Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol spatial distribution

  1. Accuracy Remote-Sensing of Aerosol Spatial Distribution in the Lower Troposphere by Twin Scanning Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Hua, D.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Wang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols in the lower troposphere play an important role in the absorption and scattering of atmospheric radiation, the forming of precipitation and the circulation of chemistry. Due to the influence of solar heating at the surface, the aerosol distribution is inhomogeneous and variation with time. Lidar is proven to be a powerful tool in the application of remote sensing of atmospheric properties (Klett 1981). However, the existing of overlap function in lidar equation limits the fine detection of aerosol optical properties in the lower troposphere by vertical measurement, either by Raman lidar (Whiteman 2003) or by high spectral resolution lidar (Imaki 2005). Although the multi-angle method can succeed the aerosol measurement from the ground, the homogeneous atmospheric is needed (Pahlow 2004). Aiming to detect the inhomogeneous aerosols in the lower troposphere and to retrieve the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients in the lidar equation, a novel method for accuracy remote-sensing of aerosol properties based on twin scanning lidars has been proposed. In order to realize the fine detection of the aerosol spatial distribution from the ground to the height of interest of atmosphere, the scanning lidar is utilized as the remote sensing tool combined with the cross scanning by the twin systems, which makes the exact solutions of those two unknown parameters retrievable. Figure shows the detection method for aerosol spatial distribution using twin scanning lidars. As two lidar equations are provided simultaneously, the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients are retrievable. Moreover, by selecting the transmitting laser wavelength, the presented method can realize the fine detection of aerosol at any spectrum, even the theoretical and technical analysis of the aerosol characteristics by applying multi-spectra.

  2. Spatial distributions and seasonal cycles of aerosol climate effects in India seen in a global climate-aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, S. V.; Pietikäinen, J.-P.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Räisänen, P.; Kupiainen, K.; Tonttila, J.; Hooda, R.; Lihavainen, H.; O'Donnell, D.; Backman, L.; Klimont, Z.; Laaksonen, A.

    2014-09-01

    Climate-aerosol interactions in India are studied by employing the global climate-aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM and the GAINS inventory for anthropogenic aerosol emissions. Model validation is done for black carbon surface concentrations in Mukteshwar and for features of the monsoon circulation. Seasonal cycles and spatial distributions of radiative forcing and the temperature and rainfall responses are presented for different model setups. While total aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in the summer, anthropogenic forcing is considerably stronger in winter than in summer. Local seasonal temperature anomalies caused by aerosols are mostly negative with some exceptions, e.g., parts of northern India in March-May. Rainfall increases due to the elevated heat pump (EHP) mechanism and decreases due to solar dimming mechanisms (SDMs) and the relative strengths of these effects during different seasons and for different model setups are studied. Aerosol light absorption does increase rainfall in northern India, but effects due to solar dimming and circulation work to cancel the increase. The total aerosol effect on rainfall is negative for northern India in the months of June-August, but during March-May the effect is positive for most model setups. These differences between responses in different seasons might help converge the ongoing debate on the EHPs and SDMs. Due to the complexity of the problem and known or potential sources for error and bias, the results should be interpreted cautiously as they are completely dependent on how realistic the model is. Aerosol-rainfall correlations and anticorrelations are shown not to be a reliable sole argument for deducing causality.

  3. A Comprehensive Archive of Aerosol and Trace Gas Spatial Distributions for Model and Satellite Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Meland, B. S.; Axisa, D.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Denver Aerosol Group has assembled measured aerosol size distributions, gaseous concentrations, and atmospheric state variables covering a 30 year time period into one comprehensive archive. Measurements were made during the period 1987-2013 and include data from a total of 21 NASA field campaigns. Measurements were taken from the ground to over 21 km in altitude, from 72 S Latitude to 90 N latitude on over 300 individual flights on NASA Research Aircraft. Aerosol measurements were made with the University of Denver's Nucleation-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer (NMASS), Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer, and/or a low-pressure Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) depending on the specific campaign. The science payloads varied with the campaign objectives, but the aerosol data were invariably acquired in conjunction with measurements by other investigators placing them in the context of atmospheric composition. The archive includes location and time of the measurements along with the tropopause heights and selected atmospheric composition and state data such as ambient temperatures and pressures, abundances of ozone, N2O, oxides of nitrogen, water vapor, CO2 etc. The data archive is stored in NetCDF format and includes all relevant metadata for measured quantities. This archive will be hosted by NASA and will be available to the public for model validation. The data includes indexing by scientific campaign, date, and spatial coordinates. This will facilitate comparisons across the available range of times, locations and related measurements. This data set has been used for validation of satellite remote sensing data. Coincident measurements of aerosol size distributions were used to calculate extinction profiles which were compared to those retrieved with the SAGE II satellite. Agreement between extinctions derived from the in situ size measurements and those provided by SAGE II was good for the 452, 525, and 1020 nm wavelength channels, but poor for

  4. Spatial Distribution of Carbonaceous Aerosol in the Southeastern Baltic Sea Region (Event of Grass Fires)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudoitis, Vadimas; Byčenkienė, Steigvilė; Plauškaitė, Kristina; Bozzetti, Carlo; Fröhlich, Roman; Mordas, Genrik; Ulevičius, Vidmantas

    2016-06-01

    The aerosol chemical composition in air masses affected by large vegetation fires transported from the Kaliningrad region (Russia) and southeast regions (Belarus and Ukraine) during early spring (March 2014) was characterized at the remote background site of Preila, Lithuania. In this study, the chemical composition of the particulate matter was studied by high temporal resolution instruments, including an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) and a seven-wavelength aethalo-meter. Air masses were transported from twenty to several hundred kilometres, arriving at the measurement station after approximately half a day of transport. The concentration-weighted trajectory analysis suggests that organic aerosol particles are mainly transported over the Baltic Sea and the continent (southeast of Belarus). Results show that a significant fraction of the vegetation burning organic aerosol is transformed into oxidised forms in less than a half-day. Biomass burning aerosol (BBOA) was quantified from the ACSM data using a positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis, while its spatial distribution was evaluated using air mass clustering approach.

  5. Characterizing the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Aerosol Optical Thickness Over the Atlantic Basin Utilizing GOES-8 Multispectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert; Prins, Elaine Mae; Feltz, Joleen M.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, modeling and analysis efforts have suggested that the direct and indirect radiative effects of both anthropogenic and natural aerosols play a major role in the radiative balance of the earth and are an important factor in climate change calculations. The direct effects of aerosols on radiation and indirect effects on cloud properties are not well understood at this time. In order to improve the characterization of aerosols within climate models it is important to accurately parameterize aerosol forcing mechanisms at the local, regional, and global scales. This includes gaining information on the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, transport regimes and mechanisms, aerosol optical thickness, and size distributions. Although there is an expanding global network of ground measurements of aerosol optical thickness and size distribution at specific locations, satellite data must be utilized to characterize the spatial and temporal extent of aerosols and transport regimes on regional and global scales. This study was part of a collaborative effort to characterize aerosol radiative forcing over the Atlantic basin associated with the following three major aerosol components in this region: urban/sulfate, Saharan dust, and biomass burning. In-situ ground measurements obtained by a network of sun photometers during the Smoke Clouds and Radiation Experiment in Brazil (SCAR-B) and the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) were utilized to develop, calibrate, and validate a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 aerosol optical thickness (AOT) product. Regional implementation of the GOES-8 AOT product was used to augment point source measurements to gain a better understanding of the spatial and temporal distributions of Atlantic basin aerosols during SCAR-B and TARFOX.

  6. Statistical analysis of the spatial-temporal distribution of aerosol extinction retrieved by micro-pulse lidar in Kashgar, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Xu, Chidong; Qian, Xianmei; Wei, Heli

    2013-02-11

    The spatial-temporal distribution of dust aerosol is important in climate model and ecological environment. An observation experiment of the aerosol vertical distribution in the low troposphere was made using the micro-pulse lidar system from Sept. 2008 to Aug. 2009 at the oasis city Kashgar, China, which is near the major dust source area of the Taklimakan desert. The monthly averaged temporal variation of aerosol extinction profiles are given in the paper. The profile of aerosol extinction coefficient suggested that the dust aerosol could be vertically transported from the ground level to the higher altitude of above 5 km around the source region, and the temporal distribution showed that the dust aerosol layer of a few hundred meters thick appeared in the seasons of early spring and summer near the ground surface.

  7. Spatial and temporal correlation length as a measure for the stationarity of atmospheric dust aerosol distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Klüser, Lars; Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina

    2015-12-01

    Fields of dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) from numerical models and satellite observations are widely used data sets for evaluating the actual distribution of atmospheric dust aerosol. In this study we investigate the use of estimates of spatial and temporal correlation lengths (CLs) calculated from simulations using the regional model system COSMO-MUSCAT (COSMO: Consortium for Small-scale Modelling; MUSCAT: MUltiScale Chemistry Aerosol Transport Model) to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol distribution, here mineral dust, and to provide an estimate on the temporal model output interval required in order to represent the local evolution of atmospheric dustiness. The CLs indicate the scales of variability for dust and thus provide an estimate for the stationarity of dust conditions in space and time. Additionally, CLs can be an estimate for the required resolution in time and space of observational systems to observe changes in atmospheric dust conditions that would be relevant for dust forecasts. Here, two years of dust simulations using COSMO-MUSCAT are analyzed. CLs for the individual years 2007 and 2008 are compared to the entire two-year period illustrating the impact of the length of time series on statistical analysis. The two years are chosen as they are contrasting with regard to mineral dust loads and thus provide additional information on the representativeness of the statistical analysis. Results from the COSMO-MUSCAT CL analysis are compared against CL estimates from satellite observations, here dust AOD inferred from IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), which provides bi-daily information of atmospheric dust loading over desert land and ocean. Although CLs estimated from the satellite observations are at a generally lower level of values, the results demonstrate the applicability of daily observations for assessing the atmospheric dust distribution. Main outcomes of this study illustrate the

  8. Spatial and temporal distribution of Arctic aerosols: new insights from the CALIPSO satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pierro, Maurizio

    The Arctic is a receptor of pollution transported from distant regions. Pollution reaches the Arctic both in gaseous and aerosol form, both of which have important climatic and ecological implications. This dissertation focuses on aerosols in the Arctic, specifically their transport to and their distribution in space and time within the arctic troposphere. The cornerstone of this thesis is the analysis of the retrievals made by the satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a two-wavelength polarization-sensitive lidar that measures the atmospheric attenuated backscatter return and provides high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds. Chapter 2 uses CALIOP observations to follow the evolution of pollution aerosols transported from East Asia to the Arctic. The transport pathway is elucidated with backtrajectories and aerosol simulations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. The polluted air mass experiences strong ascent within a cyclonic circulation near the source region. Once in the free troposphere, a block in the upper-air flow forces the circulation to take on a strongly southerly route. Since the air mass reaches the Arctic very rapidly (3-5 days), the aerosol scavenging is incomplete. Transport is nearly-isentropic except in its initial phase. Once in the Arctic, the aerosol plume slowly subsides due to radiative cooling. Using six years of CALIOP observations, Chapter 3 focuses on the horizontal, vertical and temporal distribution of Arctic aerosols. At low altitudes in the High Arctic (poleward of 70°N), aerosol extinctions maximize in winter/early spring and reach their lowest values during summer. In the lower troposphere in the Low Arctic, in addition to the winter/early spring maximum, aerosol extinctions also display a secondary maximum in summer due to boreal forest fires. CALIOP measurements show that a major low-level Eurasian pollution transport pathway occurs on the western flank of the

  9. Spatial and temporal distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the lowermost troposphere over the Amazonian tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejci, R.; Ström, J.; de Reus, M.; Williams, J.; Fischer, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Hansson, H.-C.

    2004-06-01

    We present measurements of aerosol physico-chemical properties below 5 km altitude over the tropical rain forest and the marine boundary layer (MBL) obtained during the LBA-CLAIRE 1998 project. The MBL aerosol size distribution some 50-100 km of the coast of French Guyana and Suriname showed a bi-modal shape typical of aged and cloud processed aerosol. The average particle number density in the MBL was 383 cm-3. The daytime mixed layer height over the rain forest for undisturbed conditions was estimated to be between 1200-1500 m. During the morning hours the height of the mixed layer increased by 4-5 cm s-1. The median daytime aerosol number density in the mixed layer increased from 450 cm-3 in the morning to almost 800 cm-3 in the late afternoon. The evolution of the aerosol size distribution in the daytime mixed layer over the rain forest showed two distinct patterns. Between dawn and midday, the Aitken mode particle concentrations increased, whereas later during the day, a sharp increase of the accumulation mode aerosol number densities was observed, resulting in a doubling of the morning accumulation mode concentrations from 150 cm-3 to 300 cm-3. Potential sources of the Aitken mode particles are discussed here including the rapid growth of ultrafine aerosol particles formed aloft and subsequently entrained into the mixed layer, as well as the contribution of emissions from the tropical vegetation to Aitken mode number densities. The observed increase of the accumulation mode aerosol number densities is attributed to the combined effect of: the direct emissions of primary biogenic particles from the rain forest and aerosol in-cloud processing by shallow convective clouds. Based on the similarities among the number densities, the size distributions and the composition of the aerosol in the MBL and the nocturnal residual layer we propose that the air originating in the MBL is transported above the nocturnal mixed layer up to 300-400 km inland over the rain forest

  10. Spatial and temporal distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the lowermost troposphere over the Amazonian tropical rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejci, R.; Ström, J.; de Reus, M.; Williams, J.; Fischer, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Hansson, H.-C.

    2005-06-01

    We present measurements of aerosol physico-chemical properties below 5 km altitude over the tropical rain forest and the marine boundary layer (MBL) obtained during the LBA-CLAIRE 1998 project. The MBL aerosol size distribution some 50-100km of the coast of French Guyana and Suriname showed a bi-modal shape typical of aged and cloud processed aerosol. The average particle number density in the MBL was 383cm-3. The daytime mixed layer height over the rain forest for undisturbed conditions was estimated to be between 1200-1500m. During the morning hours the height of the mixed layer increased by 144-180mh-1. The median daytime aerosol number density in the mixed layer increased from 450cm-3 in the morning to almost 800cm-3 in the late afternoon. The evolution of the aerosol size distribution in the daytime mixed layer over the rain forest showed two distinct patterns. Between dawn and midday, the Aitken mode particle concentrations increased, whereas later during the day, a sharp increase of the accumulation mode aerosol number densities was observed, resulting in a doubling of the morning accumulation mode concentrations from 150cm-3 to 300cm-3. Potential sources of the Aitken mode particles are discussed here including the rapid growth of ultrafine aerosol particles formed aloft and subsequently entrained into the mixed layer, as well as the contribution of emissions from the tropical vegetation to Aitken mode number densities. The observed increase of the accumulation mode aerosol number densities is attributed to the combined effect of: the direct emissions of primary biogenic particles from the rain forest and aerosol in-cloud processing by shallow convective clouds. Based on the similarities among the number densities, the size distributions and the composition of the aerosol in the MBL and the nocturnal residual layer we propose that the air originating in the MBL is transported above the nocturnal mixed layer up to 300-400km inland over the rain forest by

  11. Spatially resolved measurements of size and velocity distributions of aerosol droplets from a direct injection nebulizer

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, S.C.K.; Johnson, S.K.; Pang, H.M.; Houk, R.S. )

    1993-05-01

    Aerosol droplet sizes and velocities from a direct injection nebulizer (DIN) are measured with radial and axial spatial resolution by phase Doppler particle analysis (PDPA). The droplets on the central axis of the spray become finer and their size becomes more uniform when [approx]20% methanol is added to the usual aqueous solvent. This could explain why the analyte signal is a maximum at this solvent composition when the DIN is used for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Mean droplet velocities are 12 to 22 m s[sup [minus]1] with standard deviations of [plus minus]4 to [plus minus]7 m s[sup [minus]1]. The outer fringes of the aerosol plume tend to be enriched in large droplets. The Sauter mean diameter (D[sub 3,2]) and velocity of the droplets also vary substantially with axial position in the aerosol plume. 35 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Spatial Distribution of Aerosols in Four U.S. Regions: Impacts on Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Berkoff, T.; Burton, S. P.; Chen, G.; Corr, C.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Cook, A. L.; Fenn, M. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.; Harper, D. B.; Hostetler, C. A.; Lin, J. J.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Rogers, R. R.; Scarino, A. J.; Seaman, S. T.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Crawford, J. H.; Anderson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol measurements from satellites in geosynchronous orbit allow for a unique opportunity to measure urban air quality at higher spatial and temporal resolution than possible with current ground-based monitoring and satellites in low earth orbit. Geosynchronous satellites will be able to measure air quality throughout the day for a specific region of interest (such as North America for the planned NASA TEMPO satellite). However, a key constraint on satellite measurements is the spatial resolution of the retrieved data products. As the satellite footprint increases, the precision of aerosol properties improves but the ability of the satellite to measure small-scale variations in pollution diminishes. Currently, TEMPO is planned to measure aerosol optical depth (AOD) with a spatial resolution of 36 square-km. In this study, sub-pixel variability is used as a metric of how representative the satellite measurement is of ground-based air quality. Data from the DISCOVER-AQ airborne project are used to determine the sub-pixel variability in AOD, boundary layer extinction and other aerosol properties in four U.S. regions: Baltimore, Maryland, Houston, Texas, Denver, Colorado, and California's San Joaquin Valley. Sub-pixel variability in boundary layer extinction was lowest in Denver (one sigma variability of 3 /Mm at 36 square-km spatial resolution) due to low aerosol loadings and highest in the San Joaquin Valley (19 /Mm) due to variable boundary layer depths and stagnant conditions. Variability in AOD (measured by an airborne high-spectral resolution lidar) was more consistent among the sites (0.017 to 0.035) due to a reduced dependence on changes in the planetary boundary layer. The effects of our analysis will also be discussed in relation to the use of satellite measurements to infer air quality attainment. Larger satellite data footprints reduce the ability of satellites to identify small regions in urban areas with elevated pollution (i.e. hotspots) which was

  13. Water-Soluble Organic Species in Biomass Burning Aerosols in Southern Africa: Their Chemical Identification and Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Magi, B.

    2001-12-01

    During the SAFARI-2000 field campaign, 14 aerosol samples were collected from an aircraft in plumes from biomass fires (under both flaming and smoldering conditions), at various distances from the fire source. Also collected were 36 aerosol samples in haze layers ranging from the surface to 16,000 feet, some of which could be associated with specific fires. The samples were collected on teflon membrane filters (lower size limit of about 30nm in diameter) which were analyzed for total aerosol mass loading and chemical composition using several analytical techniques. Particular effort was made to speciate the water-soluble portion of the aerosol organics. Seven organic acids and seven carbohydrate species (and their possible stereoisomers) were identified and quantified, along with three inorganic anions and five inorganic cations. The identified organic species accounted for up to 32% of the total aerosol mass; compared with concurrent total carbon and organic carbon measurements, the identified organics constituted at least 5% to 30% of the mass of the total aerosol organics. A number of conspicuous spatial distribution patterns were observed for these species. For instance, using K+ to correct for dilution, it was found that gluconate, oxalate, succinate, and glutarate, along with sulfate and nitrate, all increased significantly in mass concentration from the fire source going downwind. This suggests secondary formation of these species during aerosol aging. On the other hand, formate and acetate showed decreasing trends downwind, probably due to the loss of these volatile species to the gas phase. Another striking pattern is that anhydrosugars (e.g. levoglucosan) had the highest aerosol mass fraction near smoldering fires but a very low fraction in the haze layers, whereas, dicarboxylic acids showed an almost opposite trend. This implies possible chemical reaction processes converting intermediate organic products, such as levoglucosan, to smaller products like

  14. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  15. Are atmospheric aerosols able to modify the surface winds? A sensitivity study of the biomass burning aerosols impact on the spatially-distributed wind over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baró, Rocío; Lorente-Plazas, Raquel; Jerez, Sonia; Montávez, Juan Pedro; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect the Earth's climate through their radiative effects, being one of the most uncertain areas in climate modelling. Aerosols are widely known to affect radiation, temperature, stability, clouds and precipitation through their radiative effects, which depend mainly on the aerosol optical properties. These can be divided into direct and semi-direct effect, produced by the scattering and absorption of radiation; and indirect effect, which influences the aerosols-cloud interactions. In this sense, wind fields affect aerosols levels by several different processes, finally resulting in a wind-dependent emission over land or ocean. Moreover they can disperse the particles leading to a cleaner atmosphere. But, how do aerosol particles affect the wind? Scientific literature about their effects on wind is scarce. In this sense, the objective of this work is to assess the effects of biomass burning aerosols on spatially-distributed winds over Europe. The methodology carried out consists of three WRF-Chem simulations for Europe during the Russian fires (25 July to 15 August 2010) differing in the inclusion (or not) of aerosol direct and direct+indirect radiative feedbacks. These simulations have been carried out under the umbrella of the EuMetChem COST ES1004 Action. A Euro-CORDEX compliant domain at 0.22° and 23 km resolution has been used. The first simulation does not take into account any aerosol feedbacks (NFB), the second simulation differs from the base case by the inclusion of direct effect (DFB); while the third includes the direct+indirect radiative feedbacks (TFB). Results depict that the presence of aerosol reduces the wind module over Russian. Aerosol radiative effects imply a decrease of the shortwave downwelling radiation at the bottom of the atmosphere (with maximum values of 50 W m-2 over Russia). As a consequence there is a reduction on the temperature at 2 m up to 1 K. The decrease of the temperature reduces the convective processes

  16. Spatial distribution of atmospheric aerosol optical depth over Atlantic Ocean along the route of Russian Antarctic expeditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanov, Dmitry M.; Radionov, Vladimir F.; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Smirnov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    During recent decade, Microtops and SPM portable sun photometers are used to perform annual measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and water vapor content of the atmosphere over Atlantic Ocean along the route of the Russian Antarctic expeditions (RAE). The data accumulation has made it possible to analyze the specific features of the spatial distribution of spectral AOD of the atmosphere along eastern RAE route and identify six basic regions (latitudinal zones). The statistical characteristics of AOD in the identified oceanic regions in winter and spring periods are discussed. The estimates of finely and coarsely dispersed AOD components in different regions, as well as the interannual atmospheric AOD variations, are presented.

  17. Overview of Aerosol Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols (smoke, pollution, dust or sea salt particles, small enough to be suspended in the air), their evolution, composition, variability in space and time and interaction with clouds and precipitation is still lacking despite decades of research. Understanding the global aerosol system is fundamental for progress in climate change and hydrological cycle research. While a single instrument was used to demonstrate 50 years ago that the global CO2 levels are rising, posing threat of global warming, we need an array of satellites and field measurements coupled with chemical transport models to understand the global aerosol system. This complexity of the aerosol problem results from their short lifetime (1 week) and variable chemical composition. A new generation of satellites provides exciting opportunities to measure the global distribution of aerosols, distinguishing natural from anthropogenic aerosol and measuring their interaction with clouds and climate. I shall discuss these topics and application of the data to air quality monitoring.

  18. Physical properties, chemical composition, sources, spatial distribution and sinks of indoor aerosol particles in a university lecture hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salma, I.; Dosztály, K.; Borsós, T.; Söveges, B.; Weidinger, T.; Kristóf, G.; Péter, N.; Kertész, Zs.

    2013-01-01

    than for the related outdoor urban environment. This can indicate aged ultrafine aerosol. The major amounts of CO2 arrive from the corridors through open doors by infiltration. Spatial distribution of the PM10 mass concentration within the hall was derived by CFD modelling, and spatial inhomogeneities were obtained.

  19. Spatial Distribution of Accuracy of Aerosol Retrievals from Multiple Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosols from space has been a subject of extensive research, with multiple sensors retrieving aerosol properties globally on a daily or weekly basis. The diverse algorithms used for these retrievals operate on different types of reflected signals based on different assumptions about the underlying physical phenomena. Depending on the actual retrieval conditions and especially on the geographical location of the sensed aerosol parcels, the combination of these factors might be advantageous for one or more of the sensors and unfavorable for others, resulting in disagreements between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the use of the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) to analyze and intercompare aerosol retrievals from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Based on this intercomparison, we are determining geographical locations where these products provide the greatest accuracy of the retrievals and identifying the products that are the most suitable for retrieval at these locations. The analyses are performed by comparing quality-screened satellite aerosol products to available collocated ground-based aerosol observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations, during the period of 2006-2010 when all the satellite sensors were operating concurrently. Furthermore, we will discuss results of a statistical approach that is applied to the collocated data to detect and remove potential data outliers that can bias the results of the analysis.

  20. Spatial distribution of biogenic sulphur compounds in the Arctic aerosol collected during the AREX 2011 and 2012 Oceania ship cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udisti, Roberto; Rugi, Francesco; Becagli, Silvia; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Calzolai, Giulia; Chiari, Massimo; Frosini, Daniele; Ghedini, Costanza; Marconi, Miriam; Grazia Perrone, Maria; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Walczowski, Waldek; Zielinski, Timon

    2013-04-01

    The sea area between Norway and Svalbard Islands (Norwegian and Greenland Seas) is a critical site to study the effects of the climate change on the high-latitude Northern-Hemisphere regions. In particular, changes in extension and/or in the persistence of annual sea-ice, availability of nutrients and trace-elements in the biological-active marine layers and sea surface temperatures could affect the marine primary productivity and the emission into the atmosphere of dimethylsulphide (DMS), produced by phytoplankton metabolic processes. This volatile compound is oxidised in the atmosphere mainly to sulphuric acid and Methanesulphonic acid (MSA), which undergo gas-to-particle processes and form secondary sub-micrometric aerosol particles. In this way, they play a relevant role as cloud concentration nuclei (CCN), therefore controlling the climate through scattering/absorption of solar irradiation and changes in cloud coverage (and so affecting albedo). Here, we report the spatial distribution of MSA and H2SO4 measured on 12-h aerosol samples (PM10) collected during two summer cruises of the Oceania ship (AREX 2011 and 2012 oceanographic cruises). The samples were collected on Teflon filters along several marine transects starting from Tromso (Norway) to Svalbard Island and along the Western side of Svalbard Islands. S-compounds distribution was also compared with the organic carbon (OC) aerosol fraction, determined by a EC/OC thermo-optical analyser, and with the atmospheric concentration of selected carboxylic acids (measured by ion chromatography). Preliminary results on the AREX 2011 aerosol samples show two sharp maxima of non-sea-salt sulphate and MSA in June, in phase one with each other, while lower contribution of biogenic emission are recorded in the filters collected in July. Besides, no clear trend along coastal to open-sea transects is evident. Higher MSA concentrations (up to 120 ng/m3) were measured near the Norwegian coast, along the Tromso

  1. Spatial and seasonal variations in CCN distribution and the aerosol-CCN relationship over southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Bruintjes, R. T.; Burger, R. P.; Swap, R. J.; Annegarn, H. J.

    2003-07-01

    The sources and transport of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) over southern Africa have been investigated using in situ measurements collected during the Aerosol Recirculation and Rainfall Experiment (ARREX) wet season projects and during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI-2000) intensive dry season campaign. CCN concentrations over the subcontinent are generally higher in the dry season than in the wet season and exceed 2000 cm-3 in highly polluted air masses. In the late dry season, CCN concentrations are highest in the northern regions of the subcontinent due to the burning of savanna biomass. Emissions from industries and power plants on the South African Highveld are a prolific year-round source of CCN and are sufficient to account for CCN levels south of 20°S throughout the year. Most CCN are contained within the mixing layer, which extends to an altitude of 3000-4000 m over the plateau and is capped by a temperature inversion. Multiple inversions and absolutely stable layers control the stratification of aerosols and CCN. Biomass burning particles are efficient CCN, and the median diameter of the accumulation mode is large (up to 0.19 μm). Recently emitted industrial aerosols are less soluble and have a smaller median diameter (0.11 μm). Twice as many aerosols act as CCN in the dry season (68%) than in the wet season (34%). The fraction is highest in the dry season over the tropical regions (>80%), where smoke aerosol predominates. Elevated aerosol and CCN concentrations are expected to have implications for direct radiative forcing, especially in the dry season, and for indirect forcing in the wet season.

  2. Spatial distribution and temporal variation of aerosol optical depth in the Sichuan basin, China, the recent ten years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Quanliang; Che, Huizheng; Zhang, Renjian; Gui, Ke; Zhang, Huan; Zhao, Tianliang

    2016-12-01

    The applicability of the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product was verified using CE-318 sun photometric data for the Sichuan area. The results show that MODIS_3K AOD agrees well with the AOD derived from the CE-318 sun photometer, with a high correlation coefficient (R2 = 0.91). And we used the MODIS AOD product analyzed the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the annual, seasonal and monthly distribution of AOD in the Sichuan area over the last ten years (2006-2015). In the Sichuan area, the mean change of AOD over the 10-year period showed a significant decreasing trend, reaching its maximum in 2010 and its minimum in 2015. Considering only the first five years, the lowest value was reached in 2008 and the overall trend was a standard symmetrical "V" type. Over the later five years, the annual average AOD value showed an overall decreasing trend. The monthly averaged AOD indicated a "double peaks" fluctuation trend; the two peaks appeared in March and August, and AOD changes were relatively small between September and January. Overall, the average value of AOD reached its highest values in spring, and its lowest values in autumn. In the city of Chengdu, the monthly and seasonal changes in the trend were essentially the same as those of the whole Sichuan area; However, the Chengdu AOD monthly and seasonal average change rate was higher than that of Sichuan as a whole. This shows that Chengdu is still the main contributor to the enhanced AOD value for the entire Sichuan region. The spatial distribution of AOD values indicates an "east high, west low" situation across the Sichuan area and Chengdu is one of three cities with the highest AOD values. However, the spatial variation of AOD trend value indicated an "east low, west high" the spatial distribution across the Sichuan region, opposite to the spatial distribution. Moreover, in the past 10 years, the overall AOD changes in Sichuan showed a downward

  3. Spatial distribution of aerosol black carbon over India during pre-monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum, S. Naseema; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Badarinath, K. V. S.; Safai, P. D.; Devara, P. C. S.; Singh, Sacchidanand; Vinod; Dumka, U. C.; Pant, P.

    Aerosol black carbon (BC) mass concentrations ([BC]), measured continuously during a mutli-platform field experiment, Integrated Campaign for Aerosols gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB, March-May 2006), from a network of eight observatories spread over geographically distinct environments of India, (which included five mainland stations, one highland station, and two island stations (one each in Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal)) are examined for their spatio-temporal characteristics. During the period of study, [BC] showed large variations across the country, with values ranging from 27 μg m -3 over industrial/urban locations to as low as 0.065 μg m -3 over the Arabian Sea. For all mainland stations, [BC] remained high compared to highland as well as island stations. Among the island stations, Port Blair (PBR) had higher concentration of BC, compared to Minicoy (MCY), implying more absorbing nature of Bay of Bengal aerosols than Arabian Sea. The highland station Nainital (NTL), in the central Himalayas, showed low values of [BC], comparable or even lower than that of the island station PBR, indicating the prevalence of cleaner environment over there. An examination of the changes in the mean temporal features, as the season advances from winter (December-February) to pre-monsoon (March-May), revealed that: (a) Diurnal variations were pronounced over all the mainland stations, with an afternoon low and a nighttime high; (b) At the islands, the diurnal variations, though resembled those over the mainlands, were less pronounced; and (c) In contrast to this, highland station showed an opposite pattern with an afternoon high and a late night or early morning low. The diurnal variations at all stations are mainly caused by the dynamics of local Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL). At the entire mainland as well as island stations (except HYD and DEL), [BC] showed a decreasing trend from January to May. This is attributed to the increased convective mixing and to the

  4. Spatial Variability of CCN Sized Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, A.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    The computational limitations restrict the grid size used in GCM models, and for many cloud types they are too large when compared to the scale of the cloud formation processes. Several parameterizations for e.g. convective cloud formation exist, but information on spatial subgrid variation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCNs) sized aerosol concentration is not known. We quantify this variation as a function of the spatial scale by using datasets from airborne aerosol measurement campaigns around the world including EUCAARI LONGREX, ATAR, INCA, INDOEX, CLAIRE, PEGASOS and several regional airborne campaigns in Finland. The typical shapes of the distributions are analyzed. When possible, we use information obtained by CCN counters. In some other cases, we use particle size distribution measured by for example SMPS to get approximated CCN concentration. Other instruments used include optical particle counters or condensational particle counters. When using the GCM models, the CCN concentration used for each the grid-box is often considered to be either flat, or as an arithmetic mean of the concentration inside the grid-box. However, the aircraft data shows that the concentration values are often lognormal distributed. This, combined with the subgrid variations in the land use and atmospheric properties, might cause that the aerosol-cloud interactions calculated by using mean values to vary significantly from the true effects both temporary and spatially. This, in turn, can cause non-linear bias into the GCMs. We calculate the CCN aerosol concentration distribution as a function of different spatial scales. The measurements allow us to study the variation of these distributions within from hundreds of meters up to hundreds of kilometers. This is used to quantify the potential error when mean values are used in GCMs.

  5. The Spatial Distribution and Size Evolution of Particles in Asian Outflow: The Significance of Primary and Secondary Aerosol during ACE-Asia and TRACE-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mĉnaughton, C. S.; Howell, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.; Blomquist, B.; Anderson, T.; Masonis, S. J.; Weber, R. J.; Eisele, F. L.; Mauldin, L.

    2002-12-01

    During March and April of 2001 NASA conducted the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific experiment (TRACE-P) and the NSF conducted the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). On March 18th NASA's P3-B aircraft intercepted an urban plume off the coast of China. From April 11th - 13th the NCAR/NSF C-130 aircraft sampled dust and urban aerosols associated with a passing cold front over a broad spatial extent. Using the University of Hawai`i thermally resolved Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMAs) and laser Optical Particle Counters (OPCs) aerosol size distributions were evaluated between 0.007μm and 20μm aboard both aircraft. These distributions show nucleation mode aerosols (Dp < 40nm) throughout the marine boundary layer (MBL) over several degrees of latitude and longitude during the April 11-13th event. Flights into the Yellow Sea and north and south of Kyushu Japan suggest that secondary aerosol formation occurred within the MBL most likely by gas to particle conversion shortly after sunrise. The presence of substantial concentrations of ammonium in the accumulation mode aerosol and partial neutralization of the nucleation mode aerosol suggest that the newly formed particles were created by a ternary rather than binary homogeneous nucleation mechanism involving H2SO4-H2O-NH3. Evidence for the evolution of the nucleation mode aerosol was observed throughout the day despite dry ambient aerosol surface area of 400 to 800 μm2/cm3. Estimates for the flux rate of sulfuric acid to the full size distribution were calculated at ~1.0\\times106 molecules/cm3/sec based on the growth rate of the nucleation mode. These calculated values are the same order of magnitude as production rates of H2SO4 observed at the same location during the TRACE-P campaign. This presentation highlights the observations from the ACE-Asia and TRACE-P field campaigns during the dust storm event and analyzes the survival of these recently formed particles

  6. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julia; Cermak, Jan

    2014-05-01

    This study determines the spatial and temporal distribution of regions with frequent aerosol-cloud interactions (aci) and identifies their meteorological determinants based on CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) and ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) data products. Atmospheric aerosols influence the microphysical structure of clouds, while both also respond to meteorological conditions. The potential radiative adjustments to changes in a cloud system associated with aerosol-cloud interactions are grouped and termed as effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-cloud interactions (ERFaci). It is difficult to distinguish, to what extent radiative forcing and precipitation patterns of clouds are a result of cloud feedbacks to aerosols or the existing meteorological conditions. A complete understanding of aerosol-cloud-meteorology interactions is crucial as the uncertainty range of ERFaci in climate change modeling could be significantly reduced. In the present study it is suggested that presence of hydrated aerosols is an implication for aci. Knowledge of their vertical and horizontal distribution and frequency over the globe would be important for understanding ERFaci. To identify regions with aerosol-cloud transitions the CAD score (cloud-aerosol discrimination) of the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is used. It separates aerosols and clouds according to the probability distribution functions of 5 parameters (attenuated backscatter, total color ratio, volume depolarization ratio, altitude and latitude) and assigns the likelihood of cloud or aerosol presence. This parameter is used to calculate relative frequencies of aci on a global scale from 2006 to 2013.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Water-Soluble Anions and Organic Carbons in Bulk Aerosols Collected at the Ryukyu Islands, Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Ijyu, M.; Nakaema, F.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.; Furukawa, M.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols pose health risks to humans and change global climate. Ryukyu Islands in Japan are mainly covered with maritime air mass in summer and continental air mass for the rest of the seasons. Thus, it is possible to estimate the origins of chemical components, in particular transboundary air pollutants from East Asia. Ryukyu Islands are one of the best locations for monitoring the changes in Asia's atmosphere. This study tried to elucidate the spatial and temporal distribution of water-soluble anions and organic carbons, and chemical changes during the transportation processes. Aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Sep. 2005 - Dec. 2010), Kume Island (KM, ca. 100 km from Naha), and Minami-Daitou Island (MD, ca. 350 km from Naha) from June 2008 to June 2010 on quartz filters by using identical high-volume air samplers. The sample filters were exchanged every week. The concentrations of water-soluble anions (Cl-,Br-,NO3-,NO2-,SO42-) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were determined by using ion chromatography and total organic carbon analyzer, respectively. And, concentrations of non-sea-salt SO(nss-SO42-) were calculated based on the concentrations of Na+. For the samples collected at CHAAMS, seawater component accounted for on average 56±5% of total aerosol mass. Monthly mean concentrations of nss-SO42- showed distinctive difference among the sampling sites (KM>CHAAMS>MD) during Jan. to May, suggesting that distance from Asian continent affected on its behavior. Yearly average concentrations of NO3- and nss-SO42- showed +42% and +16% increase, respectively between 2005 and 2011. Annual rate of NO3- increase was much faster than that of nss-SO42-, probably reflecting changes in lifestyles in Asian continent.

  8. Rapid High Spatial Resolution Chemical Characterization of Soil Structure to Illuminate Nutrient Distribution Mechanisms Related to Carbon Cycling Using Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Alexander, M. L. L.; Newburn, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain approximately half of Earth's terrestrial carbon. As such, it is important to understand the factors that control the cycling of this soil organic carbon between the land and the atmosphere. Models that attribute the persistence of soil organic carbon to the intrinsic properties of the molecules themselves are inconsistent with recent observations— for example, materials that are more thermodynamically stable have been found to have a shorter lifetime in soils than ones that are less stable, and vice versa. A new explanation has therefore been posited that invokes ecosystem properties as a whole, and not just intrinsic molecular properties, as the kinetic factor controlling soil carbon dynamics. Because soil dynamics occur on a small scale, techniques with high spatial resolution are required for their study. Existing techniques such as TOF-SIMS require preparation of the sample and introduction into a high vacuum system, and do not address the need to examine large numbers of sample systems without perturbation of chemical and physical properties. To address this analytical challenge, we have coupled a laser ablation (LA) module to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), thereby enabling sample introduction and subsequent measurement of small amounts of soil organic matter by the laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer (LA-AMS). Due to the adjustable laser beam width, the LA-AMS can probe spot sizes ranging from 1-150 μm in diameter, liberating from 10-100 ng/pulse. With a detection limit of 1 pM, the AMS allows for chemical characterization of the ablated material in terms of elemental ratios, compound classes, and TOC/TOM ratios. Furthermore, the LA-AMS is capable of rapid, in-situ sampling under ambient conditions, thereby eliminating the need for sample processing or transport before analysis. Here, we will present the first results from systematic studies aimed at validating the LA-AMS method as well as results from initial measurements

  9. Charicteristics of Aerosol indices distribution followed by Aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kim, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Lee, S.; Song, C.

    2010-12-01

    Transboundary transport of aerosol has been a hot issue in East Asia and with various aerosol types from different source region. To detect signals from aerosols, OMI provides aerosol indices. Aerosol Indices (AI) represent the change of spectral contrast between two wavelengths and these indices are derived in UV and Visible regions. These indices also can get not only in ocean but also in land region so that AI is good to observe the source region and transport of aerosols. In UV region, AI (UV-AI) can classify the absorbing and non-absorbing aerosols (Torres et al., 1998) so that this value is frequently used for dust detection. Additionally, visible AI (VIS-AI) uses to differentiate the absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol types. If we combine two types of indices at the coordinate system of two types of AI, distribution of indices contains different signals if aerosol types change theoretically. In this study, we want to find out classification results based by the observation data to see the theoretical distribution in two AI values. For the observation data, aerosol types are obtained from the results of MODIS-OMI algorithm and 4-channel algorithm classify four types of aerosols, i.e. dust, carbonaceous, sea-salt and Non-Absorbing (NA). These algorithms classify aerosol by using the characteristics of aerosol optical properties in visible and near IR regions. MODIS-OMI algorithm uses the MODIS AOD and UV-AI in OMI values. For UV-AI case, dust and carbonaceous types have larger UV-AI values than non-absorbing aerosols because of absorbing characteristics. However, dust and carbonaceous types cannot classify if UV-AI values use only. For VIS-AI case, dust has larger proportion, but carbonaceous aerosol has smaller proportion in high AI value. However, VIS-AI cannot clearly classify between dust and carbonaceous types except for the case of extremely high AI cases. In NA type, VIS-AI has almost positive values, but the distribution has smaller than the absorbing

  10. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  11. Analysis of spatial and seasonal distributions of MODIS aerosol optical properties and ground-based measurements of mass concentrations in the Yellow Sea region in 2009.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Sung; Chung, Yong-Seung; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-retrieved data on aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) using a moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) were used to analyze large-scale distributions of atmospheric aerosols in East Asia. AOD was relatively high in March (0.44 ± 0.25) and low in September (0.24 ± 0.21) in the East Asian region in 2009. Sandstorms originating from the deserts and dry areas in northern China and Mongolia were transported on a massive scale during the springtime, thus contributing to the high AOD in East Asia. However, whereas PM10 with diameters ≤10 μm was the highest in February at Anmyon, Cheongwon, and Ulleung, located leeward about halfway through the Korean Peninsula, AOD rose to its highest in May. The growth of hygroscopic aerosols attendant on increases in relative humidity prior to the Asian monsoon season contributed to a high AOD level in May. AE typically appears at high levels (1.30 ± 0.37) in August due to anthropogenic aerosols originating from the industrial areas in eastern China, while AOD stays low in summer due to the removal process caused by rainfall. The linear correlation coefficients of the MODIS AOD and ground-based mass concentrations of PM10 at Anmyon, Cheongwon, and Ulleung were measured at 0.4~0.6. Four cases (6 days) of mineral dustfall from sandstorms and six cases (12 days) of anthropogenically polluted particles were observed in the central area of the Korean Peninsula in 2009. PM10 mass concentrations increased at both Anmyon and Cheongwon in the cases of mineral dustfall and anthropogenically polluted particles. Cases of dustfall from sandstorms and anthropogenic polluted particles, with increasing PM10 mass concentrations, showed higher AOD values in the Yellow Sea region.

  12. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, Daven K.; Shindell, Drew Todd; Akhtar, Farhan; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Pinder, Robert W.; Loughlin, Dan; Kopacz, Monika; Singh, Kumaresh; Shim, Changsub

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary to assess realistic policy options. To address this challenge, here we show how adjoint model sensitivities can be used to provide highly spatially resolved estimates of the DRF from emissions of black carbon (BC), primary organic carbon (OC), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ammonia (NH3), using the example of emissions from each sector and country following multiple Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs). The radiative forcing efficiencies of many individual emissions are found to differ considerably from regional or sectoral averages for NH3, SO2 from the power sector, and BC from domestic, industrial, transportation and biomass burning sources. Consequently, the amount of emissions controls required to attain a specific DRF varies at intracontinental scales by up to a factor of 4. These results thus demonstrate both a need and means for incorporating spatially refined aerosol DRF into analysis of future emissions scenario and design of air quality and climate change mitigation policies.

  13. Investigation of aerosol optical properties for remote sensing through DRAGON (distributed regional aerosol gridded observation networks) campaign in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Park, Jin-Soo; Hong, You-Deok; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere, including dust and pollutants, scatters/absorbs solar radiation and change the microphysics of clouds, thus influencing the Earth's energy budget, climate, air quality, visibility, agriculture and water circulation. Pollutants have also been reported to threaten the human health. The present research collaborated with the U.S. NASA and the U.S. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is to study the aerosol characteristics in East Asia and improve the long-distance transportation monitoring technology by analyzing the observations of aerosol characteristics in East Asia during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March 2012-May 2012). The sun photometers that measure the aerosol optical characteristics were placed evenly throughout the Korean Peninsula and concentrated in Seoul and the metropolitan area. Observation data are obtained from the DRAGON campaign and the first year (2012) observation data (aerosol optical depth and aerosol spatial distribution) are analyzed. Sun photometer observations, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), are utilized to validate satellite observations from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Additional analysis is performed associated with the Northeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula in particular, to determine the spatial distribution of the aerosol.

  14. Diurnal Variation and Spatial Distribution Effects on Sulfur Speciation in Aerosol Samples as Assessed by X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES)

    PubMed Central

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Thumanu, Kanjana; Na Pattalung, Warangkana; Hirunyatrakul, Phoosak; Kittikoon, Itthipon; Ho, Kin Fai; Cao, Junji

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on providing new results relating to the impacts of Diurnal variation, Vertical distribution, and Emission source on sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum of aerosol samples. All aerosol samples used in the diurnal variation experiment were preserved using anoxic preservation stainless cylinders (APSCs) and pressure-controlled glove boxes (PCGBs), which were specially designed to prevent oxidation of the sulfur states in PM10. Further investigation of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra revealed that PM10 samples were dominated by S(VI), even when preserved in anoxic conditions. The “Emission source effect” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 was examined by comparing sulfur K-edge XANES spectra collected from various emission sources in southern Thailand, while “Vertical distribution effects” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 were made with samples collected from three different altitudes from rooftops of the highest buildings in three major cities in Thailand. The analytical results have demonstrated that neither “Emission source” nor “Vertical distribution” appreciably contribute to the characteristic fingerprint of sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum in PM10. PMID:22988545

  15. Aerosol Size Distribution in the marine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Petelski, Tomasz; Zielinski, Tymon; Pakszys, Paulina; Strzalkowska, Agata; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    We would like to present the data obtained during the regular research cruises of the S/Y Oceania over a period of time between 2009 - 2012. The Baltic Sea is a very interesting polygon for aerosol measurements, however, also difficult due to the fact that mostly cases of a mixture of continental and marine aerosols are observed. It is possible to measure clear marine aerosol, but also advections of dust from southern Europe or even Africa. This variability of data allows to compare different conditions. The data is also compared with our measurements from the Arctic Seas, which have been made during the ARctic EXperiment (AREX). The Arctic Seas are very suitable for marine aerosol investigations since continental advections of aerosols are far less frequent than in other European sea regions. The aerosol size distribution was measured using the TSI Laser Aerosol Spectrometer model 3340 (99 channels, measurement range 0.09 μm to 7 μm), condensation particle counter (range 0.01 μm to 3 μm) and laser particle counter PMS CSASP-100-HV-SP (range 0.5 μm to 47 μm in 45 channels). Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many Earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. All equipment was placed on one of the masts of S/Y Oceania. Measurements using the laser aerosol spectrometer and condensation particle counter were made on one level (8 meters above sea level). Measurements with the laser particle counter were performed at five different levels above the sea level (8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 m). Based on aerosol size distribution the parameterizations with a Log-Normal and a Power-Law distributions were made. The aerosol source functions, characteristic for the region were also determined. Additionally, poor precision of the sea spray emission determination was confirmed while using only the aerosol concentration data. The emission of sea spray depends

  16. Seasonal variation in the spatial distribution of aerosol black carbon over Bay of Bengal: A synthesis of multi-campaign measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Suresh Babu, S.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Chaubey, Jai Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Synthesizing data from several cruise experiments over the Bay of Bengal (BoB), the seasonal characterization of aerosol black carbon (BC) mass concentration was made. The study indicated that the BC mass concentration (MBC) showed significant seasonal variation over the oceanic region with MBC being the highest during the winter season (˜2407 ± 1756 ng m-3) and lowest in summer monsoon (˜765 ± 235 ng m-3). The seasonal changes in the BC mass concentration were more prominent over the northern BoB (having an annual amplitude of ˜4) compared to southern BoB (amplitude ˜ 2). Significant spatial gradients in MBC, latitudinal as well as longitudinal, existed in all the seasons. Latitudinal gradients, despite being consistently increasing northwards, were found to be sharper during winter and weakest during summer monsoon with e-fold scaling distances of ˜7.7° and ˜15.6° during winter and summer monsoon seasons respectively. Longitudinally, BC concentrations tend to increase toward east during winter and premonsoon seasons, but an opposite trend was seen in monsoon season highlighting the seasonally changing source impacts on BC loading over BoB. Examination of the results in light of possible role of transport from adjoining landmasses, using airmass back trajectory cluster analysis, also supported spatially and temporally varying source influence on oceanic region.

  17. Spatial Variability of AERONET Aerosol Optical Properties and Satellite Data in South Korea during NASA DRAGON-Asia Campaign.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Joo; Son, Youn-Suk

    2016-04-05

    We investigated spatial variability in aerosol optical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), and single scattering albedo (SSA), observed at 21 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and satellite remote sensing data in South Korea during the spring of 2012. These dense AERONET networks established in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign enabled us to examine the spatially detailed aerosol size distribution and composition as well as aerosol levels. The springtime particle air quality was characterized by high background aerosol levels and high contributions of coarse-mode aerosols to total aerosols. We found that between-site correlations and coefficient of divergence for AOD and FMF strongly relied on the distance between sites, particularly in the south-north direction. Higher AOD was related to higher population density and lower distance from highways, and the aerosol size distribution and composition reflected source-specific characteristics. The ratios of satellite NO2 to AOD, which indicate the relative contributions of local combustion sources to aerosol levels, represented higher local contributions in metropolitan Seoul and Pusan. Our study demonstrates that the aerosol levels were determined by both local and regional pollution and that the relative contributions of these pollutions to aerosols generated spatial heterogeneity in the particle air quality.

  18. Vertical distribution of the different types of aerosols in the stratosphere: Detection of solid particles and analysis of their spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Brogniez, Colette; Berthet, GwenaëL.; Bourgeois, Quentin; Gaubicher, Bertrand; Chartier, Michel; Balois, Jean-Yves; Verwaerde, Christian; Auriol, FréDéRique; Francois, Philippe; Daugeron, Daniel; Engrand, CéCile

    2008-11-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. In the past, it was assumed that only liquid droplets are present in the stratosphere. Nevertheless, a few lidar measurements have shown that sudden enhancement of aerosol content in the middle stratosphere could be due to meteoritic debris. Aircraft measurements have shown that solid particles can be found in the lower stratosphere; these particles are mainly soot, but also include some interplanetary material. In order to better document the various characteristics of aerosols in the unperturbed stratosphere (i.e., free of volcanic aerosols), we have performed observations using different balloon-borne instruments (Stratospheric and Tropospheric Aerosol Counter (STAC), Spectroscopie d'Absorption Lunaire pour l'Observation des Minoritaires Ozone et NOx (SALOMON), and Micro Radiomètre Ballon (MicroRADIBAL)) and also some satellite data (Global ozone monitoring by occultation of stars Envisat (GOMOS-Envisat)). These instruments allow us to obtain the number of particles in different size classes, the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction, and the radiance of the light scattered by aerosols. Combining all the data together, it appears that significant amounts of particles are ubiquitous in the middle stratosphere, above the canonical sulfate aerosol layer. "Background" interplanetary dusts in low concentration are likely present in the stratosphere. Above 30 km, interplanetary dust and largest grains from meteoroid disintegration dominate. Although the disintegration of meteoroids occurs in the upper stratosphere or in the mesosphere at all latitudes, these solid aerosols can be transported to the polar regions by the general circulation and can descend into the middle and lower stratosphere during winter mesospheric descents. Between about 22 km and 30 km, soot particles contribute to the population of aerosols at all latitudes. These soot, likely originating from biomass burning at

  19. Aerosol size distribution and aerosol water content measurements during Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment/Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.; Wellman, D.; Pszenny, A.

    1995-11-01

    Aerosol size distribution data measured during the June 1992 Marine Aerosol and Gas Exchange experiment are analyzed to investigate the characteristics of fine marine aerosol particles measured over the North Atlantic near the Azores Islands. Measured aerosol size distribution data were corrected using the corrected size calibration data based on the optical properties of particles being measured. The corrected size distribution data were then approximated with either one or two lognormal size distributions, depending on air mass conditions. Under clean air mass conditions <3 μm diameter aerosol size distributions typically exhibited two modes, consisting of an accumulation mode and the small end of the sea-salt particle mode. However, under the influence of continental polluted air masses, the aerosol size distribution was dominated by <1 μm diameter particles in a single mode with an increased aerosol concentration. Aerosol water content of accumulation mode marine aerosols was estimated from differences between several series of ambient and dried aerosol size distributions. The average aerosol water fraction was 0.31, which is in good agreement with an empirical aerosol growth model estimate. The average rate of SO4= production in the accumulation mode aerosol water by H2O2 oxidation was estimated to be <7×10-10 mol L-1 s-1, which is an insignificant contributor to the observed non-sea-salt SO4= in the accumulation mode.

  20. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  1. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  2. Trends in aerosol abundances and distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Clancy, R. T.; Curran, R.; Deluisi, J.; Hamill, P.; Kent, G.; Rosen, J. M.; Toon, O. B.; Yue, G.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of aerosols that reside in the upper atmosphere are described. Special emphasis is given to the influence these aerosols have on ozone observation systems, mainly through radiative effects, and on ambient ozone concentrations, mainly through chemical effects. It has long been appreciated that stratospheric particles can interfere with the remote sensing of ozone distribution. The mechanism and magnitude of this interference are evaluated. Separate sections deal with the optical properties of upper atmospheric aerosols, long-term trends in stratospheric aerosols, perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer by volcanic eruptions, and estimates of the impacts that such particles have on remotely measured ozone concentrations. Another section is devoted to a discussion of the polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's). These unique clouds, recently discovered by satellite observation, are now thought to be intimately connected with the Antarctic ozone hole. Accordingly, interest in PSC's has grown considerably in recent years. This chapter describes what we know about the morphology, physical chemistry, and microphysics of PSC's.

  3. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary...

  4. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Focusing Efficiencies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary...

  5. Coastal Aerosol Distribution by Data Assimilation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    Westphal, and L. J. B. McArthur: Sunphotometric observations of the 2001 Asian dust storm over Canada and the U.S. Geophys. Res. Lett., 9, 94.1-94.4 ...2K2. Several years of NAAPS simulations for the Pacific Ocean have been analyzed for use in planning the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM...experiment, scheduled for April 2003, and intended to study the properties and distribution of the Asian dust and aerosols that cross the Pacific every

  6. Lidar measurements of ozone and aerosol distributions during the 1992 airborne Arctic stratospheric expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Fenn, Marta A.; Grant, William B.; Ismail, Syed; Carter, Arlen F.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Langley airborne differential absorption lidar system was operated from the NASA Ames DC-8 aircraft during the 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition to investigate the distribution of stratospheric aerosols and ozone (O3) across the Arctic vortex from January to March 1992. Aerosols from the Mt. Pinatubo eruption were found outside and inside the Arctic vortex with distinctly different scattering characteristics and spatial distributions in the two regions. The aerosol and O3 distributions clearly identified the edge of the vortex and provided additional information on vortex dynamics and transport processes. Few polar stratospheric clouds were observed during the AASE-2; however, those that were found had enhanced scattering and depolarization over the background Pinatubo aerosols. The distribution of aerosols inside the vortex exhibited relatively minor changes during the AASE-2. Ozone depletion inside the vortex as limited to less than or equal to 20 percent in the altitude region from 15-20 km.

  7. Using a global aerosol model adjoint to unravel the footprint of spatially-distributed emissions on cloud droplet number and cloud albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Capps, S. L.; Moore, R. H.; Russell, A. G.; Henze, D. K.; Nenes, A.

    2012-12-01

    The adjoints of the GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Model and a comprehensive cloud droplet parameterization are coupled to study the sensitivity of cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) over US regions and Central Europe to global emissions of anthropogenic fine mode aerosol precursors. Simulations reveal that the Nd over the midwestern and southeastern US is mostly sensitive to SO2 emissions during August, and to NH3 emissions during February. Over the western US, Nd is mostly sensitivity to SO2 and primary organic aerosol emissions. In Central Europe, Nd is most sensitive to NH3 and NOx emissions. As expected, local emissions strongly affect Nd; long-range transport, however, is also important for the western US and Europe. Emissions changes projected for the year 2050 are estimated to have the largest impacts on cloud albedo and Nd over Central Europe during August (42% and 82% change, respectively) and western US during February (12% and 36.5% change, respectively).

  8. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution.

  9. Spatial Inference for Distributed Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, A. J.; Katzfuss, M.; Nguyen, H.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing data are inherently spatial, and a substantial portion of their value for scientific analyses derives from the information they can provide about spatially dependent processes. Geophysical variables such as atmopsheric temperature, cloud properties, humidity, aerosols and carbon dioxide all exhibit spatial patterns, and satellite observations can help us learn about the physical mechanisms driving them. However, remote sensing observations are often noisy and incomplete, so inferring properties of true geophysical fields from them requires some care. These data can also be massive, which is both a blessing and a curse: using more data drives uncertainties down, but also drives costs up, particularly when data are stored on different computers or in different physical locations. In this talk I will discuss a methodology for spatial inference on massive, distributed data sets that does not require moving large volumes of data. The idea is based on a combination of ideas including modeling spatial covariance structures with low-rank covariance matrices, and distributed estimation in sensor or wireless networks.

  10. Size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.

    The aim of this paper is to present data about the concentration and size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosol under slightly polluted urban conditions in Hungary. Concentration of inorganic cations (ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium), inorganic anions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, carbonate) and organic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, formic and acetic acid) for 8 particle size range between 0.0625 and 16 μm were determined. As was the case for ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, the organic acids were mostly found in the fine particle size range. Potassium and chloride were rather uniformly distributed between fine and coarse particles. Sodium, calcium, magnesium and carbonate were practically observed in the coarse mode. The results obtained for the summer and the winter half-year were also compared. The mass concentrations were recalculated in equivalents, and the ion balance was found to be reasonable in most cases. Measurement of the pH of the aerosol extracts indicates that the aerosol is acidic in the fine mode, but alkaline in the coarse particle size range.

  11. Retrieving Aerosol in a Cloudy Environment: Aerosol Availability as a Function of Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.; Heidinger, Andrew; Pierce, R. Bradley; Chin, Mian

    2011-01-01

    The challenge of using satellite observations to retrieve aerosol properties in a cloudy environment is to prevent contamination of the aerosol signal from clouds, while maintaining sufficient aerosol product yield to satisfy specific applications. We investigate aerosol retrieval availability at different instrument pixel resolutions, using the standard MODIS aerosol cloud mask applied to MODIS data and a new GOES-R cloud mask applied to GOES data for a domain covering North America and surrounding oceans. Aerosol availability is not the same as the cloud free fraction and takes into account the technqiues used in the MODIS algorithm to avoid clouds, reduce noise and maintain sufficient numbers of aerosol retrievals. The inherent spatial resolution of each instrument, 0.5x0.5 km for MODIS and 1x1 km for GOES, is systematically degraded to 1x1 km, 2x2 km, 4x4 km and 8x8 km resolutions and then analyzed as to how that degradation would affect the availability of an aerosol retrieval, assuming an aerosol product resolution at 8x8 km. The results show that as pixel size increases, availability decreases until at 8x8 km 70% to 85% of the retrievals available at 0.5 km have been lost. The diurnal pattern of aerosol retrieval availability examined for one day in the summer suggests that coarse resolution sensors (i.e., 4x4 km or 8x8 km) may be able to retrieve aerosol early in the morning that would otherwise be missed at the time of current polar orbiting satellites, but not the diurnal aerosol properties due to cloud cover developed during the day. In contrast finer resolution sensors (i.e., 1x1 km or 2x2 km) have much better opportunity to retrieve aerosols in the partly cloudy scenes and better chance of returning the diurnal aerosol properties. Large differences in the results of the two cloud masks designed for MODIS aerosol and GOES cloud products strongly reinforce that cloud masks must be developed with specific purposes in mind and that a generic cloud mask

  12. Aerosol Measurements by the Globally Distributed Micro Pulse Lidar Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Welton, Judd; Campbell, James; Berkoff, Tim; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Full time measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol are now being acquired at a number of globally distributed MP (micro pulse) lidar sites. The MP lidar systems provide full time profiling of all significant cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation from compact, eye safe instruments. There are currently eight sites in operation and over a dozen planned. At all sited there are also passive aerosol and radiation measurements supporting the lidar data. Four of the installations are at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program sites. The network operation includes instrument operation and calibration and the processing of aerosol measurements with standard retrievals and data products from the network sites. Data products include optical thickness and extinction cross section profiles. Application of data is to supplement satellite aerosol measurements and to provide a climatology of the height distribution of aerosol. The height distribution of aerosol is important for aerosol transport and the direct scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation in the atmosphere. Current satellite and other data already provide a great amount of information on aerosol distribution, but no passive technique can adequately resolve the height profile of aerosol. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is an orbital lidar to be launched in early 2002. GLAS will provide global measurements of the height distribution of aerosol. The MP lidar network will provide ground truth and analysis support for GLAS and other NASA Earth Observing System data. The instruments, sites, calibration procedures and standard data product algorithms for the MPL network will be described.

  13. Concentrations and size distributions of Antarctic stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, G. V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Neish, E.; Schultz, M.

    1989-01-01

    Particle Measuring Systems laser particle spectrometer (ASAS-X and FSSP) probes were used to measure aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions during 11 ER-2 flights between Punta Arenas (53 deg S) and Antarctica (up to 72 deg S) from August 17 to September 22, 1987. The time resolution was 10 s, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 2 km. The data were divided into two size classes (0.05-0.25 and 0.53-5.5 micron radius) to separate the small particle from the coarse particle populations. Results show that the small-particle concentrations are typical for a background aerosol during volcanic quiescence. This concentration is generally constant along a flight track; in only one instance a depletion of small particles during a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) encounter was measured, suggesting a nucleation of type I PSC particles on background aerosols. Temporary increases of the coarse particle concentrations indicated the presence of tenuous polar stratospheric clouds that were encountered most frequently at the southernmost portion of a flight track and when the aircraft descended to lower altitudes. During 'particle events', particle modes were found at 0.6-micron radius, corresponding to type I PSCs, and occasionally, at 2.0-micron radius corresponding to type II PSCs.

  14. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Aerosol Behavior Log-Normal Distribution Model.

    SciTech Connect

    GIESEKE, J. A.

    2001-10-22

    HAARM3, an acronym for Heterogeneous Aerosol Agglomeration Revised Model 3, is the third program in the HAARM series developed to predict the time-dependent behavior of radioactive aerosols under postulated LMFBR accident conditions. HAARM3 was developed to include mechanisms of aerosol growth and removal which had not been accounted for in the earlier models. In addition, experimental measurements obtained on sodium oxide aerosols have been incorporated in the code. As in HAARM2, containment gas temperature, pressure, and temperature gradients normal to interior surfaces are permitted to vary with time. The effects of reduced density on sodium oxide agglomerate behavior and of nonspherical shape of particles on aerosol behavior mechanisms are taken into account, and aerosol agglomeration due to turbulent air motion is considered. Also included is a capability to calculate aerosol concentration attenuation factors and to restart problems requiring long computing times.

  16. Lidar Investigation of Aerosol Pollution Distribution near a Coal Power Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsev, TS.; Kolarov, G.

    1992-01-01

    Using aerosol lidars with high spatial and temporal resolution with the possibility of real-time data interpretation can solve a large number of ecological problems related to the aerosol-field distribution and variation and the structure of convective flows. Significantly less expensive specialized lidars are used in studying anthropogenic aerosols in the planetary boundary layer. Here, we present results of lidar measurements of the mass-concentration field around a coal-fired power plant with intensive local aerosol sources. We studied the pollution evolution as a function of the emission dynamics and the presence of retaining layers. The technique used incorporates complex analysis of three types of lidar mapping: horizontal map of the aerosol field, vertical cross-section map, and a series of profiles along a selected path. The lidar-sounding cycle was performed for the time of atmosphere's quasi-stationarity.

  17. Temporal and spatial variation of morphological descriptors for atmospheric aerosols collected in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    China, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M. K.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmuller, H.; Onasch, T. B.; Herndon, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    We present an analysis of morphological characteristics of atmospheric aerosol collected during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) field campaign that took place in Mexico City in March 2006. The sampler was installed on the Aerodyne mobile laboratory. The aerosol samples were collected on nuclepore clear polycarbonate filters mounted in Costar pop-top membrane holders. More than one hundred filters were collected at different ground sites with different atmospheric and geographical characteristics (urban, sub-urban, mountain-top, industrial, etc.) over a month period. Selected subsets of these filters were analyzed for aerosol morphology using a scanning electron microscope and image analysis techniques. In this study we investigate spatial and temporal variations of aerosol shape descriptors, morphological parameters, and fractal dimension. We also compare the morphological results with other aerosol measurements such as aerosol optical properties(scattering and absorption) and size distribution data. Atmospheric aerosols have different morphological characteristics depending on many parameters such as emission sources, atmospheric formation pathways, aging processes, and aerosol mixing state. The aerosol morphology influences aerosol chemical and mechanical interactions with the environment, physical properties, and radiative effects. In this study, ambient aerosol particles have been classified in different shape groups as spherical, irregularly shaped, and fractal-like aggregates. Different morphological parameters such as aspect ratio, roundness, feret diameter, etc. have been estimated for irregular shaped and spherical particles and for different kinds of soot particles including fresh soot, collapsed and coated soot. Fractal geometry and image processing have been used to obtain morphological characteristics of different soot particles. The number of monomers constituting each aggregate and their diameters were

  18. Measurement of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol by Globally Distributed MP Lidar Network Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Welton, Judd; Campbell, James; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global distribution of aerosol has an important influence on climate through the scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation and through modification of cloud optical properties. Current satellite and other data already provide a great amount of information on aerosol distribution. However there are critical parameters that can only be obtained by active optical profiling. For aerosol, no passive technique can adequately resolve the height profile of aerosol. The aerosol height distribution is required for any model for aerosol transport and the height resolved radiative heating/cooling effect of aerosol. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is an orbital lidar to be launched by 2002. GLAS will provide global measurements of the height distribution of aerosol. The sampling will be limited by nadir only coverage. There is a need for local sites to address sampling, and accuracy factors. Full time measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol are now being acquired at a number of globally distributed MP (micro pulse) lidar sites. The MP lidar systems provide profiling of all significant cloud and aerosol to the limit of signal attenuation from compact, eye safe instruments. There are currently six sites in operation and over a dozen planned. At all sites there are a complement of passive aerosol and radiation measurements supporting the lidar data. Four of the installations are at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program sites. The aerosol measurements, retrievals and data products from the network sites will be discussed. The current and planned application of data to supplement satellite aerosol measurements is covered.

  19. Visualizing Spatially Varying Distribution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Luo, Alison; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Pang, Alex; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Box plot is a compact representation that encodes the minimum, maximum, mean, median, and quarters information of a distribution. In practice, a single box plot is drawn for each variable of interest. With the advent of more accessible computing power, we are now facing the problem of visual icing data where there is a distribution at each 2D spatial location. Simply extending the box plot technique to distributions over 2D domain is not straightforward. One challenge is reducing the visual clutter if a box plot is drawn over each grid location in the 2D domain. This paper presents and discusses two general approaches, using parametric statistics and shape descriptors, to present 2D distribution data sets. Both approaches provide additional insights compared to the traditional box plot technique

  20. Aerosol vertical distribution characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. Q.; Han, Y. X.; Zhao, Q.; Li, J.

    2014-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products are widely used in climatic characteristic studies and stratospheric aerosol pattern research. Some SAGE II products, e.g., temperature, aerosol surface area density, 1020 nm aerosol extinction coefficient and dust storm frequency, from ground-based observations were analysed from 1984 to 2005. This analysis explored the time and spatial variations of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols on the Tibet Plateau. The stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient increased more than two orders of magnitude because of a large volcanic eruption. However, the tropospheric aerosol extinction coefficient decreased over the same period. Removing the volcanic eruption effect, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) and tropospheric AOD was 0.197. Moreover, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD and dust storm frequency was 0.315. The maximum stratospheric AOD was attained in January, the same month as the tropospheric AOD, when the Qaidam Basin was the centre of low tropospheric AOD and the large mountains coincided with high stratospheric AOD. The vertical structure generated by westerly jet adjustment and the high altitude of the underlying surface of the Tibetan Plateau were important factors affecting winter stratospheric aerosols.

  1. Spatial Distributions of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam L.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2008-10-01

    We analyze the spatial distribution of young stars in Taurus-Auriga and Upper Sco, as determined from the two-point correlation function (i.e., the mean surface density of neighbors). The corresponding power-law fits allow us to determine the fractal dimensions of each association's spatial distribution, measure the stellar velocity dispersions, and distinguish between the bound binary population and chance alignments of members. We find that the fractal dimension of Taurus is D ~ 1.05, consistent with its filamentary structure. The fractal dimension of Upper Sco may be even shallower (D ~ 0.7), but this fit is uncertain due to the limited area and possible spatially variable incompleteness. We also find that random stellar motions have erased all primordial structure on scales of lsim0.07° in Taurus and lsim1.7° in Upper Sco; given ages of ~1 and ~5 Myr, the corresponding internal velocity dispersions are ~0.2 and ~1.0 km s-1, respectively. Finally, we find that binaries can be distinguished from chance alignments at separations of lsim120'' (17,000 AU) in Taurus and lsim75'' (11,000 AU) in Upper Sco. The binary populations in these associations that we previously studied, spanning separations of 3''-30'', is dominated by binary systems. However, the few lowest mass pairs (Mprim <~ 0.3 M⊙) might be chance alignments.

  2. Spatial separation of individual substances in effloresced crystals of ternary ammonium sulphate/dicarboxylic acid/water aerosols.

    PubMed

    Treuel, Lennart; Sandmann, Alice; Zellner, Reinhard

    2011-04-18

    This work examines the crystals resulting from the efflorescence of internally mixed aqueous aerosols comprising ammonium sulphate and different dicarboxylic acids. Most studies on the deliquescence of aerosols use previously effloresced aerosols in their experiments. However, during efflorescence a highly supersaturated solution crystallises in a kinetically controlled way unlike the case of thermodynamically controlled crystallisation. Herein the distribution of individual substances within the effloresced crystals is investigated using Raman scanning experiments. The data presented show an intriguingly complex behaviour of these ternary and quarternary aerosols. A spatial separation of substances in the crystals resulting from the efflorescence of previously internally mixed ternary salt/dicarboxylic acid/water aerosol droplets is demonstrated and mechanistic aspects are discussed.

  3. Assessment of the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Ayantika, D. C.; Pandithurai, G.; Niranjan, K.

    2014-04-01

    This paper examines the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent as represented in 21 models from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations, wherein model simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) is compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The objective of the study is to provide an assessment of the capability of various global models, participating in CMIP5 project, in capturing the realistic spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent. Results from our analysis show that majority of the CMIP5 models (excepting HADGEM2-ES, HADGEM2-CC) seriously underestimates the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent, in particular over Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). Since IGP region is dominated by anthropogenic activities, high population density, and wind driven transport of dust and other aerosol species, MODIS observations reveal high AOD values over this region. Though the representation of black carbon (BC) loading in many models is fairly good, the dust loading is observed to be significantly low in majority of the models. The presence of pronounced dust activity over northern India and dust being one of the major constituent of aerosol species, the biases in dust loading has a great impact on the AOD of that region. We found that considerable biases in simulating the 850 hPa wind field (which plays important role in transport of dust from adjacent deserts) would be the possible reason for poor representation of dust AOD and in turn total AOD over Indian region in CMIP5 models. In addition, aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) underestimated/overestimated in most of the models. However, spatial distribution of ARF in multi-model ensemble mean is comparable reasonably well with observations with bias in magnitudes. This analysis emphasizes the fundamental need to improve the representation of aerosol species in current state of

  4. Temporal and spatial variability of aerosol optical depth in the Sahel region in relation to vegetation remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Fraser, R. S.; Eck, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    In order to monitor the aerosol characteristics needed for atmospheric correction of remotely sensed data, a network of sun photometers was established in the Sahel region of Senegal, Mali, and Niger. Data analysis suggests that there is a high spatial variability of the aerosol optical thickness tau(a) in the western Sahel region. At a 67 percent confidence level the instantaneous values of tau(a) can be extrapolated approximately 270-400 km with an error tolerance of 50 percent. Spatial variability in the dry season is found to be of a similar magnitude. The ranges of variations in the NDVI in the Sahel region are shown to be approximately 0.02 and 0.01, respectively, due to commonly observed fluctuations in the aerosol optical thickness and aerosol size distribution.

  5. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Meigen; Feichter, J.; Liu, Xiaohong

    2010-07-14

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  6. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Wang, B.; Zhang, M.; Feichter, J.; Liu, X.

    2010-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  7. Coastal Aerosol Distribution By Data Assimilation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    have global coverage and include data gathering, quality control and data assimilation of the available aerosol observations, including satellite...when combined with NOGAPS fields. The area was dominated by a deep, dry, polluted air mass with near-neutral stability (not shown), in contrast to...to 6.4 efforts in EOTDA evaluation and aerosol measurement (PE 0603207N). REFERENCES 1999, Prospero, J., D. L. Westphal, and R. Poirot: The extreme air

  8. Estimation of the spatial validity of local aerosol measurements in Europe using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, Carlos; Gómez-Amo, J. Luis; Pedrós, Roberto; Utrillas, M. Pilar; Martínez-Lozano, J. Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The actual impact of atmospheric aerosols in the Earth's radiative budget is still associated to large uncertainties [IPCC, 2007]. Global monitoring of the aerosol properties and distribution in the atmosphere is needed to improve our knowledge of climate change. The instrumentation used for this purpose can be divided into two main groups: ground-based and satellite-based. Ground-based instruments, like lidars or Sun-photometers, are usually designed to measure accurate local properties of atmospheric aerosols throughout the day. However, the spatial validity of these measurements is conditioned by the aerosol variability within the atmosphere. Satellite-based sensors offer spatially resolved information about aerosols at a global scale, but generally with a worse temporal resolution and in a less detailed way. In this work, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550nm from MODIS Aqua, product MYD04 [Remer, 2005], is used to estimate the area of validity of local measurements at different reference points, corresponding to the AERONET [Holben, 1998] stations during the 2011-2012 period in Europe. For each case, the local AOD (AODloc) at each reference point is calculated as the averaged MODIS data within a radius of 15 km. Then, the AODloc is compared to the AOD obtained when a larger averaging radius is used (AOD(r)), up to 500 km. Only those cases where more than 50% of the pixels in each averaging area contain valid data are used. Four factors that could affect the spatial variability of aerosols are studied: proximity to the sea, human activity, aerosol load and geographical location (latitude and longitude). For the 76 reference points studied, which are sited in different regions of Europe, we have determined that the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between AODloc and AOD(r) , averaged for all cases, increases in a logarithmic way with the averaging radius (RMSD ? log(r)), while the linear correlation coefficient (R) decreases following a logarithmic trend

  9. Aerosol distributions and an Arctic aerosol front during AGASP: Norwegian Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Raatz, W.E.; Schnell, R.C.

    1984-05-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol characteristics obtained near Svalbard, Norway, during the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program (AGASP) indicate that high aerosol concentrations and strong visible haze were distributed throughout the troposphere. Layers of Arctic haze were observed in both dry air and moist air. A research flight on March 31, 1983, crossed a previously undocumented Arctic aerosol front structure. Condensation nucleus concentrations of 450 cm/sup -3/ within the polluted continental air mass south of the front decreased to 80 cm/sup -3/ within the clean Arctic air north of the front. Aerosols above the Aitken size range decreased one order of magnitude in both number and mass across this same air mass boundary.

  10. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ma, Y. M.; You, C.; Zhu, Z. K.

    2015-06-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP all the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported over the main body of the TP across the northeastern edge rather than the southern edge. This is may be because the altitude is much lower at the northeastern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental and smoke are also investigated based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A natural boundary seems to extend to an altitude of 6-8 km a.s.l., which may act as a dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP, especially in spring and summer. This boundary appears around 33-35° N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that this natural boundary extending to upper troposphere is consistent with the spatial pattern of aerosol loading. The whole TP blocks the atmospheric aerosols transported from surrounding regions, and the extreme high mountains on the TP also cause an obstruction to the transport of aerosols. The aerosol distribution patterns are primarily driven by atmospheric

  11. Assessment of the Aerosol Distribution Over Indian Subcontinent in CMIP5 Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Pandithurai, G.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent as represented in 21 models from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations, wherein model simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) is compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The objective of the study is to provide an assessment of the capability of various global models, participating in CMIP5 project, in capturing the realistic spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent. Results from our analysis show that majority of the CMIP5 models seriously underestimates the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent, in particular over Indo-Gangetic Plains(IGP). Though the representation of black carbon (BC) loading in many models is fairly good, the dust loading is observed to be significantly low in majority of the models. The presence of pronounced dust activity over northern India and dust being one of the major constituent of aerosol species, the biases in dust loading has a great impact on the AOD of that region. We found that considerable biases in simulating the 850 hPa wind field (which plays important role in transport of dust from adjacent deserts) would be the possible reason for poor representation of dust AOD and in turn total AOD over Indian region in CMIP5 models. In addition, aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) underestimated/overestimated in most of the models. However, spatial distribution of ARF in multi-model ensemble mean is comparable reasonably well with observations with bias in magnitudes. This analysis emphasizes the fundamental need to improve the representation of aerosol species in current state of the art climate models. As reported in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4), the level of scientific understanding (LOSU) of climatic impact of aerosols is medium-low. For better understanding of

  12. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  13. Sulfate aerosol distributions and cloud variations during El Nino anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Parungo, F. ); Hicks, B. )

    1993-02-20

    The effects of aerosols on cloud characteristics, albedo, rainfall amount, and overall climate changes were investigated by assessing the qualitative associations and quantitative correlations between the relevant variables during El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) perturbations. Both historical records and data from recent field measurements for the Pacific Ocean region were used for the investigation. The results show that ENSO perturbations could change sulfate aerosol production and distribution over the surveyed regions. Strong correlations were observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and sulfate aerosol concentrations, and between cloud amount and albedo. Weak but significant correlations were also observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and cloud amounts, and between sulfate aerosol concentrations and rainfall amounts. Although sulfate aerosols appeared to have a strong impact on cloud microphysics, the present data confirm that cloud dynamics play the pivotal role in control of cloud types and cloud amount in the studied regions. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Aerosol Size Distribution Determined From Multiple Field-Of-View Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Yabuki, M.; Tsuda, T.; Uesugi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of aerosol size distribution is essential for its influence on atmosphere and human health, especially for small particles because they are able to penetrate lung tissues, thus increasing the risk of bronchitis or lung diseases. Lidar as an active optical remote sensing technique is effective for monitoring aerosols with high temporal and spatial variations. Particles with diameters comparable to the detecting light wavelength have been effectively detected by using UV, VIS, and near-IR wavelengths. However, to quantitatively estimate the shape of the particle size distribution, more information is required with respect to sub-micrometer and smaller particles. Conventional lidar employs tiny field-of-view (FOV) to detect single scatter reflected from aerosols in the direction opposite to incident light. However, the complicated reflection on the path of laser causes multiple scatter which contains also the size distribution information of aerosols. In this study, a UV Lidar with multiple FOV receiver was used for detecting such multiple scattering effects in order to obtain more quantitative information related to particle size distribution. The FOV of Lidar receiver was program controlled in a range from 0.1 mrad to 12.4 mrad. The pacific retrieval method for aerosol size distribution using this feature and field measurement results will be introduced in the presentation.

  15. Measurement of size distributions of a coagulating aerosol. [Calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.G.

    1984-05-01

    Measurements have been performed for the determination of the size distribution of a coagulating ultrafine aerosol over a time interval of up to about 30 min. The aerosol was contained in a balloon with an initial volume of 60 l subject to a temperature inversion for the purpose of quenching the free convection and thereby diminishing the aerosol loss to the balloon wall. The aerosol size distribution was measured with the TSI electrostatic aerosol classifier hooked up to a TSI aerosol electrometer. The initial aerosol had an average diameter of about 12 nm. Measurements were taken by computer at a rate of 1 measurement cycle every 3 s; 1 cycle consists of a measurement of time, and burst measurements of electrometer current, classifier rod voltage, 3 flow rates, and 5 temperatures, followed by the calculation of averages and standard deviations, and storage of the results in a data string. The TSI instruments have been modified to permit the automatic computer reading of the parameters mentioned above. A multiplexer has been built to allow the multiplet data to be measured by a single system voltmeter. Channel switching in the multiplexer can be done either automatically by using the ''delay'' signal emitted by the system voltmeter every time it makes a reading or by software control through the 16-bit parallel interface of the computer.

  16. Aerosol vertical distribution and optical properties over China from long-term satellite and ground-based remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Pengfei; Cao, Xianjie; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Naixiu; Sun, Lu; Logan, Timothy; Shi, Jinsen; Wang, Yuan; Ji, Yuemeng; Lin, Yun; Huang, Zhongwei; Zhou, Tian; Shi, Yingying; Zhang, Renyi

    2017-02-01

    The seasonal and spatial variations of vertical distribution and optical properties of aerosols over China are studied using long-term satellite observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and ground-based lidar observations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data. The CALIOP products are validated using the ground-based lidar measurements at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL). The Taklamakan Desert and Tibetan Plateau regions exhibit the highest depolarization and color ratios because of the natural dust origin, whereas the North China Plain, Sichuan Basin and Yangtze River Delta show the lowest depolarization and color ratios because of aerosols from secondary formation of the anthropogenic origin. Certain regions, such as the North China Plain in spring and the Loess Plateau in winter, show intermediate depolarization and color ratios because of mixed dust and anthropogenic aerosols. In the Pearl River Delta region, the depolarization and color ratios are similar to but higher than those of the other polluted regions because of combined anthropogenic and marine aerosols. Long-range transport of dust in the middle and upper troposphere in spring is well captured by the CALIOP observations. The seasonal variations in the aerosol vertical distributions reveal efficient transport of aerosols from the atmospheric boundary layer to the free troposphere because of summertime convective mixing. The aerosol extinction lapse rates in autumn and winter are more positive than those in spring and summer, indicating trapped aerosols within the boundary layer because of stabler meteorological conditions. More than 80 % of the column aerosols are distributed within 1.5 km above the ground in winter, when the aerosol extinction lapse rate exhibits a maximum seasonal average in all study regions except for the Tibetan Plateau. The aerosol extinction lapse rates in the polluted regions are higher

  17. Aerosols and past environments: A global investigation into cave aerosol identification, distribution, and contribution to speleothem geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dredge, J. A.; Fairchild, I. J.; Harrison, R. M.; Woodhead, J. D.; Hellstrom, J.; Mattey, D.

    2013-12-01

    A new sector of interest is developing within cave science regarding the influence of aerosols on the cave environment and the potential speleothem palaeoenvironmental aerosol record which may be preserved. This paper presents the results from a global collaboration project which explored all aspects of aerosols in the cave environment. Cave aerosol identification, introduction and distribution Cave aerosol multivariable environmental monitoring projects were carried out in the UK, Spain, Austria and Australia. Results demonstrate that cave ventilation is the predominant control on the introduction and distribution of aerosols throughout the cave environment (Dredge et al., 2013). Consequently, aerosol transportation processes vary as a result of seasonal ventilation changes and cave morphological features. Cave aerosol contribution to speleothem geochemistry Aerosol contributions to speleothem geochemistry were determined by comparing monitored aerosol deposition to speleothem trace element data. Significant aerosol contribution scenarios were identified as: hiatus events, high aerosol flux situations and secondary microbial concentration processes. Modelling indicates that a >99.9% reduction in drip water flow rates is required to reduce trace element supply quantities to equal that of aerosol supply (Dredge et al., 2013). Aerosol palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental records Aerosol contributions and the ability to utilise aerosol records in speleothem are investigated in samples from Gibraltar and Australia. Long range dust sources and past atmospheric circulation over several glacial cycles is studied through Sr isotope analysis of a Flowstone core from Gibraltar. Results of organic fire proxy analysis from Australian speleothem samples indicate an aerosol deposition forest fire record. In addition to primary fire deposition, secondary biological feedbacks and subsequent bioaccumulation processes in the cave environment are explored by microbial analysis

  18. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ma, Y. M.; You, C.; Zhu, Z. K.

    2015-10-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP throughout the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported to the main body of the TP across the northern edge rather than the southern edge. This is maybe partly because the altitude is lower at the northern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental aerosol and smoke are also investigated, based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP can be observed clearly at an altitude of 6-8 km above sea level, especially in spring and summer. This demarcation appears around 33-35° N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high-altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that the vertical dust occurrences are consistent with the spatial patterns of AOD. The different seasonal variation patterns between the northern and southern TP are primarily driven by atmospheric circulation, and are also related to the emission characteristics over the surrounding regions.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Aerosols Around Beijing in the Summer 2006: Model Evaluation and Source Apportionment

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hitoshi; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Kita, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Hu, M.; Chang, S-Y; Blake, D. R.; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Streets, D. G.; Zhang, Q.; Zhou, T.

    2009-08-15

    Regional aerosol model calculations were made using the WRF-CMAQ and WRF-chem models to study spatial and temporal variations of aerosols around Beijing, China, in August and September 2006 when the CAREBEIJING-2006 campaign was conducted. Model calculations were compared with in-situ observations made at the urban site in Beijing and suburb site in Yufa, which is 50 km to the south of Beijing. In general, the two model calculations reproduced features of temporal variations of meteorological parameters and concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) and inorganic aerosols (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate). Spatial distributions of aerosol optical depth (AOD) obtained by the MODIS satellite sensor are also generally well reproduced. Model calculations show that enhancements in inorganic aerosol concentrations simultaneously observed at the two sites 4 to 5 times during the one-month observation period were resulted by accumulation of pollutants under stagnated air condition. Because Beijing is located at the north border the high anthropogenic emission area (the Great North China Plain), northward motion of air under the influence of anti-cyclone system caused enhancements in fine aerosol concentrations at Beijing. Concentrations of primary aerosols, such as EC, are found to be generally controlled by emissions within 100 km around Beijing within previous 24 hours. On the other hand, emissions as far as 500 km within previous 3 days were found to affect concentrations of secondary aerosols, such as sulfate. Because of significant contributions of secondary aerosols in Beijing, regional emission controls are found to be necessary for improvement of air quality in Beijing.

  20. Method of measuring charge distribution of nanosized aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Woo, K S; Liu, B Y H; Zachariah, M R

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we present the development of a method to accurately measure the positive and negative charge distribution of nanosized aerosols using a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) system. From the series of TDMA measurements, the charge fraction of nanosized aerosol particles was obtained as a function of equivalent mobility particle diameter ranging from 50 to 200 nm. The capability of this new approach was implemented by sampling from a laminar diffusion flame which provides a source of highly charged particles due to naturally occurring flame ionization process. The results from the TDMA measurement provide the charge distribution of nanosized aerosols which we found to be in reasonable agreement with Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution theory and a theory based upon charge population balance equation (PBE) combined with Fuchs theory (N.A. Fuchs, Geofis. Pura Appl. 56 (1963) 185). The theoretically estimated charge distribution of aerosol particles based on the PBE provides insight into the charging processes of nanosized aerosols surrounded by bipolar ions and electrons, and agree well with the TDMA results.

  1. Atmospheric aerosols in Rome, Italy: sources, dynamics and spatial variations during two seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struckmeier, Caroline; Drewnick, Frank; Fachinger, Friederike; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    Investigations on atmospheric aerosols and their sources were carried out in October/November 2013 and May/June 2014 consecutively in a suburban area of Rome (Tor Vergata) and in central Rome (near St Peter's Basilica). During both years a Saharan dust advection event temporarily increased PM10 concentrations at ground level by about 12-17 µg m-3. Generally, in October/November the ambient aerosol was more strongly influenced by primary emissions, whereas higher relative contributions of secondary particles (sulfate, aged organic aerosol) were found in May/June. Absolute concentrations of anthropogenic emission tracers (e.g. NOx, CO2, particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, traffic-related organic aerosol) were generally higher at the urban location. Positive matrix factorization was applied to the PM1 organic aerosol (OA) fraction of aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) data to identify different sources of primary OA (POA): traffic, cooking, biomass burning and (local) cigarette smoking. While biomass burning OA was only found at the suburban site, where it accounted for the major fraction of POA (18-24 % of total OA), traffic and cooking were more dominant sources at the urban site. A particle type associated with cigarette smoke emissions, which is associated with a potential characteristic marker peak (m/z 84, C5H10N+, a nicotine fragment) in the mass spectrum, was only found in central Rome, where it was emitted in close vicinity to the measurement location. Regarding secondary OA, in October/November, only a very aged, regionally advected oxygenated OA was found, which contributed 42-53 % to the total OA. In May/June total oxygenated OA accounted for 56-76 % of the OA. Here a fraction (18-26 % of total OA) of a fresher, less oxygenated OA of more local origin was also observed. New particle formation events were identified from measured particle number concentrations and size distributions in May/June 2014 at both sites. While they were observed

  2. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  3. Three optical methods for remotely measuring aerosol size distributions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    Three optical probing methods for remotely measuring atmospheric aerosol size distributions are discussed and contrasted. The particular detection methods which are considered make use of monostatic lidar (laser radar), bistatic lidar, and solar radiometer sensing techniques. The theory of each of these measurement techniques is discussed briefly, and the necessary constraints which must be applied to obtain aerosol size distribution information from such measurements are pointed out. Theoretical and/or experimental results are also presented which demonstrate the utility of the three proposed probing methods.

  4. Variability of aerosol vertical distribution in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalieri, O.; Cairo, F.; Fierli, F.; di Donfrancesco, G.; Snels, M.; Viterbini, M.; Cardillo, F.; Chatenet, B.; Formenti, P.; Marticorena, B.; Rajot, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the seasonal and inter-annual variability of the aerosol vertical distribution over Sahelian Africa for the years 2006, 2007 and 2008, characterizing the different kind of aerosols present in the atmosphere in terms of their optical properties observed by ground-based and satellite instruments, and their sources searched for by using trajectory analysis. This study combines data acquired by three ground-based micro lidar systems located in Banizoumbou (Niger), Cinzana (Mali) and M'Bour (Senegal) in the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA), by the AEROsol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometers and by the space-based Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard the CALIPSO satellite (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Observations). During winter, the lower levels air masses arriving in the Sahelian region come mainly from North, North-West and from the Atlantic area, while in the upper troposphere air flow generally originates from West Africa, crossing a region characterized by the presence of large biomass burning sources. The sites of Cinzana, Banizoumbou and M'Bour, along a transect of aerosol transport from East to West, are in fact under the influence of tropical biomass burning aerosol emission during the dry season, as revealed by the seasonal pattern of the aerosol optical properties, and by back-trajectory studies. Aerosol produced by biomass burning are observed mainly during the dry season and are confined in the upper layers of the atmosphere. This is particularly evident for 2006, which was characterized by a large presence of biomass burning aerosols in all the three sites. Biomass burning aerosol is also observed during spring when air masses originating from North and East Africa pass over sparse biomass burning sources, and during summer when biomass burning aerosol is transported from the southern part of the continent by the monsoon flow. During summer

  5. Initial size distributions and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-10-01

    Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source size distributions were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single size, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed size change for particles of different sizes within the whole size spectrum. The source particle size distribution measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the size range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle sizes and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. The regional distribution characteristics of aerosol optical depth over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chao; Ma, Yaoming; You, Chao; Zhu, Zhikun

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is representative of typical clean atmospheric conditions. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved by Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is higher over Qaidam Basin than the rest of the TP all the year. Different monthly variation patterns of AOD are observed over the southern and northern TP, whereby the aerosol load is usually higher in the northern TP than in the southern part. The aerosol load over the northern part increases from April to June, peaking in May. The maximum concentration of aerosols over the southern TP occurs in July. Aerosols appear to be more easily transported to the main body of the TP across the northern edge rather than the southern edge. This is may be partly because the altitude is lower at the northern edge than that of the Himalayas located along the southern edge of the TP. Three-dimensional distributions of dust, polluted dust, polluted continental and smoke are also investigated based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data. Dust is found to be the most prominent aerosol type on the TP, and other types of aerosols affect the atmospheric environment slightly. A dividing line of higher dust occurrence in the northern TP and lower dust occurrence in the southern TP can be observed clearly at altitude of 6-8 km above sea level, especially in spring and summer. This demarcation appears around 33-35°N in the middle of the plateau, and it is possibly associated with the high altitude terrain in the same geographic location. Comparisons of CALIPSO and MISR data show that the vertical dust occurrences are consistent with the spatial patterns of AOD. The different seasonal variation patterns between the northern and southern TP are primarily driven by atmospheric circulation, and are also related to the emission characteristics over the surrounding regions.

  7. Spatial heterogeneity in near surface aerosol characteristics across the Brahmaputra valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Binita; Borgohain, Arup; Bhuyan, Pradip Kumar; Kundu, Shyam Sundar; Sudhakar, S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2014-06-01

    In order to examine the spatial variability of the aerosol characteristics across the Brahmaputra valley, a land campaign was conducted during late winter (February 3-March 2) 2011. Measurements of particulate matter (PM, PM10, PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) concentrations were made onboard an interior redesigned vehicle. The length of the campaign trail stretched about 700 km, covering the longitude belt of 89.97°-95.55°E and latitude belt of 26.1°-27.6°N, comprising 13 measurement locations. The valley is divided into three sectors longitudinally: western sector (R1: 89.97°-91.75°E), middle sector (R2: 92.5°-94.01°E) and eastern sector (R3: 94.63°-95.55°E). Spatial heterogeneity in aerosol distribution has been observed with higher PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations at the western and middle sectors compared to the eastern sector. The locations in the western sector are found to be rich in BC compared to the other two sectors and there is a gradual decrease in BC concentrations from west to east of the Brahmaputra valley. Two hotspots within the western and middle sectors with high PM and BC concentrations have been identified. The associated physico-optical parameters of PM reveal abundance of PM2.5 aerosols along the entire valley. High population density in the western and middle sectors, together with the contribution of remote aerosols, leads to higher anthropogenic aerosols over those regions. Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS) slightly underestimates the measured PM10 and PM2.5 at the eastern sector while the model overestimates the measurements at a number of locations in the western sector. In general, BC is underestimated by the model. The variation of BC within the campaign trail has not been adequately captured by the model leading to higher variance in the western locations as compared to the middle and eastern locations.

  8. Seasonal variation of vertical distribution of aerosol single scattering albedo over Indian sub-continent: RAWEX aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Babu, S.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the vertical distribution of aerosols and its seasonality (especially the single scattering albedo, SSA) extensive profiling of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients have been carried out using an instrumented aircraft from seven base stations spread across the Indian mainland during winter 2012 and spring/pre-monsoon 2013 under the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment (RAWEX). Spatial variation of the vertical profiles of the asymmetry parameter, the wavelength exponent of the absorption coefficient and the single scattering albedo, derived from the measurements, are used to infer the source characteristics of winter and pre-monsoon aerosols as well as the seasonality of free tropospheric aerosols. The relatively high value of the wavelength exponent of absorption coefficient over most of the regions indicates the contribution from biomass burning and dust aerosols up to lower free tropospheric altitudes. A clear enhancement in aerosol loading and its absorbing nature is seen at lower free troposphere levels (above the planetary boundary layer) over the entire mainland during spring/pre-monsoon season compared to winter, whereas concentration of aerosols within the boundary layer showed a decrease from winter to spring. This could have significant implications on the aerosol heating structure over the Indian region and hence the regional climate.

  9. A model for predicting fog aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudiger, Joshua J.; Book, Kevin; Baker, Brooke; deGrassie, John Stephen; Hammel, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    An accurate model and parameterization of fog is needed to increase the reliability and usefulness of electro-optical systems in all relevant environments. Current models vary widely in their ability to accurately predict the size distribution and subsequent optical properties of fog. The Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM), developed to model the distribution of aerosols in the maritime environment, does not currently include a model for fog. One of the more prevalent methods for modeling particle size spectra consists of fitting a modified gamma function to fog measurement data. This limits the fog distribution to a single mode. Here we establish an empirical model for predicting complicated multimodal fog droplet size spectra using machine learning techniques. This is accomplished through careful measurements of fog in a controlled laboratory environment and measuring fog particle size distributions during outdoor fog events.

  10. Aerosol generation and circulation in the shore zone of a Large Alpine lake - 2 - Aerosol distributions over Lake Tahoe, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanCuren, R.; Pederson, J.; Lashgari, A.; Dolislager, L.; McCauley, E.

    2012-01-01

    The temporal, spatial, and size-distribution patterns of particles in ambient air over the surface of Lake Tahoe (Nevada and California) were studied as part of the 2003-2004 Lake Tahoe atmospheric deposition study (LTADS). The concentration of population along the shoreline of Lake Tahoe makes accurate characterization of local aerosol generation and transport especially important in estimation of annual particle flux to the surface of the lake. Measurements taken while cruising on the lake show that aerosol concentrations in near shore areas are primarily controlled by a combination of diurnal cycling of land- and lake- breezes and particle emissions driven by cycles of human activity near the shore. These effects were observed to be highly localized. Highest concentrations were found just offshore from urbanized areas, especially shoreline centers of activity; lowest concentrations were found along undeveloped shoreline; low-to-intermediate concentrations were measured over the middle areas of the lake. The on-lake data reported here indicate that aerosols over the lake, and thus dry deposition to the lake, are dominated by the same processes that control onshore emissions, and that the impact is strongest in the near shore areas of the lake.

  11. Inference of stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from SAGE II satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Fuller, W. H.; Yue, G. K.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for inferring stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from the water vapor concentration and aerosol extinction measurements obtained in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the associated temperature from the NMC. The aerosols are assumed to be sulfuric acid-water droplets. A modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to determine model size distribution parameters based on the SAGE II multiwavelength aerosol extinctions. It is found that the best aerosol size information is contained in the aerosol radius range between about 0.25 and 0.80 micron.

  12. Airborne Measurements of Aerosol Size Distributions During PACDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, D. C.; Gandrud, B.; Campos, T.; Kok, G.; Stith, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Pacific Dust Experiment (PACDEX) is an airborne project that attempts to characterize the indirect aerosol effect by tracing plumes of dust and pollution across the Pacific Ocean. This project occurred during April-May 2007 and used the NSF/NCAR HIAPER research aircraft. When a period of strong generation of dust particles and pollution was detected by ground-based and satellite sensors, then the aircraft was launched from Colorado to Alaska, Hawaii, and Japan. Its mission was to intercept and track these plumes from Asia, across the Pacific Ocean, and ultimately to the edges of North America. For more description, see the abstract by Stith and Ramanathan (this conference) and other companion papers on PACDEX. The HIAPER aircraft carried a wide variety of sensors for measuring aerosols, cloud particles, trace gases, and radiation. Sampling was made in several weather regimes, including clean "background" air, dust and pollution plumes, and regions with cloud systems. Altitude ranges extended from 100 m above the ocean to 13.4 km. This paper reports on aerosol measurements made with a new Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), a Radial Differential Mobility Analyzer (RDMA), a water-based CN counter, and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP). These cover the size range 10 nm to 10 um diameter. In clear air, dust was detected with the UHSAS and CDP. Polluted air was identified with high concentrations of carbon monoxide, ozone, and CN. Aerosol size distributions will be presented, along with data to define the context of weather regimes.

  13. Spatial distribution of thermal energy in equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2015-06-01

    The equipartition theorem states that in equilibrium, thermal energy is equally distributed among uncoupled degrees of freedom that appear quadratically in the system's Hamiltonian. However, for spatially coupled degrees of freedom, such as interacting particles, one may speculate that the spatial distribution of thermal energy may differ from the value predicted by equipartition, possibly quite substantially in strongly inhomogeneous or disordered systems. Here we show that for systems undergoing simple Gaussian fluctuations around an equilibrium state, the spatial distribution is universally bounded from above by 1/2k(B)T. We further show that in one-dimensional systems with short-range interactions, the thermal energy is equally partitioned even for coupled degrees of freedom in the thermodynamic limit and that in higher dimensions nontrivial spatial distributions emerge. Some implications are discussed.

  14. Airship measurements of aerosol size distributions, cloud droplet spectra, and trace gas concentrations in the marine boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, G.M.; Hoppel, W.A. )

    1993-11-01

    The use of an airship as a platform to conduct atmospheric chemistry, aerosol, and cloud microphysical research is described, and results from demonstration flights made off the Oregon coast are presented. The slow speed of the airship makes it an ideal platform to do high-spatial resolution profiling both vertically and horizontally, and to measure large aerosol and cloud droplet distributions without the difficulties caused by high-speed aircraft sampling. A unique set of data obtained during the demonstration flights show the effect that processing marine boundary layer aerosol through stratus clouds has on the aerosol size distribution. Evidence of new particle formation (nucleation of particles) was also observed on about half the days on which flights were made. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The spatial distribution of coronae on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Schubert, G.; Bindschadler, D. L.; Janes, D. M.; Moersch, J. E.; Moore, W.; Olson, P.; Ratcliff, J. T.; Stofan, E. R.; Turcotte, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Coronae on Venus are large, generally circular surface features that have distinctive tectonic, volcanic, and topographic expressions. They range in diameter from less than 200 km to at least 1000 km. Data from the Magellan spacecraft have now allowed complete global mapping of the spatial distribution of coronae on the planet. Unlike impact craters, which show a random (i.e., Poisson) spatial distribution, the distribution of coronae appears to be nonrandom. We investigate the distribution here in detail, and explore its implications in terms of mantle convection and surface modification processes.

  16. Dengue Vectors and their Spatial Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Yukiko

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, is affected by climatic factors. In addition, since their life cycles are well adapted to the human environment, environmental changes resulting from human activity such as urbanization exert a great impact on vector distribution. The different responses of Ae. aegypti and Ae albopictus to various environments result in a difference in spatial distribution along north-south and urban-rural gradients, and between the indoors and outdoors. In the north-south gradient, climate associated with survival is an important factor in spatial distribution. In the urban-rural gradient, different distribution reflects a difference in adult niches and is modified by geographic and human factors. The direct response of the two species to the environment around houses is related to different spatial distribution indoors and outdoors. Dengue viruses circulate mainly between human and vector mosquitoes, and the vector presence is a limiting factor of transmission. Therefore, spatial distribution of dengue vectors is a significant concern in the epidemiology of the disease. Current technologies such as GIS, satellite imagery and statistical models allow researchers to predict the spatial distribution of vectors in the changing environment. Although it is difficult to confirm the actual effect of environmental and climate changes on vector abundance and vector-borne diseases, environmental changes caused by humans and human behavioral changes due to climate change can be expected to exert an impact on dengue vectors. Longitudinal monitoring of dengue vectors and viruses is therefore necessary. PMID:22500133

  17. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  18. Computing spatial information from Fourier coefficient distributions.

    PubMed

    Heinz, William F; Werbin, Jeffrey L; Lattman, Eaton; Hoh, Jan H

    2011-05-01

    The spatial relationships between molecules can be quantified in terms of information. In the case of membranes, the spatial organization of molecules in a bilayer is closely related to biophysically and biologically important properties. Here, we present an approach to computing spatial information based on Fourier coefficient distributions. The Fourier transform (FT) of an image contains a complete description of the image, and the values of the FT coefficients are uniquely associated with that image. For an image where the distribution of pixels is uncorrelated, the FT coefficients are normally distributed and uncorrelated. Further, the probability distribution for the FT coefficients of such an image can readily be obtained by Parseval's theorem. We take advantage of these properties to compute the spatial information in an image by determining the probability of each coefficient (both real and imaginary parts) in the FT, then using the Shannon formalism to calculate information. By using the probability distribution obtained from Parseval's theorem, an effective distance from the uncorrelated or most uncertain case is obtained. The resulting quantity is an information computed in k-space (kSI). This approach provides a robust, facile and highly flexible framework for quantifying spatial information in images and other types of data (of arbitrary dimensions). The kSI metric is tested on a 2D Ising model, frequently used as a model for lipid bilayer; and the temperature-dependent phase transition is accurately determined from the spatial information in configurations of the system.

  19. Spatially Distributed Social Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasco, Gerald F.; Sun, Jie; Rozenfeld, Hernán D.; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We propose a bare-bones stochastic model that takes into account both the geographical distribution of people within a country and their complex network of connections. The model, which is designed to give rise to a scale-free network of social connections and to visually resemble the geographical spread seen in satellite pictures of the Earth at night, gives rise to a power-law distribution for the ranking of cities by population size (but for the largest cities) and reflects the notion that highly connected individuals tend to live in highly populated areas. It also yields some interesting insights regarding Gibrat's law for the rates of city growth (by population size), in partial support of the findings in a recent analysis of real data [Rozenfeld et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105, 18702 (2008).]. The model produces a nontrivial relation between city population and city population density and a superlinear relationship between social connectivity and city population, both of which seem quite in line with real data.

  20. Evaluation of the Global Aerosol Distribution Simulated in the NASA GEOS-5 Near-realtime Forecasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Welton, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System climate model and data assimilation system (GEOS-5) has been providing near-realtime forecasts of global aerosol distributions since 2007. The aerosol module, based on the NASA Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport model (GOCART), is run online in GEOS-5 and treats the sources, sinks, and chemical evolution of dust, sea salt, sulfate, and black and organic carbon aerosol species. Previously these forecasts have had as their focus various NASA field campaigns (e.g., TC4, ARCTAS, GloPac). Since 2009 a version of this system has produced global aerosol and meteorological forecasts at approximately 0.25 degree horizontal spatial resolution. In this paper we perform the first systematic evaluation of the current generation, near-realtime GEOS-5 aerosol forecasting system. Aerosol fields are compared to ground-based (e.g., AERONET) and satellite aerosol remote sensing observations (e.g., MODIS, MISR, CALIPSO). The modeling system and evaluation strategy are discussed, and overall model performance and biases are assessed.

  1. Mass size distributions of elemental aerosols in industrial area.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Mona; Mohamed, Amer; Ahmed, Abdel-Rahman; Nazmy, Hyam

    2015-11-01

    Outdoor aerosol particles were characterized in industrial area of Samalut city (El-minia/Egypt) using low pressure Berner cascade impactor as an aerosol sampler. The impactor operates at 1.7 m(3)/h flow rate. Seven elements were investigated including Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu, Mn and Pb using atomic absorption technique. The mean mass concentrations of the elements ranged from 0.42 ng/m(3) (for Ba) to 89.62 ng/m(3) (for Fe). The mass size distributions of the investigated elements were bi-modal log normal distribution corresponding to the accumulation and coarse modes. The enrichment factors of elements indicate that Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu and Mn are mainly emitted into the atmosphere from soil sources while Pb is mostly due to anthropogenic sources.

  2. Coastal Aerosol Distribution by Data Assimilation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    sample shows the COAMPS weather and dust forecast for the severe dust storm of March 26, 2003 during OIF. 5 RELATED PROJECTS The NRL 6.1 base...Research Laboratory. The image on the left is valid at 1027 UTC on March 27th or towards the end of the massive dust storm that impacted troops during...utilized during the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) experiment in April 2003. The goal of ADAM is to study the properties and distribution of the

  3. Distributions and regional budgets of aerosols and their precursors simulated with the EMAC chemistry-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzer, A.; de Meij, A.; Pringle, K. J.; Tost, H.; Doering, U. M.; van Aardenne, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-01-01

    The new global anthropogenic emission inventory (EDGAR-CIRCE) of gas and aerosol pollutants has been incorporated in the chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry). A relatively high horizontal resolution simulation is performed for the years 2005-2008 to evaluate the capability of the model and the emissions to reproduce observed aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) values. Model output is compared with observations from different measurement networks (CASTNET, EMEP and EANET) and AODs from remote sensing instruments (MODIS and MISR). A good spatial agreement of the distribution of sulfate and ammonium aerosol is found when compared to observations, while calculated nitrate aerosol concentrations show some discrepancies. The simulated temporal development of the inorganic aerosols is in line with measurements of sulfate and nitrate aerosol, while for ammonium aerosol some deviations from observations occur over the USA, due to the wrong temporal distribution of ammonia gas emissions. The calculated AODs agree well with the satellite observations in most regions, while negative biases are found for the equatorial area and in the dust outflow regions (i.e. Central Atlantic and Northern Indian Ocean), due to an underestimation of biomass burning and aeolian dust emissions, respectively. Aerosols and precursors budgets for five different regions (North America, Europe, East Asia, Central Africa and South America) are calculated. Over East-Asia most of the emitted aerosols (precursors) are also deposited within the region, while in North America and Europe transport plays a larger role. Further, it is shown that a simulation with monthly varying anthropogenic emissions typically improves the temporal correlation by 5-10% compared to one with constant annual emissions.

  4. Natural aerosols explain seasonal and spatial patterns of Southern Ocean cloud albedo

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Daniel T.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Wood, Robert; Grosvenor, Daniel P.; Elliott, Scott M.; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Phillip J.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspended solid and liquid particles, act as nucleation sites for cloud drop formation, affecting clouds and cloud properties—ultimately influencing the cloud dynamics, lifetime, water path, and areal extent that determine the reflectivity (albedo) of clouds. The concentration Nd of droplets in clouds that influences planetary albedo is sensitive to the availability of aerosol particles on which the droplets form. Natural aerosol concentrations affect not only cloud properties themselves but also modulate the sensitivity of clouds to changes in anthropogenic aerosols. It is shown that modeled natural aerosols, principally marine biogenic primary and secondary aerosol sources, explain more than half of the spatiotemporal variability in satellite-observed Nd. Enhanced Nd is spatially correlated with regions of high chlorophyll a, and the spatiotemporal variability in Nd is found to be driven primarily by high concentrations of sulfate aerosol at lower Southern Ocean latitudes (35o to 45oS) and by organic matter in sea spray aerosol at higher latitudes (45o to 55oS). Biogenic sources are estimated to increase the summertime mean reflected solar radiation in excess of 10 W m–2 over parts of the Southern Ocean, which is comparable to the annual mean increases expected from anthropogenic aerosols over heavily polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere. PMID:26601216

  5. Natural aerosols explain seasonal and spatial patterns of Southern Ocean cloud albedo.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Daniel T; Burrows, Susannah M; Wood, Robert; Grosvenor, Daniel P; Elliott, Scott M; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Phillip J; Hartmann, Dennis L

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspended solid and liquid particles, act as nucleation sites for cloud drop formation, affecting clouds and cloud properties-ultimately influencing the cloud dynamics, lifetime, water path, and areal extent that determine the reflectivity (albedo) of clouds. The concentration N d of droplets in clouds that influences planetary albedo is sensitive to the availability of aerosol particles on which the droplets form. Natural aerosol concentrations affect not only cloud properties themselves but also modulate the sensitivity of clouds to changes in anthropogenic aerosols. It is shown that modeled natural aerosols, principally marine biogenic primary and secondary aerosol sources, explain more than half of the spatiotemporal variability in satellite-observed N d. Enhanced N d is spatially correlated with regions of high chlorophyll a, and the spatiotemporal variability in N d is found to be driven primarily by high concentrations of sulfate aerosol at lower Southern Ocean latitudes (35(o) to 45(o)S) and by organic matter in sea spray aerosol at higher latitudes (45(o) to 55(o)S). Biogenic sources are estimated to increase the summertime mean reflected solar radiation in excess of 10 W m(-2) over parts of the Southern Ocean, which is comparable to the annual mean increases expected from anthropogenic aerosols over heavily polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

  6. Effects of Spatial Resolution on the Simulated Dust Aerosol Lifecycle: Implications for Dust Event Magnitude and Timing in the NASA GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowottnick, E.; Colarco, Peter R.; daSilva, A.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric transport model simulates global aerosol distributions with an online aerosol module. GEOS-5 may be run at various horizontal spatial resolutions depending on the research application. For example, long integration climate simulations are typically run at 2 deg or 1 deg grid spacing, whereas aerosol reanalysis and forecasting applications may be performed at O.5 deg or 0.25 deg resolutions. In this study, we assess the implications of varying spatial resolution on the simulated aerosol fields, with a particular focus on dust. Dust emissions in GEOS-5 are calculated with one of two parameterizations, one based on the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GO CART) model and another based on the Dust Entrainment and Deposition (DEAD) model. Emission fluxes are parameterized in terms of the surface wind speed, either the 10-m (GO CART) or friction (DEAD) wind speed. We consider how surface wind speeds and thus the dust emission rates are a function of the model spatial resolution. We find that spatial resolution has a significant effect on the magnitude of dust emissions, as higher resolution versions of the model have typically higher surface wind speeds. Utilizing space-borne observations from MISR, MODIS, and CALIOP, we find that simulated Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) distributions respond differently to spatial resolution over the African and Asian source regions, highlighting the need to regional dust emission tuning. When compared to ground-based observations from AERONET, we found improved timing of dust events with as spatial resolution was increased. In an attempt to improve the representation of the dust aerosol lifecycle at coarse resolutions, we found that incorporating the effects of sub-grid wind variability in a course resolution simulation led to improved agreement with observed AOT magnitudes, but did not impact the timing of simulated dust events.

  7. Vertical distribution of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficient measured by a CCD side-scattering lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Ma, Xiaomin; Shi, Bo; Shan, Huihui; Zhao, Ming; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2015-09-01

    The near-ground aerosols have the most impact on the human beings. Its fine spatial and temporal distribution, with which the environmental and meteorological departments concern themselves most, has not been elaborated very well due to the unavailable measurement tools. We present the continuous observations of the vertical profile of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficients by employing our self-developed side-scattering lidar system based on charge-coupled device camera. During the experimental period from April 2013 to August 2014, four catalogs of aerosol backscattering coefficient profiles are found in the near ground. The continuous measurement is revealed by the contour plots measured during the whole night. These experimental results indicate that the aerosol backscattering coefficients in near ground are inhomogeneous and vary with altitude and time, which are very useful for the model researchers to study the regional air pollution and its climate impact.

  8. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman L. I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2012-01-04

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a boundary layer (BL) contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (D{sub p} > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25 % of aerosol with D{sub p} > 100 nm are interstitial (not activated). A direct comparison of pre-cloud and in-cloud aerosol yields a higher estimate. Artifacts in the measurement of interstitial aerosol due to droplet shatter and evaporation are discussed. Within each of 102 constant altitude cloud transects, CDNC and interstitial aerosol were anti-correlated. An examination of one cloud as a case study shows that the

  9. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaefer, Alexander; Viulet, Tiberiu; Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

  10. Improved Cloud and Snow Screening in MAIAC Aerosol Retrievals Using Spectral and Spatial Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Laszlo, I.; Kokrkin, S.

    2012-01-01

    An improved cloud/snow screening technique in the Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm is described. It is implemented as part of MAIAC aerosol retrievals based on analysis of spectral residuals and spatial variability. Comparisons with AERONET aerosol observations and a large-scale MODIS data analysis show strong suppression of aerosol optical thickness outliers due to unresolved clouds and snow. At the same time, the developed filter does not reduce the aerosol retrieval capability at high 1 km resolution in strongly inhomogeneous environments, such as near centers of the active fires. Despite significant improvement, the optical depth outliers in high spatial resolution data are and will remain the problem to be addressed by the application-dependent specialized filtering techniques.

  11. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Ng, N. L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P. S.; Herndon, S. C.; Brooks, B.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Fleming, Z.; Visser, S.; Prevot, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the spatial distribution of PM1 in the greater London area during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012 by applying two High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). While the concentration of organic aerosol (OA) is comparable between the rural and urban sites, the OA sources are distinctly different. Due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area, the concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site. In contrast, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. This is likely caused by a steep concentration gradient of OOA when air masses are advected from polluted mainland Europe. Taking advantage of low biogenic emissions in winter, the sources of OOA, which are highly uncertain, are investigated. Combing Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis and radiocarbon analysis, the majority of OOA is estimated to arise from aged biomass burning. We deploy a suite of instruments to investigate the organic volatility at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250°C in a thermal-denuder (TD), the mass fraction remaining of organics is 16%, which indicates the presence of non-volatile organics. By comparing the OA associated with refractory black carbon (measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) and total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS), we proposed that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have undergone similar chemical processing as refractory black carbon in the atmosphere. Finally, we will discuss the relationship between the volatility and the degree of oxidation of organics.

  12. Retrieval of optical depth and particle size distribution of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols by means of sun photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, B.; Maetzler, C.; Kaempfer, N.; Heimo, A.

    1997-01-01

    Aerosol optical depth measurements by means of ground-based Sun photometry were made in Bern, Switzerland during two and a half years primarily to provide quantitative corrections for atmospheric effects in remotely sensed data in the visible and near-infrared spectral region. An investigation of the spatial variability of tropospheric aerosol was accomplished in the summer of 1994 in the Swiss Central Plain, a region often covered by a thick aerosol layer. Intercomparisons are made with two Sun photometers operated by the Swiss Meteorological Institute in Payerne and Davos. By means of an inversion technique, columnar particle size distributions were derived from the aerosol optical depth spectra. Effective radius, columnar surface area, and columnar mass were computed from the inversion results. Most of the spectra measured in Bern exhibit an Angstroem-law dependence. Consequently, the inverted size distributions are very close to power-law distributions. Data collected during a four month calibration campaign in fall 1993 at a high-mountain station in the Swiss Alps allowed the authors to study optical properties of stratospheric aerosol. The extinction spectra measured have shown to be still strongly influenced by remaining aerosol of the June 1991 volcanic eruptions of Mount Pinatubo. Inverted particle size distributions can be characterized by a broad monodisperse peak with a mode radius around 0.25 {micro}m. Both aerosol optical depths and effective radii had not yet returned to pre-eruption values. Comparison of retrieved aerosol optical depth, columnar surface area and mass, with the values derived from lidar observations performed in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Southern-Germany, yielded good agreement.

  13. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Fleming, Z. L.; Visser, S.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Ng, N. L.

    2015-08-01

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 μm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the sources of OA are distinctly different. The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC, measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for < 10 % of the total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS) at 250 °C, the two measurements are well-correlated, suggesting that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have undergone similar chemical processing as rBC in the atmosphere

  14. Spatial Aspects of Multi-Sensor Data Fusion: Aerosol Optical Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory; Zubko, V.; Gopalan, A.

    2007-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) investigated the applicability and limitations of combining multi-sensor data through data fusion, to increase the usefulness of the multitude of NASA remote sensing data sets, and as part of a larger effort to integrate this capability in the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure (Giovanni). This initial study focused on merging daily mean Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), as measured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, to increase spatial coverage and produce complete fields to facilitate comparison with models and station data. The fusion algorithm used the maximum likelihood technique to merge the pixel values where available. The algorithm was applied to two regional AOT subsets (with mostly regular and irregular gaps, respectively) and a set of AOT fields that differed only in the size and location of artificially created gaps. The Cumulative Semivariogram (CSV) was found to be sensitive to the spatial distribution of gap areas and, thus, useful for assessing the sensitivity of the fused data to spatial gaps.

  15. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  16. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, L.I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2011-06-21

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate in agreement with the dominant pollution source being SO{sub 2} from Cu smelters and power plants. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a BL contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (Dp > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25% of aerosol in the PCASP size range are interstitial (not activated). One hundred and two constant altitude cloud transects were identified and used to determine properties of interstitial aerosol. One transect is examined in detail as a case study. Approximately 25 to 50% of aerosol with D{sub p} > 110 nm were not activated, the difference between the two

  17. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, L. I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2011-06-01

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O3 and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate in agreement with the dominant pollution source being SO2 from Cu smelters and power plants. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 °C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a BL contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (Dp > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of ~150 cm-3, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that ~25 % of aerosol in the PCASP size range are interstitial (not activated). One hundred and two constant altitude cloud transects were identified and used to determine properties of interstitial aerosol. One transect is examined in detail as a case study. Approximately 25 to 50 % of aerosol with Dp > 110 nm were not activated, the difference between the two approaches possibly representing

  18. Fog-Influenced Submicron Aerosol Number Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikova, N.; Zdimal, V.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of fog on aerosol particle number size distributions (PNSD) in submicron range. Thus, five-year continuous time series of the SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) data giving information on PNSD in five minute time step were compared with detailed meteorological records from the professional meteorological station Kosetice in the Czech Republic. The comparison included total number concentration and PNSD in size ranges between 10 and 800 nm. The meteorological records consist from the exact times of starts and ends of individual meteorological phenomena (with one minute precision). The records longer than 90 minutes were considered, and corresponding SMPS spectra were evaluated. Evaluation of total number distributions showed considerably lower concentration during fog periods compared to the period when no meteorological phenomenon was recorded. It was even lower than average concentration during presence of hydrometeors (not only fog, but rain, drizzle, snow etc. as well). Typical PNSD computed from all the data recorded in the five years is in Figure 1. Not only median and 1st and 3rd quartiles are depicted, but also 5th and 95th percentiles are plotted, to see the variability of the concentrations in individual size bins. The most prevailing feature is the accumulation mode, which seems to be least influenced by the fog presence. On the contrary, the smallest aerosol particles (diameter under 40 nm) are effectively removed, as well as the largest particles (diameter over 500 nm). Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the projects GAUK 62213 and SVV-2013-267308. Figure 1. 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th percentile of aerosol particle number size distributions recorded during fog events.

  19. What drives the aerosol distribution in Guangdong - the most developed province in Southern China?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lili; Wang, Yunpeng

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to investigate the spatial and temporal variations of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over Guangdong, the most developed province in China, during 2010–2012. Linear regression and self-organizing maps (SOM) are used to investigate the relationship between AOT and its affecting factors, including Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), elevation, urbanized land fraction, and several socio-economic variables. Results show that the highest values of τ0.55 mainly occur over the rapidly-developing Pearl River Delta (PRD) region and the eastern coast. Seasonal averaged AOT is highest in summer (0.416), followed by spring (0.351), winter (0.292), and autumn (0.254). From unary linear regression and SOM analysis, AOT is shown to be strongly negatively correlated to NDVI (R2 = 0.782) and elevation (R2 = 0.731), and positively correlated with socio-economic factors, especially GDP, industry and vehicle density (R2 above 0.73), but not primary industry. Multiple linear regression between AOT and the contributing factors shows much higher R2 values (>0.8), indicative of the clear relationships between AOT and variables. This study illustrates that human activities have strong impacts on aerosols distribution in Guangdong Province. Economic and industrial developments, as well as vehicle density, are the main controlling factors on aerosol distribution. PMID:25096216

  20. COMPARISON OF SPATIAL PATTERNS OF POLLUTANT DISTRIBUTION WITH CMAQ PREDICTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system in reproducing the spatial patterns of aerosol concentrations over the country on timescales of months and years, the spatial patterns of model output are compared with those derived from observation...

  1. Aerosol size distribution at Nansen Ice Sheet Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belosi, F.; Contini, D.; Donateo, A.; Santachiara, G.; Prodi, F.

    2012-04-01

    During austral summer 2006, in the framework of the XXII Italian Antarctic expedition of PNRA (Italian National Program for Research in Antarctica), aerosol particle number size distribution measurements were performed in the 10-500 range nm over the Nansen Ice Sheet glacier (NIS, 74°30' S, 163°27' E; 85 m a.s.l), a permanently iced branch of the Ross Sea. Observed total particle number concentrations varied between 169 and 1385 cm- 3. A monomodal number size distribution, peaking at about 70 nm with no variation during the day, was observed for continental air mass, high wind speed and low relative humidity. Trimodal number size distributions were also observed, in agreement with measurements performed at Aboa station, which is located on the opposite side of the Antarctic continent to the NIS. In this case new particle formation, with subsequent particle growth up to about 30 nm, was observed even if not associated with maritime air masses.

  2. Observations and regional modeling of aerosol optical properties, speciation and size distribution over Northern Africa and western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, Laurent; Siour, Guillaume; Mailler, Sylvain; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    The aerosol speciation and size distribution is modeled during the summer 2013 and over a large area encompassing Africa, Mediterranean and western Europe. The modeled aerosol is compared to available measurements such as the AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size distribution (ASD) and the EMEP network for surface concentrations of particulate matter PM2.5, PM10 and inorganic species (nitrate, sulfate and ammonium). The main goal of this study is to quantify the model ability to realistically model the speciation and size distribution of the aerosol. Results first showed that the long-range transport pathways are well reproduced and mainly constituted by mineral dust: spatial correlation is ≈ 0.9 for AOD and Ångström exponent, when temporal correlations show that the day-to-day variability is more difficult to reproduce. Over Europe, PM2.5 and PM10 have a mean temporal correlation of ≈ 0.4 but the lowest spatial correlation ( ≈ 0.25 and 0.62, respectively), showing that the fine particles are not well localized or transported. Being short-lived species, the uncertainties on meteorology and emissions induce these lowest scores. However, time series of PM2.5 with the speciation show a good agreement between model and measurements and are useful for discriminating the aerosol composition. Using a classification from the south (Africa) to the north (northern Europe), it is shown that mineral dust relative mass contribution decreases from 50 to 10 % when nitrate increases from 0 to 20 % and all other species, sulfate, sea salt, ammonium, elemental carbon, primary organic matter, are constant. The secondary organic aerosol contribution is between 10 and 20 % with a maximum at the latitude of the Mediterranean Sea (Spanish stations). For inorganic species, it is shown that nitrate, sulfate and ammonium have a mean temporal correlation of 0.25, 0.37 and 0.17, respectively. The spatial correlation is better (0.25, 0.5 and 0.87), showing that the mean

  3. Aerosol vertical distribution over east China from RIEMS-Chem simulation in comparison with CALIPSO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Han, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    The horizontal and vertical distributions of aerosol extinction coefficient (AEC) and mass concentration over east China in October 2010 were investigated by using an online-coupled regional climate model and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) data. Model performance was evaluated comprehensively against ground observations of meteorological variables and PM10 concentrations and CALIPSO retrieved AEC profiles, which demonstrated a good ability of the model in simulating spatial distribution and evolution of aerosol concentration and optical properties. Severe pollution episodes were found over wide areas of east China during the study period, with the maximum mean PM10 concentration exceeding 200 μg m-3 in the Chongqing district and a part of the lower reaches of the Yellow River on 8-10 October. Both CALIPSO retrievals and model simulations revealed high AEC values (≥1 km-1) often occurred within 2 km above ground over most areas of east China. AEC vertical profile in or in the vicinity of China major cities along CALIPSO orbit track exhibited two typical features: one was AEC reached its maximum (∼4 km-1) near the surface (<200 m) and decreased rapidly to < 0.1 km-1 at altitudes above 1 km, another one was AEC peaked at higher altitudes of about 0.5-1 km with a maximum up to 3 km-1. AEC vertical profile was strongly dependent on vertical distribution of both aerosol concentration, composition and relative humidity. The vertical cross sections over typical regions of east China exhibited a decreasing AEC in magnitude from the continent to the China seas. Over the continent, AEC was either maximum near the surface or peaked at higher altitudes (0.5-1.0 km) due to increases of relative humidity or aerosol concentration in those regions, whereas over the seas of China, AEC profile was characterized by peak values at an altitude around 1 km, mainly due to an elevated relative humidity there, which favored rapid aerosol

  4. Coarse atmospheric aerosol: size distributions of trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, K.; Colbeck, I.

    A sampler, employing nine single stage impactors placed in parallel within a portable wind tunnel, has been used to determine the metal content of coarse atmospheric aerosol. The wind tunnel maintains a constant flow environment for the collectors housed inside it, so that representative sampling conditions are achieved compared to the varied ambient wind conditions. At a flow rate of 8 m s -1 the 50% cut-off diameters of the impactors ranged from 7.8 to 38.8 μm. Measurements were conducted at a rural and urban site near Colchester in south east England. The samplers were analysed by PIXE for P, K, Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn, Cu, V, Co, Cr, Br, Zn, Ni, Sc and Pb. It is found that the sampler can be employed to quantitatively characterise the elemental mass size distribution for aerosol larger than 10 μm. The results indicate that a small fraction of the above earth and trace elements' metal mass is present in particles greater than 10 μm. This fraction for earth metals (Ca, K, Ti) is comparatively greater in the rural site than the urban site, while for trace metals (Mn, V, Cu, Cr) this fraction constitutes a more significant part of the coarse mass at the urban site. Trace element concentrations were of a similar order of magnitude to earlier literature reports. Although the number of measurements was limited it can be concluded that the size distributions obtained were characteristic of an unpolluted area.

  5. Studying the spatial distribution of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Helen J.; Werner, Michael W.; Allen, C.; Henry, R. C.; Kimble, R.; Wofford, J.; Murthy, Jayant

    1989-01-01

    The spacial distribution of interstellar dust reflects both interstellar dynamics and the processes which form and destroy dust in the interstellar medium (ISM). The IRAS survey, because of its high sensitivity to thermal emission from dust in the IR, provides new approaches to determining the spatial distribution of dust. The initial results are reported of an attempt to use the IRAS data to probe the spatial distribution of dust - by searching for thermal emission from dust in the vicinity of bright stars. These results show that this technique (which relies on finding IR emission associated with randomly selected stars) can ultimately be used to study the distribution of dust in the ISM. The density of the cloud producing the IR emission may be derived by assuming that the dust is at its projected distance from the star and that the heating is due to the star's (known) radiation field. The heating radiation is folded into a grain model, and the number of emitting grains adjusted to reproduce the observed energy distribution. It is noted that this technique is capable in principle of detecting dust densities much lower than those typical of the cirrus clouds.

  6. Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosol Vertical Distributions above Svalbard, Norway using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Stalin, S.; Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Burkhart, J. F.; Quinn, P.; Storvold, R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2015 to investigate the processes controlling aerosol concentrations and radiative effects. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) on 9 flights totaling 19 flight hours. Measurements were made of particle number concentration and aerosol light absorption at three wavelengths, similar to those conducted in April 2011 (Bates et al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 2115-2120, 2013). A filter sample was collected on each flight for analyses of trace elements. Additional measurements in the aerosol payload in 2015 included aerosol size distributions obtained using a Printed Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS) and aerosol optical depth obtained using a four wavelength miniature Scanning Aerosol Sun Photometer (miniSASP). The data show most of the column aerosol mass and resulting optical depth in the boundary layer but frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (2000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Transport of these aerosol layers was assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion models. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  7. Aerosol effects on deep convective clouds: impact of changes in aerosol size distribution and aerosol activation parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekman, A. M. L.; Engström, A.; Söderberg, A.

    2010-03-01

    A cloud-resolving model including explicit aerosol physics and chemistry is used to study the impact of aerosols on deep convective strength. More specifically, by conducting six sensitivity series we examine how the complexity of the aerosol model, the size of the aerosols and the aerosol activation parameterization influence the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity. Only aerosol effects on liquid droplet formation are considered. We find that an increased aerosol concentration generally results in stronger convection, which for the simulated case is in agreement with the conceptual model presented by Rosenfeld et al. (2008). However, there are two sensitivity series that do not display a monotonic increase in updraft velocity with increasing aerosol concentration. These exceptions illustrate the need to: 1) account for changes in evaporation processes and subsequent cooling when assessing aerosol effects on deep convective strength, 2) better understand graupel impaction scavenging of aerosols which may limit the number of CCN at a critical stage of cloud development and thereby dampen the convection, 3) increase our knowledge of aerosol recycling due to evaporation of cloud droplets. Furthermore, we find a significant difference in the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity when using different complexities of the aerosol model and different aerosol activation parameterizations. For the simulated case, a 100% increase in aerosol concentration results in a difference in average updraft between the various sensitivity series which is as large as the average updraft increase itself. The model simulations also show that the change in graupel and rain formation is not necessarily directly proportional to the change in updraft velocity. For example, several of the sensitivity series display a decrease of the rain amount at the lowest model level with increasing updraft velocity. Finally, an increased number of aerosols in the Aitken mode (here

  8. Spatial patterns of substantial climate impact from anthropogenic aerosols in the early instrumental period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Undorf, Sabine; Bollasina, Massimo; Hegerl, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    While many aspects of climate variation in the early instrumental period (1860-1950) are still unexplained, for instance the early twentieth-century warming from the 1910s to the 1940s, the role of anthropogenic aerosols in this period has been overlooked. Yet, the period is also an interesting case study to isolate aerosol impacts since it is characterised by the increase of North American and especially European aerosol emissions concurrently with negligible Asian emissions and relatively low carbon dioxide concentrations. We thus analyse the spatial and temporal patterns of aerosol impact for this period in available observations (NOAA 20th-century reanalysis, etc.) and historical single-forcing and all-forcing experiments with state-of-the-art CMIP5 models. We make use of coupled empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) applied to surface temperature -the most reliable variable in observations- and different aerosol indicating variables such as aerosol optical depth and short-wave downward radiation, some of which include aerosol indirect effects. The principal components of the most important EOFs are then regressed onto sea level pressure, winds, and other variables to identify associated circulation patterns. A decomposition into multi-decadal and longer time scales is performed by filtering the data prior to the analysis. Our analysis reveals both statistically significant local and non-local aerosol impact and identifies circulation states associated with the temperature response. The results are consistent across different aerosol variables, and show a strong non-local response as well as specific differences between time scales. We find a distinctive circulation pattern which strongly resembles observations and might explain the observed early twentieth century warming in the Arctic.

  9. Distribution of sulfur aerosol precursors in the SPCZ released by continuous volcanic degassing at Ambrym, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Jérôme; Menkes, Christophe; Bani, Philipson; Marchesiello, Patrick; Curci, Gabriele; Grell, Georg A.; Frouin, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The Melanesian Volcanic Arc (MVA) emits about 12 kT d- 1 of sulfur dioxide (SO2) to the atmosphere from continuous passive (non-explosive) volcanic degassing, which contributes 20% of the global SO2 emission from volcanoes. Here we assess, from up-to-date and long-term observations, the SO2 emission of the Ambrym volcano, one of the dominant volcanoes in the MVA, and we investigate its role as sulfate precursor on the regional distribution of aerosols, using both satellite observations and model results at 1° × 1° spatial resolution from WRF-Chem/GOCART. Without considering aerosol forcing on clouds, our model parameterizations for convection, vertical mixing and cloud properties provide a reliable chemical weather representation, making possible a cross-examination of model solution and observations. This preliminary work enables the identification of biases and limitations affecting both the model (missing sources) and satellite sensors and algorithms (for aerosol detection and classification) and leads to the implementation of improved transport and aerosol processes in the modeling system. On the one hand, the model confirms a 50% underestimation of SO2 emissions due to satellite swath sampling of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), consistent with field studies. The OMI irregular sampling also produces a level of noise that impairs its monitoring capacity during short-term volcanic events. On the other hand, the model reveals a large sensitivity on aerosol composition and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) due to choices of both the source function in WRF-Chem and size parameters for sea-salt in FlexAOD, the post-processor used to compute offline the simulated AOD. We then proceed to diagnosing the role of SO2 volcanic emission in the regional aerosol composition. The model shows that both dynamics and cloud properties associated with the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) have a large influence on the oxidation of SO2 and on the transport pathways of

  10. A diagnostic stratospheric aerosol size distribution inferred from SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1991-01-01

    An aerosol size distribution model for the stratosphere is inferred based on 5 years of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II measurements of multispectral aerosol and water vapor extinction. The SAGE II aerosol and water vapor extinction data strongly suggest that there is a critical particle radius below which there is a relatively weak dependence of particle number density with size and above which there are few, if any, particles. A segmented power law model, as a simple representation of this dependence, is used in theoretical calculations and intercomparisons with a variety of aerosol measurements including dustsondes, longwave lidar, and wire impactors and shows a consistently good agreement.

  11. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions.

    PubMed

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A; Yang, Fan

    2016-12-13

    The influence of aerosol concentration on the cloud-droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud-droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased, the cloud-droplet mean diameter decreases, as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for low aerosol concentration; here, [Formula: see text] is the phase-relaxation time and [Formula: see text] is the turbulence-correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as [Formula: see text], and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. The result underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for aerosol indirect effects: increasing aerosol concentration changes the albedo and suppresses precipitation formation not only through reduction of the mean droplet diameter but also by narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol/slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  12. Measuring the vertical distributions of the upper tropospheric and stratospheric dust with a LOAC aerosol counter under meteorological balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignelles, Damien; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Dulac, François; Coute, Benoit; Jeannot, Matthieu; Jegou, Fabrice; Olafsson, Haraldur; Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla

    2014-05-01

    The aerosol issue is in a constant growing. At ground, the airborne particles in boundary layer represent a real risk for population and must be control. In the middle troposphere, aerosols play an important role in the microphysics and meteorology, the heterogeneous chemistry is not well understood. In the stratosphere, several teams of researchers have shown that solid aerosols might exist, the question of the dynamic of these solid aerosol in the stratosphere is open. The aim was to develop an instrument that it can make measurements from the ground to the middle stratosphere. This instrument must be able to be put under meteorological balloons, which represent the worst conditions for the development of such instruments in terms of weight, resistance under large variations of temperature and pressure, autonomy and cost if we consider that something throw under a meteorological balloon can be lost after the fly. In the consideration of these conditions, we have developed a new instrument able to make such kind of measurements. This instrument is call LOAC for Light Optical Aerosol Counter. LOAC provides the concentration and size distribution of aerosols on 19 channels from 0.2 μm to 50.0 μm every ten seconds, and determine the main nature of particles (carbonaceous aerosol, mineral, droplets of water or sulfuric acid) in relation with a large range of samples in laboratory. The physical technique is based on the observation of the scattered light by particles at two angles. LOAC is light enough (1 kilogram) to be placed under a meteorological balloon that is very easy to launch such balloons. The goal is to perform a large number of flights to gather information about the dust distribution in stratosphere and to understand the various mechanisms controlling their spatial and temporal variability. About 25 flights with have been performed in the stratosphere with the LOAC above the Mediterranean Sea, from south of Paris, from Aire-Sur-l'Adour (South-West of

  13. Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

    2013-06-05

    the Arctic winter (summer) BC burden. This BC aging treatment, however, has minimal effect on other under-predicted species. Interestingly, our modifications to CAM5 that aim at improving prediction of high-latitude and upper tropospheric aerosols also produce much better AOD and AAOD over various other regions globally when compared to multi-year AERONET retrievals. The improved aerosol distributions have impacts on other aspects of CAM5, improving the simulation of global mean liquid water path and cloud forcing.

  14. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  15. Aerosol size distribution and radiative forcing response to anthropogenically driven historical changes in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S. C.; Scott, C. E.; Rap, A.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-03-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have changed in the past millennium due to changes in land use, temperature, and CO2 concentrations. Recent reconstructions of BVOC emissions have predicted that global isoprene emissions have decreased, while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions have increased; however, all three show regional variability due to competition between the various influencing factors. In this work, we use two modeled estimates of BVOC emissions from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic changes to BVOC emissions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, global aerosol size distributions, and radiative effects using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS (Goddard Earth Observing System; TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional) global aerosol microphysics model. With anthropogenic emissions (e.g., SO2, NOx, primary aerosols) turned off and BVOC emissions changed from year 1000 to year 2000 values, decreases in the number concentration of particles of size Dp > 80 nm (N80) of > 25% in year 2000 relative to year 1000 were predicted in regions with extensive land-use changes since year 1000 which led to regional increases in the combined aerosol radiative effect (direct and indirect) of > 0.5 W m-2 in these regions. We test the sensitivity of our results to BVOC emissions inventory, SOA yields, and the presence of anthropogenic emissions; however, the qualitative response of the model to historic BVOC changes remains the same in all cases. Accounting for these uncertainties, we estimate millennial changes in BVOC emissions cause a global mean direct effect of between +0.022 and +0.163 W m-2 and the global mean cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect of between -0.008 and -0.056 W m-2. This change in aerosols, and the associated radiative forcing, could be a largely overlooked and important anthropogenic aerosol effect on regional climates.

  16. Revised spatially distributed global livestock emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asrar, G.; Wolf, J.; West, T. O.

    2015-12-01

    Livestock play an important role in agricultural carbon cycling through consumption of biomass and emissions of methane. Quantification and spatial distribution of methane and carbon dioxide produced by livestock is needed to develop bottom-up estimates for carbon monitoring. These estimates serve as stand-alone international emissions estimates, as input to global emissions modeling, and as comparisons or constraints to flux estimates from atmospheric inversion models. Recent results for the US suggest that the 2006 IPCC default coefficients may underestimate livestock methane emissions. In this project, revised coefficients were calculated for cattle and swine in all global regions, based on reported changes in body mass, quality and quantity of feed, milk production, and management of living animals and manure for these regions. New estimates of livestock methane and carbon dioxide emissions were calculated using the revised coefficients and global livestock population data. Spatial distribution of population data and associated fluxes was conducted using the MODIS Land Cover Type 5, version 5.1 (i.e. MCD12Q1 data product), and a previously published downscaling algorithm for reconciling inventory and satellite-based land cover data at 0.05 degree resolution. Preliminary results for 2013 indicate greater emissions than those calculated using the IPCC 2006 coefficients. Global total enteric fermentation methane increased by 6%, while manure management methane increased by 38%, with variation among species and regions resulting in improved spatial distributions of livestock emissions. These new estimates of total livestock methane are comparable to other recently reported studies for the entire US and the State of California. These new regional/global estimates will improve the ability to reconcile top-down and bottom-up estimates of methane production as well as provide updated global estimates for use in development and evaluation of Earth system models.

  17. Determination of minimum mass and spatial location of initiator for detonation of propylene oxide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apparao, A.; Saji, J.; Balaji, M.; Devangan, A. K.; Rao, C. R.

    2017-03-01

    The mishandling of liquid fuels during production, processing or transportation can lead to the formation of combustible two-phase mixtures. These mixtures, with the availability of a suitable energy source, may be ignited generating a deflagration, or even a detonation wave. For military applications, unconfined fuel aerosols are created and detonated with the help of a strong shock generated by a powerful energy source. The minimum energy requirement is expressed in terms of the shock strength, or mass of the high-explosive-based initiator. In this study, the detonability of unconfined aerosols of 4.3 kg propylene oxide was studied by positioning different quantities of cylindrical-shaped initiators of RDX/wax (95/5) at a fixed spatial location in the aerosol cloud, and the minimum mass of the initiator required for detonation initiation was determined. The effect of spatial location and the requirement of initiator mass, especially at farther locations where the fuel concentration is likely to be lower and closer to the lower explosive limit, was also investigated. The experimental findings help identify the detonable zone in unconfined propylene oxide aerosol clouds for different combinations of spatial location and mass of initiator.

  18. On the spatial distribution of fingerprint singularities.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, Raffaele; Maltoni, Davide

    2009-04-01

    Fingerprint singularities play an important role in several fingerprint recognition and classification systems. Although some general relationships and constraints about the location of singularities in the different fingerprint classes are well known, to the best of our knowledge no statistical models have been developed until now. This paper studies the spatial distributions of singularity locations in nature and derives, from a representative dataset of labelled samples, the probability density functions of the four main fingerprint classes. The results obtained can be directly exploited to improve the accuracy of many techniques relying on the position of singularities, as confirmed by the results of two experiments on fingerprint classification and synthesis.

  19. Vertical stratification in arthropod spatial distribution research.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E

    2013-11-01

    Spatial heterogeneity within individual host trees is often overlooked in surveys of phytophagous arthropod abundance and distribution. The armored scale Aulacaspis yasumatsui is controlled by the predator Rhyzobius lophanthae to a greater degree on leaves at 75-cm height than on leaves at ground level within its host tree Cycas micronesica. The direct influence of elevation on the predator indirectly generates vertical heterogeneity of the scale insect. Arthropod sampling schemes that fail to include all strata within the vertical profile of the host tree species may generate misleading outcomes. Results indicate that sub-meter increments can reveal significant differences in vertical distribution of phytophagous insects, and that inclusion of observations on other organisms that interact with the target arthropod may illuminate determinants of vertical heterogeneity.

  20. Seasonal and diurnal variations of aerosol extinction profile and type distribution from CALIPSO 5-year observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Tackett, Jason L.; Su, Hui; Fu, Rong

    2013-05-01

    The new Level 3 aerosol profile data derived from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) provide a multiyear global aerosol distribution with high vertical resolution. We analyzed seasonal and diurnal variations of the vertical distributions of aerosol properties represented by 5-year CALIPSO data. Results show that dust, smoke, and polluted dust are the most frequently detected aerosol types during all seasons. Dust is the dominant type, especially in the middle to upper troposphere, over most areas during boreal spring and summer, while smoke and polluted dust tend to dominate during biomass burning seasons. The seasonal variations of dust layer top height and dust contribution to all-aerosol extinction are positively correlated with the seasonal variation of the dust occurrence frequency. The seasonal cycle of aerosol properties over west Australia is similar to that over biomass burning regime areas, despite its desert regime. In general, smoke is detected more frequently from the lower to middle troposphere; clean marine and polluted continental aerosols are detected more frequently, while polluted dust is detected less frequently, in the lower troposphere during nighttime than daytime. The all-aerosol extinction is generally larger, and the aerosol layer top is detected at high altitudes more frequently during nighttime than daytime. The diurnal changes of aerosol properties are similar within the same aerosol regime. Dust extinction shows little diurnal variation except when dust is the dominant aerosol type. The results contribute to an initial global 3-D aerosol climatology which will likely be extended and improved in the future.

  1. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; ...

    2016-02-02

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 µm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the contribution from different sources is distinctly different between the two sites.more » The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC; measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for < 10 % of the total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS) at 250 °C, the two measurements are well-correlated, suggesting that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have

  2. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Fleming, Z. L.; Visser, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Ng, N. L.

    2016-02-01

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 µm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the contribution from different sources is distinctly different between the two sites. The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC; measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for < 10 % of the total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS) at 250 °C, the two measurements are well-correlated, suggesting that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have undergone similar chemical

  3. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate

  4. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E.; Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120°, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20%±15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law size distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, a, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for λ = 0.87 μm). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with α. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distributions before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate particles with rm

  5. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

    2009-05-05

    This project focused on: 1) evaluating the performance of the DOE ARM SGP Raman lidar system in measuring profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and 2) the use of the Raman lidar measurements of aerosol and water vapor profiles for assessing the vertical distribution of aerosols and water vapor simulated by global transport models and examining diurnal variability of aerosols and water vapor. The highest aerosol extinction was generally observed close to the surface during the nighttime just prior to sunrise. The high values of aerosol extinction are most likely associated with increased scattering by hygroscopic aerosols, since the corresponding average relative humidity values were above 70%. After sunrise, relative humidity and aerosol extinction below 500 m decreased with the growth in the daytime convective boundary layer. The largest aerosol extinction for altitudes above 1 km occurred during the early afternoon most likely as a result of the increase in relative humidity. The water vapor mixing ratio profiles generally showed smaller variations with altitude between day and night. We also compared simultaneous measurements of relative humidity, aerosol extinction, and aerosol optical thickness derived from the ARM SGP Raman lidar and in situ instruments on board a small aircraft flown routinely over the ARM SGP site. In contrast, the differences between the CARL and IAP aerosol extinction measurements are considerably larger. Aerosol extinction derived from the IAP measurements is, on average, about 30-40% less than values derived from the Raman lidar. The reasons for this difference are not clear, but may be related to the corrections for supermicron scattering and relative humidity that were applied to the IAP data. The investigators on this project helped to set up a major field mission (2003 Aerosol IOP) over the DOE ARM SGP site. One of the goals of the mission was to further evaluate the aerosol and water vapor retrievals from this lidar system

  6. Spatial and temporal distribution of tropical biomass burning

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, W.M.; Liu, Mei-Huey

    1994-12-01

    A database for the spatial and temporal distribution of the amount of biomass burned in tropical America, Africa, and Asia during the late 1970s is presented with a resolution of 5{degrees} latitude x 5{degrees} longitude. The sources of burning in each grid cell have been quantified. Savanna fires, shifting cultivation, deforestation, fuel wood use, and burning of agricultural residues contribute about 50, 24, 10, 11, and 5%, respectively, of total biomass burned in the tropics. Savanna fires dominate in tropical Africa, and forest fires dominant in tropical Asia. A similar amount of biomass is burned from forest and savanna fires in tropical America. The distribution of biomass burned monthly during the dry season has been derived for each grid cell using the seasonal cycles of surface ozone concentrations. Land use changes during the last decade could have a profound impact on the amount of biomass burned and the amount of trace gases and aerosol particles emitted. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Chemical and Spatial Microscopy of Individual Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivanski, Alexei V.; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2008-03-01

    Carbonaceous particles originating from biomass burning can account for a large fraction of organic aerosols in a local environment. Presently, their composition, physical, and chemical properties as well as their environmental effects are largely unknown. A distinct type of biomass burn particles, called ``tar balls'', have been observed in a number of field campaigns, both in fresh and aged smoke. They are characterized by their spherical morphology, high carbon content and ability to efficiently scatter and absorb light. Here, a combination of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy is used to determine the shape, structure and size-dependent chemical composition of 150 individual tar ball particles ranging in size from 0.15 to 1.2 μm. Oxygen is present primarily as carboxylic carbonyls and oxygen-substituted alkyl functional groups. The observed chemical composition is distinctly different from black carbon and more closely resembles high molecular weight humic-like substances. A detailed examination of the carbonyl intensity as a function of particle size reveals the presence of a thin oxygenated interface layer on the tar balls, indicative of atmospheric processing of biomass burn particles.

  8. Spatial distribution of precipitation extremes in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verpe Dyrrdal, Anita; Skaugen, Thomas; Lenkoski, Alex; Thorarinsdottir, Thordis; Stordal, Frode; Førland, Eirik J.

    2015-04-01

    Estimates of extreme precipitation, in terms of return levels, are crucial in planning and design of important infrastructure. Through two separate studies, we have examined the levels and spatial distribution of daily extreme precipitation over catchments in Norway, and hourly extreme precipitation in a point. The analyses were carried out through the development of two new methods for estimating extreme precipitation in Norway. For daily precipitation we fit the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution to areal time series from a gridded dataset, consisting of daily precipitation during the period 1957-today with a resolution of 1x1 km². This grid-based method is more objective and less manual and time-consuming compared to the existing method at MET Norway. In addition, estimates in ungauged catchments are easier to obtain, and the GEV approach includes a measure of uncertainty, which is a requirement in climate studies today. Further, we go into depth on the debated GEV shape parameter, which plays an important role for longer return periods. We show that it varies according to dominating precipitation types, having positive values in the southeast and negative values in the southwest. We also find indications that the degree of orographic enhancement might affect the shape parameter. For hourly precipitation, we estimate return levels on a 1x1 km² grid, by linking GEV distributions with latent Gaussian fields in a Bayesian hierarchical model (BHM). Generalized linear models on the GEV parameters, estimated from observations, are able to incorporate location-specific geographic and meteorological information and thereby accommodate these effects on extreme precipitation. Gaussian fields capture additional unexplained spatial heterogeneity and overcome the sparse grid on which observations are collected, while a Bayesian model averaging component directly assesses model uncertainty. We find that mean summer precipitation, mean summer temperature, latitude

  9. Ozone and aerosol distributions measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to O3 and aerosol distributions measured from an aircraft using a DIAL system in order to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during summer 1988. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere.

  10. Number size distribution measurements of biological aerosols under contrasting environments and seasons from southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Cv, Biju; Krishna, Ravi; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. Though omnipresent, their concentration and composition exhibit large spatial and temporal variations depending up on their sources, land-use, and local meteorology. The Indian tropical region, which constitutes approximately 18% of the world's total population exhibits vast geographical extend and experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the sources, properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to have significant variations over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the location and seasons. Here we present the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) from two contrasting locations in Southern tropical India measured during contrasting seasons using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS). Measurements were carried out at a pristine high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) during two contrasting seasons, South-West Monsoon (June-August, 2014) and winter (Jan - Feb, 2015) and in Chennai, a coastal urban area, during July - November 2015. FBAP concentrations at both the locations showed large variability with higher concentrations occurring at Chennai. Apart from regional variations, the FBAP concentrations also exhibited variations over two different seasons under the same environmental condition. In Munnar the FBAP concentration increased by a factor of four from South-West Monsoon to winter season. The average size distribution of FBAP at both

  11. Relationship between column aerosol optical properties and surface aerosol gravimetric concentrations during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network - Northeast ASIA 2012 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Seo, S.; Choi, M.; Kim, W. V.; Holben, B. N.; Lee, S.; Kim, J.

    2012-12-01

    One of the main objectives of Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network (DRAGON) campaign in Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission is to understand the relationship between the column optical properties of the atmosphere and the surface level air quality in terms of aerosols and gases. This study aims to identify the important parameters that affecting the relationship between those variables during the DRAGON - northeast Asia 2012 campaign. Column aerosol optical properties from ten Cimel sun photometers at DRAGON sites in Seoul, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) and particulate matter (PM10) sampling from 40 NIER (National Institute of Environmental Research of South Korea) measurement sites in Seoul during the period of 1st March - 31th May 2012 were employed in this study. The key parameters in relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and PM are reported to be aerosol vertical profile and hygroscopicity of the aerosols. The meteorological conditions including relative humidity, surface temperature, and wind speed that could affect those parameters were investigated.

  12. Spatial distribution of disease: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Selvin, S; Shaw, G; Schulman, J; Merrill, D W

    1987-09-01

    Maps transformed so as to have constant density of residential population were used to analyze the spatial distribution of disease in three specific areas. Each area had received recent attention because of suspected environmental pollution. The area adjacent to the Rocky Flats Facility (CO) was examined to identify any association between possible plutonium releases and increases in lung cancer or leukemia incidence. The industrial area of northern Contra Costa County (CA) was studied to explore a relationship between petrochemical industrial emissions and histologic-specific lung cancers. Finally, a suspected increase in the risk of congenital cardiac defects possibly related to pollution of the Santa Clara County (CA) water supply was investigated. No evidence of elevated risk of disease was found to be associated with either the Rocky Flats Facility or the polluted water of Santa Clara County. An increase in lung cancer, found by other investigators in earlier years, was shown to persist in association with industrial emissions in Contra Costa County.

  13. Spatial distribution of disease: three case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Selvin, S.; Shaw, G.; Schulman, J.; Merrill, D.W.

    1987-09-01

    Maps transformed so as to have constant density of residential population were used to analyze the spatial distribution of disease in three specific areas. Each area had received recent attention because of suspected environmental pollution. The area adjacent to the Rocky Flats Facility (CO) was examined to identify any association between possible plutonium releases and increases in lung cancer or leukemia incidence. The industrial area of northern Contra Costa County (CA) was studied to explore a relationship between petrochemical industrial emissions and histologic-specific lung cancers. Finally, a suspected increase in the risk of congenital cardiac defects possibly related to pollution of the Santa Clara County (CA) water supply was investigated. No evidence of elevated risk of disease was found to be associated with either the Rocky Flats Facility or the polluted water of Santa Clara County. An increase in lung cancer, found by other investigators in earlier years, was shown to persist in association with industrial emissions in Contra Costa County.

  14. Method for spatially distributing a population

    DOEpatents

    Bright, Edward A [Knoxville, TN; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [Knoxville, TN; Coleman, Phillip R [Knoxville, TN; Dobson, Jerome E [Lawrence, KS

    2007-07-24

    A process for spatially distributing a population count within a geographically defined area can include the steps of logically correlating land usages apparent from a geographically defined area to geospatial features in the geographically defined area and allocating portions of the population count to regions of the geographically defined area having the land usages, according to the logical correlation. The process can also include weighing the logical correlation for determining the allocation of portions of the population count and storing the allocated portions within a searchable data store. The logically correlating step can include the step of logically correlating time-based land usages to geospatial features of the geographically defined area. The process can also include obtaining a population count for the geographically defined area, organizing the geographically defined area into a plurality of sectors, and verifying the allocated portions according to direct observation.

  15. Optimal design of spatial distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastner, Michael T.; Newman, M. E. J.

    2006-07-01

    We consider the problem of constructing facilities such as hospitals, airports, or malls in a country with a nonuniform population density, such that the average distance from a person’s home to the nearest facility is minimized. We review some previous approximate treatments of this problem that indicate that the optimal distribution of facilities should have a density that increases with population density, but does so slower than linearly, as the two-thirds power. We confirm this result numerically for the particular case of the United States with recent population data using two independent methods, one a straightforward regression analysis, the other based on density-dependent map projections. We also consider strategies for linking the facilities to form a spatial network, such as a network of flights between airports, so that the combined cost of maintenance of and travel on the network is minimized. We show specific examples of such optimal networks for the case of the United States.

  16. Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number

    PubMed Central

    Saide, Pablo E.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Spak, Scott N.; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in current capabilities to constrain aerosols adversely impact atmospheric simulations. Typically, aerosol burdens within models are constrained employing satellite aerosol optical properties, which are not available under cloudy conditions. Here we set the first steps to overcome the long-standing limitation that aerosols cannot be constrained using satellite remote sensing under cloudy conditions. We introduce a unique data assimilation method that uses cloud droplet number (Nd) retrievals to improve predicted below-cloud aerosol mass and number concentrations. The assimilation, which uses an adjoint aerosol activation parameterization, improves agreement with independent Nd observations and with in situ aerosol measurements below shallow cumulus clouds. The impacts of a single assimilation on aerosol and cloud forecasts extend beyond 24 h. Unlike previous methods, this technique can directly improve predictions of near-surface fine mode aerosols responsible for human health impacts and low-cloud radiative forcing. Better constrained aerosol distributions will help improve health effects studies, atmospheric emissions estimates, and air-quality, weather, and climate predictions. PMID:22778436

  17. Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number.

    PubMed

    Saide, Pablo E; Carmichael, Gregory R; Spak, Scott N; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J Kirk

    2012-07-24

    Limitations in current capabilities to constrain aerosols adversely impact atmospheric simulations. Typically, aerosol burdens within models are constrained employing satellite aerosol optical properties, which are not available under cloudy conditions. Here we set the first steps to overcome the long-standing limitation that aerosols cannot be constrained using satellite remote sensing under cloudy conditions. We introduce a unique data assimilation method that uses cloud droplet number (N(d)) retrievals to improve predicted below-cloud aerosol mass and number concentrations. The assimilation, which uses an adjoint aerosol activation parameterization, improves agreement with independent N(d) observations and with in situ aerosol measurements below shallow cumulus clouds. The impacts of a single assimilation on aerosol and cloud forecasts extend beyond 24 h. Unlike previous methods, this technique can directly improve predictions of near-surface fine mode aerosols responsible for human health impacts and low-cloud radiative forcing. Better constrained aerosol distributions will help improve health effects studies, atmospheric emissions estimates, and air-quality, weather, and climate predictions.

  18. Measurement simulation of spatial coherence and density degree by turbulence of aerosol and CO II in atmospheric environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayama, Hiroshi; Li, Wei

    2006-09-01

    Atmopheric turbulence is one of the important correction factors to evaluate the earth's surface using a sinsor on a satellite. CO II and aerosol are selected as factors of turbulence. The effects of turbulence caused by CO II and aerosol on the light reflected from the earth's surface are estimated by measuring the degradation of spatial coherence of light in a chamber in which atmospheric turbulence is generated. Dry ice is used to generate carbon dioxide gas. degradation of spatial coherence is measured in relation to the increase of CO II. Turbulence caused by aerosol is measured by density of smoke cigarettes. The spatial coherence of light in the chamber degrades in relation to the increase of aerosol and as a result the turbulence increases. The relation between the turbulence and the degree of spatial coherence is explained in a formula.

  19. Aerosol optical depth distribution in extratropical cyclones over the Northern Hemisphere oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Posselt, Derek J.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-10-01

    Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and an extratropical cyclone database, the climatological distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in extratropical cyclones is explored based solely on observations. Cyclone-centered composites of aerosol optical depth are constructed for the Northern Hemisphere midlatitude ocean regions, and their seasonal variations are examined. These composites are found to be qualitatively stable when the impact of clouds and surface insolation or brightness is tested. The larger AODs occur in spring and summer and are preferentially found in the warm frontal and in the postcold frontal regions in all seasons. The fine mode aerosols dominate the cold sector AODs, but the coarse mode aerosols display large AODs in the warm sector. These differences between the aerosol modes are related to the varying source regions of the aerosols and could potentially have different impacts on cloud and precipitation within the cyclones.

  20. Aerosol Optical Depth Distribution in Extratropical Cyclones over the Northern Hemisphere Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Posselt, Derek J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and an extratropical cyclone database,the climatological distribution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in extratropical cyclones is explored based solely on observations. Cyclone-centered composites of aerosol optical depth are constructed for the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude ocean regions, and their seasonal variations are examined. These composites are found to be qualitatively stable when the impact of clouds and surface insolation or brightness is tested. The larger AODs occur in spring and summer and are preferentially found in the warm frontal and in the post-cold frontal regions in all seasons. The fine mode aerosols dominate the cold sector AODs, but the coarse mode aerosols display large AODs in the warm sector. These differences between the aerosol modes are related to the varying source regions of the aerosols and could potentially have different impacts on cloud and precipitation within the cyclones.

  1. Impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol direct radiative effect and heating rate in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Vasileios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Koras Carracca, Mario; Kinne, Stefan; Vardavas, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    It is now well-established that aerosols cause an overall cooling effect at the surface and a warming effect within the atmosphere. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), both positive and negative forcing can be found, depending on a number of other factors, such as surface albedo and relative position of clouds and aerosols. Whilst aerosol surface cooling is important due to its relation with surface temperature and other bio-environmental reasons, atmospheric heating is of special interest as well having significant impacts on atmospheric dynamics, such as formation of clouds and subsequent precipitation. The actual position of aerosols and their altitude relative to clouds is of major importance as certain types of aerosol, such as black carbon (BC) above clouds can have a significant impact on planetary albedo. The vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds has recently drawn the attention of the aerosol community, because partially can account for the differences between simulated aerosol radiative forcing with various models, and therefore decrease the level of our uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing, which is one of our priorities set by IPCC. The vertical profiles of aerosol optical and physical properties have been studied by various research groups around the world, following different methodologies and using various indices in order to present the impact of aerosols on radiation on different altitudes above the surface. However, there is still variability between the published results as to the actual effect of aerosols on shortwave radiation and on heating rate within the atmosphere. This study uses vertical information on aerosols from the Max Planck Aerosol Climatology (MAC-v1) global dataset, which is a combination of model output with quality ground-based measurements, in order to provide useful insight into the vertical profile of atmospheric heating for the Mediterranean region. MAC-v1 and the science behind this aerosol dataset have already

  2. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions.

  3. Spatial Distribution of Large Cloud Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Larsen, Michael; Wiscombe, Warren

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of aircraft measurements of individual drop sizes in clouds suggests that for sufficiently small volumes the mean number of cloud drops with a given radius is proportional to volume powered by a drop-size dependent exponent. For abundant small drops present, the exponent is 1 as assumed in conventional approach. However, for rarer large drops, the exponents fall below unity. We show striking examples of the spatial distribution of large cloud drops using models that simulate the observed power laws. In contrast to currently used models that assume homogeneity and therefore a Poisson distribution of cloud drops, these models show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents. The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. This clustering has vital consequences for rain physics explaining how rain can form so fast and also helps explain why remotely sensed cloud drop size is generally biased.

  4. Spatial Distribution of Large Cloud Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Larsen, M.; Wiscombe, W.

    2004-01-01

    By analyzing aircraft measurements of individual drop sizes in clouds, we have shown in a companion paper (Knyazikhin et al., 2004) that the probability of finding a drop of radius r at a linear scale l decreases as l(sup D(r)) where 0 less than or equal to D(r) less than or equal to 1. This paper shows striking examples of the spatial distribution of large cloud drops using models that simulate the observed power laws. In contrast to currently used models that assume homogeneity and therefore a Poisson distribution of cloud drops, these models show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents D(r). The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. This clustering has vital consequences for rain physics explaining how rain can form so fast. It also helps explain why remotely sensed cloud drop size is generally biased and why clouds absorb more sunlight than conventional radiative transfer models predict.

  5. GIS characterization of spatially distributed lifeline damage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toprak, Selcuk; O'Rourke, Thomas; Tutuncu, Ilker

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the visualization of spatially distributed water pipeline damage following an earthquake using geographical information systems (GIS). Pipeline damage is expressed as a repair rate (RR). Repair rate contours are developed with GIS by dividing the study area into grid cells (n ?? n), determining the number of particular pipeline repairs in each grid cell, and dividing the number of repairs by the length of that pipeline in each cell area. The resulting contour plot is a two-dimensional visualization of point source damage. High damage zones are defined herein as areas with an RR value greater than the mean RR for the entire study area of interest. A hyperbolic relationship between visual display of high pipeline damage zones and grid size, n, was developed. The relationship is expressed in terms of two dimensionless parameters, threshold area coverage (TAC) and dimensionless grid size (DGS). The relationship is valid over a wide range of different map scales spanning approximately 1,200 km2 for the largest portion of the Los Angeles water distribution system to 1 km2 for the Marina in San Francisco. This relationship can aid GIS users to get sufficiently refined, but easily visualized, maps of damage patterns.

  6. Spatial and temporal variations of chemicals in the TSP aerosols simultaneously collected at three islands in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakaki, Takemitsu; Azechi, Sotaro; Somada, Yuka; Ijyu, Moriaki; Nakaema, Fumiya; Hitomi, Yuya; Handa, Daishi; Oshiro, Yoshito; Miyagi, Youichi; Tsuhako, Ai; Murayama, Hitomi; Higaonna, Yumi; Tanahara, Akira; Itoh, Akihide; Fukushima, Soko; Higashi, Kazuaki; Henza, Yui; Nishikawa, Rin; Shinjo, Hibiki; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-11-01

    East Asia's rapid economic growth has led to concerns about the emission of air pollutants. We collected total suspended particle (TSP) aerosol samples simultaneously at three islands in Okinawa, Japan, which are downwind of East Asia, during the Asian dust season, to examine the spatial and temporal variations and chemical transformations of major chemicals in the aerosols. Weekly samples were collected from July 2008 to June 2010, and the concentrations of water-soluble cations, anions, and organic carbon (WSOC) were determined (n = 303). Spatial distribution analysis showed that monthly mean concentrations of non-sea-salt (nss)-SO42- in the spring (Asian dust season) decreased with increasing distance from Asia, while the trend for NO3- was less evident, suggesting that chemical transformation affected the long-range transport of certain chemicals. Temporal variation analysis showed that concentrations of nss-SO42-, NO3-, and WSOC during the spring were about 2.0, 2.4, and 1.8 times those in the summer (cleaner air mass from the Pacific Ocean), respectively. This study demonstrated that air pollutants were transported from the Asian continent to the Okinawa islands and affected the air quality in the region. There may also be impacts on ecosystems, because increased concentrations of particulate NO3- could increase nutrient levels around the Okinawa islands.

  7. A new stochastic algorithm for inversion of dust aerosol size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Yang, Ma-ying

    2015-08-01

    Dust aerosol size distribution is an important source of information about atmospheric aerosols, and it can be determined from multiwavelength extinction measurements. This paper describes a stochastic inverse technique based on artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to invert the dust aerosol size distribution by light extinction method. The direct problems for the size distribution of water drop and dust particle, which are the main elements of atmospheric aerosols, are solved by the Mie theory and the Lambert-Beer Law in multispectral region. And then, the parameters of three widely used functions, i.e. the log normal distribution (L-N), the Junge distribution (J-J), and the normal distribution (N-N), which can provide the most useful representation of aerosol size distributions, are inversed by the ABC algorithm in the dependent model. Numerical results show that the ABC algorithm can be successfully applied to recover the aerosol size distribution with high feasibility and reliability even in the presence of random noise.

  8. Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Results: Aerosol Backscatter Global Distribution and Wavelength Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) was initiated by NASA in 1986 as an interagency and international research effort to characterize tropospheric backscatter properties. The primary objective of the program is to develop realistic aerosol backscatter inputs for design and simulation studies for NASA's prospective Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS). To achieve this, GLOBE incorporates several different types of aerosol sensors, which operate from a variety of sensor platforms, covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and measure a diverse set of aerosol physical, chemical, and optical properties. The results of this analysis have provided important new information on the life cycles and physicochemical properties of global scale tropospheric aerosol systems. In addition, GLOBE analytical methods will be useful for the Earth Observing System (EOS) and other studies that involve the assimilation of large, complex atmospheric aerosol databases.

  9. The Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity of Precipitation and Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Forcing Uncertainty in Climatically Important Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regayre, L.; Pringle, K.; Lee, L.; Booth, B.; Browse, J.; Mann, G.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Reddington, C.; Carslaw, K. S.; Rap, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud radiative forcing and precipitation sensitivities are quantified within climatically important regions, where surface temperatures and moisture availability are thought to influence large-scale climatic effects. The sensitivity of precipitation and the balance of incoming and outgoing radiation to uncertain historical aerosol emission fluxes and aerosol-cloud parametrisations are quantified and their climatic importance considered. The predictability of monsoon onset and intensity, position of the inter-tropical convergence zone, tropical storm frequency and intensity, heat transport to the Arctic and changes in the mode of the El Niño Southern Oscillation are all limited by the parametric uncertainties examined here. Precipitation and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing sensitivities are found to be both spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Statistical analysis highlights aspects of aerosol-climate research and model development that should be prioritised in order to reduce the impact of uncertainty in regional precipitation and aerosol-cloud forcing on near-term climate projections.

  10. Particle size distribution of the stratospheric aerosol from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Malinina, Elizaveta; Rozanov, Vladimir; Hommel, Rene; Burrows, John

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are of a great scientific interest because of their crucial role in the Earth's radiative budget as well as their contribution to chemical processes resulting in ozone depletion. While the permanent aerosol background in the stratosphere is determined by the tropical injection of SO2, COS and sulphate particles from the troposphere, major perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer result form an uplift of SO2 after strong volcanic eruptions. Satellite measurements in the visible spectral range represent one of the most important sources of information about the vertical distribution of the stratospheric aerosol on the global scale. This study employs measurements of the scattered solar light performed in the limb viewing geometry from the space borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which operated onboard the ENVISAT satellite, from August 2002 to April 2012. A retrieval approach to obtain parameters of the stratospheric aerosol particle size distribution will be reported along with the sensitivity studies and first results.

  11. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  12. The spatial distribution of Mustelidae in France.

    PubMed

    Calenge, Clément; Chadoeuf, Joël; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie; Julliard, Romain; Monestiez, Pascal; Piffady, Jérémy; Pinaud, David; Ruette, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the spatial distribution of 6 Mustelidae species in France using the data collected by the French national hunting and wildlife agency under the "small carnivorous species logbooks" program. The 1500 national wildlife protection officers working for this agency spend 80% of their working time traveling in the spatial area in which they have authority. During their travels, they occasionally detect dead or living small and medium size carnivorous animals. Between 2002 and 2005, each car operated by this agency was equipped with a logbook in which officers recorded information about the detected animals (species, location, dead or alive, date). Thus, more than 30000 dead or living animals were detected during the study period. Because a large number of detected animals in a region could have been the result of a high sampling pressure there, we modeled the number of detected animals as a function of the sampling effort to allow for unbiased estimation of the species density. For dead animals -- mostly roadkill -- we supposed that the effort in a given region was proportional to the distance traveled by the officers. For living animals, we had no way to measure the sampling effort. We demonstrated that it was possible to use the whole dataset (dead and living animals) to estimate the following: (i) the relative density -- i.e., the density multiplied by an unknown constant -- of each species of interest across the different French agricultural regions, (ii) the sampling effort for living animals for each region, and (iii) the relative detection probability for various species of interest.

  13. Airborne measurements of spatial NO2 distributions during AROMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Seyler, André; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Ruhtz, Thomas; Lindemann, Carsten; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. In addition to their directly harmful effects on the respiratory system of living organisms, they influence the levels of tropospheric ozone and contribute to acid rain and eutrophication of ecosystems. As they are produced in combustion processes, they can serve as an indicator for anthropogenic air pollution. In September 2014 several European research groups conducted the ESA funded Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign to test and intercompare newly developed airborne observation sytsems dedicated to air quality satellite validation studies. The IUP Bremen contributed to this campaign with its Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution (AirMAP) on board a Cessna 207 turbo, operated by the FU Berlin. AirMAP allows the retrieval of integrated NO2 column densities in a stripe below the aircraft at a fine spatial resolution of up to 30 x 80 m2, at a typical flight altitude. Measurements have been performed over the city of Bucharest, creating for the first time high spatial resolution maps of Bucharest's NO2 distribution in a time window of approx. 2 hours. The observations were synchronised with ground-based car MAX-DOAS measurements for comparison. In addition, measurements were taken over the city of Berlin, Germany and at the Rovinari power plant, Romania. In this work the results of the research flights will be presented and conclusions will be drawn on the quality of the measurements, their applicability for satellite data validation and possible improvements for future measurements.

  14. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-11-28

    The influence of aerosol concentration on cloud droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased the cloud droplet mean diameter decreases as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc < τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc > τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τc is the phase relaxation time and τt is the turbulence correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs-1c-1 + τt-1, and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. This finding underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for the aerosol indirect effect: increasing aerosol concentration not only suppresses precipitation formation through reduction of the mean droplet diameter, but perhaps more importantly, through narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol / slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  15. Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties during haze and floating dust weather in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Wang, Yuan; Kuang, Zhongyu; Fang, Sihua; Chen, Yonghang; Kang, Yanming; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Daoyuan; Fu, Yingying

    2016-06-01

    A comparative study on the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties during haze and floating dust weather in Shanghai was conducted based on the data obtained from a micro pulse lidar. There was a distinct difference in layer thickness and extinction coefficient under the two types of weather conditions. Aerosols were concentrated below 1 km and the aerosol extinction coefficients ranged from 0.25 to 1.50 km-1 on haze days. In contrast, aerosols with smaller extinction coefficients (0.20-0.35 km-1) accumulated mainly from the surface to 2 km on floating dust days. The seasonal variations of extinction and aerosol optical depth (AOD) for both haze and floating dust cases were similar—greatest in winter, smaller in spring, and smallest in autumn. More than 85% of the aerosols appeared in the atmosphere below 1 km during severe haze and floating dust weather. The diurnal variation of the extinction coefficient of haze exhibited a bimodal shape with two peaks in the morning or at noon, and at nightfall, respectively. The aerosol extinction coefficient gradually increased throughout the day during floating dust weather. Case studies showed that haze aerosols were generated from the surface and then lifted up, but floating dust aerosols were transported vertically from higher altitude to the surface. The AOD during floating dust weather was higher than that during haze. The boundary layer was more stable during haze than during floating dust weather.

  16. Size distribution of chromate paint aerosol generated in a bench-scale spray booth.

    PubMed

    Sabty-Daily, Rania A; Hinds, William C; Froines, John R

    2005-01-01

    Spray painters are potentially exposed to aerosols containing hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] via inhalation of chromate-based paint sprays. Evaluating the particle size distribution of a paint spray aerosol, and the variables that may affect this distribution, is necessary to determine the site and degree of respiratory deposition and the damage that may result from inhaled Cr(VI)-containing paint particles. This study examined the effect of spray gun atomization pressure, aerosol generation source and aerosol aging on the size distribution of chromate-based paint overspray aerosols generated in a bench-scale paint spray booth. The study also determined the effect of particle bounce inside a Marple personal cascade impactor on measured size distributions of paint spray aerosols. Marple personal cascade impactors with a modified inlet were used for sample collection. The data indicated that paint particle bounce did not occur inside the cascade impactors sufficiently to affect size distribution when using uncoated stainless steel or PVC substrate sampling media. A decrease in paint aerosol mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) from 8.2 to 7.0 mum was observed as gun atomization pressure increased from 6 to 10 psi. Overspray aerosols were sampled at two locations in the spray booth. A downstream sampling position simulated the exposure of a worker standing between the painted surface and exhaust, a situation encountered in booths with multiple workers. The measured mean MMAD was 7.2 mum. The distance between the painted surface and sampler was varied to sample oversprays of varying ages between 2.8 and 7.7 s. Age was not a significant factor for determining MMAD. Overspray was sampled at a 90 degrees position to simulate a worker standing in front of the surface being painted with air flowing to the worker's side, a common situation in field applications. The resulting overspray MMAD averaged 5.9 mum. Direct-spray aerosols were sampled at ages from 5.3 to 11.7 s

  17. Satellite Multiangle Spectropolarimetric Imaging of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David; Macenka, Steven; Scherr, Lawrence; Seshadri, Suresh; Chipman, Russell; Keller, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    A proposed remote-sensing instrument, to be carried aboard a spacecraft in orbit around the Earth, would gather data on the spatial distribution and radiative characteristics of tropospheric aerosols. These data are needed for better understanding of the natural and anthropogenic origins of aerosols, and of the effects of aerosols on climate and atmospheric chemistry.

  18. Middle East measurements of concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles for coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, Sergey; Kopeika, Norman S.; Blaunstein, Natan S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, an extension of the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) was proposed based on analysis of an extensive series of measurements at the Irish Atlantic Coast and at the French Mediterranean Coast. We confirm the relevance of that work for the distant eastern Meditteranean and extend several coefficients of that coastal model, proposed by Piazzola et al. for the Meditteranean Coast (a form of the Navy Aerosol Model), to midland Middle East coastal environments. This analysis is based on data collected at three different Middle East coastal areas: the Negev Desert (Eilat) Red Sea Coast, the Sea of Galilee (Tiberias) Coast, and the Mediterranean (Haifa) Coast. Aerosol size distributions are compared with those obtained through measurements carried out over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean Coasts, and Mediterranean, and Baltic Seas Coasts. An analysis of these different results allows better understanding of the similarities and differences between different coastal lake, sea, and open ocean zones. It is shown that in the coastal regions in Israel, compared to open ocean and other sea zones, larger differences in aerosol particle concentration are observed. The aerosol particle concentrations and their dependences on wind speed for these coastal zones are analyzed and discussed. We propose to classify the aerosol distribution models to either: 1. a coastal model with marine aerosol domination; 2. a coastal model with continental aerosol domination (referred to as midland coast in this work); or 3. a coastal model with balanced marine and continental conditions.

  19. Aerosol and gas re-distribution by shallow cumulus clouds: An investigation using airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, Anna; Sorooshian, Armin; Ervens, Barbara; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Feingold, Graham; Murphy, Shane M.; de Gouw, Joost; Warneke, Carsten; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2012-09-01

    Aircraft measurements during the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) are used to examine the influence of shallow cumulus clouds on vertical profiles of aerosol chemical composition, size distributions, and secondary aerosol precursor gases. The data show signatures of convective transport of particles, gases and moisture from near the surface to higher altitudes, and of aqueous-phase production of aerosol mass (sulfate and organics) in cloud droplets and aerosol water. In cloudy conditions, the average aerosol volume concentration at an altitude of 2850 m, above typical cloud top levels, was found to be 34% of that at 450 m; for clear conditions, the same ratio was 13%. Both organic and sulfate mass fractions were on average constant with altitude (around 50%); however, the ratio of oxalate to organic mass increased with altitude (from 1% at 450 m to almost 9% at 3450 m), indicative of the influence of in-cloud production on the vertical abundance and characteristics of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass. A new metric termed "residual cloud fraction" is introduced as a way of quantifying the "cloud processing history" of an air parcel. Results of a parcel model simulating aqueous phase production of sulfate and organics reproduce observed trends and point at a potentially important role of SOA production, especially oligomers, in deliquesced aerosols. The observations emphasize the importance of shallow cumulus clouds in altering the vertical distribution of aerosol properties that influence both their direct and indirect effect on climate.

  20. Number Size distribution of Atmospheric Submicron Aerosols in Thirteen Sites across China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Wang, Zhibin; Yue, Dingli

    2013-04-01

    Number concentration and size distribution (15-600nm) of atmospheric submicron aerosols have been measured in thirteen sites across China during several campaigns from 2006 to 2011. All the sampling sites are categorized into four types, including five urban sites, four suburban sites, three regional sites and two cruise measurements along the eastern coast of China. Spatial and temporal variation of aerosols in nucleation mode (with particle diameter between 15 and 25 nm), Aitken mode (with particle diameter between 25 and 90 nm) as well as accumulation mode (with particle diameter between 90 and 600 nm) in all sites are investigated. Particle number concentration in urban and suburban sites are 2-5 times higher than in regional and sites and cruise measurements. Higher concentration of nucleation mode particles as well as more new particle formation events are found in urban and suburban sites than in regional sites and cruise measurements, indicating high formation rates in the urban sites due to anthropogenic emission of new particles formation precursors. Aitken mode particles are abundant in both urban sites and suburban sites, with larger variation in urban sites than in suburban sites. Accumulation mode particles present higher concentration in winter than in summer. Diurnal trend of both Aitken and accumulation mode shows a bimodal pattern, while the pattern of Aitken mode particles is much more obvious in urban sites but can be barely found in cruise measurements. Particle concentration in accumulation mode and Aitken mode have a week correlation, with aerosols in different sites occupying different Aitken/Accumulation region. Log-normal modal fitting treatment are also used on particle size distribution data to provide the modal pattern as well as the aging information. Particle size distribution shows bimodal or trimodal patterns in most cases in urban sites. However, in regional sites and cruise measurements, the unimodal fit can always do a good job

  1. [Spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates in Xiangxi River].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wan-xiang; Cai, Qing-hua; Tang, Tao; Wu, Nai-cheng; Fu, Xiao-cheng; Li, Feng-qing; Liu, Rui-qiu

    2008-11-01

    An investigation was made from July 2005 to June 2006 to understand the spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates in Xiangxi River, the largest tributary in Hubei portion of Three Gorges Reservoir. The results showed that Ephemeroptera baetis spp., Ephemeroptera epeorus spp., and Plecoptera nemoura spp. were the dominant taxa. There existed greater differences in the habitat characters and in the community structure of macroinvertebrates among the major tributaries of Xiangxi River, and the relative abundance of functional feeding groups could reflect the characters of different habitats. A comparison of the diversity of dominant taxa and their tolerance towards pollution among the major tributaries showed that Jiuchong River had the best habitat, followed by the main stream of Xiangxi River, and Gaolan River and Gufu River. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that the NH4+ -N concentration in the main stream of Xiangxi River, the pH, turbidity, water depth, SiO2, conductance, and alkalinity in Jiuchong River, the turbidity in Gaolan River, and the NH4+ -N and NO3- -N concentrations in Gufu River had significant impact on the community structure of macroinvertebrates.

  2. Evaluation of modeled vertical aerosol distributions over east-Asia using in-situ and satellite data during summer 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quennehen, Boris; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Law, Kathy S.; Thomas, Jennie L.; Ancellet, Gérard; Bazureau, Ariane; Daskalakis, Nikos; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Zhu, Tong; Pelon, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    As part of the EU ECLIPSE project, which aims to quantify the climate impact of short lived climate forcers (SLCFs), including aerosols, black carbon and ozone, regional models are being used to evaluate global model performance for specific case studies. Here, we present results using regional WRF-Chem simulations over east-Asia. Results are compared to data from field campaigns which took place in summer 2008 and from long-term measurement stations. This study will, in a first step, evaluate the ability of the model to simulate aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, with a focus on pollution layers. In a second step, the radiative impact of such layers over east-Asia will be investigated as a function of their position relative to clouds. The WRF-Chem regional model was run using MOZART gas phase chemistry and the MOSAIC aerosol scheme and was evaluated against available measurements for the period August to September 2008. The model was run using ECLIPSE anthropogenic and GFEDv3.1 fire emissions for 2008, while initial and boundary conditions were specified from the TM4 global chemical transport model. The radiative impact of pollution aerosol layers has already been investigated but less is known about the influence of vertical layering in the atmosphere. Such layers might have different radiative impacts whether they are below or above clouds and in that sense, a better understanding of their spatial extent is critical. Information about pollution aerosol layers and clouds optical properties and positions over East-Asia are determined using observations from CALIPSO. The radiative impact of these layers is simulated and compared to the observations. In addition to satellite observations, model results are evaluated against trace gas and aerosol data from aircraft campaigns over eastern Asia in summer 2008 (e.g., CAREBEIJING and CAPMEX) and ground-based measurements (e.g., NIES and ABC). In this study, we assess aerosol total concentrations and size

  3. Mid-infrared mapping of Jupiter's temperatures, aerosol opacity and chemical distributions with IRTF/TEXES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Greathouse, T. K.; Orton, G. S.; Sinclair, J. A.; Giles, R. S.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Encrenaz, T.

    2016-11-01

    Global maps of Jupiter's atmospheric temperatures, gaseous composition and aerosol opacity are derived from a programme of 5-20 μm mid-infrared spectroscopic observations using the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Image cubes from December 2014 in eight spectral channels, with spectral resolutions of R ∼2000 - 12 , 000 and spatial resolutions of 2-4° latitude, are inverted to generate 3D maps of tropospheric and stratospheric temperatures, 2D maps of upper tropospheric aerosols, phosphine and ammonia, and 2D maps of stratospheric ethane and acetylene. The results are compared to a re-analysis of Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observations acquired during Cassini's closest approach to Jupiter in December 2000, demonstrating that this new archive of ground-based mapping spectroscopy can match and surpass the quality of previous investigations, and will permit future studies of Jupiter's evolving atmosphere. The visibility of cool zones and warm belts varies from channel to channel, suggesting complex vertical variations from the radiatively-controlled upper troposphere to the convective mid-troposphere. We identify mid-infrared signatures of Jupiter's 5-μm hotspots via simultaneous M, N and Q-band observations, which are interpreted as temperature and ammonia variations in the northern Equatorial Zone and on the edge of the North Equatorial Belt (NEB). Equatorial plumes enriched in NH3 gas are located south-east of NH3-desiccated 'hotspots' on the edge of the NEB. Comparison of the hotspot locations in several channels across the 5-20 μm range indicate that these anomalous regions tilt westward with altitude. Aerosols and PH3 are both enriched at the equator but are not co-located with the NH3 plumes. The equatorial temperature minimum and PH3/aerosol maxima have varied in amplitude over time, possibly as a result of periodic equatorial brightenings and the fresh updrafts of

  4. Spatial and temporal variations in the atmospheric aerosol optical depth at the ARM CART Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.M.; Cheng, M.D.

    1998-02-01

    In an effort to better characterize the inputs to radiative transfer models and research-grade global climate simulation models (GCMs) the columnar aerosol loading, measured as the aerosol optical depth (AOD), has been computed for five facilities within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site. Characterization of the AOD reported here show clear evidence that the spatial and temporal gradient exists at a much finer linear scale than those of the CART site. The annual variations of median AOD are on the order of 0.30 at all five facilities. The Spearman correlation and varimax-rotated PCA indicated the AOD values vary consistently across the CART site. The Northwest corner facility (EF-1) was the single facility that behaved differently from the rest. This sub-GCM grid variation can not be ignored if the model is to be used to accurately predict future climate change.

  5. Investigate the relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and aerosol size distributions using aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hu; Hua, Dengxin; Mao, Jiandong; Zhou, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The real aerosol size distributions were obtained by aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer (APS) in China YinChuan. The lidar ratios at wavelengths of 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm were calculated using Mie theory. The effective radius of aerosol particles reff and volume C/F ratio (coarse/fine) Vc/f were retrieved from the real aerosol size distributions. The relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and particle reff and Vc/f were investigated. The results indicate that the lidar ratio is positive correlated to the particle reff and Vc/f. The lidar ratio is more sensitive to the coarse particles. The short wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle Vc/f and the long wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle reff. The wavelength dependency indicated that the lidar ratios decrease with increasing the wavelength. The lidar ratios are almost irrelevant to the shape and total particles of aerosol size distributions.

  6. Aerosol generation and distribution system for the Third International Cloud Condensation Nuclei Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, U.; Dea, J. Y.

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain identical samples participating CCN instruments and aerosol characterizing equipment were located along and connected to a 8.2 cm diameter aluminum tube through which the test aerosols were pumped directly from the source at very slight overpressure. Of the total of 29 experiments, 18 were carried out with artificial NaCl or (NH4)2SO4 aerosols. These were generated from salt solutions by pneumatic atomizers of special design to ensure high constancy of the aerosol output concentration. In three experiments with insoluble CCN (AgI, paraffin wax) the aerosols were generated thermally. In some of the tests, an electrostatic classifier was used for narrowing the particle size distributions.

  7. Balloon-borne measurement of the aerosol size distribution from an Icelandic flood basalt eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignelles, D.; Roberts, T. J.; Carboni, E.; Ilyinskaya, E.; Pfeffer, M.; Dagsson Waldhauserova, P.; Schmidt, A.; Berthet, G.; Jegou, F.; Renard, J.-B.; Ólafsson, H.; Bergsson, B.; Yeo, R.; Fannar Reynisson, N.; Grainger, R. G.; Galle, B.; Conde, V.; Arellano, S.; Lurton, T.; Coute, B.; Duverger, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We present in situ balloon-borne measurements of aerosols in a volcanic plume made during the Holuhraun eruption (Iceland) in January 2015. The balloon flight intercepted a young plume at 8 km distance downwind from the crater, where the plume is ∼15 min of age. The balloon carried a novel miniature optical particle counter LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) which measures particle number concentration and size distribution in the plume, alongside a meteorological payload. We discuss the possibility of calculating particle flux by combining LOAC data with measurements of sulfur dioxide flux by ground-based UV spectrometer (DOAS). The balloon passed through the plume at altitude range of 2.0-3.1 km above sea level (a.s.l.). The plume top height was determined as 2.7-3.1 km a.s.l., which is in good agreement with data from Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) satellite. Two distinct plume layers were detected, a non-condensed lower layer (300 m thickness) and a condensed upper layer (800 m thickness). The lower layer was characterized by a lognormal size distribution of fine particles (0.2 μm diameter) and a secondary, coarser mode (2.3 μm diameter), with a total particle number concentration of around 100 cm-3 in the 0.2-100 μm detection range. The upper layer was dominated by particle centered on 20 μm in diameter as well as containing a finer mode (2 μm diameter). The total particle number concentration in the upper plume layer was an order of magnitude higher than in the lower layer. We demonstrate that intercepting a volcanic plume with a meteorological balloon carrying LOAC is an efficient method to characterize volcanic aerosol properties. During future volcanic eruptions, balloon-borne measurements could be carried out easily and rapidly over a large spatial area in order to better characterize the evolution of the particle size distribution and particle number concentrations in a volcanic plume.

  8. Spatial distribution of pingos in Northern Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grosse, G.; Jones, Benjamin M.

    2010-01-01

    Pingos are prominent periglacial landforms in vast regions of the Arctic and Subarctic. They are indicators of modern and past conditions of permafrost, surface geology, hydrology and climate. A first version of a detailed spatial geodatabase of more than 6000 pingo locations in a 3.5 ?? 106 km2 region of Northern Asia was assembled from topographic maps. A first order analysis was carried out with respect to permafrost, landscape characteristics, surface geology, hydrology, climate, and elevation datasets using a Geographic Information System (GIS). Pingo heights in the dataset vary between 2 and 37 m, with a mean height of 4.8 m. About 64% of the pingos occur in continuous permafrost with high ice content and thick sediments; another 19% in continuous permafrost with moderate ice content and thick sediments. The majority of these pingos likely formed through closed system freezing, typical of those located in drained thermokarst lake basins of northern lowlands with continuous permafrost. About 82% of the pingos are located in the tundra bioclimatic zone. Most pingos in the dataset are located in regions with mean annual ground temperatures between -3 and -11 ??C and mean annual air temperatures between -7 and -18 ??C. The dataset confirms that surface geology and hydrology are key factors for pingo formation and occurrence. Based on model predictions for near-future permafrost distribution, hundreds of pingos along the southern margins of permafrost will be located in regions with thawing permafrost by 2100, which ultimately may lead to increased occurrence of pingo collapse. Based on our dataset and previously published estimates of pingo numbers from other regions, we conclude that there are more than 11 000 pingos on Earth. ?? 2010 Author(s).

  9. Spatial distribution of pingos in Northern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.

    2010-09-01

    Pingos are prominent periglacial landforms in vast regions of the Arctic and Subarctic. They are indicators of modern and past conditions of permafrost, surface geology, hydrology and climate. A first version of a detailed spatial geodatabase of more than 6000 pingo locations in a 3.5 × 106 km2 region of Northern Asia was assembled from topographic maps. A first order analysis was carried out with respect to permafrost, landscape characteristics, surface geology, hydrology, climate, and elevation datasets using a Geographic Information System (GIS). Pingo heights in the dataset vary between 2 and 37 m, with a mean height of 4.8 m. About 64% of the pingos occur in continuous permafrost with high ice content and thick sediments; another 19% in continuous permafrost with moderate ice content and thick sediments. The majority of these pingos likely formed through closed system freezing, typical of those located in drained thermokarst lake basins of northern lowlands with continuous permafrost. About 82% of the pingos are located in the tundra bioclimatic zone. Most pingos in the dataset are located in regions with mean annual ground temperatures between -3 and -11 °C and mean annual air temperatures between -7 and -18 °C. The dataset confirms that surface geology and hydrology are key factors for pingo formation and occurrence. Based on model predictions for near-future permafrost distribution, hundreds of pingos along the southern margins of permafrost will be located in regions with thawing permafrost by 2100, which ultimately may lead to increased occurrence of pingo collapse. Based on our dataset and previously published estimates of pingo numbers from other regions, we conclude that there are more than 11 000 pingos on Earth.

  10. Spatial distribution of pingos in northern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, G.; Jones, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Pingos are prominent periglacial landforms in vast regions of the Arctic and Subarctic. They are indicators of modern and past conditions of permafrost, surface geology, hydrology and climate. A first version of a detailed spatial geodatabase of 6059 pingo locations in a 3.5×106 km2 region of northern Asia was assembled from topographic maps. A first order analysis was carried out with respect to permafrost, landscape characteristics, surface geology, hydrology, climate, and elevation datasets using a Geographic Information System (GIS). Pingo heights in the dataset vary between 2 and 37 m, with a mean height of 4.8 m. About 64% of the pingos occur in continuous permafrost with high ice content and thick sediments; another 19% in continuous permafrost with moderate ice content and thick sediments. The majority of these pingos are likely hydrostatic pingos, which are typical of those located in drained thermokarst lake basins of northern lowlands with continuous permafrost. About 82% of the pingos are located in the tundra bioclimatic zone. Most pingos in the dataset are located in regions with mean annual ground temperatures between -3 and -11 °C and mean annual air temperatures between -7 and -18 °C. The dataset confirms that surface geology and hydrology are key factors for pingo formation and occurrence. Based on model predictions for near-future permafrost distribution, about 2073 pingos (34%) along the southern margins of permafrost will be located in regions with thawing permafrost by 2100, which ultimately may lead to increased occurrence of pingo collapse. Based on our dataset and previously published estimates of pingo numbers from other regions, we conclude that there are more than 11 000 pingos on Earth.

  11. Regional and local variations in atmospheric aerosols using ground-based sun photometry during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Itaru; Mukai, Sonoyo; Nakata, Makiko; Holben, Brent N.

    2016-11-01

    Aerosol mass concentrations are affected by local emissions as well as long-range transboundary (LRT) aerosols. This work investigates regional and local variations of aerosols based on Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON). We constructed DRAGON-Japan and DRAGON-Osaka in spring of 2012. The former network covers almost all of Japan in order to obtain aerosol information in regional scale over Japanese islands. It was determined from the DRAGON-Japan campaign that the values of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) decrease from west to east during an aerosol episode. In fact, the highest AOT was recorded at Fukue Island at the western end of the network, and the value was much higher than that of urban areas. The latter network (DRAGON-Osaka) was set as a dense instrument network in the megalopolis of Osaka, with a population of 12 million, to better understand local aerosol dynamics in urban areas. AOT was further measured with a mobile sun photometer attached to a car. This transect information showed that aerosol concentrations rapidly changed in time and space together when most of the Osaka area was covered with moderate LRT aerosols. The combined use of the dense instrument network (DRAGON-Osaka) and high-frequency measurements provides the motion of aerosol advection, which coincides with the wind vector around the layer between 700 and 850 hPa as provided by the reanalysis data of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP).

  12. Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid size distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai

    2016-07-19

    A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle sizing at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation distributes particles in accordance with their size. The condensation enlarges size-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle size (or mobility), the particle size spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.

  13. Measurement of mass distribution of chemical species in aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    Aerosols may be generated through the nebulizing of solutions and the evaporation of their solvent, leaving the dry solute particles. Attention is presently given to a method for the direct determination of the masses of chemical species in individual aerosol particles on a continuous, real-time basis, using mass spectrometry. After the aerosol particles are introduced into the ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, the particles impinge on a hot rhenium filament in the mass spectrometer's ion source. The resulting vapor plume is ionized by electron bombardment, and a pulse of ions is generated by each particle. The intensities of different masses in the ion pulses can then be measured by the mass spectrometer.

  14. Atmospheric correction of ocean color imagery: use of the junge power-law aerosol size distribution with variable refractive index to handle aerosol absorption.

    PubMed

    Chomko, R M; Gordon, H R

    1998-08-20

    When strongly absorbing aerosols are present in the atmosphere, the usual two-step procedure of processing ocean color data-(1) atmospheric correction to provide the water-leaving reflectance (rho(w)), followed by (2) relating rho(w) to the water constituents-fails and simultaneous estimation of the ocean and aerosol optical properties is necessary. We explore the efficacy of using a simple model of the aerosol-a Junge power-law size distribution consisting of homogeneous spheres with arbitrary refractive index-in a nonlinear optimization procedure for estimating the relevant oceanic and atmospheric parameters for case 1 waters. Using simulated test data generated from more realistic aerosol size distributions (sums of log-normally distributed components with different compositions), we show that the ocean's pigment concentration (C) can be retrieved with good accuracy in the presence of weakly or strongly absorbing aerosols. However, because of significant differences in the scattering phase functions for the test and power-law distributions, large error is possible in the estimate of the aerosol optical thickness. The positive result for C suggests that the detailed shape of the aerosol-scattering phase function is not relevant to the atmospheric correction of ocean color sensors. The relevant parameters are the aerosol single-scattering albedo and the spectral variation of the aerosol optical depth. We argue that the assumption of aerosol sphericity should not restrict the validity of the algorithm and suggest an avenue for including colored aerosols, e.g., wind-blown dust, in the procedure. A significant advantage of the new approach is that realistic multicomponent aerosol models are not required for the retrieval of C.

  15. Measurement and Modeling Results on the Evolution of Aerosol Size Distributions in the Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Kazil, J.; Reeves, J. M.; Froyd, K. D.; Wilson, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol particles in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS) affect local chemistry and radiation balance due to their role in heterogeneous reactions and contribution to light scattering. Tropical UTLS particles also act as a source of lower stratospheric aerosol populations in the mid-latitudes. Therefore, understanding the processes controlling evolution of the particles in the tropical UTLS is of great importance. We present measurements of aerosol size distributions (4-1000 nm) in the tropics during winter (Pre-AVE, 2004 and CRAVE, 2006) and summer (TC4, 2007), using NMASS (Nuclei Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer) and FCAS (Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer) instruments aboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft. At altitudes below the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), integrated number and volume distributions indicate a factor of 2-5 variability between 2004 and 2006, reflecting the influence of different air mass origins on the local aerosol population. However, above TTL, the distributions are unified, without a significant change between the two years. Furthermore, above the TTL, number fraction of nucleation mode particles decreases from up to 90% to <40% while total aerosol volume and the volume fraction of particles larger than 350 nm increase. We use an aerosol dynamic model (MAIA, Kazil et al. (2007), Weigel et al. (2011)), constrained by observations to account for the horizontal air mass mixing from mid-latitudes, to simulate aerosol evolution in the tropical UTLS. We will discuss the results of MAIA's sensitivity runs along with the available aerosol composition information to gain insight into the processes controlling the increase in aerosol volume above the TTL. We will also use 2007 observations and MAIA's model results to compare winter-summer aerosol growth processes in the tropical UTLS. Kazil, J., et al., Is aerosol formation in cirrus clouds possible?, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 1407-1413, doi:10.5194/acp-7-1407-2007, 2007. Weigel et al., In situ

  16. An inexpensive active optical remote sensing instrument for assessing aerosol distributions.

    PubMed

    Barnes, John E; Sharma, Nimmi C P

    2012-02-01

    Air quality studies on a broad variety of topics from health impacts to source/sink analyses, require information on the distributions of atmospheric aerosols over both altitude and time. An inexpensive, simple to implement, ground-based optical remote sensing technique has been developed to assess aerosol distributions. The technique, called CLidar (Charge Coupled Device Camera Light Detection and Ranging), provides aerosol altitude profiles over time. In the CLidar technique a relatively low-power laser transmits light vertically into the atmosphere. The transmitted laser light scatters off of air molecules, clouds, and aerosols. The entire beam from ground to zenith is imaged using a CCD camera and wide-angle (100 degree) optics which are a few hundred meters from the laser. The CLidar technique is optimized for low altitude (boundary layer and lower troposphere) measurements where most aerosols are found and where many other profiling techniques face difficulties. Currently the technique is limited to nighttime measurements. Using the CLidar technique aerosols may be mapped over both altitude and time. The instrumentation required is portable and can easily be moved to locations of interest (e.g. downwind from factories or power plants, near highways). This paper describes the CLidar technique, implementation and data analysis and offers specifics for users wishing to apply the technique for aerosol profiles.

  17. Study of satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth spatial resolution effect on particulate matter concentration prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandgren, J.; Mei, L.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) spatial resolution effect is investigated for the linear correlation between satellite retrieved AOD and ground level particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5). The Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm was developed for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for obtaining AOD with a high spatial resolution of 1 km and provides a good dataset for the study of the AOD spatial resolution effect on the particulate matter concentration prediction. 946 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground monitoring stations across the contiguous US have been used to investigate the linear correlation between AOD and PM2.5 using AOD at different spatial resolutions (1, 3 and 10 km) and for different spatial scales (urban scale, meso-scale and continental scale). The main conclusions are: (1) for both urban, meso- and continental scale the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD increased significantly with increasing spatial resolution of the AOD, (2) the correlation between AOD and PM2.5 decreased significantly as the scale of study region increased for the eastern part of the US while vice versa for the western part of the US, (3) the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD is much more stable and better over the eastern part of the US compared to western part due to the surface characteristics and atmospheric conditions like the fine mode fraction.

  18. Anthropogenic aerosols and the distribution of past large-scale precipitation change.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien

    2015-12-28

    The climate response of precipitation to the effects of anthropogenic aerosols is a critical while not yet fully understood aspect in climate science. Results of selected models that participated the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and the data from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project suggest that, throughout the tropics and also in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere, aerosols have largely dominated the distribution of precipitation changes in reference to the preindustrial era in the second half of the last century. Aerosol-induced cooling has offset some of the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the tropics to the Arctic and thus formed the gradients of surface temperature anomaly that enable the revealed precipitation change patterns to occur. Improved representation of aerosol-cloud interaction has been demonstrated as the key factor for models to reproduce consistent distributions of past precipitation change with the reanalysis data.

  19. Aerosol distribution and efficacy in a commercial food warehouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of field trials were conducted in a commercial field storage facility to evaluate exposure of stored-product insects to aerosol formulations of pyrethrin and the insect growth regulator methoprene. When adults of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), the red flour beetle, and Tribolium confusum (Ja...

  20. Radiative properties of Bay of Bengal aerosols: Spatial distinctiveness and source impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S. Suresh; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Kumar, V. H. Arun; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2012-03-01

    Simultaneous and collocated measurements of spectrally resolved scattering and absorption coefficients and mass concentration of near-surface composite aerosols in the marine atmosphere over the Bay of Bengal (BOB), along with incoming shortwave (0.3-3 μm) global solar radiation and columnar spectral aerosol optical depths (AOD), were made on a research cruise during the winter phase of the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (W-ICARB). The aerosol radiative properties revealed distinct spatial features associated with the contrasting outflows from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and East Asia. Both scattering and absorption coefficients depicted very high values (>200 and >15 Mm-1) over the northwestern and southeastern BOB and extremely low values (<50 and <10 Mm-1) over the central BOB. The mean value of the total scattering coefficient at 550 nm (˜123.7 ± 85.3 Mm-1) over the entire BOB during winter was higher than the mean values (˜94 ± 47 Mm-1) reported for the premonsoon season. While SSA at 550 nm showed very low values (<0.8) over a very large region in the central BOB and moderately low values over the southern BOB (˜0.85-0.9), the columnar AOD varied from the least values of ˜0.1 over the northeastern BOB to the highest values of ˜0.8 over the northwestern BOB. While significant cooling was observed at the top of the atmosphere and surface over the northwestern BOB, the atmospheric forcing was found to be significantly high (˜15 W m-2) over the southern BOB, where the aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (ARFE) at the surface was also found to be high. Examination of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived fire count along with the advection pathways revealed a strong contribution from the emissions of biomass smoke from East Asia, which might be contributing to the enhanced aerosol induced warming over the southern BOB. However, the ARFE at the surface was low over the northwestern BOB, where the

  1. [Thoughts on the spatial distribution of population].

    PubMed

    Borisovna, L; Velez, F

    1991-12-01

    city in all age groups, especially in the 15-19 cohort. A large proportion of the migrants were more highly educated than the average city dweller. The average rate of growth of the working age population in the city was 6% from 1970-80, implying a need for 35,000 new jobs annually. But in 1980-90, only 10,000 new jobs were added each year. The relative importance of tertiary sector employment has increased significantly. A review of the population characteristics and spatial distribution of the city and state of Puebla strongly suggests that decentralization should be vigorously pursued as a means of improving the wellbeing of the population.

  2. Observations of Saharan Aerosols: Results of ECLATS Field Experiment. Part I: Optical Thicknesses and Aerosol Size Distributions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquart, Y.; Bonnel, B.; Chaoui Roquai, M.; Santer, R.; Cerf, A.

    1987-01-01

    A series of ground-based and airborne observations of desert aerosols, the ECLATS experiment was carried out in December 1980 in the vicinity of Niamey (Niger). This paper deals with aerosol optical thicknesses and size distributions derived from (i) in situ measurements using singe particle optical counters (a Kratel and a Knollenberg FSSP), (ii) a ground-based cascade impactor, and (iii) ground-based measurements of the spectral variation of the sober extinction.During the experiment, aerosol optical thicknesses (at 550 nm) varied from 0.20 on very clear days to 1.5 during a so-called `dry haze' episode.Comparisons between size distributions derived from in situ measurements from ground-based cascade impactor, and from inversion of the spectral optical thicknesses, showed that the optical counters drastically underestimated the concentration of small (r<0.5 m) particles It was shown that the occurrence of a `dry haze' episode was characterized by a large increase (an order of magnitude in this particular case) of the intermediate particles (r0.5 m), whereas the concentration in very (r<0.2 m) and large (r>1 m) particles remained roughly constant.

  3. Temporal variability of aerosol optical thickness vertical distribution observed from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Travis D.; Zhang, Jianglong; Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2016-08-01

    Temporal variability in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) derived from the 0.532 µm aerosol extinction coefficient is described using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations over 8.5 years (June 2006 to December 2014). Temporal variability of CALIOP column-integrated AOT is largely consistent with total column AOT trends from several passive satellite sensors, such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor. Globally, a 0.0002 AOT per year positive trend in deseasonalized CALIOP total column AOT for daytime conditions is attributed to corresponding changes in near-surface (i.e., 0.0-0.5 km or 0.5-1.0 km above ground level (agl)) aerosol particle loading, while a -0.0006 AOT per year trend during nighttime is attributed to elevated (i.e., 1.0-2.0 km or >2.0 km agl) aerosols. Regionally, increasing daytime CALIOP AOTs are found over Southern Africa and India, mostly due to changes in aerosol loading at the 1.0-2.0 km and 0.0-0.5 km agl layers, respectively. Decreasing daytime CALIOP AOTs are observed over Northern Africa, Eastern U.S., and South America (due mostly to elevated aerosol loading), while the negative CALIOP AOT trends found over Eastern China, Europe, and Western U.S. are due mostly to aerosol layers nearer the surface. To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide both a globally comprehensive estimation of the temporal variation in aerosol vertical distribution and an insight into passive sensor column AOT trends in the vertical domain.

  4. CCN frequency distributions and aerosol chemical composition from long-term observations at European ACTRIS supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, Stefano; Rinaldi, Matteo; Schmale, Julia Yvonne; Gysel, Martin; Fröhlich, Roman; Poulain, Laurent; Henning, Silvia; Stratmann, Frank; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Cloud droplet number concentration is regulated by the availability of aerosol acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Predicting the air concentrations of CCN involves knowledge of all physical and chemical processes that contribute to shape the particle size distribution and determine aerosol hygroscopicity. The relevance of specific atmospheric processes (e.g., nucleation, coagulation, condensation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol, etc.) is time- and site-dependent, therefore the availability of long-term, time-resolved aerosol observations at locations representative of diverse environments is strategic for the validation of state-of-the-art chemical transport models suited to predict CCN concentrations. We focused on long-term (year-long) datasets of CCN and of aerosol composition data including black carbon, and inorganic as well as organic compounds from the Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at selected ACTRIS supersites (http://www.actris.eu/). We discuss here the joint frequency distribution of CCN levels and of aerosol chemical components concentrations for two stations: an alpine site (Jungfraujoch, CH) and a central European rural site (Melpitz, DE). The CCN frequency distributions at Jungfraujoch are broad and generally correlated with the distributions of the concentrations of aerosol chemical components (e.g., high CCN concentrations are most frequently found for high organic matter or black carbon concentrations, and vice versa), which can be explained as an effect of the strong seasonality in the aerosol characteristics at the mountain site. The CCN frequency distributions in Melpitz show a much weaker overlap with the distributions of BC concentrations or other chemical compounds. However, especially at high CCN concentration levels, a statistical correlation with organic matter (OM) concentration can be observed. For instance, the number of CCN (with particle diameter between 20 and 250 nm) at a supersaturation of 0.7% is

  5. Size distribution and speciation of chromium in paint spray aerosol at an aerospace facility.

    PubMed

    Sabty-Daily, Rania A; Harris, Patricia A; Hinds, William C; Froines, John R

    2005-01-01

    Spray painters are potentially exposed to aerosol containing Cr(VI) via inhalation of chromate-based paint spray. Two field studies were conducted at an aerospace facility to determine the size distribution and speciation of Cr(VI) in paint spray aerosol. Sampled paint products consisted of sparingly soluble strontium chromate in an epoxy resin matrix, a matrix generally known for its durability and toughness. Personal aerosol samples were collected using Sierra Marple personal cascade impactors and analyzed for Cr(VI) and total Cr. The size distribution of total Cr particles in the paint aerosol had a Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter (MMAD) of 7.5 mum [Geometric Standard Deviation (GSD = 2.7 mum)] in both field studies. The MMAD of Cr(VI) particles was 8.5 mum (GSD = 2.2 mum). Particles >2 mum constituted 90% or more of the total Cr and the Cr(VI) mass, in all sampled paint aerosols and were lognormally distributed. The target site for respiratory deposition of Cr in the aerosol was estimated based on the mass distribution of Cr according to particle size. On an average, 62% of the Cr and Cr(VI) mass in the paint aerosol consisted of particles >10 mum. This study showed that 71.8% of Cr(VI) mass in paint spray aerosol potentially inhaled by a spray painter may deposit in the head airways region. Only 2.0 and 1.4% of Cr(VI) mass in the paint aerosol may potentially deposit in the alveolar and tracheobronchial region, respectively. The ratio of Cr(VI) mass to total Cr mass was determined in bulk paint and the data indicate that Cr was predominantly in the Cr(VI) valence state, before spraying. The ratio of Cr(VI) mass to total Cr mass was also determined in paint aerosol samples. The data indicated that there was a reduction of Cr(VI) regardless of Cr aerosol particle size. Cr(VI) reduction occurred most likely during the 8 h sample collection time period. These findings are in agreement with the findings that observed Cr(VI) reduction during collection of airborne

  6. Variation of the vertical distribution of Nabro volcano aerosol layers in the stratosphere observed by LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Shin, Dong Ho; Müller, Detlef

    2017-04-01

    We present results of the vertical distribution variation of volcanic aerosol layers in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The data were taken with our multiwavelength aerosol Raman lidar at Gwangju (35.10° N, 126.53° E), Korea. The volcanic ash particles and gases were released around 12 June 2011 during the eruption of the Nabro volcano (13.37° N, 41.7° E) in Eritrea, east Africa. Forward trajectory computations show that the volcanic aerosols were advected from North Africa to East Asia. The first measurement of the aerosol layer over Korea was on 19 June 2011. The aerosol layers appeared between 15 km and 17 km height asl (above sea level). The maximum value of the aerosol layer of the particle backscatter coefficient (1.5 ± 0.3 Mm-1 sr-1) and the linear particle depolarization ratio at 532 nm (2.2%) were observed at 16.4 km height asl. We continuously probed the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for this volcanic aerosol layer during the following 6 months, until December 2011. The volcanic aerosol layer showed a single-peak of the particle backscatter coefficient and a comparably narrow vertical thickness at our observation site at the beginning of our observation period (i.e. comparably soon after the initial eruption period). After that initial period the vertical distribution of the plume changed. Multiple peaks and a comparably broad geometrical thickness developed with progressing observation time. The vertical thickness of the volcanic aerosol layer expanded up to 10 km by 3 August 2011. The linear particle depolarization ratios were larger in the lower part of the aerosol layer than the upper part of the aerosol layer. We observed a strong variation of the AOD (aerosol optical depth) in the first two months of our lidar observations. After these two months the AOD gradually decreased with time from September to December 20111 and the maximum particle backscatter coefficients consistently decreased. The corresponding e

  7. Influence of aerosols and surface reflectance on satellite NO2 retrieval: seasonal and spatial characteristics and implications for NOx emission constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-T.; Liu, M.-Y.; Xin, J.-Y.; Boersma, K. F.; Spurr, R.; Martin, R.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-10-01

    Satellite retrievals of vertical column densities (VCDs) of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) normally do not explicitly account for aerosol optical effects and surface reflectance anisotropy that vary with space and time. Here, we conduct an improved retrieval of NO2 VCDs over China, called the POMINO algorithm, based on measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and we test the importance of a number of aerosol and surface reflectance treatments in this algorithm. POMINO uses a parallelized LIDORT-driven AMFv6 package to derive tropospheric air mass factors via pixel-specific radiative transfer calculations with no look-up tables, taking slant column densities from DOMINO v2. Prerequisite cloud optical properties are derived from a dedicated cloud retrieval process that is fully consistent with the main NO2 retrieval. Aerosol optical properties are taken from GEOS-Chem simulations constrained by MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) data. MODIS bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) data are used for surface reflectance over land. For the present analysis, POMINO level-2 data for 2012 are aggregated into monthly means on a 0.25° long. × 0.25° lat. grid. POMINO-retrieved annual mean NO2 VCDs vary from 15-25 × 1015 cm-2 over the polluted North China Plain (NCP) to below 1015 cm-2 over much of western China. Using POMINO to infer Chinese emissions of nitrogen oxides leads to annual anthropogenic emissions of 9.05 TgN yr-1, an increase from 2006 (Lin, 2012) by about 19 %. Replacing the MODIS BRDF data with the OMLER v1 monthly climatological albedo data affects NO2 VCDs by up to 40 % for certain locations and seasons. The effect on constrained NOx emissions is small. Excluding aerosol information from the retrieval process (this is the traditional "implicit" treatment) enhances annual mean NO2 VCDs by 15-40 % over much of eastern China. Seasonally, NO2 VCDs are reduced by 10-20 % over parts of the NCP in spring and over northern China

  8. [A floating-dust case study based on the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Deng, Jun-Ying; Shi, Lan-Hong; Chen, Yong-Hang; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-03-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties of a typical floating-dust event on October 19, 2009 in Shanghai was analyzed by using Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL) and the CALIPSO satellite. The results showed that the floating-dust aerosol mainly existed below 2 km of height. The floating-dust aerosol backscatter coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.015 km(-1) x sr(-1), and the MPL extinction coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.32 km(-1). The MPL data showed that the aerosol extinction coefficient first increased and then decreased during the floating-dust event. At the same time, the aerosol layer was constantly lifting. The CALIPSO data showed that a large number of small particles were suspended in air at a height of below 2 km, while the big particles always stayed near the ground (0-0.5 km). At the height of 2-10 km, there was only few aerosols; in the range of 4-6 km, there was a mixture of particles with regular and irregular shapes. The vertical distribution of CALIPSO 532 nm total attenuated backscatter coefficient and MPL normalized relative backscatter signal was basically the same, but the extinction coefficient values gained by them were different. Observations by CALIPSO and MPL together could be more comprehensive and objective for monitoring floating-dust in Shanghai.

  9. A study on the temporal and spatial variability of absorbing aerosols using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2009-05-01

    Absorbing aerosols, especially mineral dust and black carbon, play key roles in climate change by absorbing solar radiation, heating the atmosphere, and contributing to global warming. In this paper, we first examine the consistency of the Aerosol Index (AI) product as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) instruments and then analyze these AI data sets to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of UV absorbing aerosols. In contrast to the trend in aerosol optical depth found in the advanced very high-resolution radiometer data, no obvious long-term trend in absorbing aerosols is observed from the time series of AI records. The comparison between the mean annual cycle in the two data sets shows that the cycles agree very well both globally and regionally, indicating a consistency between the AI products from TOMS and OMI. Varimax rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of detrended, deseasonalized AI data proves to be successful in isolating major dust and biomass burning source regions, as well as dust transport. Finally, we find that large, individual events, such as the Kuwait oil fire and Australian smoke plum, are isolated in individual higher-order principal components.

  10. A spatial query scheduler in a distributed environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunhui; Zhu, Xinyan; Xia, Yu; Su, Kehua

    2008-10-01

    Geographic Information System (GIS) is moving towards distribution and sharing. Distributed Spatial Database Systems (DSDBS) has attracted the attention of many scholars. This paper introduces the prospects of Distributed GIS (DGIS), and describes the definition of DSDBS and the existing problems. The researches in related fields are analyzed, including the research results in the traditional distributed relational database fields, the distributed spatial database fields and the spatial query optimization aspect. Grid technologies are developing forward, and grid will be turned into the standard distributed computing platform, therefore the application of DSDBS will be much broader than ever. The present studies on distributed spatial query focus on spatial join optimization. Researches on query scheduling are rare. In the process of constructing our test system for distributed spatial query, we find there are some replication nodes after the step of data localization. These nodes cause redundant computing of query processing. This paper gives a method to solve it based on the Query Scheduling Tree Model (QSTM). It also gives a detailed scheduling algorithm, and analyzes the effectiveness of the model and the algorithm.

  11. Cometary atmospheres: Modeling the spatial distribution of observed neutral radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Progress on modeling the spatial distributions of cometary radicals is described. The Monte Carlo particle-trajectory model was generalized to include the full time dependencies of initial comet expansion velocities, nucleus vaporization rates, photochemical lifetimes and photon emission rates which enter the problem through the comet's changing heliocentric distance and velocity. The effect of multiple collisions in the transition zone from collisional coupling to true free flow were also included. Currently available observations of the spatial distributions of the neutral radicals, as well as the latest available photochemical data were re-evaluated. Preliminary exploratory model results testing the effects of various processes on observable spatial distributions are also discussed.

  12. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  13. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols II: particle size distributions as a function of time.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Guilmette, Raymond A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing DU from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluate particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using proportional counting, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements were quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 microm and a large size mode between 2 and 15 microm. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 microm shortly after perforation to around 1 microm at the end of the 2-h sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles.

  14. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols II: Particle Size Distributions as a Function of Time

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing depleted uranium from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluated particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using beta spectrometry, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements was quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 um and a large size mode between 2 and 15 um. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 um shortly after perforation to around 1 um at the end of the 2-hr sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles.

  15. Spatial Distribution of Cyanobacteria in Modern Stromatolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prufert-Bebout, Lee; Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer; Herbert, Alice; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Living stromatolites consist of complex microbial communities with distinct distribution patterns for different microbial groups. The cyanobacterial populations of Highborne Cay Bahamas exemplify this phenomenon. Field observations reveal distinct distribution patterns for several of these cyanobacterial species. To date 10 different cyanobacterial cultures, including both filamentous and endolithic species, have been isolated from these stromatolites. We will present data on the growth and motility characteristics as well as on the nutritional requirements of these isolates. These data will then be correlated with the field observed distributions for these species. Lastly laboratory simulations of stromatolites grown under various conditions of irradiance, flow and cyanobacterial community composition will be presented. These experiments allow us to evaluate our predictions regarding controls on cyanobacterial distribution.

  16. Retrieving the aerosol particle distribution in Titan's detached layer from ISS limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seignovert, B.; Rannou, P.; Lavvas, P.; Cours, T.; West, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    The study of the detached haze layer above Titan's thick atmosphere is one of the key elements to understand the growth of the aerosols in the upper atmosphere of Titan. In this work we will present the results of a radiative transfer inversion of the vertical profile distribution of aerosols in the detached haze layer (from 300 to 600 km) by using the I/F ratio ob- served by Cassini ISS camera. The analyses will focus on the derivation of the particle size distribution.

  17. Aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO sub 2 backscatter at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, A.D.; Porter, J.N. )

    1991-03-20

    Continuous measurements of aerosol size distributions were obtained during Jan-Mar and Nov-Dec periods of 1988 at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii. These periods were chosen in order to characterize aerosol physiochemistry during periods representative of low-dust atmospheric conditions and periods associated with appreciable Asian dust transport to that site. Size distributions for particles with diameters between 0.15 and 7.6 {mu}m were accumulated in 256 size bins of a laser optical particle counter for 3-hour intervals during most of the period. The aerosol sample stream was heated to selected temperatures in order to provide size-discriminated measurements of aerosol volatility. Resulting data were used to assess the variability in aerosol concentrations and properties related to aerosol backscatter values at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m, {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}}, in the mid-troposphere. Low aerosol concentrations, considered representative of mid-tropospheric air, occurred in downslope flow between midnight and sunrise. Measurements for these time periods suggest that {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} varied from a low of about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} to a high of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1}. Coarse particles with diameters between 1.0 and 5.0 {mu}m account for most of the derived values of {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at all but the highest and lowest aerosol mass concentrations. Volatile aerosol appears to dominate aerosol mass during the cleanest periods but was a small fraction of the total during dust events. The authors estimate that minimum values for {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at about 8 km should usually fall in the range of 1-3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} and be dominated by a sulfate aerosol.

  18. Chemical Composition and Size Distributions of Coastal Aerosols Observed on the U.S. East Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Song, F.; Jusino-Atresino, R.; Thuman, C.; Gao, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol input is an important source of certain limiting nutrients, such as iron, for phytoplankton growth in several large oceanic regions. As the efficiency of biological uptake of nutrients may depend on the aerosol properties, a better knowledge of aerosol properties is critically important. Characterizing aerosols over the coastal ocean needs special attention, because the properties of aerosols could be altered by many anthropogenic processes in this land-ocean transition zone before they are transported over the remote ocean. The goal of this experiment was to examine aerosol properties, in particular chemical composition, particle-size distributions and iron solubility, over the US Eastern Seaboard, an important boundary for the transport of continental substances from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean. Our field sampling site was located at Tuckerton (39°N, 74°W) on the southern New Jersey coast. Fourteen sets of High-Volume aerosol samples and three sets of size segregated aerosol samples by a 10-stage MOUDI impactor were collected during 2007 and 2008. The ICP-MS methodology was used to analyze aerosol samples for the concentrations of thirteen trace elements: Al, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V. The IC procedures were applied to determine five cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and eleven anions (fluoride, acetate, propionate, formate, MSA, chloride, nitrate, succinate, malonate, sulfate and oxalate). The UV spectrometry was employed for the determination of iron solubility. Preliminary results suggest three major sources of aerosols: anthropogenic, crustal and marine. At this location, the concentrations of iron (II) ranged from 2.8 to 29ng m-3, accounting for ~20% of the total iron. The iron concentrations at this coastal site were substantially lower than those observed in Newark, an urban site in northern NJ. High concentrations of iron (II) were associated with both fine and coarse aerosol

  19. Distribution of 125Iricin in mice following aerosol inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Doebler, J.A.; Wiltshire, N.D.; Mayer, T.W.; Estep, J.E.; Moeller, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Studies were conducted to examine the uptake and redistribution of 251Iricin from the lungs of mice following nose-only aerosol inhalation exposure. Radiolabelled contents were measured in lung and various extra-pulmonary tissues 15 min through 30 h following 10 min aerosol exposures. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed on whole organ data obtained for lungs, stomach, liver and spleen. Radioactivity within the lungs, maximal at 15 min post-exposure, was eliminated in a biexponential fashion with a long Beta half-life (approx. 40 h). Large amounts of radiolabel were also found within the gastrointestinal tract. Radiolabel within the stomach exhibited an absorption phase and two-compartment elimination. Radiolabel content of many other tissues, including known accumulation sites for intravenously administered toxin, was significantly (p < 0,05) increased (relative to 15 min post-exposure) in association with the early elimination of radiolabel from the lungs, but levels in these tissues were very low and did not increase after 4 h post-exposure. The only exception was our sample of trachea, which showed delayed elevations in radiolabel (peak at 24 h); this pattern was attributable to the contained thyroid (not removed at necropsy) and its trapping of free (125I released) upon tissue 125Iricin degradation. The overall data indicate that ricin administered by aerosol inhalation is delivered to both respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts; however, it is not extensively transported from either tract to other potential target sites. Ricin delivered to the lungs is primarily sequestered within the lungs until degradation. Only small amounts of ricin delivered to the gastrointestinal tract are absorbed into the circulation.

  20. Inner membrane fusion mediates spatial distribution of axonal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yiyi; Lee, Hao-Chih; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Suhan, Joseph; Qiu, Minhua; Ba, Qinle; Yang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria form a dynamic interconnected network to respond to changing needs at different subcellular locations. A fundamental yet unanswered question regarding this network is whether, and if so how, local fusion and fission of individual mitochondria affect their global distribution. To address this question, we developed high-resolution computational image analysis techniques to examine the relations between mitochondrial fusion/fission and spatial distribution within the axon of Drosophila larval neurons. We found that stationary and moving mitochondria underwent fusion and fission regularly but followed different spatial distribution patterns and exhibited different morphology. Disruption of inner membrane fusion by knockdown of dOpa1, Drosophila Optic Atrophy 1, not only increased the spatial density of stationary and moving mitochondria but also changed their spatial distributions and morphology differentially. Knockdown of dOpa1 also impaired axonal transport of mitochondria. But the changed spatial distributions of mitochondria resulted primarily from disruption of inner membrane fusion because knockdown of Milton, a mitochondrial kinesin-1 adapter, caused similar transport velocity impairment but different spatial distributions. Together, our data reveals that stationary mitochondria within the axon interconnect with moving mitochondria through fusion and fission and that local inner membrane fusion between individual mitochondria mediates their global distribution. PMID:26742817

  1. Inner membrane fusion mediates spatial distribution of axonal mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiyi; Lee, Hao-Chih; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Suhan, Joseph; Qiu, Minhua; Ba, Qinle; Yang, Ge

    2016-01-08

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria form a dynamic interconnected network to respond to changing needs at different subcellular locations. A fundamental yet unanswered question regarding this network is whether, and if so how, local fusion and fission of individual mitochondria affect their global distribution. To address this question, we developed high-resolution computational image analysis techniques to examine the relations between mitochondrial fusion/fission and spatial distribution within the axon of Drosophila larval neurons. We found that stationary and moving mitochondria underwent fusion and fission regularly but followed different spatial distribution patterns and exhibited different morphology. Disruption of inner membrane fusion by knockdown of dOpa1, Drosophila Optic Atrophy 1, not only increased the spatial density of stationary and moving mitochondria but also changed their spatial distributions and morphology differentially. Knockdown of dOpa1 also impaired axonal transport of mitochondria. But the changed spatial distributions of mitochondria resulted primarily from disruption of inner membrane fusion because knockdown of Milton, a mitochondrial kinesin-1 adapter, caused similar transport velocity impairment but different spatial distributions. Together, our data reveals that stationary mitochondria within the axon interconnect with moving mitochondria through fusion and fission and that local inner membrane fusion between individual mitochondria mediates their global distribution.

  2. Inner membrane fusion mediates spatial distribution of axonal mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yiyi; Lee, Hao-Chih; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Suhan, Joseph; Qiu, Minhua; Ba, Qinle; Yang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria form a dynamic interconnected network to respond to changing needs at different subcellular locations. A fundamental yet unanswered question regarding this network is whether, and if so how, local fusion and fission of individual mitochondria affect their global distribution. To address this question, we developed high-resolution computational image analysis techniques to examine the relations between mitochondrial fusion/fission and spatial distribution within the axon of Drosophila larval neurons. We found that stationary and moving mitochondria underwent fusion and fission regularly but followed different spatial distribution patterns and exhibited different morphology. Disruption of inner membrane fusion by knockdown of dOpa1, Drosophila Optic Atrophy 1, not only increased the spatial density of stationary and moving mitochondria but also changed their spatial distributions and morphology differentially. Knockdown of dOpa1 also impaired axonal transport of mitochondria. But the changed spatial distributions of mitochondria resulted primarily from disruption of inner membrane fusion because knockdown of Milton, a mitochondrial kinesin-1 adapter, caused similar transport velocity impairment but different spatial distributions. Together, our data reveals that stationary mitochondria within the axon interconnect with moving mitochondria through fusion and fission and that local inner membrane fusion between individual mitochondria mediates their global distribution.

  3. Aerosol Size Distribution in a City Influenced by Both Rural and Urban Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, R. M.; Polanco, J.; Lozano, A.

    2006-12-01

    Most atmospheric studies have focused on sites located in either rural or urban areas. However, there are regions affected by air from both, such as the city of El Paso. Adjacent to the neighboring city of Juarez, Mexico, and in close proximity to rural areas, it is affected by desert particles and both biogenic, anthropogenic emissions. Aerosol properties largely depend upon particle size and this makes it the most important parameter for characterizing the aerosol. We focus on studies using inverse reconstruction models for particle size distribution using aerosol optical depth data. Our methodology uses Twomey's regularization technique that suppresses ill-posedness by imposing smoothing and non-negativity constraints on the desired size distributions. We have also applied T-matrix codes to study the scattering from irregularly shaped particles that exhibit rotational symmetry. Furthermore, our studies include analysis of aerosol size distributions using optic probes and soot photometers, sampled from aircraft at different heights. This work will lead to better characterization of aerosols and their impact in our rural-urban interface region. In addition, it will provide a more accurate assessment of regional transport and better boundary conditions for air quality models.

  4. An effective inversion algorithm for retrieving bimodal aerosol particle size distribution from spectral extinction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Yao, Yuchen; Ruan, Liming

    2014-12-01

    The Ant Colony Optimization algorithm based on the probability density function (PDF-ACO) is applied to estimate the bimodal aerosol particle size distribution (PSD). The direct problem is solved by the modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA, as an approximation for optically large and soft spheres, i.e., χ≫1 and |m-1|≪1) and the Beer-Lambert law. First, a popular bimodal aerosol PSD and three other bimodal PSDs are retrieved in the dependent model by the multi-wavelength extinction technique. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm can be used as an effective technique to investigate the bimodal PSD. Then, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution function to retrieve the bimodal PSDs under the independent model. Finally, the J-SB and M-β functions are applied to recover actual measurement aerosol PSDs over Beijing and Shanghai obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that these two general functions, especially the J-SB function, can be used as a versatile distribution function to retrieve the bimodal aerosol PSD when no priori information about the PSD is available.

  5. Aerosol characterization over the southeastern United States using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: spatial and seasonal variation of aerosol composition and sources with a focus on organic nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Ng, N. L.

    2015-07-01

    on the HR-ToF-AMS measurements, we estimate that the nitrate functionality from organic nitrates contributes 63-100 % to the total measured nitrates in summer. Furthermore, the contribution of organic nitrates to total OA is estimated to be 5-12 % in summer, suggesting that organic nitrates are important components in the ambient aerosol in the southeastern USA. The spatial distribution of OA is investigated by comparing simultaneous HR-ToF-AMS measurements with ACSM measurements at two different sampling sites. OA is found to be spatially homogeneous in summer due possibly to stagnant air mass and a dominant amount of regional secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the southeastern USA. The homogeneity is less in winter, which is likely due to spatial variation of primary emissions. We observe that the seasonality of OA concentration shows a clear urban/rural contrast. While OA exhibits weak seasonal variation in the urban sites, its concentration is higher in summer than winter for rural sites. This observation from our year-long measurements is consistent with 14 years of organic carbon (OC) data from the SouthEastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network. The comparison between short-term measurements with advanced instruments and long-term measurements of basic air quality indicators not only tests the robustness of the short-term measurements but also provides insights in interpreting long-term measurements. We find that OA factors resolved from PMF analysis on HR-ToF-AMS measurements have distinctly different diurnal variations. The compensation of OA factors with different diurnal trends is one possible reason for the repeatedly observed, relatively flat OA diurnal profile in the southeastern USA. In addition, analysis of long-term measurements shows that the correlation between OC and sulfate is substantially stronger in summer than winter. This seasonality could be partly due to the effects of sulfate on isoprene SOA formation as revealed by

  6. Evaluation of the representativeness of ground-based visibility for analysing the spatial and temporal variability of aerosol optical thickness in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao Yang; Wong, Man Sing; Lee, Kwon Ho

    2016-12-01

    Although visibility is a widely-used indicator to quantify the aerosol loadings, only a few studies have been analyzed the representativeness of visibility in deriving Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT). In this paper, ground-based visibility, MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) monthly AOT products between July 2002 and December 2014 were analyzed in order to extract the dominant modes of variability using the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method. The method has significant merit to reduce data dimension and examine both spatial and temporal variability simultaneously. Results indicated that the satellite retrieved AOTs agreed well with ground-based visibility in terms of inter-annual variability. The correlation coefficients in the first deseasonalized mode are greater than 0.65 between visibility and satellite AOT products. However, large differences were observed in the seasonal variability between ground-based visibility and AOT. In addition, Aerosol vertical distribution from LIdar climatology of Vertical Aerosol Structure for space-based lidar simulation studies (LIVAS) and cloud data from ground-based meteorological station were used to investigate the seasonal variability disagreement. The AOT values derived from LIVAS extinction coefficients between 0 and 500 m above surface have a stronger relationship with visibility, than total column AOT with visibility. It also indicates that seasonal variation of aerosol vertical distribution is the main cause of the disagreement between two parameters, and the uncertainties of satellite products also contribute to the disagreement. Results in this study highlighted that the visibility observation could only be used to depict the inter-annual AOT and more ancillary information could be used for studying seasonal AOT variation.

  7. Spatial distribution of dust's optical properties over the Sahara and Asia inferred from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Haywood, J. M.; Johnson, B. T.; Murakami, H.; Nakajima, T.

    2012-12-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty surrounding the role of mineral dust aerosols in the earth's climate system. One reason for this uncertainty is that the optical properties of mineral dust, such as its single scattering albedo (the ratio of scattering to total extinction), are poorly understood because ground observations are limited to several locations and the satellite standard products are not available due to the excessively bright surface of the desert in the visible wavelength. We develop a method in this paper to estimate the spatial distributions of the aerosol single scattering albedo (ω0) and optical depth (τa), with daily 1 degree latitude and 1 degree longitude resolution, using data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), as well as model simulations of radiative transfer. This approach is based on the "critical surface reflectance" method developed in the literature, which estimates ω0 from the top of the atmospheric radiance. We confirm that the uncertainties in our estimation of ω0 and τa are suitably minor and that the characteristic spatial distributions estimated over the Sahara and Asia are significant. The results for the Sahara indicate good correlation between ω0 and the surface reflectance and between ω0 and τa. Therefore, ω0 is determined mainly by the mineral composition of surface dust and/or the optical depth of airborne dust in the Sahara. On the other hand, the relationships between ω0, τa, and the surface reflectance are less clear in Asia than in the Sahara, and the values of ω0 are smaller than those in the Sahara. The regions with small ω0 values are consistent with the regions where coal-burning smoke and carbonaceous aerosols are thought to be transported, as reported in previous studies. Because the coal-burning and carbonaceous aerosols are known to be more absorptive and have smaller ω0 values than dust aerosols, our results indicate that the dust aerosols in Asia are contaminated by

  8. Spatial Distribution of Small Water Body Types across Indiana Ecoregions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their large numbers and biogeochemical activity, small water bodies (SWB), such as ponds and wetlands, can have substantial cumulative effects on hydrologic, biogeochemical, and biological processes; yet the spatial distributions of various SWB types are often unknown. Usi...

  9. Spatial Distribution of Small Water Body Types in Indiana Ecoregions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their large numbers and biogeochemical activity, small water bodies (SWBs), such as ponds and wetlands, can have substantial cumulative effects on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. Using updated National Wetland Inventory data, we describe the spatial distribution o...

  10. The Spatial Distribution of Attention within and across Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingworth, Andrew; Maxcey-Richard, Ashleigh M.; Vecera, Shaun P.

    2012-01-01

    Attention operates to select both spatial locations and perceptual objects. However, the specific mechanism by which attention is oriented to objects is not well understood. We examined the means by which object structure constrains the distribution of spatial attention (i.e., a "grouped array"). Using a modified version of the Egly et…

  11. Effect of Energetic Ion on Spatial Distribution of Recombining Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, A.; Daibo, A.; Kitajima, S.; Kumagai, T.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tsubota, S.

    Spatial distribution of electron density is considered. By using a one-dimensional recombining plasma model, effects of transient energetic ion flux are investigated. The time response of the system against the transient flux is dominated by the recombination frequency. The magnitude of modification of the spatial distribution is determined by the ratio between the ionization due to the energetic ion and the recombination of the bulk plasma.

  12. An Investigation of Aerosol Measurements from the Halogen Occultation Experiment: Validation, Size Distributions, Composition, and Relation to Other Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, Terry; Hervig, Mark E.

    1998-01-01

    The efforts envisioned within the original proposal (accepted February 1994) and the extension of this proposal (accepted February 1997) included measurement validations, the retrieval of aerosol size distributions and distribution moments, aerosol correction studies, and investigations of polar stratospheric clouds. A majority of the results from this grant have been published. The principal results from this grant are discussed.

  13. Reconstructing Spatial Distributions from Anonymized Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Horey, James L; Forrest, Stephanie; Groat, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and sensors are often equipped with GPS that accurately report a person's location. Combined with wireless communication, these devices enable a wide range of new social tools and applications. These same qualities, however, leave location-aware applications vulnerable to privacy violations. This paper introduces the Negative Quad Tree, a privacy protection method for location aware applications. The method is broadly applicable to applications that use spatial density information, such as social applications that measure the popularity of social venues. The method employs a simple anonymization algorithm running on mobile devices, and a more complex reconstruction algorithm on a central server. This strategy is well suited to low-powered mobile devices. The paper analyzes the accuracy of the reconstruction method in a variety of simulated and real-world settings and demonstrates that the method is accurate enough to be used in many real-world scenarios.

  14. Spatial distribution of Dermacentor reticulatus in Romania.

    PubMed

    Chitimia-Dobler, Lidia

    2015-11-30

    Dermacentor reticulatus (Fabricius, 1794), also known as the marsh tick or ornate dog tick is the second most significant vector (next to Ixodes ricinus) of protozoan, rickettsial and viral pathogens in Europe. Until now, only limited information on the distribution of D. reticulatus in Romania is available. A study was conducted on the distribution of D. reticulatus in Romania during 2012-2014. In this study, D. reticulatus was detected in 17 counties, in 14 of which the species was recorded for the first time. Tick activity was evident throughout the year, except during July and August. Additionally, D. reticulatus was recorded for the first time in Romania from wild boar, foxes and humans. These data suggest that this tick species has a broader geographic range and may have more veterinary and medical importance than previously known.

  15. Spatial and Temporal Variations of EC and OC Aerosol Combustion Sources in a Polluted Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Fahrni, S.; Santos, G.; Bush, S. E.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of carbonaceous aerosols are a major component of fine air particulate matter (PM2.5) in polluted metropolitan areas and in the global atmosphere. Elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC) aerosols influence Earth's energy balance by means of direct and indirect pathways and EC has been suggested as a better indicator of public health impacts from combustion-related sources than PM mass. Quantifying the contribution of fossil fuel and biomass combustion to the EC and OC emissions and their temporal and spatial variations is critical for developing efficient legislative air pollution control measures and successful climate mitigation strategies. In this study, we used radiocarbon (14C) to separate and quantify fossil and biomass contributions to a time series of EC and OC collected at 3 locations in Salt Lake City (SLC). Aerosol samples were collected on quartz fiber filters and a modified OC/EC analyzer was used with the Swiss_4S protocol to isolate and trap the EC fraction. Together with the total carbon (TC) content of the samples, the EC was analyzed for its 14C content with accelerator mass spectrometry. The 14C of OC was derived as a mass balance difference between TC and EC. EC had an annual average fraction modern of 0.13±0.06 and did not vary significantly across seasons. OC had an annual average FM of 0.49±0.13, with the winter mean (0.43±0.11) lower than the summer mean (0.64±0.13) at the 5% significance level. While the 3 stations were chosen to represent a variety of environmental conditions within SLC, no major differences in this source partitioning were observed between stations. During winter, the major sources of air pollutants in SLC are motor vehicles and wood stove combustion and determining their relative contributions has been the subject of debate. Our results indicated that fossil fuels were the dominant source of carbonaceous aerosols during winter, contributing 87% or more of the total EC mass and 40-75% of the OC

  16. Spatial distribution of the source-receptor relationship of sulfur in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, M.; Ueda, H.; Sato, K.; Sakurai, T.

    2011-07-01

    The spatial distribution of the source-receptor relationship (SRR) of sulfur over Northeast Asia was examined using a chemical transport model (RAQM) off-line coupled with a meteorological model (MM5). The simulation was conducted for the entire year of 2002. The results were evaluated using monitoring data for six remote stations of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). The modeled SO2 and O3 concentrations agreed well with the observations quantitatively. The modeled aerosol and wet deposition fluxes of SO42- were underestimated by 30 % and 50 %, respectively. The domain was divided into 5 source-receptor regions: (I) North China; (II) Central China; (III) South China; (IV) South Korea; and (V) Japan. The sulfur deposition in each receptor region amounted to about 50-75 % of the emissions from the same region. The largest contribution to the deposition in each region was originated from the same region, accounting for 53-84 %. The second largest contribution was due to Region II, supplying 14-43 %. The spatial distributions of the SRRs revealed that subregional values varied by about two times more than regional averages due to nonuniformity across the deposition fields. Examining the spatial distributions of the deposition fields was important for identifying subregional areas where the deposition was highest within a receptor region. The horizontal distribution changed substantially according to season.

  17. Spatial distribution of the source-receptor relationship of sulfur in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, M.; Ueda, H.; Sato, K.; Sakurai, T.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the source-receptor relationship (SRR) of sulfur over Northeast Asia was examined using an off-line coupled meteorological/chemical transport model (MM5/RAQM). The simulation was conducted for the entire year of 2002. The results were evaluated using monitoring data for six remote stations of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). The modeled SO2 and O3 concentrations agreed well with the observations quantitatively. The modeled aerosol and wet deposition fluxes of SO42- were underestimated by 30% and 50%, respectively, whereas the modeled precipitation was overestimated by 1.6 to 1.9 times. The domain was divided into 5 source-receptor regions: I, North China; II, Central China; III, South China; IV, South Korea; and V, Japan. The sulfur deposition in each receptor region amounted to about 50-75% of the emissions from the same region. The largest contribution to the deposition in each region was the domestic origin, accounting for 53-84%. The second largest contribution after the domestic origin was due to region II, supplying 14-43%, outside region II itself. The spatial distributions of the SRRs revealed that subregional values varied by about two times more than regional averages due to nonuniformity across the deposition fields. Examining the spatial distributions of the deposition fields was important for identifying subregional areas where the deposition was highest within a receptor region. The horizontal distribution changed substantially according to season.

  18. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF MOBILE SOURCE AIR TOXICS IN THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from the first two years of the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) were evaluated to determine spatial and temporal characteristics in concentrations of mobile source air toxics (MSATs). Outdoor concentrations of MSATs were significantly higher in samples co...

  19. EMAC model evaluation and analysis of atmospheric aerosol properties and distribution with a focus on the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meij, A.; Pozzer, A.; Pringle, K. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-10-01

    The skill of the EMAC atmospheric chemistry-climate model to predict the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is evaluated by comparing with remote sensing data products from AERONET, MODIS, MISR and CALIOP with a focus on the Mediterranean region. In addition, calculated aerosol concentrations are compared with measurements from the CASTNET, IMPROVE, EMEP, EANET and CAWNET networks. Calculated sulphate concentrations are in good agreement with the measurements, whilst the agreement is less satisfactory for ammonium and nitrate, possibly because of measurement artefacts. The model reproduces the main spatial atmospheric distribution of the sulphate and ammonium aerosols. For nitrate some differences are found when compared to observations. The analysis of black and organic carbon (BC and OC) over Europe shows that the model typically overestimates observed BC concentrations by a factor of 1.6 and underestimates OC by a factor of 2.6. For the USA BC and OC are in general overestimated and for China BC and OC are in general underestimated by the model. The seasonal distribution of elevated AODs is well represented by the model when compared to MODIS and MISR, though AODs are somewhat low-biased. Calculated annual mean AODs are in general lower than of AERONET and the temporal correlation coefficients vary between 0.11 and 0.68. High temporal correlation coefficients are found for biomass burning regions (South America and West Africa), indicating that the seasonal cycle of this source category is well represented in the model, based on the GFED inventory. High temporal correlation coefficients are obtained for the Mediterranean region during summer, which indicates that the model captures the dust intrusions. Our model calculations show that inorganic particles and associated water are the most abundant aerosol components over Europe, North America and Asia, whilst over the Mediterranean during summer dust dominates the total AOD. An analysis of the meridional vertical

  20. On numerical simulation of the global distribution of sulfate aerosol produced by a large volcanic eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Pudykiewicz, J.A.; Dastoor, A.P.

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic eruptions play an important role in the global sulfur cycle of the Earth`s atmosphere and can significantly perturb the global atmospheric chemistry. The large amount of sulfate aerosol produced by the oxidation of SO{sub 2} injected into the atmosphere during volcanic eruptions also has a relatively big influence on the radiative equilibrium of the Earth`s climatic system. The submicron particles of the sulfate aerosol reflect solar radiation more effectively than they trap radiation in the infrared range. The effect of this is observed as cooling of the Earth`s surface. The modification of the global radiation budget following volcanic eruption can subsequently cause significant fluctuations of atmospheric variables on a subclimatic scale. The resulting perturbation of weather patterns has been observed and well documented since the eruptions of Mt. Krakatau and Mt. Tambora. The impact of the sulfate aerosol from volcanic eruptions on the radiative equilibrium of the Earth`s atmosphere was also confirmed by the studies done with Global Circulation Models designed to simulate climate. The objective of the present paper is to present a simple and effective method to estimate the global distribution of the sulfate aerosol produced as a consequence of volcanic eruptions. In this study we will present results of the simulation of global distribution of sulfate aerosol from the eruption of Mt Pinatubo.

  1. Aerosol distributions and radiative forcing over the Asian Pacific region simulated by Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Toshihiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Higurashi, Akiko; Ohta, Sachio; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2003-12-01

    A three-dimensional aerosol transport-radiation model coupled with a general circulation model, Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS), simulates atmospheric aerosol distributions and optical properties. The simulated results are compared with aerosol sampling and optical observations from ground, aircraft, and satellite acquired by intensive observation campaigns over east Asia in spring 2001. Temporal variations of the aerosol concentrations, optical thickness, and Ångström exponent are in good agreement between the simulation and observations. The midrange values of the Ångström exponent, even at the Asian dust storm events over the outflow regions, suggest that the contribution of the anthropogenic aerosol, such as carbonaceous and sulfate, to the total optical thickness is of an order comparable to that of the Asian dust. The radiative forcing by the aerosol direct and indirect effects is also calculated. The negative direct radiative forcing is simulated to be over -10 W m-2 at the tropopause in the air mass during the large-scale dust storm, to which both anthropogenic aerosols and Asian dust contribute almost equivalently. The direct radiative forcing, however, largely depends on the cloud water content and the vertical profiles of aerosol and cloud. The simulation shows that not only sulfate and sea salt aerosols but also black carbon and soil dust aerosols, which absorb solar and thermal radiation, make strong negative radiative forcing by the direct effect at the surface, which may exceed the positive forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases over the east Asian region.

  2. Particle size distribution of ambient aerosols in an industrial area.

    PubMed

    Rao, B Padma; Srivastava, A; Yasmin, F; Ray, S; Gupta, N; Chauhan, C; Rao, C V C; Wate, S R

    2012-05-01

    Aerosol samples of PM(10) and PM(2.5) were collected from 38 sampling locations in and around the industrial area. The 24 h average mass concentration of PM(10) and PM(2.5) was 137.5 and 61.5 μg/m(3) respectively during summer, 122 and 97.5 μg/m(3) respectively in winter and 70 and 54 μg/m(3) respectively during post monsoon season. The relative contribution of coarse, fine and ultrafine particle to ambient air was analyzed for its temporal and seasonal variability in an industrialized area. This paper aims to establish baseline between PM(10) and PM(2.5) mass concentration levels.

  3. In Situ Aerosol-Size Distributions and Clear-Column Radiative Closure During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Oestroem, E.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) during June and July of 1997, aerosol-size distributions were measured on board the CIRPAS Pelican aircraft through the use of a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) and 2 Optical Particle Counters (OPCs). During the campaign, the boundary-layer aerosol typically possessed characteristics representative of a background marine aerosol or a continentally influenced aerosol, while the free-tropospheric aerosol was characterized by the presence or absence of a Saharan dust layer. A range of radiative closure comparisons were made using the data obtained during vertical profiles flown on 4 missions. Of particular interest here are the comparisons made between the optical properties as determined through the use of measured aerosol-size distributions and those measured directly by an airborne 14-wavelength sunphotometer and 3 nephelometers. Variations in the relative humidity associated with each of the direct measurements required consideration of the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol for size-distribution-based calculations. Simultaneous comparison with such a wide range of directly-measured optical parameters not only offers evidence of the validity of the physicochemical description of the aerosol when closure is achieved, but also provides insight into potential sources of error when some or all of the comparisons result in disagreement. Agreement between the derived and directly-measured optical properties varied for different measurements and for different cases. Averaged over the 4 case studies, the derived extinction coefficient at 525 nm exceeded that measured by the sunphotometer by 2.5% in the clean boundary layer, but underestimated measurements by 13% during pollution events. For measurements within the free troposphere, the mean derived extinction coefficient was 3.3% and 17% less than that measured by the sunphotometer during dusty and non-dusty conditions, respectively. Likewise

  4. In Situ Aerosol Size Distributions and Clear Column Radiative Closure During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D. R.; Johnson, H. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Oestroem, E.; Noone, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Putaud, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) during June and July of 1997, aerosol size distributions were measured on board the CIRPAS Pelican aircraft through the use of a DMA and two OPCS. During the campaign, the boundary layer aerosol typically possessed characteristics representative of a background marine aerosol or a continentally influenced aerosol, while the free tropospheric aerosol was characterized by the presence or absence of a Saharan dust layer. A range of radiative closure comparisons were made using the data obtained during vertical profiles flown on four missions. Of particular interest here are the comparisons made between the optical properties as determined through the use of measured aerosol size distributions and those measured directly by an airborne 14-wavelength sunphotometer and three nephelometers. Variations in the relative humidity associated with each of the direct measurements required consideration of the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol for size distribution based calculations. Simultaneous comparison with such a wide range of directly measured optical parameters not only offers evidence of the validity of the physicochemical description of the aerosol when closure is achieved, but also provides insight into potential sources of error when some or all of the comparisons result in disagreement. Agreement between the derived and directly measured optical properties varied for different measurements and for different cases. Averaged over the four case studies, the derived extinction coefficient at 525 nm exceeded that measured by the sunphotomoter by 2.5% in the clean boundary later, but underestimated measurements by 13% during pollution events. For measurements within the free troposphere, the mean derived extinction coefficient was 3.3% and 17% less than that measured by the sunphotometer during dusty and nondusty conditions, respectively. Likewise, averaged discrepancies between the derived and measured

  5. Spatial distribution visualization of PWM continuous variable-rate spray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical application is a dynamic spatial distribution process, during which spray liquid covers the targets with certain thickness and uniformity. Therefore, it is important to study the 2-D and 3-D (dimensional) spray distribution to evaluate spraying quality. The curve-surface generation methods ...

  6. Guaranteed spatial initialization of distributed spacecraft formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel P.; Ploen, Scott R.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Sohl, Garett A.

    2004-01-01

    In a precious paper the authors developed a formation initialization (FI) algorithm for a deep space, N-spacecraft formation. It was demonstrated analytically that this FI contribution of this paper is to extend this planar guarantee to deep space formations with arbitrary initial conditions. As part of the guarantee of initialization, a bound on the time-to-initialize is obtained. The guaranteed FI algorithm is then demonstrated for a two-spacecraft formation with realistic deep space mission constraints (e.g. limited field-of-view relative sensors and attitude constraints). The two-spacecraft scenario is challenging in that it has the least relative sensor field-of-view overlap. Finally, for this scenario, the distribution of time-to-initialize is characterized through a 150,000-case Monte Carlo analysis.

  7. On the Feasibility of Studying Shortwave Aerosol Radiative Forcing of Climate Using Dual-Wavelength Aerosol Backscatter Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Winker, David M.; McCormick, M. Patrick; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The current low confidence in the estimates of aerosol-induced perturbations of Earth's radiation balance is caused by the highly non-uniform compositional, spatial and temporal distributions of tropospheric aerosols on a global scale owing to their heterogeneous sources and short lifetimes. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that the inclusion of aerosol effects in climate model calculations can improve agreement with observed spatial and temporal temperature distributions. In light of the short lifetimes of aerosols, determination of their global distribution with space-borne sensors seems to be a necessary approach. Until recently, satellite measurements of tropospheric aerosols have been approximate and did not provide the full set of information required to determine their radiative effects. With the advent of active aerosol remote sensing from space (e.g., PICASSO-CENA), the applicability fo lidar-derived aerosol 180 deg -backscatter data to radiative flux calculations and hence studies of aerosol effects on climate needs to be investigated.

  8. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  9. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  10. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  11. Comparison of Summer and Winter California Central Valley Aerosol Distributions from Lidar and MODIS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Chu, D. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol distributions from two aircraft lidar campaigns conducted in the California Central Valley are compared in order to identify seasonal variations. Aircraft lidar flights were conducted in June 2003 and February 2008. While the PM2.5 concentration is highest in the winter, the aerosol optical depth measured from MODIS is highest in the summer. A seasonal comparison shows that PM2.5 in the winter can exceed summer PM2.5 by 55%, while summer AOD exceeds winter AOD by 43%. Higher temperatures wildfires in the summer produce elevated aerosol layers that are detected by satellite measurements, but not surface particulate matter monitors. Measurements of the boundary layer height from lidar instruments are necessary to incorporate satellite measurements with air quality measurements.

  12. Aerosol formation and distribution in the Arctic during AGASP-II, March-April 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnell, Russell C.; Kahl, Jonathan D.; Herbert, Gary A.; Bodhaine, B. A.; Bridgman, Howard A.

    1988-01-01

    The Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program has undertaken the determination of the distribution, transport, chemistry, aerosol physics, and radiative effects of the 'Arctic haze' air-pollution phenomenon. Attention has been given the April 2-3, 1986 haze zone, with large condensation nuclei, SO2, and soot-carbon concentrations, which appeared near the Barrow Baseline Station. The composite trajectory of the haze zone has been determined, as has its probable source region. After travelling 10,000 km, the haze still had SO2, aerosol black carbon, and condensation nuclei concentrations in excess of those measured off the East Coast of the U.S. in January of the same year.

  13. [Microorganisms distribution in the aerosol of a manned sealed cabin and the effect of artificial air ionization on this process].

    PubMed

    Zaloguev, S N; Anisimov, B V; Viktorov, A N; Gorshkov, V P

    1981-01-01

    In a manned enclosure the distribution of bacterial aerosol with respect to the size of particles is bimodal. Artificial bipolar ionization of the air may decrease the content of relatively large particles of bacterial aerosol, leaving particles with 2.0-0.6/micrometer in diameter in predominance. These properties of the bacterial aerosol structure may be of importance in the prophylaxis of aerogenic infections of cosmonauts.

  14. Development of Spatial Distribution Patterns by Biofilm Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haagensen, Janus A. J.; Hansen, Susse K.; Christensen, Bjarke B.; Molin, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Confined spatial patterns of microbial distribution are prevalent in nature, such as in microbial mats, soil communities, and water stream biofilms. The symbiotic two-species consortium of Pseudomonas putida and Acinetobacter sp. strain C6, originally isolated from a creosote-polluted aquifer, has evolved a distinct spatial organization in the laboratory that is characterized by an increased fitness and productivity. In this consortium, P. putida is reliant on microcolonies formed by Acinetobacter sp. C6, to which it attaches. Here we describe the processes that lead to the microcolony pattern by Acinetobacter sp. C6. Ecological spatial pattern analyses revealed that the microcolonies were not entirely randomly distributed and instead were arranged in a uniform pattern. Detailed time-lapse confocal microscopy at the single-cell level demonstrated that the spatial pattern was the result of an intriguing self-organization: small multicellular clusters moved along the surface to fuse with one another to form microcolonies. This active distribution capability was dependent on environmental factors (carbon source and oxygen) and historical contingency (formation of phenotypic variants). The findings of this study are discussed in the context of species distribution patterns observed in macroecology, and we summarize observations about the processes involved in coadaptation between P. putida and Acinetobacter sp. C6. Our results contribute to an understanding of spatial species distribution patterns as they are observed in nature, as well as the ecology of engineered communities that have the potential for enhanced and sustainable bioprocessing capacity. PMID:26116674

  15. Vertical Distribution of Dust and Water Ice Aerosols from CRISM Limb-geometry Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael Doyle; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, Todd; Kleinbohl, Armin; Murchie, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb enables the vertical distribution of both dust and water ice aerosols to be retrieved. More than a dozen sets of CRISM limb observations have been taken so far providing pole-to-pole cross sections, spanning more than a full Martian year. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the spherical geometry of the limb observations. Both dust and water ice vertical profiles often show a significant vertical structure for nearly all seasons and latitudes that is not consistent with the well-mixed or Conrath-v assumptions that have often been used in the past for describing aerosol vertical profiles for retrieval and modeling purposes. Significant variations are seen in the retrieved vertical profiles of dust and water ice aerosol as a function of season. Dust typically extends to higher altitudes (approx. 40-50km) during the perihelion season than during the aphelion season (<20km), and the Hellas region consistently shows more dust mixed to higher altitudes than other locations. Detached water ice clouds are common, and water ice aerosols are observed to cap the dust layer in all seasons.

  16. Final Technical Report for Interagency Agreement No. DE-SC0005453 “Characterizing Aerosol Distributions, Types, and Optical and Microphysical Properties using the NASA Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP)”

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2015-01-13

    Measurements of the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols and aerosol optical and microphysical characteristics are required to: 1) determine aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, 2) compute radiative flux and heating rate profiles, 3) assess model simulations of aerosol distributions and types, and 4) establish the ability of surface and space-based remote sensors to measure the indirect effect. Consequently the ASR program calls for a combination of remote sensing and in situ measurements to determine aerosol properties and aerosol influences on clouds and radiation. As part of our previous DOE ASP project, we deployed the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 King Air aircraft during major field experiments in 2006 (MILAGRO and MaxTEX), 2007 (CHAPS), 2009 (RACORO), and 2010 (CalNex and CARES). The HSRL provided measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm). These measurements were typically made in close temporal and spatial coincidence with measurements made from DOE-funded and other participating aircraft and ground sites. On the RACORO, CARES, and CalNEX missions, we also deployed the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). RSP provided intensity and degree of linear polarization over a broad spectral and angular range enabling column-average retrievals of aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Under this project, we analyzed observations and model results from RACORO, CARES, and CalNex and accomplished the following objectives. 1. Identified aerosol types, characterize the vertical distribution of the aerosol types, and partition aerosol optical depth by type, for CARES and CalNex using HSRL data as we have done for previous missions. 2. Investigated aerosol microphysical and macrophysical properties using the RSP. 3. Used the aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles measured by the HSRL

  17. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  18. Aerosol Size Distributions Measured in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Formation, Coagulation, Transport and Sedimentation of the Background Non-Volcanic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Wilson, J. C.; Reeves, J. M.; Brock, C. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Lowenstein, M.; Mahoney, M. J.; Herman, R. L.; Anderson, J. G.; Xueref, I.; Gerbig, C.; Andrews, A. E.; Hinsta, E.

    2002-12-01

    This study presents the particle size distribution of non-volcanic aerosols in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere measured from 1995 to 2000 during five different high-altitude aircraft missions (STRAT, POLARIS, WAM, ACCENT, and SOLVE). The Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (FCAS), Condensation Nucleus Counter (CNC), and Nucleation-Mode Aerosol Sizing Spectrometer (N-MASS) were used to characterize the particle sizes in the diameter range from 4 to 2000 nm. Measurements were made at latitudes from 3.4S to 90N and the pressure altitudes form 7 to 21 km. These particle size distributions were analyzed using the potential temperature, tropopause height, and the mixing ratio of gas phase tracers such as N2O, CO2, NOy, O3 and water vapor. Particle formation, growth and sedimentation were studied to examine how the aerosol dynamics and atmospheric transport (Holton et al., 1995) determine the steady state aerosol size distribution in the lower stratosphere. This comprehensive data set will help us to better understand the origins and fate of the stratospheric background aerosols. Reference: Holton, J. R., et al., Stratosphere-troposphere exchange, Rev. Geophys., 33, 403-439, 1995.

  19. Similarities in the Spatial Pattern of the Surface Flux Response to Present-Day Greenhouse Gases and Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persad, G.; Ming, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that present-day greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols can produce remarkably similar patterns of climate response in fully coupled general circulation model (GCM) simulations, despite having significantly different spatial patterns of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) forcing. However, there is little understanding of the mechanisms of ocean-atmosphere interaction that could lead to the response pattern formation. Surface flux perturbations are a crucial pathway by which TOA forcing is communicated to the ocean, and may be a vital link in explaining the spatial similarities in the fully coupled responses to disparate TOA forcing patterns—a phenomenon with implications for detection and attribution, as well as the climate sensitivity to different forcers. We analyze the surface energy budget response to present-day aerosols versus GHGs in single forcing, fixed SST, atmospheric GCM experiments to identify mechanisms for response pattern formation via surface flux perturbations. We find that, although the TOA forcing spatial patterns of GHGs and aerosols are largely uncorrelated, their surface radiative and heat flux patterns are significantly anti-correlated. Furthermore, this anti-correlation is largely explained by similar (but sign-reversed) spatial patterns of surface latent and sensible heat flux response to the two forcers, particularly over the winter-hemisphere extratropical oceans. These are, in turn, driven by spatially similar perturbations in surface winds from changes in mean tropical and midlatitude circulation. These results suggest that the mean atmospheric circulation, which has many anti-symmetric responses to GHG and aerosol forcings, is an efficient homogenizer of spatial patterns in the surface heat flux response to heterogeneous TOA forcings, creating an atmosphere-only pathway for similarities in the fully coupled response.

  20. Size distribution, composition and origin of the submicron aerosol in the marine boundary layer during the eastern Mediterranean "SUB-AERO" experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, K.; Colbeck, I.; Housiadas, C.; Lazaridis, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Mitsakou, C.; Smolík, J.; Ždímal, V.

    A period of intensive physical and chemical aerosol characterisation measurements was held over 5 days during July 2000 as part of the European SUB-AERO experiment.. Concurrent measurements were performed at the Finokalia remote coastal site on the island of Crete (Greece) and onboard the R/V " Aegaeon" which cruised in south part of the Aegean Sea northwards of Crete. The objective of the study was to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of microphysical parameters of the submicron aerosol and their dependence on airmass origin and chemical composition. The results reflect the submicron aerosol properties during airmass transport from the north including Europe and the Balkans and are in line with other studies on the aerosol properties of polluted continental air entering the marine boundary layer (MBL). Concentrations of submicron particulate matter (PM) mass were relatively higher at sea (20 μg m -3) compared to the coastal site (16 μg m -3). Concentrations of both organic carbon and sulphate, being the major water soluble component, were also higher at sea than at land. The high concentrations of ammonium and those of the water soluble organics, such as oxalate, can be attributed to emissions from mainland forest fires. The submicron aerosol number size distribution was unimodal with mobility mean diameters ( dg) ranging from 98 to 144 μm and standard deviations ( σg) from 1.56 to 1.9. Aerosol number concentrations at Finokalia were at least 50% lower especially when R/V Aegaeon sampled polluted air, but the modal parameters of the size distribution were very similar ( dg: 111-120, σg: 1.55-1.91). The surface MBL, under these conditions, was an aerosol rich environment where aerosol particles were transported both by the surface wind, advected from higher layers, chemically processed by interactions with gaseous precursors and physically altered by water vapour. The number to volume ratio for the submicrometer aerosol fraction reflected the

  1. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  2. Characterizing Aerosol Distributions and Optical Properties Using the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2013-02-14

    The objective of this project was to provide vertically and horizontally resolved data on aerosol optical properties to assess and ultimately improve how models represent these aerosol properties and their impacts on atmospheric radiation. The approach was to deploy the NASA Langley Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and other synergistic remote sensors on DOE Atmospheric Science Research (ASR) sponsored airborne field campaigns and synergistic field campaigns sponsored by other agencies to remotely measure aerosol backscattering, extinction, and optical thickness profiles. Synergistic sensors included a nadir-viewing digital camera for context imagery, and, later in the project, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). The information from the remote sensing instruments was used to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of aerosol properties and type. The retrieved lidar parameters include profiles of aerosol extinction, backscatter, depolarization, and optical depth. Products produced in subsequent analyses included aerosol mixed layer height, aerosol type, and the partition of aerosol optical depth by type. The lidar products provided vertical context for in situ and remote sensing measurements from other airborne and ground-based platforms employed in the field campaigns and was used to assess the predictions of transport models. Also, the measurements provide a data base for future evaluation of techniques to combine active (lidar) and passive (polarimeter) measurements in advanced retrieval schemes to remotely characterize aerosol microphysical properties. The project was initiated as a 3-year project starting 1 January 2005. It was later awarded continuation funding for another 3 years (i.e., through 31 December 2010) followed by a 1-year no-cost extension (through 31 December 2011). This project supported logistical and flight costs of the NASA sensors on a dedicated aircraft, the subsequent

  3. Ship measurements of submicron aerosol size distributions over the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Hwan; Yum, Seong Soo; Lee, Young-Gon; Choi, Byoung-Cheol

    2009-08-01

    During the spring of 2005, the total particle concentrations and the submicron aerosol size distributions were measured on board the research vessel over the south sea of Korea and the Korean sector of the Yellow Sea. Similar measurements were made over the East China Sea in autumn 2005. The aerosol properties varied dynamically according to the meteorological conditions, the proximity to the land masses and the air mass back trajectories. The average total particle concentration was the lowest over the East China Sea, 4335 ± 2736 cm - 3, but the instantaneous minimum, 837 cm - 3, for the entire ship measurement was recorded during the Yellow Sea cruise. There was also a long (more than 6 h) stretch of low total particle concentrations that fell as low as 1025 cm - 3 during the East China Sea cruise when the ship was the farthest from the shores and the air mass back trajectories resided long hours over the sea. These observations lead to the suggestion of ~ 1000 cm - 3 as the background total particle concentration over the marine boundary layer in the studied region of the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea, implying significant anthropogenic influence even for the background value. In the mean time, average aerosol size distributions were unimodal and the mode diameter ranged between 52 and 86 nm, excluding the fog periods, which suggests that the aerosols measured in this study experienced relatively less aging processes within the marine boundary layer.

  4. Estimating and Modeling Gene Flow for a Spatially Distributed Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    AD-A238 221/I1 Estimating and modeling gene flow for a spatially distributed species JUL1 7 1961T. Burr 1 and T. V. Kurien 2 Department of Statistics...modeling gene flow for a spatially distributed species. By T. Burr and T. V. Kurien Departmeii Of Statistics Florida State University Abstract This...chromosome (referred to as a locus) is a meaningful string of several hundred symbols called a gene . Typ- ically there are many loci on a chromosome. The

  5. Effect of particle spatial distribution on particle deposition in ventilation rooms.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Wu, Jun

    2009-10-15

    We used simulations and experimental tests to investigate indoor particle deposition during four commonly used ventilation modes, including ceiling supply, side-up supply, side-down supply and bottom supply. We used a condensation monodisperse aerosol generator to generate fine diethylhexyl sebacate (DEHS) particles of different sizes along with two optical particle counters that measured particle concentration at the exhaust opening and inside a three-dimensional ventilated test room. We then simulated particle deposition using the same ventilation modes with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. Our simulated results indicate that mean deposition velocity/rate for particles 0.5-10 microm (aerodynamic diameter) is not affected by different ventilation modes. However, both our experimental and simulated results indicate that the deposition loss factor, a parameter defined based on mass balance principle to reflect the influence of particle distribution on deposited particle quantity, differ significantly by ventilation mode. This indicates that ventilation plays an important role in determining particle deposition due to the apparent differences in the spatial distribution of particles. The particle loss factor during ventilation modes characterized by upward air flow in the room is smaller than that of mixing ventilation; however this trend was strongly influenced by the relative location of the inlets, outlets and aerosol source.

  6. Spatial and temporal predictions of moose winter distribution.

    PubMed

    Månsson, J; Bunnefeld, N; Andrén, H; Ericsson, G

    2012-10-01

    Herbivores are usually distributed unevenly across the landscape often because of variation in resource availability. We used zero-inflated generalised additive models (to account for data with a high number of zeros) that include georeferences to predict winter distribution of a large herbivore (moose Alces alces). Moose distribution was analysed in relation to forage availability and distance to neighbouring sites. Our results showed that the ability to explain moose distribution indexed by pellet count data at a local scale increased when spatial information (longitude and latitude) was added to the model compared to the model only including food availability. By using the relationship between moose and forage distribution, and the spatial information, we predicted patch choice by moose reasonably well in 2 out of 4 years. However, the distribution of moose was also influenced by weather conditions, as it was most clumped in the year with most snow. In conclusion, our study lends support for a non-linear approach using georeferences for a comprehensive understanding of herbivore distribution at a small scale. This result also indicates that the use of a certain patch by moose not only depends on the selected patch itself but is also influenced by the neighbouring patch and factors at a larger spatial scale, such as moose management influencing the density above moose home range level. The relatively high proportion of unexplained variation suggests that the use of a certain patch is also influenced by other factors such as topography, predation, competition, weather conditions, and wildlife management strategies.

  7. Unleashing spatially distributed ecohydrology modeling using Big Data tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, B.; Idaszak, R.

    2015-12-01

    Physically based spatially distributed ecohydrology models are useful for answering science and management questions related to the hydrology and biogeochemistry of prairie, savanna, forested, as well as urbanized ecosystems. However, these models can produce hundreds of gigabytes of spatial output for a single model run over decadal time scales when run at regional spatial scales and moderate spatial resolutions (~100-km2+ at 30-m spatial resolution) or when run for small watersheds at high spatial resolutions (~1-km2 at 3-m spatial resolution). Numerical data formats such as HDF5 can store arbitrarily large datasets. However even in HPC environments, there are practical limits on the size of single files that can be stored and reliably backed up. Even when such large datasets can be stored, querying and analyzing these data can suffer from poor performance due to memory limitations and I/O bottlenecks, for example on single workstations where memory and bandwidth are limited, or in HPC environments where data are stored separately from computational nodes. The difficulty of storing and analyzing spatial data from ecohydrology models limits our ability to harness these powerful tools. Big Data tools such as distributed databases have the potential to surmount the data storage and analysis challenges inherent to large spatial datasets. Distributed databases solve these problems by storing data close to computational nodes while enabling horizontal scalability and fault tolerance. Here we present the architecture of and preliminary results from PatchDB, a distributed datastore for managing spatial output from the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys). The initial version of PatchDB uses message queueing to asynchronously write RHESSys model output to an Apache Cassandra cluster. Once stored in the cluster, these data can be efficiently queried to quickly produce both spatial visualizations for a particular variable (e.g. maps and animations), as well

  8. Retrieval of spatial field of atmospheric aerosol concentration according to data from local measurements: A modification of the method of back trajectory statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubny, V. A.; Nagovitsyna, E. S.

    2013-07-01

    The well-known method of the back trajectory statistics (BTS) is used to develop a new approach to estimating atmospheric pollution fields according to local measurements. On the basis of instrumental measurements at one or a few monitoring points and information on atmospheric dynamics (in this work, back trajectories of the motion of air particles), the BTS method makes it possible to estimate the spatial structure of fields of a measured quantity. Results from solving a simplified demonstration of estimating the spatial distribution of the volume concentration of a fine aerosol fraction are presented; these results were obtained on the basis of an analysis of photometric measurements in the period of 2004-2010 at six AERO-NET monitoring sites on the territory of Russia: Zvenigorod, Moscow, Yekaterinburg, Tomsk, Yakutsk, and Ussuriisk.

  9. Meridional Distribution of Aerosol Optical Thickness over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishcha, P.; Silva, Arlindo M.; Starobinets, B.; Long, C. N.; Kalashnikova, O.; Alpert, P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed that, over the global ocean, there is hemispheric asymmetry in aerosols and no noticeable asymmetry in cloud fraction (CF). In the current study, we focus on the tropical Atlantic (30 Deg N 30 Deg S) which is characterized by significant amounts of Saharan dust dominating other aerosol species over the North Atlantic. We found that, by contrast to the global ocean, over a limited area such as the tropical Atlantic, strong meridional asymmetry in dust aerosols was accompanied by meridional CF asymmetry. During the 10-year study period (July 2002 June 2012), NASA Aerosol Reanalysis (aka MERRAero) showed that, when the meridional asymmetry in dust aerosol optical thickness (AOT) was the most pronounced (particularly in July), dust AOT averaged separately over the tropical North Atlantic was one order of magnitude higher than dust AOT averaged over the tropical South Atlantic. In the presence of such strong meridional asymmetry in dust AOT in July, CF averaged separately over the tropical North Atlantic exceeded CF averaged over the tropical South Atlantic by 20%. Our study showed significant cloud cover, up to 0.8 - 0.9, in July along the Saharan Air Layer which contributed to above-mentioned meridional CF asymmetry. Both Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) measurements and MERRAero data were in agreement on seasonal variations in meridional aerosol asymmetry. Meridional asymmetry in total AOT over the Atlantic was the most pronounced between March and July, when dust presence over the North Atlantic was maximal. In September and October, there was no noticeable meridional asymmetry in total AOT and meridional CF distribution over the tropical Atlantic was almost symmetrical.

  10. Connecting the solubility and CCN activation of complex organic aerosols: a theoretical study using solubility distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riipinen, I.; Rastak, N.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    We present a theoretical study investigating the cloud activation of multicomponent organic particles. We modeled these complex mixtures using solubility distributions (analogous to volatility distributions in the VBS, i.e., volatility basis set, approach), describing the mixture as a set of surrogate compounds with varying water solubilities in a given range. We conducted Köhler theory calculations for 144 different mixtures with varying solubility range, number of components, assumption about the organic mixture thermodynamics and the shape of the solubility distribution, yielding approximately 6000 unique cloud condensation nucleus (CCN)-activation points. The results from these comprehensive calculations were compared to three simplifying assumptions about organic aerosol solubility: (1) complete dissolution at the point of activation; (2) combining the aerosol solubility with the molar mass and density into a single effective hygroscopicity parameter κ; and (3) assuming a fixed water-soluble fraction ϵeff. The complete dissolution was able to reproduce the activation points with a reasonable accuracy only when the majority (70-80%) of the material was dissolved at the point of activation. The single-parameter representations of complex mixture solubility were confirmed to be powerful semi-empirical tools for representing the CCN activation of organic aerosol, predicting the activation diameter within 10% in most of the studied supersaturations. Depending mostly on the condensed-phase interactions between the organic molecules, material with solubilities larger than about 0.1-100 g L-1 could be treated as soluble in the CCN activation process over atmospherically relevant particle dry diameters and supersaturations. Our results indicate that understanding the details of the solubility distribution in the range of 0.1-100 g L-1 is thus critical for capturing the CCN activation, while resolution outside this solubility range will probably not add

  11. Unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We use a statistical-mechanical identity closely related to the familiar virial theorem, to derive unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids. In particular, we obtain estimators for both the fluid density rho(r) in the vicinity of a fixed solute and the pair correlation g(r) of a homogeneous classical fluid. We illustrate the utility of our estimators with numerical examples, which reveal advantages over traditional histogram-based methods of computing such distributions.

  12. Global View of Aerosol Vertical Distributions from CALIPSO Lidar Measurements and GOCART Simulations: Regional and Seasonal Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Winker, David M.; Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Kittaka, Chieko; Diehl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This study examines seasonal variations of the vertical distribution of aerosols through a statistical analysis of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) lidar observations from June 2006 to November 2007. A data-screening scheme is developed to attain good quality data in cloud-free conditions, and the polarization measurement is used to separate dust from non-dust aerosol. The CALIPSO aerosol observations are compared with aerosol simulations from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) model and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The CALIPSO observations of geographical patterns and seasonal variations of AOD are generally consistent with GOCART simulations and MODIS retrievals especially near source regions, while the magnitude of AOD shows large discrepancies in most regions. Both the CALIPSO observation and GOCART model show that the aerosol extinction scale heights in major dust and smoke source regions are generally higher than that in industrial pollution source regions. The CALIPSO aerosol lidar ratio also generally agrees with GOCART model within 30% on regional scales. Major differences between satellite observations and GOCART model are identified, including (1) an underestimate of aerosol extinction by GOCART over the Indian sub-continent, (2) much larger aerosol extinction calculated by GOCART than observed by CALIPSO in dust source regions, (3) much weaker in magnitude and more concentrated aerosol in the lower atmosphere in CALIPSO observation than GOCART model over transported areas in midlatitudes, and (4) consistently lower aerosol scale height by CALIPSO observation than GOCART model. Possible factors contributing to these differences are discussed.

  13. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant Chandrakar, Kamal; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-12-01

    The influence of aerosol concentration on the cloud-droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud-droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased, the cloud-droplet mean diameter decreases, as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc<τtτc<τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc>τtτc>τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τcτc is the phase-relaxation time and τtτt is the turbulence-correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs1=τc1+τt

  14. Validating a spatially distributed hydrological model with soil morphology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doppler, T.; Honti, M.; Zihlmann, U.; Weisskopf, P.; Stamm, C.

    2013-10-01

    Spatially distributed hydrological models are popular tools in hydrology and they are claimed to be useful to support management decisions. Despite the high spatial resolution of the computed variables, calibration and validation is often carried out only on discharge time-series at specific locations due to the lack of spatially distributed reference data. Because of this restriction, the predictive power of these models, with regard to predicted spatial patterns, can usually not be judged. An example of spatial predictions in hydrology is the prediction of saturated areas in agricultural catchments. These areas can be important source areas for the transport of agrochemicals to the stream. We set up a spatially distributed model to predict saturated areas in a 1.2 km2 catchment in Switzerland with moderate topography. Around 40% of the catchment area are artificially drained. We measured weather data, discharge and groundwater levels in 11 piezometers for 1.5 yr. For broadening the spatially distributed data sets that can be used for model calibration and validation, we translated soil morphological data available from soil maps into an estimate of the duration of soil saturation in the soil horizons. We used redox-morphology signs for these estimates. This resulted in a data set with high spatial coverage on which the model predictions were validated. In general, these saturation estimates corresponded well to the measured groundwater levels. We worked with a model that would be applicable for management decisions because of its fast calculation speed and rather low data requirements. We simultaneously calibrated the model to the groundwater levels in the piezometers and discharge. The model was able to reproduce the general hydrological behavior of the catchment in terms of discharge and absolute groundwater levels. However, the accuracy of the groundwater level predictions was not high enough to be used for the prediction of saturated areas. The groundwater

  15. Mechanical Motion Induced by Spatially Distributed Limit-Cycle Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Mukae, Yuuki

    2017-03-01

    Spatially distributed limited-cycle oscillators are seen in various physical and biological systems. In internal organs, mechanical motions are induced by the stimuli of spatially distributed limit-cycle oscillators. We study several mechanical motions by limit-cycle oscillators using simple model equations. One problem is deformation waves of radius oscillation induced by desynchronized limit-cycle oscillators, which is motivated by peristaltic motion of the small intestine. A resonance-like phenomenon is found in the deformation waves, and particles can be transported by the deformation waves. Another is the beating motion of the heart. The expansion and contraction motion is realized by a spatially synchronized limit-cycle oscillation; however, the strong beating disappears by spiral chaos, which is closely related to serious arrhythmia in the heart.

  16. [Comparative studies of particle distribution range of aerosol cromolyn sodium generated by MDI systems].

    PubMed

    Gradoń, L; Sosnowski, T R

    1999-05-01

    Particles size distribution of the sodium cromoglycate preparations: CROPOZ PLUS and CROMOGEN EB generated with MDI and for under-pressure releasing methods were measured. Results of measurements indicate a significant repeatability of each sample properties. An average contribution of mass of the respirable fraction for both aerosolized pharmaceuticals is in the range of 40% of the generated dose. CROMOGEN EB with optimizer (spacer) gives a higher contribution of the respirable fraction--up to 50% of dose, with simultaneous lower value of the released mass of aerosol. Particles size distribution of CROPOZ PLUS within a respirable fraction indicates an efficient penetration and deposition of particles in the upper, central and peripheral parts of tracheobronchial tree (TB). High contribution of submicron particles of CROMOGEN EB with optimizer gives efficient penetration and deposition of these particles in the lungs.

  17. Anthropogenic aerosols and the distribution of past large‐scale precipitation change

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The climate response of precipitation to the effects of anthropogenic aerosols is a critical while not yet fully understood aspect in climate science. Results of selected models that participated the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and the data from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project suggest that, throughout the tropics and also in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere, aerosols have largely dominated the distribution of precipitation changes in reference to the preindustrial era in the second half of the last century. Aerosol‐induced cooling has offset some of the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the tropics to the Arctic and thus formed the gradients of surface temperature anomaly that enable the revealed precipitation change patterns to occur. Improved representation of aerosol‐cloud interaction has been demonstrated as the key factor for models to reproduce consistent distributions of past precipitation change with the reanalysis data. PMID:27134319

  18. Spatial distribution of pipe collapses in Goodwin Creek Watershed, Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Internal erosion of soil pipes can induce pipe collapses that affect soil erosion process and landform evolution. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial distribution of pipe collapses in agricultural fields of Goodwin Creek watershed. Ground survey was carried out to detect pipe co...

  19. Spatial distribution of glycerophospholipids in the ocular lens.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Vidová, Veronika; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Volný, Michael; Novák, Petr; Strohalm, Martin; Kostiainen, Risto; Havlíček, Vladimír; Wiedmer, Susanne K; Holopainen, Juha M

    2011-04-29

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution of lipids in the intraocular lens is important for understanding the physiology and biochemistry of this unique tissue and for gaining a better insight into the mechanisms underlying diseases of the lens. Following our previous study showing the spatial distribution of sphingolipids in the porcine lens, the current study used ultra performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOFMS) to provide the whole lipidome of porcine lens and these studies were supplemented by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) of the lens using ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) to determine the spatial distribution of glycerophospholipids. Altogether 172 lipid species were identified with high confidence and their concentration was determined. Sphingomyelins, phosphatidylcholines, and phosphatidylethanolamines were the most abundant lipid classes. We then determined the spatial and concentration-dependent distributions of 20 phosphatidylcholines, 6 phosphatidylethanolamines, and 4 phosphatidic acids. Based on the planar molecular images of the lipids, we report the organization of fiber cell membranes within the ocular lens and suggest roles for these lipids in normal and diseased lenses.

  20. A crucial role for spatial distribution in bacterial quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meng; Zheng, Huizhen; Ren, Ying; Lou, Ruyun; Wu, Fan; Yu, Weiting; Liu, Xiudong; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process that enables bacteria to communicate using secreted signaling molecules, and then makes a population of bacteria to regulate gene expression collectively and control behavior on a community-wide scale. Theoretical studies of efficiency sensing have suggested that both mass-transfer performance in the local environment and the spatial distribution of cells are key factors affecting QS. Here, an experimental model based on hydrogel microcapsules with a three-dimensional structure was established to investigate the influence of the spatial distribution of cells on bacterial QS. Vibrio harveyi cells formed different spatial distributions in the microcapsules, i.e., they formed cell aggregates with different structures and sizes. The cell aggregates displayed stronger QS than did unaggregated cells even when equal numbers of cells were present. Large aggregates (LA) of cells, with a size of approximately 25 μm, restricted many more autoinducers (AIs) than did small aggregates (SA), with a size of approximately 10 μm, thus demonstrating that aggregate size significantly affects QS. These findings provide a powerful demonstration of the fact that the spatial distribution of cells plays a crucial role in bacterial QS. PMID:27698391

  1. Dynamics of strongly coupled spatially distributed logistic equations with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchenko, I. S.; Kashchenko, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of a system of two logistic delay equations with spatially distributed coupling is studied. The coupling coefficient is assumed to be sufficiently large. Special nonlinear systems of parabolic equations are constructed such that the behavior of their solutions is determined in the first approximation by the dynamical properties of the original system.

  2. Recording the spatial distribution of coherent-radiation intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavskii, V.Y.; Przhevskii, S.S.; Shalomeeva, N.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of recording the spatial distribution of laser-radiation intensity, which is proven theoretically and confirmed by experiment. The authors consider the influence of the inhomogeneity and the wave front of radiation within the confines of a focusing optical element on the character of the diffracted image of the element.

  3. Spatial distribution read-out system for thermoluminescence sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, I.; Tomiyama, T.; Imaeda, K.; Ninagawa, K.; Wada, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Misaki, A.

    1985-01-01

    A spatial distribution read-out system of thermoluminescence (TL) sheets is developed. This system consists of high gain image intensifier, a CCD-TV camera, a video image processor and a host computer. This system has been applied to artificial TL sheets (BaSO4:Eu doped) for detecting high energy electromagnetic shower and heavy nuclei tracks.

  4. Spatial Distribution of Glycerophospholipids in the Ocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Pól, Jaroslav; Vidová, Veronika; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Volný, Michael; Novák, Petr; Strohalm, Martin; Kostiainen, Risto; Havlíček, Vladimír; Wiedmer, Susanne K.; Holopainen, Juha M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution of lipids in the intraocular lens is important for understanding the physiology and biochemistry of this unique tissue and for gaining a better insight into the mechanisms underlying diseases of the lens. Following our previous study showing the spatial distribution of sphingolipids in the porcine lens, the current study used ultra performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOFMS) to provide the whole lipidome of porcine lens and these studies were supplemented by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) of the lens using ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) to determine the spatial distribution of glycerophospholipids. Altogether 172 lipid species were identified with high confidence and their concentration was determined. Sphingomyelins, phosphatidylcholines, and phosphatidylethanolamines were the most abundant lipid classes. We then determined the spatial and concentration-dependent distributions of 20 phosphatidylcholines, 6 phosphatidylethanolamines, and 4 phosphatidic acids. Based on the planar molecular images of the lipids, we report the organization of fiber cell membranes within the ocular lens and suggest roles for these lipids in normal and diseased lenses. PMID:21559377

  5. Spatial distribution of metabolites in the human lens.

    PubMed

    Tamara, Semen O; Yanshole, Lyudmila V; Yanshole, Vadim V; Fursova, Anjella Zh; Stepakov, Denis A; Novoselov, Vladimir P; Tsentalovich, Yuri P

    2016-02-01

    Spatial distribution of 34 metabolites along the optical and equatorial axes of the human lens has been determined. For the majority of metabolites, the homogeneous distribution has been observed. That suggests that the rate of the metabolite transformation in the lens is low due to the general metabolic passivity of the lens fiber cells. However, the redox processes are active in the lens; as a result, some metabolites, including antioxidants, demonstrate the "nucleus-depleted" type of distribution, whereas secondary UV filters show the "nucleus-enriched" type. The metabolite concentrations at the lens poles and equator are similar for all metabolites under study. The concentric pattern of the "nucleus-depleted" and "nucleus-enriched" distributions testifies that the metabolite distribution inside the lens is mostly governed by a passive diffusion, relatively free along the fiber cells and retarded in the radial direction across the cells. No significant difference in the metabolite distribution between the normal and cataractous human lenses was found.

  6. Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial Patterns of Southern Ocean Cloud Albedo

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Daniel; Burrows, Susannah M.; Wood, R.; Grosvenor, Daniel P.; Elliott, Scott; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2015-07-17

    Small particles called aerosols act as nucleation sites for cloud drop formation, affecting clouds and cloud properties – ultimately influencing the cloud dynamics, lifetime, water path and areal extent that determine the reflectivity (albedo) of clouds. The concentration Nd of droplets in clouds that influences planetary albedo is sensitive to the availability of aerosol particles on which the droplets form. Natural aerosol concentrations not only affect cloud properties themselves, but also modulate the sensitivity of clouds to changes in anthropogenic aerosols. Here, it is shown that modeled natural aerosols, principally marine biogenic primary and secondary aerosol sources, explain more than half of the spatiotemporal variability in satellite-observed Nd. Enhanced Nd over regions of high biological activity is found to be driven primarily by high concentrations of sulfate aerosol at lower Southern Ocean latitudes (35-45°S) and by organic matter in sea spray aerosol at higher latitudes (45-55°S). Biogenic sources are estimated to increase the summertime mean reflected solar radiation in excess of 10 W m-2 over parts of the Southern Ocean, which is comparable to the annual mean increases expected from anthropogenic aerosols over heavily polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

  7. Relationship Between Aerosol Number Size Distribution and Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient in an Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Matthew; Matthews, James; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Small ions are created in the atmosphere by ground based radioactive decay and solar and cosmic radiation ionising the air. The ionosphere is maintained at a high potential relative to the Earth due to global thunderstorm activity, a current from the ionosphere transfers charge back to the ground through the weakly ionised atmosphere. A potential gradient (PG) exists between the ionosphere and the ground that can be measured in fair weather using devices such as an electric field mill. PG is inversely-proportional to the conductivity of the air and therefore to the number of ions of a given electrical mobility; a reduction of air ions will cause an increase of PG. Aerosols in the atmosphere act as a sink of air ions with an attachment rate dependent on aerosol size distribution and ion mobility. These relationships have been used to infer high particulate, and hence pollution, levels in historic datasets of atmospheric PG. A measurement campaign was undertaken in Manchester, UK for three weeks in July and August where atmospheric PG was measured with an electric field mill (JCI131, JCI Chilworth) on a second floor balcony, aerosol size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI3936), aerosol concentration measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC, Grimm 5.403) and local meteorological measurements taken on a rooftop measurement site ~200 m away. Field mill and CPC data were taken at 1 s intervals and SMPS data in 2.5 minute cycles. Data were excluded for one hour either side of rainfall as rainclouds and droplets can carry significant charge which would affect PG. A quantity relating to the attachment of ions to aerosol (Ion Sink) was derived from the effective attachment coefficient of the aerosols. Further measurements with the field mill and CPC were taken at the same location in November 2015 when bonfire events would be expected to increase aerosol concentrations. During the summer measurements, particle number count (PNC

  8. Characteristics of Aerosol Volume Distributions Measured at Meppen, W. Germany.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    shown in Fig. 3-1 have been identified previously by Typically, size distribution data has been presented Whitby (1978), who termed the mode in the...3-2(a) for 4 November, the middle mode appears out by Whitby et al. (1972), Shettle (1975) and demon- with a coarse particle mode and in Fig. 3-2(b...123 999. 0275, NTIS No. ADA 114 637. Whitby , K.T., R.B. Husar and B.Y.H. Liu (1972), "The p . Johnson, R.W. and W.S. Hering (1981), "An Analysis of

  9. Asian aerosols: current and year 2030 distributions and implications to human health and regional climate change.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Gregory R; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Kulkarni, Sarika; D'Allura, Alessio; Tang, Youhua; Streets, David; Zhang, Qiang; Bond, Tami C; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Jamroensan, Aditsuda; Marrapu, Pallavi

    2009-08-01

    Aerosol distributions in Asia calculated over a 4-year period and constrained by satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) are presented. Vast regions in Asia that include > 80% of the population have PM2.5 concentrations that exceed on an annual basis the WHO guideline of 10 microg/m3, often by factors of 2 to 4. These high aerosol loadings also have important radiative effects, causing a significant dimming at the surface, and mask approximately 45% of the warming by greenhouse gases. Black carbon (BC) concentrations are high throughout Asia, representing 5-10% of the total AOD, and contributing significantly to atmospheric warming (its warming potential is approximately 55% of that due to CO2). PM levels and AODs in year 2030, estimated based on simulations that consider future changes in emissions, are used to explore opportunities for win-win strategies built upon addressing air quality and climate change together. It is found that in 2030 the PM2.5 levels in significant parts of Asia will increase and exacerbate health impacts; but the aerosols will have a larger masking effect on radiative forcing, due to a decrease in BC and an increase in SO2 emissions.

  10. Fractal nature of hydrocarbon deposits. 2. Spatial distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, C.C.; Schutter, T.A; Herring, P.R.; Thomas, W.J. ); Scholz, C.H. )

    1991-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are unevenly distributed within reservoirs and are found in patches whose size distribution is a fractal over a wide range of scales. The spatial distribution of the patches is also fractal and this can be used to constrain the design of drilling strategies also defined by a fractal dimension. Fractal distributions are scale independent and are characterized by a power-law scaling exponent termed the fractal dimension. The authors have performed fractal analyses on the spatial distribution of producing and showing wells combined and of dry wells in 1,600-mi{sup 2} portions of the Denver and Powder River basins that were nearly completely drilled on quarter-mile square-grid spacings. They have limited their analyses to wells drilled to single stratigraphic intervals so that the map pattern revealed by drilling is representative of the spatial patchiness of hydrocarbons at depth. The fractal dimensions for the spatial patchiness of hydrocarbons in the two basins are 1.5 and 1.4, respectively. The fractal dimension for the pattern of all wells drilled is 1.8 for both basins, which suggests a drilling strategy with a fractal dimension significantly higher than the dimensions 1.5 and 1.4 sufficient to efficiently and economically explore these reservoirs. In fact, the fractal analysis reveals that the drilling strategy used in these basins approaches a fractal dimension of 2.0, which is equivalent to random drilling with no geologic input. Knowledge of the fractal dimension of a reservoir prior to drilling would provide a basis for selecting and a criterion for halting a drilling strategy for exploration whose fractal dimension closely matches that of the spatial fractal dimension of the reservoir, such a strategy should prove more efficient and economical than current practice.

  11. The distribution of PM10 and PM2.5 carbonaceous aerosol in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haijun; He, Jiang; Zhao, Boyi; Zhang, Lijun; Fan, Qingyun; Lü, Changwei; Dudagula; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Yinghui

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM), including PM10 and PM2.5, is one of the major impacts on air quality, visibility, climate change, earth radiation balance, and public health. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) are the major components of PM. 804 samples (PM10 and PM2.5) were simultaneously collected from six urban sites covering 3 districts in Baotou, in January, April, September, and November 2014. As to a long-term study on the effects of carbonaceous aerosol, data were collected annually at Environmental Protection Agency of Baotou (EPB). The concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5, the spatial distribution and content of OC and EC, the relationship between OC and EC, and the formation of secondary organic carbon (SOC) have been investigated. The findings indicated that the concentrations of these particle matter are higher than that in US or European standards. The average concentrations of OC in PM10 and PM2.5 follow the order: January > November > April > September; and for EC in PM10 and PM2.5 follow the order: January > November > September > April. Affected by metrological factors, it was indicated that high wind speed and low relative humidity were beneficial for removal of OC and EC in January and November. Pearson correlations and cluster analysis on OC and EC concentrations in PM10 and PM2.5 with gaseous pollutants (SO2, NO2, and CO) suggested that OC shared the same emission sources with SO2 and CO from combustion, while EC's sources mainly came from vehicles exhaust and combustion which contributed to NO2 as well. The OC concentration is mainly primary in warm months, while it appears secondary in cold months in Baotou. There is a common characteristic among the cities with higher SOC in winter, wherever the coal combustion can lead to the severe pollution. This work is important for the construction of the database of OC and EC concentrations in PM10 and PM2.5 at spatial and time intervals, and it can provide scientific suggestion for similar PM

  12. A fast integrated mobility spectrometer for rapid measurement of sub-micrometer aerosol size distribution, Part I: Design and model evaluation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jian; Pikridas, Michael; Spielman, Steven R.; ...

    2017-06-01

    This study discusses, a fast integrated mobility spectrometer (FIMS) was previously developed to characterize submicron aerosol size distributions at a frequency of 1 Hz and with high size resolution and counting statistics. However, the dynamic size range of the FIMS was limited to one decade in particle electrical mobility. It was proposed that the FIMS dynamic size range can be greatly increased by using a spatially varying electric field. This electric field creates regions with drastically different field strengths in the separator, such that particles of a wide diameter range can be simultaneously classified and subsequently measured. A FIMS incorporatingmore » this spatially varying electric field is developed. This paper describes the theoretical frame work and numerical simulations of the FIMS with extended dynamic size range, including the spatially varying electric field, particle trajectories, activation of separated particles in the condenser, and the transfer function, transmission efficiency, and mobility resolution. The influences of the particle Brownian motion on FIMS transfer function and mobility resolution are examined. The simulation results indicate that the FIMS incorporating the spatially varying electric field is capable of measuring aerosol size distribution from 8 to 600 nm with high time resolution. As a result, the experimental characterization of the FIMS is presented in an accompanying paper.« less

  13. A CLOSURE STUDY OF AEROSOL MASS CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF VALUES OBTAINED WITH FILTERS AND BY DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF MASS DISTRIBUTIONS. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare measurements of aerosol mass concentrations obtained gravimetrically using Teflon coated glass fiber filters and by integrating mass distributions measured with the differential mobility analyzer–aerosol particle mass analyzer (DMA–APM) technique (Aero...

  14. Aged boreal biomass-burning aerosol size distributions from BORTAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K. M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J. W.; Duck, T. J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number-size distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellite) measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ~ 1-2 days) from boreal wildfires in northwestern Ontario. The composite median size distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 230 nm (number-median diameter) and σ = 1.5, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA / ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.09-0.17 μg m-3 ppbv-1 (parts per billion by volume) with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA (organic aerosol) production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period (plume age: 1-2 days), though it does not preclude OA production/loss at earlier stages. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA / ΔCO enhancement ratios. We

  15. Spatial distribution of mineral dust single scattering albedo based on DREAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Ničković, Slobodan; Ilić, Luka

    2016-04-01

    Mineral dust comprises a significant part of global aerosol burden. There is a large uncertainty in estimating role of dust in Earth's climate system, partly due to poor characterization of its optical properties. Single scattering albedo is one of key optical properties determining radiative effects of dust particles. While it depends on dust particle sizes, it is also strongly influenced by dust mineral composition, particularly the content of light-absorbing iron oxides and the mixing state (external or internal). However, an assumption of uniform dust composition is typically used in models. To better represent single scattering albedo in dust atmospheric models, required to increase accuracy of dust radiative effect estimates, it is necessary to include information on particle mineral content. In this study, we present the spatial distribution of dust single scattering albedo based on the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) with incorporated particle mineral composition. The domain of the model covers Northern Africa, Middle East and the European continent, with horizontal resolution set to 1/5°. It uses eight particle size bins within the 0.1-10 μm radius range. Focusing on dust episode of June 2010, we analyze dust single scattering albedo spatial distribution over the model domain, based on particle sizes and mineral composition from model output; we discuss changes in this optical property after long-range transport. Furthermore, we examine how the AERONET-derived aerosol properties respond to dust mineralogy. Finally we use AERONET data to evaluate model-based single scattering albedo. Acknowledgement We would like to thank the AERONET network and the principal investigators, as well as their staff, for establishing and maintaining the AERONET sites used in this work.

  16. Seasonal and spatial variation of the bacterial mutagenicity of fine organic aerosol in southern california.

    PubMed Central

    Hannigan, M P; Cass, G R; Lafleur, A L; Busby, W F; Thilly, W G

    1996-01-01

    The bacterial mutagenicity of a set of 1993 urban particulate air pollution samples is examined using the Salmonella typhimurium TM677 forward mutation assay. Amibent fine particulate samples were collected for 24 hr every sixth day throughout 1993 at four urban sites, including Long Beach, central Los Angeles, Azusa, and Rubidoux, California, and at an upwind background site on San Nicolas Island. Long Beach and central Los Angeles are congested urban areas where air quality is dominated by fresh emissions from air pollution sources; Azuasa and Rubidoux are located farther downwind and receive transported air pollutants plus increased quantities of the products of atmospheric chemical reactions. Fine aerosol samples from Long Beach and Los Angeles show a pronounced seasonal variation in bacterial mutagenicity per cubic meter of- ambient air, with maximum in the winter and a minimum in the summer. The down-wind smog receptor site at Rubidoux shows peak mutagenicity (with postmitochondrial supernatant but no peak without postmitochondrial supernatant) during the September-October periods when direct transport from upwind sources can be expected. At most sites the mutagenicity per microgram of organic carbon from the aerosol is not obviously higher during the summer photochemical smog period than during the colder months. Significant spatial variation in bacterial mutagenicity is observed: mutagenicity per cubic meter of ambient air, on average, is more than an order of magnitude lower at San Nicolas Island than within the urban area. The highest mutagenicity values per microgram of organics supplied to the assay are found at the most congested urban sites at central Los Angeles and Long Beach. The highest annual average values of mutagenicity per cubic meter of air sampled occur at central Los Angeles. These findings stress the importance of proximity to sources of direct emissions of bacterial mutagens and imply that if important mutagen-forming atmospheric

  17. Impact of the spatial laser distribution on photocathode gun operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Brachmann, Axel; Emma, Paul; Gilevich, Sasha; Huang, Zhirong

    2012-09-01

    It is widely believed that a drive laser with uniform temporal and spatial laser profiles is required to generate the lowest emittance beam at the photoinjector. However, for a given 3 ps smooth-Gaussian laser temporal profile, our recent simulations indicate that a truncated-Gaussian laser spatial profile produces an electron beam with smaller emittance. The simulation results are qualitatively confirmed by later analytical calculation, and also confirmed by measurements: emittance reduction of ˜25% was observed at the linac coherent light source (LCLS) injector with a truncated-Gaussian laser spatial profile at the nominal operating bunch charge of 150 pC. There was a significant secondary benefit—laser transmission through the iris for the truncated-Gaussian profile was about twice that compared to the nearly uniform distribution, which significantly loosens the laser power and quantum efficiency requirements for drive laser system and photocathode. Since February 9, 2012, the drive laser with the truncated-Gaussian spatial distribution has been used for LCLS routine user operations and the corresponding free electron laser power is at least the same as the one when using the nearly uniform spatial profile.

  18. Temporal variation of 7Be and 210Pb size distributions in ambient aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Dietl, F.; Frank, G.; Tschiersch, J.

    The size distributions of the cosmogenic 7Be and of the long-lived radon progeny 210Pb in ambient aerosols were measured continuously from December 1994 to the end of March 1996 in ground-level air at a semi-rural location in south Germany. Aerosol sampling was performed at a height of 4 m above ground with a low-pressure cascade impactor of the Berner type covering the size range from 0.06 to 16 μm and simultaneously with an high-volume sampler. Each sampling period was 10 d. Activities of 7Be and 210Pb were measured by gamma spectrometry and aerosol mass was determined gravimetrically. In all experiments the activity distributions of 7Be as well as of 210Pb were unimodal (log-normal) and associated with submicron aerosols of about 0.5-0.6 μm aerodynamic diameter. On average, the activity median diameters of 7Be (AMD: 0.57 μm) and of 210Pb (AMD: 0.53 μm) have been found to be significantly lower than the average mass median diameter (MMD: 0.675 μm) and higher or at most equal than the respective surface median diameter (SMD: 0.465 μm) of the aerosols: SMD⩽AMD Pb210distributions of 210Pb (AMD: 0.595 μm) and 7Be (AMD: 0.59 μm) was not detectable, in summer, 210Pb was associated with significantly smaller aerosols (AMD: 0.43 μm) than 7Be (AMD: 0.52 μm). Comparing the activity median diameters observed in summer with those in winter, on average significantly lower diameters were found in summer pointing to shorter residence times in the summer months.

  19. A new spatial snow distribution in hydrological models parameterized from observed spatial variability of precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaugen, Thomas; Weltzien, Ingunn

    2016-04-01

    The traditional catchment hydrological model with its many free calibration parameters is not a well suited tool for prediction under conditions for which is has not been calibrated. Important tasks for hydrological modelling such as prediction in ungauged basins and assessing hydrological effects of climate change are hence not solved satisfactory. In order to reduce the number of calibration parameters in hydrological models we have introduced a new model which uses a dynamic gamma distribution as the spatial frequency distribution of snow water equivalent (SWE). The parameters are estimated from observed spatial variability of precipitation and the magnitude of accumulation and melting events and are hence not subject to calibration. The relationship between spatial mean and variance of precipitation is found to follow a pattern where decreasing temporal correlation with increasing accumulation or duration of the event leads to a levelling off or even a decrease of the spatial variance. The new model for snow distribution is implemented in the, already parameter parsimonious, DDD (Distance Distribution Dynamics) hydrological model and was tested for 71 Norwegian catchments. We compared the new snow distribution model with the current operational snow distribution model where a fixed, calibrated coefficient of variation parameterizes a log-normal model for snow distribution. Results show that the precision of runoff simulations is equal, but that the new snow distribution model better simulates snow covered area (SCA) when compared with MODIS satellite derived snow cover. In addition, SWE is simulated more realistically in that seasonal snow is melted out and the building up of "snow towers" is prevented and hence spurious trends in SWE.

  20. Influence of aerosols and surface reflectance on satellite NO2 retrieval: seasonal and spatial characteristics and implications for NOx emission constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-T.; Liu, M.-Y.; Xin, J.-Y.; Boersma, K. F.; Spurr, R.; Martin, R.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-04-01

    Satellite retrievals of vertical column densities (VCDs) of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) normally do not explicitly account for aerosol optical effects and surface reflectance anisotropy that vary with space and time. Here, we conduct an improved retrieval of NO2 VCDs over China, called the POMINO algorithm, based on measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and we test the importance of a number of aerosol and surface reflectance treatments in this algorithm. POMINO uses a parallelized LIDORT-driven AMFv6 package to derive tropospheric air mass factors via pixel-specific radiative transfer calculations with no look-up tables, taking slant column densities from DOMINO v2. Prerequisite cloud optical properties are derived from a dedicated cloud retrieval process that is fully consistent with the main NO2 retrieval. Aerosol optical properties are taken from GEOS-Chem simulations constrained by MODIS AOD values. MODIS bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) data are used for surface reflectance over land. For the present analysis, POMINO level-2 data for 2012 are aggregated into monthly means on a 0.25° long. × 0.25° lat. grid. POMINO-retrieved annual mean NO2 VCDs vary from 15-25 × 1015 cm-2 over the polluted North China Plain (NCP) to below 1015 cm-2 over much of west China. The subsequently-constrained Chinese annual anthropogenic emissions are 9.05 TgN yr-1, an increase from 2006 (Lin, 2012) by about 19%. Replacing the MODIS BRDF data with the OMLER v1 monthly climatological albedo data affects NO2 VCDs by up to 40% for certain locations and seasons. The effect on constrained NOx emissions is small. Excluding aerosol information from the retrieval process (this is the traditional "implicit" treatment) enhances annual mean NO2 VCDs by 15-40% over much of east China. Seasonally, NO2 VCDs are reduced by 10-20% over parts of the NCP in spring and over north China in winter, despite the general enhancements in summer and fall

  1. Spatial paradigms of lotic diatom distribution: A landscape ecology perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Passy, S.I.

    2001-01-01

    Spatial distributional patterns of benthic diatoms and their relation to current velocity were investigated in an unshaded cobble-bottom reach of White Creek (Washington County, NY). On 27 August 1999, diatoms were sampled and current velocity and depth were measured on a regular square sampling grid with a grain size of 0.01 m2, interval of 0.5 m, and extent of 16 m2. The relative abundance of the 18 common diatom species enumerated in the 81 samples was subjected to detrended correspondence analysis (DCA). The first axis (DCA1) explained 51% of the variance in diatom data and separated the samples according to current regimes. The spatial autocorrelation of DCA1 sample scores in deposition and erosion regions of White Creek was determined by Moran's I statistic to indicate patch size. In White Creek the patch length of all diatom communities was more than 3.1 m, whereas the patch width was 1 m in the deposition region and 0.5 m in the erosion region. There were 5 dominant diatom taxa, Achnanthes minutissima Ku??tz. et vars, Fragilaria capucina Dezmazie??res et vars, F. crotonensis Kitt., Diatoma vulgaris Bory, and Synedra ulna (Nitz.) Ehr. et vars. The patch length of the dominant species varied from 1 to more than 4.1 m, whereas the patch width, if defined, was 0.5 m. Achnanthes minutissima and F. capucina, the two diatom species with the highest relative abundance, displayed spatially structured patches of low abundance and comparatively random patches of high abundance, suggesting broad scale abiotic control of species performance in low abundance regions and finer scale biotic control of high abundance areas. Another objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that higher current velocities, which generally impede immigration, would increase randomness and complexity (i.e. homogeneity of diatom distributional patterns). The spatial complexity in low versus high velocity transects was determined by calculating the respective fractal dimension (D) of DCA

  2. Vertical Distribution and Columnar Optical Properties of Springtime Biomass-Burning Aerosols over Northern Indochina during the 7-SEAS/BASELInE field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N. H.; Wang, S. H.; Welton, E. J.; Holben, B. N.; Tsay, S. C.; Giles, D. M.; Stewart, S. A.; Janjai, S.; Anh, N. X.; Hsiao, T. C.; Chen, W. N.; Lin, T. H.; Buntoung, S.; Chantara, S.; Wiriya, W.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the aerosol optical properties and vertical distributions in major biomass-burning emission area of northern Indochina were investigated using ground-based remote sensing (i.e., four Sun-sky radiometers and one lidar) during the Seven South East Asian Studies/Biomass-burning Aerosols & Stratocumulus Environment: Lifecycles & Interactions Experiment conducted during spring 2014. Despite the high spatial variability of the aerosol optical depth (AOD; which at 500 nm ranged from 0.75 to 1.37 depending on the site), the temporal variation of the daily AOD demonstrated a consistent pattern among the observed sites, suggesting the presence of widespread smoke haze over the region. Smoke particles were characterized as small (Ångström exponent at 440-870 nm of 1.72 and fine mode fraction of 0.96), strongly absorbing (single-scattering albedo at 440 nm of 0.88), mixture of black and brown carbon particles (absorption Ångström exponent at 440-870 nm of 1.5) suspended within the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Smoke plumes driven by the PBL dynamics in the mountainous region reached as high as 5 km above sea level; these plumes subsequently spread out by westerly winds over northern Vietnam, southern China, and the neighboring South China Sea. Moreover, the analysis of diurnal variability of aerosol loading and optical properties as well as vertical profile in relation to PBL development, fire intensity, and aerosol mixing showed that various sites exhibited different variability based on meteorological conditions, fuel type, site elevation, and proximity to biomass-burning sources. These local factors influence the aerosol characteristics in the region and distinguish northern Indochina smoke from other biomass-burning regions in the world.

  3. Spatial Distribution of Flower Color Induced by Interspecific Sexual Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuma; Takakura, Koh-ichi; Kawata, Masakado

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms shaping the spatiotemporal distribution of species has long been a central concern of ecology and evolutionary biology. Contemporary patterns of plant assemblies suggest that sexual interactions among species, i.e., reproductive interference, lead to the exclusive distributions of closely related species that share pollinators. However, the fitness consequences and the initial ecological/evolutionary responses to reproductive interference remain unclear in nature, since reproductive isolation or allopatric distribution has already been achieved in the natural community. In Japan, three species of blue-eyed grasses (Sisyrinchium) with incomplete reproductive isolation have recently colonized and occur sympatrically. Two of them are monomorphic with white flowers, whereas the other exhibits heritable color polymorphism (white and purple morphs). Here we investigated the effects of the presence of two monomorphic species on the distribution and reproductive success of color morphs. The frequency and reproductive success of white morphs decreased in area where monomorphic species were abundant, while those of purple morphs did not. The rate of hybridization between species was higher in white morphs than in the purple ones. Resource competition and habitat preference seemed not to contribute to the spatial distribution and reproductive success of two morphs. Our results supported that color-dependent reproductive interference determines the distribution of flower color polymorphism in a habitat, implying ecological sorting promoted by pollinator-mediated reproductive interference. Our study helps us to understand the evolution and spatial structure of flower color in a community. PMID:27723785

  4. Aerosol contributions to speleothem geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dredge, J. A.; Fairchild, I. J.; Harrison, R.; Woodhead, J. D.; Hellstrom, J.

    2011-12-01

    The term "aerosols" encompasses the suspension of both fine solid or liquid particles within a gaseous medium. Aerosols become suspended into the earth's atmosphere through a multitude of processes both natural and anthropogenic. Atmospheric aerosols enter cave networks as a result of cave ventilation processes and are either deposited, or cycled and removed from the system. Speleothem offer a multiproxy palaeoclimate resource; many of the available proxies have been extensively investigated and utilised for palaeoclimatic reconstructions in a range of studies. The potential contribution of aerosols to speleothem chemistry and their applicability for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions remains untested and the extent of their value as an addition to palaeoclimate sciences unknown. Aerosols through incorporation into speleothem may provide a novel palaeoenvironmental resource. The aerosol component of interest is that which is transported into the cave atmosphere and deposited and are available for incorporation into precipitated calcite. Aerosol deposition and therefore distribution in the cave has shown to be a complex function of ventilation and changing environmental factors. Through detailed monitoring aerosols have been detected, identified, characterised and quantified to determine their prominence in the cave system. Investigations are on a case study basis, searching for suitable aerosol proxies of environmentally significant emission processes. Case studies include: Palaeofires at Yarrangobilly Caves, Australia; anthropogenic emissions at St Michaels Cave, Gibraltar and Cheddar gorge, UK; and drip water aerosol production and geochemical addition in Obir cave, Austria. Monitoring has allowed for the temporal and spatial determination of aerosols in karst networks. Speleothem samples will be analysed in combination with in-situ monitoring to determine incorporation factors and record preservation. By understanding how aerosols are transmitted within the

  5. MODIS Aerosol Observations used to Constrain Dust Distributions and Lifecycle in the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, P.; Nowottnick, E.; daSilva, A.

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 240 Tg of mineral dust aerosol are transported annually from Saharan Africa to the Atlantic Ocean. Dust affects the Earth radiation budget, and plays direct (through scattering and absorption of radiation) and indirect (through modification of cloud properties and environment) roles in climate. Deposition of dust to the surface provides an important nutrient source to terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. Dust is additionally a contributor to adverse air quality. Among the tools toward understanding the lifecycle and impacts of mineral dust aerosols are numerical models. Important constraints on these models come from quantitative satellite observations, like those from the space-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). In particular, Kauhan et al. [2005] used MODIS aerosol observations to infer transport and deposition fluxes of Saharan dust over the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Amazonian basins. Those observations are used here to constrain the transport of dust and its interannual variability simulated in the NASA GEOS-5 general circulation model and data assimilation system. Significant uncertainty exists in the MODIS-derived fluxes, however, due to uncertainty in the wind fields provided by meteorological analyses in this region. That same uncertainty in the wind fields is manifest in our GEOS-5 simulations of dust distributions. Here we use MODIS observations to investigate the seasonality and location of the Saharan dust plume and explore through sensitivity analysis of our model the meteorological controls on the dust distribution, including dust direct radiative effects and sub-gridscale source and sink processes.

  6. Aerosols, clouds, and precipitation in the North Atlantic trades observed during the Barbados aerosol cloud experiment - Part 1: Distributions and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Feingold, Graham; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Chuang, Patrick; Donaher, Shaunna L.

    2016-07-01

    Shallow marine cumulus clouds are by far the most frequently observed cloud type over the Earth's oceans; but they are poorly understood and have not been investigated as extensively as stratocumulus clouds. This study describes and discusses the properties and variations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed in the North Atlantic trades during a field campaign (Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment- BACEX, March-April 2010), which took place off Barbados where African dust periodically affects the region. The principal observing platform was the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter (TO) research aircraft, which was equipped with standard meteorological instruments, a zenith pointing cloud radar and probes that measured aerosol, cloud, and precipitation characteristics.The temporal variation and vertical distribution of aerosols observed from the 15 flights, which included the most intense African dust event during all of 2010 in Barbados, showed a wide range of aerosol conditions. During dusty periods, aerosol concentrations increased substantially in the size range between 0.5 and 10 µm (diameter), particles that are large enough to be effective giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The 10-day back trajectories showed three distinct air masses with distinct vertical structures associated with air masses originating in the Atlantic (typical maritime air mass with relatively low aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer), Africa (Saharan air layer), and mid-latitudes (continental pollution plumes). Despite the large differences in the total mass loading and the origin of the aerosols, the overall shapes of the aerosol particle size distributions were consistent, with the exception of the transition period.The TO was able to sample many clouds at various phases of growth. Maximum cloud depth observed was less than ˜ 3 km, while most clouds were less than 1 km

  7. Indoor/outdoor radon decay products associated aerosol particle-size distributions and their relation to total number concentrations.

    PubMed

    Moriizumi, Jun; Yamada, Shinya; Xu, Yang; Matsuki, Satoru; Hirao, Shigekazu; Yamazawa, Hiromi

    2014-07-01

    The activity size distributions of indoor and outdoor radioactive aerosol associated with short-lived radon decay products were observed at Nagoya, Japan, for some periods from 2010 to 2012, following the indoor observation by Mostafa et al. [Mostafa, A. M. A., Tamaki, K., Moriizumi, J., Yamazawa, H. and Iida, T. The weather dependence of particle size distribution of indoor radioactive aerosol associated with radon decay products. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 146: (1-3), 19-22 (2011)]. The tendency of smaller indoor activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) after rainfalls showed in the previous study was not consistently obtained, while the consistent tendency of less indoor radioactive particles with diameters in the accumulation mode was observed again after rainfalls. The indoor aerosols showed activity size distributions similar to the outdoor ones. Non-radioactive aerosol particle concentrations measured with a laser particle counter suggested a somewhat liner relationship with AMAD.

  8. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  9. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-08-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  10. The weather dependence of particle size distribution of indoor radioactive aerosol associated with radon decay products.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, A M A; Tamaki, K; Moriizumi, J; Yamazawa, H; Iida, T

    2011-07-01

    This study was performed to measure the activity size distribution of aerosol particles associated with short-lived radon decay products in indoor air at Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan. The measurements were performed using a low pressure Andersen cascade impactor under variable meteorological conditions. The results showed that the greatest activity fraction was associated with aerosol particles in the accumulation size range (100-1000 nm) with a small fraction of nucleation mode (10-100 nm). Regarding the influence of the weather conditions, the decrease in the number of accumulation particles was observed clearly after rainfall without significant change in nucleation particles, which may be due to a washout process for the large particles.

  11. Assessment of the aerosols distribution in the Bucharest metropolitan area in relation with health effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, M. A.; Dida, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    MODIS Terra/Aqua time-series satellite images and in- situ monitoring of particle matter PM2.5 and PM10 have been used in an effort to qualitatively assess distribution of aerosols in the greater Bucharest area during 2010-2011 period. It was found that PM2.5 and PM10 aerosols exhibit their highest concentration mostly in the central part mainly due to road traffic as well as in the industrialized parts outside of city's centre. An epidemiological study examining the relationships between adverse health outcomes and exposure to air pollutants in metropolitan agglomeration of Bucharest used ambient air pollution measurements like as PM10 and PM2.5 levels as a proxy for personal exposure levels. The measurements of environmental concentrations of particulate matter air pollutants have been correlated with health effects on respiratory health status of school children in urban/periurban areas of Bucharest.

  12. Validating a spatially distributed hydrological model with soil morphology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doppler, T.; Honti, M.; Zihlmann, U.; Weisskopf, P.; Stamm, C.

    2014-09-01

    Spatially distributed models are popular tools in hydrology claimed to be useful to support management decisions. Despite the high spatial resolution of the computed variables, calibration and validation is often carried out only on discharge time series at specific locations due to the lack of spatially distributed reference data. Because of this restriction, the predictive power of these models, with regard to predicted spatial patterns, can usually not be judged. An example of spatial predictions in hydrology is the prediction of saturated areas in agricultural catchments. These areas can be important source areas for inputs of agrochemicals to the stream. We set up a spatially distributed model to predict saturated areas in a 1.2 km2 catchment in Switzerland with moderate topography and artificial drainage. We translated soil morphological data available from soil maps into an estimate of the duration of soil saturation in the soil horizons. This resulted in a data set with high spatial coverage on which the model predictions were validated. In general, these saturation estimates corresponded well to the measured groundwater levels. We worked with a model that would be applicable for management decisions because of its fast calculation speed and rather low data requirements. We simultaneously calibrated the model to observed groundwater levels and discharge. The model was able to reproduce the general hydrological behavior of the catchment in terms of discharge and absolute groundwater levels. However, the the groundwater level predictions were not accurate enough to be used for the prediction of saturated areas. Groundwater level dynamics were not adequately reproduced and the predicted spatial saturation patterns did not correspond to those estimated from the soil map. Our results indicate that an accurate prediction of the groundwater level dynamics of the shallow groundwater in our catchment that is subject to artificial drainage would require a model that

  13. Boundary layer aerosol size distribution, mass concentration and mineralogical composition in Morocco and at Cape Verde Islands during SAMUM I-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandler, K.; Lieke, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is dedicated to the understanding of the radiative effects of mineral dust. Two major field experiments were performed: A first joint field campaign took place at Ouarzazate and near Zagora, southern Morocco, from May 13 to June 7, 2006. Aircraft and ground based measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were carried out to collect a data set of surface and atmospheric columnar information within a major dust source. This data set combined with satellite data provides the base of the first thorough columnar radiative closure tests in Saharan dust. A second field experiment was conducted during January-February 2008, in the Cape Verde Islands region, where about 300 Tg of mineral dust are transported annually from Western Africa across the Atlantic towards the Caribbean Sea and the Amazon basin. Along its transport path, the mineral dust is expected to influence significantly the radiation budget - by direct and indirect effects - of the subtropical North Atlantic. We are lacking a radiative closure in the Saharan air plume. One focus of the investigation within the trade wind region is the spatial distribution of mixed dust/biomass/sea salt aerosol and their physical and chemical properties, especially with regard to radiative effects. We report on measurements of size distributions, mass concentrations and mineralogical composition conducted at the Zagora (Morocco) and Praia (Cape Verde islands) ground stations. The aerosol size distribution was measured from 20 nm to 500

  14. Dual-beam, light-scattering interferometry for simultaneous measurements of droplet-size and velocity distributions of aerosols from commonly used nebulizers

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, R.H.; Ishii, I.; Montaser, A. ); Meyer, G.A. )

    1990-02-15

    Dual-beam, light-scattering interferometry is introduced for simultaneous measurement of droplet-size and droplet-velocity distributions. The technique was tested in the characterization of tertiary aerosols produced by five nebulization systems (a pneumatic, an ultrasonic, and three frit-type nebulizers) used in inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. In general, the Sauter mean diameter (D{sub 3,2}) of tertiary aerosol produced by frit-type nebulizer was smaller than those of ultrasonic and pneumatic nebulizers. At higher injector gas flow, D{sub 3,2} was reduced for the pneumatic nebulizer but was increased for the ultrasonic nebulizer. At the same injector gas flow rate, droplets move slightly faster if helium is used as injector gas instead of argon. For all practical purposes, the D{sub 3,2} values measured for tertiary aerosol with dual-beam, light-scattering interferometry are comparable to the same data obtained by laser Fraunhofer diffraction. Compared to laser Fraunhofer diffraction, the proposed technique possesses two unique advantages. First, droplet velocity distribution can be measured. Second, spatially resolved information on droplet-size and velocity distributions may be obtained directly and rapidly.

  15. Spatial distribution of enzyme activities in the rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere, the tiny zone of soil surrounding roots, certainly represents one of the most dynamic habitat and interfaces on Earth. Activities of enzymes produced by both plant roots and microbes are the primary biological drivers of organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling. That is why there is an urgent need in spatially explicit methods for the determination of the rhizosphere extension and enzyme distribution. Recently, zymography as a new technique based on diffusion of enzymes through the 1 mm gel plate for analysis has been introduced (Spohn & Kuzyakov, 2013). We developed the zymography technique to visualize the enzyme activities with a higher spatial resolution. For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities as a function of distance from the root tip and the root surface in the soil. We visualized the two dimensional distribution of the activity of three enzymes: β-glucosidase, phosphatase and leucine amino peptidase in the rhizosphere of maize using fluorogenically labelled substrates. Spatial-resolution of fluorescent images was improved by direct application of a substrate saturated membrane to the soil-root system. The newly-developed direct zymography visualized heterogeneity of enzyme activities along the roots. The activity of all enzymes was the highest at the apical parts of individual roots. Across the roots, the enzyme activities were higher at immediate vicinity of the roots (1.5 mm) and gradually decreased towards the bulk soil. Spatial patterns of enzyme activities as a function of distance from the root surface were enzyme specific, with highest extension for phosphatase. We conclude that improved zymography is promising in situ technique to analyze, visualize and quantify spatial distribution of enzyme activities in the rhizosphere hotspots. References Spohn, M., Kuzyakov, Y., 2013. Phosphorus mineralization can be driven by microbial need for carbon. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 61: 69-75

  16. Aerosol Lidar and MODIS Satellite Comparisons for Future Aerosol Loading Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell; Szykman, James; Severance, Kurt; Chu, D. Allen; Rosen, Rebecca; Al-Saadi, Jassim

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the concentration and distribution of atmospheric aerosols using both airborne lidar and satellite instruments is a field of active research. An aircraft based aerosol lidar has been used to study the distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the California Central Valley and eastern US coast. Concurrently, satellite aerosol retrievals, from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, were take over the Central Valley. The MODIS Level 2 aerosol data product provides retrieved ambient aerosol optical properties (e.g., optical depth (AOD) and size distribution) globally over ocean and land at a spatial resolution of 10 km. The Central Valley topography was overlaid with MODIS AOD (5x5 sq km resolution) and the aerosol scattering vertical profiles from a lidar flight. Backward air parcel trajectories for the lidar data show that air from the Pacific and northern part of the Central Valley converge confining the aerosols to the lower valley region and below the mixed layer. Below an altitude of 1 km, the lidar aerosol and MODIS AOD exhibit good agreement. Both data sets indicate a high presence of aerosols near Bakersfield and the Tehachapi Mountains. These and other results to be presented indicate that the majority of the aerosols are below the mixed layer such that the MODIS AOD should correspond well with surface measurements. Lidar measurements will help interpret satellite AOD retrievals so that one day they can be used on a routine basis for prediction of boundary layer aerosol pollution events.

  17. [Spatial distribution of soil animals: a geostatistical approach].

    PubMed

    Gongal'skiĭ, K B; Zaĭtsev, A S; Savin, F A

    2009-01-01

    Spatial distribution is one of the main parameters of populations of soil animals. Spatial soil ecology having been developing during last decades bases animal distribution estimates on the geostatistic approach. A simple principle underlying the latter's methodology is that samples placed close to each other have more similarity than those distantly placed, it is usually called autocorrelation. The principles of basic statistics cannot be applied to autocorrelated data. Apiplying variograms, Mantel test, Moran index, and SADIE statistics enables to reveal the size of clusters of both soil parameters and soil animal aggregations. This direction of investigations quite popular in the western literature is just rarely employed by Russian soil ecologists. Statistically correct procedures allow developing field sampling methodology that is vital in applied studies of soil ecology, namely, in bioindication and ecotoxicology of soils, in the assessment of biological resources in terms of abundance and biomass of soil animals. This methodology has a decisive importance in the development of soil biogeography.

  18. Stellar bars and the spatial distribution of infrared luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereux, Nicholas

    1987-01-01

    Ground-based 10 micron observations of the central region of over 100 infrared luminous galaxies are presented. A first order estimate of the spatial distribution of infrared emission in galaxies is obtained through a combination of ground-based and Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) data. The galaxies are nearby and primarily noninteracting, permitting an unbiased investigation of correlations with Hubble type. Approximately 40% of the early-type barred galaxies in this sample are associated with enhanced luminosity in the central (approximately 1 kpc diameter) region. The underlying luminosity source is attributed to both Seyfert and star formation activity. Late-type spirals are different in that the spatial distribution of infrared emission and the infrared luminoisty are not strongly dependent on barred morphology.

  19. Spread of pedigree versus genetic ancestry in spatially distributed populations.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, J; Etheridge, A M; Véber, A; Barton, N H

    2016-04-01

    Ancestral processes are fundamental to modern population genetics and spatial structure has been the subject of intense interest for many years. Despite this interest, almost nothing is known about the distribution of the locations of pedigree or genetic ancestors. Using both spatially continuous and stepping-stone models, we show that the distribution of pedigree ancestors approaches a travelling wave, for which we develop two alternative approximations. The speed and width of the wave are sensitive to the local details of the model. After a short time, genetic ancestors spread far more slowly than pedigree ancestors, ultimately diffusing out with radius ∼ t rather than spreading at constant speed. In contrast to the wave of pedigree ancestors, the spread of genetic ancestry is insensitive to the local details of the models.

  20. Spatially varying color distributions for interactive multilabel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Claudia; Cremers, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    We propose a method for interactive multilabel segmentation which explicitly takes into account the spatial variation of color distributions. To this end, we estimate a joint distribution over color and spatial location using a generalized Parzen density estimator applied to each user scribble. In this way, we obtain a likelihood for observing certain color values at a spatial coordinate. This likelihood is then incorporated in a Bayesian MAP estimation approach to multiregion segmentation which in turn is optimized using recently developed convex relaxation techniques. These guarantee global optimality for the two-region case (foreground/background) and solutions of bounded optimality for the multiregion case. We show results on the GrabCut benchmark, the recently published Graz benchmark, and on the Berkeley segmentation database which exceed previous approaches such as GrabCut, the Random Walker, Santner's approach, TV-Seg, and interactive graph cuts in accuracy. Our results demonstrate that taking into account the spatial variation of color models leads to drastic improvements for interactive image segmentation.

  1. A Critical Examination of Spatial Biases Between MODIS and MISR Aerosol Products - Application for Potential AERONET Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Kahn, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT) and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB) with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while side-stepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a km1 file.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Global Onshore Wind Speed Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.

    2013-09-09

    Wind power, a renewable energy source, can play an important role in electrical energy generation. Information regarding wind energy potential is important both for energy related modeling and for decision-making in the policy community. While wind speed datasets with high spatial and temporal resolution are often ultimately used for detailed planning, simpler assumptions are often used in analysis work. An accurate representation of the wind speed frequency distribution is needed in order to properly characterize wind energy potential. Using a power density method, this study estimated global variation in wind parameters as fitted to a Weibull density function using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis data. The estimated Weibull distribution performs well in fitting the time series wind speed data at the global level according to R2, root mean square error, and power density error. The spatial, decadal, and seasonal patterns of wind speed distribution were then evaluated. We also analyzed the potential error in wind power estimation when a commonly assumed Rayleigh distribution (Weibull k = 2) is used. We find that the assumption of the same Weibull parameter across large regions can result in substantial errors. While large-scale wind speed data is often presented in the form of average wind speeds, these results highlight the need to also provide information on the wind speed distribution.

  3. Nuclear signature effect on spatial distribution of molecular harmonic in the presence of spatial inhomogeneous field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liqiang; Li, Wenliang

    2017-01-01

    Spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra from \\text{H}\\text{2}+ in the presence of inhomogeneous field has been theoretically investigated. It shows that (i) the harmonic intensities from the negative-H nucleus play the dominating role in harmonic emission spectra. (ii) Through the investigations of the nuclear signature effect on the spatial distribution of the molecular harmonic spectra, the differences of the harmonic intensities between the negative-H nucleus and the positive-H nucleus can be enhanced and reduced with the introduction of the higher vibrational state and the heavy nucleus (i.e. \\text{D}2+ ), respectively. The time-frequency analyses of the harmonic spectra, the time-dependent wave function and the electron localization have been shown to explain the harmonic spatial distribution and the electron motion. (iii) Due to the plasmon-resonance-enhancement near the metallic nanostructure, the harmonic cutoff can be remarkably enhanced as the spatial position of the inhomogeneous field moving away from the gap center. The ionization probabilities have been shown to explain the harmonic cutoff extension.

  4. Sampling design for spatially distributed hydrogeologic and environmental processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christakos, G.; Olea, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for the design of sampling networks over space is proposed. The methodology is based on spatial random field representations of nonhomogeneous natural processes, and on optimal spatial estimation techniques. One of the most important results of random field theory for physical sciences is its rationalization of correlations in spatial variability of natural processes. This correlation is extremely important both for interpreting spatially distributed observations and for predictive performance. The extent of site sampling and the types of data to be collected will depend on the relationship of subsurface variability to predictive uncertainty. While hypothesis formulation and initial identification of spatial variability characteristics are based on scientific understanding (such as knowledge of the physics of the underlying phenomena, geological interpretations, intuition and experience), the support offered by field data is statistically modelled. This model is not limited by the geometric nature of sampling and covers a wide range in subsurface uncertainties. A factorization scheme of the sampling error variance is derived, which possesses certain atttactive properties allowing significant savings in computations. By means of this scheme, a practical sampling design procedure providing suitable indices of the sampling error variance is established. These indices can be used by way of multiobjective decision criteria to obtain the best sampling strategy. Neither the actual implementation of the in-situ sampling nor the solution of the large spatial estimation systems of equations are necessary. The required values of the accuracy parameters involved in the network design are derived using reference charts (readily available for various combinations of data configurations and spatial variability parameters) and certain simple yet accurate analytical formulas. Insight is gained by applying the proposed sampling procedure to realistic examples related

  5. Aerosol retrieval algorithm for the characterization of local aerosol using MODIS L1B data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, A. M.; Sarker, M. L. R.

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in radiation budget, climate change, hydrology and visibility. However, it has immense effect on the air quality, especially in densely populated areas where high concentration of aerosol is associated with premature death and the decrease of life expectancy. Therefore, an accurate estimation of aerosol with spatial distribution is essential, and satellite data has increasingly been used to estimate aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosol product (AOD) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data is available at global scale but problems arise due to low spatial resolution, time-lag availability of AOD product as well as the use of generalized aerosol models in retrieval algorithm instead of local aerosol models. This study focuses on the aerosol retrieval algorithm for the characterization of local aerosol in Hong Kong for a long period of time (2006-2011) using high spatial resolution MODIS level 1B data (500 m resolution) and taking into account the local aerosol models. Two methods (dark dense vegetation and MODIS land surface reflectance product) were used for the estimation of the surface reflectance over land and Santa Barbara DISORT Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code was used to construct LUTs for calculating the aerosol reflectance as a function of AOD. Results indicate that AOD can be estimated at the local scale from high resolution MODIS data, and the obtained accuracy (ca. 87%) is very much comparable with the accuracy obtained from other studies (80%-95%) for AOD estimation.

  6. Spatial distribution of Serengeti wildebeest in relation to resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilmshurst, J.F.; Fryxell, J.M.; Farm, Brian P.; Sinclair, A.R.E.; Henschel, C.P.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the spatial distribution of radio-marked wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) in the Serengeti ecosystem in relation to the distribution of their food resources, comparing patterns in the wet and dry seasons and at local and landscape spatial scales. A mechanistic model of ruminant energy optimization predicted that wildebeest should maximize energy intake on swards 3 cm high and maintain energy balance on swards between 3 and 10 cm high. At the ecosystem scale, wildebeest preferred short and intermediate-height grass of moderate greenness during both the wet and dry seasons. This was consistent with the model prediction which suggests that large-scale movements by wildebeest are motivated, at least partially, by an energy-maximizing strategy. At the local scale, however, wildebeest showed spatial selectivity only on the basis of grass greenness, not on grass height. This differed from model expectations and may have resulted from wildebeest exploiting ephemeral green flushes of grass caused by localized rainfall in their movement radius. According to these results, the influence of other nutritional or behavioural factors on wildebeest distributions is not rejected, yet they suggest the potentially important role of an energy intake maximizing strategy on movement patterns. Our findings show that wildebeest movements are broadly similar to those of other large herbivores that migrate in response to resource gradients.

  7. Spatial uncertainty analysis: Propagation of interpolation errors in spatially distributed models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, D.L.; Marks, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    In simulation modelling, it is desirable to quantify model uncertainties and provide not only point estimates for output variables but confidence intervals as well. Spatially distributed physical and ecological process models are becoming widely used, with runs being made over a grid of points that represent the landscape. This requires input values at each grid point, which often have to be interpolated from irregularly scattered measurement sites, e.g., weather stations. Interpolation introduces spatially varying errors which propagate through the model We extended established uncertainty analysis methods to a spatial domain for quantifying spatial patterns of input variable interpolation errors and how they propagate through a model to affect the uncertainty of the model output. We applied this to a model of potential evapotranspiration (PET) as a demonstration. We modelled PET for three time periods in 1990 as a function of temperature, humidity, and wind on a 10-km grid across the U.S. portion of the Columbia River Basin. Temperature, humidity, and wind speed were interpolated using kriging from 700- 1000 supporting data points. Kriging standard deviations (SD) were used to quantify the spatially varying interpolation uncertainties. For each of 5693 grid points, 100 Monte Carlo simulations were done, using the kriged values of temperature, humidity, and wind, plus random error terms determined by the kriging SDs and the correlations of interpolation errors among the three variables. For the spring season example, kriging SDs averaged 2.6??C for temperature, 8.7% for relative humidity, and 0.38 m s-1 for wind. The resultant PET estimates had coefficients of variation (CVs) ranging from 14% to 27% for the 10-km grid cells. Maps of PET means and CVs showed the spatial patterns of PET with a measure of its uncertainty due to interpolation of the input variables. This methodology should be applicable to a variety of spatially distributed models using interpolated

  8. Online Simulations of Global Aerosol Distributions in the NASA GEOS-4 Model and Comparisons to Satellite and Ground-Based Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; daSilva, Arlindo; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented a module for tropospheric aerosols (GO CART) online in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 4 model and simulated global aerosol distributions for the period 2000-2006. The new online system offers several advantages over the previous offline version, providing a platform for aerosol data assimilation, aerosol-chemistry-climate interaction studies, and short-range chemical weather forecasting and climate prediction. We introduce as well a methodology for sampling model output consistently with satellite aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrievals to facilitate model-satellite comparison. Our results are similar to the offline GOCART model and to the models participating in the AeroCom intercomparison. The simulated AOT has similar seasonal and regional variability and magnitude to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations. The model AOT and Angstrom parameter are consistently low relative to AERONET in biomass-burning-dominated regions, where emissions appear to be underestimated, consistent with the results of the offline GOCART model. In contrast, the model AOT is biased high in sulfate-dominated regions of North America and Europe. Our model-satellite comparison methodology shows that diurnal variability in aerosol loading is unimportant compared to sampling the model where the satellite has cloud-free observations, particularly in sulfate-dominated regions. Simulated sea salt burden and optical thickness are high by a factor of 2-3 relative to other models, and agreement between model and satellite over-ocean AOT is improved by reducing the model sea salt burden by a factor of 2. The best agreement in both AOT magnitude and variability occurs immediately downwind of the Saharan dust plume.

  9. Spatial distribution of dust's optical properties over the Sahara and Asia inferred from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Haywood, J. M.; Yokohata, T.; Murakami, H.; Nakajimae, T.

    2013-11-01

    There is great uncertainty regarding the role of mineral dust aerosols in Earth's climate system. One reason for this uncertainty is that the optical properties of mineral dust, such as its single scattering albedo (the ratio of scattering to total extinction), are poorly constrained because ground observations are limited to a few locations and satellite standard products are not available due to the excessively bright surface of the desert in the visible wavelength, which makes robust retrievals difficult. Here, we develop a method to estimate the spatial distributions of the aerosol single scattering albedo (ω0) and optical depth (τa), with daily 1°×1° spatial resolution using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) as well as model simulations of radiative transfer. This approach is based on the "critical surface reflectance" method developed in the literature, which estimates ω0 from the top of the atmospheric radiance. We estimate the uncertainties in ω0 over the Sahara (Asia) to be approximately 0.020 and 0.010 (0.023 and 0.017) for bands 9 and 1, respectively, while the uncertainty in τa is approximately 0.235 and 0.228 (0.464 and 0.370) for bands 9 and 1, respectively. The 5-95% range of the spatial distribution of ω0 over the Sahara (Asia) is approximately 0.90-0.94 and 0.96-0.99 (0.87-0.94 and 0.89-0.97) for bands 9 and 1, respectively, and that of τa over the Sahara (Asia) is approximately 0.8-1.4 and 0.8-1.7 (0.7-2.0 and 0.7-1.9) for bands 9 and 1, respectively. The results for the Sahara indicate a good correlation between ω0 and the surface reflectance, and between ω0 and τa. However, the relationships between ω0, τa, and surface reflectance are less clear in Asia than in the Sahara, and the ω0 values are smaller than those in the Sahara. The regions with small ω0 values are consistent with the regions where coal-burning smoke and carbonaceous aerosols are reported to be transported in previous studies

  10. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Yee, L. D.; Schilling, K.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zuend, A.; Ziemann, P. J.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multi-generation gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a mid-experiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. The results of the current work have a number of implications for SOA models. While the dynamics of an aerosol size distribution reflects the mechanism of growth, we demonstrate here that it provides a key constraint in interpreting laboratory and ambient SOA formation. This work, although carried out specifically for the long chain alkane, dodecane, is expected to be widely applicable to other major classes of SOA precursors. SOA consists of a myriad of organic compounds containing various functional groups, which can generally undergo heterogeneous/multiphase reactions forming low-volatility products such as oligomers and other high molecular mass compounds. If particle-phase chemistry is indeed

  11. Aerosol Remote Sensing from AERONET, the Ground-Based Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric particles including mineral dust, biomass burning smoke, pollution from carbonaceous aerosols and sulfates, sea salt, impact air quality and climate. The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) program, established in the early 1990s, is a federation of ground-based remote sensing aerosol networks of Sun/sky radiometers distributed around the world, which provides a long-term, continuous and readily accessible public domain database of aerosol optical (e.g., aerosol optical depth) and microphysical (e.g., aerosol volume size distribution) properties for aerosol characterization, validation of satellite retrievals, and synergism with Earth science databases. Climatological aerosol properties will be presented at key worldwide locations exhibiting discrete dominant aerosol types. Further, AERONET's temporary mesoscale network campaign (e.g., UAE2, TIGERZ, DRAGON-USA.) results that attempt to quantify spatial and temporal variability of aerosol properties, establish validation of ground-based aerosol retrievals using aircraft profile measurements, and measure aerosol properties on compatible spatial scales with satellite retrievals and aerosol transport models allowing for more robust validation will be discussed.

  12. Bimodal Distribution of Sulfuric Acid Aerosols in the Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Zhang, X.; Crisp, D.; Bardeen, C. G.; Yung, Y. L.

    2013-10-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express have revealed that the upper haze of Venus, between 70 and 90 km, is variable on the order of days and that it is populated by two particle modes. In this work, we posit that the observed phenomena are caused by the transient mixing of the clouds and the haze, as well as another source of sulfuric acid aerosols in the upper haze that nucleate on meteoric dust. We test this hypothesis by simulating a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface using a model based upon the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres and consider the effects of meteoric dust and polysulfur acting as condensation nuclei in the upper haze and upper cloud, respectively, as well as transient winds at the cloud tops caused by subsolar convection. Our aerosol number density results are consistent with Pioneer Venus data from Knollenberg and Hunten (1980), while our gas distribution results match the Magellan radio occultation data as analyzed by Kolodner and Steffes (1998) below 55 km. The size distribution of cloud particles shows two distinct modes in the upper clouds region and three distinct modes in the middle and lower clouds regions, qualitatively matching the observations of Pioneer Venus. The UH size distribution shows one distinct mode that is likely an upwelled cloud particle population with which an in situ meteoric dust condensation particle population has coagulated. The results of the transient wind simulations yield a variability timescale that is consistent with Venus Express observations, as well as a clear bimodal size distribution in the UH.

  13. Mapping PET-measured triamcinolone acetonide (TAA) aerosol distribution into deposition by airway generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Berridge, M S; Finlay, W H; Heald, D L

    2000-04-10

    The three dimensional (3D) distribution of inhaled drugs was measured using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) (Berridge, M.S, Muswick, G.J., Lee, Z., Leisure, G.L., Nelson, A.D., Muzic, R.F. Jr., Miraldi, F., Heald, D.L., 1997. PET evaluation of Azmacort(R) ([C-11]triamcinolone acetonide) dose administration. J. Nucl. Med. 38 (5) Suppl., 4-5). Data analysis was based upon regional ratios or penetration indices. To improve the analytical usefulness and objectivity, labeled drug from dynamic PET images was mapped into 23 airway generations following a general framework from a SPECT-based methodology (Fleming, J.S., Nassim, M.A., Hashish, A.H., Bailey, A.G. , Conway, J., Holgate, S., Halson, P., Moore, E., Martonen, T.B., 1995. Description of pulmonary deposition of radiolabeled aerosol by airway generation using a conceptual three dimensional model of lung morphology. J. Aerosol Med. 8, 341-356). A recently developed airway network model was used in this study. Quantitative PET scans of [C-11]triamcinolone acetonide distribution in the lung were determined following administration of Azmacort(R), a commercial metered dose inhaler with an integrated spacer device. Distributions at varying time periods after drug administration were investigated to explore the dynamics and kinetics of the aerosolized drug. Initially, deposition of labeled drug on conducting airways (generations 1-14) was found to be higher than those on acinar airways (generation 15-23), 64% versus 36%. The distribution pattern changed slowly with time. By 47 min, 51% of the dose remaining in the lung was found on conducting airways while 49% was on acinar airways. This study illustrates the value of PET imaging for the evaluation and design of drug formulations.

  14. Spatial variations in immediate greenhouse gases and aerosol emissions and resulting radiative forcing from wildfires in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shengli; Liu, Heping; Dahal, Devendra; Jin, Suming; Li, Shuang; Liu, Shuguang

    2016-02-01

    Boreal fires can cool the climate; however, this conclusion came from individual fires and may not represent the whole story. We hypothesize that the climatic impact of boreal fires depends on local landscape heterogeneity such as burn severity, prefire vegetation type, and soil properties. To test this hypothesis, spatially explicit emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols and their resulting radiative forcing are required as an important and necessary component towards a full assessment. In this study, we integrated remote sensing (Landsat and MODIS) and models (carbon consumption model, emission factors model, and radiative forcing model) to calculate the carbon consumption, GHGs and aerosol emissions, and their radiative forcing of 2001-2010 fires at 30 m resolution in the Yukon River Basin of Alaska. Total carbon consumption showed significant spatial variation, with a mean of 2,615 g C m-2 and a standard deviation of 2,589 g C m-2. The carbon consumption led to different amounts of GHGs and aerosol emissions, ranging from 593.26 Tg (CO2) to 0.16 Tg (N2O). When converted to equivalent CO2 based on global warming potential metric, the maximum 20 years equivalent CO2 was black carbon (713.77 Tg), and the lowest 20 years equivalent CO2 was organic carbon (-583.13 Tg). The resulting radiative forcing also showed significant spatial variation: CO2, CH4, and N2O can cause a 20-year mean radiative forcing of 7.41 W m-2 with a standard deviation of 2.87 W m-2. This emission forcing heterogeneity indicates that different boreal fires have different climatic impacts. When considering the spatial variation of other forcings, such as surface shortwave forcing, we may conclude that some boreal fires, especially boreal deciduous fires, can warm the climate.

  15. A Modelling Approach on Fine Particle Spatial Distribution for Street Canyons in Asian Residential Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Uhrner, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Rapidly increasing urban pollution poses severe health risks.Especially fine particles pollution is considered to be closely related to respiratory and cardiovascular disease. In this work, ambient fine particles are studied in street canyons of a typical Asian residential community using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) dispersion modelling approach. The community is characterised by an artery road with a busy traffic flow of about 4000 light vehicles (mainly cars and motorcycles) per hour at rush hours, three streets with hundreds light vehicles per hour at rush hours and several small lanes with less traffic. The objective is to study the spatial distribution of the ambient fine particle concentrations within micro-environments, in order to assess fine particle exposure of the people living in the community. The GRAL modelling system is used to simulate and assess the emission and dispersion of the traffic-related fine particles within the community. Traffic emission factors and traffic situation is assigned using both field observation and local emissions inventory data. High resolution digital elevation data (DEM) and building height data are used to resolve the topographical features. Air quality monitoring and mobile monitoring within the community is used to validate the simulation results. By using this modelling approach, the dispersion of fine particles in street canyons is simulated; the impact of wind condition and street orientation are investigated; the contributions of car and motorcycle emissions are quantified respectively; the residents' exposure level of fine particles is assessed. The study is funded by "Taiwan Megacity Environmental Research (II)-chemistry and environmental impacts of boundary layer aerosols (Year 2-3) (103-2111-M-001-001-); Spatial variability and organic markers of aerosols (Year 3)(104-2111-M-001 -005 -)"

  16. Particle size distribution of radioactive aerosols after the Fukushima and the Chernobyl accidents.

    PubMed

    Malá, Helena; Rulík, Petr; Bečková, Vera; Mihalík, Ján; Slezáková, Miriam

    2013-12-01

    Following the Fukushima accident, a series of aerosol samples were taken between 24th March and 13th April 2011 by cascade impactors in the Czech Republic to obtain the size distribution of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (7)Be aerosols. All distributions could be considered monomodal. The arithmetic means of the activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) for artificial radionuclides and for (7)Be were 0.43 and 0.41 μm with GDSs 3.6 and 3.0, respectively. The time course of the AMADs of (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (7)Be in the sampled period showed a slight decrease at a significance level of 0.05, whereas the AMAD pertaining to (131)I increased at a significance level of 0.1. Results obtained after the Fukushima accident were compared with results obtained after the Chernobyl accident. The radionuclides released during the Chernobyl accident for which we determined the AMAD fell into two categories: refractory radionuclides ((140)Ba, (140)La (141)Ce, (144)Ce, (95)Zr and (95)Nb) and volatile radionuclides ((134)Cs, (137)Cs, (103)Ru, (106)Ru, (131)I, and (132)Te). The AMAD of the refractory radionuclides was approximately 3 times higher than the AMAD of the volatile radionuclides; nevertheless, the size distributions for volatile radionuclides having a mean AMAD value of 0.51 μm were very close to the distributions after the Fukushima accident.

  17. Detailed mass size distributions of atmospheric aerosol species in the Negev desert, Israel, during ARACHNE-96

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, Willy; Ptasinski, Jacek; Cafmeyer, Jan

    1999-04-01

    As part of the 1996 summer intensive of the Aerosol, RAdiation and CHemistry Experiment (ARACHNE-96), the mass size distribution of various airborne particulate elements was studied at a remote site in the Negev Desert, Israel. Aerosol collections were made with 8-stage PIXE International cascade impactors (PCIs) and 12-stage small deposit area low pressure impactors (SDIs) and the samples were analyzed by PIXE for about 20 elements. The mineral elements (Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe) exhibited a unimodal size distribution which peaked at about 6 μm, but the contribution of particles larger than 10 μm was clearly more pronounced during the day than during night. Sulphur and Br had a tendency to exhibit two modes in the submicrometer size range, with diameters at about 0.3 and 0.6 μm, respectively. The elements V and Ni, which are indicators of residual fuel burning, showed essentially one fine mode (at 0.3 μm) in addition to a coarse mode which represented the mineral dust contribution. Overall, good agreement was observed between the mass size distributions from the PCI and SDI devices. The PCI was superior to the SDI for studying the size distribution in the coarse size range, but the SDI was clearly superior for unravelling the various modes in the submicrometer size range.

  18. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  19. Pickup Ion Velocity Distributions at Titan: Effects of Spatial Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, R. E.; Sittler, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    The principle source of pickup ions at Titan is its neutral exosphere, extending well above the ionopause into the magnetosphere of Saturn or the solar wind, depending on the moon's orbital position. Thermal and nonthermal processes in the thermosphere generate the distribution of neutral atoms and molecules in the exosphere. The combination of these processes and the range of mass numbers, 1 to over 28, contribute to an exospheric source structure that produces pickup ions with gyroradii that are much larger or smaller than the corresponding scale heights of their neutral sources. The resulting phase space distributions are dependent on the spatial structure of the exosphere as well as that of the magnetic field and background plasma. When the pickup ion gyroradius is less than the source gas scale height, the pickup ion velocity distribution is characterized by a sharp cutoff near the maximum speed, which is twice that of the ambient plasma times the sine of the angle between the magnetic field and the flow velocity. This was the case for pickup H(sup +) ions identified during the Voyager 1 flyby. In contrast, as the gyroradius becomes much larger than the scale height, the peak of the velocity distribution in the source region recedes from the maximum speed. Iri addition, the amplitude of the distribution near the maximum speed decreases. These more beam like distributions of heavy ions were not observed from Voyager 1 , but should be observable by more sensitive instruments on future spacecraft, including Cassini. The finite gyroradius effects in the pickup ion velocity distributions are studied by including in the analysis the possible range of spatial structures in the neutral exosphere and background plasma.

  20. Modal structure of chemical mass size distribution in the high Arctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillamo, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Aurela, Minna; MäKelä, Timo; Maenhaut, Willy; Leek, Caroline

    2001-11-01

    Chemical mass size distributions of aerosol particles were measured in the remote marine boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean as part of the Atmospheric Research Program on the Arctic Ocean Expedition 1996 (AOE-96). An inertial impaction method was used to classify aerosol particles into different size classes for subsequent chemical analysis. The particle chemical composition was determined by ion chromatography and by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. Continuous particle size spectra were extracted from the raw data using a data inversion method. Clear and varying modal structures for aerosols consisting of primary sea-salt particles or of secondary particles related to dimethyl sulfide emissions were found. Concentration levels of all modes decreased rapidly when the distance from open sea increased. In the submicrometer size range the major ions found by ion chromatography were sulfate, methane sulfonate, and ammonium. They had most of the time a clear Aitken mode and one or two accumulation modes, with aerodynamic mass median diameters around 0.1 μm, 0.3 μm, and between 0.5-1.0 μm, respectively. The overall submicron size distributions of these three ions were quite similar, suggesting that they were internally mixed over most of this size range. The corresponding modal structure was consistent with the mass size distributions derived from the particle number size distributions measured with a differential mobility particle sizer. The Aitken to accumulation mode mass ratio for nss-sulfate and MSA was substantially higher during clear skies than during cloudy periods. Primary sea-salt particles formed a mode with an aerodynamic mass median diameter around 2 μm. In general, the resulting continuous mass size distributions displayed a clear modal structure consistent with our understanding of the two known major source mechanisms. One is the sea-salt aerosol emerging from seawater by bubble bursting. The other is related to

  1. Volume and surface area size distribution, water mass and model fitting of GCE/CASE/WATOX marine aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.

    1990-06-01

    As a part of the Global Change Expedition/Coordinated Air-Sea Experiment/Western Atlantic Ocean Experiment (GCE/CASE/WATOX), size distributions of marine aerosols were measured at two altitudes of about 2750 and 150 m above sea level (asl) over the size range 0.1 ˜ 32 μm. Lognormal fitting was applied to the corrected aerosol size spectra to determine the volume and surface area size distributions of the CASE-WATOX marine aerosols. Each aerosol size distribution was fitted with three lognormal distributions representing fine-, large-, and giant-particle modes. Water volume fraction and dry particle size of each aerosol size distribution were also calculated using empirical formulas for particle size as a function of relative humidity and particle type. Because of the increased influence from anthropogenic sources in the continental United States, higher aerosol volume concentrations were observed in the fine-particle mode near-shore off the east coast; 2.11 and 3.63 μm3 cm-3 for free troposphere (FT) and marine boundary layer (MBL), compared with the open-sea Bermuda area values; 0.13 and 0.74 μm3 cm-3 for FT and MBL. The large-particle mode exhibits the least variations in volume distributions between the east coast and open-sea Bermuda area, having a volume geometric median diameter (VGMD) between 1.4 and 1.6 μm and a geometric standard deviation between 1.57 and 1.68. For the giant-particle mode, larger VGMD and volume concentrations were observed for marine aerosols nearshore off the east coast than in the open-sea Bermuda area because of higher relative humidity and higher surface wind speed conditions. Wet VGMD and aerosol water volume concentrations at 15 m asl ship level were determined by extrapolating from those obtained by analysis of the CASE-WATOX aircraft aerosol data. Abundance of aerosol water in the MBL serves as an important pathway for heterogeneous conversion of SO2 in sea salt aerosol particles.

  2. Spatial Distribution of Soil Fauna In Long Term No Tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbo, J. Z. F.; Vieira, S. R.; Siqueira, G. M.

    2012-04-01

    The soil is a complex system constituted by living beings, organic and mineral particles, whose components define their physical, chemical and biological properties. Soil fauna plays an important role in soil and may reflect and interfere in its functionality. These organisms' populations may be influenced by management practices, fertilization, liming and porosity, among others. Such changes may reduce the composition and distribution of soil fauna community. Thus, this study aimed to determine the spatial variability of soil fauna in consolidated no-tillage system. The experimental area is located at Instituto Agronômico in Campinas (São Paulo, Brazil). The sampling was conducted in a Rhodic Eutrudox, under no tillage system and 302 points distributed in a 3.2 hectare area in a regular grid of 10.00 m x 10.00 m were sampled. The soil fauna was sampled with "Pitfall Traps" method and traps remained in the area for seven days. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics to determine the main statistical moments (mean variance, coefficient of variation, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis). Geostatistical tools were used to determine the spatial variability of the attributes using the experimental semivariogram. For the biodiversity analysis, Shannon and Pielou indexes and richness were calculated for each sample. Geostatistics has proven to be a great tool for mapping the spatial variability of groups from the soil epigeal fauna. The family Formicidae proved to be the most abundant and dominant in the study area. The parameters of descriptive statistics showed that all attributes studied showed lognormal frequency distribution for groups from the epigeal soil fauna. The exponential model was the most suited for the obtained data, for both groups of epigeal soil fauna (Acari, Araneae, Coleoptera, Formicidae and Coleoptera larva), and the other biodiversity indexes. The sampling scheme (10.00 m x 10.00 m) was not sufficient to detect the spatial

  3. Lidar Measurements of Aerosol and Ozone Distributions During the 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Butler, C. F.; Fenn, M. A.; Grant, W. B.; Carter, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The LaRC airborne lidar system was operated from the ARC DC-8 aircraft during the 1992 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (ASEE-2) to investigate the distribution of stratospheric aerosols and O3 across the Arctic vortex from Jan. to Mar. 1992. Monthly flights were made across the Arctic vortex from Anchorage, Alaska, to Stavanger, Norway, and then back to Bangor, Maine, and additional round-trip flights north into the vortex were made each month from either Stavanger or Bangor depending on the location of the vortex that month. The airborne lidar system uses the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique at laser wavelengths of 301.5 and 310.8 nm to measure O3 profiles above the DC-8 over the 12-25 km altitude range. Lidar measurements of aerosol backscatter and depolarization profiles over the 12-30 km altitude range are made simultaneously with the O3 measurements using infrared (IR) and visible (VIS) laser wavelengths of 603 and 1064 nm, respectively. The measurements of Pinatubo aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds, and O3 made with the airborne DIAL system during the AASE-2 expedition and to chemical and dynamical process that contribute to O3 depletion in the wintertime Arctic stratosphere.

  4. Comparison of Summer and Winter California Central Valley Aerosol Distributions from Lidar and MODIS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper; DeYoung, Russell; Ferrare, Richard; Chu, D. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol distributions from two aircraft lidar campaigns conducted in the California Central Valley are compared in order to identify seasonal variations. Aircraft lidar flights were conducted in June 2003 and February 2007. While the ground PM(sub 2.5) concentration is highest in the winter, the aerosol optical depth measured from MODIS is highest in the summer. A seasonal comparison shows that PM(sub 2.5) in the winter can exceed summer PM(sub 2.5) by 55%, while summer AOD exceeds winter AOD by 43%. Higher temperatures and wildfires in the summer produce elevated aerosol layers that are detected by satellite measurements, but not surface particulate matter monitors. Temperature inversions, especially during the winter, contribute to higher PM(sub 2.5) measurements at the surface. Measurements of the boundary layer height from lidar instruments provide valuable information need to understand the relationship between satellite measurements of optical depth and in-situ measurements of PM(sub 2.5).

  5. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard; Browell, Edward; Kooi, Susan; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Dunion, Jason; Heymsfield, Gerry; Anderson, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) onboard the NASA DC-8 was used to measure high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern Atlantic region during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment, which was conducted from August 15 to September 12, 2006. These measurements were made in conjunction with flights designed to study African Easterly Waves (AEW), Tropical Disturbances (TD), and Saharan Aerosol Layers (SALs) as well as flights performed in clear air and convective regions. As a consequence of their unique radiative properties and dynamics, SAL layers have a significant influence in the development of organized convection associated with TD. Interactions of the SAL with tropical air during early stages of the development of TD were observed. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on TDs and hurricanes. Seven AEWs were studied and four of these evolved into tropical storms and three did not. Three out of the four tropical storms evolved into hurricanes.

  6. Asymmetric competition causes multimodal size distributions in spatially structured populations.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Jorge; Allen, Robert B; Coomes, David A; Eichhorn, Markus P

    2016-01-27

    Plant sizes within populations often exhibit multimodal distributions, even when all individuals are the same age and have experienced identical conditions. To establish the causes of this, we created an individual-based model simulating the growth of trees in a spatially explicit framework, which was parametrized using data from a long-term study of forest stands in New Zealand. First, we demonstrate that asymmetric resource competition is a necessary condition for the formation of multimodal size distributions within cohorts. By contrast, the legacy of small-scale clustering during recruitment is transient and quickly overwhelmed by density-dependent mortality. Complex multi-layered size distributions are generated when established individuals are restricted in the spatial domain within which they can capture resources. The number of modes reveals the effective number of direct competitors, while the separation and spread of modes are influenced by distances among established individuals. Asymmetric competition within local neighbourhoods can therefore generate a range of complex size distributions within even-aged cohorts.

  7. Asymmetric competition causes multimodal size distributions in spatially structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Jorge; Allen, Robert B.; Coomes, David A.; Eichhorn, Markus P.

    2016-01-01

    Plant sizes within populations often exhibit multimodal distributions, even when all individuals are the same age and have experienced identical conditions. To establish the causes of this, we created an individual-based model simulating the growth of trees in a spatially explicit framework, which was parametrized using data from a long-term study of forest stands in New Zealand. First, we demonstrate that asymmetric resource competition is a necessary condition for the formation of multimodal size distributions within cohorts. By contrast, the legacy of small-scale clustering during recruitment is transient and quickly overwhelmed by density-dependent mortality. Complex multi-layered size distributions are generated when established individuals are restricted in the spatial domain within which they can capture resources. The number of modes reveals the effective number of direct competitors, while the separation and spread of modes are influenced by distances among established individuals. Asymmetric competition within local neighbourhoods can therefore generate a range of complex size distributions within even-aged cohorts. PMID:26817778

  8. Atmospheric aerosols size distribution properties in winter and pre-monsoon over western Indian Thar Desert location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Chhagan; Vyas, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    The first ever experimental results over Indian Thar Desert region concerning to height integrated aerosols size distribution function in particles size ranging between 0.09 to 2 µm such as, aerosols columnar size distribution (CSD), effective radius (Reff), integrated content of total aerosols (Nt), columnar content of accumulation and coarse size aerosols particles concentration (Na) (size < 0.5 µm) and (Nc) (size between 0.5 to 2 µm) have been described specifically during winter (a stable weather condition and intense anthropogenic pollution activity period) and pre-monsoon (intense dust storms of natural mineral aerosols as well as unstable atmospheric weather condition period) at Jaisalmer (26.90°N, 69.90°E, 220 m above surface level (asl)) located in central Thar desert vicinity of western Indian site. The CSD and various derived other aerosols size parameters are retrieved from their average spectral characteristics of Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) from UV to Infrared wavelength spectrum measured from Multi-Wavelength solar Radiometer (MWR). The natures of CSD are, in general, bio-modal character, instead of uniformly distributed character and power law distributions. The observed primary peaks in CSD plots are seen around about 1013 m2 μm-1 at radius range 0.09-0.20 µm during both the seasons. But, in winter months, secondary peaks of relatively lower CSD values of 1010 to 1011 m2/μm-1 occur within a lower radius size range 0.4 to 0.6 µm. In contrast to this, while in dust dominated and hot season, the dominated secondary maxima of the higher CSD of about 1012 m2μm-3 is found of bigger aerosols size particles in a rage of 0.6 to 1.0 µm which is clearly demonstrating the characteristics of higher aerosols laden of bigger size aerosols in summer months relative to their prevailed lower aerosols loading of smaller size aerosols particles (0.4 to 0.6 µm) in cold months. Several other interesting features of changing nature of monthly spectral AOT

  9. Spatial distribution of flood risk and quality of spatial management: case study in Odra Valley, Poland.

    PubMed

    Rucinska, Dorota

    2015-02-01

    This article presents methodological solutions aimed at presenting the spatial distribution of flood risk and quality of spatial management (land use), indicating both those areas used reasonably and those requiring modification. The purpose was to identify key risk areas and risk-free areas from the point of view of human security and activity on the floodplains, based on the examples of the vicinities of Wroclaw and Raciborz in the Odra Valley, Poland. Due to recent climate change, Poland has suffered the effects of severe flooding (e.g., 1997, 2001, 2010). The analyses conducted were motivated by the European Parliament and Council's recently implemented Directive 2007/60/WE, as well as by the demand for studies for local spatial planning. The analysis indicates that reasonably developed areas do not account for the majority of those studied, making up 36% of the Wroclaw area and 15% of the Raciborz area.

  10. The evolution of biomass-burning aerosol size distributions due to coagulation: dependence on fire and meteorological details and parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kimiko M.; Laing, James R.; Stevens, Robin G.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-06-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols have a significant effect on global and regional aerosol climate forcings. To model the magnitude of these effects accurately requires knowledge of the size distribution of the emitted and evolving aerosol particles. Current biomass-burning inventories do not include size distributions, and global and regional models generally assume a fixed size distribution from all biomass-burning emissions. However, biomass-burning size distributions evolve in the plume due to coagulation and net organic aerosol (OA) evaporation or formation, and the plume processes occur on spacial scales smaller than global/regional-model grid boxes. The extent of this size-distribution evolution is dependent on a variety of factors relating to the emission source and atmospheric conditions. Therefore, accurately accounting for biomass-burning aerosol size in global models requires an effective aerosol size distribution that accounts for this sub-grid evolution and can be derived from available emission-inventory and meteorological parameters. In this paper, we perform a detailed investigation of the effects of coagulation on the aerosol size distribution in biomass-burning plumes. We compare the effect of coagulation to that of OA evaporation and formation. We develop coagulation-only parameterizations for effective biomass-burning size distributions using the SAM-TOMAS large-eddy simulation plume model. For the most-sophisticated parameterization, we use the Gaussian Emulation Machine for Sensitivity Analysis (GEM-SA) to build a parameterization of the aged size distribution based on the SAM-TOMAS output and seven inputs: emission median dry diameter, emission distribution modal width, mass emissions flux, fire area, mean boundary-layer wind speed, plume mixing depth, and time/distance since emission. This parameterization was tested against an independent set of SAM-TOMAS simulations and yields R2 values of 0.83 and 0.89 for Dpm and modal width, respectively. The

  11. FDATMOS16 non-linear partitioning and organic volatility distributions in urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Madronich, Sasha; Kleinman, Larry; Conley, Andrew; Lee-Taylor, Julie; Hodzic, A.; Aumont, Bernard

    2015-12-17

    Gas-to-particle partitioning of organic aerosols (OA) is represented in most models by Raoult’s law, and depends on the existing mass of particles into which organic gases can dissolve. This raises the possibility of non-linear response of particle-phase OA to the emissions of precursor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that contribute to this partitioning mass. Implications for air quality management are evident: A strong non-linear dependence would suggest that reductions in VOC emission would have a more-than-proportionate benefit in lowering ambient OA concentrations. Chamber measurements on simple VOC mixtures generally confirm the non-linear scaling between OA and VOCs, usually stated as a mass-dependence of the measured OA yields. However, for realistic ambient conditions including urban settings, no single component dominates the composition of the organic particles, and deviations from linearity are presumed to be small. Here we re-examine the linearity question using volatility spectra from several sources: (1) chamber studies of selected aerosols, (2) volatility inferred for aerosols sampled in two megacities, Mexico City and Paris, and (3) an explicit chemistry model (GECKO-A). These few available volatility distributions suggest that urban OA may be only slightly super-linear, with most values of the sensitivity exponent in the range 1.1-1.3, also substantially lower than seen in chambers for some specific aerosols. Furthermore, the rather low values suggest that OA concentrations in megacities are not an inevitable convergence of non-linear effects, but can be addressed (much like in smaller urban areas) by proportionate reductions in emissions.

  12. Non-linear partitioning and organic volatility distributions of urban aerosols.

    PubMed

    Madronich, S; Conley, A J; Lee-Taylor, J; Kleinman, L I; Hodzic, A; Aumont, B

    2016-07-18

    Gas-to-particle partitioning of organic aerosols (OA) is represented in most models by Raoult's law, and depends on the existing mass of particles into which organic gases can dissolve. This raises the possibility of non-linear response of particle-phase OA mass to the emissions of precursor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that contribute to this partitioning mass. Implications for air quality management are evident: a strong non-linear dependence would suggest that reductions in VOC emission would have a more-than-proportionate benefit in lowering ambient OA concentrations. Chamber measurements on simple VOC mixtures generally confirm the non-linear scaling between OA and VOCs, usually stated as a mass-dependence of the measured OA yields. However, for realistic ambient conditions including urban settings, no single component dominates the composition of the organic particles, and deviations from linearity are presumed to be small. Here we re-examine the linearity question using volatility spectra from several sources: (1) chamber studies of selected aerosols, (2) volatility inferred for aerosols sampled in two megacities, Mexico City and Paris, and (3) an explicit chemistry model (GECKO-A). These few available volatility distributions suggest that urban OA may be only slightly super-linear, with most values of the normalized sensitivity exponent in the range 1.1-1.3, also substantially lower than seen in chambers for some specific aerosols. The rather low exponents suggest that OA concentrations in megacities are not an inevitable convergence of non-linear effects, but can be addressed (much like in smaller urban areas) by proportionate reductions in emissions.

  13. FDATMOS16 non-linear partitioning and organic volatility distributions in urban aerosols

    DOE PAGES

    Madronich, Sasha; Kleinman, Larry; Conley, Andrew; ...

    2015-12-17

    Gas-to-particle partitioning of organic aerosols (OA) is represented in most models by Raoult’s law, and depends on the existing mass of particles into which organic gases can dissolve. This raises the possibility of non-linear response of particle-phase OA to the emissions of precursor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that contribute to this partitioning mass. Implications for air quality management are evident: A strong non-linear dependence would suggest that reductions in VOC emission would have a more-than-proportionate benefit in lowering ambient OA concentrations. Chamber measurements on simple VOC mixtures generally confirm the non-linear scaling between OA and VOCs, usually stated as amore » mass-dependence of the measured OA yields. However, for realistic ambient conditions including urban settings, no single component dominates the composition of the organic particles, and deviations from linearity are presumed to be small. Here we re-examine the linearity question using volatility spectra from several sources: (1) chamber studies of selected aerosols, (2) volatility inferred for aerosols sampled in two megacities, Mexico City and Paris, and (3) an explicit chemistry model (GECKO-A). These few available volatility distributions suggest that urban OA may be only slightly super-linear, with most values of the sensitivity exponent in the range 1.1-1.3, also substantially lower than seen in chambers for some specific aerosols. Furthermore, the rather low values suggest that OA concentrations in megacities are not an inevitable convergence of non-linear effects, but can be addressed (much like in smaller urban areas) by proportionate reductions in emissions.« less

  14. Use of Probability Distribution Functions for Discriminating Between Cloud and Aerosol in Lidar Backscatter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, Davd M.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Poole, Lamont R.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; McGill, Mathew

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe the algorithm hat will be used during the upcoming Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission for discriminating between clouds and aerosols detected in two wavelength backscatter lidar profiles. We first analyze single-test and multiple-test classification approaches based on one-dimensional and multiple-dimensional probability density functions (PDFs) in the context of a two-class feature identification scheme. From these studies we derive an operational algorithm based on a set of 3-dimensional probability distribution functions characteristic of clouds and aerosols. A dataset acquired by the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) is used to test the algorithm. Comparisons are conducted between the CALIPSO algorithm results and the CPL data product. The results obtained show generally good agreement between the two methods. However, of a total of 228,264 layers analyzed, approximately 5.7% are classified as different types by the CALIPSO and CPL algorithm. This disparity is shown to be due largely to the misclassification of clouds as aerosols by the CPL algorithm. The use of 3-dimensional PDFs in the CALIPSO algorithm is found to significantly reduce this type of error. Dust presents a special case. Because the intrinsic scattering properties of dust layers can be very similar to those of clouds, additional algorithm testing was performed using an optically dense layer of Saharan dust measured during the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE). In general, the method is shown to distinguish reliably between dust layers and clouds. The relatively few erroneous classifications occurred most often in the LITE data, in those regions of the Saharan dust layer where the optical thickness was the highest.

  15. A review of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in atmospheric aerosols: Molecular distributions, sources and transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Bikkina, Srinivas

    2016-03-01

    This review aims to update our understanding on molecular distributions of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in atmospheric aerosols with a focus on their geographical variability, size distribution, sources and formation pathways. In general, molecular distributions of diacids in aerosols from the continental sites and over the open ocean waters are often characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic acid (C3) and/or succinic acid (C4), while those sampled over the polar regions often follow the order of C4 ≥ C2 and C3. The most abundant and ubiquitous diacid is oxalic acid, which is principally formed via atmospheric oxidation of its higher homologues of long chain diacids and other pollution-derived organic precursors (e.g., olefins and aromatic hydrocarbons). However, its occurrence in marine aerosols is mainly due to the transport from continental outflows (e.g., East Asian outflow during winter/spring to the North Pacific) and/or governed by photochemical/aqueous phase oxidation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids (e.g., oleic acid) and isoprene emitted from the productive open ocean waters. The long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants from mid latitudes to the Arctic in dark winter facilitates to accumulate the reactants prior to their intense photochemical oxidation during springtime polar sunrise. Furthermore, the relative abundances of C2 in total diacid mass showed similar temporal trends with downward solar irradiation and ambient temperatures, suggesting the significance of atmospheric photochemical oxidation processing. Compound-specific isotopic analyses of oxalic acid showed the highest δ13C among diacids whereas azelaic acid showed the lowest value, corroborating the significance of atmospheric aging of oxalic acid. On the other hand, other diacids gave intermediate values between these two diacids, suggesting that aging of oxalic acid is associated with 13C enrichment.

  16. Spatial variability of Chinook salmon spawning distribution and habitat preferences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cram, Jeremy M.; Torgersen, Christian; Klett, Ryan S.; Pess, George R.; May, Darran; Pearsons, Todd N.; Dittman, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated physical habitat conditions associated with the spawning sites of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and the interannual consistency of spawning distribution across multiple spatial scales using a combination of spatially continuous and discrete sampling methods. We conducted a census of aquatic habitat in 76 km of the upper main-stem Yakima River in Washington and evaluated spawning site distribution using redd survey data from 2004 to 2008. Interannual reoccupation of spawning areas was high, ranging from an average Pearson’s correlation of 0.62 to 0.98 in channel subunits and 10-km reaches, respectively. Annual variance in the interannual correlation of spawning distribution was highest in channel units and subunits, but it was low at reach scales. In 13 of 15 models developed for individual years (2004–2008) and reach lengths (800 m, 3 km, 6 km), stream power and depth were the primary predictors of redd abundance. Multiple channels and overhead cover were patchy but were important secondary and tertiary predictors of reach-scale spawning site selection. Within channel units and subunits, pool tails and thermal variability, which may be associated with hyporheic exchange, were important predictors of spawning. We identified spawning habitat preferences within reaches and channel units that are relevant for salmonid habitat restoration planning. We also identified a threshold (i.e., 2-km reaches) beyond which interannual spawning distribution was markedly consistent, which may be informative for prioritizing habitat restoration or conservation. Management actions may be improved through enhanced understanding of spawning habitat preferences and the consistency with which Chinook Salmon reoccupy spawning areas at different spatial scales.

  17. Directional spatial frequency analysis of lipid distribution in atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, Clyde; Reese, Eric; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert; Russell, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the growth of fibrous plaques due to the retention of cholesterol and lipids within the artery wall, which can lead to vessel occlusion and cardiac events. One way to evaluate arterial disease is to quantify the amount of lipid present in these plaques, since a higher disease burden is characterized by a higher concentration of lipid. Although therapeutic stimulation of reverse cholesterol transport to reduce cholesterol deposits in plaque has not produced significant results, this may be due to current image analysis methods which use averaging techniques to calculate the total amount of lipid in the plaque without regard to spatial distribution, thereby discarding information that may have significance in marking response to therapy. Here we use Directional Fourier Spatial Frequency (DFSF) analysis to generate a characteristic spatial frequency spectrum for atherosclerotic plaques from C57 Black 6 mice both treated and untreated with a cholesterol scavenging nanoparticle. We then use the Cauchy product of these spectra to classify the images with a support vector machine (SVM). Our results indicate that treated plaque can be distinguished from untreated plaque using this method, where no difference is seen using the spatial averaging method. This work has the potential to increase the effectiveness of current in-vivo methods of plaque detection that also use averaging methods, such as laser speckle imaging and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Influence of spatial temperature distribution on high accuracy interferometric metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongqiang; Miao, Erlong; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Huaijiang

    2010-10-01

    We calculate the influence of temperature change on the refractive index of air, establish a model of air temperature distribution and analyze the effect of different temperature distribution on the high accuracy interferometric metrology. First, a revised Edlen formula is employed to acquire the relation between temperature and refractive index of air, followed by introducing the fixed temperature gradient distribution among the spatial grid within the optical cavity between the reference flat and the test flat of the Fizeau interferometer, accompanied by a temperature change random function within each grid. Finally, all the rays through the air layer with different incident angles are traced by Matlab program in order to obtain the final output position, angle and OPD for each ray. The influence of different temperature distribution and the length of the optical cavity in on the testing accuracy can be analyzed through the RMS value that results from repeatable rays tracing. As a result, the horizontal distribution (vertical to optical axis) has a large effect on the testing accuracy. Thus, to realize the high accuracy figure metrology, the horizontal distribution of temperature must be rigorously controlled as well as to shorten the length of the optical cavity to a large extent. The results from our simulation are of great significant for the accuracy analysis of interferometric testing and the research of manufacturing a interferometer.

  19. Retrieval of the aerosol size distribution in the complex anomalous diffraction approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franssens, Ghislain R.

    This contribution reports some recently achieved results in aerosol size distribution retrieval in the complex anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) to MIE scattering theory. This approximation is valid for spherical particles that are large compared to the wavelength and have a refractive index close to 1. The ADA kernel is compared with the exact MIE kernel. Despite being a simple approximation, the ADA seems to have some practical value for the retrieval of the larger modes of tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols. The ADA has the advantage over MIE theory that an analytic inversion of the associated Fredholm integral equation becomes possible. In addition, spectral inversion in the ADA can be formulated as a well-posed problem. In this way, a new inverse formula was obtained, which allows the direct computation of the size distribution as an integral over the spectral extinction function. This formula is valid for particles that both scatter and absorb light and it also takes the spectral dispersion of the refractive index into account. Some details of the numerical implementation of the inverse formula are illustrated using a modified gamma test distribution. Special attention is given to the integration of spectrally truncated discrete extinction data with errors.

  20. Improvement of the CULTEX(®) exposure technology by radial distribution of the test aerosol.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Heller, Wolf-Dieter; Krischenowski, Olaf; Möhle, Niklas; Hochrainer, Dieter

    2017-03-02

    The exposure of cellular based systems cultivated on microporous membranes at the air-liquid interface (ALI) has been accepted as an appropriate approach to simulate the exposure of cells of the respiratory tract to native airborne substances. The efficiency of such an exposure procedure with regard to stability and reproducibility depends on the optimal design at the interface between the cellular test system and the exposure technique. The actual exposure systems favor the dynamic guidance of the airborne substances to the surface of the cells in specially designed exposure devices. Two module types, based on a linear or radial feed of the test atmosphere to the test system, were used for these studies. In our technical history, the development started with the linear designed version, the CULTEX(®) glass modules, fulfilling basic requirements for running ALI exposure studies (Mohr and Durst, 2005). The instability in the distribution of different atmospheres to the cells caused us to create a new exposure module, characterized by a stable and reproducible radial guidance of the aerosol to the cells. The outcome was the CULTEX(®) RFS (Mohr et al., 2010). In this study, we describe the differences between the two systems with regard to particle distribution and deposition clarifying the advantages and disadvantages of a radial to a linear aerosol distribution concept.

  1. RACORO aerosol data processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elisabeth Andrews

    2011-10-31

    The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

  2. Methodology for measuring exhaust aerosol size distributions using an engine test under transient operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Desantes, José; Bermúdez, Vicente; Molina, Santiago; Linares, Waldemar G.

    2011-11-01

    A study on the sources of variability in the measurement of particle size distribution using a two-stage dilution system and an engine exhaust particle sizer was conducted to obtain a comprehensive and repeatable methodology that can be used to measure the particle size distribution of aerosols emitted by a light-duty diesel engine under transient operating conditions. The paper includes three experimental phases: an experimental validation of the measurement method; an evaluation of the influence of sampling factors, such as dilution system pre-conditioning; and a study of the effects of the dilution conditions, such as the dilution ratio and the dilution air temperature. An examination of the type and degree of influence of each studied factor is presented, recommendations for reducing variability are given and critical parameter values are identified to develop a highly reliable measurement methodology that could be applied to further studies on the effect of engine operating parameters on exhaust particle size distributions.

  3. Spatial Distribution of Pair Production Over the Pulsar Polar Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Parfrey, Kyle

    2016-10-01

    Using an analytic, axisymmetric approach that includes general relativity, coupled to a condition for pair production deduced from simulations, we derive general results about the spatial distribution of pair-producing field lines over the pulsar polar cap. In particular, we show that pair production on magnetic field lines operates over only a fraction of the polar cap for an aligned rotator for general magnetic field configurations, assuming the magnetic field varies spatially on a scale that is larger than the size of the polar cap. We compare our result to force-free simulations of a pulsar with a dipole surface field and find excellent agreement. Our work has implications for first-principles simulations of pulsar magnetospheres and for explaining observations of pulsed radio and high-energy emission.

  4. Landscape genetics and the spatial distribution of chronic wasting disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, M.D.; Scribner, K.T.; Weckworth, B.V.; Langenberg, J.A.; Filcek, K.B.

    2008-01-01

    Predicting the spread of wildlife disease is critical for identifying populations at risk, targeting surveillance and designing proactive management programmes. We used a landscape genetics approach to identify landscape features that influenced gene flow and the distribution of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wisconsin white-tailed deer. CWD prevalence was negatively correlated with genetic differentiation of study area deer from deer in the area of disease origin (core-area). Genetic differentiation was greatest, and CWD prevalence lowest, in areas separated from the core-area by the Wisconsin River, indicating that this river reduced deer gene flow and probably disease spread. Features of the landscape that influence host dispersal and spatial patterns of disease can be identified based on host spatial genetic structure. Landscape genetics may be used to predict high-risk populations based on their genetic connection to infected populations and to target disease surveillance, control and preventative activities. ?? 2007 The Royal Society.

  5. Spatially distributed characterization of soil-moisture dynamics using travel-time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heße, Falk; Zink, Matthias; Kumar, Rohini; Samaniego, Luis; Attinger, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Travel-time distributions are a comprehensive tool for the characterization of hydrological system dynamics. Unlike the streamflow hydrograph, they describe the movement and storage of water within and throughout the hydrological system. Until recently, studies using such travel-time distributions have generally either been applied to lumped models or to real-world catchments using available time series, e.g., stable isotopes. Whereas the former are limited in their realism and lack information on the spatial arrangements of the relevant quantities, the latter are limited in their use of available data sets. In our study, we employ the spatially distributed mesoscale Hydrological Model (mHM) and apply it to a catchment in central Germany. Being able to draw on multiple large data sets for calibration and verification, we generate a large array of spatially distributed states and fluxes. These hydrological outputs are then used to compute the travel-time distributions for every grid cell in the modeling domain. A statistical analysis indicates the general soundness of the upscaling scheme employed in mHM and reveals precipitation, saturated soil moisture and potential evapotranspiration as important predictors for explaining the spatial heterogeneity of mean travel times. In addition, we demonstrate and discuss the high information content of mean travel times for characterization of internal hydrological processes.

  6. Spatial distribution of environmental DNA in a nearshore marine habitat

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan P.; Shelton, Andrew Olaf; Samhouri, Jameal F.; Lowell, Natalie C.; Williams, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    In the face of increasing threats to biodiversity, the advancement of methods for surveying biological communities is a major priority for ecologists. Recent advances in molecular biological technologies have made it possible to detect and sequence DNA from environmental samples (environmental DNA or eDNA); however, eDNA techniques have not yet seen widespread adoption as a routine method for biological surveillance primarily due to gaps in our understanding of the dynamics of eDNA in space and time. In order to identify the effective spatial scale of this approach in a dynamic marine environment, we collected marine surface water samples from transects ranging from the intertidal zone to four kilometers from shore. Using PCR primers that target a diverse assemblage of metazoans, we amplified a region of mitochondrial 16S rDNA from the samples and sequenced the products on an Illumina platform in order to detect communities and quantify their spatial patterns using a variety of statistical tools. We find evidence for multiple, discrete eDNA communities in this habitat, and show that these communities decrease in similarity as they become further apart. Offshore communities tend to be richer but less even than those inshore, though diversity was not spatially autocorrelated. Taxon-specific relative abundance coincided with our expectations of spatial distribution in taxa lacking a microscopic, pelagic life-history stage, though most of the taxa detected do not meet these criteria. Finally, we use carefully replicated laboratory procedures to show that laboratory treatments were remarkably similar in most cases, while allowing us to detect a faulty replicate, emphasizing the importance of replication to metabarcoding studies. While there is much work to be done before eDNA techniques can be confidently deployed as a standard method for ecological monitoring, this study serves as a first analysis of diversity at the fine spatial scales relevant to marine ecologists

  7. Spatial distribution of neurons innervated by chandelier cells.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Woodruff, Alan; Inan, Melis; Anderson, Stewart A; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchan-Perez, Angel

    2015-09-01

    Chandelier (or axo-axonic) cells are a distinct group of GABAergic interneurons that innervate the axon initial segments of pyramidal cells and are thus thought to have an important role in controlling the activity of cortical circuits. To examine the circuit connectivity of chandelier cells (ChCs), we made use of a genetic targeting strategy to label neocortical ChCs in upper layers of juvenile mouse neocortex. We filled individual ChCs with biocytin in living brain slices and reconstructed their axonal arbors from serial semi-thin sections. We also reconstructed the cell somata of pyramidal neurons that were located inside the ChC axonal trees and determined the percentage of pyramidal neurons whose axon initial segments were innervated by ChC terminals. We found that the total percentage of pyramidal neurons that were innervated by a single labeled ChC was 18-22 %. Sholl analysis showed that this percentage peaked at 22-35 % for distances between 30 and 60 µm from the ChC soma, decreasing to lower percentages with increasing distances. We also studied the three-dimensional spatial distribution of the innervated neurons inside the ChC axonal arbor using spatial statistical analysis tools. We found that innervated pyramidal neurons are not distributed at random, but show a clustered distribution, with pockets where almost all cells are innervated and other regions within the ChC axonal tree that receive little or no innervation. Thus, individual ChCs may exert a strong, widespread influence on their local pyramidal neighbors in a spatially heterogeneous fashion.

  8. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  9. Diversity and spatial distribution of surname structure in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Okyu; Son, Woo-Sik

    2015-11-01

    We studied the population structure of South Korea by using the distributions of surnames for all 246 administrative regions. Every 4,177 surnames are distinguished by their bon-gwan which indicates the place of their family clans. Using Fisher's Alpha, we found that the level of inbreeding increases as the distance from the capital Seoul increases. We introduced the Shannon index to measure the level of spatial diffusion for each surname population, and the geographical clusters based on similarities of the surname compositions among the regions show almost exact agreement with those at the administrative districts.

  10. Spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Du Hai; Sim, Jillian Ooi Lean; Fauzi, Rosmadi; Moi, Phang Siew

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this article is to represent spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia. Seaweeds have been collected since 1984 along coastlines of 4675 km of peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak. However, there is no seaweed database and they cannot be displayed in a geographic view. Therefore, a database with 805 georeferenced observations was setup and GIS is used to analyze seaweed diversity based on this database. The highest number of observations is 94 which occur along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. The highest number of species richness is 82 which are also along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. Rhodophyta has the highest species richness while Chlorophyta has the least species richness.

  11. Mapping the Methane and Aerosol Distributions within Titan's Troposphere: Complementing The Cassini/VIMS T90 Flyby of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot

    2012-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere is mainly nitrogen gas with several trace constituents, including methane at the few percent level. The presence of methane has been a puzzle for decades, since the CH4 in Titan's atmosphere is expected to be destroyed by UV photolysis in ten million years or so. The source of Titan's atmospheric methane continues to be a major question. We propose a set of three STIS image cubes with the G750M grating at 0.62, 0.72 and 0.89 |*|m methane bands. These bands probe altitudes from the surface to 70 km; unlike CH4 bands at 1.6 or 2.3 |*|m, these cubes will provide a 3-D picture of Titan's troposphere {below 40 km}. The Cassini/VIMS visible channel has not been useful for this purpose for two reasons: its spectral resolution {about R=100} is coarse and its inconsistent background subtraction scheme that can lead to "stripes." HST/STIS resolves Titan's 1" disk into over 80 spatially resolved spectra, each with a spectral resolution greater than R=5000. STIS is a unique tool for mapping the 3-D distributions of CH4 and aerosols in Titan's troposphere.We request observations within a day of the Cassini flyby of Titan on April 5, 2013 around 21:40 UT in order to combine Cassini/VIMS and STIS mage cubes. Together, the visible {STIS} and IR {VIMS} image cubes will probe altitudes from the surface to the stratosphere {several hundred km}. The proposed STIS image cubes will provide the best tropospheric map of CH4 to date, relevant to surface/atmospheric coupling of CH4, latitudinal inhomogeneity of CH4 or aerosols, or the presence of condensates at low altitudes.

  12. Sectorial and geographical contributions to summertime black carbon spatial distributions over the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, G. R.; Huang, M.; Kulkarni, S.; Streets, D. G.; Zhang, Q.

    2011-12-01

    Primary and secondary aerosols from local and distant sources in various emission sectors cause both direct and indirect effects on the climate system, and adversely affect human health and public welfare. Black carbon (BC), mainly generated from fossil-fuel combustion and biomass burning, absorbs light and warms the atmosphere. Its short lifetime and geographical/temporal variability indicate that the climate benefits of reduction in its emissions will be much faster than those reductions in carbon dioxide. In this study, we evaluate the ARCTAS global BC sector emission inventories using a regional chemical transport modeling system STEM and quantify sector (biomass burning, shipping, industrial, power, transportation and residential) contributions from local and distant sources to the BC spatial distributions (surface and vertical distributions, and total column amounts) over the continental US in summer 2008. The sector contributions are further summarized for ten EPA regions for comparison and contrast. Due to the increasing trend of BC emissions from outside of the North America in the past decade, we focus on western US regions that are sensitive to extra-regional pollutions. The estimated amount of transported BC is compared with previous studies and correlated with the tracer CO calculations to help study uncertainties. The increasing BC trend during 1990-2004 summer over the mountain regions was observed, opposite to the trend over the Pacific regions [Murphy et al., 2011]. To better understand these trends, statistical analysis is used to contrast the role of transported BC on these regions. Furthermore, the seasonal variations of the impacts of transported BC over the US are discussed regarding the transported amounts and pathways. Mitigation policies are suggested to consider the absolute concentrations for BC as well as its relative relationship with cooling aerosols (such as sulfate (SO4), nitrate (NO3), and organics), with special focus on

  13. Spatial variability of aerosol and black carbon concentrations in the troposphere of the Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valerii S.; Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Paris, Jean D.; Nédéléc, Philippe; Chernov, Dmitry G.; Shmargunov, Vladimir P.

    2015-11-01

    A cycle of flights of the Optik TU-134 Flying Laboratory of IAO SB RAS over regions of Western Siberia and the Russian Arctic (55.0-74.8°N, 61.3-82.9°E) was carried out on October 15-17 of 2014 within the framework of the YAK-AEROSIB Russian—French Project. The mass concentrations of submicron aerosol and Black Carbon (BC) in the troposphere up to a height of 8.5 km were measured in the flights. The ranges of variability were 0.3-20 μg/m3 for the aerosol concentration and 0.02-1 μg/m3 for the BC concentration. In the subpolar latitudes of 71-74.8°N, the lower levels of aerosol (0.8-6 μg/m3) and BC (0.02-0.3 μg/m3) were observed. The comparison of the results of airborne sensing in 2008 and 2014 has shown that in the Western Subartic the aerosol and BC concentrations in the vertical profiles up to six times exceeded those observed in the Eastern Subarctic (0.3-1 μg/m3 and 10-50 ng/m3). The excess of the mean integral BC concentrations and the aerosol optical depth was, on average, 2-2.5 times (0.16 mg/m2; 0.02). In the region of the Kara Sea at heights of 0.5-2 and 4-6 km, the excess of the aerosol content in the western sector in comparison with the eastern one was, on average, 2 times, while for the black carbon the excess achieved 7 times at heights of 1-2 km (0.25- 0.035 μg/m3). The mean integral concentrations of aerosol and black carbon ˜ 1.3 times exceeded those in the clearer eastern region of the sea (0.31 mg/m2; 0.049). The obtained estimates indicate the decrease of the aerosol and BC concentrations in the subpolar latitudes of the Russian Federation from the west to the east.

  14. Spatial Distribution Balance Analysis of Hospitals in Wuhan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nai; Chen, Shiyi; Hu, Weilu; Wu, Zhongheng; Chao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution pattern of hospitals in Wuhan indicates a core in the central urban areas and a sparse distribution in the suburbs, particularly at the center of suburbs. This study aims to improve the gravity and Huff models to analyze healthcare accessibility and resources. Results indicate that healthcare accessibility in central urban areas is better than in the suburbs, where it increasingly worsens for the suburbs. A shortage of healthcare resources is observed in large-scale and high-class hospitals in central urban areas, whereas the resources of some hospitals in the suburbs are redundant. This study proposes the multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) analysis model for the location assessment in constructing new hospitals, which can effectively ameliorate healthcare accessibility in suburban areas. This study presents implications for the planning of urban healthcare facilities. PMID:27706069

  15. Spatial distribution of female genital mutilation in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Nwakeze, Ngozi; Kandala, Shadrack Ngianga I I

    2009-11-01

    The harmful effects of female genital mutilation (FGM) on women are recognized worldwide. Although it is practiced by persons of all socioeconomic backgrounds, there are differences within countries and between communities. The aim of this study was to use the 2003 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data to determine the spatial distribution of the prevalence of FGM and associated risk factors. Data were available for 7,620 women; 1,673 (22.0%) interviewed had had FGM and 2,168 women had living children, of whom 485 (22.4%) daughters had undergone FGM. Unmarried women were more likely to report a lower prevalence of FGM. Modernization (education and high socioeconomic status) had minimal impact on the likelihood of FGM, but education plays an important role in the mother's decision not to circumcise her daughter. It follows from these findings that community factors have a large effect on FGM, with individual factors having little effect on the distribution of FGM.

  16. A general circulation model study of the global carbonaceous aerosol distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, W. F.; Ramaswamy, V.; Kasibhatla, P.

    2002-08-01

    Atmospheric distributions of carbonaceous aerosols are simulated using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory SKYHI general circulation model (GCM) (latitude-longitude resolution of ~3° × 3.6°). A number of systematic analyses are conducted to investigate the seasonal and interannual variability of the concentrations at specific locations and to investigate the sensitivity of the distributions to various physical parameters. Comparisons are made with several observational data sets. At four specific sites (Mace Head, Mauna Loa, Sable Island, and Bondville) the monthly mean measurements of surface concentrations of black carbon made over several years reveal that the model simulation registers successes as well as failures. Comparisons are also made with averages of measurements made over varying time periods, segregated by geography and rural/remote locations. Generally, the mean measured remote surface concentrations exceed those simulated. Notwithstanding the large variability in measurements and model simulations, the simulations of both black and organic carbon tend to be within about a factor of 2 at a majority of the sites. There are major challenges in conducting comparisons with measurements due to inadequate sampling at some sites, the generally short length of the observational record, and different methods used for estimating the black and organic carbon amounts. The interannual variability in the model and in the few such measurements available points to the need for doing multiyear modeling and to the necessity of comparing with long-term measurements. There are very few altitude profile measurements; notwithstanding the large uncertainties, the present comparisons suggest an overestimation by the model in the free troposphere. The global column burdens of black and organic carbon in the present standard model integration are lower than in previous studies and thus could be regarded as approximately bracketing a lower end of the simulated

  17. Thermal Emission Spectrometer Results: Mars Atmospheric Thermal Structure and Aerosol Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Infrared spectra returned by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are well suited for retrieval of the thermal structure and the distribution of aerosols in the Martian atmosphere. Combined nadir- and limb-viewing spectra allow global monitoring of the atmosphere up to 0.01 mbar (65 km). We report here on the atmospheric thermal structure and the distribution of aerosols as observed thus far during the mapping phase of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. Zonal and temporal mean cross sections are used to examine the seasonal evolution of atmospheric temperatures and zonal winds during a period extending from northern hemisphere mid-summer through vernal equinox (L(sub s) = 104-360 deg). Temperature maps at selected pressure levels provide a characterization of planetary-scale waves. Retrieved atmospheric infrared dust opacity maps show the formation and evolution of regional dust storms during southern hemisphere summer. Response of the atmospheric thermal structure to the changing dust loading is observed. Maps of water-ice clouds as viewed in the thermal infrared are presented along with seasonal trends of infrared water-ice opacity. Uses of these observations for diagnostic studies of the dynamics of the atmosphere are discussed.

  18. Using high time resolution aerosol and number size distribution measurements to estimate atmospheric extinction.

    PubMed

    Malm, William C; McMeeking, Gavin R; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Levin, Ezra; Carrico, Christian M; Day, Derek E; Collett, Jeffrey L; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy P; Raja, Suresh

    2009-09-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park is experiencing reduced visibility and changes in ecosystem function due to increasing levels of oxidized and reduced nitrogen. The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS) study was initiated to better understand the origins of sulfur and nitrogen species as well as the complex chemistry occurring during transport from source to receptor. As part of the study, a monitoring program was initiated for two 1-month time periods--one during the spring and the other during late summer/fall. The monitoring program included intensive high time resolution concentration measurements of aerosol number size distribution, inorganic anions, and cations, and 24-hr time resolution of PM2.5 and PM10 mass, sulfate, nitrate, carbon, and soil-related elements concentrations. These data are combined to estimate high time resolution concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol mass and fine mass species estimates of ammoniated sulfate, nitrate, and organic and elemental carbon. Hour-by-hour extinction budgets are calculated by using these species concentration estimates and measurements of size distribution and assuming internal and external particle mixtures. Summer extinction was on average about 3 times higher than spring extinction. During spring months, sulfates, nitrates, carbon mass, and PM10 - PM2.5 mass contributed approximately equal amounts of extinction, whereas during the summer months, carbonaceous material extinction was 2-3 times higher than other species.

  19. Impact of Indonesian forest fires during the 1997 El Nino on aerosol distribution and clear sky aerosol aradiatikve forcing over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran, K.; Nair, S.; Rejeev, K.

    The El Nino event of 1997-1998 followed by the La Nina in 1998-1999 was the strongest of its kind encountered in the 20t h century. Associated with this event Indonesia experienced severe drought leading to large forest fires. Large aerosol plume from these fires has advected over the Equatorial Indian Ocean region. Development and decay of this plume and its regional transport are studied using aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from NOAA-14 AVHRR data using the Discrete Ordinate Method along with the tropospheric circulation derived from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. In the second half of 1997 extensive smoke and haze episodes are observed over the tropical Indian Ocean in the latitude range of 5° N to 10° S. The AOD values at 630nm often exceeded 1.0 near Indonesia and in the southeastern parts of Bay of Bengal. Development of this plume started from September and continued up to the first half of November. During first half of September, the plume was conf ined to the coastal regions of Indonesia and then started developing towards west to reach up to 60°E. Decay of the plume started by the middle of November and subsided almost completely by December. During the development phase this plume showed a consistent increase in AOD from western Indian Ocean to Eastern part of tropical Indian Ocean. This westward transport of aerosols from the Indonesian region was confined to the equatorial latitudes. This was due to the reversal of zonal circulation during the El Nino period leading to large westward wind anomaly in the equatorial Indian Ocean region. Westward propagation of the aerosol plume is arrested near ~60°E because of the large convection and rainfall caused by El Nino in this longitude region. The El Nino related weather and atmospheric dynamics is found to have significantly influenced the regional aerosol distribution over the Indian Ocean. On an average, the diurnal mean clear sky aerosol radiative forcing at top of atmosphere (TOA) is estimated to be

  20. Role of the Atmospheric General Circulation on the Temporal Variability of the Aerosol Distribution over Dakar (Senegal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senghor, Habib; Machu, Eric; Hourdin, Frederic; Thierno Gaye, Amadou; Gueye, Moussa; Simina Drame, Mamadou

    2016-04-01

    The natural or anthropogenic aerosols play an important role on the climate system and the human health through their optical and physical properties. To evaluate the potential impacts of these aerosols, it is necessary to better understand their temporal variability in relation with the atmospheric ciculation. Some previous case studies have pointed out the influence of the sea-breeze circulation on the vertical distribution of the aerosols along the Western African coast. In the present work, Lidar (Ceilometer CL31; located at Dakar) data are used for the period 2012-2014 together with Level-3 data from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) between 2007 and 2014 for studying the seasonal cycle of the vertical distribution of aerosols over Dakar (17.5°W, 14.74°N). Both instruments show strong seasonal variability with a maximum of aerosol occurrence in May over Dakar. The CL31 shows a crucial impact of sea-breeze circulation on the diurnal cycle of the Mixed Atmospheric Boundary Layer and a strong dust signal in spring in the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) located between 500 and 1000 m altitudes over Dakar.

  1. Comparative Climate Responses of Anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases, All Major Aerosol Components, Black Carbon, and Methane, Accounting for the Evolution of the Aerosol Mixing State and of Clouds/Precipitation from Multiple Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2005-12-01

    Several modeling studies to date have simulated the global climate response of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and bulk (non-size-resolved) sulfate or generic aerosol particles together, but no study has examined the climate response of greenhouse gases simultaneously with all major size- and composition resolved aerosol particle components. Such a study is important for improving our understanding of the effects of anthropogenic pollutants on climate. Here, the GATOR-GCMOM model is used to study the global climate response of (a) all major greenhouse gases and size-resolved aerosol components, (b) all major greenhouse gases alone, (c) fossil-fuel soot (black carbon, primary organic matter, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate), and (d) methane. Aerosol components treated in all simulations included water, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, hydrogen ion, soil dust, and pollen/spores. Fossil-fuel soot (FFS) was emitted into its own size distribution. All other components, including biofuel and biomass soot, sea-spray, soil dust, etc., were emitted into a second distribution (MIX). The FFS distribution grew by condensation of secondary organic matter and sulfuric acid, hydration of water, and dissolution of nitric acid, ammonia, and hydrochloric acid. It self-coagulated and heterocoagulated with the MIX distribution, which also grew by condensation, hydration, and dissolution. Treatment of separate distributions for FFS allowed FFS to evolve from an external mixture to an internal mixture. In both distributions, black carbon was treated as a core component for optical calculations. Both aerosol distributions served as CCN during explicit size-resolved cloud formation. The resulting clouds grew by coagulation and condensation, coagulated with interstitial aerosol particles, and fell to the surface as rain and snow, carrying aerosol constituents with them. Thus, cloud

  2. A modal approach to modeling spatially distributed vibration energy dissipation.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The nonlinear behavior of mechanical joints is a confounding element in modeling the dynamic response of structures. Though there has been some progress in recent years in modeling individual joints, modeling the full structure with myriad frictional interfaces has remained an obstinate challenge. A strategy is suggested for structural dynamics modeling that can account for the combined effect of interface friction distributed spatially about the structure. This approach accommodates the following observations: (1) At small to modest amplitudes, the nonlinearity of jointed structures is manifest primarily in the energy dissipation - visible as vibration damping; (2) Correspondingly, measured vibration modes do not change significantly with amplitude; and (3) Significant coupling among the modes does not appear to result at modest amplitudes. The mathematical approach presented here postulates the preservation of linear modes and invests all the nonlinearity in the evolution of the modal coordinates. The constitutive form selected is one that works well in modeling spatially discrete joints. When compared against a mathematical truth model, the distributed dissipation approximation performs well.

  3. The spatial distribution of infrared radiation from visible reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luan, Ling; Werner, Michael W.; Dwek, Eli; Sellgren, Kris

    1989-01-01

    The emission at IRAS 12 and 25 micron bands of reflection nebulae is far in excess of that expected from the longer wavelength equilibrium thermal emission. The excess emission in the IRAS 12 micron band is a general phenomenon, seen in various components of interstellar medium such as IR cirrus clouds, H II regions, atomic and molecular clouds, and also normal spiral galaxies. This excess emission has been attributed to UV excited fluorescence in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules or to the effect of temperature fluctuations in very small grains. Results are presented of studies of IRAS data on reflection nebulae selected from the van den Bergh reflection nebulae sample. Detailed scans of flux ratio and color temperature across the nebulae were obtained in order to study the spatial distribution of IR emission. A model was used to predict the spatial distribution of IR emission from dust grains illuminated by a B type star. The model was also used to explore the excitation of the IRAS 12 micron band emission as a function of stellar temperature. The model predictions are in good agreement with the analysis of reflection nebulae, illuminated by stars with stellar temperature ranging from 21,000 down to 3,000 K.

  4. Soil nutrients influence spatial distributions of tropical trees species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, R.; Dalling, J.W.; Harms, K.E.; Yavitt, J.B.; Stallard, R.F.; Mirabello, M.; Hubbell, S.P.; Valencia, R.; Navarrete, H.; Vallejo, M.; Foster, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of niche vs. neutral assembly mechanisms in structuring tropical tree communities remains an important unsettled question in community ecology [Bell G (2005) Ecology 86:1757-1770]. There is ample evidence that species distributions are determined by soils and habitat factors at landscape (0.5 million individual trees of 1,400 species and 10 essential plant nutrients, we used Monte Carlo simulations of species distributions to test plant-soil associations against null expectations based on dispersal assembly. We found that the spatial distributions of 36-51% of tree species at these sites show strong associations to soil nutrient distributions. Neutral dispersal assembly cannot account for these plant-soil associations or the observed niche breadths of these species. These results indicate that belowground resource availability plays an important role in the assembly of tropical tree communities at local scales and provide the basis for future investigations on the mechanisms of resource competition among tropical tree species. ?? 2007 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  5. Spatial distributions of angular momenta in quantum and quasiclassical stereodynamics.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Marcelo P; Aoiz, F Javier; Sáez-Rábanos, V; Brouard, Mark

    2004-11-22

    We have recently reported a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization [M. P. de Miranda and F. Javier Aoiz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 083201 (2004)]. This paper presents a detailed account of the derivation outlined in that paper, and discusses the implications of the new results. These include (i) a new expression of the role of the uncertainty principle in the broadening of angular momentum distributions, (ii) the attribution of azimuthal fluctuations of angular momentum distributions to spatial quantum beats, (iii) the definition of a new Fourier transform of the density matrix, distinct from those suggested in the past, that provides an alternative view of how the quantum description of angular momentum polarization approaches the classical one in the correspondence principle limit, (iv) a prescription for the determination of a quasiclassical angular momentum distribution function that does not suffer from problems encountered with its purely classical counterpart, and (v) a description of how angular momentum distributions commonly visualized with recourse to the classical vector model can be depicted with exact and well-defined quantum mechanics.

  6. Spatial distributions of angular momenta in quantum and quasiclassical stereodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Miranda, Marcelo P.; Aoiz, F. Javier; Sáez-Rábanos, V.; Brouard, Mark

    2004-11-01

    We have recently reported a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization [M. P. de Miranda and F. Javier Aoiz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 083201 (2004)]. This paper presents a detailed account of the derivation outlined in that paper, and discusses the implications of the new results. These include (i) a new expression of the role of the uncertainty principle in the broadening of angular momentum distributions, (ii) the attribution of azimuthal fluctuations of angular momentum distributions to spatial quantum beats, (iii) the definition of a new Fourier transform of the density matrix, distinct from those suggested in the past, that provides an alternative view of how the quantum description of angular momentum polarization approaches the classical one in the correspondence principle limit, (iv) a prescription for the determination of a quasiclassical angular momentum distribution function that does not suffer from problems encountered with its purely classical counterpart, and (v) a description of how angular momentum distributions commonly visualized with recourse to the classical vector model can be depicted with exact and well-defined quantum mechanics.

  7. On The Spatial Distribution and the Origin of Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Youjun; Zhang, Fupeng; Yu, Qingjuan

    2010-02-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) escaping away from the Galactic halo are dynamical products of interactions of stars with the massive black hole(s) (MBH) in the Galactic Center (GC). They are mainly B-type stars with their progenitors unknown. OB stars are also populated in the GC, with many being hosted in a clockwise-rotating young stellar (CWS) disk within half a parsec from the MBH and their formation remaining puzzles. In this paper, we demonstrate that HVSs can well memorize the injecting directions of their progenitors using both analytical arguments and numerical simulations, i.e., the ejecting direction of an HVS is almost anti-parallel to the injecting direction of its progenitor. Therefore, the spatial distribution of HVSs maps the spatial distribution of the parent population of their progenitors directly. We also find that almost all the discovered HVSs are spatially consistent with being located on two thin disk planes. The orientation of one plane is consistent with that of the (inner) CWS disk, which suggests that most of the HVSs originate from the CWS disk or a previously existed disk-like stellar structure with an orientation similar to it. The rest of HVSs may be correlated with the plane of the northern arm of the mini-spiral in the GC or the plane defined by the outer warped part of the CWS disk. Our results not only support the GC origin of HVSs but also imply that the central disk (or the disk structure with a similar orientation) should persist or be frequently rejuvenated over the past 200 Myr, which adds a new challenge to the stellar disk formation and provides insights to the longstanding problem of gas fueling into MBHs.

  8. Spatial and temporal distribution of onroad CO2 emissions at the Urban spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Gurney, K. R.; Zhou, Y.; Mendoza, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Hestia Project is a multi-disciplinary effort to help better understand the spatial and temporal distribution of fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emission at urban scale. Onroad transportation is an essential source of CO2 emissions. This study examines two urban domains: Marion County (Indianapolis) and Los Angeles County and explores the methods and results associated with the spatial and temporal distribution of local urban onroad CO2 emissions. We utilize a bottom-up approach and spatially distribute county emissions based on the Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) counts provided by local Department of Transportation. The total amount of CO2 emissions is calculated by the National Mobile Inventory Model (NMIM) for Marion County and the EMission FACtors (EMFAC) model for Los Angeles County. The NMIM model provides CO2 emissions based on vehicle miles traveled (VMT) data at the county-level from the national county database (NCD). The EMFAC model provides CO2 emissions for California State based on vehicle activities, including VMT, vehicle population and fuel types. A GIS road atlas is retrieved from the US Census Bureau. Further spatial analysis and integration are performed by GIS software to distribute onroad CO2 emission according to the traffic volume. The temporal allocation of onroad CO2 emission is based on the hourly traffic data obtained from the Metropolitan Planning Orgnizations (MPO) for Marion County and Department of Transportation for Los Angeles County. The annual CO2 emissions are distributed according to each hourly fraction of traffic counts. Due to the fact that ATR stations are unevenly distributed in space, we create Thiessen polygons such that each road segment is linked to the nearest neighboring ATR station. The hourly profile for each individual station is then combined to create a "climatology" of CO2 emissions in time on each road segment. We find that for Marion County in the year 2002, urban interstate and arterial roads have

  9. Spatial variability of carbonaceous aerosol concentrations in East and West Jerusalem.

    PubMed

    von Schneidemesser, Erika; Zhou, Iiabin; Stone, Elizabeth A; Schauer, James I; Shpund, Jacob; Brenner, Shmuel; Qasrawi, Radwan; Abdeen, Ziad; Sarnat, Jeremy A

    2010-03-15

    Carbonaceous aerosol concentrations and sources were compared during a year long study at two sites in East and West Jerusalem that were separated by a distance of approximately 4 km. One in six day 24-h PM(2.5) elemental and organic carbon concentrations were measured, along with monthly average concentrations of particle-phase organic compound tracers for primary and secondary organic aerosol sources.Tracer compounds were used in a chemical mass balance ICMB) model to determine primary and secondary source contributions to organic carbon. The East Jerusalem sampling site at Al Quds University experienced higher concentrations of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) compared to the West Jerusalem site at Hebrew University. The annual average concentrations of OC and EC at the East Jerusalem site were 5.20 and 2.19 μg m(-3), respectively, and at the West Jerusalem site were 4.03 and 1.14 μg m(-3), respectively. Concentrations and trends of secondary organic aerosol and vegetative detritus were similar at both sites, but large differences were observed in the concentrations of organic aerosol from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, which was the cause of the large differences in OC and EC concentrations observed at the two sites.

  10. Emissions from residential combustion considering end-uses and spatial constraints: Part I, methods and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winijkul, Ekbordin; Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a framework to attribute national-level atmospheric emissions in the year 2010 from the residential sector, one of the largest energy-related sources of aerosol emissions. We place special emphasis on end-uses, dividing usage into cooking, heating, lighting, and others. This study covers regions where solid biomass fuel provides more than 50% of total residential energy: Latin America, Africa, and Asia (5.2 billion people in 2010). Using nightlight data and population density, we classify five land types: urban, electrified rural with forest access, electrified rural without forest access, non-electrified rural with forest access, and non-electrified rural without forest access. We then apportion national-level residential fuel consumption among all land-types and end-uses, and assign end-use technologies to each combination. The resulting calculation gives spatially-distributed emissions of particulate matter, black carbon, organic carbon, nitrogen oxides, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Within this study region, about 13% of the energy is consumed in urban areas, and 45% in non-urban land near forests. About half the energy is consumed in land without access to electricity. Cooking accounts for 54% of the consumption, heating for 9%, and lighting only 2%, with unidentified uses making up the remainder. Because biofuel use is assumed to occur preferentially where wood is accessible and electricity is not, our method shifts emissions to land types without electrification, compared with previous methods. The framework developed here is an important first step in acknowledging the role of household needs and local constraints in choosing energy provision. Although data and relationships described here need further development, this structure offers a more physically-based understanding of residential energy choices and, ultimately, opportunities for emission reduction.

  11. Spatial and seasonal variations of fine particle water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) over the Southeastern United States: implications for secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Hecobian, A.; Zheng, M.; Frank, N. H.; Edgerton, E. S.; Weber, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the Southeastern US is investigated by analyzing the spatial-temporal distribution of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and other PM2.5 components from 900 archived 24 h Teflon filters collected at 15 urban or rural EPA Federal Reference Method (FRM) network sites throughout 2007. Online measurements of WSOC at an urban/rural-paired site in Georgia in the summer of 2008 are contrasted to the filter data. Based on FRM filters, excluding biomass-burning events (levoglucosan < 50 ng m-3), WSOC and sulfate were highly correlated with PM2.5 mass and both comprised a large mass fraction of PM2.5 (13% and 35%, respectively). Sulfate and WSOC both tracked ambient temperature throughout the year, suggesting the temperature effects were mainly on the photochemical processes that lead to secondary formation. FRM WSOC, and to a lesser extent sulfate, were spatially homogeneous throughout the region, yet WSOC was moderately enhanced (27%) in locations of greater predicted isoprene emissions in summer. A Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis identified two major source types for the summer WSOC; 22% of the WSOC were associated with ammonium sulfate, and 56% of the WSOC was associated with brown carbon and oxalate. A small urban excess of FRM WSOC (10%) was observed in the summer of 2007, however, comparisons of online WSOC measurements at one urban/rural pair (Atlanta/Yorkville) in August 2008 showed substantially greater difference in WSOC (31%) relative to the FRM data, suggesting a low bias for urban filters. The measured Atlanta urban excess, combined with the estimated boundary layer heights, gave an estimated Atlanta daily WSOC production rate in August of 0.55 mg C m-2 h-1 between mid-morning and mid-afternoon. This study characterizes the regional nature of fine particles in the Southeastern US, confirming the importance of secondary organic aerosol and the roles of both biogenic and anthropogenic emissions.

  12. Spatial distribution of water stress and evapotranspiration estimates using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauneker, P.; Lischeid, G.

    2012-04-01

    The estimation of spatial distribution of evapotranspiration poses a particular challenge in quantitative hydrology. Conventional methods provide punctual measurements of evapotranspiration rates which may be transformed into aggregated mean values by extrapolation or the application of empirical models. The influence of spatial structures (heterogeneity of the landscape) in relevant small spatial scales is captured insufficiently by these methods. Modern optical remote sensors aboard an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) provide the basis for the generation of high spatial resolution data. Spectral data in the optical, near infrared and thermal infrared domain will be used as input into a surface energy balance (SEB) model to produce evapotranspiration maps. The spectral properties of vegetation are of particular importance for the calculation, since plants are the link between soil and atmosphere and thus have major impact on evapotranspiration rates of land surfaces. First estimates of plant status and indicators of transpiration behavior will be obtained by applying and combining water stress parameters of different wavelengths. As opposed to satellite data, time-series of self-determined spatial and temporal resolution may be created by varying flight altitude and turnaround times. Thus it is possible to analyze the influence of landscape structures, as well as the chronological development of the observed parameters. Located at the interface between hydrology and remote sensing this work utilizes an innovative remote sensing platform to gain distributed spectral information. This information will be used to visualize evapotranspiration patterns in hydrological heterogeneous areas. Particular attention will be paid to the analysis of transition zones of varying water supply and under the influence of selected environmental parameters (e.g. soil moisture, depth of GW-table). To reach that goal it is essential to generate a robust processing chain, involving all

  13. Polar organic marker compounds in atmospheric aerosols: Determination, time series, size distributions and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan

    Terrestrial vegetation releases substantial amounts of reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs; e.g., isoprene, monoterpenes) into the atmosphere. The VOCs can be rapidly photooxidized under conditions of high solar radiation, yielding products that can participate in new particle formation and growth processes above forests. This thesis focuses on the characterization, identification and quantification of oxidation products of biogenic VOC (BVOCs) as well as other species (tracer compounds) that provide information on aerosol sources and source processes. Atmospheric aerosols from various forested sites (i.e., Hyytiala, southern Finland; Rondonia, Brazil; K-Puszta, Hungary and Julich, Germany) were analyzed with Gas Chromotography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) using analytical procedure that targets polar organic compounds. The study demonstrated that isoprene (i.e., 2-methyerythritol, 2-methylthreitol, 2-methylglyceric acid and C5-alkene triols (2-methyl-1,3,4-trihydroxy-l-butene (cis and trans) and 3 methyl-2,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene)) and monoterpene (pinic acid, norpinic acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid) oxidation products were present in substantial concentrations in atmospheric aerosols suggesting that oxidation of BVOC from the vegetation is an important process in all studied sites. On the other hand, presence of levoglucosan, biomass burning marker, especially in Amazonian rain forest site at Rondonia, Brazil, pointed that all sites were affected by anthropogenic activities, namely biomass burning. Other identified compounds included plyols, arabitol, mannitol and erythritol, which are marker compounds for fungal spores and monosacharides, glucose and fructose, markers for plant polens. Temporal variations as well as mass size distributions of the detected species confirmed the possible formation mechanisms of marker compounds.

  14. Environmental DNA reflects spatial and temporal jellyfish distribution

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Miho; Katsuhara, Koki R.; Fujiwara, Ayaka; Hidaka, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kohji; Masuda, Reiji

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis allows us to survey underwater macro-organisms easily and cost effectively; however, there have been no reports on eDNA detection or quantification for jellyfish. Here we present the first report on an eDNA analysis of marine jellyfish using Japanese sea nettle (Chrysaora pacifica) as a model species by combining a tank experiment with spatial and temporal distribution surveys. We performed a tank experiment monitoring eDNA concentrations over a range of time intervals after the introduction of jellyfish, and quantified the eDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time PCR. The eDNA concentrations peaked twice, at 1 and 8 h after the beginning of the experiment, and became stable within 48 h. The estimated release rates of the eDNA in jellyfish were higher than the rates previously reported in fishes. A spatial survey was conducted in June 2014 in Maizuru Bay, Kyoto, in which eDNA was collected from surface water and sea floor water samples at 47 sites while jellyfish near surface water were counted on board by eye. The distribution of eDNA in the bay corresponded with the distribution of jellyfish inferred by visual observation, and the eDNA concentration in the bay was ~13 times higher on the sea floor than on the surface. The temporal survey was conducted from March to November 2014, in which jellyfish were counted by eye every morning while eDNA was collected from surface and sea floor water at three sampling points along a pier once a month. The temporal fluctuation pattern of the eDNA concentrations and the numbers of observed individuals were well correlated. We conclude that an eDNA approach is applicable for jellyfish species in the ocean. PMID:28245277

  15. Environmental DNA reflects spatial and temporal jellyfish distribution.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Fukuda, Miho; Katsuhara, Koki R; Fujiwara, Ayaka; Hidaka, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kohji; Masuda, Reiji

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis allows us to survey underwater macro-organisms easily and cost effectively; however, there have been no reports on eDNA detection or quantification for jellyfish. Here we present the first report on an eDNA analysis of marine jellyfish using Japanese sea nettle (Chrysaora pacifica) as a model species by combining a tank experiment with spatial and temporal distribution surveys. We performed a tank experiment monitoring eDNA concentrations over a range of time intervals after the introduction of jellyfish, and quantified the eDNA concentrations by quantitative real-time PCR. The eDNA concentrations peaked twice, at 1 and 8 h after the beginning of the experiment, and became stable within 48 h. The estimated release rates of the eDNA in jellyfish were higher than the rates previously reported in fishes. A spatial survey was conducted in June 2014 in Maizuru Bay, Kyoto, in which eDNA was collected from surface water and sea floor water samples at 47 sites while jellyfish near surface water were counted on board by eye. The distribution of eDNA in the bay corresponded with the distribution of jellyfish inferred by visual observation, and the eDNA concentration in the bay was ~13 times higher on the sea floor than on the surface. The temporal survey was conducted from March to November 2014, in which jellyfish were counted by eye every morning while eDNA was collected from surface and sea floor water at three sampling points along a pier once a month. The temporal fluctuation pattern of the eDNA concentrations and the numbers of observed individuals were well correlated. We conclude that an eDNA approach is applicable for jellyfish species in the ocean.

  16. Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution and associated radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta Region of China

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Youfei; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor J.; Cribb, Maureen

    2012-02-09

    Four years of columnar aerosol particle optical properties (2006 to 2009) and one year database worth of aerosol particle vertical profile of 527 nm extinction coefficient (June 2008 to May 2009) are analyzed at Taihu in the central Yangtze Delta region in eastern China. Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution, and influence on shortwave radiation and heating rates were investigated. Multiyear variations of aerosol optical depths (AOD), Angstrom exponents, single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (ASY) are analyzed, together with the vertical profile of aerosol extinction. AOD is largest in summer and smallest in winter. SSAs exhibit weak seasonal variation with the smallest values occurring during winter and the largest during summer. The vast majority of aerosol particles are below 2 km, and about 62%, 67%, 67% and 83% are confined to below 1 km in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. Five-day back trajectory analyses show that the some aerosols aloft are traced back to northern/northwestern China, as far as Mongolia and Siberia, in spring, autumn and winter. The presence of dust aerosols were identified based on the linear depolarization measurements together with other information (i.e., back trajectory, precipitation, aerosol index). Dust strongly impacts the vertical particle distribution in spring and autumn, with much smaller effects in winter. The annual mean aerosol direct shortwave radiative forcing (efficiency) at the bottom, top and within the atmosphere are -34.8 {+-} 9.1 (-54.4 {+-} 5.3), -8.2 {+-} 4.8 (-13.1 {+-} 1.5) and 26.7 {+-} 9.4 (41.3 {+-} 4.6) W/m{sup 2} (Wm{sup -2} T{sup -1}), respectively. The mean reduction in direct and diffuse radiation reaching surface amount to 109.2 {+-} 49.4 and 66.8 {+-} 33.3 W/m{sup 2}, respectively. Aerosols significantly alter the vertical profile of solar heating, with great implications for atmospheric stability and dynamics within the lower troposphere.

  17. Longitudinal distributions of dicarboxylic acids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids in the marine aerosols from the central Pacific including equatorial upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoque, Mir Md. Mozammal; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-03-01

    Remote marine aerosol samples (total suspended particles) were collected during a cruise in the central Pacific from Japan to Mexico (1°59'N-35°N and 171°54'E-90°58'W). The aerosol samples were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids as well as organic and elemental carbon, water-soluble organic carbon, and total nitrogen (WSTN). During the study, diacids were the most abundant compound class followed by fatty acids, ω-oxoacids, and α-dicarbonyls. Molecular compositions of diacids showed a predominance of oxalic (C2) acid followed by malonic (C3) and succinic (C4) acids. Oxalic acid comprises 74% of total diacids. This result suggests that photochemical production of oxalic acid is significant over the central Pacific. Spatial distributions of diacids, ω-oxoacids, pyruvic acid, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids together with total carbon and WSTN showed higher abundances in the eastern equatorial Pacific where the upwelling of high-nutrient waters followed by high biological productivity is common, indicating that their in situ production is important in the warmer central Pacific through photochemical oxidation from their gaseous and particulate precursors. This study demonstrates that there is a strong linkage in biogeochemical cycles of carbon in the sea-air interface via ocean upwelling, phytoplankton productivity, sea-to-air emissions of organic matter, and formation of secondary organic aerosols in the eastern equatorial Pacific.

  18. Investigating vertical distributions of ozone and of the aerosol extinction coefficient in the middle atmosphere with the MKS-M and SFN-4 instruments on board Salyut-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badaev, V. V.; Grechko, G. M.; Elanskii, N. F.; Kan, V.; Plotkin, M. E.

    1989-04-01

    The technical characteristics of the multichannel spectrometer (MKS-M) system combined with a camera containing a spectrophotography attachment (SFN-4) are discussed together with results obtained by this system on distributions of ozone and aerosol in the middle atmosphere. It is demonstrated that this system is capable of retrieving the fine structure of vertical ozone and aerosol extinction distributions in the lower stratosphere. Results show that, in the ozonosphere, the contents of ozone and of aerosol exhibit a negative correlation.

  19. Size distributions and source function of sea spray aerosol over the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yingjia; Sheng, Lifang; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Dongliang; Jia, Nan; Kong, Yawen

    2016-08-01

    The number concentrations in the radius range of 0.06-5 μm of aerosol particles and meteorological parameters were measured on board during a cruise in the South China Sea from August 25 to October 12, 2012. Effective fluxes in the reference height of 10 m were estimated by steady state dry deposition method based on the observed data, and the influences of different air masses on flux were discussed in this paper. The number size distribution was characterized by a bimodal mode, with the average total number concentration of (1.50 ± 0.76)×103 cm-3. The two mode radii were 0.099 µm and 0.886 µm, both of which were within the scope of accumulation mode. A typical daily average size distribution was compared with that measured in the Bay of Bengal. In the whole radius range, the number concentrations were in agreement with each other; the modes were more distinct in this study than that abtained in the Bay of Bengal. The size distribution of the fluxes was fitted with the sum of log-normal and power-law distribution. The impact of different air masses was mainly on flux magnitude, rather than the shape of spectral distribution. A semiempirical source function that is applicable in the radius range of 0.06 µm< r 80<0.3 µm with the wind speed varying from 1.00 m s-1 to 10.00 m s-1 was derived.

  20. Spatial variations in immediate greenhouse gases and aerosol emissions and resulting radiative forcing from wildfires in interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Shengli; Liu, Heping; Dahal, Devendra; Jin, Suming; Li, Shuang; Liu, Shu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Boreal fires can cool the climate; however, this conclusion came from individual fires and may not represent the whole story. We hypothesize that the climatic impact of boreal fires depends on local landscape heterogeneity such as burn severity, prefire vegetation type, and soil properties. To test this hypothesis, spatially explicit emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols and their resulting radiative forcing are required as an important and necessary component towards a full assessment. In this study, we integrated remote sensing (Landsat and MODIS) and models (carbon consumption model, emission factors model, and radiative forcing model) to calculate the carbon consumption, GHGs and aerosol emissions, and their radiative forcing of 2001–2010 fires at 30 m resolution in the Yukon River Basin of Alaska. Total carbon consumption showed significant spatial variation, with a mean of 2,615 g C m−2 and a standard deviation of 2,589 g C m−2. The carbon consumption led to different amounts of GHGs and aerosol emissions, ranging from 593.26 Tg (CO2) to 0.16 Tg (N2O). When converted to equivalent CO2 based on global warming potential metric, the maximum 20 years equivalent CO2 was black carbon (713.77 Tg), and the lowest 20 years equivalent CO2 was organic carbon (−583.13 Tg). The resulting radiative forcing also showed significant spatial variation: CO2, CH4, and N2O can cause a 20-year mean radiative forcing of 7.41 W m−2 with a standard deviation of 2.87 W m−2. This emission forcing heterogeneity indicates that different boreal fires have different climatic impacts. When considering the spatial variation of other forcings, such as surface shortwave forcing, we may conclude that some boreal fires, especially boreal deciduous fires, can warm the climate.

  1. Spatial bedrock erosion distribution in a natural gorge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, A. R.; Turowski, J. M.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of morphological evolution both in terrestrial and planetary landscapes is of increasing interest in the geosciences. In mountainous regions, bedrock channel formation as a consequence of the interaction of uplift and erosion processes is fundamental for the entire surface evolution. Hence, the accurate description of bedrock channel development is important for landscape modelling. To verify existing concepts developed in the lab and to analyse how in situ channel erosion rates depend on the interrelations of discharge, sediment transport and topography, there is a need of highly resolved topographic field data. We analyse bedrock erosion over two years in a bedrock gorge downstream of the Gorner glacier above the town of Zermatt, Switzerland. At the study site, the Gornera stream cuts through a roche moutonnée in serpentine rock of 25m length, 5m width and 8m depth. We surveyed bedrock erosion rates using repeat terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) with an average point spacing of 5mm. Bedrock erosion rates in direction of the individual surface normals were studied directly on the scanned point clouds applying the M3C2 algorithm (Lague et al., 2013, ISPRS). The surveyed erosion patterns were compared to a simple stream erosivity visualisation obtained from painted bedrock sections at the study location. Spatially distributed erosion rates on bedrock surfaces based on millions of scan points allow deduction of millimeter-scale mean annual values of lateral erosion, incision and downstream erosion on protruding streambed surfaces. The erosion rate on a specific surface point is shown to depend on the position of this surface point in the channel's cross section, its height above the streambed and its spatial orientation to the streamflow. Abrasion by impacting bedload was likely the spatially dominant erosion process, as confirmed by the observed patterns along the painted bedrock sections. However, a single plucking event accounted for the half

  2. Accounting for Vegetation Effects in Spatially Distributed Snowmelt Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garen, D. C.; Marks, D.

    2004-05-01

    The effects of vegetation on snowpack energy dynamics can be highly significant and must be taken into account when simulating snowmelt. This becomes challenging, however, for spatially distributed models covering large areas such as river basins. In this case, processes occurring at the scale of individual trees or bushes must be parameterized and upscaled to the size of the model's grid cells, which could range from 10 up to a few hundred meters. An application of a spatially distributed energy balance snowmelt model to the Boise River basin in Idaho, USA has required the development of algorithms to account for the effects of vegetation (especially forest) on the climate input data to the model. This particularly affects the solar and thermal radiation input to the snowpack, including not only the direct effects of the vegetation but also the effect of vegetation debris on the snow albedo. Vegetation effects on vertical profiles of wind speed and temperature could not be considered due to limited measurements, and only a crude estimate of wind speed differences between forested and nonforested grid cells was used. The simulated snow fields were verified using point snow water equivalent and snow depth data as well as satellite images of snow covered area. Although good results were obtained in these comparisons, each of these methods has limitations, in that point measurements are not necessarily representative of a grid cell, and satellite images have a coarse resolution and cannot detect snow under trees. Another test was to use the simulated snowmelt fields as input to a spatially distributed water balance and streamflow simulation model, which indicated that the volume and timing of snowmelt input to the basin were accurately represented. A limitation of the modeling method used is that the models are run independently in sequence, the output of one being stored and becoming the input of the next. This means that there is no opportunity for feedbacks between

  3. Spatial distribution of metals in the constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Kongroy, Porntawee; Tantemsapya, Netnapid; Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh Ren; Wirojanagud, Wanpen

    2012-02-01

    Investigation of the spatial distribution of metals was conducted for two constructed wetlands used as tertiary treatment in Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science (CNU) and Metal Processing Industries (MPI) located in Tainan, Taiwan. These two distinguished sites were selected to compare the distribution of metals for constructed wetlands treating different types of wastewater. Along the distance, samples of water, sediment, and macrophytes were analyzed for metals including Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn. Additionally, measurements of water quality including temperature, pH, EC, ORP, DO, TSS, BOD, COD, and turbidity were performed. Results show that, at CNU, wastewater contained higher organic consititute (BOD 29.3 +/- 11.7 mg/, COD 46.7 +/- 33.6 mg/L) with low metals content. Wastewater at MPI contained low level of organic consititute (BOD 7.1 +/- 3.3 mg/L, and COD 66.0 +/- 56.5 mg/L) and higher metals content. Metals distribution of both sites showed similar results where metals in the sediments in the inlet zone have greater concentrations than other areas. The constructed wetlands can remove Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn. However, there was no removal of Al, Cr, Fe, and Mn. A distance along the constructed wetlands had no effect on metal concentrations in macrophyte and water.

  4. Integrating water by plant roots over spatially distributed soil salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homaee, Mehdi; Schmidhalter, Urs

    2010-05-01

    In numerical simulation models dealing with water movement and solute transport in vadose zone, the water budget largely depends on uptake patterns by plant roots. In real field conditions, the uptake pattern largely changes in time and space. When dealing with soil and water salinity, most saline soils demonstrate spatially distributed osmotic head over the root zone. In order to quantify such processes, the major difficulty stems from lacking a sink term function that adequately accounts for the extraction term especially under variable soil water osmotic heads. The question of how plants integrate such space variable over its rooting depth remains as interesting issue for investigators. To move one step forward towards countering this concern, a well equipped experiment was conducted under heterogeneously distributed salinity over the root zone with alfalfa. The extraction rates of soil increments were calculated with the one dimensional form of Richards equation. The results indicated that the plant uptake rate under different mean soil salinities preliminary reacts to soil salinity, whereas at given water content and salinity the "evaporative demand" and "root activity" become more important to control the uptake patterns. Further analysis revealed that root activity is inconstant when imposed to variable soil salinity. It can be concluded that under heterogeneously distributed salinity, most water is taken from the less saline increment while the extraction from other root zone increments with higher salinities never stops.

  5. Spatial distribution of tropospheric ozone in western Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, S.M.; Peterson, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    We quantified the distribution of tropospheric ozone in topographically complex western Washington state, USA (total area a??6000 km2), using passive ozone samplers along nine river drainages to measure ozone exposure from near sea level to high-elevation mountain sites. Weekly average ozone concentrations were higher with increasing distance from the urban core and at higher elevations, increasing a mean of 1.3 ppbv per 100 m elevation gain for all mountain transects. Weekly average ozone concentrations were generally highest in Cascade Mountains drainages east and southeast of Seattle (maximum=55a??67 pbv) and in the Columbia River Gorge east of Portland (maximum=59 ppbv), and lowest in the western Olympic Peninsula (maximum=34 ppbv). Higher ozone concentrations in the Cascade Mountains and Columbia River locations downwind of large cities indicate that significant quantities of ozone and ozone precursors are being transported eastward toward rural wildland areas by prevailing westerly winds. In addition, temporal (week to week) variation in ozone distribution is synchronous within and between all drainages sampled, which indicates that there is regional coherence in air pollution detectable with weekly averages. These data provide insight on large-scale spatial variation of ozone distribution in western Washington, and will help regulatory agencies optimize future monitoring networks and identify locations where human health and natural resources could be at risk.

  6. Spatial distribution of venous gas emboli in the lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souders, J. E.; Doshier, J. B.; Polissar, N. L.; Hlastala, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of gaseous pulmonary emboli is presumed to be determined by their buoyancy. We hypothesized that regional pulmonary blood flow may also influence their distribution. Therefore, pulmonary blood flow was measured in supine, anesthetized dogs with use of 15-microm fluorescent microspheres at baseline and during N(2) embolism. The animals were killed, and the lungs were excised, air-dried, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces with weights and spatial coordinates recorded. Embolism was defined as a >10% flow decrease relative to baseline. Vertically, the incidence of embolism increased substantially by 6 +/- 1% per additional centimeter in height compared with baseline (P = 0.0003). Embolism also increased radially by 3 +/- 1%/cm from the hilum (P = 0.002). There was a weaker but statistically significant increase in embolism to pieces with greater baseline flow, 9 +/- 2% for every 1. 0 increase in relative baseline flow (P = 0.008). We conclude that the distribution of gaseous emboli is influenced by buoyancy and flow dynamics within the pulmonary vasculature.

  7. Ozone and aerosol distributions over the Amazon Basin during the wet season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Gregory, G. L.; Harriss, R. C.; Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of O3 and aerosol measurements made in the lower troposphere from April 13 through May 10, 1987, as part of the wet season field experiment. Aircraft flights on the NASA Electra were conducted in the vicinity of Manaus, Brazil and between Manaus and the mouth of the Amazon River. Airborne O3 measurements were made in situ and with a lidar system pointed below the aircraft in nadir mode of operation. Data collection and results concerning the distributions of O3 and aerosols observed during the wet season from within the mixed layer to the middle troposphere over the central Amazon basin and between Manaus and Belem are discussed, and these observations are compared to the measurements obtained in the 1985 dry season. Ozone mixing ratio values are found to be lower than those of the 1985 dry season by 6-8 ppbv, indicating a strong removal process near the surface during wet season. It is also found that within the mixed layer O3 levels appeared to be lower over the forest compared to over the ocean.

  8. Seasonal monitoring and estimation of regional aerosol distribution over Po valley, northern Italy, using a high-resolution MAIAC product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvani, Barbara; Pierce, R. Bradley; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Wang, Yujie; Ghermandi, Grazia; Teggi, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the new 1 km-resolved Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm is employed to characterize seasonal PM10 - AOD correlations over northern Italy. The accuracy of the new dataset is assessed compared to the widely used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5.1 Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data, retrieved at 0.55 μm with spatial resolution of 10 km (MYD04_L2). We focused on evaluating the ability of these two products to characterize both temporal and spatial distributions of aerosols within urban and suburban areas. Ground PM10 measurements were obtained from 73 of the Italian Regional Agency for Environmental Protection (ARPA) monitoring stations, spread across northern Italy, during a three-year period from 2010 to 2012. The Po Valley area (northern Italy) was chosen as the study domain because of its severe urban air pollution, resulting from it having the highest population and industrial manufacturing density in the country, being located in a valley where two surrounding mountain chains favor the stagnation of pollutants. We found that the global correlations between the bin-averaged PM10 and AOD are R2 = 0.83 and R2 = 0.44 for MYD04_L2 and for MAIAC, respectively, suggesting a greater sensitivity of the high-resolution product to small-scale deviations. However, the introduction of Relative Humidity (RH) and Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) depth corrections allowed for a significant improvement to the bin-averaged PM - AOD correlation, which led to a similar performance: R2 = 0.96 for MODIS and R2 = 0.95 for MAIAC. Furthermore, the introduction of the PBL information in the corrected AOD values was found to be crucial in order to capture the clear seasonal cycle shown by measured PM10 values. The study allowed us to define four seasonal linear correlations that estimate PM10 concentrations satisfactorily from the remotely sensed MAIAC AOD retrieval. Overall, the results show that the high

  9. Macular pigment spatial distribution effects on glare disability

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Christopher M.; Bassi, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This project explored the relationship of the macular pigment optical density (MPOD) spatial profile with measures of glare disability (GD) across the macula. Methods A novel device was used to measure MPOD across the central 16° of retina along four radii using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP)at eccentricities of 0°, 2°, 4°, 6° and 8°. MPOD was measured as discrete and integrated values at all measured retinal loci. GD was calculated as a difference in contrast sensitivity (CS) between no glare and glare conditions using identical stimuli presented at the same eccentricities. GD was defined as [(CSNo Glare − CSGlare)/CSNo Glare] in order to isolate the glare attenuation effects of MPOD by controlling for CS variability among the subject sample. Correlations of the discrete and integrated MPOD with GD were compared. Results The cHFP identified reliable MPOD spatial distribution maps demonstrating a 1st-order exponential decay as a function of increasing eccentricity. There was a significant negative correlation between both measures of foveal MPOD and GD using 6 cycles per degree (cpd) and 9 cpd stimuli. Significant correlations were found between corresponding parafoveal MPOD measures and GD at 2 and 4° of eccentricity using 9 cpd stimuli with greater MPOD associated with less glare disability. Conclusions These results are consistent with the glare attenuation effects of MP at higher spatial frequencies and support the hypothesis that discrete and integrated measures of MPOD have similar correlations with glare attenuation effects across the macula. Additionally, peak foveal MPOD appears to influence GD across the macula. PMID:25697374

  10. The Spatial Distribution and Spectrum of Radiation Produced by Sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, B. E.; Kochkin, P.; Hansen, R. S.; Grondahl, O.

    2012-12-01

    Energetic x-rays are produced by lab sparks, though the exact mechanism is the subject of some debate. We report the results of experiments with a scintillating optical fiber detector at various positions around nearly 1000 sparks. The statistical properties of the spatial distributions and correlations between different positions within a single spark will be described. In addition to the scintillating fiber detector, data from a pair of conventional scintillation detectors are also presented and the resulting energy spectra and statistical properties are given. These data are very useful for evaluation of mechanisms of runaway electron and x-ray production in sparks and may have implications for larger-scale processes in lightning and terrestrial gamma-ray flashes.

  11. Spatial Distribution of Dopant Incorporation in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrey, Harvey; Moseley, John; Colegrove, Eric; Burst, James; Albin, David; Metzger, Wyatt; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2016-11-21

    In this work we use state-of-the-art cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum imaging that provides spectrum-per-pixel mapping of the CL emission to examine how dopant elements are incorporated into CdTe. Emission spectra and intensity are used to monitor the spatial distribution of additional charge carriers through characteristic variations in the CL emission based on theoretical modeling. Our results show that grain boundaries play a role in the incorporation of dopants in CdTe, whether intrinsic or extrinsic. This type of analysis is crucial for providing feedback to design different processing schedules that optimize dopant incorporation in CdTe photovoltaic material, which has struggled to reach high carrier concentration values. Here, we present results on CdTe films exposed to copper, phosphorus, and intrinsic doping treatments.

  12. Wigner distribution measurement of the spatial coherence properties of FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mey, Tobias; Schäfer, Bernd; Mann, Klaus; Keitel, Barbara; Plönjes, Elke; Kuhlmann, Marion

    2015-09-01

    Free-electron lasers deliver VUV and soft x-ray pulses with the best brilliance available and a high degree of spatial coherence. Users of such facilities have high demands on phase and coherence properties of the beam, for instance when working with coherent diffractive imaging. Thus, detailed knowledge of these parameters is of great importance and provides the possibility for advanced machine studies. The Wigner distribution function (WDF) describes the entire propagation properties of an electromagnetic beam including all information on its spatial coherence. It can be reconstructed from beam profiles taken at different positions along its propagation direction. Here, we present measurements of the WDF conducted at the Free-electron laser FLASH at DESY. As a result, we derive the entire four-dimensional mutual coherence function, the coherence lengths and the global degree of coherence. Additionally, we provide an estimation of the possible error that our algorithm might produce for the derived quantities. In comparison to existing studies that characterize the photon beam of FLASH, we find significantly lower values for the global degree of coherence. This difference cannot be explained by our error estimation. We explore the possible reasons for this discrepancy and their effect on the value of the global degree of coherence.

  13. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of maternal death

    PubMed Central

    Carreno, Ioná; Bonilha, Ana Lúcia de Lourenzi; da Costa, Juvenal Soares Dias

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of maternal mortality and its spatial distribution. METHODS Ecological study with a sample made up of 845 maternal deaths in women between 10 and 49 years, registered from 1999 to 2008 in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil. Data were obtained from Information System on Mortality of Ministry of Health. The maternal mortality ratio and the specific maternal mortality ratio were calculated from records, and analyzed by the Poisson regression model. In the spatial distribution, three maps of the state were built with the rates in the geographical macro-regions, in 1999, 2003, and 2008. RESULTS There was an increase of 2.0% in the period of ten years (95%CI 1.00;1.04; p = 0.01), with no significant change in the magnitude of the maternal mortality ratio. The Serra macro-region presented the highest maternal mortality ratio (1.15, 95%CI 1.08;1.21; p < 0.001). Most deaths in Rio Grande do Sul were of white women over 40 years, with a lower level of education. The time of delivery/abortion and postpartum are times of increased maternal risk, with a greater negative impact of direct causes such as hypertension and bleeding. CONCLUSIONS The lack of improvement in maternal mortality ratio indicates that public policies had no impact on women’s reproductive and maternal health. It is needed to qualify the attention to women’s health, especially in the prenatal period, seeking to identify and prevent risk factors, as a strategy of reducing maternal death. PMID:25210825

  14. Spatial Distribution of Black Bear Incident Reports in Michigan.

    PubMed

    McFadden-Hiller, Jamie E; Beyer, Dean E; Belant, Jerrold L

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between humans and carnivores have existed for centuries due to competition for food and space. American black bears are increasing in abundance and populations are expanding geographically in many portions of its range, including areas that are also increasing in human density, often resulting in associated increases in human-bear conflict (hereafter, bear incidents). We used public reports of bear incidents in Michigan, USA, from 2003-2011 to assess the relative contributions of ecological and anthropogenic variables in explaining the spatial distribution of bear incidents and estimated the potential risk of bear incidents. We used weighted Normalized Difference Vegetation Index mean as an index of primary productivity, region (i.e., Upper Peninsula or Lower Peninsula), primary and secondary road densities, and percentage land cover type within 6.5-km2 circular buffers around bear incidents and random points. We developed 22 a priori models and used generalized linear models and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to rank models. The global model was the best compromise between model complexity and model fit (w = 0.99), with a ΔAIC 8.99 units from the second best performing model. We found that as deciduous forest cover increased, the probability of bear incident occurrence increased. Among the measured anthropogenic variables, cultivated crops and primary roads were the most important in our AIC-best model and were both positively related to the probability of bear incident occurrence. The spatial distribution of relative bear incident risk varied markedly throughout Michigan. Forest cover fragmented with agriculture and other anthropogenic activities presents an environment that likely facilitates bear incidents. Our map can help wildlife managers identify areas of bear incident occurrence, which in turn can be used to help develop strategies aimed at reducing incidents. Researchers and wildlife managers can use similar mapping techniques to

  15. The Spatial Distribution and Kinematics of the Circumgalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Kacprzak, Glenn; Charlton, Jane C.; Muzahid, Sowgat

    2017-01-01

    We have examined the spatial distribution and kinematics of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) within 200 kpc of galaxies in the redshift range 0.1 to 1.0. The galaxies are resolved in HST images and are selected to have background quasars with sightlines that probe their CGM. We measured the cool/warm CGM in MgII absorption and the warm/hot CGM in OVI absorption using Keck/HIRES, VLT/UVES, and HST/COS. We have found that the CGM gas is highly organized such that: (1) gas is concentrated along the galaxy polar axes with high velocity dispersion, and (2) gas is concentrated along the galaxy major axes with smaller velocity dispersion. We constrain the geometry of the gas to reside between 20-40 degrees of the projected major axis and within 60 degrees of the projected minor axis, with little-to-no gas found in between. Furthermore, strongest absorption and largest velocity spreads are found for highly inclined (face on) galaxies with the bluest colors, suggesting outflows along the minor axes of star-forming galaxies. The major axis of bluer galaxies have similar velocity spreads to those of the gas surrouncding redder galaxies, which show little spatial preference in the distribution of the gas dynamics. Our results are consistent with the current view of the CGM originating from major axis (co-planer) inflows/recycled gas and from minor axis wind-driven outflows. We address how our results place strong contraints on the baryon cycle.

  16. Spatial Distribution of Black Bear Incident Reports in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    McFadden-Hiller, Jamie E.; Beyer, Dean E.; Belant, Jerrold L.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between humans and carnivores have existed for centuries due to competition for food and space. American black bears are increasing in abundance and populations are expanding geographically in many portions of its range, including areas that are also increasing in human density, often resulting in associated increases in human-bear conflict (hereafter, bear incidents). We used public reports of bear incidents in Michigan, USA, from 2003–2011 to assess the relative contributions of ecological and anthropogenic variables in explaining the spatial distribution of bear incidents and estimated the potential risk of bear incidents. We used weighted Normalized Difference Vegetation Index mean as an index of primary productivity, region (i.e., Upper Peninsula or Lower Peninsula), primary and secondary road densities, and percentage land cover type within 6.5-km2 circular buffers around bear incidents and random points. We developed 22 a priori models and used generalized linear models and Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC) to rank models. The global model was the best compromise between model complexity and model fit (w = 0.99), with a ΔAIC 8.99 units from the second best performing model. We found that as deciduous forest cover increased, the probability of bear incident occurrence increased. Among the measured anthropogenic variables, cultivated crops and primary roads were the most important in our AIC-best model and were both positively related to the probability of bear incident occurrence. The spatial distribution of relative bear incident risk varied markedly throughout Michigan. Forest cover fragmented with agriculture and other anthropogenic activities presents an environment that likely facilitates bear incidents. Our map can help wildlife managers identify areas of bear incident occurrence, which in turn can be used to help develop strategies aimed at reducing incidents. Researchers and wildlife managers can use similar mapping techniques to

  17. Spatial distribution of Lindane concentration in topsoil across France.

    PubMed

    Orton, T G; Saby, N P A; Arrouays, D; Jolivet, C C; Villanneau, E J; Marchant, B P; Caria, G; Barriuso, E; Bispo, A; Briand, O

    2013-01-15

    Lindane [γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH)] is an organochlorine pesticide with toxic effects on humans. It is bioaccumulative and can remain in soils for long periods, and although its use for crop spraying was banned in France in 1998, it is possible that residues from before this time remain in the soil. The RMQS soil monitoring network consists of soil samples from 2200 sites on a 16 km regular grid across France, collected between 2002 and 2009. We use 726 measurements of the Lindane concentration in these samples to (i) investigate the main explanatory factors for its spatial distribution across France, and (ii) map this distribution. Geostatistics provides an appropriate framework to analyze our spatial dataset, though two issues regarding the data are worth special consideration: first, the harmonization of two subsets of the data (which were analyzed using different measurement processes), and second, the large proportion of data from one of these subsets that fell below a limit of quantification. We deal with these issues using recent methodological developments in geostatistics. Results demonstrate the importance of land use and rainfall for explaining part of the variability of Lindane across France: land use due to the past direct input of Lindane on cropland and its subsequent persistence in the soil, and rainfall due to the re-deposition of volatilized Lindane. Maps show the concentrations to be generally largest in the north and northwest of France, areas of more intensive agricultural land. We also compare levels to some contamination thresholds taken from the literature, and present maps showing the probability of Lindane concentrations exceeding these thresholds across France. These maps could be used as guidelines for deciding which areas require further sampling before some possible remediation strategy could be applied.

  18. Aerosol Types using Passive Remote Sensing: Global Distribution, Consistency Check, Total-Column Investigation and Translation into Composition Derived from Climate and Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Dawson, K. W.; Johnson, M. S.; Burton, S. P.; Redemann, J.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Butler, C. F.; Holben, B. N.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Froyd, K. D.; Dibb, J. E.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    To improve the predictions of aerosol composition in chemical transport models (CTMs) and global climate models (GCMs), we have developed an aerosol classification algorithm (called Specified Clustering and Mahalanobis Classification, SCMC) that assigns an aerosol type to multi-parameter retrievals by spaceborne, airborne or ground based passive remote sensing instruments [Russell et al., 2014]. The aerosol types identified by our scheme are pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke and pure marine. We apply the SCMC method to two different total-column datasets of aerosol optical properties: inversions from the ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and retrievals from the space-borne POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances) instrument. The POLDER retrievals that we use differ from the standard POLDER retrievals [Deuzé et al., 2001] as they make full use of multi-angle, multispectral polarimetric data [Hasekamp et al., 2011]. We analyze agreement in the aerosol types inferred from both AERONET and POLDER globally. Then, we investigate how our total-column "effective" SCMC aerosol types relate to different aerosol types within the column (i.e. either a mixture of different types within one layer in the vertical or the stacking of different aerosol types within the vertical column). For that, we compare AERONET-SCMC aerosol types to collocated NASA LaRC HSRL vertically resolved aerosol types [Burton et al., 2012] during the SEAC4RS and DISCOVER-AQ airborne field experiments, mostly over Texas in Aug-Sept 2013. Finally, in order to evaluate the GEOS-Chem CTM aerosol types, we translate each of our SCMC aerosol type into a unique distribution of GEOS-Chem aerosol composition (e.g. biomass burning, dust, sulfate, sea salt). We bridge the gap between remote sensing and model-inferred aerosol types by using multiple years of collocated AERONET

  19. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation. Several methods are used to investigate aerosol properties and thus quantify their direct and indirect impacts on climate. At the Puy de Dôme station, continuous high-altitude near-surface in situ measurements and low-altitude ground-based remote sensing atmospheric column measurements give the opportunity to compare the aerosol extinction measured with both methods over a 1-year period. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a comparison is realised with continuous measurements of a high-altitude site during a long-term period. This comparison addresses to which extent near-surface in situ measurements are representative of the whole atmospheric column, the aerosol mixing layer (ML) or the free troposphere (FT). In particular, the impact of multi-aerosol layers events detected using lidar backscatter profiles is analysed. A good correlation between in situ aerosol extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer is observed with a correlation coefficient around 0.80, indicating that the in situ measurements station is representative of the overall atmospheric column. After filtering for multilayer cases and correcting for each layer optical contribution (ML and FT), the atmospheric structure seems to be the main factor influencing the comparison between the two measurement techniques. When the site lies in the ML, the in situ extinction represents 45 % of the sun photometer ML extinction while when the site lies within the FT, the in situ extinction is more than 2 times higher than the FT sun photometer extinction. Moreover, the assumption of a decreasing linear vertical aerosol profile in the whole atmosphere has been tested, significantly improving the instrumental agreement. Remote sensing retrievals of the aerosol particle size distributions (PSDs) from the sun photometer

  20. A numerical study of the particle size distribution of an aerosol undergoing turbulent coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reade, Walter C.; Collins, Lance R.

    2000-07-01

    Coagulation and growth of aerosol particles subject to isotropic turbulence has been explored using direct numerical simulations. The computations follow the trajectories of 262 144 initial particles as they are convected by the turbulent flow field. Collision between two parent particles leads to the formation of a new daughter particle with the mass and momentum (but not necessarily the energy) of the parent particles. The initially monodisperse population of particles will develop a size distribution over time that is controlled by the collision dynamics. In an earlier study, Sundaram & Collins (1997) showed that collision rates in isotropic turbulence are controlled by two statistics: (i) the radial distribution of the particles and (ii) the relative velocity probability density function. Their study considered particles that rebound elastically; however, we find that the formula that they derived is equally valid in a coagulating system. However, coagulation alters the numerical values of these statistics from the values they attain for the elastic rebound case. This difference is substantial and must be taken into consideration to properly predict the evolution of the size distribution of a population of particles. The DNS results also show surprising trends in the relative breadth of the particle size distribution. First, in all cases, the standard deviation of the particle size distribution of particles with finite Stokes numbers is much larger than the standard deviat