in reducing the uncertainty when comparing simulations with AERONET retrievals.

  16. Aerosol Remote Sensing from OMI Observations: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo; Jethva, Hiren T.

    2014-01-01

    The unique advantage of OMI observations for the characterization of aerosol properties is the availability of radiance measurement at near UV wavelengths. In spite of its coarse spatial resolution, OMI's near UV observations make possible the characterization of aerosol absorption properties. This capability is unavailable in any of the currently operational high spatial resolution aerosol sensors. A unique decadal record of aerosol absorption optical depth and single scattering albedo from near UV observations has been produced from OMI observations. In this presentation we will review the evolution of OMI's aerosol retrieval capability over the past ten years including retrieval algorithm improvements, assessment of retrieved products, and development of new retrieval capabilities to infer the optical depth of aerosol layers located above clouds.

  17. Preliminary Results from an Assimilation of TOMS Aerosol Observations Into the GOCART Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilva, Arlindo; Weaver, Clark J.; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    At NASA Goddard we are developing a global aerosol data assimilation system that combines advances in remote sensing and modeling of atmospheric aerosols. The goal is to provide high resolution, 3-D aerosol distributions to the research community. Our first step is to develop a simple assimilation system for Saharan mineral aerosol. The Goddard Chemistry and Aerosol Radiation model (GOCART) provides accurate 3-D mineral aerosol size distributions that compare well with TOMS satellite observations. Surface, mobilization, wet and dry deposition, convective and long-range transport are all driven by assimilated fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System, GEOS-DAS. Our version of GOCART transports sizes from.08-10 microns and only simulates Saharan dust. TOMS radiance observations in the ultra violet provide information on the mineral and carbonaceous aerosol fields. We use two main observables in this study: the TOMS aerosol index (AI) which is directly related to the ratio of the 340 and 380 radiances and the 380 radiance. These are sensitive to the aerosol optical thickness, the single scattering albedo and the height of the aerosol layer. The Goddard Aerosol Assimilation System (GAAS) uses the Data Assimilation Office's Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) to combine TOMS observations and GOCART model first guess fields. At this initial phase we only assimilate observations into the the GOCART model over regions of Africa and the Atlantic where mineral aerosols dominant and carbonaceous aerosols are minimal, Our preliminary results during summer show that the assimilation with TOMS data modifies both the aerosol mass loading and the single scattering albedo. Assimilated aerosol fields will be compared with assimilated aerosol fields from GOCART and AERONET observations over Cape Verde.

  18. Using a global aerosol model adjoint to unravel the footprint of spatially-distributed emissions on cloud droplet number and cloud albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Capps, S. L.; Moore, R. H.; Russell, A. G.; Henze, D. K.; Nenes, A.

    2012-12-01

    The adjoints of the GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Model and a comprehensive cloud droplet parameterization are coupled to study the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) over US regions and Central Europe to global emissions of anthropogenic fine mode aerosol precursors. Simulations reveal that the Nd over the midwestern and southeastern US is mostly sensitive to SO2 emissions during August, and to NH3 emissions during February. Over the western US, Nd is mostly sensitivity to SO2 and primary organic aerosol emissions. In Central Europe, Nd is most sensitive to NH3 and NOx emissions. As expected, local emissions strongly affect Nd; long-range transport, however, is also important for the western US and Europe. Emissions changes projected for the year 2050 are estimated to have the largest impacts on cloud albedo and Nd over Central Europe during August (42% and 82% change, respectively) and western US during February (12% and 36.5% change, respectively).

  19. Sensitivity analysis of aerosol direct radiative forcing in ultraviolet visible wavelengths and consequences for the heat budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, N.; Katsoulis, B.; Vardavas, I.

    2004-09-01

    A series of sensitivity studies were performed with a spectral radiative transfer model using aerosol data from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS, data available at aerosol/aerosol.htm">http://www.meteo.physik.uni-muenchen.de/strahlung/aerosol/aerosol.htm) in order to investigate and quantify the relative role of key climatic parameters on clear-sky ultraviolet visible direct aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), within the atmosphere and at the Earth's surface. The model results show that relative humidity and aerosol single-scattering albedo are the most important climatic parameters that determine aerosol forcing at the TOA and at the Earth's surface and atmosphere, respectively. Relative humidity exerts a non-linear positive radiative effect, i.e. increasing humidity amplifies the magnitude of the forcing in the atmosphere and at the surface. Our model sensitivity studies show that increasing relative humidity by 10%, in relative terms, increases the aerosol forcing by factors of 1.42 at the TOA, 1.02 in the atmosphere and 1.17 at the surface. An increase in aerosol single-scattering albedo by 10%, in relative terms, increased the aerosol forcing at the TOA by 1.29, while it decreased the forcing in the atmosphere and at the surface by factors of 0.2 and 0.69, respectively. Our results show that an increase in relative humidity enhances the planetary cooling effect of aerosols (increased reflection of solar radiation to space) over oceans and low-albedo land areas, whilst over polar regions and highly reflecting land surfaces the warming effect of aerosols changes to a cooling effect. Thus, global warming and an associated increase in relative humidity would lead to enhanced aerosol cooling worldwide. The sensitivity results also demonstrate that an increase in surface albedo due to

  20. Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

    2012-07-19

    The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

  1. Primary and secondary contributions to aerosol light scattering and absorption in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2009-06-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer, a nephelometer, an aethalometer, and an aerosol mass spectrometer were used to measure at ground level real-time aerosol light absorption, scattering, and chemistry at an urban site located in North East Mexico City (Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexican Petroleum Institute, denoted by IMP), as part of the Megacity Impact on Regional and Global Environments field experiment, MILAGRO, in March 2006. Photoacoustic and reciprocal nephelometer measurements at 532 nm accomplished with a single instrument compare favorably with conventional measurements made with an aethalometer and a TSI nephelometer. The diurnally averaged single scattering albedo at 532 nm was found to vary from 0.60 to 0.85 with the peak value at midday and the minimum value at 07:00 a.m. local time, indicating that the Mexico City plume is likely to have a net warming effect on local climate. The peak value is associated with strong photochemical generation of secondary aerosol. It is estimated that the photochemical production of secondary aerosol (inorganic and organic) is approximately 75% of the aerosol mass concentration and light scattering in association with the peak single scattering albedo. A strong correlation of aerosol scattering at 532 nm and total aerosol mass concentration was found, and an average mass scattering efficiency factor of 3.8 m2/g was determined. Comparisons of photoacoustic and aethalometer light absorption with oxygenated organic aerosol concentration (OOA) indicate a very small systematic bias of the filter based measurement associated with OOA and the peak aerosol single scattering albedo.

  2. Primary and secondary contributions to aerosol light scattering and absorption in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2008-09-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer, a nephelometer, an aetholemeter, and an aerosol mass spectrometer were used to measure at ground level real-time aerosol light absorption, scattering, and chemistry at an urban site located in north east Mexico City (Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexican Petroleum Institute, denoted by IMP), as part of the Megacity Impact on Regional and Global Environments field experiment, MILAGRO, in March 2006. Photoacoustic and reciprocal nephelometer measurements at 532 nm accomplished with a single instrument compare favorably with conventional measurements made with an aethelometer and a TSI nephelometer. The diurnally averaged single scattering albedo at 532 nm was found to vary from 0.60 to 0.85 with the peak value at midday and the minimum value at 7 a.m. local time, indicating that the Mexico City plume is likely to have a net warming effect on local climate. The peak value is associated with strong photochemical generation of secondary aerosol. It is estimated that the same-day photochemical production of secondary aerosol (inorganic and organic) is approximately 40 percent of the aerosol mass concentration and light scattering in association with the peak single scattering albedo. A strong correlation of aerosol scattering at 532 nm and total aerosol mass concentration was found, and an average mass scattering efficiency factor of 3.8 m2/g was determined. Comparisons of photoacoustic and aethalometer light absorption with oxygenated organic aerosol concentration (OOA) indicate a very small systematic bias of the filter based measurement associated with OOA and the peak aerosol single scattering albedo.

  3. Aerosol light absorption measurements during the Reno Aerosol Optics Experiment: Photoacoustic measurements and a multiple-scattering model for the aethalometer response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Moosmueller, H.; Sheridan, P. J.; Ogren, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    The filter used on the aethalometer is a multiple scattering substrate, yet the current parameterization of the instrument simply uses Beer's law for its analysis when obtaining black carbon concentration. Specific characterizations of the instrument response, where filter attenuation was obtained as a function of wavelength, gave the following impressions. 1. Filter attenuation generally increases inversely with wavelength for all aerosol types. 2. When subjected to a constant flow of low single scattering albedo aerosol, the instrument shows a non-constant response. The response is highest when the filter single scattering albdeo is highest, and it decreases as the filter blackens. 3. When subjected to a constant flow of essentially unity single scattering albedo aerosol, the instrument shows a non-zero response, even though it should do so. A few percent of scattering is converted to absorption, because the addition of purely scattering aerosol is analogous to a simple thickening of the filter. The effect is more pronounced at shorter wavelengths, and is related to item 1. The multiple scattering model reproduces these behaviors. The photoacoustic instrument light absorption calibration with nitrogen dioxide gas will be presented along with closure data from extinction minus scattering as evaluations of its measurement accuracy.

  4. Quantification of aerosol type, and sources of aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sumita; Ramachandran, S.; Holben, B. N.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2014-12-01

    Differences and similarities in aerosol characteristics, for the first time, over two environmentally distinct locations in Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) - Kanpur (KPR) (urban location) and Gandhi College (GC) (rural site) are examined. Aerosol optical depths (AODs) exhibit pronounced seasonal variability with higher values during winter and premonsoon. Aerosol fine mode fraction (FMF) and Ångström exponent (α) are higher over GC than KPR indicating relatively higher fine mode aerosol concentration over GC. Higher FMF over GC is attributed to local biomass burning activities. Analysis of AOD spectra revealed that aerosol size distribution is dominated by wide range of fine mode fractions or mixture of modes during winter and postmonsoon, while during premonsoon and monsoon coarse mode aerosols are more abundant. Single scattering albedo (SSA) is lower over GC than KPR. SSA spectra reveals the abundance of fine mode (coarse mode) absorbing (scattering) aerosols during winter and postmonsoon (premonsoon and monsoon). Spectral SSA features reveal that OC contribution to enhanced absorption is negligible. Analysis shows that absorbing aerosols can be classified as Mostly Black Carbon (BC), and Mixed BC and Dust over IGP. Mixed BC and dust is always higher over KPR, while Mostly BC is higher over GC throughout the year. The amount of long range transported dust exhibits a gradient between KPR (higher) and GC (lower). Results on seasonally varying aerosol types, and absorbing aerosol types and their gradients over an aerosol hotspot are important to tune models and to reduce the uncertainty in radiative and climate impact of aerosols.

  5. Effect of atmospheric dust loading on martian albedo measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinzi, Angelo; Palomba, Ernesto; Rinaldi, Giovanna; D'Amore, Mario

    2010-08-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of the variation of albedo measured by orbiting instruments with atmospheric opacity on Mars. The study has been conduced by analysing Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) data from martian regions with different surface albedo. In support of these data, synthetic spectra with different surface albedo and atmospheric opacities have been computed, so that a comparison has been performed. The synthetic spectra have been retrieved by using two different grain sizes for suspended dust (0.5 and 1.2 μm), allowing a comparison between the two models and the observations. Using the DCI, a parameter describing the quantity of dust deposited on the surface, the effectiveness of the single scattering approximation has been tested for low atmospheric opacity by analysing the quality of the linear fit up to different atmospheric opacity. For more opaque conditions two kinds of fits have been applied to the data, linear and second-order degree polynomial. In this case, we found that the polynomial fit better describes the observations. The analysis of these data made it possible to notice a peculiar trend, already reported by Christensen (1988), of the albedo over Syrtis Major after the occurrence of dust storms, but, differently from that work, now the study of DCI together with atmospheric opacity and albedo allowed us to robustly confirm the hypothesis made by Christensen. Finally, the comparison between observations and synthetic spectra computed with models with different particles grain sizes indicates that dust particles of 0.5 μm diameter are the most effective to change the aerosol atmospheric opacity on Mars.

  6. Critical Reflectance Derived from MODIS: Application for the Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption over Desert Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Kelley C.; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2012-01-01

    Aerosols are tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere that scatter and absorb sunlight. Smoke particles are aerosols, as are sea salt, particulate pollution and airborne dust. When you look down at the earth from space sometimes you can see vast palls of whitish smoke or brownish dust being transported by winds. The reason that you can see these aerosols is because they are reflecting incoming sunlight back to the view in space. The reason for the difference in color between the different types of aerosol is that the particles arc also absorbing sunlight at different wavelengths. Dust appears brownish or reddish because it absorbs light in the blue wavelengths and scatters more reddish light to space, Knowing how much light is scattered versus how much is absorbed, and knowin that as a function of wavelength is essential to being able to quantify the role aerosols play in the energy balance of the earth and in climate change. It is not easy measuring the absorption properties of aerosols when they are suspended in the atmosphere. People have been doing this one substance at a time in the laboratory, but substances mix when they are in the atmosphere and the net absorption effect of all the particles in a column of air is a goal of remote sensing that has not yet been completely successful. In this paper we use a technique based on observing the point at which aerosols change from brightening the surface beneath to darkening it. If aerosols brighten a surface. they must scatter more light to space. If they darken the surface. they must be absorbing more. That cross over point is called the critical reflectance and in this paper we show that critical reflectance is a monotonic function of the intrinsic absorption properties of the particles. This parameter we call the single scattering albedo. We apply the technique to MODIS imagery over the Sahara and Sahel regions to retrieve the single scattering albedo in seven wavelengths, compare these retrievals to ground

  7. Global Albedo

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... the albedo. Bright surfaces have albedo near unity, and dark surfaces have albedo near zero. The DHR refers to the amount of spectral ... Atmospheric Science Data Center's  MISR Level 3 Imagery web site . The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit ...

  8. Effect of In-Plume Aerosol Processing on the Efficacy of Marine Cloud Albedo Enhancement from Controlled Sea-Spray Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, R. G.; Spracklen, D.; Korhonen, H.; Pierce, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    The intentional enhancement of cloud albedo via controlled sea-spray injection from ships has been suggested as a possible means to control anthropogenic global warming (1); however, there remains significant uncertainty in the efficacy of this method due to uncertainties in aerosol and cloud microphysics. Recent analysis showed that more sea-spray may be necessary than previously assumed to reach a desired cooling due to nonlinearities in the aerosol/cloud microphysics (2). A major assumption used in (2) is that all sea-spray was emitted uniformly into some oceanic grid boxes, and thus did not account for sub-grid aerosol microphysics within the sea-spray plumes. However, as a consequnce of the fast sea-spray injection rates which are proposed, in the order of 1x10^17 1/s (1), particle concentrations in these plumes may be quite high and particle coagulation may significantly reduce the number of emitted particles and increase their average size. Therefore, it is possible that the emissions necessary to reach a desired cooling may be even larger than currently assumed. We explore the processing of the freshly emitted sea-spray plumes in the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES)/Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM, 3) with the online aerosol microphysics module TOMAS (4). We determine how the final number and size of particles (once well mixed with background air) depends on the emission rate and size distribution of the sea-spray plume and on the pre-existing aerosol concentrations and local atmospheric conditions. Finally, we make suggestions for effective size-resolved emissions for use in climate models. (1) Salter, S. et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A., 2008. (2) Korhonen, H. et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 4133-4143, 2010. (3) Khairoutdinov, M., and Randall, D.,. J. Atmos. Sci., 60, 607-625, 2003. (4) Pierce, J. and Adams, P., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 1339-1356, 2009.

  9. Effect of In-Plume Aerosol Processing on the Efficacy of Marine Cloud Albedo Enhancement from Controlled Sea-Spray Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, G. S.; Stevens, R. G.; Spracklen, D. V.; Korhonen, H.; Pierce, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The intentional enhancement of cloud albedo via controlled sea-spray injection from ships has been proposed as a possible method to control anthropogenic global warming (1); however, there remains significant uncertainty in the efficacy of this method due to uncertainties in aerosol and cloud microphysics. A major assumption used in multiple recent studies (2,3) is that all sea-spray was emitted uniformly into some oceanic grid boxes, and thus did not account for sub-grid aerosol microphysics within the sea-spray plumes. However, as a consequence of the fast sea-spray injection rates which are proposed, in the order of 10^17 1/s (1), particle concentrations in these plumes may be quite high and particle coagulation may significantly reduce the number of emitted particles and increase their average size. Therefore, it is possible that the emissions necessary to reach a desired cooling may be even larger than currently assumed. We explore the evolution of these sea-salt plumes using a multi-shelled Gaussian plume model with size-resolved aerosol coagulation. We determine how the final number and size of particles depends on the emission rate and size distribution of the emitted sea-spray plume and local atmospheric conditions, including wind speed and boundary-layer stability. Under the injection rates reported in (1) and typical marine conditions, we find that the number of aerosol particles is reduced by about 40%. This fraction decreases for decreasing emission rates or increasing wind speeds due to lower particle concentrations in the plume. Finally, we make suggestions for effective size-resolved emissions for use in climate models. (1) Salter, S. et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A., 2008. (2) Korhonen, H. et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 4133-4143, 2010. (3) Partanen, A.-I. et al., J. Geophys. Res., 117, D02203, 2012.

  10. Assessment of 10-Year Global Record of Aerosol Products from the OMI Near-UV Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, C.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.

    2014-12-01

    Global observations of aerosol properties from space are critical for understanding climate change and air quality applications. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the EOS-Aura satellite provides information on aerosol optical properties by making use of the large sensitivity to aerosol absorption and dark surface albedo in the UV spectral region. These unique features enable us to retrieve both aerosol extinction optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) successfully from radiance measurements at 354 and 388 nm by the OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV). Recent improvements to algorithms in conjunction with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) carbon monoxide data also reduce uncertainties due to aerosol layer heights and types significantly in retrieved products. We present validation results of OMI AOD against space and time collocated Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measured AOD values over multiple stations representing major aerosol episodes and regimes. We also compare the OMI SSA against the inversion made by AERONET as well as an independent network of ground-based radiometer called SKYNET in Japan, China, South-East Asia, India, and Europe. The outcome of the evaluation analysis indicates that in spite of the "row anomaly" problem, affecting the sensor since mid-2007, the long-term aerosol record shows remarkable sensor stability. The OMAERUV 10-year global aerosol record is publicly available at the NASA data service center web site (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/Aura/data-holdings/OMI/omaeruv_v003.shtml).

  11. Constraining Aerosol Properties Using H2O Retrievals from the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Zeng, Z.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Sander, S. P.; Wennberg, P. O.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    H2O has absorption features across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the ultraviolet to the infrared. The California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) on the top of Mt Wilson, California, offers continuous high-resolution spectral measurements from 4000 to 8000 cm-1. We retrieve H2O slant column densities (SCDs) at different wavelengths using CLARS data. In particular, we compare retrievals from the spectralon, which is above the planetary boundary layer and relatively immune to aerosol scattering, with those from West Pasadena, a location in the Los Angeles basin that is influenced by aerosol scattering. SCD retrievals for West Pasadena show significantly larger variance across different wavelengths. The retrieval error in West Pasadena is much larger than can be attributed to spectroscopic uncertainties, and reflects the wavelength dependence of aerosol scattering. Using a two-stream enhanced single scattering (2S-ESS) radiative transfer (RT) model, we simulated the effect of aerosol scattering on H2O SCD retrievals at different wavelengths. We found the effects are sensitive to the surface albedo, aerosol phase function and single scattering albedo. Using an empirical relationship derived from the radiative transfer model simulations, we relate the H2O retrieval variance to the aerosol optical depth Angstrom coefficient and compare the results with AERONET observations. The additional information gained from H2O retrieval variance within a large range of wavelengths could be used to improve OCO-2 type CO2 retrievals in the presence of aerosols.

  12. Retrieving the height of smoke and dust aerosols by synergistic use of VIIRS, OMPS, and CALIOP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, N. Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jeong, Myeong-Jae

    2015-08-01

    This study extends the application of the previously developed Aerosol Single-scattering albedo and layer Height Estimation (ASHE) algorithm, which was originally applied to smoke aerosols only, to both smoke and dust aerosols by including nonspherical dust properties in the retrieval process. The main purpose of the algorithm is to derive aerosol height information over wide areas using aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors simultaneously: aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), UV aerosol index from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), and total backscatter coefficient profile from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). The case studies suggest that the ASHE algorithm performs well for both smoke and dust aerosols, showing root-mean-square error of the retrieved aerosol height as compared to CALIOP observations from 0.58 to 1.31 km and mean bias from -0.70 to 1.13 km. In addition, the algorithm shows the ability to retrieve single-scattering albedo to within 0.03 of Aerosol Robotic Network inversion data for moderate to thick aerosol loadings (AOD of ~1.0). For typical single-layered aerosol cases, the estimated uncertainty in the retrieved height ranges from 1.20 to 1.80 km over land and from 1.15 to 1.58 km over ocean when favorable conditions are met. Larger errors are observed for multilayered aerosol events, due to the limited sensitivities of the passive sensors to such cases.

  13. Infrared Aerosol Radiative Forcing at the Surface and the Top of the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2003-01-01

    We study the clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing at infrared wavelengths using data from the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) cruise of the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown. Limited number of data points is analyzed mostly from ship and collocated satellite values. An optical model is derived from chemical measurements, lidar profiles, and visible extinction measurements which is used to and estimate the infrared aerosol optical thickness and the single scattering albedo. The IR model results are compared to detailed Fourier Transform Interferometer based infrared aerosol forcing estimates, pyrgeometer based infrared downward fluxes, and against the direct solar forcing observations. This combined approach attests for the self-consistency of the optical model and allows to derive quantities such as the infrared forcing at the top of the atmosphere or the infrared optical thickness. The mean infrared aerosol optical thickness at 10 microns is 0.08 and the single scattering albedo is 0.55. The modeled infrared aerosol forcing reaches 10 W/sq m during the cruise, which is a significant contribution to the total direct aerosol forcing. The surface infrared aerosol radiative forcing is between 10 to 25% of the shortwave aerosol forcing. The infrared aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere can go up to 19% of the solar aerosol forcing. We show good agreement between satellite (CERES instrument) retrievals and model results at the top of the atmosphere. Over the Sea of Japan, the average infrared radiative forcing is 4.6 W/sq m in the window region at the surface and it is 1.5 W/sq m at top of the atmosphere. The top of the atmosphere IR forcing efficiency is a strong function of aerosol temperature while the surface IR forcing efficiency varies between 37 and 55 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit). and changes between 10 to 18 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit).

  14. Detailed Aerosol Characterization using Polarimetric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, Otto; di Noia, Antonio; Stap, Arjen; Rietjens, Jeroen; Smit, Martijn; van Harten, Gerard; Snik, Frans

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are believed to cause the second most important anthropogenic forcing of climate change after greenhouse gases. In contrast to the climate effect of greenhouse gases, which is understood relatively well, the negative forcing (cooling effect) caused by aerosols represents the largest reported uncertainty in the most recent assessment of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). To reduce the large uncertainty on the aerosol effects on cloud formation and climate, accurate satellite measurements of aerosol optical properties (optical thickness, single scattering albedo, phase function) and microphysical properties (size distribution, refractive index, shape) are essential. There is growing consensus in the aerosol remote sensing community that multi-angle measurements of intensity and polarization are essential to unambiguously determine all relevant aerosol properties. This presentations adresses the different aspects of polarimetric remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, including retrieval algorithm development, validation, and data needs for climate and air quality applications. During past years, at SRON-Netherlands Instite for Space Research retrieval algorithms have been developed that make full use of the capabilities of polarimetric measurements. We will show results of detailed aerosol properties from ground-based- (groundSPEX), airborne- (NASA Research Scanning Polarimeter), and satellite (POLDER) measurements. Also we will discuss observational needs for future instrumentation in order to improve our understanding of the role of aerosols in climate change and air quality.

  15. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval over snow surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F. C.; Painter, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Significant amounts of black carbon and dust aerosols are transported to and accumulated in snowpacks of mountain ranges around the globe. The direct climate forcing of these particles is increasingly understood, whereas its indirect radiative forcing due to snow albedo and snow cover changes is still under investigation. In-situ and new remote sensing techniques are used to estimate snowpack properties from local to regional scales. Nevertheless, orbital and suborbital Earth observation data are difficult to analyze due to high spatial variability of the snowpack in rugged terrain. In addition, changes in atmospheric turbidity significantly complicate the estimation of snow cover characteristics and requires prior retrieval of optical and microphysical aerosol properties. Unfortunately, most aerosol retrieval techniques work only over dark surfaces. We therefore present a study on the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval over snow surfaces. Radiative transfer calculations show that the sensitivity to surface spectral albedo depends strongly on the aerosol single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering efficiency to total extinction efficiency). Absorbing aerosol types (e.g. soot) provide a relatively good AOD retrieval sensitivity for very bright surfaces. The findings provide a basis for the development of future techniques and algorithms, which are able to concurrently retrieve snow and aerosol properties using remote sensing data. We explore these sensitivities with synthetic data and a time series of imaging spectrometer data, in situ spectral irradiance measurements, and sunphotometer measurements of AOD in the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA. Ultimately, this research is important to map and better understand regional influences of aerosol and climate forcings on the cryosphere and water cycle in mountainous and other cold regions.

  16. Interactive Soil Dust Aerosol Model in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Sensitivity of the Soil Dust Cycle to Radiative Properties of Soil Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Tegen, Ina; Miller, Ron L.

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity of the soil dust aerosol cycle to the radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols is studied. Four experiments with the NASA/GISS atmospheric general circulation model, which includes a soil dust aerosol model, are compared, all using a prescribed climatological sea surface temperature as lower boundary condition. In one experiment, dust is included as dynamic tracer only (without interacting with radiation), whereas dust interacts with radiation in the other simulations. Although the single scattering albedo of dust particles is prescribed to be globally uniform in the experiments with radiatively active dust, a different single scattering albedo is used in those experiments to estimate whether regional variations in dust optical properties, corresponding to variations in mineralogical composition among different source regions, are important for the soil dust cycle and the climate state. On a global scale, the radiative forcing by dust generally causes a reduction in the atmospheric dust load corresponding to a decreased dust source flux. That is, there is a negative feedback in the climate system due to the radiative effect of dust. The dust source flux and its changes were analyzed in more detail for the main dust source regions. This analysis shows that the reduction varies both with the season and with the single scattering albedo of the dust particles. By examining the correlation with the surface wind, it was found that the dust emission from the Saharan/Sahelian source region and from the Arabian peninsula, along with the sensitivity of the emission to the single scattering albedo of dust particles, are related to large scale circulation patterns, in particular to the trade winds during Northern Hemisphere winter and to the Indian monsoon circulation during summer. In the other regions, such relations to the large scale circulation were not found. There, the dependence of dust deflation to radiative forcing by dust particles is probably

  17. Applications of UV Scattering and Absorbing Aerosol Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M.; Beirle, S.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosols cause a substantial amount of radiative forcing, but quantifying this amount is difficult: determining aerosol concentrations in the atmosphere and, especially, characterizing their (optical) properties, has proved to be quite a challenge. A good way to monitor aerosol characteristics on a global scale is to perform satellite remote sensing. Most satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms are based on fitting of aerosol-induced changes in earth reflectance, which are usually subtle and have a smooth wavelength dependence. In such algorithms certain aerosol models are assumed, where optical parameters such as single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter and size parameter (or Angstrom exponent) are defined. Another, semi-quantitative technique for detecting aerosols is the calculation of UV Aerosol Indices (UVAI). The Absorbing and Scattering Aerosol Indices detect "UV-absorbing" aerosols (most notably mineral dust, black and brown carbon particles) and "scattering" aerosols (sulfate and secondary organic aerosol particles), respectively. UVAI are essentially a measure of the contrast between two wavelengths in the UV range. The advantages of UVAI are: they can be determined in the presence of clouds, they are rather insensitive to surface type, and they are very sensitive to aerosols. The Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) has been in use for over a decade, and the Scattering Aerosol Index (SAI) was recently introduced by our group. Whereas the AAI is mainly used to detect desert dust and biomass burning plumes, the SAI can be used to study regions with high concentrations of non-absorbing aerosols, either anthropogenic (e.g. sulfate aerosols in eastern China) or biogenic (e.g. secondary organic aerosols formed from VOCs emitted by plants). Here we will present our recent UVAI results from SCIAMACHY: we will discuss the seasonal trend of SAI, and correlate our UVAI data with other datasets such as trace gases (HCHO, NO2, CO) and fire counts from the (A

  18. Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation by Aerosols during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rabbette, M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redermann, J.; Higurashi, A.; Nakajima, T.; Quinn, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the upward and downward spectral solar radiant fluxes were measured with the Spectral Solar Flux Radiometer (SSFR), and the aerosol optical depth was measured with the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) aboard the Center for INterdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. IN this paper, we examine the data obtained for two cases: a moderately thick aerosol layer, 12 April, and a relatively thin aerosol case, 16 April 2001. ON both days, the Twin Otter flew vertical profiles in the Korean Strait southeast of Gosan Island. For both days we determine the aerosol spectral absorption of the layer and estimate the spectral aerosol absorption optical depth and single-scattering albedo. The results for 12 April show that the single-scattering albedo increases with wavelength from 0.8 at 400 nm to 0.95 at 900 nm and remains essentially constant from 950 to 1700 nm. On 16 April the amount of aerosol absorption was very low; however, the aerosol single-scattering albedo appears to decrease slightly with wavelength in the visible region. We interpret these results in light of the two absorbing aerosol species observed during the ACE-asia study: mineral dust and black carbon. The results for 12 April are indicative of a mineral dust-black carbon mixture. The 16 April results are possibly caused by black carbon mixed with nonabsorbing pollution aerosols. For the 12 April case we attempt to estimate the relative contributions of the black carbon particles and the mineral dust particles. We compare our results with other estimates of the aerosol properties from a Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite analysis and aerosol measurements made aboard the Twin Otter, aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ronald H Brown ship, and at ground sites in Gosan and Japan. The results indicate a relatively complicated aerosol

  19. Global aerosol optical properties and application to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol retrieval over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-07-01

    As more information about global aerosol properties has become available from remotely sensed retrievals and in situ measurements, it is prudent to evaluate this new information, both on its own and in the context of satellite retrieval algorithms. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from global Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometer sites, we perform cluster analysis to determine aerosol type as a function of location and season. We find that three spherical-derived types (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol) and one spheroid-derived types (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally describe the range of AERONET observed global aerosol properties. The fine-dominated types are separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (ω0), ranging from nonabsorbing aerosol (ω0 ˜ 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to moderately absorbing aerosol (ω0 ˜ 0.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (ω0 ˜ 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We identify the dominant aerosol type at each site, and extrapolate to create seasonal 1° × 1° maps of expected aerosol types. Each aerosol type is bilognormal, with dynamic (function of optical depth) size parameters (radius, standard deviation, volume distribution) and complex refractive index. Not only are these parameters interesting in their own right, they can also be applied to aerosol retrieval algorithms, such as to aerosol retrieval over land from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. Independent direct-Sun AERONET observations of spectral aerosol optical depth (τ) are consistent the spectral dependence of the models, indicating that our derived aerosol models are relevant.

  20. Statistical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol as determined from AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Kokhanovsky, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Seasonal means and standard deviations of column-integrated aerosol optical properties (e.g. spectral aerosol optical thickness (AOT), single scattering albedo, phase function, Ångström exponent, volume particle size distribution, complex refractive index, absorbing aerosol optical thickness) from several Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites located in typical aerosol source and background regions are investigated (Holben et al., 1998). The AERONET program is an inclusive network of ground-based sun-photometers that measure atmospheric aerosol optical properties (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/). The results can be used for improving the accuracy of satellite-retrieved AOT, assessments of the global aerosol models, studies of atmospheric pollution and aerosol radiative forcing on climate. We have paid a special attention to several AERONET sites that are Mexico_City (Mexico), Alta_Floresta (Brazil), Avignon (France), Solar_Village (Saudi Arabia), and Midway_Island (Pacific) representative for industrial/urban, biomass burning, rural, desert dust and oceanic aerosols, respectively. We have found that the optical and microphysical aerosol properties are highly dependent on the local aerosol emission sources and seasonal meteorological conditions.

  1. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  2. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  3. Radiative forcing under mixed aerosol conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GarcíA, O. E.; Expósito, F. J.; DíAz, J. P.; DíAz, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The mixture of mineral dust with biomass burning or urban-industrial aerosols presents significant differences in optical properties when compared to those of the individual constituents, leading to different impacts on solar radiation levels. This effect is assessed by estimating the direct radiative forcing (ΔF) of these aerosols from solar flux models using the radiative parameters derived from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). These data reveal that, in oceanic and vegetative covers (surface albedo (SA) < 0.30), the aerosol effect at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is always cooling the Earth-atmosphere system, regardless of the aerosol type. The obtained average values of ΔF range between -27 ± 15 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 0.55 μm, 0.3 ± 0.3) for mineral dust mixed with urban-industrial aerosols, registered in the East Asia region, and -34 ± 18 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.8 ± 0.4) for the mixture of the mineral dust and biomass burning particles, observed in the Central Africa region. In the intermediate SA range (0.30-0.50) the TOA radiative effect depends on the aerosol absorption properties. Thus, aerosols with single scattering albedo at 0.55 μm lower than ˜0.88 lead to a warming of the system, with ΔF of 10 ± 11 Wm-2 for the mixture of mineral dust and biomass burning. Cases with SA > 0.30 are not present in East Asia region. At the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) the maximum ΔF values are associated with the highest AOD levels obtained for the mixture of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols (-130 ± 44 Wm-2 with AOD = 0.8 ± 0.4 for SA < 0.30).

  4. Satellite and ground-based study of optical properties of 1997 Indonesian Forest Fire aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Teruyuki; Higurashi, Akiko; Takeuchi, Nobuo; Herman, Jay R.

    Optical properties of biomass burning aerosols in the event of Indonesian forest fires in 1997 were studied by groundbased sky radiometry and satellite remote sensing with AVHRR and TOMS radiometers. The AVHRR-derived optical thickness distribution agreed with the distribution of TOMS-derived UV-absorbing aerosol index and with the optical thickness measured by sky radiometry and sunphotometry. The single scattering albedo of aerosols was fairly constant as 0.9 in the September-October period. Relationship between Ångström turbidity factor and exponent supported the polydispersion consisted of aged small particles. This observation was consistent with the fact that the retrieved volume size distribution by sky radiometry has a distinct accumulation mode with a peak radius of 0.25 µm. Those optical properties of smoke aerosols seem to reflect the specific chemical structure of Indonesian forest fire aerosols, i.e., a mixture of carbonaceous and sulfate particles.

  5. MISR UAE2 Aerosol Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-21

    ... therein. The changes include: additional spherical pollution and biomass burning analogs having lower single-scattering albedo ... calibration, affecting low optical depth retrievals over ocean, and a richer selection of multi-modal particle mixtures. ...

  6. Effects of morphology on the radiative properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols with different aging status.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tianhai; Wu, Yu; Chen, Hao

    2014-06-30

    Light absorbing carbon aerosols play a substantial role in climate change through radiative forcing, which is the dominant absorber of solar radiation. Radiative properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols are strongly dependent on the morphological factors and the mixing mechanism of black carbon with other aerosol components. This study focuses on the morphological effects on the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. Three types aerosols with different aging status such as freshly emitted BC particles, thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols, heavily coated light absorbing carbon aerosols are studied. Our study showed that morphological factors change with the aging of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols to result in a dramatic change in their optical properties. The absorption properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols can be enhanced approximately a factor of 2 at 0.67 um, and these enhancements depend on the morphological factors. A larger shell/core diameter ratio of volume-equivalent shell-core spheres (S/C), which indicates the degree of coating, leads to stronger absorption. The enhancement of absorption properties accompanies a greater enhancement of scattering properties, which is reflected in an increase in single scattering albedo (SSA). The enhancement of single scattering albedo due to the morphological effects can reach a factor of 3.75 at 0.67 μm. The asymmetry parameter has a similar yet smaller enhancement. Moreover, the corresponding optical properties of shell-and-core model determined by using Lorenz -Mie solutions are presented for comparison. We found that the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosol can differ fundamentally from those calculated for the Mie theory shell-and-core model, particularly for thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols. Our studies indicate that the complex morphology

  7. Simultaneous Retrieval of Multiple Aerosol Parameters Using a Multi-Angular Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, K. S.; Weger, R. C.; Welch, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic, are important to the earth's radiative balance through their direct and indirect effects. They scatter the incoming solar radiation (direct effect) and modify the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (indirect effect). Although it has been suggested that aerosols exert a net cooling influence on climate, this effect has received less attention than the radiative forcing due to clouds and greenhouse gases. In order to understand the role that aerosols play in a changing climate, detailed and accurate observations are a prerequisite. The retrieval of aerosol optical properties by satellite remote sensing has proven to be a difficult task. The difficulty results mainly from the tenuous nature and variable composition of aerosols. To date, with single-angle satellite observations, we can only retrieve reliably against dark backgrounds, such as over oceans and dense vegetation. Even then, assumptions must be made concerning the chemical composition of aerosols. The best hope we have for aerosol retrievals over bright backgrounds are observations from multiple angles, such as those provided by the MISR and POLDER instruments. In this investigation we examine the feasibility of simultaneous retrieval of multiple aerosol optical parameters using reflectances from a typical set of twelve angles observed by the French POLDER instrument. The retrieved aerosol optical parameters consist of asymmetry factor, single scattering albedo, surface albedo, and optical thickness.

  8. LASE measurements of aerosols and water vapor during TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Melfi, Harvey; Whiteman, David N.; Schwenner, Geary; Evans, Keith D.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Hignett, Philip; Holben, Brent N.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.

  9. Global Aerosol Optical Models and Lookup Tables for the New MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Loraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Since 2000, MODIS has been deriving aerosol properties over land from MODIS observed spectral reflectance, by matching the observed reflectance with that simulated for selected aerosol optical models, aerosol loadings, wavelengths and geometrical conditions (that are contained in a lookup table or 'LUT'). Validation exercises have showed that MODIS tends to under-predict aerosol optical depth (tau) in cases of large tau (tau greater than 1.0), signaling errors in the assumed aerosol optical properties. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from the hundreds of global AERONET sunphotometer sites, we found that three spherical-derived models (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol), and one spheroid-derived model (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally described the range of observed global aerosol properties. The fine dominated models were separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (omega(sub 0)), ranging from non-absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to neutrally absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We determined the dominant model type in each region and season, to create a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid of assumed aerosol type. We used vector radiative transfer code to create a new LUT, simulating the four aerosol models, in four MODIS channels. Independent AERONET observations of spectral tau agree with the new models, indicating that the new models are suitable for use by the MODIS aerosol retrieval.

  10. Expressive Single Scattering for Light Shaft Stylization.

    PubMed

    Kol, Timothy R; Klehm, Oliver; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Eisemann, Elmar

    2016-04-14

    Light scattering in participating media is a natural phenomenon that is increasingly featured in movies and games, as it is visually pleasing and lends realism to a scene. In art, it may further be used to express a certain mood or emphasize objects. Here, artists often rely on stylization when creating scattering effects, not only because of the complexity of physically correct scattering, but also to increase expressiveness. Little research, however, focuses on artistically influencing the simulation of the scattering process in a virtual 3D scene. We propose novel stylization techniques, enabling artists to change the appearance of single scattering effects such as light shafts. Users can add, remove, or enhance light shafts using occluder manipulation. The colors of the light shafts can be stylized and animated using easily modifiable transfer functions. Alternatively, our system can optimize a light map given a simple user input for a number of desired views in the 3D world. Finally, we enable artists to control the heterogeneity of the underlying medium. Our stylized scattering solution is easy to use and compatible with standard rendering pipelines. It works for animated scenes and can be executed in real time to provide the artist with quick feedback.

  11. Aerosol Airmass Type Mapping Over the Urban Mexico City Region From Space-based Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.; Limbacher, J. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Using Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and sub-orbital measurements from the 2006 INTEX-B/MILAGRO field campaign, in this study we explore MISR's ability to map different aerosol air mass types over the Mexico City metropolitan area. The aerosol air mass distinctions are based on shape, size and single scattering albedo retrievals from the MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval algorithm. In this region, the research algorithm identifies dust-dominated aerosol mixtures based on non-spherical particle shape, whereas spherical biomass burning and urban pollution particles are distinguished by particle size. Two distinct aerosol air mass types based on retrieved particle microphysical properties, and four spatially distributed aerosol air masses, are identified in the MISR data on 6 March 2006. The aerosol air mass type identification results are supported by coincident, airborne high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients are also consistent between the MISR and sub-orbital measurements, but particles having single-scattering albedo of approx. 0.7 at 558 nm must be included in the retrieval algorithm to produce good absolute AOD comparisons over pollution-dominated aerosol air masses. The MISR standard V22 AOD product, at 17.6 km resolution, captures the observed AOD gradients qualitatively, but retrievals at this coarse spatial scale and with limited spherical absorbing particle options underestimate AOD and do not retrieve particle properties adequately over this complex urban region. However, we demonstrate how AOD and aerosol type mapping can be accomplished with MISR data over complex urban regions, provided the retrieval is performed at sufficiently high spatial resolution, and with a rich enough set of aerosol components and mixtures.

  12. Aerosol airmass type mapping over the Urban Mexico City region from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.; Limbacher, J. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-09-01

    Using Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and sub-orbital measurements from the 2006 INTEX-B/MILAGRO field campaign, in this study we explore MISR's ability to map different aerosol air mass types over the Mexico City metropolitan area. The aerosol air mass distinctions are based on shape, size and single scattering albedo retrievals from the MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval algorithm. In this region, the research algorithm identifies dust-dominated aerosol mixtures based on non-spherical particle shape, whereas spherical biomass burning and urban pollution particles are distinguished by particle size. Two distinct aerosol air mass types based on retrieved particle microphysical properties, and four spatially distributed aerosol air masses, are identified in the MISR data on 6 March 2006. The aerosol air mass type identification results are supported by coincident, airborne high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients are also consistent between the MISR and sub-orbital measurements, but particles having single-scattering albedo of ≈0.7 at 558 nm must be included in the retrieval algorithm to produce good absolute AOD comparisons over pollution-dominated aerosol air masses. The MISR standard V22 AOD product, at 17.6 km resolution, captures the observed AOD gradients qualitatively, but retrievals at this coarse spatial scale and with limited spherical absorbing particle options underestimate AOD and do not retrieve particle properties adequately over this complex urban region. However, we demonstrate how AOD and aerosol type mapping can be accomplished with MISR data over complex urban regions, provided the retrieval is performed at sufficiently high spatial resolution, and with a rich enough set of aerosol components and mixtures.

  13. Intercomparison between aerosol optical properties by a PREDE skyradiometer and CIMEL sunphotometer over Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, H.; Shi, G.; Uchiyama, A.; Yamazaki, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.; Zhang, X.

    2007-11-01

    This study compares the aerosol optical and physical properties simultaneously measured by a SKYNET PREDE skyradiometer and AERONET/PHOTONS CIMEL sunphotometer at a location in Beijing, China. Aerosol optical properties (AOP) including the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent (α), volume size distribution, single scattering albedo (ω) and the complex refractive index were compared. The difference between the two types of instruments was less than 1.3% for the AOD and less than 4% for the single scattering albedo below the wavelength of 670 nm. There is a difference between the volume size distribution patterns derived from two instruments, which is probablely due to difference of measurement protocols and inversion algorithms for the respective instruments. AOP under three distinct weather conditions (background, haze, and dust days) over Beijing were compared by using the retrieved skyradiometer and sunphotometer data combined with MODIS satellite results, pyranometer measurements, PM10 measurements, and backtrajectory analysis. The results show that the significant difference of AOP under background, haze, and dust days over Beijing is probablely due to different aerosol components under distinct weather conditions.

  14. Intercomparison between aerosol optical properties by a PREDE skyradiometer and CIMEL sunphotometer over Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, H.; Shi, G.; Uchiyama, A.; Yamazaki, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.; Zhang, X.

    2008-06-01

    This study compares the aerosol optical and physical properties simultaneously measured by a SKYNET PREDE skyradiometer and AERONET/PHOTONS CIMEL sunphotometer at a location in Beijing, China. Aerosol optical properties (AOP) including the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent (α), volume size distribution, single scattering albedo (ω) and the complex refractive index were compared. The difference between the two types of instruments was less than 1.3% for the AOD and less than 4% for the single scattering albedo below the wavelength of 670 nm. There is a difference between the volume size distribution patterns derived from two instruments, which is probably due to difference of measurement protocols and inversion algorithms for the respective instruments. AOP under three distinct weather conditions (background, haze, and dust days) over Beijing were compared by using the retrieved skyradiometer and sunphotometer data combined with MODIS satellite results, pyranometer measurements, PM10 measurements, and backtrajectory analysis. The results show that the significant difference of AOP under background, haze, and dust days over Beijing is probably due to different aerosol components under distinct weather conditions.

  15. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2007-07-01

    A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF), enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI) and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL) for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02)-i0.017(±0.003) at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH) profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  16. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2008-02-01

    A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF), enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI) and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL) for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02)-i0.017(±0.003) at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH) profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  17. [Optical properties of aerosol during haze-fog episodes in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing-Na; Li, Xin-Mei; Deng, Zen-Grandeng; De, Qing-Yangzong; Yuan, Shuai

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the optical properties of aerosol during haze-fog episodes in Beijing. The aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent (alpha), size distribution and single scattering albedo (omega) during haze-fog episodes were analyzed between 2002 and 2008 using AERONENT data. During haze-fog episodes, the aerosol optical depth showed a decreasing trend with wavelengths, and showed high values with an average 1.34 at 440 nm. The magnitude of Angstrom exponent was relatively high during haze-fog episodes and the mean values reached 1.11. The frequency distribution of alpha was up to 94% when alpha > 0.9, indicating the predominance of fine particles during haze-fog episodes in Beijing. The aerosol volume size distributions presented a bimodal structure (fine and coarse modes). The maxima (peaks) radius of fine mode showed an increasing trend with AOD, however, those of coarse mode showed a decreasing trend with AOD. The size distribution showed a distinct difference in dominant mode for the different AOD. The single scattering albedo showed an increasing trend with AOD during haze-fog episodes in Beijing. The mean value of omega was 0.89 at the four wavelengths and the omega exhibited a low sensitivity to wavelengths.

  18. [Aerosol Optical Properties in the Northern Suburb of Nanjing During Haze Days in January 2013].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-peng; Ma, Yan; Zheng, Jun; Cui, Fen-ping; Zhou, Yao-yao

    2016-03-15

    In January 2013 large-scale, continuous and severe haze occurred in Nanjing. Three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) was used for real-time, online and situ measurements of aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients in the northern suburb of Nanjing during January 2013. The results indicated that the average aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients were (83.20 ± 35.24) Mm⁻¹ and (670.16 ± 136.44) Mm⁻¹ during haze days, which were 3.85 and 3.45 times higher than those on clean days, respectively. The diurnal variation of absorption and scattering coefficients showed a bimodal distribution. The mean single scattering albedo and scattering Angstrom exponent were (0.89 ± 0.04) and (1.30 ± 0.27) respectively, indicating the predominance of scattering fine particles during haze days in Nanjing. Aerosols could be significantly removed by precipitation. The absorption and scattering coefficients showed negative correlations with surface wind speed, and the single scattering albedo and Angstrom exponent showed positive correlations with wind speed. Aerosol scattering coefficient was highest under southeasterly wind, whereas the absorption coefficient was highest under the southwesterly wind. In the three haze pollution events, Haze 1 and Haze 2 were mainly affected by long-range transportation of pollutants. Haze 1 was mainly affected by aging air mass from north Nanjing, Haze 2 was mainly affected by biomass burning air mass from southwest Nanjing, while Haze 3 was mainly caused by the high sulfate.

  19. Phase function, backscatter, extinction, and absorption for standard radiation atmosphere and El Chichon aerosol models at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Suttles, J. T.; Lecroy, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Tabular values of phase function, Legendre polynominal coefficients, 180 deg backscatter, and extinction cross section are given for eight wavelengths in the atmospheric windows between 0.4 and 2.2 microns. Also included are single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, and refractive indices. These values are based on Mie theory calculations for the standard rediation atmospheres (continental, maritime, urban, unperturbed stratospheric, volcanic, upper atmospheric, soot, oceanic, dust, and water-soluble) assest measured volcanic aerosols at several time intervals following the El Chichon eruption. Comparisons of extinction to 180 deg backscatter for different aerosol models are presented and related to lidar data.

  20. Simultaneous Retrieval of Multiple Aerosol Parameters Using a Multi-Angular Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, K.-S.; Weger, R. C.; Welch, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic, are important to the earth's radiative balance through their direct and indirect effects. They scatter the incoming solar radiation (direct effect) and modify the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (indirect effect). Although it has been suggested that aerosols exert a net cooling influence on climate, this effect has received less attention than the radiative forcing due to clouds and greenhouse gases. In order to understand the role that aerosols play in a changing climate, detailed and accurate observations are a prerequisite. The retrieval of aerosol optical properties by satellite remote sensing has proven to be a difficult task. The difficulty results mainly from the tenuous nature and variable composition of aerosols. To date, with single-angle satellite observations, we can only retrieve reliably against dark backgrounds, such as over oceans and dense vegetation. Even then, assumptions must be made concerning the chemical composition of aerosols. In this investigation we examine the feasibility of simultaneous retrieval of multiple aerosol optical parameters using reflectances from a typical set of twelve angles observed by the French POLDER instrument. The retrieved aerosol optical parameters consist of asymmetry factor, single scattering albedo, surface albedo, and optical thickness.

  1. Assessment of 10 Year Record of Aerosol Optical Depth from OMI UV Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Changwoo; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren

    2014-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the EOS-Aura satellite provides information on aerosol optical properties by making use of the large sensitivity to aerosol absorption in the near-ultraviolet (UV) spectral region. Another important advantage of using near UV observations for aerosol characterization is the low surface albedo of all terrestrial surfaces in this spectral region that reduces retrieval errors associated with land surface reflectance characterization. In spite of the 13 × 24 square kilometers coarse sensor footprint, the OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single-scattering albedo under cloud-free conditions from radiance measurements at 354 and 388 nanometers. We present validation results of OMI AOD against space and time collocated Aerosol Robotic Network measured AOD values over multiple stations representing major aerosol episodes and regimes. OMAERUV's performance is also evaluated with respect to those of the Aqua-MODIS Deep Blue and Terra-MISR AOD algorithms over arid and semi-arid regions in Northern Africa. The outcome of the evaluation analysis indicates that in spite of the "row anomaly" problem, affecting the sensor since mid-2007, the long-term aerosol record shows remarkable sensor stability.

  2. Aerosol Spectral Radiative Forcing Efficiency from Airborne Measurements During Multiple Field Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Leblanc, S. E.; Pilewskie, P.; Redemann, J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of shortwave spectral irradiance in conjunction with measurements of aerosol optical depth are used to determine the direct aerosol radiative forcing for various different regions and missions. To better compare cases with different air masses and solar geometry, we use the concept of top-of-layer and bottom-of-layer relative forcing efficiency. The aerosol layers were sampled from aircraft during several field campaigns, including the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO, Mexico, 2006); the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS, Alaska and Alberta, 2008), Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex, California, 2010); and the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3, central US, 2012). We show that the spectral shape of the relative forcing efficiency is similar for these aerosol layers regardless of the aerosol type. The spectral relative forcing efficiency at any one wavelength for the majority of the cases is constrained within a span of 20% per unit of midvisible aerosol optical depth. Single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and surface albedo are secondary products for the various methods used to determine aerosol radiative forcing. Using these, we determine the diurnally averaged spectral and broadband top-of-atmosphere and surface radiative forcing efficiency for the various different aerosol types and surface conditions.

  3. Global Albedo

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... to one in the visible region of the solar spectrum whereas deep clean ocean water has an albedo that is close to zero. Five years of ... Atmospheric Science Data Center's  MISR Level 3 Imagery  web site. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit ...

  4. Variability of Solar Radiation under Cloud-Free Skies in China: The Role of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Yun; Wang, Weiguo; Leung, L. ruby; Kaiser, Dale P.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed long-term surface global and diffuse solar radiation, aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), and relative humidity (RH) from China. Our analysis reveals that much of China experienced significant decreases in global solar radiation (GSR) and increases in diffuse solar radiation under cloud-free skies between the 1960s and 1980s. With RH and aerosol SSA being rather constant during that time period, we suggest that the increasing aerosol loading from emission of pollutants is responsible for the observed reduced GSR and increased diffuse radiation in cloud-free skies. Although pollutant emissions continue to increase after the 1980s, the increment of aerosol SSA since 1980s can partly explain the transition of GSR from a decreasing trend to no apparent trend around that time. Preliminary analysis is also provided on the potential role of RH in affecting the global and diffuse solar radiation reaching the earth surface.

  5. Aerosol Retrieval from Multiangle Multispectral Photopolarimetric Measurements: Importance of Spectral Range and Angular Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Hasekamp, O.; Van Diedenhoven, B.; Cairns, B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the importance of spectral range and angular resolution for aerosol retrieval from multiangle photopolarimetric measurements over land. For this purpose, we use an extensive set of simulated measurements for different spectral ranges and angular resolutions and subsets of real measurements of the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) carried out during the PODEX and SEAC4RS campaigns over the continental USA. Aerosol retrievals performed from RSP measurements show good agreement with ground-based AERONET measurements for aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and refractive index. Furthermore, we found that inclusion of shortwave infrared bands (1590 and/or 2250 nm) significantly improves the retrieval of AOD, SSA and coarse mode microphysical properties. However, accuracies of the retrieved aerosol properties do not improve significantly when more than five viewing angles are used in the retrieval.

  6. Steps Toward an EOS-Era Aerosol Air Mass Type Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    We still have a way to go to develop a global climatology of aerosol type from the EOS-era satellite data record that currently spans more than 12 years of observations. We have demonstrated the ability to retrieve aerosol type regionally, providing a classification based on the combined constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA) from the MISR instrument. Under good but not necessarily ideal conditions, the MISR data can distinguish three-to-five size bins, two-to-four bins in SSA, and spherical vs. non-spherical particles. However, retrieval sensitivity varies enormously with scene conditions. So, for example, there is less information about aerosol type when the mid-visible aerosol optical depth (AOD) is less that about 0.15 or 0.2.

  7. In-depth discrimination of aerosol types using multiple clustering techniques over four locations in Indo-Gangetic plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibi, Humera; Alam, Khan; Bibi, Samina

    2016-11-01

    Discrimination of aerosol types is essential over the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) because several aerosol types originate from different sources having different atmospheric impacts. In this paper, we analyzed a seasonal discrimination of aerosol types by multiple clustering techniques using AERosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) datasets for the period 2007-2013 over Karachi, Lahore, Jaipur and Kanpur. We discriminated the aerosols into three major types; dust, biomass burning and urban/industrial. The discrimination was carried out by analyzing different aerosol optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Angstrom Exponent (AE), Extinction Angstrom Exponent (EAE), Abortion Angstrom Exponent (AAE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Real Refractive Index (RRI) and their interrelationship to investigate the dominant aerosol types and to examine the variation in their seasonal distribution. The results revealed that during summer and pre-monsoon, dust aerosols were dominant while during winter and post-monsoon prevailing aerosols were biomass burning and urban industrial, and the mixed type of aerosols were present in all seasons. These types of aerosol discriminated from AERONET were in good agreement with CALIPSO (the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) measurement.

  8. Estimating aerosol light-scattering enhancement from dry aerosol optical properties at different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, Gloria; Jefferson, Anne; Sheridan, Patrick; Andrews, Elisabeth; Lyamani, Hassan; Ogren, John; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2014-05-01

    Microphysical and optical properties of aerosol particles are strongly dependent on the relative humidity (RH). Knowledge of the effect of RH on aerosol optical properties is of great importance for climate forcing calculations and for comparison of in-situ measurements with satellite and remote sensing retrievals. The scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is defined as the ratio of the scattering coefficient at a high and reference RH. Predictive capability of f(RH) for use in climate models would be enhanced if other aerosol parameters could be used as proxies to estimate hygroscopic growth. Toward this goal, we explore the relationship between aerosol light-scattering enhancement and dry aerosol optical properties such as the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) at multiple sites around the world. The measurements used in this study were conducted by the US Department of Energy at sites where different aerosol types predominate (pristine marine, polluted marine, dust dominated, agricultural and forest environments, among others). In all cases, the scattering enhancement decreases as the SSA decreases, that is, as the contribution of absorbing particles increases. On the other hand, for marine influenced environments the scattering enhancement clearly increases as the contribution of coarse particles increases (SAE decreases), evidence of the influence of hygroscopic coarse sea salt particles. For other aerosol types the relationship between f(RH) and SAE is not so straightforward. Combining all datasets, f(RH) was found to exponentially increase with SSA with a high correlation coefficient.

  9. 3D aerosol climatology over East Asia derived from CALIOP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yongbo; Sun, Xuejin; Zhang, Chuanliang; Zhang, Riwei; Li, Yan; Li, Haoran

    2017-03-01

    The seasonal mean extinction coefficient profile (ECP), single scattering albedo (SSA), and scattering phase function (SPF) derived from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) version 3 Level 2 5-km aerosol profile product (2011-2014) were compiled into a three-dimensional (3D) aerosol climatology for East Asia. The SSA and SPF were calculated as the weighted averages of the scattering properties of the CALIOP aerosol subtypes. The weights were set to the occurrence frequencies of the subtypes. The single scattering properties of each subtype were extrapolated from the volume-based size distribution and complex refractive indexes based on Mie calculations. For the high-loading episodes (aerosol optical depth ≥ 0.6), the exponential ECP structures were most frequently observed over the farmland and desert areas, along with the uplifted ECP structures over the marine and coastal areas. Besides the desert areas, high-loading episodes also occurred over areas with frequent agricultural and industry activities. Unlike the conventional half-3D aerosol climatology (vertically constant SSA and SPF), this newly generated climatology specified SSA and SPF in the full-3D space (full-3D aerosol climatology). Errors on the shortwave radiative heating rate (SW RHR) due to the half-3D aerosol climatology approximation were quantified. The SW RHR errors were around ±1 K/day, implying that the half-3D aerosol climatology should be used with caution in climate modeling. This study is among the first to generate a full-3D aerosol climatology from the CALIOP data. This full-3D aerosol climatology is potentially useful for aerosol remote sensing and climate modeling.

  10. Overview of the Megacity Aerosol Experiment: Mexico City (MAX-Mex)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols can play an important role the radiative balance of the globe. This is due to their ability to scatter and absorb solar radiation. The sign of this forcing will depend on their chemical composition and size, their lifetimes, and position in the atmosphere. Major sources of aerosols are now coming from megacities: Cities with more than 10 million population. As part of the MILAGRO campaign, the Megacity Aerosol Experiment: Mexico City was conducted by the Atmospheric Science Program of the Climate Change Research Division of the Department of Energy in collaboration with the scientists supported by NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies. The preliminary results of the study will be overviewed and highlights of the efforts from both ground based and airborne measurements presented. Data from the study confirm that the megacity plumes are significant sources of both primary and secondary aerosols into the regional scale, and black carbon and secondary aerosols are contributing to single scattering albedos in the Valley of Mexico and downwind that are substantially reduced when compared to other areas (such as the eastern United States). The potential of biomass burning as well as megacity plumes contributing to a decrease in the aerosol single scattering albedos (aerosol direct effects) on regional scales will be discussed. This work was performed as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City under the support of the Atmospheric Science Program. "This researchwas supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64328.

  11. Sun photometer aerosol retrievals during SALTRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, Carlos; Torres, Benjamin; Althausen, Dietrich; Groß, Silke; Freudenthaler, Volker; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Gasteiger, Josef; Ansmann, Albert; Wiegner, Matthias; González, Ramiro; Cachorro, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE), aims at investigating the long-range transport of Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean. A large set of ground-based and airborne aerosol and meteorological instrumentation was used for this purpose during a 5-week campaign that took place during June-July 2013. Several Sun photometers were deployed at Barbados Island during this campaign. Two Cimels included in AERONET and the Sun and Sky Automatic Radiometer (SSARA) were co-located with the ground-based lidars BERTHA and POLIS. A set of optical and microphysical aerosol properties derived from Sun and Sky spectral observations (principal plane and almucantar configurations) in the range 340-1640nm are analyzed, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), volume size distribution, complex refractive index, sphericity and single scattering albedo. The Sun photometers include polarization capabilities, therefore apart from the inversion of sky radiances as it is routinely done in AERONET, polarized radiances are also inverted. Several dust events are clearly identified in the measurement period, with moderated AOD (500nm) in the range 0.3 to 0.6. The clean marine background was also observed during short periods. The retrieved aerosol properties are compared with the lidar and in-situ observations carried out within SALTRACE, as well as with data collected during the SAMUM campaigns in Morocco and Cape Verde, in order to investigate possible changes in the dust plume during the transport.

  12. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  13. Effect of reflectance model choice on earthshine-based terrestrial albedo determinations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejll, Peter; Gleisner, Hans; Flynn, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Earthshine observations can be used to determine near-hemispheric average terrestrial albedos by careful observation of the relative strength of the earthshine-lit half of the Moon coupled with correct modelling of the reflectances of Earth and Moon, as well as lunar single-scattering albedo maps. Using our own observations of the earthshine, from Mauna Loa Observatory in 2011-12, we investigate the influence of the choice of bidirectional reflectance models for the Moon on derived terrestrial albedos. We find a considerable dependence on albedo results in this choice, and discuss ways to determine what the origin of the dependence is - e.g is it in the joint choices of lunar and terrestrial BRDFs, or is the choice of terrestrial BRDF less important than the lunar one? We report on the results of modelling lunar reflectance and albedo in 6 ways and terrestrial reflectance in two ways, assuming a uniform single-scattering albedo on Earth.

  14. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering in Mexico City: Comparison With Las Vegas, NV, and Los Angeles, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Campbell, D.; Fujita, E.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol light scattering and absorption measurements were deployed in and near Mexico City in March 2006 as part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments (MIRAGE). The primary site in Mexico City was an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP). Similar campaigns were held in Las Vegas, NV in January-February, 2003; and Los Angeles, CA at numerous sites during all seasons from 2003 through 2007. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions. The photoacoustic instrument (PAS) used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In Mexico City the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 20 and 180 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed probably as a consequence of secondary aerosol formation. We will present the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site and compare with Las Vegas diurnal variation. Mexico City 'breaths' more during the course of the day than Las Vegas, Nevada in part because the latitude of Mexico City resulted in more direct solar radiation. Further insight on the meteorological connections and population dynamics will be discussed.

  15. Evidence of a Weakly Absorbing Intermediate Mode of Aerosols in AERONET Data from Saharan and Sahelian Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianelli, Scott M.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Carlson, Barbara E.; Hameed, Sultan

    2013-01-01

    Accurate retrievals of aerosol size distribution are necessary to estimate aerosols' impact on climate and human health. The inversions of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) usually retrieve bimodal distributions. However, when the inversion is applied to Saharan and Sahelian dust, an additional mode of intermediate size between the coarse and fine modes is sometimes seen. This mode explains peculiarities in the behavior of the Angstrom exponent, along with the fine mode fraction retrieved using the spectral deconvolution algorithm, observed in a March 2006 dust storm. For this study, 15 AERONET sites in northern Africa and on the Atlantic are examined to determine the frequency and properties of the intermediate mode. The mode is observed most frequently at Ilorin in Nigeria. It is also observed at Capo Verde and multiple sites located within the Sahel but much less frequently at sites in the northern Sahara and the Canary Islands. The presence of the intermediate mode coincides with increases in Angstrom exponent, fine mode fraction, single-scattering albedo, and to a lesser extent percent sphericity. The Angstrom exponent decreases with increasing optical depth at most sites when the intermediate mode is present, but the fine mode fraction does not. Single-scattering albedo does not steadily decrease with fine mode fraction when the intermediate mode is present, as it does in typical mixtures of dust and biomass-burning aerosols. Continued investigation is needed to further define the intermediate mode's properties, determine why it differs from most Saharan dust, and identify its climate and health effects.

  16. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  17. Steps Toward an EOS-Era Aerosol Type Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    We still have a way to go to develop a global climatology of aerosol type from the EOS-era satellite data record that currently spans more than 12 years of observations. We have demonstrated the ability to retrieve aerosol type regionally, providing a classification based on the combined constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA) from the MISR instrument. Under good but not necessarily ideal conditions, the MISR data can distinguish three-to-five size bins, two-to-four bins in SSA, and spherical vs. non-spherical particles. However, retrieval sensitivity varies enormously with scene conditions. So, for example, there is less information about aerosol type when the mid-visible aerosol optical depth (AOD) is less that about 0.15 or 0.2, or when the range of scattering angles observed is reduced by solar geometry, even though the quality of the AOD retrieval itself is much less sensitive to these factors. This presentation will review a series of studies aimed at assessing the capabilities, as well as the limitations, of MISR aerosol type retrievals involving wildfire smoke, desert dust, volcanic ash, and urban pollution, in specific cases where suborbital validation data are available. A synthesis of results, planned upgrades to the MISR Standard aerosol algorithm to improve aerosol type retrievals, and steps toward the development of an aerosol type quality flag for the Standard product, will also be covered.

  18. Impact of Aerosols on Photolysis Frequencies during CALNEX-LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Stutz, J.

    2010-12-01

    The transmission of solar UV radiation through the atmosphere is impacted by the presence of aerosols. Aerosol composition, size, shape, and single scattering albedo influence the intensity of actinic flux. Changes in photolysis rates directly affect the photochemical ozone production and loss. Measurements of photolysis frequencies were made at the Caltech campus (altitude 0.264 km) and at JPL’s CLARS Observatory at Mount Wilson (altitude 1.74 km) during the summer of 2010 as part of the CALNEX-LA campaign. Of particular interest are the periods when aerosol optical depth is high (greater than 0.2 at 340 nm). During these times, jNO2 photolysis rates were approximately 10 percent lower at CalTech with respect to Mount Wilson. The NCAR Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiation model was used to calculate actinic flux and photolysis frequencies in cloud and aerosol free conditions, as well as with the default urban aerosol profile. Neither of these TUV simulations accurately described the photolysis frequency observations at Caltech. This highlights the importance of correctly paramaterizing aerosol optical properties in radiative transfer models. This error has a significant impact on photochemical ozone production in air quality forecasts. Comparison of TUV j-values at Mount Wilson with standard aerosol profiles shows how well the model performs in an environment with lower aerosol optical depth.

  19. Stratospheric aerosol forcing for climate modeling: 1850-1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfeuille, Florian; Luo, Beiping; Thomason, Larry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present here a stratospheric aerosol dataset produced using the available aerosol optical depth observations from the pre-satellite period. The scarce atmospheric observations are supplemented by additional information from an aerosol microphysical model, initialized by ice-core derived sulfur emissions. The model is used to derive extinctions at all altitudes, latitudes and times when sulfur injections are known for specific volcanic eruptions. The simulated extinction coefficients are then scaled to match the observed optical depths. In order to produce the complete optical properties at all wavelengths (and the aerosol surface area and volume densities) needed by climate models, we assume a lognormal size distribution of the aerosols. Correlations between the extinctions in the visible and the effective radius and distribution width parameters are taken from the better constrained SAGE II period. The aerosol number densities are then fitted to match the derived extinctions in the 1850-1978 period. From these aerosol size distributions, we then calculate extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors at all wavelengths using the Mie theory. The aerosol surface area densities and volume densities are also provided.

  20. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with

  1. Spatial Variability of AERONET Aerosol Optical Properties and Satellite Data in South Korea during NASA DRAGON-Asia Campaign.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Joo; Son, Youn-Suk

    2016-04-05

    We investigated spatial variability in aerosol optical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), and single scattering albedo (SSA), observed at 21 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and satellite remote sensing data in South Korea during the spring of 2012. These dense AERONET networks established in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign enabled us to examine the spatially detailed aerosol size distribution and composition as well as aerosol levels. The springtime particle air quality was characterized by high background aerosol levels and high contributions of coarse-mode aerosols to total aerosols. We found that between-site correlations and coefficient of divergence for AOD and FMF strongly relied on the distance between sites, particularly in the south-north direction. Higher AOD was related to higher population density and lower distance from highways, and the aerosol size distribution and composition reflected source-specific characteristics. The ratios of satellite NO2 to AOD, which indicate the relative contributions of local combustion sources to aerosol levels, represented higher local contributions in metropolitan Seoul and Pusan. Our study demonstrates that the aerosol levels were determined by both local and regional pollution and that the relative contributions of these pollutions to aerosols generated spatial heterogeneity in the particle air quality.

  2. Impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on the direct aerosol radiative effect in summer on North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y.; Zhao, C. S.; Tao, J. C.; Bian, Y. X.; Ma, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, relative humidity (RH) profiles and their impacts on the vertical variations of aerosol optical properties and the direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) have been investigated based on surface measurements from the Haze in China campaign and sounding data from the North China Plain. Among the profiles obtained from July to September in 2008, about half have RHs greater than 80% within the mixed layer. The vertical variations in the aerosol optical properties at ambient RH, including the extinction coefficient (σext), single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (g), are remarkably different from the variations in the dry aerosols and are highly dependent on the RH profiles. Increases of the aerosol optical depth and column-averaged SSA and g due to aerosol water uptake can reach up to 64%, 0.052 and 0.079, respectively. The fractional contribution to the instantaneous DARE at the top of the atmosphere due to aerosol hygroscopic growth reaches 60% in high RH profiles. DARE estimates can be significantly biased if the RH dependence of SSA or g is not considered. We suggest that if their vertical profiles or column-averaged values are absent, then the ambient values of SSA and g at the surface should be used rather than the values of SSA and g obtained from dry aerosols when estimating DAREs.

  3. The effects of atmospheric dust on observations of Martian surface albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Mariner 9 and Viking missions provided abundant evidence that aeolian processes are active over much of surface of Mars. A radiative transfer model was developed which allows the effects of atmospheric dust loading and variable surface albedo to be investigated. This model incorporated atmospheric dust opacity, the single scattering albedo, and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, the bidirectional; reflectance of the surface, and variable lighting and viewing geometry. The Cerberus albedo feature was examined in detail using this technique.

  4. A novel single-cavity three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer for atmospheric aerosol research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, Claudia; Ibrahim, Inas; Schleicher, Nina; Hitzenberger, Regina; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Leisner, Thomas; Schnaiter, Martin

    2016-11-01

    The spectral light-absorbing behavior of carbonaceous aerosols varies depending on the chemical composition and structure of the particles. A new single-cavity three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer was developed and characterized for measuring absorption coefficients at three wavelengths across the visible spectral range. In laboratory studies, several types of soot with different organic content were generated by a diffusion flame burner and were investigated for changes in mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) values, absorption and scattering Ångström exponents (αabs and αsca), and single scattering albedo (ω). By increasing the organic carbonaceous (OC) content of the aerosol from 50 to 90 % of the total carbonaceous mass, for 660 nm nearly no change of MAC was found with increasing OC content. In contrast, for 532 nm a significant increase, and for 445 nm a strong increase of MAC was found with increasing OC content of the aerosol. Depending on the OC content, the Ångström exponents of absorption and scattering as well as the single scattering albedo increased. These laboratory results were compared to a field study at a traffic-dominated urban site, which was also influenced by residential wood combustion. For this site a daily average value of αabs(445-660) of 1.9 was found.

  5. WRF-Chem Simulations of Aerosols and Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at different sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korean, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 um or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan due to the pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter, spring and autumn and over North China in summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. The model also captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over ocean at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5 to 30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO4 2-, NO3 - and NH4+. Positive BC RF at TOA compensates 40~50% of the TOA cooling associated with anthropogenic aerosol.

  6. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Castaneda, Rene; Owano, Thomas; Baer, Douglas S.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5 M/m). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  7. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  8. Internally Consistent MODIS Estimate of Aerosol Clear-Sky Radiative Effect Over the Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2004-01-01

    Modern satellite remote sensing, and in particular the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), offers a measurement-based pathway to estimate global aerosol radiative effects and aerosol radiative forcing. Over the Oceans, MODIS retrieves the total aerosol optical thickness, but also reports which combination of the 9 different aerosol models was used to obtain the retrieval. Each of the 9 models is characterized by a size distribution and complex refractive index, which through Mie calculations correspond to a unique set of single scattering albedo, assymetry parameter and spectral extinction for each model. The combination of these sets of optical parameters weighted by the optical thickness attributed to each model in the retrieval produces the best fit to the observed radiances at the top of the atmosphere. Thus the MODIS Ocean aerosol retrieval provides us with (1) An observed distribution of global aerosol loading, and (2) An internally-consistent, observed, distribution of aerosol optical models that when used in combination will best represent the radiances at the top of the atmosphere. We use these two observed global distributions to initialize the column climate model by Chou and Suarez to calculate the aerosol radiative effect at top of the atmosphere and the radiative efficiency of the aerosols over the global oceans. We apply the analysis to 3 years of MODIS retrievals from the Terra satellite and produce global and regional, seasonally varying, estimates of aerosol radiative effect over the clear-sky oceans.

  9. Characterization of absorbing aerosol types using ground and satellites based observations over an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibi, Samina; Alam, Khan; Chishtie, Farrukh; Bibi, Humera

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, for the first time, an effort has been made to seasonally characterize the absorbing aerosols into different types using ground and satellite based observations. For this purpose, optical properties of aerosol retrieved from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were utilized over Karachi for the period 2012 to 2014. Firstly, OMI AODabs was validated with AERONET AODabs and found to have a high degree of correlation. Then, based on this validation, characterization was conducted by analyzing aerosol Fine Mode Fraction (FMF), Angstrom Exponent (AE), Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Aerosol Index (AI) and their mutual correlation, to identify the absorbing aerosol types and also to examine the variability in seasonal distribution. The absorbing aerosols were characterized into Mostly Black Carbon (BC), Mostly Dust and Mixed BC & Dust. The results revealed that Mostly BC aerosols contributed dominantly during winter and postmonsoon whereas, Mostly Dust were dominant during summer and premonsoon. These types of absorbing aerosol were also confirmed with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) observations.

  10. Regional simulation of aerosol radiative effects and their influence on rainfall over India using WRFChem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sumita; Cherian, Ribu; Islam, Sahidul; Das, Subrata Kumar; Kaginalkar, Akshara

    2016-12-01

    A regional climate model, WRFChem has been utilized to simulate aerosol and rainfall distribution over India during July 2010 which was a normal monsoon year. Two identical simulations, one includes aerosol feedback via their direct and indirect effects and other one without any aerosol effect, are structured to understand the impact of aerosol net (direct + indirect) effect on rainfall pattern over India. Model results are accompanied by satellite and ground based observations to examine the robustness of the model simulations. It is shown that the model can reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of meteorological parameters, rainfall distribution, aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo reasonably well. Model simulated spatial distribution and magnitude of aerosol optical depth over India are realistic, particularly over northwest India, where mineral dust is a major contributor to the total aerosol loading and over Indo-Gangetic Plain region (IGP) where AOD remains high throughout the year. Net (shortwave + longwave) atmospheric heating rate is the highest (> 0.27 K day - 1) over east IGP due to abundant dust and anthropogenic aerosols while it is the lowest over peninsular India and over the Thar desert (< 0.03 K day - 1) which can be attributed to less aerosol concentration and longwave cooling, respectively. It is shown that, inclusion of aerosol direct and indirect effects have strong influence ( ± 20%) on rainfall magnitude and its distribution over Indian subcontinent during monsoon.

  11. Satellite remote sensing of aerosols generated by the Island of Nauru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bradley G.; Chylek, Petr; Porch, William M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2006-11-01

    We use imagery from the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) to search for aerosols generated by the Island of Nauru, an island located in the tropical western Pacific Ocean. Nauru frequently displays linear cloud trails for many kilometers downwind of the island, and this study was intended to investigate the presence of aerosols as an aid to understanding those features. The study had three components: (1) a search for specific aerosol plumes, (2) a comparison of downwind and upwind aerosol loading to look for asymmetries, and (3) application of matched filters to increase the visibility of aerosol plumes. The plume search resulted in the finding of three aerosol plumes, two of which are presented as imagery and also radiance profiles. The comparison of downwind and upwind reflectance spectra demonstrated that the radiance is slightly higher downwind of the island, and the residual spectra (downwind minus upwind) have a spectrum consistent with sea salt aerosol. Application of clutter-matched filters to MTI imagery accentuated the upper (near source) sections of an aerosol plume when utilizing a single-scatter albedo signature for coarse-grained sea salt aerosol. We combine our observations with models from the literature to describe a simple mechanism by which Nauru aerosols are created by wave breaking and wind tearing of sea spray and then entrained by island-influenced wind motions.

  12. AERONET-based microphysical and optical properties of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-09-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad ''families'' of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA ∼0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA ∼0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA ∼0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysical/optical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  13. Aeronet-based Microphysical and Optical Properties of Smoke-dominated Aerosol near Source Regions and Transported over Oceans, and Implications for Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad families of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA 0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA 0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savanna at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA 0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysicaloptical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  14. Characterization of Ambient Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Levy, M. E.; Zheng, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the strong absorption over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon (BC) is a key short-lived climate forcer, which contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. The impact of BC on the radiative forcing of the Earth-Atmosphere system is highly dependent of the particle properties. In this presentation, emphasis will be placed on characterizing BC containing aerosols in at the California-Mexico border to obtain a greater understanding of the atmospheric aging and properties of ambient BC aerosols. A comprehensive set of directly measured aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, hygroscopicity, volatility, and several optical properties, will be discussed to quantify the mixing state and composition of ambient particles. In Tijuana, Mexico, submicron aerosols are strongly influenced by vehicle emissions; subsequently, the BC concentration in Tijuana is considerably higher than most US cities with an average BC concentration of 2.71 × 2.65 g cm-3. BC accounts for 24.75 % × 9.44 of the total submicron concentration on average, but periodically accounts for over 50%. This high concentration of BC strongly influences many observed aerosol properties such as single scattering albedo, hygroscopicity, effective density, and volatility.

  15. Effects of snow physical parameters on spectral albedo and bidirectional reflectance of snow surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Teruo; Aoki, Tadao; Fukabori, Masashi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Fumihiko

    2000-04-01

    Observations of spectral albedo and bidirectional reflectance in the wavelength region of λ = 0.35-2.5 μm were made together with snow pit work on a flat snowfield in eastern Hokkaido, Japan. The effects of snow impurities, density, layer structure, and grain size attained by in situ and laboratory measurements were taken into account in snow models for which spectral albedos were calculated using a multiple-scattering model for the atmosphere-snow system. Comparisons of these theoretical albedos with measured ones suggest that the snow impurities were concentrated at the snow surface by dry fallout of atmospheric aerosols. The optically equivalent snow grain size was found to be of the order of a branch width of dendrites or of a dimension of narrower portion of broken crystals. This size was smaller than both the mean grain size and the effective grain size obtained from micrographs by image processing. The observational results for the bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) normalized by the radiance at the nadir showed that the anisotropic reflection was very significant in the near-infrared region, especially for λ > 1.4 μm, while the visible normalized BRDF (NBRDF) patterns were relatively flat. Comparison of this result with two kinds of theoretical NBRDFs, where one having been calculated using single-scattering parameters by Mie theory and the other using the same parameters except for Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function obtained from the same asymmetry factor as in the Mie theory, showed that the observed NBRDF agreed with the theoretical one using the HG phase function rather than with that using the Mie phase function, while the albedos calculated with both phase functions agreed well with each other.

  16. Effect of tropospheric aerosols upon atmospheric infrared cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Cess, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of tropospheric aerosols on atmospheric infrared cooling rates is investigated by the use of recent models of infrared gaseous absorption. A radiative model of the atmosphere that incorporates dust as an absorber and scatterer of infrared radiation is constructed by employing the exponential kernel approximation to the radiative transfer equation. Scattering effects are represented in terms of a single scattering albedo and an asymmetry factor. The model is applied to estimate the effect of an aerosol layer made of spherical quartz particles on the infrared cooling rate. Calculations performed for a reference wavelength of 0.55 microns show an increased greenhouse effect, where the net upward flux at the surface is reduced by 10% owing to the strongly enhanced downward emission. There is a substantial increase in the cooling rate near the surface, but the mean cooling rate throughout the lower troposphere was only 10%.

  17. Investigation of snow single scattering properties based on first order Legendre phase function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppanapelli, Lavan Kumar; Casselgren, Johan; Wåhlin, Johan; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    Angularly resolved bidirectional reflectance measurements were modelled by approximating a first order Legendre expanded phase function to retrieve single scattering properties of snow. The measurements from 10 different snow types with known density and specific surface area (SSA) were investigated. A near infrared (NIR) spectrometer was used to measure reflected light above the snow surface over the hemisphere in the wavelength region of 900-1650 nm. A solver based on discrete ordinate radiative transfer (DISORT) model was used to retrieve the estimated Legendre coefficients of the phase function and a correlation between the coefficients and physical properties of different snow types is investigated. Results of this study suggest that the first two coefficients of the first order Legendre phase function provide sufficient information about the physical properties of snow where the latter captures the anisotropic behaviour of snow and the former provides a relative estimate of the single scattering albedo of snow. The coefficients of the first order phase function were compared with the experimental data and observed that both the coefficients are in good agreement with the experimental data. These findings suggest that our approach can be applied as a qualitative tool to investigate physical properties of snow and also to classify different snow types.

  18. An exploratory study on the aerosol height retrieval from OMI measurements of the 477 nm O2 - O2 spectral band using a neural network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimot, Julien; Pepijn Veefkind, J.; Vlemmix, Tim; de Haan, Johan F.; Amiridis, Vassilis; Proestakis, Emmanouil; Marinou, Eleni; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study on the aerosol layer height (ALH) retrieval from the OMI 477 nm O2 - O2 spectral band. We have developed algorithms based on the multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network (NN) approach and applied them to 3-year (2005-2007) OMI cloud-free scenes over north-east Asia, collocated with MODIS Aqua aerosol product. In addition to the importance of aerosol altitude for climate and air quality objectives, our long-term motivation is to evaluate the possibility of retrieving ALH for potential future improvements of trace gas retrievals (e.g. NO2, HCHO, SO2) from UV-visible air quality satellite measurements over scenes including high aerosol concentrations. This study presents a first step of this long-term objective and evaluates, from a statistic point of view, an ensemble of OMI ALH retrievals over a long time period of 3 years covering a large industrialized continental region. This ALH retrieval relies on the analysis of the O2 - O2 slant column density (SCD) and requires an accurate knowledge of the aerosol optical thickness, τ. Using MODIS Aqua τ(550 nm) as a prior information, absolute seasonal differences between the LIdar climatology of vertical Aerosol Structure for space-based lidar simulation (LIVAS) and average OMI ALH, over scenes with MODIS τ(550 nm) ≥ 1. 0, are in the range of 260-800 m (assuming single scattering albedo ω0 = 0. 95) and 180-310 m (assuming ω0 = 0. 9). OMI ALH retrievals depend on the assumed aerosol single scattering albedo (sensitivity up to 660 m) and the chosen surface albedo (variation less than 200 m between OMLER and MODIS black-sky albedo). Scenes with τ ≤ 0. 5 are expected to show too large biases due to the little impact of particles on the O2 - O2 SCD changes. In addition, NN algorithms also enable aerosol optical thickness retrieval by exploring the OMI reflectance in the continuum. Comparisons with collocated MODIS Aqua show agreements between -0. 02 ± 0. 45 and -0. 18 ± 0

  19. Dominance of pollutant aerosols over an urban region and its impact on boundary layer temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Shamitaksha; Jana, Soumyajyoti; Maitra, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Collocated measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and black carbon at different wavelengths over Kolkata, an urban region in eastern India, have been used to calculate aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA). The wavelength dependence of SSA and AOD has been presented to discriminate the aerosol types over this highly populated metropolitan area. The spectral pattern shows that SSA decreases with wavelength for most of the time in a year and corresponding Ångström coefficient is greater than unity. These optical properties indicate the dominance of fine-mode pollutant particles over the city. The temperature lapse rate profile within the surface boundary layer has been found to be significantly influenced by the heating effect of fine-mode pollutants, and consequently, the growth of the convective processes in the lower troposphere is notably affected. In addition, a back trajectory analysis has also been presented to indicate that transported air masses can have significant impact on spectral pattern of SSA.

  20. An Analysis of AERONET Aerosol Absorption Properties and Classifications Representative of Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Smirnov, Alexander; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (tau) and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0) ) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption [i.e., omega (sub 0) and absorption Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub abs))] and size [i.e., extinction Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub ext)) and fine mode fraction of tau] relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to: (1) determine the average omega (sub 0) and alpha(sub abs) at each site (expanding upon previous work); (2) perform a sensitivity study on alpha(sub abs) by varying the spectral omega (sub 0); and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral omega (sub 0) averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < delta omega (sub 0) <= 0.02 decrease) than in previous work and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of alpha(sub abs) show significant overlap among aerosol type categories and at least 10% of the alpha(sub abs) retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral omega (sub 0) by +/- 0.03 induces significant alpha(sub abs) changes from the unperturbed value by at least approx. +/- 0.6 for Dust, approx. +/-0.2 for Mixed, and approx. +/-0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The omega (sub 0)440nm and alpha(sub ext) 440-870nm relationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  1. Influences of relative humidity on aerosol optical properties and aerosol radiative forcing during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Jiyoung

    In situ measurements at Gosan, South Korea, and onboard C-130 aircraft during ACE-Asia were analyzed to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. The temporal variation of aerosol chemical composition at the Gosan super-site was highly dependent on the air mass transport pathways and source region. RH in the springtime over East Asia were distributed with very high spatial and temporal variation. The RH profile onboard C-130 aircraft measurements exhibits a mixed layer height of about 2 km. Aerosol scattering coefficient ( σsp) under ambient RH was greatly enhanced as compared with that at dry RH (RH<40%). From the aerosol optical and radiative transfer modeling studies, we found that the extinction and scattering coefficients are greatly enhanced with RH. Single scattering albedo with RH is also sensitively changed in the longer wavelength. Asymmetry parameter ( g) is gradually increased with RH although g decreases with wavelength at a given RH. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and RH of 50% increased to factors 1.24, 1.51, 2.16, and 3.20 at different RH levels 70, 80, 90, and 95%, respectively. Diurnal-averaged aerosol radiative forcings for surface, TOA, and atmosphere were increased with RH because AOD was increased with RH due to hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. This result implies that the hygroscopic growth due to water-soluble or hydrophilic particles in the lower troposphere may significantly modify the magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing both at the surface and TOA. However, the diurnal-averaged radiative forcing efficiencies at the surface, TOA, and atmosphere were decreased with increasing RH. The decrease of the forcing efficiency with RH results from the fact that increasing rate of aerosol optical depth with RH is greater than the increasing rate of aerosol radiative forcing with RH.

  2. Using Retrieved Aerosol Spectral Properties to Characterize Aerosol Composition and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral dependence of aerosol properties, such as aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA), can be used to infer aerosol composition. In particular, aerosol mixtures dominated by dust absorption will have monotonically increasing SSA with wavelength while that dominated by black carbon absorption has monotonically decreasing SSA spectra. However, spectral AAOD and SSA measured in reality may differ from these extreme cases, due to the complicated composition and mixing states. In this study, we use spectral SSA and AAOD retrieved from AERONET measurements, assisted by CALIPSO aerosol type product and Mie calculations, to characterize aerosol mixtures over representative regions. Moreover, in addition to the monotonically increasing or decreasing AAOD and SSA spectra, we find the spectral dependence of these two parameters are frequently peaked (at 675 nm or 870 nm) over several places including East Asia, India, West Africa and South America. We thus suggest that SSA spectral curvature, defined as the negative of the second derivative of SSA as a function of wavelength, can provide additional information on the composition of these aerosol mixtures. Further analysis indicates that moderate mixing of black carbon with dust or organic carbon is mainly responsible for producing the SSA curvature. An optimization scheme was developed to match the observed AAOD and SSA spectra with Mie calculations assuming different aerosol composition and mixing states. Results suggest that while external mixing can explain most of the observed AAOD and SSA spectral dependence, internal mixing or core-shell mode is also likely under many circumstances, such as East Asia during winter and post-monsoon and winter seasons over India. This method offers the potential to quantitatively infer aerosol composition from these spectral measurements of aerosol optical properties.

  3. Radiative Flux Changes by Aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa over the Atlantic Ocean: Measurements and Calculations from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Hignett, P.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Chien, A.; Bergstrom, R.; Durkee, P. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the past climate and predicting climate change. To help reduce this uncertainty, the 1996 Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (TARFOX) and the 1997 second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) measured the properties and radiative effects of American, European, and African aerosols over the Atlantic. In TARFOX, radiative fluxes and microphysics of the American aerosol were measured from the UK C-130 while optical depth spectra, aerosol composition, and other properties were measured by the University of Washington C-131A and the CIRPAS Pelican. Closure studies show that the measured flux changes agree with those derived from the aerosol measurements using several modelling approaches. The best-fit midvisible single-scatter albedos (approx. 0.89 to 0.93) obtained from the TARFOX flux comparisons are in accord with values derived by independent techniques. In ACE-2 we measured optical depth and extinction spectra for both European urban-marine aerosols and free-tropospheric African dust aerosols, using sunphotometers on the R/V Vodyanitskiy and the Pelican. Preliminary values for the radiative flux sensitivities (Delta Flux / Delta Optical depth) computed for ACE-2 aerosols (boundary layer and African dust) over ocean are similar to those found in TARFOX. Combining a satellite-derived optical depth climatology with the aerosol optical model validated for flux sensitivities in TARFOX provides first-cut estimates of aerosol-induced flux changes over the Atlantic Ocean.

  4. Aerosols in the Convective Boundary Layer: Radiation Effects on the Coupled Land-Atmosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Schroter, J.; Donovan, D. P.; Krol, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the responses of the surface energy budget and the convective boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics to the presence of aerosols using a combination of observations and numerical simulations. A detailed observational dataset containing (thermo)dynamic variables observed at CESAR (Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research) and aerosol information from the European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud, Climate, and Air Quality Interactions (IMPACT/EUCAARI) campaign is employed to design numerical experiments reproducing two prototype clear-sky days characterized by: (i) a well-mixed residual layer above a ground inversion and (ii) a continuously growing CBL. A large-eddy simulation (LES) model and a mixed-layer (MXL) model, both coupled to a broadband radiative transfer code and a land-surface model, are used to study the impacts of aerosol scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation on the land-atmosphere system. We successfully validate our model results using the measurements of (thermo)dynamic variables and aerosol properties for the two different CBL prototypes studied here. Our findings indicate that in order to reproduce the observed surface energy budget and CBL dynamics, information of the vertical structure and temporal evolution of the aerosols is necessary. Given the good agreement between the LES and the MXL model results, we use the MXL model to explore the aerosol effect on the land-atmosphere system for a wide range of optical depths and single scattering albedos. Our results show that higher loads of aerosols decrease irradiance, imposing an energy restriction at the surface. Over the studied well-watered grassland, aerosols reduce the sensible heat flux more than the latent heat flux. As a result, aerosols increase the evaporative fraction. Moreover, aerosols also delay the CBL morning onset and anticipate its afternoon collapse. If also present above the CBL during the morning transition, aerosols maintain a persistent near

  5. Ultraviolet Absorption by Secondary Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are typically formed in the atmosphere by the condensation of a myriad of intermediates from the photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many of these partly oxidized molecules have functional groups (chromophores) that absorb at the ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths available in the troposphere (λ ≳ 290 nm). We used the explicit chemical model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics for Organics in the Atmosphere) to estimate UV absorption cross sections for the gaseous and particulate components of SOA from different precursors (biogenic and anthropogenic) and formed in different environments (low and high NOx, day and night). Model predictions are evaluated with laboratory and field measurements of SOA UV optical properties (esp. mass absorption coefficients and single scattering albedo), and implications are presented for surface UV radiation trends, urban actinic flux modification, and SOA lifetimes.

  6. Developments of aerosol retrieval algorithm for Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) and the retrieval accuracy test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Ahn, C.; Bhartia, P. K.; Torres, O.

    2013-12-01

    A scanning UV-Visible spectrometer, the GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) onboard the GEO-KOMPSAT2B (Geostationary Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite) is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018. The GEMS employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol optical properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). By taking the advantage, the OMI UV aerosol algorithm has provided information on the absorbing aerosol (Torres et al., 2007; Ahn et al., 2008). This study presents a UV-VIS algorithm to retrieve AOD and SSA from GEMS. The algorithm is based on the general inversion method, which uses pre-calculated look-up table with assumed aerosol properties and measurement condition. To obtain the retrieval accuracy, the error of the look-up table method occurred by the interpolation of pre-calculated radiances is estimated by using the reference dataset, and the uncertainties about aerosol type and height are evaluated. Also, the GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with measured normalized radiance from OMI, a provisional data set for GEMS measurement, and the results are compared with the values from AERONET measurements over Asia. Additionally, the method for simultaneous retrieve of the AOD and aerosol height is discussed.

  7. Study of aerosol radiative properties under different relative humidity conditions in the thermal infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. P.; Yang, P.; Nasiri, S. L.; Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    In the aerosol transport process, the optical properties of aerosol particles can vary due to humidification or mixing with other kinds of aerosols. Previous studies have shown mixing dust with other types of aerosol tends to make the aerosol more spectrally absorptive, but the degree of impact of relative humidity (RH) along the transport path is not clear. To investigate this effect, we conduct a numerical study to estimate the radiative sensitivity of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Specifically, the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) database is used, which provides the optical properties (i.e., the extinction, scattering and absorption coefficient, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and phase function) of ten types of aerosols under various relative humidity conditions. Lookup tables (LUTs) of the bidirectional reflectivity, transmissivity and effective emissivity will be computed for the ten aerosol types for input to the high-spectral-resolution radiative transfer model (HRTM). Using these LUTs, the HTRM can calculate top-of-atmospheric brightness temperatures, which we can use to determine the degree of radiative sensitivity in the infrared spectral region. Furthermore, comparisons between simulations and MODIS observations will be presented.

  8. Monitoring Aerosols from Space: What We can Say, and What We Can't

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    Aerosols are understood to play a significant role is the global energy balance, and especially on atmospheric as well as surface energy balances regionally. A combination of direct radiative cooling of the surface, atmospheric warming through diabatic heating, and indirect effects of aerosol on clouds are all thought to contribute to the net aerosol effect, though the magnitudes of each are both highly variable in space and time, and highly uncertain. Passive space-based remote sensing is a key tool for constraining these effects, due to the frequent, global coverage satellites can provide. However, information from such observations about total-column aerosol amount (i.e., aerosol optical depth or AOD), and especially about aerosol type, is limited. The current generation of passive aerosol remote-sensing instruments, including the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) offer vast improvements over previous instruments, including AOD over water and much of the land surface, fine vs. coarse particle type over ocean from MODIS, and discrimination of about a dozen aerosol types from MISR under good retrieval conditions, based on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA) constraints. This presentation will summarize the capabilities and expected improvements in the currently available aerosol products, in light of required energy budget constraints. Ways of addressing the need for detailed information about particle microphysical properties, especially SSA, unobtainable from MISR or MODIS, will be discussed.

  9. Easy Volcanic Aerosol (EVA v1.0): an idealized forcing generator for climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, Matthew; Stevens, Bjorn; Schmidt, Hauke; Timmreck, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosols from volcanic eruptions have a significant impact on the Earth's climate. To include the effects of volcanic eruptions in climate model simulations, the Easy Volcanic Aerosol (EVA) forcing generator provides stratospheric aerosol optical properties as a function of time, latitude, height, and wavelength for a given input list of volcanic eruption attributes. EVA is based on a parameterized three-box model of stratospheric transport and simple scaling relationships used to derive mid-visible (550 nm) aerosol optical depth and aerosol effective radius from stratospheric sulfate mass. Precalculated look-up tables computed from Mie theory are used to produce wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction, single scattering albedo, and scattering asymmetry factor values. The structural form of EVA and the tuning of its parameters are chosen to produce best agreement with the satellite-based reconstruction of stratospheric aerosol properties following the 1991 Pinatubo eruption, and with prior millennial-timescale forcing reconstructions, including the 1815 eruption of Tambora. EVA can be used to produce volcanic forcing for climate models which is based on recent observations and physical understanding but internally self-consistent over any timescale of choice. In addition, EVA is constructed so as to allow for easy modification of different aspects of aerosol properties, in order to be used in model experiments to help advance understanding of what aspects of the volcanic aerosol are important for the climate system.

  10. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations On Aerosol-Radiation Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Flatau, P. J.; Valero, F. P. J.; Nakajima, T.; Holben, B.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergin, M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Vogelmann, A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    ACE-Asia's extensive measurements from land, ocean, air and space quantified aerosol-radiation interactions. Results from each platform type, plus satellite-suborbital combinations, include: 1. Time series of multiwavelength aerosol optical depth (ADD), Angstrom exponent (alpha), single-scattering albedo (SSA), and size distribution from AERONET radiometry at 13 stations. In China and Korea AOD and alpha were strongly anticorrelated (reflecting transient dust events); dust volume-size modes peaked near 8 microns diameter; and SSA(dust) greater than SSA(pollution). 2. Calculations and measurements of photosynthetically active radiation and aerosols in China yield 24-h average downward surface radiative forcing per AOD(500 nm) of -27 W/sq m (400-700 nm). 3. The Hawaii-Japan cruise sampled a gradient with AOD(500 nm) extremes of 0.1 and 1.1. Shipboard measurements showed that adding dust to pollution increased SSA(550 nm, 55% RH), typically from -0.91 to approx. 0.97. Downwelling 8-12 micron radiances showed aerosol effects, especially in the major April dust event, with longwave forcing estimated at -5 to 15 W/sq m. 4. Extinction profiles from airborne sunphotometry and total-direct-diffuse radiometry show wavelength dependence often varying strongly with height, reflecting layering of dust-dominated over pollution-dominated aerosols. Comparing sunphotometric extinction profiles to those from in situ measurements (number and composition vs size, or scattering and absorption) shows layer heights agree, but extinction sometimes differs. 5. Airborne solar spectral flux radiometry yields absorption spectra for layers. Combining with AOD spectra yields best-fit aerosol single scattering albedo spectra. 6. Visible, NIR and total solar fluxes combined with AOD give radiative forcing efficiencies at surface and aloft.

  11. Characteristics and radiative impact of the aerosol generated by the Canberra firestorm of January 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, R. M.; O'Brien, D. M.; Campbell, S. K.

    2006-01-01

    The extensive fires in southeastern Australia in January 2003 culminated in the Canberra firestorm of 18 January. The fires generated a pall of smoke that blanketed the Canberra area for the following week and affected the region for most of the following month. Analysis of Sun photometer data shows that aerosol optical depths τ500 > 7 were observed during the week following the firestorm. During the subsequent month the smoke aerosol dispersed, although background conditions (τ500 < 0.1) did not return until after significant rain in late February. Analysis of aerosol optical properties retrieved from sky radiance scans shows remarkably high single scattering albedo (ϖ440 ˜ 0.96) with only a small depression evident in the week following the firestorm. This indicates that the aerosols were significantly less absorbing than would be expected from smoke freshly generated by flaming combustion, possibly a result of inefficient combustion due to the extreme intensity of the fire, and marks them out as quite distinct from the more absorbing biomass burning aerosols encountered in the savannas of tropical Australia. The high single scattering albedo gave rise to mean radiative forcings of -50 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and -172 W m-2 at the surface during the week following the firestorm. Maximum heating rates are depressed by a factor of two at ϖ440 = 0.96 compared with ϖ440 = 0.88. Nevertheless, for plausible atmospheric profiles the large optical depths caused heating rates peaking at more than 10 K/day near the top of the smoke layer. The layer stabilized the lower troposphere through a combination of reduced surface heating and a positive gradient in heating rate through most of the layer. The enhanced stability suppressed surface temperatures and winds during the week following the firestorm, reducing the risk of renewed fire danger, and suggesting a useful role for aerosol effects in weather prediction models.

  12. A study of the aerosol radiative properties needed to compute direct aerosol forcing in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shaocai; Saxena, V. K.; Wenny, B. N.; Deluisi, J. J.; Yue, G. K.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.

    2000-10-01

    To assess the direct radiative forcing due to aerosols in southeastern United States where a mild cooling is under way, an accurate set of data describing the aerosol radiative properties are needed. We report here aerosol optical depth (AOD) and diffuse to-direct solar irradiance ratio (DDR) at three operational wavelengths (415, 500, 673 nm) determined by using Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) at two sites (a mountain top site: Mount Gibbes, 35.78°N, 82.29°W, 2006 m mean sea level (msl); a valley site: Black Mountain, 35.66°N, 82.38°W, 951 m msl), which are separated horizontally by 10 km and vertically by 1 km. The characteristics AOD and DDR were determined from the field measurements obtained during 1995. It was found that the representative total AOD values at 500 nm at the valley site for highly polluted (HP), marine (M) and continental (C) air masses were 0.68±0.33, 0.29±0.19, and 0.10±0.04, respectively. The fact that the ratio of the mean 1 km layer optical depth to total mean optical depth at 500 nm from the valley site was 71% indicates that the major portion of the atmospheric aerosol was located in the lowest 1 km surface boundary layer (SBL). There was a significant linear correlation between the DDR and the total AOD at both sites. A simple, fast, and operative search-graph method was used to retrieve the columnar size distribution (number concentration N effective radius reff, and geometric standard deviation σg) from the optical depth observations at the three operational wavelengths. The ground albedo, single-scattering albedo, and imaginary part of the refractive index are calculated using a mathematically unique procedure involving a Mie code and a radiative transfer code in conjunction with the retrieved aerosol size distribution, AOD, and DDR. It was found that N, reff, and σg were in the range of 1.9×10 to 1.7×104 cm-3, 0.09-0.68 μm, and 1.12-2.70, respectively. The asymmetry factor and single-scattering albedo

  13. Airborne Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Extinction and Scattering During the Aerosol IOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Ricci, K.; Provencal, R.; Schmid, B.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Arnott, P.

    2003-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300 Mm-1 with an estimated precision of 0.1 Min-1 for 1550 nm light and 0.2 Mm-1 for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects.= We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those friom a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  14. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis, Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and mineral aerosols originated in arid and semi-arid regions and transported across large distances, often above clouds. Because these aerosols absorb solar radiation, their role in the radiative transfer balance of the earth atmosphere system is especially important. The generally negative (cooling) top of the atmosphere direct effect of absorbing aerosols, may turn into warming when the light-absorbing particles are located above clouds. The actual effect depends on the aerosol load and the single scattering albedo, and on the geometric cloud fraction. In spite of its potential significance, the role of aerosols above clouds is not adequately accounted for in the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing effects due to the lack of measurements. In this paper we discuss the basis of a simple technique that uses near-UV observations to simultaneously derive the optical depth of both the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud for overcast conditions. The two-parameter retrieval method described here makes use of the UV aerosol index and reflectance measurements at 388 nm. A detailed sensitivity analysis indicates that the measured radiances depend mainly on the aerosol absorption exponent and aerosol-cloud separation. The technique was applied to above-cloud aerosol events over the Southern Atlantic Ocean yielding realistic results as indicated by indirect evaluation methods. An error analysis indicates that for typical overcast cloudy conditions and aerosol loads, the aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 54% whereas the cloud optical depth can be derived within 17% of the true value.

  15. Utilization of O4 Slant Column Density to Derive Aerosol Layer Height from a Space-Borne UV-Visible Hyperspectral Sensor: Sensitivity and Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 10(sup 40) molecules (sup 2) per centimeters(sup -5), to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nanometers, the O4 absorption band at 477 nanometers is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nanometers is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 meters for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80 percent of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 kilometer compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  16. Towards a Global Aerosol Climatology: Preliminary Trends in Tropospheric Aerosol Amounts and Corresponding Impact on Radiative Forcing between 1950 and 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegen, Ina; Koch, Dorothy; Lacis, Andrew A.; Sato, Makiko

    1999-01-01

    A global aerosol climatology is needed in the study of decadal temperature change due to natural and anthropogenic forcing of global climate change. A preliminary aerosol climatology has been developed from global transport models for a mixture of sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel burning, including also contributions from other major aerosol types such as soil dust and sea salt. The aerosol distributions change for the period of 1950 to 1990 due to changes in emissions of SO2 and carbon particles from fossil fuel burning. The optical thickness of fossil fuel derived aerosols increased by nearly a factor of 3 during this period, with particularly strong increase in eastern Asia over the whole time period. In countries where environmental laws came into effect since the early 1980s (e.g. US and western Europe), emissions and consequently aerosol optical thicknesses did not increase considerably after 1980, resulting in a shift in the global distribution pattern over this period. In addition to the optical thickness, aerosol single scattering albedos may have changed during this period due to different trends in absorbing black carbon and reflecting sulfate aerosols. However, due to the uncertainties in the emission trends, this change cannot be determined with any confidence. Radiative forcing of this aerosol distribution is calculated for several scenarios, resulting in a wide range of uncertainties for top-of-atmosphere (TOA) forcings. Uncertainties in the contribution of the strongly absorbing black carbon aerosol leads to a range in TOA forcings of ca. -0.5 to + 0.1 Wm (exp. -2), while the change in aerosol distributions between 1950 to 1990 leads to a change of -0.1 to -0.3 Wm (exp. -2), for fossil fuel derived aerosol with a "moderate" contribution of black carbon aerosol.

  17. Evaluation of biomass burning aerosols in the HadGEM3 climate model with observations from the SAMBBA field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ben T.; Haywood, James M.; Langridge, Justin M.; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Morgan, William T.; Szpek, Kate; Brooke, Jennifer K.; Marenco, Franco; Coe, Hugh; Artaxo, Paulo; Longo, Karla M.; Mulcahy, Jane P.; Mann, Graham W.; Dalvi, Mohit; Bellouin, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    We present observations of biomass burning aerosol from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) and other measurement campaigns, and use these to evaluate the representation of biomass burning aerosol properties and processes in a state-of-the-art climate model. The evaluation includes detailed comparisons with aircraft and ground data, along with remote sensing observations from MODIS and AERONET. We demonstrate several improvements to aerosol properties following the implementation of the Global Model for Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP-mode) modal aerosol scheme in the HadGEM3 climate model. This predicts the particle size distribution, composition, and optical properties, giving increased accuracy in the representation of aerosol properties and physical-chemical processes over the Coupled Large-scale Aerosol Scheme for Simulations in Climate Models (CLASSIC) bulk aerosol scheme previously used in HadGEM2. Although both models give similar regional distributions of carbonaceous aerosol mass and aerosol optical depth (AOD), GLOMAP-mode is better able to capture the observed size distribution, single scattering albedo, and Ångström exponent across different tropical biomass burning source regions. Both aerosol schemes overestimate the uptake of water compared to recent observations, CLASSIC more so than GLOMAP-mode, leading to a likely overestimation of aerosol scattering, AOD, and single scattering albedo at high relative humidity. Observed aerosol vertical distributions were well captured when biomass burning aerosol emissions were injected uniformly from the surface to 3 km. Finally, good agreement between observed and modelled AOD was gained only after scaling up GFED3 emissions by a factor of 1.6 for CLASSIC and 2.0 for GLOMAP-mode. We attribute this difference in scaling factor mainly to different assumptions for the water uptake and growth of aerosol mass during ageing via oxidation and condensation of organics. We also note that similar agreement

  18. A-Train Aerosol Observations Preliminary Comparisons with AeroCom Models and Pathways to Observationally Based All-Sky Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Russell, P.; LeBlanc, S.; Vaughan, M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Rogers, R.; Burton, S.; Torres, O.; Remer, L.; Stier, P.; Schutgens, N.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a technique for combining CALIOP aerosol backscatter, MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), and OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) retrievals for the purpose of estimating full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately for calculating the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative forcing. We present results using one year of data collected in 2007 and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. Use of the recently released MODIS Collection 6 data for aerosol optical depths derived with the dark target and deep blue algorithms has extended the coverage of the multi-sensor estimates towards higher latitudes. We compare the spatio-temporal distribution of our multi-sensor aerosol retrievals and calculations of seasonal clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing based on the aerosol retrievals to values derived from four models that participated in the latest AeroCom model intercomparison initiative. We find significant inter-model differences, in particular for the aerosol single scattering albedo, which can be evaluated using the multi-sensor A-Train retrievals. We discuss the major challenges that exist in extending our clear-sky results to all-sky conditions. On the basis of comparisons to suborbital measurements, we present some of the limitations of the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals in the presence of adjacent or underlying clouds. Strategies for meeting these challenges are discussed.

  19. Global all-sky shortwave direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols from combined satellite observations and GOCART simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wenying; Loeb, Norman G.; Schuster, Gregory L.; Chin, Mian; Rose, Fred G.

    2013-01-01

    more absorbing than those in MODIS/MATCH. Large difference in all-sky TOA DRF from these two aerosol data sets highlights the complexity in determining the all-sky DRF, since the presence of clouds amplifies the sensitivities of DRF to aerosol single-scattering albedo and aerosol vertical distribution.

  20. On the effect of different aerosol types on surface solar radiation levels over the region of Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandri, Georgia; Georgoulias, Aristeidis K.; Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Meleti, Charikleia; Balis, Dimitris

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we examine the direct effect of different aerosol types on the surface solar radiation (SSR) levels in the region of Eastern Mediterranean. Simulations with the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model were performed using ground and satellite-based data as input. An IDL tool that "feeds" SBDART with the appropriate input data was developed allowing us to simulate SSR with a time step of 1 hour. Level-2 aerosol optical depth, cloud optical depth, cloud fraction, effective droplet radius, cloud top pressure, precipitable water and surface albedo data from MODIS, as well as ozone total column data from Earth Probe TOMS and OMI satellite sensors, coarse resolution cloud data from the ISCCP and single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and Angström exponent sunphotometric data from the AERONET are used in our radiative transfer simulations. Simulations are performed over selected spots within Eastern Mediterranean for clear, liquid cloud and ice cloud covered skies and for different aerosol types (maritime, dust, anthropogenic, fine-mode natural). The optical properties of aerosols were determined using a combination of satellite, ground-based, model and reanalysis products. The aerosol direct radiative effect is defined as the difference between simulations done with and without the presence of aerosols. This research has been financed by EPAN II and PEP under the national action "Bilateral, multilateral and regional R&T cooperations" (AEROVIS Sino-Greek project).

  1. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  2. Biomass Burning Aerosol Absorption Measurements with MODIS Using the Critical Reflectance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Li; Martins, Vanderlei J.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2010-01-01

    This research uses the critical reflectance technique, a space-based remote sensing method, to measure the spatial distribution of aerosol absorption properties over land. Choosing two regions dominated by biomass burning aerosols, a series of sensitivity studies were undertaken to analyze the potential limitations of this method for the type of aerosol to be encountered in the selected study areas, and to show that the retrieved results are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the assumptions used in the retrieval of smoke aerosol. The critical reflectance technique is then applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) data to retrieve the spectral aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) in South African and South American 35 biomass burning events. The retrieved results were validated with collocated Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. One standard deviation of mean MODIS retrievals match AERONET products to within 0.03, the magnitude of the AERONET uncertainty. The overlap of the two retrievals increases to 88%, allowing for measurement variance in the MODIS retrievals as well. The ensemble average of MODIS-derived SSA for the Amazon forest station is 0.92 at 670 nm, and 0.84-0.89 for the southern African savanna stations. The critical reflectance technique allows evaluation of the spatial variability of SSA, and shows that SSA in South America exhibits higher spatial variation than in South Africa. The accuracy of the retrieved aerosol SSA from MODIS data indicates that this product can help to better understand 44 how aerosols affect the regional and global climate.

  3. Aerosol Scattering and Absorption Properties Over the Central Himalayan Location Nainital: Results from Gvax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, M. M.; Babu, S.; Nair, V. S.; Satheesh, S.; Naja, M.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive characterization of aerosols over a central Himalayan location, Nainital (29.4° N, 79.5° E, 1958 m amsl) were carried out during June 2011 to March 2012 under the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX). Owing to the highly turbid, persistent and increasing aerosol concentration over the Ganges Valley in northern India, their influence on surface dimming, mid-tropospheric warming and monsoon circulations, the experimental site Nainital is best suited for studying the regional distribution of complex aerosol sources, their transport and direct and indirect radiative forcing mechanisms. During the study period, aerosol scattering (absorption) coefficients showed values as high as > 500 Mm-1 (> 50 Mm-1) in local noon time during the onset of winter and early spring and as low as < 300 Mm-1 (< 40 Mm-1) during the summer months. Consequently, aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased in winter (< 0.9, for 45% of occurrences) with large day-to-day modulations and higher values (> 0.9, for 81% of occurrences) during summer. Based on the spectral distribution of scattering coefficients, fine mode aerosols dominate the summer compared to winter season. The strong absorption during the winter and early spring is associated with the prevalence of biomass burning aerosols and/or dust as reveal by the steep spectral dependence of absorption coefficients (αabs >2.0). These observed seasonal variations are attributed to the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer as well as the influence of long range transport over the Himalayan location.

  4. Climatological Aspects of the Optical Properties of Fine/Coarse Mode Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Sinyuk, A.; Pinker, R. T.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Chatenet, B.; Li, Z.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S.N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Dubovik O.; O'Neill, N. T.; Smirnov, A.; Wang, P.; Xia, X.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol mixtures composed of coarse mode desert dust combined with fine mode combustion generated aerosols (from fossil fuel and biomass burning sources) were investigated at three locations that are in and/or downwind of major global aerosol emission source regions. Multiyear monitoring data at Aerosol Robotic Network sites in Beijing (central eastern China), Kanpur (Indo-Gangetic Plain, northern India), and Ilorin (Nigeria, Sudanian zone of West Africa) were utilized to study the climatological characteristics of aerosol optical properties. Multiyear climatological averages of spectral single scattering albedo (SSA) versus fine mode fraction (FMF) of aerosol optical depth at 675 nm at all three sites exhibited relatively linear trends up to 50% FMF. This suggests the possibility that external linear mixing of both fine and coarse mode components (weighted by FMF) dominates the SSA variation, where the SSA of each component remains relatively constant for this range of FMF only. However, it is likely that a combination of other factors is also involved in determining the dynamics of SSA as a function of FMF, such as fine mode particles adhering to coarse mode dust. The spectral variation of the climatological averaged aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) was nearly linear in logarithmic coordinates over the wavelength range of 440-870 nm for both the Kanpur and Ilorin sites. However, at two sites in China (Beijing and Xianghe), a distinct nonlinearity in spectral AAOD in logarithmic space was observed, suggesting the possibility of anomalously strong absorption in coarse mode aerosols increasing the 870 nm AAOD.

  5. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol -Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  6. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGES

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; ...

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inmore » two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.« less

  7. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  8. Use of the NASA GEOS-5 SEAC4RS Meteorological and Aerosol Reanalysis for assessing simulated aerosol optical properties as a function of smoke age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Buchard, V.; Govindaraju, R.; Chen, G.; Hair, J. W.; Russell, P. B.; Shinozuka, Y.; Wagner, N.; Lack, D.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model, which includes an online aerosol module, provided chemical and weather forecasts during the SEAC4RS field campaign. For post-mission analysis, we have produced a high resolution (25 km) meteorological and aerosol reanalysis for the entire campaign period. In addition to the full meteorological observing system used for routine NWP, we assimilate 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from MODIS (both Aqua and Terra satellites), ground-based AERONET sun photometers, and the MISR instrument (over bright surfaces only). Daily biomass burning emissions of CO, CO2, SO2, and aerosols are derived from MODIS fire radiative power retrievals. We have also introduced novel smoke "age" tracers, which provide, for a given time, a snapshot histogram of the age of simulated smoke aerosol. Because GEOS-5 assimilates remotely sensed AOD data, it generally reproduces observed (column) AOD compared to, for example, the airborne 4-STAR instrument. Constraining AOD, however, does not imply a good representation of either the vertical profile or the aerosol microphysical properties (e.g., composition, absorption). We do find a reasonable vertical structure for aerosols is attained in the model, provided actual smoke injection heights are not much above the planetary boundary layer, as verified with observations from DIAL/HRSL aboard the DC8. The translation of the simulated aerosol microphysical properties to total column AOD, needed in the aerosol assimilation step, is based on prescribed mass extinction efficiencies that depend on wavelength, composition, and relative humidity. Here we also evaluate the performance of the simulated aerosol speciation by examining in situ retrievals of aerosol absorption/single scattering albedo and scattering growth factor (f(RH)) from the LARGE and AOP suite of instruments. Putting these comparisons in the context of smoke age as diagnosed by the model helps us to

  9. Aerosol optical properties under the condition of heavy haze over an urban site of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Che, Huizheng; Xia, Xiangao; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yaqiang; Sun, Junying; Zhang, Xiaoye; Shi, Guangyu

    2015-01-01

    In January 2013, several serious haze pollution events happened in North China. Cimel sunphotometer measurements at an urban site of Beijing (Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences-CAMS) from 1 to 30 January 2013 were used to investigate the detailed variation of aerosol optical properties. It was found that Angstrom exponents were mostly larger than 0.80 when aerosol optical depth values are higher than 0.60 at the urban region of Beijing during January 2013. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) at the urban region of Beijing can remain steady at approximately 0.40 before haze happening and then increased sharply to more than 1.50 at 500 nm with the onset of haze, which suggests that the fine-mode AOD is a factor of 20 of the coarse-mode AOD during a serious haze pollution event. The single scattering albedo was approximately 0.90 ± 0.03 at 440, 675, 870 and 1,020 nm during the haze pollution period. The single scattering albedo at 440 nm as a function of the fine-mode fraction was relatively consistent, but it was highly variable at 675, 870 and 1,020 nm. Except on January 12 and 18, all the fine-mode particle volumes were larger than those of coarse particles, which suggests that fine particles from anthropogenic activities made up most of the haze. Aerosol type classification analysis showed that the dominant aerosol types can be classified as both "mixed" and "urban/industrial (U/I) and biomass burning (BB)" categories during the heavy haze period of Beijing in January of 2013. The mixed category occurrence was about 31 %, while the U/I and BB was about 69 %.

  10. Link between aerosol optical, microphysical and chemical measurements in an underground railway station in Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.; Fortain, A.

    Measurements carried out in Paris Magenta railway station in April-May 2006 underlined a repeatable diurnal cycle of aerosol concentrations and optical properties. The average daytime PM 10 and PM 2.5 concentrations in such a confined space were approximately 5-30 times higher than those measured in Paris streets. Particles are mainly constituted of dust, with high concentrations of iron and other metals, but are also composed of black and organic carbon. Aerosol levels are linked to the rate at which rain and people pass through the station. Concentrations are also influenced by ambient air from the nearby streets through tunnel ventilation. During daytime approximately 70% of aerosol mass concentrations are governed by coarse absorbing particles with a low Angström exponent (˜0.8) and a low single-scattering albedo (˜0.7). The corresponding aerosol density is about 2 g cm -3 and their complex refractive index at 355 nm is close to 1.56-0.035 i. The high absorption properties are linked to the significant proportion of iron oxides together with black carbon in braking systems. During the night, particles are mostly submicronic, thus presenting a greater Angström exponent (˜2). The aerosol density is lower (1.8 g cm -3) and their complex refractive index presents a lower imaginary part (1.58-0.013 i), associated to a stronger single-scattering albedo (˜0.85-0.90), mostly influenced by the ambient air. For the first time we have assessed the emission (deposition) rates in an underground station for PM 10, PM 2.5 and black carbon concentrations to be 3314 ± 781(-1164 ± 160), 1186 ± 358(-401 ± 66) and 167 ± 46(-25 ± 9) μg m -2 h -1, respectively.

  11. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  12. Global All-sky Shortwave Direct Radiative Forcing of Anthropogenic Aerosols from Combined Satellite Observations and GOCART Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Schuster, G. L.; Chin, M.; Rose, F. G.

    2013-05-01

    , since the presence of clouds amplifies the sensitivities of DRF to aerosol single scattering albedo and aerosol vertical distribution.

  13. Impact of aerosols and cloud parameters on Indian summer monsoon rain at intraseasonal scale: a diagnostic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Charu; Thomas, Litty; Kumar, K. Kishore

    2017-01-01

    Aerosol and cloud parameters are known to be the influencing factors of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) variability at interannual and intraseasonal scales. In this study, we investigate the impact of remotely sensed aerosol optical depth and associated parameters (cloud fraction, cloud optical depth, cloud effective radii, cloud top pressure, and single-scattering albedo) on the individual active (break) spells of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) season. Active and break spells are identified using satellite-derived data sets over the central Indian (CI) region. The present analysis suggests that the CI region is loaded with higher aerosol concentration and that rainfall is significantly negatively correlated with aerosol optical depth (significant at 1 % significance level) over CI. Contrary to the composite-based previous studies, it has been observed that the aerosol loading and cloud properties are considerably different during the individual active and break events. For break events, composite representation shows that aerosols are stacked along the Himalayan region while all individual break events do not portray this type of aerosol dispensation. It appears from the present analysis that the aerosols may impact the intraseasonal variability of ISMR through its indirect effect by altering the cloud properties and consequently the rainfall. Therefore, aerosols are supposed to be a regional contributor in affecting the intraseasonal variability of summer monsoon rainfall.

  14. Comparision of aerosol optical properties observed over two AERONET sites of Nepal during pre-to post monsoon season of 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devkota, B. D.; Aryal, R. P.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosol optical properties (AOP) deduced from CIMEL sun photometer measurements at two AERONET sites EVK2-CNR (located at elevation 5050m,in the foot hill of Mount Everest) and Kathmandu_univ (located at elevation 1510 m, near Kathmandu city) during pre-monsoon to post-monsoon season of 2009 are compared. We present time series of key climate significant AOP such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), absorption angstrom exponent, single scattering albedo, absorption AOD, lidar ratio over these two sites. The lidar ratio (LR), single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption AOD due to the total aerosol particles (diameter (d)<10microns) were derived at 500nm using the volume size distribution and refractive index from AERONET inversion products. The variation of absorption AOD at two sites show the same nature with the lowest at monsoon period and highest at pre-monsoon season. This absorption value is higher over kathmandu_univ site than over the EVK2-CNR site by the factor of ~2 in all seasons. The retrieved absorption angstrom exponent over the EVK2-CNR site is near 1(the theoretical value for black carbon) and with low SSA value 0.55(+-0.089) during pre-monsoon period indicating presence of black carbon. We will also discuss the seasonal variability of these properties based on regional and long-range air mass sources at two sites.

  15. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measurements and the results of the first step. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of the size distribution, refractive index (real and imaginary parts), extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor. Sensitivity tests were conducted by applying the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the simulated sky radiometer and lidar data for vertical profiles of three different aerosols, continental average, transported dust, and pollution aerosols. The vertical profiles of the size distribution, extinction coefficient, and asymmetry factor were well estimated in all cases. The vertical profiles of the refractive index and single-scattering albedo of transported dust, but not those of transported pollution aerosol, were well estimated. To demonstrate the performance and validity of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, we applied the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the actual measurements at Tsukuba, Japan. The detailed vertical structures of the aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate of transported dust and smoke were investigated. Examination of the relationship between the solar heating rate and the aerosol optical properties showed that the vertical profile of the asymmetry factor played an important role in creating vertical variation in the solar heating rate. We then compared the columnar optical properties retrieved with the SKYLIDAR algorithm to those produced with the more established scheme SKYRAD.PACK, and the surface solar irradiance calculated from the SKYLIDAR

  16. The dependence of the single-scattering properties of small ice crystals on orientation average, particle shape, and wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Current methods of representing the bulk scattering properties of cirrus for numerical models and satellite retrieval algorithms require weighting the single-scattering properties of specific shapes and sizes of ice crystals by their observed concentrations. Thus, to determine the influence of cirrus on solar and infrared radiation, as required for climate studies, knowledge of the single-scattering properties of ice crystals is required. Except for a few large ice crystals, most ice crystals do not have preferred orientations. Thus, the corresponding single-scattering properties of ice crystals used for numerical models and remote sensing retrievals are typically calculated assuming random orientations. The Euler's angle, selected using a random number generator, has been exclusively used to determine crystals' orientation for such calculations. When more orientations are used to determine the mean scattering properties, the scattering properties are determined with higher accuracy. However, computational resources limit the number of orientations that can be used in these calculations. Past studies used several efficient orientation-averaging schemes (e.g., quasi-Monte-Carlo and optimal cubature on the sphere) for calculating light scattering properties. These studies mainly focused on small sizes and considered relatively simple shapes, such as spheres and sphere aggregates. Atmospheric ice crystals are non-spherical and their sizes are much larger than those studied previously. In this study, the minimum numbers of orientations needed to determine the single-scattering properties of four different realistically shaped atmospheric ice crystals (i.e., column, droxtal, Gaussian random sphere, and budding Bucky ball) with predefined accuracy levels are determined using the Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA) ver. 1.0. The results of the calculations are also used to quantify how the scattering and absorption efficiency, the single-scattering albedo

  17. Evaluation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in MIRAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Easter, Richard C.; Wagener, Richard; Nemesure, Seth; Chapman, Elaine G.; Zhang, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2001-04-01

    A variety of measurements have been used to evaluate the treatment of aerosol radiative properties and radiative impacts of aerosols simulated by the Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges (MIRAGE). The treatment of water uptake in MIRAGE agrees with laboratory measurements for the aerosol components that have been measured. The simulated frequency of relative humidity near 100% is about twice that of European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analyzed relative humidity. When the analyzed relative humidity is used to calculate aerosol water uptake in MIRAGE, the simulated aerosol optical depth agrees with most surface measurements after cloudy conditions are filtered out and differences between model and station elevations are accounted for. Simulated optical depths are low over sites in Brazil during the biomass burning season and over sites in central Canada during the wildfire season, which can be attributed to limitations in the organic and black car bon emissions data used by MIRAGE. The simulated aerosol optical depths are mostly within a factor of two of satellite estimates, but MIRAGE simulates excessively high aerosol optical depths off the east coast of the US and China, and too little dust off the coast of West Africa and in the Arabian Sea. The simulated distribution of single-scatter albedo is consistent with the available in situ surface measurements. The simulated sensitivity of radiative forcing to aerosol optical depth is consistent with estimates from measurements where available. The simulated spatial distribution of aerosol radiance is broadly consistent with estimates from satellite measurements, but with the same errors as the aerosol optical depth. The simulated direct forcing is within the uncertainty of estimates from measurements in the North Atlantic.

  18. Profiling Transboundary Aerosols over Taiwan and Assessing Their Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chou, Ming-Dah; Tsay, Si-Chee; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Hsu, N. Christina; Giles, David M.; Liu, Gin-Rong; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A synergistic process was developed to study the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties and their effects on solar heating using data retrieved from ground-based radiation measurements and radiative transfer simulations. Continuous MPLNET and AERONET observations were made at a rural site in northern Taiwan from 2005 to 2007. The aerosol vertical extinction profiles retrieved from ground-based lidar measurements were categorized into near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, representing 76% of all cases. Fine-mode (Angstrom exponent, alpha, approx.1.4) and moderate-absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo approx.0.93, asymmetry factor approx.0.73 at 440 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. The column-integrated aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (tau(sub 500nm)) ranges from 0.1 to 0.6 for the near-surface transport type, but can be doubled in the presence of upper-layer aerosol transport. We utilize aerosol radiative efficiency (ARE; the impact on solar radiation per unit change of tau(sub 500nm)) to quantify the radiative effects due to different vertical distributions of aerosols. Our results show that the ARE at the top-of-atmosphere (-23 W/ sq m) is weakly sensitive to aerosol vertical distributions confined in the lower troposphere. On the other hand, values of the ARE at the surface are -44.3, -40.6 and -39.7 W/sq m 38 for near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, respectively. Further analyses show that the impact of aerosols on the vertical profile of solar heating is larger for the near-surface transport type than that of two-layer transport type. The impacts of aerosol on the surface radiation and the solar heating profiles have implications for the stability and convection in the lower troposphere.

  19. A new method of satellite-based haze aerosol monitoring over the North China Plain and a comparison with MODIS Collection 6 aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wenzhong; Luo, Nana; Zhao, Wenji

    2016-05-01

    With worldwide urbanization, hazy weather has been increasingly frequent, especially in the North China Plain. However, haze aerosol monitoring remains a challenge. In this paper, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements were used to develop an enhanced haze aerosol retrieval algorithm (EHARA). This method can work not only on hazy days but also on normal weather days. Based on 12-year (2002-2014) Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol property data, empirical single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (AF) values were chosen to assist haze aerosol retrieval. For validation, EHARA aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, along with MODIS Collection 6 (C6) dark-pixel and deep blue aerosol products, were compared with AERONET data. The results show that the EHARA can achieve greater AOT spatial coverage under hazy conditions with a high accuracy (73% within error range) and work a higher resolution (1-km). Additionally, this paper presents a comprehensive discussion of the differences between and limitations of the EHARA and the MODIS C6 DT land algorithms.

  20. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived from Sea WiFS-Inferred Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties inferred from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) radiance measurements are used to compute the aerosol shortwave radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength of 865-nm is taken from the SeaWIFS archive. It is found that the nominal optical thickness over oceans ranges from 0.1 to 0.2. Using a maritime aerosol model and the radiances measured at the various SeaWiFS channels, the Angstrom exponent is determined to be 0.2174, the single-scattering albedo to be 0.995, and the asymmetry factor to be 0.786. The radiative transfer model has eight bands in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions and three bands in the near infrared. It includes the absorption due to aerosols, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and the scattering due to aerosols and gases (Rayleigh scattering). The radiative forcing is computed over global oceans for four months (January, April, July, and October, 1998) to represent four seasons. It is found that the aerosol radiative forcing is large and changes significantly with seasons near the continents with large-scale forest fires and desert dust. Averaged over oceans and the four months, the aerosol radiative forcing is approximately 7 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere. This large radiative forcing is expected to have a significant cooling effect on the Earth's climate as implied from simulations of a number of general circulation models.

  1. Improvement of aerosol optical depth retrieval from MODIS spectral reflectance over the global ocean using new aerosol models archived from AERONET inversion data and tri-axial ellipsoidal dust database data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Yang, P.

    2011-12-01

    New over-ocean aerosol models are developed by integrating extensive AERONET inversion data and a database of the optical properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal dust particles. These models allow more accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for high AOD cases. Spectral AOD, single scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function, which are used to calculate a lookup table (LUT), are archived by combining inversion data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun/sky radiometers and single-scattering properties from the tri-axial ellipsoidal dust database. The aerosol models are categorized from the AERONET data using the fine-mode fraction (FMF) at 550 nm and the SSA at 440 nm to resolve a variety of aerosol types throughout the globe. For each aerosol model, the changes in aerosol optical properties (AOP) are included as functions of AOD. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and MODIS for the period from 2003 to 2010 show that the new aerosol models improve correlation compared to the MODIS Collection 5 products with a Pearson coefficient of 0.93 and a regression slope of 0.99 compared to 0.92 and 0.85, respectively, for the MODIS operational algorithm. Moreover, use of the new algorithms increases the percentage of data within an expected error of ± (0.03 + 0.05 × AOD) from 62 to 64% overall and from 39 to 51% for high AOD cases (AOD > 0.3). Errors in the retrieved AOD are characterized further with respect to the Ångström exponent (AE), scattering angle (Θ), and air mass factor (AMF). Overall, the new aerosol models reduce systematic errors in AOD retrieval compared with the Collection 5 data due to realistic AOP assumptions. In particular, the scattering angle dependence of the retrieved AOD for dust cases is significantly mitigated due to improved treatment of the nonsphericity of dust particles by the new algorithm.

  2. Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, O. P.; Stap, A.; di Noia, A.; Rietjens, J.; Smit, M.; van Harten, G.; Snik, F.

    2014-12-01

    To reduce the large uncertainty on the aerosol effects on cloud formation and climate, accurate satellite measurements of aerosol optical properties (optical thickness, single scattering albedo, phase function) and microphysical properties (size distribution, refractive index, shape) are essential. Satellite instruments that perform multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements have the capability to provide these aerosol properties with sufficient accuracy. The only satellite instrument that provided a multi-year data set of multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements is the POLDER-3 instrument onboard the PARASOL microsatellite that operated between 2005-2013. PARASOL provides measurements of a ground scene under (up to) 16 viewing geometries in 9 spectral bands (3 for polarization). In order to make full use of the capability of PARASOL measurements of intensity and polarization properties of reflected light at multiple viewing angles and multiple wavelengths, we developed a retrieval algorithm that considers a continuous parameter space for aerosol microphysical properties (size distribution and refractive index) and properly accounts for land or ocean reflection by retrieving land and ocean parameters simultaneously with aerosol properties. Here, we present the key aspects of our PARASOL retrievals (inverse method, forward model, information content, cloud screening, computational aspects) as well as a validation of retrieved aerosol properties with ground-based measurements of the AERONET network. Also, we discuss required improvements for the next generation of polarimetric instruments dedicated to aerosol remote sensing and introduce a new spectropolarimetric instrument named SPEX. We will demonstrate the capabilities of SPEX based on ground based field measurements and characterization measurements in the labatory.

  3. Factors Influencing the Mesoscale Variations in Marine Stratocumulus Albedo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    aerosols can indeed modulate cloud albedo, other parameters such as sea surface temperature may similarly affect cloud albedo. Additionally, the...major role in determining planetary albedo and tend to be located along the eastern pe- ripheries of the major oceans (Warren et al., 1988). They...cloud, in cloud and from re- motely retrieved parameters all show substantial interflight vari- ability in their spatial patterns. In some flights the

  4. Characterization and source apportionment of aerosol light extinction with a coupled model of CMB-IMPROVE in Hangzhou, Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiao; Zhang, Yu-fen; Feng, Yin-chang; Zheng, Xian-jue; Jiao, Li; Hong, Sheng-mao; Shen, Jian-dong; Zhu, Tan; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the characteristics and sources of aerosol light extinction in the Yangtze River Delta of China, a campaign was carried out in Hangzhou from December 2013 to November 2014. Hourly data for air pollutants including PM2.5, SO2, NO2, O3 and CO, and aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficient and aerosol absorbing coefficient was obtained in the environmental air quality automatic monitoring station. Meteorological parameters were measured synchronously in the automated meteorology monitoring station. Additionally, around seven sets of ambient PM2.5 samples per month were collected and analyzed during the campaign. The annual mean aerosol scattering coefficient, aerosol absorbing coefficient and aerosol single scattering albedo measured in this study was 514 ± 284 Mm- 1, 35 ± 20 Mm- 1 and 94% respectively. The aerosol extinction coefficient reconstructed using the modified IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environment) formula was compared to the measured extinction coefficient. Better correlations could be found between the measured and reconstructed extinction coefficient when RH was under 90%. A coupled model of CMB (chemical mass balance) and modified IMPROVE was used to apportion the sources of aerosol light extinction in Hangzhou. Vehicle exhaust, secondary nitrate and secondary sulfate were identified as the most significant sources for aerosol light extinction, accounted for 30.2%, 24.1% and 15.8% respectively.

  5. Atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery: use of the junge power-law aerosol size distribution with variable refractive index to handle aerosol absorption.

    PubMed

    Chomko, R M; Gordon, H R

    1998-08-20

    When strongly absorbing aerosols are present in the atmosphere, the usual two-step procedure of processing ocean color data-(1) atmospheric correction to provide the water-leaving reflectance (rho(w)), followed by (2) relating rho(w) to the water constituents-fails and simultaneous estimation of the ocean and aerosol optical properties is necessary. We explore the efficacy of using a simple model of the aerosol-a Junge power-law size distribution consisting of homogeneous spheres with arbitrary refractive index-in a nonlinear optimization procedure for estimating the relevant oceanic and atmospheric parameters for case 1 waters. Using simulated test data generated from more realistic aerosol size distributions (sums of log-normally distributed components with different compositions), we show that the ocean's pigment concentration (C) can be retrieved with good accuracy in the presence of weakly or strongly absorbing aerosols. However, because of significant differences in the scattering phase functions for the test and power-law distributions, large error is possible in the estimate of the aerosol optical thickness. The positive result for C suggests that the detailed shape of the aerosol-scattering phase function is not relevant to the atmospheric correction of ocean color sensors. The relevant parameters are the aerosol single-scattering albedo and the spectral variation of the aerosol optical depth. We argue that the assumption of aerosol sphericity should not restrict the validity of the algorithm and suggest an avenue for including colored aerosols, e.g., wind-blown dust, in the procedure. A significant advantage of the new approach is that realistic multicomponent aerosol models are not required for the retrieval of C.

  6. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogren, J. A.; Ahlquist, N. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Charlson, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of stratospheric aerosols are measured using a variation on the integrating plate method. The technique is based on the decrease in the transparency of a substrate when an absorbing aerosol is deposited on it. A Lambert scatterer is placed behind the substrate to integrate forward scattered light and minimize the effect of scattering on the measurement. The low pressure in the stratosphere is used for the direct impaction of particles onto a narrow strip of opal glass. The eight samples collected had a median value of 4 x 10 to the -9th m with an uncertainty of + or - 5 x 10 to the -9th m. If this absorption is due to graphitic carbon, then its concentration is estimated at about 0.4 ng/cu m, or about 0.25% of the total aerosol mass concentration. Estimates of the aerosol scattering coefficients based on satellite extinction inversions result in an aerosol single-scattering albedo in the range of 0.96-1.0.

  7. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  8. A new approach for retrieving the UV-vis optical properties of ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important part in the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. To quantify the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions, researchers must obtain a detailed understanding of the spectrally dependent intensive and extensive optical properties of different aerosol types. Our new approach retrieves the optical coefficients and the single-scattering albedo of the total aerosol population over 300 to 650 nm wavelength, using extinction measurements from a broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer at 315 to 345 nm and 390 to 420 nm, extinction and absorption measurements at 404 nm from a photoacoustic cell coupled to a cavity ring-down spectrometer, and scattering measurements from a three-wavelength integrating nephelometer. By combining these measurements with aerosol size distribution data, we retrieved the time- and wavelength-dependent effective complex refractive index of the aerosols. Retrieval simulations and laboratory measurements of brown carbon proxies showed low absolute errors and good agreement with expected and reported values. Finally, we implemented this new broadband method to achieve continuous spectral- and time-dependent monitoring of ambient aerosol population, including, for the first time, extinction measurements using cavity-enhanced spectrometry in the 315 to 345 nm UV range, in which significant light absorption may occur.

  9. The direct radiative forcing effects of aerosols on the climate in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hui

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used to explore the influence of aerosol direct radiative effects on regional climate of California. Aerosol data is provided by the MOZART global chemistry transport model and includes sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust and sea salt. To investigate the sensitivity of aerosol radiative effects to different aerosol species and to the quantity of sulfate and dust, tests are conducted by using different combinations of aerosols and by resetting the quantity of sulfate and dust. The model results show that all the considered aerosols could have a cooling effect of one half to one degree in terms of temperature and that dust and sulfate are the most important aerosols. However, large uncertainties exist. The results suggest that the dust from MOZART is greatly overestimated over the simulation domain. The single scattering albedo (SSA) values of dust used in some global climate models are likely underestimated compared to recent studies on dust optical properties and could result in overestimating the corresponding cooling effects by approximately 0.1 degree. Large uncertainties exist in estimating the roles of different forcing factors which are causing the observed temperature change in the past century in California.

  10. Sensitivity of Multiangle Imaging to the Optical and Microphysical Properties of Biomass Burning Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David; Yau, Kevin; Seinfeld, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of biomass burning (BB) carbonaceous particles in the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Standard Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm is assessed, and algorithm refinements are suggested, based on a theoretical sensitivity analysis and comparisons with near-coincident AERONET measurements at representative BB sites. Over the natural ranges of BB aerosol microphysical and optical properties observed in past field campaigns, patterns of retrieved Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), particle size, and single scattering albedo (SSA) are evaluated. On the basis of the theoretical analysis, assuming total column AOD of 0.2, over a dark, uniform surface, MISR can distinguish two to three groups in each of size and SSA, except when the assumed atmospheric particles are significantly absorbing (mid-visible SSA approx.0.84), or of medium sizes (mean radius approx.0.13 pin); sensitivity to absorbing, medium-large size particles increases considerably when the assumed column AOD is raised to 0.5. MISR Research Aerosol Retrievals confirm the theoretical results, based on coincident AERONET inversions under BB-dominated conditions. When BB is externally mixed with dust in the atmosphere, dust optical model and surface reflection uncertainties, along with spatial variability, contribute to differences between the Research Retrievals and AERONET. These results suggest specific refinements to the MISR Standard Aerosol Algorithm complement of component particles and mixtures. They also highlight the importance for satellite aerosol retrievals of surface reflectance characterization, with accuracies that can be difficult to achieve with coupled surface-aerosol algorithms in some higher AOD situations.

  11. Optical properties and CCN activity of aerosols in a high-altitude Himalayan environment: Results from RAWEX-GVAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh; Jayachandran, V.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Satheesh, S. K.; Naja, Manish; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2015-03-01

    The seasonality and mutual dependence of aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity under varying meteorological conditions at the high-altitude Nainital site (~2 km) in the Indo-Gangetic Plains were examined using nearly year-round measurements (June 2011 to March 2012) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement mobile facility as part of the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment-Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment of the Indian Space Research Organization and the U.S. Department of Energy. The results from collocated measurements provided enhanced aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, CCN concentrations, and total condensation nuclei concentrations during the dry autumn and winter months. The CCN concentration (at a supersaturation of 0.46) was higher during the periods of high aerosol absorption (single scattering albedo (SSA) < 0.80) than during the periods of high aerosol scattering (SSA > 0.85), indicating that the aerosol composition seasonally changes and influences the CCN activity. The monthly mean CCN activation ratio (at a supersaturation of 0.46) was highest (>0.7) in late autumn (November); this finding is attributed to the contribution of biomass-burning aerosols to CCN formation at high supersaturation conditions.

  12. Aerosol optical properties over the Svalbard region of Arctic: ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2016-05-01

    In view of the increasing anthropogenic presence and influence of aerosols in the northern polar regions, long-term continuous measurements of aerosol optical parameters have been investigated over the Svalbard region of Norwegian Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, 79°N, 12°E, 8 m ASL). This study has shown a consistent enhancement in the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients during spring. The relative dominance of absorbing aerosols is more near the surface (lower single scattering albedo), compared to that at the higher altitude. This is indicative of the presence of local anthropogenic activities. In addition, long-range transported biomass burning aerosols (inferred from the spectral variation of absorption coefficient) also contribute significantly to the higher aerosol absorption in the Arctic spring. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimates from ground based Microtop sun-photometer measurements reveals that the columnar abundance of aerosols reaches the peak during spring season. Comparison of AODs between ground based and satellite remote sensing indicates that deep blue algorithm of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals over Arctic snow surfaces overestimate the columnar AOD.

  13. Analysis of aerosol absorption properties and transport over North Africa and the Middle East using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Ashraf; El-Askary, Hesham; Adetokunbo, Peter; Fuad, Abu-Tharr

    2016-11-01

    In this paper particle categorization and absorption properties were discussed to understand transport mechanisms at different geographic locations and possible radiative impacts on climate. The long-term Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data set (1999-2015) is used to estimate aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and the absorption Ångström exponent (αabs) at eight locations in North Africa and the Middle East. Average variation in SSA is calculated at four wavelengths (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm), and the relationship between aerosol absorption and physical properties is used to infer dominant aerosol types at different locations. It was found that seasonality and geographic location play a major role in identifying dominant aerosol types at each location. Analyzing aerosol characteristics among different sites using AERONET Version 2, Level 2.0 data retrievals and the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model (HYSPLIT) backward trajectories shows possible aerosol particle transport among different locations indicating the importance of understanding transport mechanisms in identifying aerosol sources.

  14. Areal Average Albedo (AREALAVEALB)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Riihimaki, Laura; Marinovici, Cristina; Kassianov, Evgueni

    2008-01-01

    he Areal Averaged Albedo VAP yields areal averaged surface spectral albedo estimates from MFRSR measurements collected under fully overcast conditions via a simple one-line equation (Barnard et al., 2008), which links cloud optical depth, normalized cloud transmittance, asymmetry parameter, and areal averaged surface albedo under fully overcast conditions.

  15. Modeling Greenland's Climate Response to the Presence of Biomass Burning Aerosols in the Atmosphere and Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, J. L.; Flanner, M.; Bergin, M. H.; Courville, Z.; Dibb, J. E.; Polashenski, C.; Soja, A. J.; Strellis, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning events are known to produce large emissions of aerosol particles, including light-absorbing black carbon (BC) and brown carbon. Once exported from fire-based source regions to the Arctic via atmospheric transport mechanisms, these particles can change the regional climate through solar absorption while suspended at various heights in the atmosphere or once deposited onto the terrain (through the reduction of surface albedo). Greenland is particularly vulnerable to positive aerosol forcing due to its perennial ice cover and high surface albedo. Surface measurements and remote sensing observations indicate that Greenland is occasionally impacted by smoke from North American and Eurasian wildfires, including during the summer of 2011 when aerosol optical depth (AOD) over central Greenland exceeded 0.20 and aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) dropped below 0.90. Measurements of impurities in snow pits also indicate that wildfires exerted transient influence on surface albedo during the summers of 2012 and 2013, with average peak BC concentrations of 4 and 15 ng/g, respectively. Here, we apply idealized climate simulations to study how Greenland surface temperature and melt are affected by elevated levels of light-absorbing particles above and on the ice sheet. We apply the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in a configuration with prescribed sea surface temperatures and active atmosphere and land model components. In one set of experiments, we prescribe constant values of AOD and SSA in the troposphere over Greenland, informed by measurements from 2011. In a second set of experiments we prescribe constant mass mixing ratios of BC and dust in surface snow based on measurements of snow that fell during 2012-2014. These simulations will inform on the amount of excess snow melt that may occur on Greenland due to biomass burning, and on the relative impacts of atmospheric and snow-deposited smoke.

  16. Climatology of aerosol optical properties near the New England coast: preparation for the Two Column Aerosol Program (TCAP) field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, C. M.; Chand, D.; Berg, L.; Kassianov, E.; Chapman, E.

    2011-12-01

    A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to provide observations with which to evaluate the uncertainty in model simulations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and their relation to estimates of aerosol radiative forcing and hence, to climate. To meet this objective, detailed ground-based aerosol measurements will be made via deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) at Cape Cod, Massachusetts for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012. These measurements will be supported by two scheduled aircraft campaigns using the ARM Aerial Facility's (AAF) G-1 aircraft and the NASA B-200 aircraft in July 2012 and again in February 2013. Each campaign will include sampling within two atmospheric columns using the aircrafts; one column will be located directly over, or very close to, Cape Cod, while the second will be over a relatively remote maritime location. This preliminary study presented here is designed to select the optimum location of the second, remote maritime atmospheric column using the mean and standard deviation of previously observed AODs from surface and space. An area with the large variability in AOD will be considered as a potential location for evaluation of the outputs from atmospheric models. In this study, we present regional climatological values of (1) AOD from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua satellite platforms; (2) single scattering albedo from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) satellite; (3) the vertical distribution of aerosol layers from the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite; and (4) the long term aerosol optical properties from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) surface sunphotometer at Martha's Vineyard, MA. Seasonal and geographical variations in these quantities will be analyzed and possible explanations will be presented based on

  17. Variability of aerosol optical depth and aerosol radiative forcing over Northwest Himalayan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheb, Shaik Darga; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, D.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the aerosol loading in India is increasing that has significant impact on the weather/climatic conditions. The present study discusses the analysis of temporal (monthly and seasonal) variation of aerosol optical depth(AOD) by the ground based observations from sun photometer and estimate the aerosol radiative forcing and heating rate over selected station Dehradun in North western Himalayas, India during 2015. The in-situ measurements data illustrate that the maximum seasonal average AOD observed during summer season AOD at 500nm ≍ 0.59+/-0.27 with an average angstrom exponent, α ≍0.86 while minimum during winter season AOD at 500nm ≍ 0.33+/-0.10 with angstrom exponent, α ≍1.18. The MODIS and MISR derived AOD was also compared with the ground measured values and are good to be in good agreement. Analysis of air mass back trajectories using HYSPLIT model reveal that the transportation of desert dust during summer months. The Optical Properties of Aerosols and clouds (OPAC) model was used to compute the aerosol optical properties like single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom coefficient (α) and Asymmetry(g) parameter for each day of measurement and they are incorporated in a Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model, i.e Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) to estimate the direct short-wave (0.25 to 4 μm) Aerosol Radiative forcing at the Surface (SUR), the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and Atmosphere (ATM). The maximum Aerosol Radiative Forcing (ARF) was observed during summer months at SUR ≍ -56.42 w/m2, at TOA ≍-21.62 w/m2 whereas in ATM ≍+34.79 w/m2 with corresponding to heating rate 1.24°C/day with in lower atmosphere.

  18. Retrieval of Aerosol information from UV measurement by using optimal estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W. V.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. D.; Moon, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    An algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and aerosol loading height is developed for GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) measurement. The GEMS is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018, and employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol information such as AOD and SSA [Torres et al., 2007; Torres et al., 2013; Ahn et al., 2014]. However, the large contribution of atmospheric scattering results in the increase of the sensitivity of the backward radiance to aerosol loading height. Thus, the assumption of aerosol loading height becomes important issue to obtain accurate result. Accordingly, this study focused on the simultaneous retrieval of aerosol loading height with AOD and SSA by utilizing the optimal estimation method. For the RTM simulation, the aerosol optical properties were analyzed from AERONET inversion data (level 2.0) at 46 AERONET sites over ASIA. Also, 2-channel inversion method is applied to estimate a priori value of the aerosol information to solve the Lavenberg Marquardt equation. The GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with OMI level-1B dataset, a provisional data for GEMS measurement, and the result is compared with OMI standard aerosol product and AERONET values. The retrieved AOD and SSA show reasonable distribution compared with OMI products, and are well correlated with the value measured from AERONET. However, retrieval uncertainty in aerosol loading height is relatively larger than other results.

  19. Atmospheric Teleconnection over Eurasia Induced by Aerosol Radiative Forcing During Boreal Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, K. M.; Chin, Mian; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, Greg K.

    2005-01-01

    The direct effects of aerosols on global and regional climate during boreal spring are investigated based on simulations using the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) finite-volume general circulation model (fvGCM) with Microphyics of clouds in Relaxed Arakawa Schubert Scheme (McRAS). The aerosol loading are prescribed from three-dimensional monthly distribution of tropospheric aerosols viz., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt from output of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor are computed as wavelength-dependent radiative forcing in the radiative transfer scheme of the fvGCM, and as a function of the aerosol loading and ambient relative humidity. We find that anomalous atmospheric heat sources induced by absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) excites a planetary scale teleconnection pattern in sea level pressure, temperature and geopotential height spanning North Africa through Eurasia to the North Pacific. Surface cooling due to direct effects of aerosols is found in the vicinity and downstream of the aerosol source regions, i.e., South Asia, East Asia, and northern and western Africa. Additionally, atmospheric heating is found in regions with large loading of dust (over Northern Africa, and Middle East), and black carbon (over South-East Asia). Paradoxically, the most pronounced feature in aerosol-induced surface temperature is an east-west dipole anomaly with strong cooling over the Caspian Sea, and warming over central and northeastern Asia, where aerosol concentration are low. Analyses of circulation anomalies show that the dipole anomaly is a part of an atmospheric teleconnection driven by atmospheric heating anomalies induced by absorbing aerosols in the source regions, but the influence was conveyed globally through barotropic energy dispersion and sustained by feedback processes

  20. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions.

  1. Inferring aerosol types over the Indo-Gangetic Basin from ground based sunphotometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Tripathi, S. N.; Dey, Sagnik; Kanawade, V. P.; Tiwari, S.

    2012-06-01

    A discrimination of aerosol types over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) region during pre-monsoon period was made using multi-year ground based sun/sky radiometer measured aerosol products associated with the size of aerosols and radiation absorptivity. High dust enriched aerosols (i.e. polluted dust, PD) were found to contribute more over the central IGB station at Kanpur (KNP, 62%) as compared to the eastern IGB station at Gandhi College (GC, 31%) whereas vice-versa was observed for polluted continental (PC) aerosols, which contain high anthropogenic and less dust aerosols. Contributions of carbonaceous particles having high absorbing (mostly black carbon, MBC) and low absorbing (mostly organic carbon, MOC) aerosols were found to be 11% and 10%, respectively at GC, which was ~ 46% and 62% higher than the observed contributions at KNP; however, very less contribution of non-absorbing (NA) aerosols was observed only at GC (2%). Variability in aerosol types together with single scattering albedo (SSA) at both the stations were also studied during the forenoon (FN) and afternoon (AN) hour, which suggests their strong association with emission sources. Results were well substantiated with the air mass back-trajectories and the fire products. Spectral information of SSA for each aerosol type discriminates the dominance of natural dust (SSA increases with increasing wavelength) with anthropogenic aerosols (SSA decreases with increasing wavelength) at both the locations. The estimated absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) values suggest relative dominance of absorbing type aerosols over the central part of IGB (due to dominant dust absorption) as compared to the eastern part during pre-monsoon period.

  2. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes During Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, K. M.; Chin, Mian

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  3. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes during Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Chin, Mian; Kim, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and.black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  4. Model analysis of influences of aerosol mixing state upon its optical properties in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Xu, Liren

    2013-07-01

    The air quality model system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality) coupled with an aerosol optical/radiative module was applied to investigate the impact of different aerosol mixing states (i.e., externally mixed, half externally and half internally mixed, and internally mixed) on radiative forcing in East Asia. The simulation results show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) generally increased when the aerosol mixing state changed from externally mixed to internally mixed, while the single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased. Therefore, the scattering and absorption properties of aerosols can be significantly affected by the change of aerosol mixing states. Comparison of simulated and observed SSAs at five AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites suggests that SSA could be better estimated by considering aerosol particles to be internally mixed. Model analysis indicates that the impact of aerosol mixing state upon aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is complex. Generally, the cooling effect of aerosols over East Asia are enhanced in the northern part of East Asia (Northern China, Korean peninsula, and the surrounding area of Japan) and are reduced in the southern part of East Asia (Sichuan Basin and Southeast China) by internal mixing process, and the variation range can reach ±5 W m-2. The analysis shows that the internal mixing between inorganic salt and dust is likely the main reason that the cooling effect strengthens. Conversely, the internal mixture of anthropogenic aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon, could obviously weaken the cooling effect.

  5. Retrieval of UV Aerosol Index using backscattered monochromatic radiance measured by GOSAT CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Park, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    UV Aerosol Index(AI) using backscattered radiance at a single channel has been retrieved. In the current UV AI algorithm, two UV channels are used to contrast the absorbing aerosol loaded atmosphere to Rayleigh scattering condition. There have been needs to retrieve information of absorbing aerosol from a single UV channel, such as GOSAT CAI. 30-day minimum composite method, however, makes the process possible to construct the condition with the use of only single UV channel. Also, absorption by aerosol changes with respect to AOD and wavelength for different aerosol types. Therefore, single channel aerosol index(SAI) can detect absorbing aerosol qualitatively. Correlation coefficient of SAI to current UV AI indicate significant value, showing possibility of detecting highly absorbing aerosols. The application of a cloud screening makes the presence of absorbing aerosols even more clear. Radiative transfer calculations using VLIDORT were performed to test the sensitivity of SAI and UV AI to aerosol optical properties, showing that highly absorbing aerosol results in meaningful SAI. Results from dust case study in East Asia show reasonable performance of SAI for the region with single scattering albedo below 0.90. This study concludes with a comparison of SAI from GOSAT lv.1b data to OMI UVAI data, where reasonable agreement and low false detection was found for dust cases in East Asia. The SAI value of -0.2 to 0.0 from GOSAT-CAI was comparable to OMI dust threshold value of 0.7. These findings corroborate the suitability of SAI as a for detecting absorbing aerosols for satellite instrument with a single UV channel.

  6. Impact of North American intense fires on aerosol optical properties measured over the European Arctic in July 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowicz, K. M.; Pakszys, P.; Ritter, C.; Zielinski, T.; Udisti, R.; Cappelletti, D.; Mazzola, M.; Shiobara, M.; Xian, P.; Zawadzka, O.; Lisok, J.; Petelski, T.; Makuch, P.; Karasiński, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper impact of intensive biomass burning (BB) in North America in July 2015, on aerosol optical and microphysical properties measured in the European Arctic, is discussed. This study was made within the framework of the Impact of Absorbing aerosols on Radiating forcing in the European Arctic project. During the BB event aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm exceeded 1.2 in Spitsbergen and 0.7 in Andenes (Norway). Angstrom exponent exceeded 1.4, while the absorbing Angstrom exponent varied between 1 and 1.25. BB aerosols were observed in humid atmosphere with a total water vapor column between 2 and 2.5 cm. In such conditions aerosols are activated and may produce clouds at different altitudes. Vertical structure of aerosol plumes over Svalbard, obtained from ceilometers and lidars, shows variability of range-corrected signal between surface and middle and upper troposphere. Aerosol backscattering coefficients show values up to 10-5 m-1 sr-1 at 532 nm. Aerosol surface observations indicate chemical composition typical for biomass burning particles and very high single scattering properties. Scattering and absorption coefficients at 530 nm were up to 130 and 15 Mm-1, respectively. Single scattering albedo at the surface varied from 0.9 to 0.94. The averaged values over the entire atmospheric column ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. Preliminary statistics of model and Sun photometer data as well as previous studies indicate that this event, in the Arctic region, must be considered extreme (such AOD was not observed in Svalbard since 2005) with a significant impact on energy budget.

  7. Influences of external vs. core-shell mixing on aerosol optical properties at various relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties of external and core-shell mixtures of aerosol species present in the atmosphere are calculated in this study for different relative humidities. Core-shell Mie calculations are performed using the values of radii, refractive indices and densities of aerosol species that act as core and shell, and the core-shell radius ratio. The single scattering albedo (SSA) is higher when the absorbing species (black carbon, BC) is the core, while for a sulfate core SSA does not vary significantly as the BC in the shell dominates the absorption. Absorption gets enhanced in core-shell mixing of absorbing and scattering aerosols when compared to their external mixture. Thus, SSA is significantly lower for a core-shell mixture than their external mixture. SSA is more sensitive to core-shell ratio than mode radius when BC is the core. The extinction coefficient, SSA and asymmetry parameter are higher for external mixing when compared to BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell), and water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) mixtures in the relative humidity range of 0 to 90%. Spectral SSA exhibits the behaviour of the species which acts as a shell in core-shell mixing. The asymmetry parameter for an external mixture of water soluble aerosol and BC is higher than BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell) mixing and increases as function of relative humidity. The asymmetry parameter for the water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) is independent of relative humidity as BC is hydrophobic. The asymmetry parameter of the core-shell mixture decreases when BC aerosols are involved in mixing, as the asymmetry parameter of BC is lower. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) of core-shell mixtures increases at a higher rate when the relative humidity exceeds 70% in continental clean and urban aerosol models, whereas AOD remains the same when the relative humidity exceeds 50% in maritime aerosol models. The SSA for continental aerosols varies for core-shell mixing of water soluble

  8. Identification of aerosol types over Indo-Gangetic Basin: implications to optical properties and associated radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, S; Srivastava, A K; Singh, A K; Singh, Sachchidanand

    2015-08-01

    The aerosols in the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB) are a mixture of sulfate, dust, black carbon, and other soluble and insoluble components. It is a challenge not only to identify these various aerosol types, but also to assess the optical and radiative implications of these components. In the present study, appropriate thresholds for fine-mode fraction and single-scattering albedo have been used to first identify the aerosol types over IGB. Four major aerosol types may be identified as polluted dust (PD), polluted continental (PC), black carbon-enriched (BCE), and organic carbon-enriched (OCE). Further, the implications of these different types of aerosols on optical properties and radiative forcing have been studied. The aerosol products derived from CIMEL sun/sky radiometer measurements, deployed under Aerosol Robotic Network program of NASA, USA were used from four different sites Karachi, Lahore, Jaipur, and Kanpur, spread over Pakistan and Northern India. PD is the most dominant aerosol type at Karachi and Jaipur, contributing more than 50% of all the aerosol types. OCE, on the other hand, contributes only about 12-15% at all the stations except at Kanpur where its contribution is ∼38%. The spectral dependence of AOD was relatively low for PD aerosol type, with the lowest AE values (<0.5); whereas, large spectral dependence in AOD was observed for the remaining aerosol types, with the highest AE values (>1.0). SSA was found to be the highest for OCE (>0.9) and the lowest for BCE (<0.9) type aerosols, with drastically different spectral variability. The direct aerosol radiative forcing at the surface and in the atmosphere was found to be the maximum at Lahore among all the four stations in the IGB.

  9. Effect of Aerosols on Surface Radiation and Air Quality in the Central American Region Estimated Using Satellite UV Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Torres, O.; Krotkov, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    Solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface is reduced by both aerosol scattering and aerosol absorption. Over many parts of the world the latter effect can be as large or larger than the former effect, and small changes in the aerosol single scattering albedo can either cancel the former effect or enhance it. In addition, absorbing aerosols embedded in clouds can greatly reduce the amount of radiation reaching the surface by multiple scattering. Though the potential climatic effects of absorbing aerosols have received considerable attention lately, their effect on surface UV, photosynthesis, and photochemistry can be equally important for our environment and may affect human health and agricultural productivity. Absorption of all aerosols commonly found in the Earth's atmosphere becomes larger in the UV and blue wavelengths and has a relatively strong wavelength dependence. This is particularly true of mineral dust and organic aerosols. However, these effects have been very difficult to estimate on a global basis since the satellite instruments that operate in the visible are primarily sensitive to aerosol scattering. A notable exception is the UV Aerosol Index (AI), first produced using NASA's Nimbus-7 TOMS data. AI provides a direct measure of the effect of aerosol absorption on the backscattered UV radiation in both clear and cloudy conditions, as well as over snow/ice. Although many types of aerosols produce a distinct color cast in the visible images, and aerosols absorption over clouds and snow/ice could, in principle be detected from their color, so far this technique has worked well only in the UV. In this talk we will discuss what we have learned from the long-term record of AI produced from TOMS and Aura/OMI about the possible role of aerosols on surface radiation and air quality in the Central American region.

  10. Detection of a gas flaring signature in the AERONET optical properties of aerosols at a tropical station in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawole, Olusegun G.; Cai, Xiaoming; Levine, James G.; Pinker, Rachel T.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    The West African region, with its peculiar climate and atmospheric dynamics, is a prominent source of aerosols. Reliable and long-term in situ measurements of aerosol properties are not readily available across the region. In this study, Version 2 Level 1.5 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data were used to study the absorption and size distribution properties of aerosols from dominant sources identified by trajectory analysis. The trajectory analysis was used to define four sources of aerosols over a 10 year period. Sorting the AERONET aerosol retrievals by these putative sources, the hypothesis that there exists an optically distinct gas flaring signal was tested. Dominance of each source cluster varies with season: desert-dust (DD) and biomass burning (BB) aerosols are dominant in months prior to the West African Monsoon (WAM); urban (UB) and gas flaring (GF) aerosol are dominant during the WAM months. BB aerosol, with single scattering albedo (SSA) at 675 nm value of 0.86 ± 0.03 and GF aerosol with SSA (675 nm) value of 0.9 ± 0.07, is the most absorbing of the aerosol categories. The range of Absorption Angstr&öm Exponent (AAE) for DD, BB, UB and GF classes are 1.99 ± 0.35, 1.45 ± 0.26, 1.21 ± 0.38 and 0.98 ± 0.25, respectively, indicating different aerosol composition for each source. The AAE (440-870 nm) and Angstr&öm Exponent (AE) (440-870 nm) relationships further show the spread and overlap of the variation of these optical and microphysical properties, presumably due in part to similarity in the sources of aerosols and in part, due to mixing of air parcels from different sources en route to the measurement site.

  11. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, Elina; van Zyl, Pieter G.; Müller, Detlef; Balis, Dimitris; Komppula, Mika

    2016-07-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type are available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol properties, i.e. effective radius and single-scattering albedo, were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the lidar ratio at 532 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr, 41 ± 13 sr, 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively, for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr, 75 ± 14 sr, 3.2 ± 1.3 % and 1.7 ± 0.3, respectively, for biomass burning aerosol layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 µm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed aerosols, respectively, while the single-scattering albedo at 532 nm was 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532

  12. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, E.; van Zyl, P. G.; Müller, D.; Balis, D.; Komppula, M.

    2015-12-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type is available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol proper ties, i.e. effective radius and single scattering, albedo were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr; 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr; 3.2 ± 1.3 %; 2.0 ± 0.4 respectively for biomass burning aerosols layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 μm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed biomass burning and desert dust aerosols, respectively, while the single scattering albedo at 532 nm were 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532 nm), respectively for

  13. Retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties from AERONET photopolarimetric measurements: 1. Information content analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper is the first part of a two-part study that aims to retrieve aerosol particle size distribution (PSD) and refractive index from the multispectral and multiangular polarimetric measurements taken by the new-generation Sun photometer as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). It provides theoretical analysis and guidance to the companion study in which we have developed an inversion algorithm for retrieving 22 aerosol microphysical parameters associated with a bimodal PSD function from real AERONET measurements. Our theoretical analysis starts with generating the synthetic measurements at four spectral bands (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm) with a Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model for various types of spherical aerosol particles. Subsequently, the quantitative information content for retrieving aerosol parameters is investigated in four observation scenarios, i.e., I1, I2, P1, and P2. Measurements in the scenario (I1) comprise the solar direct radiances and almucantar radiances that are used in the current AERONET operational inversion algorithm. The other three scenarios include different additional measurements: (I2) the solar principal plane radiances, (P1) the solar principal plane radiances and polarization, and (P2) the solar almucantar polarization. Results indicate that adding polarization measurements can increase the degree of freedom for signal by 2-5 in the scenario P1, while not as much of an increase is found in the scenarios I2 and P2. Correspondingly, smallest retrieval errors are found in the scenario P1: 2.3% (2.9%) for the fine-mode (coarse-mode) aerosol volume concentration, 1.3% (3.5%) for the effective radius, 7.2% (12%) for the effective variance, 0.005 (0.035) for the real-part refractive index, and 0.019 (0.068) for the single-scattering albedo. These errors represent a reduction from their counterparts in scenario I1 of 79% (57%), 76% (49%), 69% (52%), 66% (46%), and 49% (20%), respectively. We further

  14. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  15. A comprehensive climatology of Arctic aerosol properties on the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, Jessie; de Boer, Gijs; Shupe, Matthew; McComiskey, Allison

    2016-04-01

    type supporting the highest single scattering albedos. This complete set of aerosol properties can be used to improve our knowledge of the sources of aerosols found in the Arctic.

  16. The Multi-Dimensional Challenge of Validating Remote-Sensing Aerosol-Type Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R. A.; Gaitley, B. J.; Limbacher, J.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol type is required globally for climate-forcing calculations, constraining aerosol transport models, and other applications. However, validating satellite aerosol type retrievals is much more challenging than testing AOD results, because aerosol type is a more complex quantity, and ground-truth data are far less numerous and generally not as robust. We employ a combination of assessment relative to climatological expectation, statistical comparisons with surface-based observations, and near-coincident field campaign measurements, to evaluate MISR aerosol-type retrieval results. Although the retrievals are not constrained by a priori expectations, there is general regional coherence in the dominant retrieved aerosol types, indicating consistency in the retrieval process. Comparisons with expectation, on a regional, seasonal basis, demonstrate qualitative consistency with regard to particle size (three-to-five bins), shape (spherical vs. non-spherical), and single-scattering albedo (SSA; two-to-four bins) when mid-visible AOD exceeds about 0.15 or 0.2. Statistical comparisons with surface-based sun and sky-scanning photometer retrievals provide both qualitative and quantitative illustration of retrieval sensitivity, identifying strengths and limitations of the MISR Standard Version 22 aerosol product, and pointing to specific areas where improvements could be made. Field campaign results offer the most detailed and robust aerosol-type constraints. They allow us, with the help of the MISR Research aerosol retrieval algorithm, to test the limits of the MISR data information content, which in specific cases substantially exceeds the general sensitivity. This presentation will briefly review the statistical techniques employed and summarize the key MISR aerosol-type retrieval validation results of this work.

  17. Aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties observed in the ambient atmosphere during haze pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Xie, Yisong; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao; Zhang, Ying; Li, Li; Lv, Yang; Qie, Lili; Xu, Hua

    Aerosol’s properties in the ambient atmosphere may differ significantly from sampling results due to containing of abundant water content. We performed sun-sky radiometer measurements in Beijing during 2011 and 2012 winter to obtain distribution of spectral and angular sky radiance. The measurements are then used to retrieve aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, including single scattering albedo, size distribution, complex refractive indices and aerosol component fractions identified as black carbon, brown carbon, mineral dust, ammonium sulfate-like components and water content inside particle matters. We found that during winter haze condition aerosol is dominated by fine particles with center radius of about 0.2 micron. Fine particles contribute about 93% to total aerosol extinction of solar light, and result in serious decrease of atmospheric visibility during haze condition. The percentage of light absorption of haze aerosol can up to about 10% among its total extinction, much higher than that of unpolluted conditions, that causes significant radiative cooling effects suppressing atmospheric convection and dispersion of pollutants. Moreover, the average water content occupies about one third of the ambient aerosol in volume which suggests the important effect of ambient humidity in the formation of haze pollution.

  18. Retrieval of Aerosol Profiles using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Selami; Frieß, Udo; Apituley, Arnoud; Henzing, Bas; Baars, Holger; Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Adam, Mariana; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Zieger, Paul; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a well established measurement technique to derive atmospheric trace gas profiles. Using MAX-DOAS measurements of trace gases with a known vertical profile, like the oxygen-dimer O4, it is possible to retrieve information on atmospheric aerosols. Based on the optimal estimation method, we have developed an algorithm which fits simultaneously measured O4 optical densities and relative intensities at several wavelengths and elevation angles to values simulated by a radiative transfer model. Retrieval parameters are aerosol extinction profile and optical properties such as single scattering albedo, phase function and Angström exponent. In 2008 and 2009 several intercomparison campaigns with established aerosol measurement techniques took place in Cabauw/Netherlands, Melpitz/Germany, Ispra/Italy and Leipzig/Germany, where simultaneous DOAS, lidar, Sun photometer and Nephelometer measurements were performed. Here we present results of the intercomparisons for cloud free conditions. The correlation of the aerosol optical thickness retrieved by the DOAS technique and the Sun photometer shows coefficients of determination from 0.96 to 0.98 and slopes from 0.94 to 1.07. The vertical structure of the DOAS retrieved aerosol extinction profiles compare favourably with the structures seen by the backscatter lidar. However, the vertical spatial development of the boundary layer is reproduced with a lower resolution by the DOAS technique. Strategies for the near real-time retrieval of trace gas profiles, aerosol profiles and optical properties will be discussed as well.

  19. Light Absorption of Stratospheric Aerosols: Long-Term Trend and Contribution by Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel , R. F.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of aerosol light-absorption coefficients are useful for studies of radiative transfer and heating rates. Ogren appears to have published the first light- absorption coefficients in the stratosphere in 1981, followed by Clarke in 1983 and Pueschel in 1992. Because most stratospheric soot appears to be due to aircraft operations, application of an aircraft soot aerosol emission index to projected fuel consumption suggests a threefold increase of soot loading and light absorption by 2025. Together, those four data sets indicate an increase in mid-visible light extinction at a rate of 6 % per year. This trend is similar to the increase per year of sulfuric acid aerosol and of commercial fleet size. The proportionality between stepped-up aircraft operations above the tropopause and increases in stratospheric soot and sulfuric acid aerosol implicate aircraft as a source of stratospheric pollution. Because the strongly light-absorbing soot and the predominantly light-scattering sulfuric acid aerosol increase at similar rates, however, the mid-visible stratospheric aerosol single scatter albedo is expected to remain constant and not approach a critical value of 0.98 at which stratospheric cooling could change to warming.

  20. Effective aerosol optical depth from pyranometer measurements of surface solar radiation (global radiation) at Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindfors, A. V.; Kouremeti, N.; Arola, A.; Kazadzis, S.; Bais, A. F.; Laaksonen, A.

    2013-04-01

    Pyranometer measurements of the solar surface radiation (SSR) are available at many locations worldwide, often as long time series covering several decades into the past. These data constitute a potential source of information on the atmospheric aerosol load. Here, we present a method for estimating the aerosol optical depth (AOD) using pyranometer measurements of the SSR together with total water vapor column information. The method, which is based on radiative transfer simulations, was developed and tested using recent data from Thessaloniki, Greece. The effective AOD calculated using this method was found to agree well with co-located AERONET measurements, exhibiting a correlation coefficient of 0.9 with 2/3 of the data found within ±20% or ±0.05 of the AERONET AOD. This is similar to the performance of current satellite aerosol methods. Differences in the AOD as compared to AERONET can be explained by variations in the aerosol properties of the atmosphere that are not accounted for in the idealized settings used in the radiative transfer simulations, such as variations in the single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent. Furthermore, the method is sensitive to calibration offsets between the radiative transfer simulations and the pyranometer SSR. The method provides an opportunity of extending our knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol load to locations and times not covered by dedicated aerosol measurements.

  1. Effective aerosol optical depth from pyranometer measurements of surface solar radiation (global radiation) at Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindfors, A. V.; Kouremeti, N.; Arola, A.; Kazadzis, S.; Bais, A. F.; Laaksonen, A.

    2012-12-01

    Pyranometer measurements of the solar surface radiation (SSR) are available at many locations worldwide, often as long time series covering several decades into the past. These data constitute a potential source of information on the atmospheric aerosol load. Here, we present a method for estimating the aerosol optical depth (AOD) using pyranometer measurements of the SSR together with total water vapor column information. The method, which is based on radiative transfer simulations, was developed and tested using recent data from Thessaloniki, Greece. The effective AOD calculated using this method was found to agree well with co-located AERONET measurements, exhibiting a correlation coefficient of 0.9 with 2/3 of the data found within ±20% or ±0.05 of the AERONET AOD. This is similar to the performance of current satellite aerosol methods. Differences in the AOD as compared to AERONET can be explained by variations in the aerosol properties of the atmosphere that are not accounted for in the idealized settings used in the radiative transfer simulations, such as variations in the single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent. Furthermore, the method is sensitive to calibration offsets between the radiative transfer simulations and the pyranometer SSR. The method provides an opportunity of extending our knowledge of the atmospheric aerosol load to locations and times not covered by dedicated aerosol measurements.

  2. Direct radiative effect of aerosols based on PARASOL and OMI satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Torres, Omar

    2017-02-01

    Accurate portrayal of the aerosol characteristics is crucial to determine aerosol contribution to the Earth's radiation budget. We employ novel satellite retrievals to make a new measurement-based estimate of the shortwave direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA), both over land and ocean. Global satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function from PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) are used in synergy with OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) SSA. Aerosol information is combined with land-surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function and cloud characteristics from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite products. Eventual gaps in observations are filled with the state-of-the-art global aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM2. It is found that our estimate of DREA is largely insensitive to model choice. Radiative transfer calculations show that DREA at top-of-atmosphere is -4.6 ± 1.5 W/m2 for cloud-free and -2.1 ± 0.7 W/m2 for all-sky conditions, during year 2006. These fluxes are consistent with, albeit generally less negative over ocean than, former assessments. Unlike previous studies, our estimate is constrained by retrievals of global coverage SSA, which may justify different DREA values. Remarkable consistency is found in comparison with DREA based on CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and MODIS observations.

  3. Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols Based on PARASOL and OMI Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Torres, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Accurate portrayal of the aerosol characteristics is crucial to determine aerosol contribution to the Earth's radiation budget. We employ novel satellite retrievals to make a new measurement-based estimate of the shortwave direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA), both over land and ocean. Global satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function from PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) are used in synergy with OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) SSA. Aerosol information is combined with land-surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function and cloud characteristics from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite products. Eventual gaps in observations are filled with the state-of-the-art global aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM2. It is found that our estimate of DREA is largely insensitive to model choice. Radiative transfer calculations show that DREA at top-of-atmosphere is -4.6 +/- 1.5 W/sq m for cloud-free and -2.1 +/- 0.7 W/sq m for all-sky conditions, during year 2006. These fluxes are consistent with, albeit generally less negative over ocean than, former assessments. Unlike previous studies, our estimate is constrained by retrievals of global coverage SSA, which may justify different DREA values. Remarkable consistency is found in comparison with DREA based on CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and MODIS observations.

  4. North Atlantic Aerosol Radiative Impacts Based on Satellite Measurements and Aerosol Intensive Properties from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    We estimate the impact of North Atlantic aerosols on the net short-wave flux at the tropopause by combining satellite-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) maps with model aerosol properties determined via closure analyses in TARFOX and ACE 2. We exclude African dust, primarily by restricting latitudes to 25-60 N. The analyses use in situ aerosol composition measurements and air- and ship-borne sun-photometer measurements of AOD spectra. The aerosol model yields computed flux sensitivities (dFlux/dAOD) that agree with measurements by airborne flux radiometers in TARFOX. Its midvisible single-scattering albedo is 0.9. which is in the range obtained from in situ measurements of scattering and absorption in both TARFOX and ACE 2. Combining satellite-derived AOD maps with the aerosol model yields maps of 24-hour average net radiative flux changes. For simultaneous AVHRR, radiance measurements exceeded the sunphotometer AODs by about 0.04. However. shipboard sunphotometer and AVHRR AODs agreed Within 0.02 for data acquired during satellite overflights on two other days. We discuss attempts to demonstrate column closure within the MBL by comparing shipboard sunphotometer AODs and values calculated from simultaneous shipboard in-situ aerosol size distribution measurements. These comparisons were mostly unsuccessful, but they illustrate the difficulties inherent in this type of closure analysis. Specifically, AODs derived from near-surface in-situ size distribution measurements are extremely sensitive to the assumed hygroscopic growth model that itself requires an assumption of particle composition as a function of height and size, to the radiosonde-measured relative humidity, and to the vertical profile of particle number. We investigate further the effects of hygroscopic particle growth within the MBL by using shipboard lidar aerosol backscatter profiles together with the sunphotometer AOD.

  5. The ultraviolet continuum albedo of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, W.D.; Wagener, R.; Caldwell, J.; Fricke, K.H. New York State Univ., Stony Brook York Univ., Toronto Bonn Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    A radiative transfer code explicitly treating the Raman scattering of solar protons by H{sub 2} is presently used to analyze the Uranus geometric albedo in the 2000-5000 A range. The Baines and Bergstralh (1986) baseline model used reproduces the geometric albedo peak produced by Raman scattering filling of solar absorption line cores, but is found to be excessively bright for wavelengths below 2400 A. This discrepancy is resolvable through inclusion of an absorbing stratospheric haze layer, and results are thereby obtained which are consistent with the Pollack et al. (1987) model, in which aerosols are generated stratospherically through photochemical effects on hydrocarbons. 20 refs.

  6. The influence of aerosols on photochemical smog in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, T.; Madronich, S.; Rivale, S.; Muhlia, A.; Mar, B.

    Aerosols in the Mexico City atmosphere can have a non-negligible effect on the ultraviolet radiation field and hence on the formation of photochemical smog. We used estimates of aerosol optical depths from sun photometer observations in a detailed radiative transfer model, to calculate photolysis rate coefficients ( JNO 2) for the key reaction NO 2+ hν→NO+O ( λ<430 nm). The calculated values are in good agreement with previously published measurements of JNO 2 at two sites in Mexico City: Palacio de Minerı´a (19°25'59″N, 99°07'58″W, 2233 masl), and IMP (19°28'48″N, 99°11'07″W, 2277 masl) and in Tres Marias, a town near Mexico City (19°03'N, 99°14'W, 2810 masl). In particular, the model reproduces very well the contrast between the two urban sites and the evidently much cleaner Tres Marias site. For the measurement days, reductions in surface JNO 2 by 10-30% could be attributed to the presence of aerosols, with considerable uncertainty due largely to lack of detailed data on aerosol optical properties at ultraviolet wavelengths (esp. the single scattering albedo). The potential impact of such large reductions in photolysis rates on surface ozone concentrations is illustrated with a simple zero-dimensional photochemical model.

  7. Evaluation of aerosol optical properties of GEOS-Chem over East Asia during the DRAGON-Asia 2012 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, D. S.; Park, R.; Kim, J.

    2015-12-01

    A nested version of 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem v9-01-02) is evaluated over East Asia during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia 2012 campaign period, focusing on fine-mode aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). Both are important to assess the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on climate. We compare the daily mean simulated optical properties of aerosols with the observations from DRAGON-Asia campaign for March-May, 2012 (provided in level 2.0: cloud screened and quality assured). We find that the model reproduces the observed daily variability of fAOD (R=0.67), but overestimates the magnitude by 30%, which is in general consistent with other global model comparisons from ACCMIP. However, a significant high bias in the model is found compared to the observed SSA at 440 nm, which is important for determining the sign of aerosol radiative forcing. In order to understand causes for this gap we conduct several sensitivity tests by changing source magnitudes and input parameters of aerosols, affecting the aerosol optical properties under various atmospheric conditions, which allows us to reduce the gap and to find the optimal values in the model.

  8. Modeling the spectral optical properties of ammonium sulfate and biomass burning aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.C.; Grossman, A.S.; Penner, J.E.

    1997-09-01

    The importance of including the global and regional radiative effects of aerosols in climate models has increasingly been realized. Accurate modeling of solar radiative forcing due to aerosols from anthropogenic sulfate and biomass burning emissions requires adequate spectral resolution and treatment of spatial and temporal variability. The variation of aerosol spectral optical properties with local relative humidity and dry aerosol composition must be considered. Because the cost of directly including Mie calculations within a climate model is prohibitive, parameterizations from offline calculations must be used. Starting from a log-normal size distribution of dry ammonium sulfate, we developed optical properties for tropospheric sulfate aerosol at 15 relative humidities up to 99 percent. The resulting aerosol size distributions were then used to calculate bulk optical properties at wavelengths between 0.175 {micro}m and 4 {micro}m. Finally, functional fits of optical properties were made for each of 12 wavelength bands as a function of relative humidity. Significant variations in optical properties occurred across the total solar spectrum. Relative increases in specific extinction and asymmetry factor with increasing relative humidity became larger at longer wavelengths. Significant variation in single-scattering albedo was found only in the longest near-IR band. This is also the band with the lowest albedo. A similar treatment was done for aerosols from biomass burning. In this case, size distributions were taken as having two carbonaceous size modes and a larger dust mode. The two carbonaceous modes were considered to be humidity dependent. Equilibrium size distributions and compositions were calculated for 15 relative humidities and five black carbon fractions. Mie calculations and Chandrasekhar averages of optical properties were done for each of the resulting 75 cases. Finally, fits were made for each of 12 spectral bands as functions of relative humidity

  9. Aerosol characteristics in Phimai, Thailand determined by continuous observation with a polarization sensitive Mie-Raman lidar and a sky radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Matsui, Ichiro; Jin, Yoshitaka; Khatri, Pradeep; Irie, Hitoshi; Takamura, Tamio; Aoki, Kazuma; Thana, Boossarasiri

    2015-06-01

    Distributions and optical characteristics of aerosols were continuously observed with a polarization-sensitive (532 nm), Mie-scattering (532 and 1064 nm) and Raman-scattering (607 nm) lidar and a sky radiometer in Phimai, Thailand. Polarization lidar measurements indicated that high concentration plumes of spherical aerosols considered as biomass burning smoke were often observed in the dry season. Plumes of non-spherical aerosols considered as long-range transported soil dust from Africa, the Middle East, or Northeast Asia were occasionally observed. Furthermore, low-concentration non-spherical aerosols were almost always observed in the atmospheric mixing layer. Extinction coefficient profiles of spherical aerosols and non-spherical dust exhibited different diurnal variations, and spherical aerosols including smoke were distributed in higher altitudes in the mixing layer and residual layer. The difference can be explained by hygroscopic growth of smoke particles and buoyancy of the smoke. Analysis of seasonal variations of optical properties derived from the Raman lidar and the sky radiometer confirmed that the lidar ratio, aerosol optical depth, and Angstrom exponent were higher in the dry season (October-May) and lower in the wet season (June-September). The single scattering albedo was lower in the dry season. These seasonal variations are explained by frequent biomass burning in the dry season consistent with previous studies in Southeast Asian region. At the same time, the present work confirmed that soil dust was a major aerosol component in Phimai, Thailand.

  10. An Aerosol Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratio Database Derived from the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network: Applications for Space-based Lidar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Spinhime, James D.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Holben, Brent; Tsay, Si-Chee; Bucholtz, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Backscatter lidar signals are a function of both backscatter and extinction. Hence, these lidar observations alone cannot separate the two quantities. The aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio, S, is the key parameter required to accurately retrieve extinction and optical depth from backscatter lidar observations of aerosol layers. S is commonly defined as 4*pi divided by the product of the single scatter albedo and the phase function at 180-degree scattering angle. Values of S for different aerosol types are not well known, and are even more difficult to determine when aerosols become mixed. Here we present a new lidar-sunphotometer S database derived from Observations of the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET). MPLNET is a growing worldwide network of eye-safe backscatter lidars co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Values of S for different aerosol species and geographic regions will be presented. A framework for constructing an S look-up table will be shown. Look-up tables of S are needed to calculate aerosol extinction and optical depth from space-based lidar observations in the absence of co-located AOD data. Applications for using the new S look-up table to reprocess aerosol products from NASA's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) will be discussed.

  11. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing-based retrievals of aerosol composition require known or assumed relationships between aerosol optical properties and types. Most optically-based aerosol classification schemes apply some combination of the spectral dependence of aerosol light scattering and absorption-using the absorption and either scattering or extinction Angstrom exponents (AAE, SAE and EAE), along with single-scattering albedo (SSA). These schemes can differentiate between such aerosol types as dust, biomass burning, and urban/industrial but no such studies have been conducted in the SE U.S., where a large fraction of the background aerosol is a variable mixture of biogenic SOA, sulfates, and black carbon. In addition, AERONET retrievals of SSA are often highly uncertain due to low AOD in the region during most months. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Aerosol chemistry measured at AppalAIR is representative of the background SE U.S (Link et al. 2014) Dried aerosol light absorption and dried and humidified aerosol light scattering and hemispheric backscattering at 3 visible wavelengths and 2 particle size cuts (sub-1μm and sub-10μm) are measured continuously. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to the ratio of sulfate to organic aerosol(OA), as are SSA and AAE. SAE is a less sensitive indicator of fine-mode aerosol size than hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) and is more sensitive to fine-mode aerosol

  12. Wintertime aerosol properties during foggy and nonfoggy days over urban center Delhi and their implications for shortwave radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Dilip; Jayaraman, A.; Rajesh, T. A.; Gadhavi, H.

    2006-08-01

    We present results from complimentary measurements of physical and optical properties of aerosols carried out at Delhi, as part of the Indian Space Research Organization Geosphere Biosphere Programme's Land Campaign II in December 2004. For the first time we unravel ground truth values of several radiatively important aerosol parameters such as their wavelength dependency in absorption, scattering behavior, single-scattering albedo, number size distribution, and vertical distribution in the atmosphere from this polluted megacity in south Asia. Interesting features are observed in the behavior of aerosol parameters under intermittent foggy, hazy, and clear-sky conditions prevalent during the campaign. All aerosol parameters exhibited a large distribution in their values, with variabilities being particularly higher on hazy and foggy days. The average clear-sky aerosol optical depth (AOD) value is 0.91 ± 0.48, which is higher than the AOD value reported for most other cities in India during this season of the year. Increases in AOD on hazy and foggy days are found to be spectrally nonuniform. The percentage increase in AOD at shorter wavelengths was higher on hazy days compared to clear days. Diurnally averaged BC mass concentration varied from a low of 15 μg/m3 during clear days to a high of about 65 μg/m3 on hazy days. The wavelength dependency of aerosol absorption shows signatures of the presence of a significant amount of absorbing aerosols produced from biofuel/biomass burning. Single-scattering albedo at 525 nm is found to vary between 0.6 and 0.8 with an average value of 0.68 for the entire period. Lidar observations reveal that during a fog event there is a subsidence of aerosols to an extremely dense and shallow atmospheric layer of less than 200 m height from the surface. The presence of an aerosol layer at elevated altitudes is also detected. All the results are combined and used for estimating aerosol radiative forcing using a discrete ordinate

  13. Measurements of scattering and absorption properties of surface aerosols at a semi-arid site, Anantapur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Gopal, K.; Balakrishnaiah, G.; Arafath, S. Md.; Raja Obul Reddy, K.; Siva Kumar Reddy, N.; Pavan Kumari, S.; Raghavendra Kumar, K.; Chakradhar Rao, T.; Lokeswara Reddy, T.; Reddy, R. R.; Nazeer Hussain, S.; Vasudeva Reddy, M.; Suresh Babu, S.; Mallikarjuna Reddy, P.

    2017-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties are continuously measured at a semi-arid station, Anantapur from June 2012 to May 2013 which describes the impact of surface aerosols on climate change over the region. Scattering coefficient (σsct) and absorption coefficient (σabs) are obtained from integrating Nephelometer and Aethalometer, respectively. Also, the single scattering albedo (ω0), Scattering/absorption Ångström exponents were examined during the period of study. Diurnal variations of σsct and σabs show a bi-peak pattern with two maxima and one minimum in a day. The largest values of σsct and σabs are obtained in winter while the lowest values are measured in monsoon. From the measurements σsct550 and σabs550 are found to be 110 ± 12.23 Mm- 1 and 33 ± 5.2 Mm- 1, respectively during the study period. An analysis of the ω0 suggests that there is a more absorbing fraction in the particle composition over the measurement site. The ω0 obtained in the surface boundary layer of Anantapur is below the critical value of 0.86 that determines the shift from cooling to warming. A relationship between scattering/absorption coefficients and scattering/absorption Ångström exponent and single scattering albedo is further examined. In order to understand the origins of the air masses in the study region, we performed seven-day back trajectory analyses based on the NOAA HYSPLIT model. These trajectories were computed at several altitudes (3000 m, 1500 m, and 500 m) for June 2012 and May 2013. These results put in evidence the need of efforts to reduce absorbing particles (black carbon) emissions to avoid the possible warming that would result from the reductions of the cooling aerosol only.

  14. Vertical Structure and Optical Properties of Titans Aerosols from Radiance Measurements Made Inside and Outside the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doose, Lyn R.; Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, Martin G.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2017-01-01

    Prompted by the detection of stratospheric cloud layers by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS; see Anderson, C.M., Samuelson, R.E. [2011]. Icarus 212, 762-778), we have re-examined the observations made by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) in the atmosphere of Titan together with two constraints from measurements made outside the atmosphere. No evidence of thin layers (<1 km) in the DISR image data sets is seen beyond the three previously reported layers at 21 km, 11 km, and 7 km by Karkoschka and Tomasko (Karkoschka, E., Tomasko, M.G. [2009]. Icarus 199, 442-448). On the other hand, there is evidence of a thicker layer centered at about 55 km. A rise in radiance gradients in the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS) data below 55 km indicates an increase in the volume extinction coefficient near this altitude. To fit the geometric albedo measured from outside the atmosphere the decrease in the single scattering albedo of Titan's aerosols at high altitudes, noted in earlier studies of DISR data, must continue to much higher altitudes. The altitude of Titan's limb as a function of wavelength requires that the scale height of the aerosols decrease with altitude from the 65 km value seen in the DISR observations below 140 km to the 45 km value at higher altitudes. We compared the variation of radiance with nadir angle observed in the DISR images to improve our aerosol model. Our new aerosol model fits the altitude and wavelength variations of the observations at small and intermediate nadir angles but not for large nadir angles, indicating an effect that is not reproduced by our radiative transfer model. The volume extinction profiles are modeled by continuous functions except near the enhancement level near 55 km altitude. The wavelength dependence of the extinction optical depth is similar to earlier results at wavelengths from 500 to 700 nm, but is smaller at shorter wavelengths and larger toward longer wavelengths. A Hapke

  15. Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Novakov, T.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Magi, Brian

    2002-06-17

    Particulate matter collected aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft over southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season was analyzed for total carbon, organic carbon, and black carbon contents using thermal and optical methods. Samples were collected in smoke plumes of burning savanna and in regional haze. A known artifact, produced by the adsorption of organic gases on the quartz filter substrates used to collect the particulate matter samples, comprised a significant portion of the total carbon collected. Consequently, conclusions derived from the data are greatly dependent on whether or not organic carbon concentrations are corrected for this artifact. For example, the estimated aerosol co-albedo (1 - single scattering albedo), which is a measure of aerosol absorption, of the biomass smoke samples is 60 percent larger using corrected organic carbon concentrations. Thus, the corrected data imply that the biomass smoke is 60 percent more absorbing than do the uncorrected data. The black carbon to (corrected) organic carbon mass ratio (BC/OC) of smoke plume samples (0.18/2610.06) is lower than that of samples collected in the regional haze (0.25/2610.08). The difference may be due to mixing of biomass smoke with background air characterized by a higher BC/OC ratio. A simple source apportionment indicates that biomass smoke contributes about three-quarters of the aerosol burden in the regional haze, while other sources (e.g., fossil fuel burning) contribute the remainder.

  16. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over land using MSG/SEVIRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Lu; Xue, Yong; Guang, Jie; Di, Aojie

    2016-04-01

    In the present study we proposed an algorithm to estimate hourly Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) using multi-temporal data from SEVIRI aboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). The algorithm coupled a Radiative Transfer Model with Ross-Li-sparse bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) to calculate the AOD and bidirectional reflectance simultaneously using the visible and near-infrared (NIR) channel of SEVIRI data. We assume the surface albedo doesn't vary over a short time (e.g. 1 day), and a κ-ratio approach was used which assumes the ratio of surface reflectance in the visible and NIR channel for two observations is the same. In the inversion, the MODIS product (MCD43) was used as the prior information of the surface reflectance and the single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (g) were derived from six pre-defined aerosol types. The retrieved AOD and AngstrÖm exponent α were compared with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements, which shows good consistency.

  17. Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties During the Asian Dust Above Monterey Experiment and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, K.; Strawa, A. W.; Provencal, R.; Castaneda, R.; Bucholtz, A.; Schmid, B.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300/Mm with an estimated precision of 0.1/Mm for 1550 nm light and 0.2/Mm for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects. We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those from a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  18. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Taufiq; Moosmüller, H.; Chung, Chul E.

    2015-10-01

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  19. Development the EarthCARE aerosol classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Hünerbein, Anja; Donovan, Dave; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    The Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is a joint ESA/JAXA mission planned to be launched in 2018. The multi-sensor platform carries a cloud-profiling radar (CPR), a high-spectral-resolution cloud/aerosol lidar (ATLID), a cloud/aerosol multi-spectral imager (MSI), and a three-view broad-band radiometer (BBR). Three out of the four instruments (ATLID, MSI, and BBR) will be able to sense the global aerosol distribution and contribute to the overarching EarthCARE goals of sensor synergy and radiation closure with respect to aerosols. The high-spectral-resolution lidar ATLID obtains profiles of particle extinction and backscatter coefficients, lidar ratio, and linear depolarization ratio as well as the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 355 nm. MSI provides AOT at 670 nm (over land and ocean) and 865 nm (over ocean). Next to these primary observables the aerosol type is one of the required products to be derived from both lidar stand-alone and ATLID-MSI synergistic retrievals. ATLID measurements of the aerosol intensive properties (lidar ratio, depolarization ratio) and ATLID-MSI observations of the spectral AOT will provide the basic input for aerosol-type determination. Aerosol typing is needed for the quantification of anthropogenic versus natural aerosol loadings of the atmosphere, the investigation of aerosol-cloud interaction, assimilation purposes, and the validation of atmospheric transport models which carry components like dust, sea salt, smoke and pollution. Furthermore, aerosol classification is a prerequisite for the estimation of direct aerosol radiative forcing and radiative closure studies. With an appropriate underlying microphysical particle description, the categorization of aerosol observations into predefined aerosol types allows us to infer information needed for the calculation of shortwave radiative effects, such as mean particle size, single-scattering albedo, and spectral conversion factors. In order to ensure

  20. Absorption of visible radiation by aerosols in the volcanic plume of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Ogren, J A; Charlson, R J; Radke, L F; Domonkos, S K

    1981-02-20

    Samples of particles from Mount St. Helens were collected in both the stratosphere and troposphere for measurement of the light absorption coefficient. Results indicate that the stratospheric dust had a small but finite absorption coefficient ranging up to 2 x 10(-7) per meter at a wavelength of 0.55 micrometer, which is estimated to yield an albedo for single scatter of 0.98 or greater. Tropospheric results showed similar high values of an albedo for single scatter.

  1. Absorption of visible radiation by aerosols in the volcanic plume of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, J.A.; Charlson, R.J.; Radke, L.F.; Domonkos, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of particles from Mount St. Helens were collected in both the stratosphere and troposhere for measurement of the light absorption coefficient. Results indicate that the stratospheric dust had a small but finite absorption coefficient ranging up to 2 x 10-7 per meter at a wavelength of 0.55 micrometer, which is estimated to yield an albedo for single scatter of 0.98 or greater. Tropospheric results showed similar high values of an albedo for single scatter.

  2. Principles in Remote Sensing of Aerosol from MODIS Over Land and Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Chu, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    The well-calibrated spectral radiances measured by MODIS will be processed to retrieve daily aerosol properties that include optical thickness and mass loading over land and optical thickness, the mean particle size of the dominant mode and the ratio between aerosol modes over ocean. In addition, after launch, aerosol single scattering albedo will be calculated as an experimental product. The retrieval process over land is based on a dark target method that identifies appropriate targets in the mid-IR channels and uses an empirical relationship found between the mid-ER and the visible channels to estimate surface reflectance in the visible from the mid-HZ reflectance measured by satellite. The method employs new aerosol models for industrial, smoke and dust aerosol. The process for retrieving aerosol over the ocean makes use of the wide spectral band from 0.55-2.13 microns and a look-up table constructed from combinations of five accumulation modes and five coarse modes. Both the over land and over ocean algorithms have been validated with satellite and airborne radiance measurements. We estimate that MODIS will be able to measure aerosol optical thickness (t) to within 0.05 +/- 0.2t over land and to within 0.05 +/- 0.05t over ocean. Much of the earth's surface is located far from aerosol sources and experience very low aerosol optical thickness. Will the accuracy expected from MODIS retrievals be sufficient to measure the global aerosol direct and indirect forcing? We are attempting to answer this question using global model results and cloud climatology.

  3. Sensitivity of the atmospheric temperature profile to the aerosol absorption in the presence of dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Amo, J. L.; di Sarra, A.; Meloni, D.

    2014-12-01

    Radiative transfer simulations in the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) spectral regions have been carried out to investigate the time evolution of the atmospheric heating/cooling rates and their influence on the temperature profiles under different vertical distributions of the aerosol absorption. The case study is based on measurements made at Rome, Italy, on 20 June 2007, when a dust layer was present above the urban boundary layer (BL) and the column aerosol optical depth at 550 nm was about 0.37. Column-integrated aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo, as well as vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and meteorological variables have been derived from observations and used in the simulations. Different profiles of the aerosol absorption are considered by varying the absorption of the BL aerosols and of the desert dust, without changing the overall columnar properties. Three scenarios have been considered, with absorbing (ABL) or scattering (SBL) particles in the BL, and with a vertically homogeneous case (HL), which is taken as the reference. Calculations show that, for the selected case, about 25% of the SW heating is offset by the LW cooling within the dust layer. Different longwave/all-wave contributions are observed in the BL, depending on the BL aerosol absorption. Changes of atmospheric temperature induced by aerosol-radiation interactions only, have been investigated, while interactions with the surface through changes of the latent and sensible heat flux have been neglected. The evolution of temperature is similar for the three scenarios within the dust layer, with a daytime increase and a smaller nighttime decrease. After 24 h, the increase of the atmospheric temperature due to the aerosol radiative processes is about 1 K. In the BL, the increase of temperature is strongly dependent on the aerosol absorption capability. The oscillatory behaviour of the temperature with time in the dust layer, and the different evolution in the BL are

  4. The Sensitivity of SeaWiFS Ocean Color Retrievals to Aerosol Amount and Type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Sayer, Andrew M.; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Franz, Bryan A.

    2016-01-01

    As atmospheric reflectance dominates top-of-the-atmosphere radiance over ocean, atmospheric correction is a critical component of ocean color retrievals. This paper explores the operational Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) algorithm atmospheric correction with approximately 13 000 coincident surface-based aerosol measurements. Aerosol optical depth at 440 nm (AOD(sub 440)) is overestimated for AOD below approximately 0.1-0.15 and is increasingly underestimated at higher AOD; also, single-scattering albedo (SSA) appears overestimated when the actual value less than approximately 0.96.AOD(sub 440) and its spectral slope tend to be overestimated preferentially for coarse-mode particles. Sensitivity analysis shows that changes in these factors lead to systematic differences in derived ocean water-leaving reflectance (Rrs) at 440 nm. The standard SeaWiFS algorithm compensates for AOD anomalies in the presence of nonabsorbing, medium-size-dominated aerosols. However, at low AOD and with absorbing aerosols, in situ observations and previous case studies demonstrate that retrieved Rrs is sensitive to spectral AOD and possibly also SSA anomalies. Stratifying the dataset by aerosol-type proxies shows the dependence of the AOD anomaly and resulting Rrs patterns on aerosol type, though the correlation with the SSA anomaly is too subtle to be quantified with these data. Retrieved chlorophyll-a concentrations (Chl) are affected in a complex way by Rrs differences, and these effects occur preferentially at high and low Chl values. Absorbing aerosol effects are likely to be most important over biologically productive waters near coasts and along major aerosol transport pathways. These results suggest that future ocean color spacecraft missions aiming to cover the range of naturally occurring and anthropogenic aerosols, especially at wavelengths shorter than 440 nm, will require better aerosol amount and type constraints.

  5. WRF-Chem simulations of aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, L. Ruby

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF, including direct, semi-direct and indirect forcing) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at many sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korea, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 μm or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan, which indicates the possible influence of pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. The model underestimates SO42- and organic carbon (OC) concentrations over mainland China by about a factor of 2, while overestimates NO3- concentration in autumn along the Yangtze River. The model captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter and spring and over North China in winter, spring and summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over adjacent oceans at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5-30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO42-, NO3- and NH4

  6. Evolution of Biomass Burning Aerosols in the Near Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, Arthur; Kleinman, Lawrence; Arnott, W. Patrick; Adachi, Kouji; Buseck, Peter; Lewis, Ernest; Onasch, Timothy; pikridas, Michail; Shilling, John; Springston, Stephen; Wang, Jian; Yokelson, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of aerosols that can perturb Earth's climate through the direct (both scattering and absorption), indirect (cloud formation and precipitation), and semi-direct (cloud dissipation) radiative effects. Despite much effort, quantities important to determining radiative forcing for these events still remain highly uncertain due to the inherent difficultly of conducting the required measurements and instrumentation limitations. Further adding to this uncertainty is that few field campaigns have been conducted in the northern temperate latitudes in spite of biomass burning producing about one-third of the PM2.5 in the US. During the summer and early fall of 2013, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored an aircraft-based field campaign to study the near-field evolution of particulate emissions from biomass burning. Key scientific objectives for the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) are to 1) quantify the downwind time evolution of microphysical, morphological, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols generated by biomass burning, 2) use the time sequences of observations to constrain processes and parameterizations in a Lagrangian model of aerosol evolution, and 3) incorporate time evolution information into a single-column radiative transfer model for determining forcing per unit carbon burned. Discussion will be on the near-field evolution of particle mixing state and morphology, chemical composition, and microphysical processes that determine aerosol size distribution and single scattering albedo (SSA) of light absorbing aerosols. In cases studied, increases in the coating thickness of refractive black carbon (rBC) particles, organic aerosol/rBC ratio, scattering/CO ratio, and aerosol size distributions have been observed. Results are based on wildfires sampled in the US northwest and on controlled agricultural burns in the south

  7. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  8. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: An AQMEII-2 perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curci, G.; Hogrefe, C.; Bianconi, R.; Im, U.; Balzarini, A.; Baró, R.; Brunner, D.; Forkel, R.; Giordano, L.; Hirtl, M.; Honzak, L.; Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Knote, C.; Langer, M.; Makar, P. A.; Pirovano, G.; Pérez, J. L.; San José, R.; Syrakov, D.; Tuccella, P.; Werhahn, J.; Wolke, R.; Žabkar, R.; Zhang, J.; Galmarini, S.

    2015-08-01

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model intercomparison, we used the bulk mass profiles of aerosol chemical species sampled over the locations of AERONET stations across Europe and North America to calculate the aerosol optical properties under a range of common assumptions for all models. Several simulations with parameters perturbed within a range of observed values are carried out for July 2010 and compared in order to infer the assumptions that have the largest impact on the calculated aerosol optical properties. We calculate that the most important factor of uncertainty is the assumption about the mixing state, for which we estimate an uncertainty of 30-35% on the simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The choice of the core composition in the core-shell representation is of minor importance for calculation of AOD, while it is critical for the SSA. The uncertainty introduced by the choice of mixing state choice on the calculation of the asymmetry parameter is the order of 10%. Other factors of uncertainty tested here have a maximum average impact of 10% each on calculated AOD, and an impact of a few percent on SSA and g. It is thus recommended to focus further research on a more accurate representation of the aerosol mixing state in models, in order to have a less uncertain simulation of the related optical properties.

  9. Albedos. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F.V.

    1993-07-01

    The albedo of the earth's surface varies dramatically from values of about 3 to 4 percent for calm bodies of water up to about 55 percent for gypsum sands. This rather broad range of reflected incoming solar radiation presents difficulties when attempting to define an average albedo for terrain over a large region from locally determined values. The patchwork, or checkerboard, appearance of the earth's surface as viewed from above is the result of various human activities, such as agriculture, the proliferation of urban sprawl, and road building. Each of these variable appearing surfaces will have individual albedos, rendering any attempt to determine an a real albedo almost an impossibility on the mesoscale. However, a vast data base exists for microscale applications for individual acreages, for example. A compilation of these data is presented.... Albedo, Solar radiation, Crops, Urban areas, Land uses.

  10. Global aerosol typing from a combination of A-Train satellite observations in clear-sky and above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Russell, P. B.; Vaughan, M.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Livingston, J. M.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    According to the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the model estimates of Radiative Forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions (RFari) for individual aerosol types are less certain than the total RFari [Boucher et al., 2013]. For example, the RFari specific to Black Carbon (BC) is uncertain due to an underestimation of its mass concentration near source regions [Koch et al., 2009]. Several recent studies have evaluated chemical transport model (CTM) predictions using observations of aerosol optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) or Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) from satellite or ground-based instruments (e.g., Huneeus et al., [2010]). However, most passive remote sensing instruments fail to provide a comprehensive assessment of the particle type without further analysis and combination of measurements. To improve the predictions of aerosol composition in CTMs, we have developed an aerosol classification algorithm (called Specified Clustering and Mahalanobis Classification, SCMC) that assigns an aerosol type to multi-parameter retrievals by spaceborne, airborne or ground based passive remote sensing instruments [Russell et al., 2014]. The aerosol types identified by our scheme are pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke and pure marine. First, we apply the SCMC method to five years of clear-sky space-borne POLDER observations over Greece. We then use the aerosol extinction and SSA spectra retrieved from a combination of MODIS, OMI and CALIOP clear-sky observations to infer the aerosol type over the globe in 2007. Finally, we will extend the spaceborne aerosol classification from clear-sky to above low opaque water clouds using a combination of CALIOP AOD and backscatter observations and OMI absorption AOD values from near-by clear-sky pixels.

  11. Host Model Uncertainties in Aerosol Radiative Forcing Estimates: Results from the AeroCom Prescribed Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Stier, Phillip; Schutgens, Nick A.; Bellouin, N.; Bian, Huisheng; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, Mian; Ghan, Steven J.; Huneeus, N.; Kinne, Stefan; Lin, G.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Myhre, G.; Penner, J. E.; Randles, Cynthia; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Takemura, T.; Yu, Fangqun; Yu, Hongbin; Zhou, Cheng

    2013-03-20

    Simulated multi-model "diversity" in aerosol direct radiative forcing estimates is often perceived as mea- sure of aerosol uncertainty. However, current models used for aerosol radiative forcing calculations vary considerably in model components relevant for forcing calculations and the associated "host-model uncertainties" are generally convoluted with the actual aerosol uncertainty. In this AeroCom Prescribed intercomparison study we systematically isolate and quantify host model uncertainties on aerosol forcing experiments through prescription of identical aerosol radiative properties in nine participating models. Even with prescribed aerosol radiative properties,simulated clear-sky and all-sky aerosol radiative forcings show significant diversity. For a purely scattering case with globally constant optical depth of 0.2, the global-mean all-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing is -4.51 Wm-2 and the inter-model standard deviation is 0.70 Wm-2, corresponding to a relative standard deviation of 15%. For a case with partially absorbing aerosol with an aerosol optical depth of 0.2 and single scattering albedo of 0.8, the forcing changes to 1.26 Wm-2, and the standard deviation increases to 1.21 W-2, corresponding to a significant relative standard deviation of 96%. However, the top-of-atmosphere forcing variability owing to absorption is low, with relative standard deviations of 9% clear-sky and 12% all-sky. Scaling the forcing standard deviation for a purely scattering case to match the sulfate radiative in the AeroCom Direct Effect experiment, demonstrates that host model uncertain- ties could explain about half of the overall sulfate forcing diversity of 0.13 Wm-2 in the AeroCom Direct Radiative Effect experiment. Host model errors in aerosol radiative forcing are largest in regions of uncertain host model components, such as stratocumulus cloud decks or areas with poorly constrained.

  12. Photoacoustic Optical Properties at UV, VIS, and near IR Wavelengths for Laboratory Generated and Winter Time Ambient Urban Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W.A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM (sub 2.5) and PM( sub 10) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In

  13. Retrieval of aerosol absorption properties using the AATSR satellite instrument: a case study of wildfires over Russia 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, E.; Kolmonen, P.; Virtanen, T. H.; Sogacheva, L.; Sundström, A.-M.; de Leeuw, G.

    2014-09-01

    The retrieval of aerosol properties from satellite data is based on the optimized fit of simulated and measured radiances at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The simulations are made using a radiative transfer model with a variety of representative aerosol properties.The optimum fit is obtained for a certain combination of aerosol components, which are externally mixed to provide the aerosol model which in turn is used to calculate the aerosol optical depth (AOD). However, other aerosol properties could be provided. In the aerosol retrieval algorithm (ADV) applied to data from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR), four aerosol components are used, each of which is defined by their (lognormal) size distribution and a complex refractive index. The fine mode fraction is a continuous mixture of weakly and strongly absorbing components which allows for the definition of any absorbing aerosol model within the specified limits. Hence, assuming that the correct aerosol model is selected during the retrieval process, also the single scattering albedo (SSA) should correctly be retrieved. In this paper we present the SSA retrieval using the ADV algorithm by application to wildfires over Russia in the summer of 2010. Together with the AOD, the SSA provides the aerosol absorbing optical depth (AAOD). The results are compared with AERONET data, i.e. AOD level 2.0 and SSA and AAOD inversion products. The RMSE is 0.03 for SSA and 0.02 for AAOD. The SSA is further evaluated by comparison with the SSA retrieved from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). The SSA retrieved from both instruments show similar features, but the AATSR-retrieved SSA values over areas affected by wildfires are lower.

  14. Pollution and mineral dust aerosol retrievals over dark water from MISR multi-angle satellite imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R.; Kalashnikova, O.; Li, W.; McDonald, D.; Diner, D.; Martonchik, J.

    2003-04-01

    The MISR multi-angle imaging instrument, flying aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite, makes measurements at nine view angles, in each of four wavelengths, near-simultaneously. MISR systematically covers a range of air mass factors from one to three, and in mid-latitudes, samples scattering angles extending from about 60^o to 160^o. We are quantifying the information these data provide about particle size distribution, shape, composition, and amount, with the help of field data acquired during the ACE-Asia and CLAMS campaigns. In both campaigns, we obtained high-resolution data over a 400-km-wide swath, coincident with observations by multiple instruments on two or more surface and airborne aerosol-measuring platforms. The cases obtained capture a range of clean, dusty, and polluted aerosol conditions. Initial characterization of the detailed environmental conditions for five of these cases, based on the field observations, has been completed. This presentation uses the field results as ground truth, to critically test the sensitivity of MISR aerosol retrievals to assumed particle micro-physical properties, a key step in refining the satellite multi-angle retrieval algorithms. We concentrate here on our ability to distinguish pollution aerosols from naturally occurring, non-spherical Asian dust, to measure the total aerosol column optical depth, and to determine the size distribution and single scattering albedo of the pollution component.

  15. Retrieval of Intensive Aerosol Properties from MFRSR observations: Partly Cloudy Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

    2010-09-30

    An approach for the obtaining column intensive aerosol properties, namely the single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP), from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) spectral observations under partly cloudy conditions is described. The approach involves the MFRSR-based aerosol retrieval for clear-sky periods and an interpolation of the retrieved column aerosol properties for cloudy periods. The observed weak diurnal variability of SSA and ASP at the surface and the close association of the surface intensive aerosol properties with their column counterparts form the basis of such interpolation. The approach is evaluated by calculating the corresponding clear-sky total, direct and diffuse fluxes at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673 and 870 nm) and compare them with the observed fluxes. The aerosol properties provided by this approach are applied for (i) an examination of the statistical relationship between spectral (visible spectral range) and broadband values of the total normalized cloud radiative forcing and (ii) an estimation of the fractional sky cover. Data collected during 13 days with single-layer cumulus clouds observed at U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during summer 2007 are applied to illustrate the performance and application of this approach.

  16. Profiling aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties in ambient conditions by combining in situ and remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Nenes, Athanasios; Marinou, Eleni; Solomos, Stavros; Rosenberg, Phil; Trembath, Jamie; Nott, Graeme J.; Allan, James; Le Breton, Michael; Bacak, Asan; Coe, Hugh; Percival, Carl; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    We present the In situ/Remote sensing aerosol Retrieval Algorithm (IRRA) that combines airborne in situ and lidar remote sensing data to retrieve vertical profiles of ambient aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties, employing the ISORROPIA II model for acquiring the particle hygroscopic growth. Here we apply the algorithm on data collected from the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft during the ACEMED campaign in the Eastern Mediterranean. Vertical profiles of aerosol microphysical properties have been derived successfully for an aged smoke plume near the city of Thessaloniki with aerosol optical depth of ˜ 0.4 at 532 nm, single scattering albedos of ˜ 0.9-0.95 at 550 nm and typical lidar ratios for smoke of ˜ 60-80 sr at 532 nm. IRRA retrieves highly hydrated particles above land, with 55 and 80 % water volume content for ambient relative humidity of 80 and 90 %, respectively. The proposed methodology is highly advantageous for aerosol characterization in humid conditions and can find valuable applications in aerosol-cloud interaction schemes. Moreover, it can be used for the validation of active space-borne sensors, as is demonstrated here for the case of CALIPSO.

  17. Ground-based remote sensing of aerosol optical properties and their radiative impacts in PRD region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Boru; Deng, XueJiao; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Fei; Zou, Yu; Deng, Tao; Liu, Xiantong

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol direct effects on surface irradiance were explored by using 7 years' ground-based broadband and spectral radiation data at Panyu, the main site of atmospheric composition monitoring in Pearl River Delta (PRD) . Aerosol optical properties were derived from a Sun photometer, and the radiations were calculated by SBDART model. Results demonstrated that in dry seasons(from October to next February), the annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550nm was 0.535, and more than 60% AOD was in a range of 0.2-0.6. Due to the fact that few dust taken place in PRD region, the course mode of weak or strong absorbing aerosol was negligible. However, the proportion of fine mode, weak radiation absorbing particle was about 9.52%, with the Angstrom exponent (α440/470) = 1.30, single scatter co-albedo (ω0) =0.04.Up to 90% of the aerosol was dominated by fine mode, strong absorbing particles, as given by mean α440/470 = 1.35, ω0 =0.14. Because of strong absorption, the variations in aerosol concentration significantly heated the air, and cooled down the surface. The annual mean shortwave direct radiation forcing at the surface (SFC), inside the atmosphere (ATM), and at the top of atmosphere (TOA) was -33.51

  18. Aerosol Properties from Multi-spectral and Multi-angular Aircraft 4STAR Observations: Expected Advantages and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is developed to retrieve aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. The necessarily compact design of the 4STAR may cause noticeable apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles. We assess the sensitivity of expected 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval to such enhancement by applying the operational AERONET retrieval code and constructed synthetic 4STARlike data. Also, we assess the sensitivity of the broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing to uncertainties in aerosol retrievals associated with the sky radiance enhancement. Our sensitivity study results suggest that the 4STARbased aerosol retrieval has limitations in obtaining detailed information on particle size distribution and scattering phase function. However, these limitations have small impact on the retrieved bulk optical parameters, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 2%, or ±0.02), and the calculated direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 6%, or 2 Wm-2).

  19. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  20. Organic Aerosols from SÃO Paulo and its Relationship with Aerosol Absorption and Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Brito, J. F.; Rizzo, L. V.

    2012-12-01

    The megacity of São Paulo with its 19 million people and 7 million cars is a challenge from the point of view of air pollution. High levels of organic aerosols, PM10, black carbon and ozone and the peculiar situation of the large scale use of ethanol fuel makes it a special case. Little is known about the impact of ethanol on air quality and human health and the increase of ethanol as vehicle fuel is rising worldwide An experiment was designed to physico-chemical properties of aerosols in São Paulo, as well as their optical properties. Aerosol size distribution in the size range of 1nm to 10 micrometers is being measured with a Helsinki University SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer), an NAIS (Neutral ion Spectrometer) and a GRIMM OPC (Optical Particle Counter). Optical properties are being measured with a TSI Nephelometer and a Thermo MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). A CIMEL sunphotometer from the AERONET network measure the aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. The ACSM was operated for 3 months continuosly during teh wintertime of 2012. The measured total particle concentration typically varies between 10,000 and 30,000 cm-3 being the lowest late in the night and highest around noon and frequently exceeding 50,000 cm-3. Clear diurnal patterns in aerosol optical properties were observed. Scattering and absorption coefficients typically range between 20 and 100 Mm-1 at 450 nm, and between 10 to 40 Mm-1 at 637 nm, respectively, both of them peaking at 7:00 local time, the morning rush hour. The corresponding single scattering albedo varies between 0.50 and 0.85, indicating a significant contribution of primary absorbing particles to the aerosol population. During the first month a total of seven new particle formation events were observed with growth rates ranging from 9 to 25

  1. An analysis of AERONET aerosol absorption properties and classifications representative of aerosol source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (τ) and single scattering albedo (ωo) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption (i.e., ωo and absorption Ångström exponent (αabs)) and size (i.e., extinction Ångström exponent (αext) and fine mode fraction of τ) relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to (1) determine the averageωo and αabs at each site (expanding upon previous work), (2) perform a sensitivity study on αabs by varying the spectral ωo, and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral ωo averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < δωo ≤ 0.02 decrease) than in previous work, and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of αabs show significant overlap among aerosol type categories, and at least 10% of the αabs retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral ωo by ±0.03 induces significant αabs changes from the unperturbed value by at least ˜±0.6 for Dust, ˜±0.2 for Mixed, and ˜±0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The ωo440nm and αext440-870nmrelationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  2. Observations of Surfzone Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, G.; Feddersen, F.

    2014-12-01

    The surfzone environment (where waves break) contains several unique and previously unconsidered processes that affect the heat budget. Entering short-wave radiation is a dominant term in both shelf and surfzone heat budgets. In contrast to the shelf, however, depth limited wave breaking in the surfzone generates spray, whitewater and suspended sediments, elevating the surface albedo (ratio of reflected to incident short-wave radiation). Elevated albedo reduces the level of solar short-wave radiation entering the water, potentially resulting in less heating. Additionally, surfzone water quality is often impacted by fecal bacteria contamination. As bacteria mortality is related to short-wave solar radiation, elevated surfzone albedo could reduce pathogen mortality, impacting human health. Albedo in the open ocean has been frequently studied and parameterizations often consider solar zenith angle, wind speed and ocean chlorophyll concentration, producing albedo values typically near 0.06. However, surfzone albedo observations have been extremely sparse, yet show depth limited wave breaking may increase the albedo by nearly a factor of 10 up to 0.5. Here, we present findings from a field study at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier to observe the affect of waves on surfzone albedo. Concurrent measurements were taken with a four-way radiometer (to measure both downwelling and upwelling short-wave and long wave radiation) mounted above the surfzone. A co-located GoPro camera was used to relate visual aspects of the surfzone to measured reflectance, and wave height and period were observed with a bottom mounted pressure sensor in 5 m water depth just outside the surfzone. Wind speed and direction were observed on the pier 10 m above the water surface. Here, we will examine the surfzone albedo dependence on surfzone parameters, such as wave height.

  3. Sensitivity of PARASOL multi-angle photo-polarimetric aerosol retrievals to cloud contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stap, F. A.; Hasekamp, O.; Röckmann, T.

    2014-10-01

    An important problem in satellite remote sensing of aerosols is related to the need to perform an adequate cloud screening. If a cloud screening is applied that is not strict enough, the ground scene has the probability of residual cloud cover which causes large errors on the retrieved aerosol parameters. On the other hand, if the cloud screening procedure is too strict, too many clear sky cases, especially near-cloud scenes, will falsely be flagged cloudy. The detrimental effects of cloud contamination as well as the importance of aerosol cloud interactions that can be studied in these near-cloud scenes call for new approaches to cloud screening. Multi-angle, multi-wavelength photo-polarimetric measurements have a unique capability to distinguish between scattering by (liquid) cloud droplets and aerosol particles. In this paper the sensitivity of aerosol retrievals from multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements to cloud contamination is investigated and the ability to intrinsically filter the cloud contaminated scenes based on a goodness-of-fit criteria is evaluated. Hereto, an aerosol retrieval algorithm is applied to a partially clouded, synthetic data-set including partial cloud cover as well as non-cloud screened POLDER-3/PARASOL observations It is found that a goodness-of-fit filter, together with a filter on the coarse mode refractive index (mrcoarse > 1.335) and a cirrus screening adequately reject the cloud contaminated scenes. No bias nor larger SD are found in the retrieved parameters for this intrinsic cloud filter compared to the parameters retrieved in a priori cloud screened data-set (using MODIS/AQUA cloud masks) of PARASOL observations. Moreover, less high aerosol load scenes are misinterpreted as cloud contaminated. The retrieved aerosol optical thickness, single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent show good agreement with AERONET observations. Furthermore, the synthetic retrievals give confidence in the ability of the algorithm to

  4. Sensitivity of PARASOL multi-angle photopolarimetric aerosol retrievals to cloud contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stap, F. A.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-03-01

    An important problem in satellite remote sensing of aerosols is related to the need to perform an adequate cloud screening. If a cloud screening is applied that is not strict enough, the ground scene has the probability of residual cloud cover which causes large errors on the retrieved aerosol parameters. On the other hand, if the cloud-screening procedure is too strict, too many clear sky cases, especially near-cloud scenes, will falsely be flagged cloudy. The detrimental effects of cloud contamination as well as the importance of aerosol cloud interactions that can be studied in these near-cloud scenes call for new approaches to cloud screening. Multi-angle multi-wavelength photopolarimetric measurements have a unique capability to distinguish between scattering by (liquid) cloud droplets and aerosol particles. In this paper the sensitivity of aerosol retrievals from multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements to cloud contamination is investigated and the ability to intrinsically filter the cloud-contaminated scenes based on a goodness-of-fit criteria is evaluated. Hereto, an aerosol retrieval algorithm is applied to a partially clouded over-ocean synthetic data set as well as non-cloud-screened over-ocean POLDER-3/PARASOL observations. It is found that a goodness-of-fit filter, together with a filter on the coarse mode refractive index (mrcoarse > 1.335) and a cirrus screening, adequately rejects the cloud-contaminated scenes. No bias or larger SD are found in the retrieved parameters for this intrinsic cloud filter compared to the parameters retrieved in a priori cloud-screened data set (using MODIS/AQUA cloud masks) of PARASOL observations. Moreover, less high-aerosol load scenes are misinterpreted as cloud contaminated. The retrieved aerosol optical thickness, single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent show good agreement with AERONET observations. Furthermore, the synthetic retrievals give confidence in the ability of the algorithm to correctly

  5. Aerosol Source Plume Physical Characteristics from Space-based Multiangle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Li, W.-H.; Moroney, Catherine; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Fishbein, Evan

    2007-01-01

    Models that assess aerosol effects on regional air quality and global climate parameterize aerosol sources in terms of amount, type, and injection height. The multiangle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) aboard NASA's Terra satellite retrieves total column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), and aerosol type over cloud-free land and water. A stereo-matching algorithm automatically retrieves reflecting-layer altitude wherever clouds or aerosol plumes have discernable spatial contrast, with about 500-m accuracy, at 1.1-km horizontal resolution. Near-source biomass burning smoke, volcanic effluent, and desert dust plumes are observed routinely, providing information about aerosol amount, particle type, and injection height useful for modeling applications. Compared to background aerosols, the plumes sampled have higher AOT, contain particles having expected differences in Angstrom exponent, size, single-scattering albedo, and for volcanic plume and dust cloud cases, particle shape. As basic thermodynamics predicts, thin aerosol plumes lifted only by regional winds or less intense heat sources are confined to the boundary layer. However, when sources have sufficient buoyancy, the representative plumes studied tend to concentrate within discrete, high-elevation layers of local stability; the aerosol is not uniformly distributed up to a peak altitude, as is sometimes assumed in modeling. MISR-derived plume heights, along with meteorological profile data from other sources, make it possible to relate radiant energy flux observed by the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), also aboard the Terra spacecraft, to convective heat flux that plays a major role in buoyant plume dynamics. A MISR climatology of plume behavior based on these results is being developed.

  6. Single-scattering properties of ice particles in the microwave regime: Temperature effect on the ice refractive index with implications in remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jiachen; Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.; Weng, Fuzhong; Liu, Quanhua; Greenwald, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    An ice crystal single-scattering property database is developed in the microwave spectral region (1 to 874 GHz) to provide the scattering, absorption, and polarization properties of 12 ice crystal habits (10-plate aggregate, 5-plate aggregate, 8-column aggregate, solid hexagonal column, hollow hexagonal column, hexagonal plate, solid bullet rosette, hollow bullet rosette, droxtal, oblate spheroid, prolate spheroid, and sphere) with particle maximum dimensions from 2 μm to 10 mm. For each habit, four temperatures (160, 200, 230, and 270 K) are selected to account for temperature dependence of the ice refractive index. The microphysical and scattering properties include projected area, volume, extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, and six independent nonzero phase matrix elements (i.e. P11, P12, P22, P33, P43 and P44). The scattering properties are computed by the Invariant Imbedding T-Matrix (II-TM) method and the Improved Geometric Optics Method (IGOM). The computation results show that the temperature dependence of the ice single-scattering properties in the microwave region is significant, particularly at high frequencies. Potential active and passive remote sensing applications of the database are illustrated through radar reflectivity and radiative transfer calculations. For cloud radar applications, ignoring temperature dependence has little effect on ice water content measurements. For passive microwave remote sensing, ignoring temperature dependence may lead to brightness temperature biases up to 5 K in the case of a large ice water path.

  7. Aerosol Absorption Retrieval at Ultraviolet Wavelengths in a Complex Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Raptis, Panagiotis; Kouremeti, Natalia; Amirdis, Vassilis; Arola, Antti; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Schuster, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    We have used total and diffuse UV irradiance measurements from a multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (UVMFR) in order to investigate aerosol absorption in the UV range for a 5-year period in Athens, Greece. This dataset was used as input to a radiative transfer model and the single scattering albedo (SSA) at 368 and 332 nm was calculated. Retrievals from a collocated CIMEL sun photometer were used to evaluate the products and study the absorption spectral behavior of retrieved SSA values. The UVMFR SSA, together with synchronous, CIMEL-derived retrievals of SSA at 440 nm, had a mean of 0.90, 0.87 and 0.83, with lowest values (higher absorption) encountered at the shorter wavelengths. In addition, noticeable diurnal variation of the SSA in all wavelengths is shown, with amplitudes up to 0.05. Strong SSA wavelength dependence is revealed for cases of low Angstrom exponents, accompanied by a SSA decrease with decreasing extinction optical depth, suggesting varying influence under different aerosol composition. However, part of this dependence for low aerosol optical depths is masked by the enhanced SSA retrieval uncertainty. Dust and brown carbon UV absorbing properties were also investigated to explain seasonal patterns.

  8. Aerosol absorption retrieval at ultraviolet wavelengths in a complex environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Raptis, Panagiotis; Kouremeti, Natalia; Amiridis, Vassilis; Arola, Antti; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Schuster, Gregory L.

    2016-12-01

    We have used total and diffuse UV irradiance measurements from a multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (UVMFR) in order to investigate aerosol absorption in the UV range for a 5-year period in Athens, Greece. This dataset was used as input to a radiative transfer model and the single scattering albedo (SSA) at 368 and 332 nm was calculated. Retrievals from a collocated CIMEL sun photometer were used to evaluate the products and study the absorption spectral behavior of retrieved SSA values. The UVMFR SSA, together with synchronous, CIMEL-derived retrievals of SSA at 440 nm, had a mean of 0.90, 0.87 and 0.83, with lowest values (higher absorption) encountered at the shorter wavelengths. In addition, noticeable diurnal variation of the SSA in all wavelengths is shown, with amplitudes up to 0.05. Strong SSA wavelength dependence is revealed for cases of low Ångström exponents, accompanied by a SSA decrease with decreasing extinction optical depth, suggesting varying influence under different aerosol composition. However, part of this dependence for low aerosol optical depths is masked by the enhanced SSA retrieval uncertainty. Dust and brown carbon UV absorbing properties were also investigated to explain seasonal patterns.

  9. MISR Global Aerosol Product Assessment by Comparison with AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Garay, Michael J.; Diner, David J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A statistical approach is used to assess the quality of the MISR Version 22 (V22) aerosol products. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieval results are improved relative to the early post- launch values reported by Kahn et al. [2005a], varying with particle type category. Overall, about 70% to 75% of MISR AOD retrievals fall within 0.05 or 20% AOD of the paired validation data, and about 50% to 55% are within 0.03 or 10% AOD, except at sites where dust, or mixed dust and smoke, are commonly found. Retrieved particle microphysical properties amount to categorical values, such as three groupings in size: "small," "medium," and "large." For particle size, ground-based AERONET sun photometer Angstrom Exponents are used to assess statistically the corresponding MISR values, which are interpreted in terms of retrieved size categories. Coincident Single-Scattering Albedo (SSA) and fraction AOD spherical data are too limited for statistical validation. V22 distinguishes two or three size bins, depending on aerosol type, and about two bins in SSA (absorbing vs. non-absorbing), as well as spherical vs. non-spherical particles, under good retrieval conditions. Particle type sensitivity varies considerably with conditions, and is diminished for mid-visible AOD below about 0.15 or 0.2. Based on these results, specific algorithm upgrades are proposed, and are being investigated by the MISR team for possible implementation in future versions of the product.

  10. Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

    2002-09-26

    Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

  11. Impact of springtime biomass-burning aerosols on radiative forcing over northern Thailand during the 7SEAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Shantanu Kumar; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Lee, Chung-Te; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent; Janjai, Serm; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Chantara, Somporn

    2016-04-01

    Biomass-burning (BB) aerosols are the significant contributor to the regional/global aerosol loading and radiation budgets. BB aerosols affect the radiation budget of the earth and atmosphere by scattering and absorbing directly the incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. These aerosols can exert either cooling or warming effect on climate, depending on the balance between scattering and absorption. BB activities in the form of wildland forest fires and agricultural crop burning are very pronounced in the Indochina peninsular regions in Southeast Asia mainly in spring (late February to April) season. The region of interest includes Doi Ang Khang (19.93° N, 99.05° E, 1536 msl) in northern Thailand, as part of the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS)/BASELInE (Biomass-burning Aerosols & Stratocumulus Environment: Lifecycles & Interactions Experiment) campaign in 2013. In this study, for the first time, the direct aerosol radiative effects of BB aerosols over near-source BB emissions, during the peak loading spring season, in northern Indochina were investigated by using ground-based physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols as well as the aerosol optical and radiative transfer models. Information on aerosol parameters in the field campaign was used in the OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) model to estimate various optical properties corresponding to aerosol compositions. Clear-sky shortwave direct aerosol radiative effects were further estimated with a raditive transfer model SBDART (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer). The columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD500) was found to be ranged from 0.26 to 1.13 (with the mean value 0.71 ± 0.24). Fine-mode (fine mode fraction ≈0.98, angstrom exponent ≈1.8) and significantly absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo ≈0.89, asymmetry-parameter ≈0.67 at 441 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. Water soluble and black carbon (BC) aerosols mainly

  12. Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Ground-Based Radiation and Aerosol Validation Using the NOAA Mobile SURFRAD Station Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, Joseph; Lantz, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is preparing for the launch of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) satellite in 2015. This satellite will feature higher time (5-minute versus 30-minute sampling) and spatial resolution (0.5 km vs 1 km in the visible channel) than current GOES instruments provide. NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service has funded the Global Monitoring Division at the Earth System Research Laboratory to provide ground-based validation data for many of the new and old products the new GOES instruments will retrieve specifically related to radiation at the surface and aerosol and its extensive and intensive properties in the column. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) had an emphasis on aerosol; therefore, we asked to be involved in this campaign to de-bug our new instrumentation and to provide a new capability that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Mobile Facilities (AMF) did not possess, namely surface albedo measurement out to 1625 nm. This gave us a chance to test remote operation of our new multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer/multi-filter radiometer (MFRSR/MFR) combination. We did not deploy standard broadband shortwave and longwave radiation instrumentation because ARM does this as part of every AMF deployment. As it turned out, the ARM standard MFRSR had issues, and we were able to provide the aerosol column data for the first 2 months of the campaign covering the summer flight phase of the deployment. Using these data, we were able to work with personnel at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to retrieve not only aerosol optical depth (AOD), but single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter, as well.

  13. Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects Over the Northwest Atlantic, Northwest Pacific, and North Indian Oceans: Estimates Based on In-situ Chemical and Optical Measurements and Chemical Transport Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Anderson, T. L.; Baynard, T.; Bond, T.; Boucher, O.; Carmichael, G.; Clarke, A.; Erlick, C.; Guo, H.; Horowitz, L.; Howell, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Maring, H.; McComiskey, A.; Middlebrook, A.; Noone, K.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Penner, J.; Quinn, P. K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Savoie, D. L.; Schwartz, S. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Tang, Y.; Weber, R. J.; Wu, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of climate change over the industrial era is that due to aerosols, a substantial fraction of which is the uncertainty associated with scattering and absorption of shortwave (solar) radiation by anthropogenic aerosols in cloud-free conditions. Quantifying and reducing the uncertainty in aerosol influences on climate is critical to understanding climate change over the industrial period and to improving predictions of future climate change for assumed emission scenarios. Measurements of aerosol properties during major field campaigns in several regions of the globe during the past decade are contributing to an enhanced understanding of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on light scattering and climate. The present study, which focuses on three regions downwind of major urban/population centers (North Indian Ocean during INDOEX, the Northwest Pacific Ocean during ACE-Asia, and the Northwest Atlantic Ocean during ICARTT), incorporates understanding gained from field observations of aerosol distributions and properties into calculations of perturbations in radiative fluxes due to these aerosols. This study evaluates the current state of observations and of two chemical transport models (STEM and MOZART). Measurements of burdens, extinction optical depth, and direct radiative effect of aerosols (change in radiative flux due to total aerosols) are used as measurement-model check points to assess uncertainties. In-situ measured and remotely sensed aerosol properties for each region (mixing state, mass scattering efficiency, single scattering albedo, and angular scattering properties and their dependences on relative humidity) are used as input parameters to two radiative transfer models (GFDL and University of Michigan) to constrain estimates of aerosol radiative effects, with uncertainties in each step propagated through the analysis. Such comparisons with observations and resultant reductions in uncertainties are

  14. Improvement of Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval over Hong Kong from a Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Using Critical Reflectance with Background Optical Depth Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Jhoon; Wong, Man Sing; Yoon, Jongmin; Lee, Jaehwa; Wu, Dong L.; Chan, P.W.; Nichol, Janet E.; Chung, Chu-Yong; Ou, Mi-Lim

    2014-01-01

    Despite continuous efforts to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) using a conventional 5-channelmeteorological imager in geostationary orbit, the accuracy in urban areas has been poorer than other areas primarily due to complex urban surface properties and mixed aerosol types from different emission sources. The two largest error sources in aerosol retrieval have been aerosol type selection and surface reflectance. In selecting the aerosol type from a single visible channel, the season-dependent aerosol optical properties were adopted from longterm measurements of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-photometers. With the aerosol optical properties obtained fromthe AERONET inversion data, look-up tableswere calculated by using a radiative transfer code: the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S). Surface reflectance was estimated using the clear sky composite method, awidely used technique for geostationary retrievals. Over East Asia, the AOD retrieved from the Meteorological Imager showed good agreement, although the values were affected by cloud contamination errors. However, the conventional retrieval of the AOD over Hong Kong was largely underestimated due to the lack of information on the aerosol type and surface properties. To detect spatial and temporal variation of aerosol type over the area, the critical reflectance method, a technique to retrieve single scattering albedo (SSA), was applied. Additionally, the background aerosol effect was corrected to improve the accuracy of the surface reflectance over Hong Kong. The AOD retrieved froma modified algorithmwas compared to the collocated data measured by AERONET in Hong Kong. The comparison showed that the new aerosol type selection using the critical reflectance and the corrected surface reflectance significantly improved the accuracy of AODs in Hong Kong areas,with a correlation coefficient increase from0.65 to 0.76 and a regression line change from tMI [basic algorithm] = 0

  15. Assessment of aerosol optics, microphysics, and transport process of biomass-burning haze over northern SE Asia: 7-SEAS AERONET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Giles, D. M.; Eck, T. F.; Lin, N.; Tsay, S.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Initiated in 2007, the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) is aimed to facilitate an interdisciplinary research on the aerosol environment in SE Asia (SEA) as a whole, promote international collaboration, and further enhance scientific understanding of the impact of biomass burning on clouds, atmospheric radiation, hydrological cycle, and region climates. One of the key measurements proposed in the 7-SEAS is the NASA/AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) observation, which provides helpful information on columnar aerosol optical properties and allows us consistently to examine biomass-burning aerosols across northern SEA from ground-based remote-sensing point of view. In this presentation, we will focus on the two 7-SEAS field deployments, i.e. the 2012 Son La Experiment and the 2013 BASELInE (Biomass-burning Aerosols & Stratocumulus Environment: Lifecycles and Interactions Experiment). We analyze the daytime variation of aerosol by using consistent measurements from 15 of AERONET sites over Indochina, the South China Sea, and Taiwan. Spatiotemporal characteristics of aerosol optical properties (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine/coarse mode AOD, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor) will be discussed. Strong diurnal variation of aerosol optical properties was observed to be attributed to planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics. A comparison between aerosol loading (i.e. AOD) and surface PM2.5 concentration will be presented. Our results demonstrate that smoke aerosols emitted from agriculture burning that under certain meteorological conditions can degrade regional air quality 3000 km from the source region, with additional implications for aerosol radiative forcing and regional climate change over northern SE Asia.

  16. View From a Megacity: Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering at Four Sites in and Near Mexico City.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Megacity Impacts on Regional and Global Environments, MIRAGE-Mex deployment to Mexico City in the period of 30 days, March 2006, a suite of photoacoustic spectrometers (PAS) were installed to measure at ground level the light absorption and scattering by aerosols at four sites: an urban site at Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexican Oil Institute, denoted by IMP), a suburban site at the Technological University of Tecamac, a rural site at "La Biznaga" ranch, and a site at the Paseo de Cortes (altitude 3,810 meters ASL) in the rural area above Amecameca in the State of Mexico, on the saddle between the volcanoes Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl. The IMP site gave in-situ characterization of the Mexico City plume under favorable wind conditions while the other sites provided characterization of the plume, mixed in with any local sources. The second and third sites are north of Mexico City, and the fourth site is south. The PAS used at IMP operates at 532 nm, and conveniently allowed for characterization of gaseous absorption at this wavelength as well. Instruments at the second and third sites operate at 870 nm, and the one at the fourth site at 780 nm. Light scattering measurements are accomplished within the PAS by the reciprocal nephelometery method. In the urban site the aerosol absorption coefficient typically varies between 40 and 250 Mm-1 during the course of the day and significant diurnal variation of the aerosol single scattering albedo was observed. Comparisons with TSI nephelometer scattering and Aetholemeter absorption measurements at the T0 site will be presented. We will present a broad overview of the diurnal variation of the scattering and absorption as well as the single scattering albedo and fraction of absorption due to gases at the IMP site. Insight on the dynamical connections will be discussed.

  17. AERONET-based models of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2014-10-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol system. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of aerosol microphysical/optical parameters at 10 sites reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke observed at coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at the near-source sites. Differences between sites tend to be larger than variability at an individual site, although optical properties for some sites in different regions can be quite similar. Across the sites, typical midvisible SSA ranges from ~ 0.95-0.97 (sites dominated by boreal forest or peat burning, typically with larger fine-mode particle radius and spread) to ~ 0.88-0.9 (sites most influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning, typically smaller fine-mode particle radius and spread). The tropical forest site Alta Floresta (Brazil) is closer to this second category, although with intermediate SSA ~ 0.92. The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average midvisible SSA ~ 0.85. Sites with stronger absorption also tend to have stronger spectral gradients in SSA, becoming more absorbing at longer wavelengths. Microphysical/optical models are presented in detail so as to facilitate their use in radiative transfer calculations, including extension to UV (ultraviolet) wavelengths, and lidar ratios. One intended application is to serve as candidate optical models for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean often have insufficient absorption (i.e. too high SSA) to represent these biomass burning aerosols. The underestimates in satellite-retrieved AOD in smoke outflow regions, which have important consequences for applications of these satellite data sets, are consistent with

  18. Aerosol retrievals from AVHRR radiances: effects of particle nonsphericity and absorption and an updated long-term global climatology of aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, M.; Geogdzhaev, I.; Liu, L.; Orgen, A.; Lacis, A.; Rossow, W.; Hovenier, J.; Volten, H.; Muñoz, O.

    2003-09-01

    The paper describes and discusses long-term global retrievals of aerosol properties from channel-1 and -2 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) radiances. We reconfirm the previously reached conclusion that the nonsphericity of dust-like and dry sea salt aerosols can lead to very large errors in the retrieved optical thickness if one mistakenly applies the scattering model for spherical particles. Comparisons of single-scattering albedo and Ångström exponent values retrieved from the AVHRR data and those measured in situ at Sable Island indicate that the currently adopted value 0.003 can be a reasonable choice for the imaginary part of the aerosol refractive index in the global satellite retrievals. Several unexpected features in the long-term satellite record indicate a serious problem with post-launch calibration of channel-2 radiances from the NOAA-11 spacecraft. We solve this problem by using a simple re-calibration procedure removing the observed artifacts and derive a global climatology of aerosol optical thickness and size over the oceans for the period extending from July 1983 to December 1999. The global monthly mean optical thickness and Ångström exponent of tropospheric aerosols show no significant trends over the entire period and oscillate around the average values 0.145 and 0.75, respectively. The Northern hemisphere means optical thickness systematically exceeds that averaged over the Southern hemisphere. The AVHRR retrieval results during the period affected by the Mt. Pinatubo eruption are consistent with the retrievals of the stratospheric aerosol optical thickness based on Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) data. Time series of the aerosol optical thickness and Ângström exponent derived for four separate geographic regions exhibit varying degrees of seasonal variability controlled by local meteorological events and/or anthropogenic activities.

  19. Asteroid sizes and albedos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1977-01-01

    The radiometric method of determining asteroid diameters is described, and a synthesis of radiometric and polarimetric measurements of the diameters and geometric albedos of a total of 187 asteroids is presented. An analysis is offered of the size distributions of different albedo classes down to 80-km diameter for the entire main asteroid belt (2.0-3.5 AU). The distribution of albedos is found to be strongly bimodal, with mean albedos for the C and S group of 0.035 and 0.15, respectively. The C asteroids outnumber the S asteroids at all sizes and all values of semimajor axis, with the proportion of C asteroids increasing from a little over half inside 2.5 AU to more than 95% beyond 3.0 AU. Other aspects of the distribution of C, S, and M asteroids are discussed, and the total mass of main-belt asteroids larger than 70 km is estimated.

  20. A new description of Titan's aerosol optical properties from the analysis of VIMS Emission Phase Function observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Sebastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Sotin, Christophe; Rannou, Pascal; Bézard, Bruno; Cornet, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Huygens probe gave unprecedented information on the properties of Titan's aerosols (vertical distribution, opacity as a function of wavelength, phase function, single scattering albedo) by in-situ measurements (Tomasko et al. 2008). Being the only existing in-situ atmospheric probing for Titan, this aerosol model currently is the reference for many Titan studies (e.g. by being applied as physical input in radiative transfer models of the atmosphere). Recently a reanalysis of the DISR dataset, corroborated by data from the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS), was carried out by the same group (Doose et al. 2016), leading to significant changes to the indications given by Tomasko et al. (2008).Here we present the analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation (EPF) performed by VIMS during the Cassini flyby T88 (November 2012). An EPF observes the same spot on the surface (and thus the same atmosphere) with the same emergence angle but with different incidence angles. In this way, our EPF allows, for the first time, to have direct information on the phase function of Titan's aerosols, as well as on other important physical parameters of the aerosols as the behavior of their extinction as a function of wavelength and the single scattering albedo (also as a function of wavelength) for the whole VIMS range (0.8-5.2 μm). The T88 EPF is composed of 25 VIMS datacubes spanning a scattering angle range approximately from 0°to 70°.We used the radiative transfer model described in Hirtzig et al. (2013) as baseline, updated with improved methane (+ related isotopes) spectroscopy. By changing the aerosol description in the model, we found the combination of aerosol optical parameters that fits best a constant aerosol column density over the whole set of the VIMS datacubes. We confirmed that the new results from Doose et al. (2016) do improve the fit for what concerns the vertical profile and the extinction as a function of wavelength. However, a different

  1. A new description of Titan's aerosol optical properties from the analysis of VIMS Emission Phase Function observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Sotin, Christophe; Rannou, Pascal; Bezard, Bruno; Cornet, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The Huygens probe gave unprecedented information on the properties of Titan's aerosols (vertical distribution, opacity as a function of wavelength, phase function, single scattering albedo) by in-situ measurements (Tomasko et al. 2008). Being the only existing in-situ atmospheric probing for Titan, this aerosol model currently is the reference for many Titan studies (e.g. by being applied as physical input in radiative transfer models of the atmosphere). Recently a reanalysis of the DISR dataset, corroborated by data from the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS), was carried out by the same group (Doose et al. 2016), leading to significant changes to the indications given by Tomasko et al. (2008). Here we present the analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation (EPF) performed by VIMS during the Cassini flyby T88 (November 2012). An EPF observes the same spot on the surface (and thus the same atmosphere) with the same emergence angle but with different incidence angles. In this way, our EPF allows, for the first time, to have direct information on the phase function of Titan's aerosols, as well as on other important physical parameters of the aerosols as the behavior of their extinction as a function of wavelength and the single scattering albedo (also as a function of wavelength) for the whole VIMS range (0.8-5.2 µm). The T88 EPF is composed of 25 VIMS datacubes spanning a scattering angle range approximately from 0°to 70°. We used the radiative transfer model described in Hirtzig et al. (2013) as baseline, updated with improved methane (+ related isotopes) spectroscopy. By changing the aerosol description in the model, we found the combination of aerosol optical parameters that fits best a constant aerosol column density over the whole set of the VIMS datacubes. We confirmed that the new results from Doose et al. (2016) do improve the fit for what concerns the vertical profile and the extinction as a function of wavelength. However, a different

  2. Simulation of aerosol radiative properties with the ORISAM-RAD model during a pollution event (ESCOMPTE 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Pont, V.; Liousse, C.; Roger, J. C.; Dubuisson, P.

    The aim of this study is to present the organic and inorganic spectral aerosol module-radiative (ORISAM-RAD) module, allowing the 3D distribution of aerosol radiative properties (aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter) from the ORISAM module. In this work, we test ORISAM-RAD for one selected day (24th June) during the ESCOMPTE (expérience sur site pour contraindre les modèles de pollution atmosphérique et de transport d'emissions) experiment for an urban/industrial aerosol type. The particle radiative properties obtained from in situ and AERONET observations are used to validate our simulations. In a first time, simulations obtained from ORISAM-RAD indicate high aerosol optical depth (AOD)˜0.50-0.70±0.02 (at 440 nm) in the aerosol pollution plume, slightly lower (˜10-20%) than AERONET retrievals. In a second time, simulations of the single scattering albedo ( ωo) have been found to well reproduce the high spatial heterogeneities observed over this domain. Concerning the asymmetry parameter ( g), ORISAM-RAD simulations reveal quite uniform values over the whole ESCOMPTE domain, comprised between 0.61±0.01 and 0.65±0.01 (at 440 nm), in excellent agreement with ground based in situ measurements and AERONET retrievals. Finally, the outputs of ORISAM-RAD have been used in a radiative transfer model in order to simulate the diurnal direct radiative forcing at different locations (urban, industrial and rural). We show that anthropogenic aerosols strongly decrease surface solar radiation, with diurnal mean surface forcings comprised between -29.0±2.9 and -38.6±3.9 W m -2, depending on the sites. This decrease is due to the reflection of solar radiations back to space (-7.3±0.8<Δ FTOA<-12.3±1.2 W m -2) and to its absorption into the aerosol layer (21.1±2.1<Δ FATM<26.3±2.6 W m -2). These values are found to be consistent with those measured at local scale.

  3. The albedo of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, G. W.; Lutz, B. L.; Thompson, D. T.; Bus, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    Photometric observations of Titan since 1972 show a cyclical variation of about 10 percent. A minimum value of brightness and albedo apparently occurred in 1984. Spectrophotometric observations, made annualy since 1980 at 8 A resolution, 3295-8880 A, were used to derive the value p-asterisk = 0.156 + or - 0.010 for the integrated geometric albedo in 1984. Variations of the equivalent widths of spectral features were not seen.

  4. Greenland Glacier Albedo Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a NASA-funded project with the prime goal of addressing the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Since the formal initiation of the program in 1995, there has been a significant improvement in the estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheet. Results from this program reveal that the high-elevation regions of the ice sheet are approximately in balance, but the margins are thinning. Laser surveys reveal significant thinning along 70 percent of the ice sheet periphery below 2000 m elevations, and in at least one outlet glacier, Kangerdlugssuaq in southeast Greenland, thinning has been as much as 10 m/yr. This study examines the albedo variability in four outlet glaciers to help separate out the relative contributions of surface melting versus ice dynamics to the recent mass balance changes. Analysis of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder albedo shows that at the Petermann and Jakobshavn glaciers, there has been a negative trend in albedo at the glacier terminus from 1981 to 2000, whereas the Stor+strommen and Kangerdlugssuaq glaciers show slightly positive trends in albedo. These findings are consistent with recent observations of melt extent from passive microwave data which show more melt on the western side of Greenland and slightly less on the eastern side. Significance of albedo trends will depend on where and when the albedo changes occur. Since the majority of surface melt occurs in the shallow sloping western margin of the ice sheet where the shortwave radiation dominates the energy balance in summer (e.g. Jakobshavn region) this region will be more sensitive to changes in albedo than in regions where this is not the case. Near the Jakobshavn glacier, even larger changes in albedo have been observed, with decreases as much as 20 percent per decade.

  5. Albedo estimates for debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Henize, Karl G.; Talent, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The albedo of upper-stage breakup debris is proposed as an accurate discriminator among the various possible causes of breakup, which encompass residual fuel explosions and hypervelocity particle impacts. The fragments from an impact are covered with a thin layer of soot deposited from the destruction of polymeric circuit boards, while pressure vessel explosion fragments can be expected to remain soot-free. Albedo also facilitates the interpretation of small-debris optical telescope measurements.

  6. OMI tropospheric NO2 air mass factors over South America: effects of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; Torres, O.; de Haan, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning is an important and uncertain source of aerosols and NOx (NO + NO2) to the atmosphere. OMI observations of tropospheric NO2 are essential for characterizing this emissions source, but inaccuracies in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric columns due to the radiative effects of aerosols, especially light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, are not well understood. It has been shown that the O2-O2 effective cloud fraction and pressure retrieval is sensitive to aerosol optical and physical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosols implicitly influence the tropospheric air mass factor (AMF) calculations used in the NO2 retrieval through the effective cloud parameters used in the independent pixel approximation. In this work, we explicitly account for the effects of biomass burning aerosols in the tropospheric NO2 AMF calculation by including collocated aerosol extinction vertical profile observations from the CALIOP instrument, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) in the DISAMAR radiative transfer model for cloud-free scenes. Tropospheric AMFs calculated with DISAMAR were benchmarked against AMFs reported in the Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) retrieval; the mean and standard deviation (SD) of the difference was 0.6 ± 8%. Averaged over three successive South American biomass burning seasons (2006-2008), the spatial correlation in the 500 nm AOD retrieved by OMI and the 532 nm AOD retrieved by CALIOP was 0.6, and 72% of the daily OMAERUV AOD observations were within 0.3 of the CALIOP observations. Overall, tropospheric AMFs calculated with observed aerosol parameters were on average 10% higher than AMFs calculated with effective cloud parameters. For effective cloud radiance fractions less than 30%, or effective cloud pressures greater than 800 hPa, the difference between tropospheric AMFs based on implicit and explicit aerosol parameters is on average 6 and 3

  7. Effects of aerosols on clear-sky solar radiation in the ALADIN-HIRLAM NWP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, Emily; Toll, Velle; Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Rontu, Laura; Masek, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The direct shortwave radiative effect of aerosols under clear-sky conditions in the Aire Limitee Adaptation dynamique Developpement InterNational - High Resolution Limited Area Model (ALADIN-HIRLAM) numerical weather prediction system was investigated using three shortwave radiation schemes in diagnostic single-column experiments: the Integrated Forecast System (IFS), acraneb2 and the hlradia radiation schemes. The multi-band IFS scheme was formerly used operationally by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) whereas hlradia and acraneb2 are broadband schemes. The former is a new version of the HIRLAM radiation scheme while acraneb2 is the radiation scheme in the ALARO-1 physics package. The aim was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the numerical weather prediction (NWP) system regarding aerosols and to prepare it for use of real-time aerosol information. The experiments were run with particular focus on the August 2010 Russian wildfire case. Each of the three radiation schemes accurately (within ±4 % at midday) simulates the direct shortwave aerosol effect when observed aerosol optical properties are used. When the aerosols were excluded from the simulations, errors of more than +15 % in global shortwave irradiance were found at midday, with the error reduced to +10 % when standard climatological aerosols were used. An error of -11 % was seen at midday if only observed aerosol optical depths at 550 nm, and not observation-based spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors, were included in the simulations. This demonstrates the importance of using the correct aerosol optical properties. The dependency of the direct radiative effect of aerosols on relative humidity was tested and shown to be within ±6 % in this case. By modifying the assumptions about the shape of the IFS climatological vertical aerosol profile, the inherent uncertainties associated with assuming fixed vertical

  8. Attribution of aerosol radiative forcing over India during the winter monsoon to emissions from source categories and geographical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, S.; Venkataraman, C.; Boucher, O.

    2011-08-01

    We examine the aerosol radiative effects due to aerosols emitted from different emission sectors (anthropogenic and natural) and originating from different geographical regions within and outside India during the northeast (NE) Indian winter monsoon (January-March). These studies are carried out through aerosol transport simulations in the general circulation (GCM) model of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD). The model estimates of aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) show lower values (0.86-0.92) over the region north to 10°N comprising of the Indian subcontinent, Bay of Bengal, and parts of the Arabian Sea compared to the region south to 10°N where the estimated SSA values lie in the range 0.94-0.98. The model estimated SSA is consistent with the SSA values inferred through measurements on various platforms. Aerosols of anthropogenic origin reduce the incoming solar radiation at the surface by a factor of 10-20 times the reduction due to natural aerosols. At the top-of-atmosphere (TOA), aerosols from biofuel use cause positive forcing compared to the negative forcing from fossil fuel and natural sources in correspondence with the distribution of SSA which is estimated to be the lowest (0.7-0.78) from biofuel combustion emissions. Aerosols originating from India and Africa-west Asia lead to the reduction in surface radiation (-3 to -8 W m -2) by 40-60% of the total reduction in surface radiation due to all aerosols over the Indian subcontinent and adjoining ocean. Aerosols originating from India and Africa-west Asia also lead to positive radiative effects at TOA over the Arabian Sea, central India (CNI), with the highest positive radiative effects over the Bay of Bengal and cause either negative or positive effects over the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP).

  9. Airborne Sunphotometer Studies of Aerosol Properties and Effects, Including Closure Among Satellite, Suborbital Remote, and In situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russlee, Philip B.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Airborne sunphotometry has been used to measure aerosols from North America, Europe, and Africa in coordination with satellite and in situ measurements in TARFOX (1996), ACE-2 (1997), PRIDE (2000), and SAFARI 2000. Similar coordinated measurements of Asian aerosols are being conducted this spring in ACE-Asia and are planned for North American aerosols this summer in CLAMS. This paper summarizes the approaches used, key results, and implications for aerosol properties and effects, such as single scattering albedo and regional radiative forcing. The approaches exploit the three-dimensional mobility of airborne sunphotometry to access satellite scenes over diverse surfaces (including open ocean with and without sunglint) and to match exactly the atmospheric layers sampled by airborne in situ measurements and other radiometers. These measurements permit tests of the consistency, or closure, among such diverse measurements as aerosol size-resolved chemical composition; number or mass concentration; light extinction, absorption, and scattering (total, hemispheric back and 180 deg.); and radiative fluxes. In this way the airborne sunphotometer measurements provide a key link between satellite and in situ measurements that helps to understand any discrepancies that are found. These comparisons have led to several characteristic results. Typically these include: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements than between remote and in situ measurements. (2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements. (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from in situ measurements. Aerosol intensive properties derived from these closure studies have been combined with satellite-retrieved fields of optical depth to produce fields of regional radiative forcing. We show results for the North Atlantic derived from AVHRR optical depths and aerosol intensive properties from TARFOX and ACE-2. Companion papers

  10. Diurnal Evolution of Aerosol Optical Properties and Morphology at Pico Tres Padres: A Phenomenological Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, C.; Chakrabarty, R.; Dubey, M. K.; Moosmuller, H.; Chylek, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Herndon, S.; Zavala, M.; Kolb, C.

    2007-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties affect planetary radiative balance and therefore climate. The optical properties are related to chemical composition, size distribution, and morphology, which also have implications for human health and environmental degradation. During the MILAGRO field campaign, we measured ensemble aerosol absorption and angle-integrated scattering in Mexico City. These measurements were performed using the Los Alamos aerosol photoacoustic instrument with an integrated nephelometer (LAPA) operating at 781 nm. The LAPA was mounted on-board the Aerodyne Inc. mobile laboratory, which hosted a wide variety of gaseous and aerosol instruments. During the campaign, the Aerodyne mobile laboratory was moved to different sites, capturing the influence of spatial and temporal parameters including location, aging, elevation, and sources on ambient air pollution. The LAPA operated almost continuously between the 3rd and the 28th of March 2006. During the same period we collected ambient aerosols on more than 100 Nuclepore filters for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Filter samples were collected during specific pollution events and different times of the day. Subsequently, SEM images of selected filters were taken to study particle morphology. The elemental composition of a few individual particles was also qualitatively assessed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Between March 7th and 19th the laboratory was sampling air close to the top of the Pico Tres Padres, a ~3000 m high mountain on the north side of the Mexico City. Daily changes of aerosol loading and pollutant concentrations followed the expected diurnal variations of the boundary layer height. Here we report a preliminary analysis of aerosol absorption, scattering, and morphology at Pico Tres Padres for three specific days (9th, 11th and 12th of March 2006). The single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering to total extinction) during these three days showed a characteristic drop in the

  11. Studing Taklamakan aerosol properties with Lidar (STAPL)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    By now, the global impacts of atmospheric dust have been well-established. Nevertheless, relevant properties such as size distribution, depolarization ratio, and even single-scattering albedo have been shown to vary substantially between dust producing regions and are also strongly dependent on the ...

  12. Inferring the composition and concentration of aerosols by combining the AERONET, MPLNET and CALIOP data: comparison with in-situ measurements and utilization to evaluate and improve GCM results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, D.; Ginoux, P. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2009-12-01

    We present a method to derive the concentration of aerosol components using the spectral measurements of AOD (aerosol optical depth) and single scattering albedo along with their size distribution and extinction profile available from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) and MPLNET (Micro-pulse Lidar Network) stations as well as the space borne CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar [Ganguly et al., 2009a; 2009b]. The technique involves finding the best combination of aerosol concentration by minimizing differences between measured and calculated spectral variation in AOD and single scattering albedo along with the size distribution of aerosols over specific locations. Lidar data on extinction profile provides the vertical constraint on the distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Relative humidity from NCEP reanalysis is used to compute the hygroscopic growth factors and associated changes in the optical properties of aerosol components at all vertical levels. The technique has been successfully applied over different regions around the world such as North America, Southern Africa and South Asia. The results have been validated using in-situ measurements of aerosol composition available from the first two regions. Finally, we show how these results are being used to evaluate and improve the GFDL-AM2/AM3 climate model simulations. We believe our technique could also be used for the retrieval of air quality by calculating PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations. This could improve the existing methods by providing a better relation between surface measurements of PM2.5 concentration and satellite data. References: Ganguly, D., P. Ginoux, V. Ramaswamy, O. Dubovik, J. Welton, E. A. Reid and B. N. Holben (2009a), Inferring the composition and concentration of aerosols by combining AERONET and MPLNET data: comparison with other measurements and utilization to evaluate GCM output, J. Geophys. Res., 114, D16203, doi:10.1029/2009JD011895. Ganguly, D., P

  13. In situ airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties during photochemical pollution events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; van Dingenen, R.; Roger, J. C.; Despiau, S.; Cachier, H.

    2005-02-01

    Dry aerosol optical properties (scattering, absorbing coefficients, and single scattering albedo) were derived from in situ airborne measurements during two photochemical pollution events (25 and 26 June) observed during the Experience sur Site pour Contraindre les Modeles de Pollution atmospherique et de Transport d'Emissions (ESCOMPTE) experiment. Two flights were carried out during daytime (one during the morning and one at noon) over a domain, allowing the investigation of how an air pollution event affects the particle optical properties. Both horizontal distribution and vertical profiles are presented. Results from the horizontal mapping show that plumes of enhanced scattering and absorption are formed in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) during the day in the sea breeze-driven outflow of the coastal urban-industrial area of Marseille-Fos de Berre. The domain-averaged scattering coefficient (at 550 nm) over land σs changes from 35 (28) Mm-1 during land breeze to 63 (43) Mm-1 during sea breeze on 25 June (26 June), with local maxima reaching > 100 Mm-1. The increase in the scattering coefficient is associated with new particle formation, indicative of secondary aerosol formation. Simultaneously, the domain-averaged absorption coefficient increases from 5.6 (3.4) Mm-1 to 9.3 (8.0) Mm-1. The pollution plume leads to strong gradients in the single scattering albedo ωo over the domain studied, with local values as low as 0.73 observed inside the pollution plume. The role of photochemistry and secondary aerosol formation during the 25 June case is shown to increase ωo and to make the aerosol more `reflecting' while the plume moves away from the sources. The lower photochemical activity, observed in the 26 June case, induces a relatively higher contribution of black carbon, making the aerosol more absorbing. Results from vertical profiles at a single near-urban location in the domain indicate that the changes in optical properties happen almost entirely within

  14. Models for the optical simulations of fractal aggregated soot particles thinly coated with non-absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Light absorption enhancement of aged soot aerosols is highly sensitive to the morphologies and mixing states of soot aggregates and their non-absorbing coatings, such as organic materials. The quantification of these effects on the optical properties of thinly coated soot aerosols is simulated using an effective model with fixed volume fractions. Fractal aggregated soot was simulated using the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) algorithm and discretized into soot dipoles. The dipoles of non-absorbing aerosols, whose number was fixed by the volume fraction, were further generated from the neighboring random edge dipoles. Their optical properties were calculated using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method and were compared with other commonly used models. The optical properties of thinly coated soot calculated using the fixed volume fraction model are close to (less than ~10% difference) the results of the fixed coating thickness model, except their asymmetry parameters (up to ~25% difference). In the optical simulations of thinly coated soot aerosols, this relative difference of asymmetry parameters and phase functions between these realistic models may be notable. The realizations of the fixed volume fraction model may introduce smaller variation of optical results than those of the fixed coating thickness model. Moreover, the core-shell monomers model and homogeneous aggregated spheres model with the Maxwell-Garnett (MG) theory may underestimate (up to ~20%) the cross sections of thinly coated soot aggregates. The single core-shell sphere model may largely overestimate (up to ~150%) the cross sections and single scattering albedo of thinly coated soot aggregates, and it underestimated (up to ~60%) their asymmetry parameters. It is suggested that the widely used single core-shell sphere approximation may not be suitable for the single scattering calculations of thinly coated soot aerosols.

  15. New Aerosol Models for the Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness and Normalized Water-Leaving Radiances from the SeaWiFS and MODIS Sensors Over Coastal Regions and Open Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Ziauddin; Franz, Bryan A.; McClain, Charles R.; Kwiatkowska, Ewa J.; Werdell, Jeremy; Shettle, Eric P.; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development of a new suite of aerosol models for the retrieval of atmospheric and oceanic optical properties from the SeaWiFs and MODIS sensors, including aerosol optical thickness (tau), angstrom coefficient (alpha), and water-leaving radiance (L(sub w)). The new aerosol models are derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations and have bimodal lognormal distributions that are narrower than previous models used by the Ocean Biology Processing Group. We analyzed AERONET data over open ocean and coastal regions and found that the seasonal variability in the modal radii, particularly in the coastal region, was related to the relative humidity, These findings were incorporated into the models by making the modal radii, as well as the refractive indices, explicitly dependent on relative humidity, From those findings, we constructed a new suite of aerosol models. We considered eight relative humidity values (30%, 50%, 70%, 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%. and 95%) and, for each relative humidity value, we constructed ten distributions by varying the fine-mode fraction from zero to 1. In all. 80 distributions (8Rh x 10 fine-mode fractions) were created to process the satellite data. We. also assumed that the coarse-mode particles were nonabsorbing (sea salt) and that all observed absorptions were entirely due to fine-mode particles. The composition of fine mode was varied to ensure that the new models exhibited the same spectral dependence of single scattering albedo as observed in the AERONET data,

  16. A study of regional aerosol radiative properties and effects on ultraviolet-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenny, B. N.; Schafer, J. S.; Deluisi, J. J.; Saxena, V. K.; Barnard, W. F.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Vergamini, A. J.

    1998-07-01

    A field experiment was conducted in western North Carolina to investigate the relationship between aerosol optical properties and atmospheric transmission. Two research measurement sites in close horizontal proximity but at different altitudes were established to measure the transmission of UV radiation through a slab of atmosphere. An identical set of radiation sensing instruments, including a broadband UV-B radiometer, a direct Sun pyrheliometer, a shadowband radiometer, and a spectral photometer, was placed at both sites, a mountaintop site (Mount Gibbes 35.78°N, 82.29°W, 2004 m elevation) and a valley site (Black Mountain, North Carolina 35.66°N, 82.38°N, 951 m elevation). Aerosol size distribution sampling equipment was located at the valley site. Broadband solar pseudo-optical depth and aerosol optical depths at 415 nm, 500 nm, and 673 nm were measured for the lowest 1-km layer of the troposphere. The measurements exhibited variations based on an air mass source region as determined by back trajectory analysis. Broadband UV-B transmission through the layer also displayed variations relating to air mass source region. Spectral UV transmission revealed a dependence upon wavelength, with decreased transmission in the UV-B region (300-320 nm) versus UV-A region (320-363.5 nm). UV-B transmission was found to be negatively correlated with aerosol optical depth. Empirical relations were developed to allow prediction of solar noon UV-B transmission if aerosol optical depth at two visible wavelengths (415 and 500 nm) is known. A new method was developed for determining aerosol optical properties from the radiation and aerosol size distribution measurements. The aerosol albedo of single scatter was found to range from 0.75 to 0.93 and the asymmetry factor ranged from 0.63 to 0.76 at 312 nm, which is close to the peak response of human skin to UV radiation.

  17. Aerosol direct radiative forcing in desert and semi-desert regions of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jinyuan; Gong, Chongshui; Wang, Shigong; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of dust aerosols were measured using narrow-band data from a portable sun photometer at four desert and semi-desert stations in northwestern China from 2004 to 2007. Ground-based and satellite observations indicated absorbing dust aerosol loading over the region surrounded by eight large-scale deserts. Radiation forcing was identified by using the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model. The ranges of annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angström exponents, and single-scattering albedo (SSA) were from 0.25 to 0.35, from - 0.73 to 1.18, and from 0.77 to 0.86, respectively. The ranges of annual mean aerosol direct radiative forcing values at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), mid-atmosphere, and on the surface were from 3.9 to 12.0, from 50.0 to 53.1, and from - 39.1 to - 48.1 W/m2, respectively. The aerosols' optical properties and radiative characteristics showed strong seasonal variations in both the desert and semi-desert regions. Strong winds and relatively low humidity will lead dust aerosols in the atmosphere to an increase, which played greatly affected these optical properties during spring and winter in northwestern China. Based on long-term observations and retrieved data, aerosol direct radiative forcing was confirmed to heat the atmosphere (50-53 W/m2) and cool the surface (- 39 to - 48 W/m2) above the analyzed desert. Radiative forcing in the atmosphere in spring and winter was 18 to 21 W/m2 higher than other two seasons. Based on the dust sources around the sites, the greater the AOD, the more negative the forcing. The annual averaged heating rates for aerosols close to the ground (1 km) were approximately 0.80-0.85 K/day.

  18. [Aerosol optical properties during different air-pollution episodes over Beijing].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chan-Zhen; Yu, Xing-Na; Zhou, Bin; Xiang, Lei; Nie, Hao-Hao

    2013-11-01

    Based on the 2005-2011 data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), this study conducted analysis on aerosol optical properties over Beijing during different air-pollution episodes (biomass burning, CNY firework, dust storm). The aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed notable increases in the air-pollution episodes while the AOD (at 440 nm) during dust storm was 4. 91, 4. 07 and 2.65 times higher as background, biomass burning and firework aerosols. AOD along with Angstrom exponent (alpha) can be used to determine the aerosol types. The dust aerosol had the highest AOD and the lowest alpha. The alpha value of firework (1.09) was smaller than biomass burning (1.21) and background (1.27), indicating that coarse particles were dominant in the former type. Higher AOD of burnings (than background) can be attributed to the optical extinction capability of black carbon aerosol. The single scattering albedo (SSA) was insensitive to wavelength. The SSA value of dust (0.934) was higher than background (0.878), biomass burning (0.921) and firework (0.905). Additionally, the extremely large SSA of burnings here maybe was caused by the aging smoke, hygroscopic growth and so on. The peak radius of aerosol volume size distributions were 0.1-0.2 microm and 2.24 -3.85 microm in clear and polluted conditions. The value of volume concentration ratio between coarse and fine particles was in the order of clear background (1.04), biomass burning (1.10), CNY firework (1.91) and dust storm (4.96) episode.

  19. Spectral aerosol direct radiative forcing from airborne radiative measurements during CalNex and ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Samuel E.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Redemann, J.; Hostetler, C.; Ferrare, R.; Hair, J.; Langridge, J. M.; Lack, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    This study presents the aerosol radiative forcing derived from airborne measurements of shortwave spectral irradiance during the 2010 Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex). Relative forcing efficiency, the radiative forcing normalized by aerosol optical thickness and incident irradiance, is a means of comparing the aerosol radiative forcing for different conditions. In this study, it is used to put the aerosol radiative effects of an air mass in the Los Angeles basin in context with case studies from three field missions that targeted other regions and aerosol types, including a case study from the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS). For CalNex, we relied on irradiance measurements onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during a flight on 19 May 2010 over a ground station. CalNex presented a difficulty for determining forcing efficiency since one of the input parameters, optical thickness, was not available from the same aircraft. However, extinction profiles were available from a nearby aircraft. An existing retrieval algorithm was modified to use those measurements as initial estimate for the missing optical thickness. In addition, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (secondary products of the method), were compared with CalNex in situ measurements. The CalNex relative forcing efficiency spectra agreed with earlier studies that found this parameter to be constrained at each wavelength within 20% per unit of aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm regardless of aerosol type and experiment, except for highly absorbing aerosols sampled near Mexico City. The diurnally averaged below-layer forcing efficiency integrated over the wavelength range of 350-700 nm for CalNex is estimated to be -58.6 ± 13.8 W/m2, whereas for the ARCTAS case it is -48.7 ± 11.5 W/m2.

  20. Aerosol Properties over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: A Mesoscale Perspective from the TIGERZ Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Tripathi, Sachchida; Eck, Thomas F.; Newcomb, W. Wayne; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, Russell R.; Thompson, Anne M.; Mattoo, Shana; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Singh, Remesh P.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    High aerosol loading over the northern Indian subcontinent can result in poor air quality leading to human health consequences and climate perturbations. The international 2008 TIGERZ experiment intensive operational period (IOP) was conducted in the Indo \\Gangetic Plain (IGP) around the industrial city of Kanpur (26.51degN, 80.23deg E), India, during the premonsoon (April-June). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometers performed frequent measurements of aerosol properties at temporary sites distributed within an area covering 50 sq km around Kanpur to characterize pollution and dust in a region where complex aerosol mixtures and semi \\bright surface effects complicate satellite retrieval algorithms. TIGERZ IOP Sun photometers quantified aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases up to 0.10 within and downwind of the city, with urban emissions accounting for 10 C20% of the IGP aerosol loading on deployment days. TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged volume size distribution and single scattering albedo retrievals indicated spatially homogeneous, uniformly sized, spectrally absorbing pollution and dust particles. Aerosol absorption and size relationships were used to categorize black carbon and dust as dominant absorbers and to identify a third category in which both black carbon and dust dominate absorption.Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD retrievals with the lowest quality assurance (QA > or = 0) flags were biased high with respect to TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged measurements. MODIS AOD retrievals with QA 0 had moderate correlation (R(sup 2) = 0.52-69) with the Kanpur AERONET site, whereas retrievals with QA > 0 were limited in number. Mesoscale \\distributed Sun photometers quantified temporal and spatial variability of aerosol properties, and these results were used to validate satellite retrievals.

  1. Desert dust aerosol air mass mapping in the western Sahara, using particle properties derived from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Müller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite's larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05-0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR's ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  2. Desert Dust Aerosol Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, Using Particle Properties Derived from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Mueller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; Von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite s larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR s ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  3. The surface aerosol optical properties in the urban area of Nanjing, west Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bingliang; Wang, Tijian; Liu, Jane; Li, Shu; Xie, Min; Han, Yong; Chen, Pulong; Hu, Qiduo; Yang, Xiu-qun; Fu, Congbin; Zhu, Jialei

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies of aerosol optical properties are useful for reducing uncertainties in estimations of aerosol radiative forcing and forecasting visibility. In this study, the observed near-surface aerosol optical properties in urban Nanjing are analysed from March 2014 to February 2016. Results show that near-surface urban aerosols in Nanjing are mainly from local emissions and the surrounding regions. They have lower loadings but are more scattering than aerosols in most cities in China. The annual mean aerosol extinction coefficient (EC), single-scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP) at 550 nm are 381.96 Mm-1, 0.9 and 0.57, respectively. The aerosol absorption coefficient (AAC) is about 1 order of magnitude smaller than its scattering coefficient (SC). However, the absorbing aerosol has a larger Ångström exponent (AAE) value, 1.58 at 470/660 nm, about 0.2 larger than the scattering aerosols (SAE). All the aerosol optical properties follow a near-unimodal pattern, and their values are mostly concentrated around their averages, accounting for more than 60 % of the total samplings. Additionally, they have substantial seasonality and diurnal variations. High levels of SC and AAC all appear in winter due to higher aerosol and trace gas emissions. AAE (ASP) is the smallest (largest) in summer, possibly because of high relative humidity (RH) which also causes considerably larger SC and smaller SAE, although intensive gas-to-particle transformation could produce a large number of finer scattering aerosols in this season. Seasonality of EC is different from the columnar aerosol optical depth. Larger AACs appear during the rush hours of the day while SC and back-scattering coefficient (Bsp) only peak in the early morning. Aerosols are fresher in the daytime than at night-time, leading to their larger Ångström exponent and smaller ASP. Different temporal variations between AAC and SC cause the aerosols to be more absorbing (smaller SSA) in autumn

  4. Evaluation of LIDAR/Polarimeter Aerosol Measurements by In Situ Instrumentation during DEVOTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Dolgos, G.; Ottaviani, M.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Yang, M. M.; Hair, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Combined measurements from LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) and polarimeter instruments provide the opportunity for enhanced satellite observations of aerosol properties including retrievals of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, effective radius, and refractive index. However, these retrievals (specifically for refractive index) have not been fully vetted and require additional intercomparisons with in situ measurements to improve accuracy. Proper validation of these combined LIDAR/polarimeter retrievals requires evaluation in varying atmospheric conditions and of varying aerosol composition. As part of this effort, two NASA Langley King Air aircraft have been outfitted to provide coordinated measurements of aerosol properties. One will be used as a remote sensing platform with the NASA Langley high-spectral resolution LIDAR (HSRL) and NASA GISS research scanning polarimeter (RSP). The second aircraft has been modified for use as an in situ platform and will house a suite of aerosol microphysical instrumentation, a pair of diode laser hygrometers (DLHs) for water vapor and cloud extinction measurements, and a polarized imaging nephelometer (PI-Neph). The remote sensing package has flown in a variety of campaigns, however only rarely has been able to coordinate with in situ measurements. The use of two collocated aircraft will allow for future coordinated flights to provide a more complete dataset for evaluation of aerosol retrievals and allow for fast-response capability. Results from the first coordinated King Air flights as part of DEVOTE (Development and Evaulation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters) will be presented. Flights are planned out of Hampton, VA during September and October 2011 including underflights of the CALIPSO satellite and overflights of ground-based AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sites. These will provide a comparison of aerosol properties between in situ and remote instruments (ground, aircraft, and satellite

  5. Numerical investigation of the coagulation mixing between dust and hygroscopic aerosol particles and its impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, I.-Chun; Chen, Jen-Ping; Lin, Yi-Chiu; Chung-Kuang Chou, Charles; Chen, Wei-Nai

    2015-05-01

    A statistical-numerical aerosol parameterization was incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system to study the coagulation mixing process focusing on a dust storm event that occurred over East Asia. Simulation results show that the coagulation mixing process tends to decrease aerosol mass, surface area, and number concentrations over the dust source areas. Over the downwind oceanic areas, aerosol concentrations generally increased due to enhanced sedimentation as particles became larger upon coagulation. The mixture process can reduce the overall single-scattering albedo by up to 10% as a result of enhanced core with shell absorption by dust and reduction in the number of scattering particles. The enhanced dry deposition speed also altered the vertical distribution. In addition, the ability of aerosol particles to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) increased from around 107 m-3 to above 109 m-3 over downwind areas because a large amount of mineral dust particles became effective CCN with solute coating, except over the highly polluted areas where multiple collections of hygroscopic particles by dust in effect reduced CCN number. This CCN effect is much stronger for coagulation mixing than by the uptake of sulfuric acid gas on dust, although the nitric acid gas uptake was not investigated. The ability of dust particles to serve as ice nuclei may decrease or increase at low or high subzero temperatures, respectively, due to the switching from deposition nucleation to immersion freezing or haze freezing.

  6. Aerosol climatology over Mexico City basin: Characterization of their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabali-Sandoval, Giovanni; Valdéz-Barrón, Mauro; Bonifaz-Alfonso, Roberto; Riveros-Rosas, David; Estévez, Héctor

    2015-04-01

    Climatology of aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and size parameters were analyzed using a 15-year (1999-2014) data set from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) observations over Mexico City basin. Since urban air pollution is one of the biggest problems that face this megacity, many studies addressing these issues have been published. However few studies have examined the climatology of aerosol taking into account their optical properties over long-time period. Pollution problems in Mexico City have been generated by the daily activities of some 21 million people coupled with the vast amount of industry located within the city's metropolitan area. Another contributing factor is the unique geographical setting of the basin encompassing Mexico City. The basin covers approximately 5000 km2 of the Mexican Plateau at an average elevation of 2250 m above sea level (ASL) and is surrounded on three sides by mountains averaging over 3000 m ASL. In this work we present preliminary results of aerosol climatology in Mexico City.

  7. Comparative accuracy of the Albedo, transmission and absorption for selected radiative transfer approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D.; HARSHVARDHAN

    1986-01-01

    Illustrations of both the relative and absolute accuracy of eight different radiative transfer approximations as a function of optical thickness, solar zenith angle and single scattering albedo are given. Computational results for the plane albedo, total transmission and fractional absorption were obtained for plane-parallel atmospheres composed of cloud particles. These computations, which were obtained using the doubling method, are compared with comparable results obtained using selected radiative transfer approximations. Comparisons were made between asymptotic theory for thick layers and the following widely used two stream approximations: Coakley-Chylek's models 1 and 2, Meador-Weaver, Eddington, delta-Eddington, PIFM and delta-discrete ordinates.

  8. Assessment of aerosol optical and micro-physical features retrieved from direct and diffuse solar irradiance measurements from Skyradiometer at a high altitude station at Merak: Assessment of aerosol optical features from Merak.

    PubMed

    Ningombam, Shantikumar S; Srivastava, A K; Bagare, S P; Singh, R B; Kanawade, V P; Dorjey, Namgyal

    2015-11-01

    Optical and micro-physical features of aerosol are reported using Skyradiometer (POM-01L, Prede, Japan) observations taken from a high-altitude station Merak, located in north-eastern Ladakh of the western trans-Himalayas region during January 2011 to December 2013. The observed daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD, at 500 nm) at the site varied from 0.01 to 0.14. However, 75 % of the observed AOD lies below 0.05 during the study period. Seasonal peaks of AOD occurred in spring as 0.06 and minimum in winter as 0.03 which represents the aged background aerosols at the site. Yearly mean AOD at 500 nm is found to be around 0.04 and inter-annual variations of AOD is very small (nearly ±0.01). Angstrom exponent (a) varied seasonally from 0.73 in spring to 1.5 in autumn. About 30 % of the observed a lies below 0.8 which are the indicative for the presence of coarse-mode aerosols at the site. The station exhibits absorbing aerosol features which prominently occurred during spring and that may be attributed by the transported anthropogenic aerosol from Indo-Gangatic Plain (IGP). Results were well substantiated with the air mass back-trajectory analysis. Furthermore, seasonal mean of single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm) varied from of 0.94 to 0.98 and a general increasing trend is noticed from 400 to 870 nm wavelengths. These features are apparently regional characteristics of the site. Aerosol asymmetry factor (AS) decreases gradually from 400 to 870 nm and varied from 0.66 to 0.69 at 500 nm across the seasons. Dominance of desert-dust aerosols, associated by coarse mode, is indicated by tri-modal features of aerosol volume size distribution over the station during the entire seasons.

  9. Diurnal variations of aerosol optical properties in the North China Plain and their influences on the estimates of direct aerosol radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Ye; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the diurnal variations of aerosol optical properties and their influences on the estimation of daily average direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) in the North China Plain (NCP) are investigated based on in situ measurements from Haze in China campaign. For ambient aerosol, the diurnal patterns of single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (g) in the NCP are both highest at dawn and lowest in the late afternoon, and quite different from those of dry-state aerosol. The relative humidity is the dominant factor which determines the diurnal patterns of SSA and g for ambient aerosol. Basing on the calculated SSA and g, several cases are designed to investigate the impacts of the diurnal changes of aerosol optical properties on DARE. The results demonstrate that the diurnal changes of SSA and g in the NCP have significant influences on the estimation of DARE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). If the full temporal coverage of aerosol optical depth (AOD), SSA and g are available, an accurate estimation of daily average DARE can be achieved by using the daily averages of AOD, SSA and g. However, due to the lack of full temporal coverage datasets of SSA and g, their daily averages are usually not available. Basing on the results of designed cases, if the RH plays a dominant role in the diurnal variations of SSA and g, we suggest that using both SSA and g averaged over early morning and late afternoon as inputs for radiative transfer model to improve the accurate estimation of DARE. If the temporal samplings of SSA or g are too few to adopt this method, either averaged over early morning or late afternoon of both SSA and g can be used to improve the estimation of DARF at TOA.

  10. Investigation on seasonal variations of aerosol properties and its influence on radiative effect over an urban location in central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Subin; Gharai, Biswadip; Niranjan, K.; Rao, P. V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol plays an important role in modulating solar radiation, which are of great concern in perspective of regional climate change. The study analysed the physical and optical properties of aerosols over an urban area and estimated radiative effect using three years in-situ data from sunphotometer, aethalometer and nephelometer as input to radiative transfer model. Aerosols properties indicate the dominance of fine mode aerosols over the study area. However presence of coarse mode aerosols is also found during pre-monsoon [March-April-May]. Daily mean aerosol optical depth showed a minimum during winter [Dec-Jan-Feb] (0.45-0.52) and a maximum during pre-monsoon (0.6-0.7), while single scattering albedo (ω) attains its maximum (0.78 ± 0.05) in winter and minimum (0.67 ± 0.06) during pre-monsoon and asymmetry factor varied in the range between 0.48 ± 0.02 to 0.53 ± 0.04. Episodic events of dust storm and biomass burning are identified by analyzing intrinsic aerosol optical properties like scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) during the study periods and it has been observed that during dust storm events ω is lower (˜0.77) than that of during biomass burning (˜0.81). The aerosol direct radiative effect at top of the atmosphere during winter is -11.72 ± 3.5 Wm-2, while during pre-monsoon; it is -5.5 ± 2.5 Wm-2, which can be due to observed lower values of ω during pre-monsoon. A large positive enhancement of atmospheric effect of ˜50.53 Wm-2 is observed during pre-monsoon compared to winter. Due to high aerosol loading in pre-monsoon, a twofold negative surface forcing is also observed in comparison to winter.

  11. Aerosol airmass type mapping over the urban Mexico City region from space-based multi-angle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Kahn, R. A.; Limbacher, J. A.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2013-03-01

    Using Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and sub-orbital measurements from the 2006 INTEX-B/MILAGRO field campaign, in this study we demonstrate MISR's ability to map different aerosol air mass types over the Mexico City metropolitan area. The aerosol air mass distinctions are based on shape, size and single scattering albedo retrievals from the MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval algorithm. In this region, the research algorithm identifies dust-dominated aerosol mixtures based on non-spherical particle shape, whereas spherical biomass burning and urban pollution particles are distinguished by particle size. Four distinct aerosol air masses are identified in the MISR data on 6 March 2006; these results are supported by coincident, airborne high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients are also consistent between the MISR and sub-orbital measurements, but particles having SSA558≈0.7 must be included in the retrieval algorithm to produce good absolute AOD comparisons over pollution-dominated aerosol air masses. The MISR standard V22 AOD product, at 17.6 km resolution, captures the observed AOD gradients qualitatively, but retrievals at this coarse spatial scale and with limited spherical absorbing particle options underestimate AOD and do not retrieve particle properties adequately over this complex urban region. However, we demonstrate how AOD and aerosol type mapping can be accomplished with MISR data over urban regions, provided the retrieval is performed at sufficiently high spatial resolution, and with a rich enough set of aerosol components and mixtures.

  12. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  13. The effect of ozone and aerosols on the surface erythemal UV radiation estimated from OMI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joonsuk; Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Deok Rae; Kim, Seung-Yeon; Song, Chang-Keun; Hong, Jun Suk; Hong, Youdeog; Lee, Sukjo

    2013-05-01

    Surface erythemal UV radiation is mainly affected by total column ozone, aerosols, clouds, and solar zenith angle. The effect of ozone on the surface UV radiation has been explored many times in the previous studies due to the decrease of ozone layer. In this study, we calculated the effect of aerosols on the surface UV radiation as well as that of ozone using data acquired from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). First, ozone, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and surface erythemal UVB radiation measured from satellite are compared with those from ground measurements. The results showed that the comparison for ozone was good with r 2 of 0.92. For aerosol, there was difference between satellite measurements and surface measurements due to the insufficient information on aerosol in the retrieval algorithm. The r 2 for surface erythemal UV radiation was high (˜0.94) but satellite measurements showed about 30% larger values than surface measurements on average by not considering the effect of absorbing aerosols in the retrieval process from satellite measurements. Radiative amplification factor (RAF) is used to access the effect of ozone and aerosol quantitatively. RAF for ozone was 0.97˜1.49 with solar zenith angle. To evaluate the effect of aerosol on the surface UV radiation, only clear-sky pixel data were used and solar zenith angle and total column amount of ozone were fixed. Also, RAF for aerosol was assessed according to the single scattering albedo (SSA) of aerosols. The results showed that RAF for aerosol with smaller SSA (< 0.90) was larger than that for with larger SSA (> 0.90). The RAF for aerosol was 0.09˜0.22 for the given conditions which was relatively small compared to that for ozone. However, considering the fact that aerosol optical depth can change largely in time and space while the total column amount of ozone does not change very much, it needs to include the effect of aerosol to predict the variations of surface UV radiation more correctly.

  14. Combined multispectral/hyperspectral remote sensing of tropospheric aerosols for quantification of their direct radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarragh, Gregory R.

    Scattering and absorption of solar radiation by aerosols in the atmosphere has a direct radiative effect on the climate of the Earth. Unfortunately, according to the IPCC the uncertainties in aerosol properties and their effect on the climate system represent one of the largest uncertainties in climate change research. Related to aerosols, one of the largest uncertainties is the fraction of the incident radiation that is scattered rather than absorbed, or their single scattering albedo. In fact, differences in single scattering albedo have a significant impact on the magnitude of the cooling effect of aerosols (opposite to that of greenhouse gasses) which can even have a warming effect for strongly absorbing aerosols. Satellites provide a unique opportunity to measure aerosol properties on a global scale. Traditional approaches use multispectral measurements of intensity at a single view angle to retrieve at most two aerosol parameters over land but it is being realized that more detail is required for accurate quantification of the direct effect of aerosols, in particular its anthropogenic component, and therefore more measurement information is required. One approach to more advanced measurements is to use not only intensity measurements but also polarimetric measurements and to use multiple view angles. In this work we explore another alternative: the use of hyperspectral measurements in molecular absorption bands. Our study can be divided into three stages the first of which is the development of a fast radiative transfer model for rapid simulation of measurements. Our approach is matrix operator based and uses the Pade approximation for the matrix exponential to evaluate the homogeneous solution. It is shown that the method is two to four times faster than the standard and efficient discrete ordinate technique and is accurate to the 6th decimal place. The second part of our study forms the core and is divided into two chapters the first of which is a rigorous

  15. Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David; Clayton, Marian; Schmid, Beat; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Orgren, John; Andrews, Elisabeth; Goldsmith, John E. M.; Jonsson, Hafidi

    2006-01-01

    Raman lidar water vapor and aerosol extinction profiles acquired during the daytime over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma (36.606 N, 97.50 W, 315 m) are evaluated using profiles measured by in situ and remote sensing instruments deployed during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (IOP). The automated algorithms used to derive these profiles from the Raman lidar data were first modified to reduce the adverse effects associated with a general loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar since early 2002. The Raman lidar water vapor measurements, which are calibrated to match precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from coincident microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements were, on average, 5-10% (0.3-0.6 g/m(exp 3) higher than the other measurements. Some of this difference is due to out-of-date line parameters that were subsequently updated in the MWR PWV retrievals. The Raman lidar aerosol extinction measurements were, on average, about 0.03 km(exp -1) higher than aerosol measurements derived from airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical thickness and in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption. This bias, which was about 50% of the mean aerosol extinction measured during this IOP, decreased to about 10% when aerosol extinction comparisons were restricted to aerosol extinction values larger than 0.15 km(exp -1). The lidar measurements of the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio and airborne Sun photometer measurements of the aerosol optical thickness were used along with in situ measurements of the aerosol size distribution to retrieve estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo (omega(sub o)) and the effective complex refractive index. Retrieved values of omega(sub o) ranged from (0.91-0.98) and were in generally good agreement with omega(sub o) derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering and absorption. Elevated aerosol

  16. Absorbing and scattering aerosols over the source region of biomass burning emissions: Implications in the assessment of optical and radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Atinderpal; Srivastava, Rohit; Rastogi, Neeraj; Singh, Darshan

    2016-02-01

    The current study focuses on the assessment of model simulated optical and radiative properties of aerosols incorporating the measured chemical composition of aerosol samples collected at Patiala during October, 2011-February, 2012. Monthly average mass concentration of PM2.5, elemental carbon (EC), primary organic carbon (POC), water-soluble (WS) and insoluble (INS) aerosols ranged from 120 to 192, 6.2 to 7.2, 20 to 39, 59 to 111 and 35 to 90 μg m-3, respectively. Mass concentration of different components of aerosols was further used for the assessment of optical properties derived from Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) model simulations. Microtops based measured aerosol optical depth (AOD500) ranged from 0.47 to 0.62 showing maximum value during November and December, and minimum during February. Ångström exponent (α380-870) remained high (>0.90) throughout the study period except in February (0.74), suggesting predominance of fine mode particles over the study region. The observed ratio of scattering to absorbing aerosols was incorporated in OPAC model simulations and single scattering albedo (SSA at 500 nm) so obtained ranged between 0.80 and 0.92 with relatively low values during the period of extensive biomass burning. In the present study, SBDART based estimated values of aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) at the surface (SRF) and top of the atmosphere (TOA) ranged from -31 to -66 Wm-2 and -2 to -18 W m-2 respectively. The atmospheric ARF, ranged between + 18 and + 58 Wm-2 resulting in the atmospheric heating rate between 0.5 and 1.6 K day-1. These results signify the role of scattering and absorbing aerosols in affecting the magnitude of aerosol forcing.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of spectral albedo for artificial snowpacks composed of spherical and nonspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, Tomonori; Aoki, Teruo; Hori, Masahiro; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Abe, Osamu; Aniya, Masamu

    2006-07-20

    The optical properties of snowpacks composed of spherical and nonspherical particles artificially prepared in a cold laboratory are investigated by measuring spectral albedos. The measured spectral albedo in the spectral region lambda=0.35-2.5 microm is compared with the theoretically calculated albedo, for which a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is employed for multiple scattering combined with the Mie theory and the ray-tracing technique for single scattering by snow particles. Since the spherical particles are a little aggregate, the effects of a cluster of the spheres on snow albedo are examined using a generalized multiparticle Mie-solution model [Appl. Opt. 34, 4573 (1995); J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 79-80, 1121 (2003)]. The snow albedo of a cluster of the spheres can be represented with that of the singe sphere slightly larger than its component of the cluster in case of small grains. The observed albedos for the spherical snow particles agree with the theoretically calculated ones for the snow grain size measured in the snow pit work. The snow albedos for the nonspherical particles, which were dendrites, are influenced by the branch width and the branch length, based on a comparison of the theoretically calculated albedo by using circular cylindrical snow particles and the observed albedo. The snow albedo in the near-infrared region depends on the branch width only when the branch length is sufficiently greater than the branch width. The comparison between the spherical and nonspherical snow particles indicates that the spectral albedo of the nonspherical particles can be represented by using an equal volume-area ratio sphere.

  18. The albedo of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; O'Brien, Denis; Webster, Peter J.; Pilewski, Peter; Kato, Seiji; Li, Jui-lin

    2015-03-01

    The fraction of the incoming solar energy scattered by Earth back to space is referred to as the planetary albedo. This reflected energy is a fundamental component of the Earth's energy balance, and the processes that govern its magnitude, distribution, and variability shape Earth's climate and climate change. We review our understanding of Earth's albedo as it has progressed to the current time and provide a global perspective of our understanding of the processes that define it. Joint analyses of surface solar flux data that are a complicated mix of measurements and model calculations with top-of-atmosphere (TOA) flux measurements from current orbiting satellites yield a number of surprising results including (i) the Northern and Southern Hemispheres (NH, SH) reflect the same amount of sunlight within ~ 0.2 W m-2. This symmetry is achieved by increased reflection from SH clouds offsetting precisely the greater reflection from the NH land masses. (ii) The albedo of Earth appears to be highly buffered on hemispheric and global scales as highlighted by both the hemispheric symmetry and a remarkably small interannual variability of reflected solar flux (~0.2% of the annual mean flux). We show how clouds provide the necessary degrees of freedom to modulate the Earth's albedo setting the hemispheric symmetry. We also show that current climate models lack this same degree of hemispheric symmetry and regulation by clouds. The relevance of this hemispheric symmetry to the heat transport across the equator is discussed.

  19. Generation and UV-VIS-NIR spectral responses of organo-mineral aerosol for modelling soil derived dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Illés, E.; Tombácz, E.; Szabó, G.; Bozóki, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Various optical properties of laboratory constructed clay minerals coated by humic acid were determined in this study. For the preparation of organo-clay complexes, an adsorption method was conducted in Ca2+ dominated aquaeous solutions, which provides the opportunity to generate solely internally mixed aerosol particles with complete surface covering. The wavelength dependent optical absorption and scattering coefficients of the syntetised organo-clay complexes and the single clay components were measured in-situ in aerosol phase, using multi-wavelength photoacoustic and scattering instruments. Other climate relevant optical properties such as mass absorption and scattering coefficients, absorption enhancement factor, the imaginary part of complex refractive index, single scattering albedo and coating thickness were also deduced from the measured data. The estimated thickness of humic acid coating was about 10-20 nm. Even such relatively thin shell substantially enhanced the measured absorption of the clay particles with an enhancement factor of about 3-7 in the visible-near ultraviolet range, while caused smaller changes in the mass scattering values. As a cumulative effect, the coating decreased the single scattering albedo of the clay particles; from 0.99 ± 0.04 to 0.93 ± 0.04 in case of illite and from 0.99 ± 0.04 to 0.90 ± 0.03 in case of kaolin at 525 nm. The HA coating slightly modified the shape, the particles became less excentric. We presented a new method capable of generating solely internally mixed particles. Applying this method we experimentally demonstrated the strong effect of a light absorbing coating on the optical properties of dust particle.

  20. Coherent Backscattering in Los Albedo Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Hale, A. S.; Smythe, W. D.; Piatek, J.

    2002-09-01

    The opposition effect [1] observed in phase curves of materials in the lab and on planetary surfaces is attributed to two processes: 'shadow hiding opposition effect' (SHOE) and 'coherent backscattering opposition effect' (CBOE) [2,3,4]. The relative contributions of SHOE and CBOE are studied by measuring reflectance phase curves in circularly polarized light. If single scattering predominates, the circular polarization ratio (CPR) decreases with decreasing phase angle. If multiple scattering predominates, the CPR strongly increases. We observed this increase in CPR in highly reflective media [5,6,7]. In low reflectance media most of the returned signal is singly scattered and CPR is not expected to sharply increase. We have found that most such materials indeed exhibit only a slight CPR increase. However, lunar soils show a strong CPR increase [8]. Recently we encountered another interesting counter example in Boron Carbide-a material with albedo even lower than the Moon's. We find a significant CPR increase, a result inconsistent with the conventional interpretation of CBOE [8]. This suggests that albedo alone is not the principal regulator of CBOE. This CBOE may be due to multiple scattering within individual particles [10]. Unusual particle shapes may facilitate this process. Understanding this behavior contributes to the development of models that can retrieve textural properties from remote sensing data. Work performed at JPL/PITT under NASA PG&G grants. 1.Geherels, T. Astrophys. J, 123, 331-338, 1956. 2. Hapke, B. Icarus, 67, 246-280, 1986. 3. Shkuratov, Yu. SA-A.J., 27, 581-583, 1983. 4. Hapke, B. Icarus, 88, 407-417, 1990. 5. Nelson, R., et al. Icarus 131, 223-230, 1998. 6. Nelson, R., et al Icarus, 147, 545-558, 2000. 7. Nelson, R., et al. Planet. Space Sci, 2002. 8. Hapke B. et al. Science, 260, 509-511. 9. Mishchenko, M.I. Earth, Moon and Planets, 58, 127-144, 1992. 10. Hapke, B. Icarus, 157, 534-537, 2002

  1. Global Retrieval of Aerosol Properties from Sources to Sinks By MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina

    2005-01-01

    Mineral dust and smoke aerosols play an important role in both climate forcing and oceanic productivity throughout the entire year. Due to the relatively short lifetime (a few hours to about a week), the distributions of these airborne particles vary extensively in both space and time. Consequently, satellite observations are needed over both source and sink regions for continuous temporal and spatial sampling of dust and smoke properties. However, despite their importance, the high spatial resolution satellite measurements of these aerosols near their sources have been lacking, In this paper, we will demonstrate the capability of a new satellite algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over bright-reflecting surfaces such as urban areas and deserts. Such retrievals have been difficult to perform using previously available algorithms that use wavelengths from the mid-visible to the near IR because they have trouble separating the aerosol signal from the contribution due to the bright surface reflectance. The new algorithm, called Deep Blue, utilizes blue-wavelength measurements from instruments such as MODIS and SeaWiFS to infer the properties of aerosols, since the surface reflectance over land in the blue part of the spectrum is much lower than for longer wavelength channels. We have validated the satellite retrieved aerosol optical thickness with data from AERONET sunphotometers over land, including desert and semi-desert regions. The comparisons show reasonable agreements between these two. Our results show that the dust plumes lifted from the deserts near India/Pakistan border, and over Afghanistan, and the Arabian Peninsula are often observed by MODIS to be transported along the Indo-Gangetic Basin and mixed with the fine mode pollution particles generated by anthropogenic activities in this region, particularly during the pre-monsoon season (April-May). These new satellite products will allow scientists to determine

  2. Development and Testing of the New Surface LER Climatology for OMI UV Aerosol Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pawan; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren; Ahn, Changwoo

    2014-01-01

    Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard Aura satellite retrieved aerosols properties using UV part of solar spectrum. The OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) is a global inversion scheme which retrieves aerosol properties both over ocean and land. The current version of the algorithm makes use of TOMS derived Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) climatology. A new monthly climatology of surface LER at 354 and 388 nm have been developed. This will replace TOMS LER (380 nm and 354nm) climatology in OMI near UV aerosol retrieval algorithm. The main objectives of this study is to produce high resolution (quarter degree) surface LER sets as compared to existing one degree TOMS surface LERs, to product instrument and wavelength consistent surface climatology. Nine years of OMI observations have been used to derive monthly climatology of surface LER. MODIS derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been used to make aerosol corrections on OMI wavelengths. MODIS derived BRDF adjusted reflectance product has been also used to capture seasonal changes in the surface characteristics. Finally spatial and temporal averaging techniques have been used to fill the gaps around the globes, especially in the regions with consistent cloud cover such as Amazon. After implementation of new surface data in the research version of algorithm, comparisons of AOD and single scattering albedo (SSA) have been performed over global AERONET sites for year 2007. Preliminary results shows improvements in AOD retrievals globally but more significance improvement were observed over desert and bright locations. We will present methodology of deriving surface data sets and will discuss the observed changes in retrieved aerosol properties with respect to reference AERONET measurements.

  3. Aerosol radiative forcing efficiency in the UV-B region over central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Olcese, Luis E.; Lanzaco, Bethania L.; Achad, Mariana; López, María Laura; Toselli, Beatriz M.

    2016-07-01

    AEROSOL Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and global UV-B (280-315 nm) irradiance measurements and calculations were combined to investigate the effects of aerosol loading on the ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B) reaching the surface under cloudless conditions in Córdoba, Argentina. The aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and the aerosol forcing efficiency (ARFE) were calculated for an extended period of time (2000-2013) at a ground-based monitoring site affected by different types and loading of aerosols. The ARFE was evaluated by using the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 340 nm retrieved by AERONET at the Cordoba CETT site. The individual and combined effects of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the ARFE were also analyzed. In addition, and for comparison purposes, the MODIS AOD at 550 nm was used as input in a machine learning method to better characterize the aerosol load at 340 nm and evaluate the ARFE retrieved from AOD satellite measurements. The ARFE at the surface calculated using AOD data from AERONET ranged from (-0.11 ± 0.01) to (-1.76 ± 0.20) Wm-2 with an average of -0.61 Wm-2; however, when using AOD data from MODIS (TERRA/AQUA satellites), it ranged from (-0.22 ± 0.03) to (-0.65 ± 0.07) Wm-2 with an average value of -0.43 Wm-2. At the same SZA and SSA, the maximum difference between ground and satellite-based was 0.22 Wm-2.

  4. Effects of data assimilation on the global aerosol key optical properties simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaomei; Dai, Tie; Schutgens, Nick A. J.; Goto, Daisuke; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Shi, Guangyu

    2016-09-01

    We present the one month results of global aerosol optical properties for April 2006, using the Spectral Radiation Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS) coupled with the Non-hydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), by assimilating Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) with Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF). The simulated AOD, Ångström Exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA) are validated by independent Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations over the global sites. The data assimilation has the strongest positive effect on the AOD simulation and slight positive influences on the AE and SSA simulations. For the time-averaged globally spatial distribution, the data assimilation increases the model skill score (S) of AOD, AE, and SSA from 0.55, 0.92, and 0.75 to 0.79, 0.94, and 0.80, respectively. Over the North Africa (NAF) and Middle East region where the aerosol composition is simple (mainly dust), the simulated AODs are best improved by the data assimilation, indicating the assimilation correctly modifies the wrong dust burdens caused by the uncertainties of the dust emission parameterization. Assimilation also improves the simulation of the temporal variations of the aerosol optical properties over the AERONET sites, with improved S at 60 (62%), 45 (55%) and 11 (50%) of 97, 82 and 22 sites for AOD, AE and SSA. By analyzing AOD and AE at five selected sites with best S improvement, this study further indicates that the assimilation can reproduce short duration events and ratios between fine and coarse aerosols more accurately.

  5. Deriving High Resolution UV Aerosol Optical Depth over East Asia using CAI-OMI Joint Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring aerosols using near UV spectral region have been successfully performed over decades by Ozong Monitoring Instruments (OMI) with benefit of strong aerosol signal over continuous dark surface reflectance, both land and ocean. However, because of big foot print of OMI, the cloud contamination error was a big issue in the UV aerosol algorithm. In the present study, high resolution UV aerosol optical depth (AOD) over East Asia was derived by collaborating the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite/Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (GOSAT/TANSO)-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) and OMI together. AOD of 0.1 degree grid resolution was retrieved using CAI band 1 (380nm) by bring OMI lv.2 aerosol type, single scattering albedo, and aerosol layer peak height in 1 degree grid resolution. Collocation of the two dataset within the 0.5 degree grid with time difference of OMI and CAI less than 5 minute was selected. Selected region becomes wider as it goes to the higher latitude. Also, calculated degradation factor of 1.57 was applied to CAI band1 (380nm) by comparing normalized radiance and Lambertian Equivalent Reflectivity (LER) of both sensors. The calculated degradation factor was reasonable over dark scene, but inconsistent over cirrus cloud and bright area. Then, surface reflectance was developed by compositing CAI LER minimum data over three month period, since the infrequent sampling rate associated with the three-day recursion period of GOSAT and the narrow CAI swath of 1000 km. To retrieve AOD, look up table (LUT) was generated using radiative transfer model VLIDORT NGST. Finally, the retrieved AOD was validated with AERONET ground based measurement data during the Dragon-NE Asia campaign in 2012.

  6. Mixing state of aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: Radiative forcing and heating rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, R.; Ramachandran, S.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols are a major atmospheric variable which perturb the Earth-atmosphere radiation balance by absorbing and scattering the solar and terrestrial radiation. Aerosols are produced by natural and anthropogenic processes. The presence of different types of aerosol over a location and aerosols transported from long-range can give rise to different mixing states because of aging and interaction among the different aerosol species. Knowledge of the mixing state of aerosols is important for an accurate assessment of aerosols in climate forcing, as assumptions regarding the mixing state of aerosol and its effect on optical properties can give rise to uncertainties in modeling their direct and indirect effects [1]. Seasonal variations in mixing states of aerosols over an urban (Kanpur) and a rural location (Gandhi College) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) are determined using the measured and modeled aerosol optical properties, and the impact of aerosol mixing state on aerosol radiative forcing are investigated. IGP is one of the most populated and polluted river basins in the world, rich in fertile lands and agricultural production. Kanpur is an urban, industrial and densely populated city, and has several large/small scale industries and vehicles, while Gandhi College in IGP is a rural village, located southeast of Kanpur. Aerosol optical properties obtained from Aerosol Robotic Network sun/sky radiometers [2] over these two environmentally distinct locations in Indo-Gangetic Plain are used in the study, along with aerosol vertical profiles obtained from CALIPSO (Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) lidar observations. Probable mixing state of aerosols is determined utilizing the aerosol optical properties viz., aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter. The coated-sphere Mie calculation requires the refractive index of core and shell species, and the radius of core and shell particles. Core to shell radius

  7. Regional aerosol optical properties and radiative impact of the extreme smoke event in the European Arctic in spring 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund Myhre, C.; Toledano, C.; Myhre, G.; Stebel, K.; Yttri, K. E.; Aaltonen, V.; Johnsrud, M.; Frioud, M.; Cachorro, V.; de Frutos, A.; Lihavainen, H.; Campbell, J. R.; Chaikovsky, A. P.; Shiobara, M.; Welton, E. J.; Tørseth, K.

    2007-11-01

    In spring 2006 a special meteorological situation occurred in the European Arctic region giving record high levels of air pollution. The synoptic situation resulted in extensive transport of pollution predominantly from agricultural fires in Eastern Europe into the Arctic region and record high air-pollution levels were measured at the Zeppelin observatory at Ny-Ålesund (78°54' N, 11°53' E) in the period from 25 April to 12 May. In the present study we investigate the optical properties of the aerosols from this extreme event and we estimate the radiative forcing of this episode. We examine the aerosol optical properties from the source region and into the European Arctic and explore the evolution of the episode and the changes in the optical properties. A number of sites in Eastern Europe, Northern Scandinavia and Svalbard are included in the study. The observations show that the maximum AOD was from 2-3 May at all sites and varies from 0.52 to 0.87, and the corresponding Ångstrøm exponent was relatively large. Lidar measurements from Minsk, ALOMAR (Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research at Andenes) and Ny-Ålesund show that the aerosol layer was below 3 km at all sites the height is decreasing from the source region and into the Arctic. For the AERONET sites included (Minsk, Toravere, Hornsund) we have further studied the evolution of the aerosol size. The single scattering albedo at Svalbard is provided for two sites; Ny-Ålesund and Hornsund. Importantly the calculated single scattering albedo based on the aerosol chemical composition and size distribution from Ny-Ålesund and the AERONET measurements at Hornsund are consistent. We have found strong agreement between the satellite daily MODIS AOD and the ground-based AOD observations. This agreement is crucial for accurate radiative forcing calculations. We calculate a strong negative radiative forcing for the most polluted days employing the analysed ground based data, MODIS AOD and a

  8. The impacts of aerosol loading, composition, and water uptake on aerosol extinction variability in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Chen, G.; Corr, C. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Diskin, G. S.; Moore, R. H.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Anderson, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    In order to utilize satellite-based aerosol measurements for the determination of air quality, the relationship between aerosol optical properties (wavelength-dependent, column-integrated extinction measured by satellites) and mass measurements of aerosol loading (PM2.5 used for air quality monitoring) must be understood. This connection varies with many factors including those specific to the aerosol type - such as composition, size, and hygroscopicity - and to the surrounding atmosphere, such as temperature, relative humidity (RH), and altitude, all of which can vary spatially and temporally. During the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project, extensive in situ atmospheric profiling in the Baltimore, MD-Washington, D.C. region was performed during 14 flights in July 2011. Identical flight plans and profile locations throughout the project provide meaningful statistics for determining the variability in and correlations between aerosol loading, composition, optical properties, and meteorological conditions. Measured water-soluble aerosol mass was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate (campaign average of 32 %) and organics (57 %). A distinct difference in composition was observed, with high-loading days having a proportionally larger percentage of sulfate due to transport from the Ohio River Valley. This composition shift caused a change in the aerosol water-uptake potential (hygroscopicity) such that higher relative contributions of inorganics increased the bulk aerosol hygroscopicity. These days also tended to have higher relative humidity, causing an increase in the water content of the aerosol. Conversely, low-aerosol-loading days had lower sulfate and higher black carbon contributions, causing lower single-scattering albedos (SSAs). The average black carbon concentrations were 240 ng m-3 in the lowest 1 km, decreasing to 35 ng m-3 in the free troposphere (above

  9. The detailed aerosol properties derived using GRASP Algorithm from multi-angular polarimetric POLDER/PARASOL observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Litvinov, Pavel; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Ducos, Fabrice; Fuertes, David; Huang, Xin; Derimian, Yevgeny; Ovigneur, Bertrand; Descloitres, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    The presentation introduces a new aerosol product derived from multi-angular polarimetric POLDER/PARASOL observations using recently developed GRASP algorithm The GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) algorithm described by Dubovik et al. (2011, 2014) derives an extended set of aerosol parameters including detailed particle size distribution, spectral refractive index, single scattering albedo and the fraction of non-spherical particles. Over land GRASP simultaneously retrieves properties of both aerosol and underlying surface. The robust performance of algorithm was illustrated in a series of numerical tests and real data case studies. However, the algorithm is significantly slower than conventional look-up-table retrievals because it performs all radiative transfer calculations on-line. This is why the application of the algorithm for processing large volumes of satellite data was considered as unacceptably challenging task. During two last years GRASP algorithm and its operational retrieval environment has been significantly optimized, improved and adapted for processing extended set of observational data. Hence, here we demonstrate the first results of GRASP aerosol products obtained from large data sets of PARASOL/POLDER observations. It should be noted that in addition the core retrieved aerosol and surface parameters GRASP output may include a variety of user-oriented products including values of daily fluxes and aerosol radiative forcing. 1. Dubovik, O., M. Herman, A. Holdak, T. Lapyonok, D. Tanré, J. L. Deuzé, F. Ducos, A. Sinyuk, and A. Lopatin, "Statistically optimized inversion algorithm for enhanced retrieval of aerosol properties from spectral multi-angle polarimetric satellite observations", Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 975-1018, 2011. 2. Dubovik, O., T. Lapyonok, P. Litvinov, M. Herman, D. Fuertes, F. Ducos, A. Lopatin, A. Chaikovsky, B. Torres, Y. Derimian, X. Huang, M. Aspetsberger, and C. Federspiel "GRASP: a versatile

  10. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, G. G.; Lefer, B. L.; Hall, S. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Corr, C. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, S.

    2012-08-01

    Urban air pollution absorbs and scatters solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus has a potentially large effect on tropospheric photochemical rates. We present the first detailed comparison between UV actinic fluxes (AF) measured in highly polluted conditions and simulated with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measured AF values are typically smaller than the model by up to 25% in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, for pollution-free and cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 67% and NO2 for 25% of AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the AF perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols enhance AF above the PBL and reduce AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA < 0.6) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the AF.

  11. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, G. G.; Lefer, B. L.; Hall, S. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Corr, C. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, S.

    2013-01-01

    Urban air pollution absorbs and scatters solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus has a potentially large effect on tropospheric photochemical rates. We present the first detailed comparison between actinic fluxes (AF) in the wavelength range 330-420 nm measured in highly polluted conditions and simulated with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measured AF values are typically smaller than the model by up to 25% in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, for pollution-free and cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68% and NO2 for 25% of AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the AF perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols enhance AF above the PBL and reduce AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA < 0.6) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the AF.

  12. Aerosols: Non-CO2 Non-Greenhouse Non-Gas Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S. E.

    2005-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols influence Earth's radiation budget and climate by scattering and absorbing solar radiation (direct effects) and by modifying the reflectivity and extent of clouds (indirect effects). While aerosol forcing is arguably less important from a policy perspective than greenhouse gas forcing because of the short residence times of these aerosols (about a week) compared to the lifetimes of the well mixed greenhouse gases (decades to centuries), knowledge of aerosol forcing over the industrial period is essential to empirical inference of Earth's climate sensitivity from temperature change over this period and to evaluation of the performance of climate model simulations over this period. Accuracy in global-average forcing by anthropogenic aerosols required for these purposes is estimated to be ~0.5 w m-2 [Schwartz, J. Air Waste Management Assoc. 54, 1351-1359 (2004)]. For an accumulation-mode (radius 50-1000 nm) scattering aerosol above a dark surface the forcing per optical depth (at 550 nm) during daylight hours for cloud-free sky is 50 to 100 W m-2. Such a forcing intensity implies, taking into account 50% nighttime and ~50% cloud cover, that global average optical depth of anthropogenic aerosol must be known to 0.02 - 0.04, an accuracy achievable by careful ground-based measurements, but which would be difficult to achieve globally because of high spatial and temporal variation. Top-of-atmosphere forcing for a given optical depth is sensitive also to single scattering albedo, size distribution (as manifested in asymmetry parameter, backscatter fraction, or Angstrom exponent) and surface reflectance; these sensitivities are examined here. It is necessary as well to determine the fraction of forcing that is due to anthropogenic aerosol. Similar considerations apply to aerosol indirect forcing, which depends to first approximation on the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei as a function of applied supersaturation, which depends on the

  13. Mixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, Christian M.; Kus, Pinar; Rood, Mark J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2003-12-01

    The Ron Brown cruise during ACE-Asia (March-April 2001) encountered complex aerosol that at times was dominated by marine, polluted, volcanic, and dust aerosols. Average total light scattering coefficients (σsp for Dp <10 μm, relative humidity (RH) = 19%, and λ = 550 nm) ranged from 23 (marine) to 181 Mm-1 (dust). Aerosol hygroscopicity ranged from deliquescent with hysteresis (marine frequently and polluted variably) to hygroscopic without hysteresis (volcanic) to nearly hygrophobic (dust-dominated). Average deliquescence and crystallization RH were 77 ± 2% and 42 ± 3%, respectively. The ambient aerosol was typically on the upper branch of the hysteresis loop for marine and polluted air masses and the lower branch for dust-dominated aerosols. Average f(RH = ambient), defined as σsp (RH = ambient)/σsp (RH = 19%), ranged from 1.25 (dust) to 2.88 (volcanic). Average h(RH ˜60%), defined as f(RH)upper branch/f(RH)lower branch, were 1.6, 1.3, 1, and 1.25 for marine, polluted, volcanic, and dust, demonstrating an importance of hysteresis to optical properties. Hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) at ambient RH ranged from 0.077 (marine) to 0.111 (dust), while single scattering albedo (ω) at ambient RH ranged from 0.94 (dust and polluted) to 0.99 (marine).

  14. Altitude Differentiated Aerosol Extinction Over Tenerife (North Atlantic Coast) During ACE-2 by Means of Ground and Airborne Photometry and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formenti, P.; Elias, T.; Welton, J.; Diaz, J. P.; Exposito, F.; Schmid, B.; Powell, D.; Holben, B. N.; Smirnov, A.; Andreae, M. O.; Devaux, C.; Voss, K.; Lelieveld, J.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Retrievals of spectral aerosol optical depths (tau(sub a)) by means of sun photometers have been undertaken in Tenerife (28 deg 16' N, 16 deg 36' W) during ACE-2 (June-July 1997). Five ground-based sites were located at four different altitudes in the marine boundary layer and in the free troposphere, from 0 to 3570 m asl. The goal of the investigation was to provide estimates of the vertical aerosol extinction over the island, both under clean and turbid conditions. Inversion of spectral tau(sub a) allowed to retrieve size distributions, from which the single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) and the asymmetry factor g could be estimated as a function of altitude. These parameters were combined to calculate aerosol forcing in the column. Emphasis is put on episodes of increased turbidity, which were observed at different locations simultaneously, and attributed to outbreaks of mineral dust from North Africa. Differentiation of tau(sub a) as a function of altitude provided the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient sigma(sub e). For dust outbreaks, aerosol extinction is concentrated in two distinct layers above and below the strong subsidence inversion around 1200 m asl. Vertical profiles of tau(sub a) and sigma(sub e) are shown for July 8. In some occasions, vertical profiles are compared to LIDAR observations, performed both at sea level and in the low free troposphere, and to airborne measurements of aerosol optical depths.

  15. Sunphotometry of the 2006-2007 aerosol optical/radiative properties at the Himalayan Nepal Climate Observatory - Pyramid (5079 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, G. P.; Angelini, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Verza, G. P.; Marinoni, A.; Barnaba, F.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of being located at the heart of the highest mountain range in the world, the Himalayan Nepal Climate Observatory (5079 m a.s.l.) at the Ev-K2-CNR Pyramid is shown to be affected by the advection of pollution aerosols from the populated regions of southern Nepal and the Indo-Gangetic plains. Such an impact is observed along most of the period April 2006-March 2007 addressed here, with a minimum in the monsoon season. Backtrajectory-analysis indicates long-range transport episodes occurring in this period to originate mainly in the West Asian deserts. At this high altitude site, the measured aerosol optical depth is observed to be: 1) about one order of magnitude lower than the one measured at Gandhi College (60 m a.s.l.), in the Indo-Gangetic basin, and 2) maximum during the monsoon period, due to the presence of elevated (cirrus-like) particle layers. Assessment of the aerosol radiative forcing results to be hampered by the persistent presence of these high altitude particle layers, which impede a continuous measurement of both the aerosol optical depth and its radiative properties from sky radiance inversions. Even though the retrieved absorption coefficients of pollution aerosols was rather large (single scattering albedo of the order of 0.6-0.9 were observed in the month of April 2006), the corresponding low optical depths (~0.03 at 500 nm) are expected to limit the relevant radiative forcings. Still, the high specific forcing of this aerosol and its capability of altering snow surface albedo provide good reason for continuous monitoring.

  16. Global profiles of the direct aerosol effect using vertically resolved aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Pappas, Vasilios; Matsoukas, Christos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In general, aerosols cause cooling of the surface and the planet, while they warm the atmosphere due to scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. The importance of vertically resolved direct radiative effect (DRE) and heating/cooling effects of aerosols is strong, while large uncertainties still lie with their magnitudes. In order to be able to quantify them throughout the atmosphere, a detailed vertical profile of the aerosol effect is required. Such data were made available recently by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. CALIOP is the first polarization lidar to fly in space and has been acquiring unique data on aerosols and clouds since June 2006. The aim of this study is to investigate both the vertically resolved geographic and seasonal variation of the DRE due to aerosols. The vertical profile of DRE under all-sky and clear-sky conditions is computed using the deterministic spectral radiative transfer model FORTH. From the DRE, the effect on atmospheric heating/cooling rate profiles due to aerosols can also be derived. We use CALIOP Level 2-Version 3 Layer aerosol optical depth data as input to our radiation transfer model, for a period of 3 complete years (2007-2009). These data are provided on a 5 km horizontal resolution and in up to 8 vertical layers and have been regridded on our model horizontal and vertical resolutions. We use cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), while the aerosol asymmetry factor and single scattering albedo are taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model computations are performed on a monthly, 2.5°× 2.5° resolution on global scale, at 40

  17. Enhancement of aerosol characterization using synergy of lidar and sun - photometer coincident observations: the GARRLiC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, A.; Dubovik, O.; Chaikovsky, A.; Goloub, Ph.; Lapyonok, T.; Tanré, D.; Litvinov, P.

    2013-03-01

    concentration but it also differentiates between the contributions of fine and coarse modes of aerosol. The detailed microphysical properties are assumed height independent and different for each mode and expected to be derived as a part of the retrieval. Thus, the GARRLiC inversion algorithm retrieves vertical distribution of both fine and coarse aerosol concentrations as well as the size distribution, complex refractive index and single scattering albedo for each mode. The potential and limitations of the method are demonstrated by the series of sensitivity tests. The practical outcome of the approach is illustrated by applications of the algorithm to the real lidar and radiometer observations obtained over selected AERONET site.

  18. Aerosol variability over the Mediterranean basin from 2005-2012 POLDER-3/PARASOL and AERONET/PHOTONS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapello, Isabelle; Ducos, Fabrice; Dulac, François; Léon, Jean-François; Mallet, Marc; Tanré, Didier; Goloub, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    POLDER-3 (Polarization and Directionnality of the Earth's Reflectances) has been launched on board the PARASOL microsatellite in December 2004. Although the PARASOL orbit has been lowered twice (in September 2009 and in November 2011) compared to the other platforms of the A-Train constellation, POLDER observations continue, providing now more than seven years of innovative retrievals of aerosol properties from space. In this study we focus on analyzing POLDER-3 capabilities to derive both aerosol loads (Total Aerosol Optical Thickness) and size properties (fine and coarse spherical/non-spherical Aerosol Optical Thickness, Angström coefficients) over oceanic surfaces. This analysis, as part of the ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) program, focus on the Mediterranean basin, a region under the influence of a complex mixture of aerosols from different sources. Especially we aim to investigate the respective contributions of (i) pollution aerosols (emitted by industry and urban environments of some European regions or megacities surrounding the basin), (ii) carbonaceous particles (from biomass burning events), (iii) mineral dust exported from arid and semi-arid regions of North Africa. In a first step, our study consists in an analysis of aerosol variability retrieved from AERONET/PHOTONS photometer records from selected sites located in Western part of the Mediterranean basin (i.e., Soust-East of France, Spain, Corsica/Sardinia), as well as central part (i.e., Italia and Lampedusa), and Eastern part (i.e.,Greece and Turkey). These measurements provide a unique characterization of both aerosol load (aerosol optical depth) and properties (size distribution and absorption though single scattering albedo) and their temporal variability over each part of the Mediterranean basin. The second step focus on a regional validation of the PARASOL monthly aerosol products by comparison with these equivalent and selected ground-based AERONET

  19. Variability of aerosol optical properties in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, M.; Cusack, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2011-08-01

    Aerosol light scattering, absorption and particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured at Montseny, a regional background site in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) which is part of the European Supersite for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (EUSAAR). Off line analyses of 24 h PM filters collected with Hi-Vol instruments were performed for the determination of the main chemical components of PM. Mean scattering and hemispheric backscattering coefficients (@ 635 nm) were 26.6±23.2 Mm-1 and 4.3±2.7 Mm-1, respectively and the mean aerosol absorption coefficient (@ 637 nm) was 2.8±2.2 Mm-1. Mean values of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Ångström exponent (å) (calculated from 450 nm to 635 nm) at MSY were 0.90±0.05 and 1.3±0.5 respectively. A clear relationship was observed between the PM1/PM10 and PM2.5/PM10 ratios as a function of the calculated Ångström exponents. Mass scattering cross sections (MSC) for fine mass and sulfate at 635 nm were 2.8±0.5 m2 g-1 and 11.8±2.2 m2 g-1, respectively, while the mean aerosol absorption cross section (MAC) was 10.4±2.0 m2 g-1. The variability in aerosol optical properties in the WMB were largely explained by the origin and ageing of air masses over the measurement site. The MAC values appear dependent of particles aging: similar to the expected absorption cross-section for fresh emissions under Atlantic Advection episodes and higher under aerosol pollution episodes. The analysis of the Ångström exponent as a function of the origin the air masses revealed that polluted winter anticyclonic conditions and summer recirculation scenarios typical of the WMB led to an increase of fine particles in the atmosphere (å = 1.5±0.1) while the aerosol optical properties under Atlantic Advection episodes and Saharan dust outbreaks were clearly dominated by coarser particles (å = 1.0±0.4). The sea breeze played an important role in transporting pollutants from the developed WMB coastlines towards inland rural areas

  20. Radiative effects of aerosols on the environment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbin

    Anthropogenic emissions and concentrations of aerosol precursors and aerosols over China are among the highest in major countries of the world. Due to large emissions of soot and dust, aerosol absorption is high. Based on the observed direct and diffuse irradiance, a single scattering albedo of about 0.8 is derived for two large agri/eco/industrial areas. Aerosol direct effect can exert various environmental impacts in China. Photochemical activities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are significantly reduced because of reductions in photolysis rates and in emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons. Crop yields under optimal conditions can be reduced due to the reduction in surface solar irradiance. The most significant aerosol radiative perturbation is in changing the air-surface interaction and diurnal evolution of ABL. Reductions in various surface heat fluxes due to aerosols depend on soil moisture. Over a relatively dry surface, the evaporation has a small change, leading to the largest decrease of surface skin temperature at noon. Over a relatively wet surface, a substantial reduction in evaporation results in the largest surface cooling in the early morning. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) can be reduced by an amount comparable to the observed decrease of DTR. The longwave absorption of aerosols can lead to an increase of the daily minimum temperature and contributes to about 20% of the decrease in the DTR. The near-surface air temperature has the largest cooling in the early morning because the ABL is shallow and the temperature is sensitive to the radiative perturbation. As a result of the reduced sensible heat flux, the surface layer becomes more stable. Moreover, the aerosol heating enhances the stabilization of surface layer and in turn further reduces the sensible heat flux. As a result the ABL height can be reduced substantially. This will have many important ramifications, including trapping/accumulation of air pollutants, and perturbing the water

  1. Global detection of absorbing aerosols over the ocean in the red and near-infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waquet, F.; Péré, J.-C.; Peers, F.; Goloub, P.; Ducos, F.; Thieuleux, F.; Tanré, D.

    2016-09-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA at 865 nm) has been estimated over clear-sky ocean for 2006 by using measurements acquired by POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances). Our estimates are correlated with Sun photometer retrievals (R = 0.63). Differences in SSA are generally around 0.05 and systematically fall below 0.055 for optical thicknesses ≥0.3 (at 865 nm) and modeling errors ≤3.0%. Fine absorbing aerosols (radius ≤ 0.16 μm) are detected in many coastal regions. The lowest SSAs are retrieved over the southeast Atlantic during summer (0.80), whereas nonabsorbing fine particles (≥0.98) are observed over the North Pacific. During winter, fine absorbing aerosols are detected together with mineral dust near the coasts of western Africa (0.90), over the tropical Atlantic (0.88), and around India (0.88). Long-range transport of absorbing species is also detected, as for instance over the Arctic. This study could help to constrain aerosol absorption and radiative forcing in models.

  2. Retrieval of aerosol complex refractive index from a synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements during LISAIR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2007-06-01

    Particulate pollutant exchanges between the streets and the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL), and their daily evolution linked to human activity were studied in the framework of the LIdar pour la Surveillance de l'AIR (LISAIR) experiment. This program lasted from 10 to 30 May 2005. A synergetic approach combining dedicated active (lidar) and passive (sunphotometer) remote sensors as well as ground based in situ instrumentation (nephelometer, aethalometer and particle sizers) was used to investigate urban aerosol optical properties within Paris. Aerosol complex refractive indices were assessed to be 1.56-0.034 i at 355 nm and 1.59-0.040 i at 532 nm, thus leading to single-scattering albedo values between 0.80 and 0.88. These retrievals are consistent with soot components in the aerosol arising from traffic exhausts indicating that these pollutants have a radiative impact on climate. We also discussed the influence of relative humidity on aerosol properties. A good agreement was found between vertical extinction profile derived from lidar backscattering signal and retrieved from the coupling between radiosounding and ground in situ measurements.

  3. Retrieval of aerosol complex refractive index from a synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements during LISAIR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2007-01-01

    Particulate pollutant exchanges between the streets and the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL), and their daily evolution linked to human activity were studied in the framework of the LIdar pour la Surveillance de l'AIR (LISAIR) experiment. This program lasted from 10 to 30 May 2005. A synergetic approach combining dedicated active (lidar) and passive (sunphotometer) remote sensors as well as ground based in situ instrumentation (nephelometer, aethalometer and particle sizers) was used to investigate urban aerosol optical properties within Paris. Aerosol complex refractive indices were assessed to be 1.56-0.034i at 355 nm and 1.59-0.040i at 532 nm, thus leading to single-scattering albedo values between 0.80 and 0.88. These retrievals are consistent with soot components in the aerosol arising from traffic exhausts indicating that these pollutants have a radiative impact on climate. We also discussed the influence of relative humidity on aerosol properties. A good agreement was found between vertical extinction profile derived from lidar backscattering signal and retrieved from the coupling between radiosounding and ground in situ measurements.

  4. Synergistic angular and spectral estimation of aerosol properties using CHRIS/PROBA-1 and simulated Sentinel-3 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, W. H.; North, P. R. J.

    2015-04-01

    We develop a method to derive aerosol properties over land surfaces using combined spectral and angular information, such as available from ESA Sentinel-3 mission, to be launched in 2015. A method of estimating aerosol optical depth (AOD) using only angular retrieval has previously been demonstrated on data from the ENVISAT and PROBA-1 satellite instruments, and is extended here to the synergistic spectral and angular sampling of Sentinel-3. The method aims to improve the estimation of AOD, and to explore the estimation of fine mode fraction (FMF) and single scattering albedo (SSA) over land surfaces by inversion of a coupled surface/atmosphere radiative transfer model. The surface model includes a general physical model of angular and spectral surface reflectance. An iterative process is used to determine the optimum value of the aerosol properties providing the best fit of the corrected reflectance values to the physical model. The method is tested using hyperspectral, multi-angle Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) images. The values obtained from these CHRIS observations are validated using ground-based sun photometer measurements. Results from 22 image sets using the synergistic retrieval and improved aerosol models show an RMSE of 0.06 in AOD, reduced to 0.03 over vegetated targets.

  5. Synergistic angular and spectral estimation of aerosol properties using CHRIS/PROBA-1 and simulated Sentinel-3~data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, W. H.; North, P. R. J.

    2014-06-01

    A method has been developed to estimate Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Fine Mode Fraction (FMF) and Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) over land surfaces using simulated Sentinel-3 data. The method uses inversion of a coupled surface/atmosphere radiative transfer model, and includes a general physical model of angular surface reflectance. An iterative process is used to determine the optimum value of the aerosol properties providing the best fit of the corrected reflectance values for a number of view angles and wavelengths with those provided by the physical model. A method of estimating AOD using only angular retrieval has previously been demonstrated on data from the ENVISAT and PROBA-1 satellite instruments, and is extended here to the synergistic spectral and angular sampling of Sentinel-3 and the additional aerosol properties. The method is tested using hyperspectral, multi-angle Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) images. The values obtained from these CHRIS observations are validated using ground based sun-photometer measurements. Results from 22 image sets using the synergistic retrieval and improved aerosol models show an RMSE of 0.06 in AOD, reduced to 0.03 over vegetated targets.

  6. Natural versus anthropogenic factors affecting low-level cloud albedo over the North Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Kim, Yongseung; Kolber, Zbigniew; Wilson, Cara; Wirick, Creighton; Cess, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Cloud albedo plays a key role in regulating earth's climate. Cloud albedo depends on column-integrated liquid water content and the density of cloud condensation nuclei, which consists primarily of submicrometer-sized aerosol sulfate particles. A comparison of two independent satellite data sets suggests that, although anthropogenic sulfate emissions may enhance cloud albedo immediately adjacent to the east coast of the United States, over the central North Atlantic Ocean the variability in albedo can be largely accounted for by natural marine and atmospheric processes that probably have remained relatively constant since the beginning of the industrial revolution.

  7. Implementation of the T-matrix method on a massively parallel machine: a comparison of hexagonal ice cylinder single-scattering properties using the T-matrix and improved geometric optics methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havemann, S.; Baran, A. J.; Edwards, J. M.

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes a series of improvements to an already existing T-matrix implementation for calculating the single-scattering properties of non-axisymmetric particles at large size parameters.The improvements aim to use the computational resources in terms of memory and time as efficiently as possible by taking into account various simplifications of the T-matrix formulation.In this paper the randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystal is considered and the orientational averaging is done analytically. Within the framework of the T-matrix approach, symmetries of the hexagonal cylinders allow the formulation of eight independent subproblems, for each of which the memory demand is reduced by a factor of 144 compared to the general formulation.The memory demand strongly increases as a function of size parameter.For non-axisymmetric particles, memory demand rises approximately as the fourth power of the size parameter.In order to have more memory available, the T-matrix code was parallelized and implemented on a multi-processor CRAY T3E supercomputer.Extended precision is software emulated. With these new developments the single-scattering properties of randomly oriented hexagonal columns can be calculated for size parameters up to about 40.This size parameter reaches into the region of Improved Geometric Optics (IGO), which is applicable down to size parameters of around 20. Comparisons of IGO and T-matrix results for the single-scattering albedo and the extinction efficiency show that at a size parameter of around 30, the single-scattering albedos are generally within about 2%. IGO underpredicts the extinction efficiency by 4% at l = 3.775 mm and by 11% at the more absorbing wavelength of l = 4.9 mm.This underprediction may be due to the version may be due to the version of IGO usedsince this does not take into account the inhomogeneity of the refracted wave in an absorbing medium.

  8. Effective Albedo of Vegetated Terrain at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives an explicit expression for an effective albedo of vegetated terrain from the zero- and multiple- order radiative transfer (RT) model comparison. The formulation establishes a direct physical link between the effective vegetation parameterization and the theoretical description of absorption and scattering within the canopy. The paper will present an evaluation of the derived albedo for corn canopies with data taken during an experiment at Alabama A&M Winfield A. Thomas Agricultural Research Station near Huntsville, Alabama in June, 1998. The test site consisted of two 50-m x 60-m plots - one with a bare surface and the other with grass cover - and four 30-m x 50-m plots of corn at different planting densities. One corn field was planted at a full density of 9.5 plants/sq m while the others were planted at 1/3, 1/2 and 2/3 of the full density. The fields were observed with a truck-mounted L-band radiometer at incident angle of 15 degree for the period of two weeks. Soil moisture (SM) changed daily due to irrigation and natural rainfall. Variations in gravimetric SM from 18 % to 34 % were seen during this period. Ground truth data, including careful characterization of the corn size and orientation statistics, and its dielectric, was also collected and used to simulate the effective albedo for the vegetation. The single-scattering albedo is defined as the fractional power scattered from individual vegetation constituents with respect to canopy extinction. It represents single-scattering properties of vegetation elements only, and is independent of ground properties. The values of the albedo get higher when there is dense vegetation (i.e. forest, mature corn, etc.) with scatterers, such as branches and trunks (or stalks in the case of corn), which are large with respect to the wavelength. This large albedo leads to a reduction in brightness temperature in the zero-order RT solution (known as tau-omega model). Higher-order multiple-scattering RT

  9. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: measurements and model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Palancar, G. G.; Lefer, B. L.; Hall, S. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Corr, C. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, S.

    2013-01-24

    Ultraviolet (UV) actinic fluxes (AF) measured with three Scanning Actinic Flux Spectroradiometers (SAFS) are compared with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model v.5 in order to assess the effects of aerosols and NO2 concentrations on the radiation. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measurements are typically smaller by up to 25 % in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, than actinic flux modeled for clean, cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68%, NO2 for 25%, and residual uncertainties for 7% of these AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the actinic flux perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols caused enhanced AF above the PBL and reduced AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA<0.7) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Finally, additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the actinic flux.

  10. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth from surface solar radiation measurements using machine learning algorithms, non-linear regression and a radiative transfer-based look-up table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen, Jani; Kokkola, Harri; Mielonen, Tero; Esa Juhani Mononen, Mika; Lipponen, Antti; Reunanen, Juha; Vilhelm Lindfors, Anders; Mikkonen, Santtu; Erkki Juhani Lehtinen, Kari; Kouremeti, Natalia; Bais, Alkiviadis; Niska, Harri; Arola, Antti

    2016-07-01

    In order to have a good estimate of the current forcing by anthropogenic aerosols, knowledge on past aerosol levels is needed. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a good measure for aerosol loading. However, dedicated measurements of AOD are only available from the 1990s onward. One option to lengthen the AOD time series beyond the 1990s is to retrieve AOD from surface solar radiation (SSR) measurements taken with pyranometers. In this work, we have evaluated several inversion methods designed for this task. We compared a look-up table method based on radiative transfer modelling, a non-linear r