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Sample records for aerosol species sulfate

  1. The optical constants of several atmospheric aerosol species - Ammonium sulfate, aluminum oxide, and sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.; Khare, B. N.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of problems which are related to a use of measured optical constants in the simulation of the optical constants of real atmospheric aerosols. The techniques of measuring optical constants are discussed, taking into account transmission measurements through homogeneous and inhomogeneous materials, the immersion of a material in a liquid of a known refractive index, the consideration of the minimum deviation angle of prism measurement, the interference of multiply reflected light, reflectivity measurements, and aspects of mathematical analysis. Graphs show the real and the imaginary part of the refractive index as a function of wavelength for aluminum oxide, NaCl, and ammonium sulfate. Tables are provided for the dispersion parameters and the optical constants.

  2. Volcanic sulfate aerosol formation in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Erwan; Bekki, Slimane; Ninin, Charlotte; Bindeman, Ilya

    2014-11-01

    The isotopic composition of volcanic sulfate provides insights into the atmospheric chemical processing of volcanic plumes. First, mass-independent isotopic anomalies quantified by Δ17O and to a lesser extent Δ33S and Δ36S in sulfate depend on the relative importance of different oxidation mechanisms that generate sulfate aerosols. Second, the isotopic composition of sulfate (δ34S and δ18O) could be an indicator of fractionation (distillation/condensation) processes occurring in volcanic plumes. Here we present analyses of O- and S isotopic compositions of volcanic sulfate absorbed on very fresh volcanic ash from nine moderate historical eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere. Most of our volcanic sulfate samples, which are thought to have been generated in the troposphere or in the tropopause region, do not exhibit any significant mass-independent fractionation (MIF) isotopic anomalies, apart from those from an eruption of a Mexican volcano. Coupled to simple chemistry model calculations representative of the background atmosphere, our data set suggests that although H2O2 (a MIF-carrying oxidant) is thought to be by far the most efficient sulfur oxidant in the background atmosphere, it is probably quickly consumed in large dense tropospheric volcanic plumes. We estimate that in the troposphere, at least, more than 90% of volcanic secondary sulfate is not generated by MIF processes. Volcanic S-bearing gases, mostly SO2, appear to be oxidized through channels that do not generate significant isotopically mass-independent sulfate, possibly via OH in the gas phase and/or transition metal ion catalysis in the aqueous phase. It is also likely that some of the sulfates sampled were not entirely produced by atmospheric oxidation processes but came out directly from volcanoes without any MIF anomalies.

  3. Analytical techniques for ambient sulfate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Graczyk, D.G.; Kumar, R.; Cunningham, P.T.

    1981-06-01

    Work done to further develop the infrared spectroscopic analytical method for the analysis of atmospheric aerosol particles, as well as some exploratory work on a new procedure for determining proton acidity in aerosol samples is described. Earlier work had led to the successful use of infrared (ir) spectrophotometry for the analysis of nitrate, ammonium, and neutral and acidic sulfates in aerosol samples collected by an impactor on a Mylar-film substrate. In this work, a filter-extraction method was developed to prepare filter-collected aerosol samples for ir analysis. A study was made comparing the ir analytical results on filter-collected samples with impactor-collected samples. Also, the infrared analytical technique was compared in field studies with light-scattering techniques for aerosol analysis. A highly sensitive instrument for aerosol analysis using attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy was designed, built, and tested. This instrument provides a measurement sensitivity much greater (by a factor of 6 for SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/) than that obtainable using the KBr-pellet method. This instrument collect size- and time-resolved samples and is potentially capable of providing automated, near real-time aerosol analysis. Exploratory work on a novel approach to the determination of proton acidity in filter- or impactor-collected aerosol samples is also described. In this technique, the acidic sample is reacted with an access of a tagged, vapor-phase base. The unreacted base is flushed off and the amount of the tag retained by the sample is a direct measure of the proton acidity of the sample. The base was tagged with Ge, which can be conveniently determined by the x-ray fluorescence technique.

  4. Sources of Size Segregated Sulfate Aerosols in the Arctic Summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremaninezhadgharelar, R.; Norman, A. L.; Abbatt, J.; Levasseur, M.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols drive significant radiative forcing and affect Arctic climate. Despite the importance of these particles in Arctic climate change, there are some key uncertainties in the estimation of their effects and sources. Aerosols in six size fractions between <0.49 to 7.0 microns in diameter were collected on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic, during July 2014. A cascade impactor fitted to a high volume sampler was used for this study and was modified to permit collection of SO2 after aerosols were removed from the gas stream. The isotopic composition of sulfate aerosols and SO2 was measured and apportionment calculations have been performed to quantify the contribution of biogenic as well as anthropogenic sources to the growth of different aerosol size fractions in the atmosphere. The presence of sea salt sulfate aerosols was especially high in coarse mode aerosols as expected. The contribution of biogenic sulfate concentration in this study was higher than anthropogenic sulfate. Around 70% of fine aerosols (<0.49 μm) and 86% of SO2 were from biogenic sources. Concentrations of biogenic sulfate for fine aerosols, ranging from 18 to 625 ng/m3, were five times higher than total biogenic sulfate concentrations measured during Fall in the same region (Rempillo et al., 2011). A comparison of the isotope ratio for SO2 and fine aerosols offers a way to determine aerosol growth from local SO2 oxidation. For some samples, the values for SO2 and fine aerosols were close together suggesting the same source for SO2 and aerosol sulfur.Aerosols drive significant radiative forcing and affect Arctic climate. Despite the importance of these particles in Arctic climate change, there are some key uncertainties in the estimation of their effects and sources. Aerosols in six size fractions between <0.49 to 7.0 microns in diameter were collected on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic, during July 2014. A cascade impactor

  5. Sulfate aerosol distributions and cloud variations during El Nino anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Parungo, F. ); Hicks, B. )

    1993-02-20

    The effects of aerosols on cloud characteristics, albedo, rainfall amount, and overall climate changes were investigated by assessing the qualitative associations and quantitative correlations between the relevant variables during El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) perturbations. Both historical records and data from recent field measurements for the Pacific Ocean region were used for the investigation. The results show that ENSO perturbations could change sulfate aerosol production and distribution over the surveyed regions. Strong correlations were observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and sulfate aerosol concentrations, and between cloud amount and albedo. Weak but significant correlations were also observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and cloud amounts, and between sulfate aerosol concentrations and rainfall amounts. Although sulfate aerosols appeared to have a strong impact on cloud microphysics, the present data confirm that cloud dynamics play the pivotal role in control of cloud types and cloud amount in the studied regions. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Deliquescence behavior of organic/ammonium sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Sarah D.; Wise, Matthew E.; Cushing, Melinda; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2002-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that tropospheric aerosols composed of internal mixtures of organics with sulfates are quite common with the organic composing up to 50% of the particle mass. The influences of the organics on the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol are not known. In this paper, we report the solubility of a series of dicarboxylic acids in saturated ammonium sulfate solution as a function of temperature. We also report the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the pure dicarboxylic acids and of mixtures of dicarboxylic acids with ammonium sulfate. For the systems studied, we find that the presence of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids caused deliquescence to occur at a lower relative humidity (RH) than pure ammonium sulfate. In contrast, the less soluble dicarboxylic acids had no measurable effect on the deliquescence relative humidity of ammonium sulfate.

  7. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  8. Thermochemical, cloud condensation nucleation ability and optical properties of alkyl aminium sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavi, A.; Bluvshtein, N.; Segre, E.; Segev, L.; Flores, J.; Rudich, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The increased interest in the chemistry of alkylamines and their possible roles in the atmosphere increased recently due to field observations of the correlation between new particle formation and post nucleation growth events and the presence of alkylamines in their cationic form. Due to their high saturation vapor pressure it is unlikely that short chain alkylamines will contribute to particle formation or growth by condensation. Therefore, it was previously suggested that their contribution to particulate phase is the result of acid-base reactions between the basic alkylamines and atmospherically relevant acids such as sulfuric and nitric acid. In this study we present laboratory data on the thermochemical, CCN activity and optical properties of selected atmospherically relevant alkyl aminium sulfate salts: Monomethyl aminium sulfate (MMAS), dimethyaminium sulfate (DMAS), trimethylaminium sulfate, monoethylaminium sulfate (MEAS), diethylaminium sulfate (DEAS) and triethylaminium sulfate (TEAS)). We found that the vapor pressure of these aminium salts is 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of ammonium sulfate and as such they can contribute to new aerosols and secondary aerosols formation. We infer that these species have very high CCN activity, with hygroscopicity parameter that is lower but close to that ammonium sulfate. Finally, we present the optical properties of these alkyl aminium sulfate salts between 360 and 420 nm. These compounds are less scattering than ammonium sulfate and show minimal wavelength dependence in this range. These compounds also do not absorb light. These derived parameters can contribute to the better understanding and characterization of the role that these compounds play in atmospheric chemical reactions, gas-solid partitioning and their possible contribution to the microphysical and radiative effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  9. O-MIF signature in sulfate aerosols from Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwann, Legendre; Erwan, Martin; Slimane, Bekki; Armando, Retama; Pierre, Cartigny; Becky, Alexander; Aurora, Armienta Maria; Claus, Siebe

    2016-04-01

    Since the discovery of mass independent fractionation of sulfur and oxygen isotopes (S- and O-MIF) on Earth, the study of sulfate isotopic composition opened a new and wide field of investigation on the evolution of the atmospheric composition and its consequences for the climate. Sulfate aerosols that have a negative forcing on the climate can therefore be studied via their isotopic composition and leads to better constraints on their formation, fate and sinks, which is essential for our understanding of the sulfur cycle on Earth. In this study we focus on the interaction between anthropogenic and volcanic emissions that is necessary to figure out the climatic impact of volcanoes in large urban area. For the first time the O- composition of sulfate aerosols was monitored over the past 25 years in one of the world's largest megacities: Mexico City (MC). Sulfate aerosols from the megalopolis were sampled from 1989 to 2013 in different stations by high volume pumps and collected on glass filters. Additionally, fresh volcanic ash samples were collected during recent eruptions (from 1997 to 2013) of the Popocatepetl, which is only 70km from MC. After extraction and purification of sulfate from filters and volcanic ash, the isotopic composition is measured. The sulfate aerosols from MC show O-MIF composition with Δ17O of about 0.7‰ during the wet season and around 1.2‰ during the dry season and δ18O from -0.4‰ to 17.5‰. However, the volcanic sulfate aerosols from the Popocatepetl do not show O-MIF and δ18O vary from 7.0‰ to 12.2‰. The dataset allows us to discuss the seasonal variations in the SO2 oxidation pathways that lead to sulfate aerosol formation in the troposphere above MC during the last 25 years. Furthermore, since 1997 we are able to trace and quantify the influence of volcanic sulfate aerosols on the megalopolis, which is important for the sulfur budget in the region.

  10. Effective Henry's law partitioning and the salting constant of glyoxal in aerosols containing sulfate.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Christopher J; Waxman, Eleanor M; Slowik, Jay G; Dommen, Josef; Pfaffenberger, Lisa; Praplan, Arnaud P; Prévôt, André S H; Baltensperger, Urs; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-05-07

    The reversible partitioning of glyoxal was studied in simulation chamber experiments for the first time by time-resolved measurements of gas-phase and particle-phase concentrations in sulfate-containing aerosols. Two complementary methods for the measurement of glyoxal particle-phase concentrations are compared: (1) an offline method utilizing filter sampling of chamber aerosols followed by HPLC-MS/MS analysis and (2) positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) data. Ammonium sulfate (AS) and internally mixed ammonium sulfate/fulvic acid (AS/FA) seed aerosols both show an exponential increase of effective Henry's law coefficients (KH,eff) with AS concentration (cAS, in mol kg(-1) aerosol liquid water, m = molality) and sulfate ionic strength, I(SO4(2-)) (m). A modified Setschenow plot confirmed that "salting-in" of glyoxal is responsible for the increased partitioning. The salting constant for glyoxal in AS is K(S)CHOCHO = (-0.24 ± 0.02) m(-1), and found to be independent of the presence of FA. The reversible glyoxal uptake can be described by two distinct reservoirs for monomers and higher molecular weight species filling up at characteristic time constants. These time constants are τ1 ≈ 10(2) s and τ2 ≈ 10(4) s at cAS < 12 m, and about 1-2 orders of magnitude slower at higher cAS, suggesting that glyoxal uptake is kinetically limited at high salt concentrations.

  11. Size fractionated speciation of nitrate and sulfate aerosols in a sub-tropical industrial environment.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Tripathi, B D; Mishra, V K; Prajapati, S K

    2006-03-01

    Size fractionated chemical speciation of acidic aerosols were performed for ammonium sulfate, other sulfates, ammonium nitrate and other nitrates in a sub-tropical industrial area, Bina, India during December 2003 to November 2004. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed highly significant temporal variations (p > .001) in the concentrations of nitrate and sulfate aerosols in all the three size fractions (fine, mid-size and coarse). Winter demonstrated utmost concentrations of ammonium sulfate, which ranged from 3.2 to 26.4 microg m(-3) in fine particles and 0.20-0.34 microg m(-3) in coarse particles. Ammonium sulfate was chiefly in fine mode (43.77% of total particulate sulfate) as compared to coarse particles (28.60% of total particulate sulfate). The major fraction Ammonium sulfate existed in different forms in atmospheric aerosols, for example NH4Fe(SO4)2, (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)3H(SO4)2 in fine particles, and (NH4)4(NO3)SO4+ in coarse particles. Other sulfate concentrations were also higher during winter ranging from 1.89 to 14.3 microg m(-3) in fine particles and 0.12-0.65microg m(-3) in coarse particles. Ammonium nitrate constituted the major fraction of total particulate nitrate all through the year and was principally in fine particles (the highest concentration in January i.e. 14.2 microg m(-3)). Other nitrates were mainly distributed in the fine particles (highest concentration in January i.e. 11.2 microg m(-3)) All the sulfate and nitrate species were mainly distributed in fine mode and have significant impact on human health.

  12. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C.; Lee, E.C.; Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B.; Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Bailey, P. L.; Gille, J. C.; Lee, E. C.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Fishbein, E. F.; Waters, J. W.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605/cm (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 micrometers) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheriodal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculations and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles.

  14. Optical Properties of Internally Mixed Aerosol Particles Composed of Dicarboxylic Acids and Ammonium Sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Miriam A.; Hasenkopf, Christa A.; Beaver, Melinda R.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of internally mixed aerosol particles composed of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy at a wavelength of 532 nm. The real refractive indices of these nonabsorbing species were retrieved from the extinction and concentration of the particles using Mie scattering theory. We obtain refractive indices for pure ammonium sulfate and pure dicarboxylic acids that are consistent with literature values, where they exist, to within experimental error. For mixed particles, however, our data deviates significantly from a volume-weighted average of the pure components. Surprisingly, the real refractive indices of internal mixtures of succinic acid and ammonium sulfate are higher than either of the pure components at the highest organic weight fractions. For binary internal mixtures of oxalic or adipic acid with ammonium sulfate, the real refractive indices of the mixtures are approximately the same as ammonium sulfate for all organic weight fractions. Various optical mixing rules for homogeneous and slightly heterogeneous systems fail to explain the experimental real refractive indices. It is likely that complex particle morphologies are responsible for the observed behavior of the mixed particles. Implications of our results for atmospheric modeling and aerosol structure are discussed.

  15. Analysis of reversibility and reaction products of glyoxal uptake onto ammonium sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Chhabra, P. S.; Chan, A. W.; Surratt, J. D.; Kwan, A. J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2009-04-01

    masses assigned to sulfate esters in previous work (Liggio et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 39, 1532, 2005) via low resolution AMS studies were assigned as glyoxal oligomers in our study via high resolution AMS spectra. However, organosulfates were identified under irradiated conditions, and we present attempts to identify the specific species via comparison with lab synthesized organosulfates. The influence of irradiation on organosulfate formation is still under investigation. Under irradiated conditions we see clear evidence for active oxidative photochemistry. The aerosol phase becomes increasingly oxidized and oxidation products, such as organic acids, similar to those observed in studies using bulk samples by Carlton et al. (Atmos. Environ. 41, 7588, 2007) are formed. Overall uptake is reduced under our experimental conditions, likely due to increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity. We also report observation of imidazoles (carbon-nitrogen containing aromatic heterocycles) resulting from reaction of glyoxal with the nitrogen component of the ammonium sulfate seed aerosol. The imidazoles form irreversibly under dark and irradiated conditions, in ammonium sulfate and acidified ammonium sulfate (pH~1) aerosol. The molecular framework of imidazoles is very stable as a result of the aromaticity. The primary imidazole product, which has a low vapor pressure estimated at 0.0014 Torr, is predicted to be present as a (protonated) cation, owing to its basicity (pKB = 7). It is thus likely not a candidate for repartitioning to the gas phase. Evidence for participation of ammonium in reactions with glyoxal using bulk samples has recently been reported by Noziere et al. (JPCA 113, 231, 2008; ACPD 9, 1, 2009). This study reveals the complex chemistry occurring within ammonium sulfate seed aerosol even for systems with greatly reduced complexity compared to atmospheric aerosol. The results increase our understanding of the contribution of glyoxal to SOA formation

  16. Geo-Engineering Climate Change with Sulfate Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasch, P. J.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    We explore the impact of injecting a precursor of sulfate aerosols into the middle atmosphere where they would act to increase the planetary albedo and thus counter some of the effects of greenhouse gase forcing. We use an atmospheric general circulation model (CAM, the Community Atmosphere Model) coupled to a slab ocean model for this study. Only physical effects are examined, that is we ignore the biogeochemical and chemical implications of changes to greenhouse gases and aerosols, and do not explore the important ethical, legal, and moral issues that are associated with deliberate geo-engineering efforts. The simulations suggest that the sulfate aerosol produced from the SO2 source in the stratosphere is sufficient to counterbalance most of the warming associated with the greenhouse gas forcing. Surface temperatures return to within a few tenths of a degree(K) of present day levels. Sea ice and precipitation distributions are also much closer to their present day values. The polar region surface temperatures remain 1-3 degrees warm in the winter hemisphere than present day values. This study is very preliminary. Only a subset of the relevant effects have been explored. The effect of such an injection of aerosols on middle atmospheric chemistry, and the effect on cirrus clouds are obvious missing components that merit scrutiny. There are probably others that should be considered. The injection of such aerosols cannot help in ameliorating the effects of CO2 changes on ocean PH, or other effects on the biogeochemistry of the earth system.

  17. Ambient aerosols remain highly acidic despite dramatic sulfate reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead

    2016-04-01

    The pH of fine particles has many vital environmental impacts. By affecting aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity, particle pH is linked to regional air quality and climate, and adverse effects on human health. Sulfate is often the main acid component that drives pH of fine particles (i.e., PM2.5) and is neutralized to varying degrees by gas phase ammonia. Sulfate levels have decreased by approximately 70% over the Southeastern United States in the last fifteen years, but measured ammonia levels have been fairly steady implying the aerosol may becoming more neutral. Using a chemically comprehensive data set, combined with a thermodynamic analysis, we show that PM2.5 in the Southeastern U.S. is highly acidic (pH between 0 and 2), and that pH has remained relatively unchanged throughout the past decade and a half of decreasing sulfate. Even with further sulfate reductions, pH buffering by gas-particle partitioning of ammonia is expected to continue until sulfate drops to near background levels, indicating that fine particle pH will remain near current levels into the future. These results are non-intuitive and reshape expectations of how sulfur emission reductions impact air quality in the Southeastern U.S. and possibly other regions across the globe.

  18. Transient Sulfate Aerosols as a Signature of Exoplanet Volcanism.

    PubMed

    Misra, Amit; Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Koehler, Matthew C; Sholes, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Geological activity is thought to be important for the origin of life and for maintaining planetary habitability. We show that transient sulfate aerosols could be a signature of exoplanet volcanism and therefore of a geologically active world. A detection of transient aerosols, if linked to volcanism, could thus aid in habitability evaluations of the exoplanet. On Earth, subduction-induced explosive eruptions inject SO2 directly into the stratosphere, leading to the formation of sulfate aerosols with lifetimes of months to years. We demonstrate that the rapid increase and gradual decrease in sulfate aerosol loading associated with these eruptions may be detectable in transit transmission spectra with future large-aperture telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), for a planetary system at a distance of 10 pc, assuming an Earth-like atmosphere, bulk composition, and size. Specifically, we find that a signal-to-noise ratio of 12.1 and 7.1 could be achieved with E-ELT (assuming photon-limited noise) for an Earth analogue orbiting a Sun-like star and M5V star, respectively, even without multiple transits binned together. We propose that the detection of this transient signal would strongly suggest an exoplanet volcanic eruption, if potential false positives such as dust storms or bolide impacts can be ruled out. Furthermore, because scenarios exist in which O2 can form abiotically in the absence of volcanic activity, a detection of transient aerosols that can be linked to volcanism, along with a detection of O2, would be a more robust biosignature than O2 alone.

  19. Evaluating Ammonium, Nitrate and Sulfate Aerosols in 3-Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezuman, K.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial distribution of aerosols and their chemical composition dictates whether they would have a cooling or a warming effect on the climate system. Hence, properly modeling the 3-dimensonal distribution of aerosols is a crucial step for coherent climate simulations. Since surface networks only give 2-D data, and most satellites supply integrated column information, it is thus important to integrate aircraft measurements in climate model evaluation. In this study, the vertical distribution of ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate, is constrained against a collection of 14 AMS flight campaigns, and surface measurements from 2000-2010 in the USA and Europe. GISS modelE2, one of the only models to include nitrate aerosol in CIMP5, is used with multiple aerosol microphysics (MATRIX, OMA) and thermodynamic (ISORROPIA-II, EQSAM) configurations. Our results show that the MATRIX microphysical scheme improves the model performance for sulfate and that there is a systematic underestimation of ammonium and nitrate over the USA and Europe. In terms of gaseous precursors, underestimation of nitrate and ammonium is likely tied to ammonia emissions uncertainties, while nitric acid concentrations are largely overestimated in the higher levels of the model, influenced by strong strat-trop exchange. At high altitudes, nitrate formation is calculated to be ammonia limited, whose profile measurements are scarce.

  20. Hygroscopic behavior of multicomponent organic aerosols and their internal mixtures with ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, B.; Tong, S. R.; Liu, Q. F.; Li, K.; Wang, W. G.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ge, M. F.

    2015-08-01

    Water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) are important components of organics in the atmospheric fine particulate matter. Although WSOCs play an important role in the hygroscopicity of aerosols, water uptake behavior of internally mixed WSOC aerosols remains limited characterization. Here, the hygroscopic properties of single component such as levoglucosan, oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid and phthalic acid and multicomponent WSOC aerosols mainly involving oxalic acid are investigated with the hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The coexisting hygroscopic species including levoglucosan, malonic acid and phthalic acid have strong influence on the hygroscopic growth and phase behavior of oxalic acid, even suppress its crystallization completely. The interactions between oxalic acid and levoglucosan are confirmed by infrared spectra. The discrepancies between measured growth factors and predictions from Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) with UNIFAC method and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) approach increase at medium and high relative humidity (RH) assuming oxalic acid in a solid state. For the internal mixture of oxalic acid with levoglucosan or succinic acid, there is enhanced water uptake at high RH due to positive chemical interactions between solutes. Organic mixture has more complex effect on the hygroscopicity of ammonium sulfate than single species. Although hygroscopic species such as levoglucosan accounts for a small fraction in the multicomponent aerosols, they may still strongly influence the hygroscopic behavior of ammonium sulfate by changing phase state of oxalic acid which plays the role of "intermediate" species. Considering the abundance of oxalic acid in the atmospheric aerosols, its mixtures with hygroscopic species may significantly promote water uptake under high RH conditions and thus affect the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, optical properties and chemical reactivity of atmospheric particles.

  1. Hygroscopic behavior of multicomponent organic aerosols and their internal mixtures with ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Bo; Tong, Shengrui; Liu, Qifan; Li, Kun; Wang, Weigang; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-03-01

    Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) are important components of organics in the atmospheric fine particulate matter. Although WSOCs play an important role in the hygroscopicity of aerosols, knowledge on the water uptake behavior of internally mixed WSOC aerosols remains limited. Here, the hygroscopic properties of single components such as levoglucosan, oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid, phthalic acid, and multicomponent WSOC aerosols mainly involving oxalic acid are investigated with the hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The coexisting hygroscopic species including levoglucosan, malonic acid, and phthalic acid have a strong influence on the hygroscopic growth and phase behavior of oxalic acid, even suppressing its crystallization completely during the drying process. The phase behaviors of oxalic acid/levoglucosan mixed particles are confirmed by infrared spectra. The discrepancies between measured growth factors and predictions from Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) with the Universal Quasi-Chemical Functional Group Activity Coefficient (UNIFAC) method and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) approach increase at medium and high relative humidity (RH) assuming oxalic acid in a crystalline solid state. For the internal mixture of oxalic acid with levoglucosan or succinic acid, there is enhanced water uptake at high RH compared to the model predictions based on reasonable oxalic acid phase assumption. Organic mixture has more complex effects on the hygroscopicity of ammonium sulfate than single species. Although hygroscopic species such as levoglucosan account for a small fraction in the multicomponent aerosols, they may still strongly influence the hygroscopic behavior of ammonium sulfate by changing the phase state of oxalic acid which plays the role of "intermediate" species. Considering the abundance of oxalic acid in the atmospheric aerosols, its mixtures with hygroscopic species may significantly promote water uptake

  2. Climate Impacts of Atmospheric Sulfate and Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Song, Qingyuan; Menon, Surabi; Yu, Shaocai; Liu, Shaw C.; Shi, Guangyu; Leung, Lai R.; Luo, Yunfeng

    2008-09-19

    Although the global average surface temperature has increased by about 0.6°C during the last century (IPCC, 2001), some regions such as East Asia, Eastern North America, and Western Europe have cooled rather than warmed during the past decades (Jones, 1988; Qian and Giorgi, 2000). Coherent changes at the regional scale may reflect responses to different climate forcings that need to be understood in order to predict the future net climate response at the global and regional scales under different emission scenarios. Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in global climate change (IPCC 2001). They perturb the earth’s radiative budget directly by scattering and absorbing solar and long wave radiation, and indirectly by changing cloud reflectivity, lifetime, and precipitation efficiency via their role as cloud condensation nuclei. Because aerosols have much shorter lifetime (days to weeks) compared to most greenhouse gases, they tend to concentrate near their emission sources and distribute very unevenly both in time and space. This non-uniform distribution of aerosols, in conjunction with the greenhouse effect, may lead to differential net heating in some areas and net cooling in others (Penner et al. 1994). Sulfate aerosols come mainly from the oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from fossil fuel burning. Black carbon aerosols are directly emitted during incomplete combustion of biomass, coal, and diesel derived sources. Due to the different optical properties, sulfate and black carbon affect climate in different ways. Because of the massive emissions of sulfur and black carbon that accompany the rapid economic expansions in East Asia, understanding the effects of aerosols on climate is particularly important scientifically and politically in order to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies.

  3. Sulfate Aerosol Formation and Oxidation Pathways on Haze Event over East Asia Region Focusing on Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.; Koo, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    The aerosol transports from China largely contribute to high PM (Particulate Matter) concentration in Korea. Especially, secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) such as nitrate, sulfate and ammonium are largely transported from China to Korea during haze event. The measured PM2.5 (Particle Matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5㎛) concentrations at the supersite monitoring stations in Korea are normally over 100 ug/m3 and SIAs are major chemical species with more than 70% of PM2.5 during the event. According to our air quality forecast model, sulfate concentrations are largely under-predicted in winter and slightly over-predicted in summer. Those discrepancies between model predicted and observed sulfate concentrations are mainly due to uncertainties of precursor emissions of NOx, SO2, and VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) and chemical mechanism of the sulfate formation in the chemical forecast model of CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality Model). Formation of sulfate is chemically linked to primary emissions of sulfur dioxide and to be abundancy of atmospheric oxidants such as hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, ozone, methyl hydroperoxide, and peroxyacetic acid. All of these oxidant species are formed via photochemical reactions with NOx and VOCs. The aim of this work is to investigate the dependency of sulfate formation on oxidant levels in winter and summer during episode event using CMAQ and its sulfate tracking probing tool. The sensitivity of the precursor emissions of SO2, NOx, VOCs and NH3 was also tested to understand the pathways of the sulfate formation. The results show that long range transport from China is a major factor to determine sulfate level in Korea during haze events and dominant mechanisms in the sulfate formation are the gas-phase OH and aqueous phase H2O2 reactions. NOx-SO2-VOCs chemical regimes for the sulfate formation is the VOCs limited regimes in Korea. The further details of the sensitivity run of the precursor emissions and

  4. Freezing Behavior of Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols Inferred from Trajectory Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Toon, O. B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1995-01-01

    Based on the trajectory analysis presented in this paper, a new mechanism is described for the freezing of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols. Temperature histories based on 10-day back trajectories for six ER-2 flights during AASE-I (1989) and AAOE (1987) are presented. The mechanism requires, as an initial step, the cooling of a H2SO4/H2O aerosol to low temperatures. If a cooling cycle is then followed up by a warming to approximately 196-198 K, the aerosols may freeze due to the growth of the crystallizing embryos formed at the colder temperature. The HNO3 absorbed at colder temperatures may increase the nucleation rate of the crystalling embryos and therefore influence the crystallization of the supercooled aerosols upon warming. Of all the ER-2 flights described, only the polar stratospheric clouds (PSC), observed on the flights of January 24, and 25, 1989 are consistent with the thermodynamics of liquid ternary solutions of H2SO4/HNO3/H2O (type Ib PSCs). For those two days, back trajectories indicate that the air mass was exposed to sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) melting temperatures about 24 hours prior to being sampled by the ER-2. Temperature histories, recent laboratory measurements, and the properties of glassy solids suggest that stratospheric H2SO4 aerosols may undergo a phase transition to SAT upon warming at approximately 198 K after going through a cooling cycle to about 194 K or lower.

  5. Surface submicron aerosol chemical composition: What fraction is not sulfate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Miller, T. L.; Coffman, D. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Harris, J. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Forbes, G.; Anderson, T. L.; Covert, D. S.; Rood, M. J.

    2000-03-01

    Measurements of submicron aerosol mass and the mass of major ionic components have been made over the past 5 years on cruises in the Pacific and Southern Oceans and at monitoring stations across North America (Barrow, Alaska; Cheeka Peak, Washington; Bondville, Illinois; and Sable Island, Nova Scotia). Reported here are submicron concentrations of aerosol mass, nonsea salt (nss) sulfate, sea salt, methanesulfonate, other nss inorganic ions, and residual, or chemically unanalyzed, mass. Residual mass concentrations are based on the difference between simultaneously measured aerosol mass and the mass of the major ionic components. A standardized sampling protocol was used for all measurements making the data from each location directly comparable. For the Pacific and Southern Oceans, concentrations of the chemical components are presented in zonally averaged 20° latitude bins. For the monitoring stations, mean concentrations are presented for distinct air mass types (marine, clean continental, and polluted based on air mass back trajectories). In addition, percentile information for each chemical component is given to indicate the variability in the measured concentrations. Mean nss sulfate submicron aerosol mass fractions for the different latitude bins of the Pacific ranged from 0.14±0.01 to 0.34±0.03 (arithmetic mean±absolute uncertainty at the 95% confidence level). The lowest average value occurred in the 40°-60°S latitude band where nss sulfate concentrations were low due to the remoteness from continental sources and sea salt concentrations were relatively high. Mean nss sulfate aerosol mass fractions were more variable at the monitoring stations ranging from 0.13±0.004 to 0.65±0.02. Highest values occurred in polluted air masses at Bondville and Sable Island. Sea salt mean mass fractions ranged between 0.20±0.02 and 0.53±0.03 at all latitude bands of the Pacific (except 20°-40°N where the residual mass fraction was relatively high) and at Barrow

  6. Uptake of Ambient Organic Gases to Acidic Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S.

    2009-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere has been an area of significant interest due to its climatic relevance, its effects on air quality and human health. Due largely to the underestimation of SOA by regional and global models, there has been an increasing number of studies focusing on alternate pathways leading to SOA. In this regard, recent work has shown that heterogeneous and liquid phase reactions, often leading to oligomeric material, may be a route to SOA via products of biogenic and anthropogenic origin. Although oligomer formation in chamber studies has been frequently observed, the applicability of these experiments to ambient conditions, and thus the overall importance of oligomerization reactions remain unclear. In the present study, ambient air is drawn into a Teflon smog chamber and exposed to acidic sulfate aerosols which have been formed in situ via the reaction of SO3 with water vapor. The aerosol composition is measured with a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), and particle size distributions are monitored with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The use of ambient air and relatively low inorganic particle loading potentially provides clearer insight into the importance of heterogeneous reactions. Results of experiments, with a range of sulfate loadings show that there are several competing processes occurring on different timescales. A significant uptake of ambient organic gases to the particles is observed immediately followed by a slow shift towards higher m/z over a period of several hours indicating that higher molecular weight products (possibly oligomers) are being formed through a reactive process. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions can occur with ambient organic gases, even in the presence of ammonia, which may have significant implications to the ambient atmosphere where particles may be neutralized after their formation.

  7. The relative roles of sulfate aerosols and greenhouse gases in climate forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiehl, J. T.; Briegleb, B. P.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations of the effects of both natural and anthropogenic tropospheric sulfate aerosols indicate that the aerosol climate forcing is sufficiently large in a number of regions of the Northern Hemisphere to reduce significantly the positive forcing from increased greenhouse gases. Summer sulfate aerosol forcing in the Northern Hemisphere completely offsets the greenhouse forcing over the eastern United States and central Europe. Anthropogenic sulfate aerosols contribute a globally averaged annual forcing of -0.3 watt per square meter as compared with +2.1 watts per square meter for greenhouse gases. Sources of the difference in magnitude with the previous estimate of Charlson et al. (1992) are discussed.

  8. Non-sulfate sulfur in fine aerosols across the United States: Insight for organosulfate prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Kabindra M.; Peltier, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the discrepancies in long-term sulfur measurements from 2000 to 2012 by two separate speciation methods, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy and ion chromatography (IC) across the United States (334 sites). Overall, there was a good correlation between sulfur measurements by XRF spectroscopy and IC (R ≥ 0.90 for most of the sites). However, the inorganic sulfate measured by ion chromatography was not sufficient to account for all the sulfur measured by XRF spectroscopy at many of the sites. Discrepancies were observed with the high ratios of sulfur measured by XRF spectroscopy to that by IC. Such high ratios also exhibited seasonal variation, and differed across land use types; significant differences occurred at locations classified as forest, agriculture, and mobile, but not in locations classified as commercial, desert, industrial, and residential. On average, the excess, or non-sulfate, sulfur (unmeasured organic sulfur or other inorganic species of sulfur) was variable and observed as high as ~13% of organic carbon and ~2% of PM2.5. The contribution of such assumed organosulfur was larger in the eastern region than other geographical locations in the United States. Besides the temporal and spatial trends, the additional sulfur was found to be related to other factors such as aerosol acidity and emission sources. The results suggest that these unmeasured sulfur species could have significant contribution to aerosol burden, and the understanding of these could help to control PM2.5 levels and to assess other effects of sulfur aerosols. PMID:25620874

  9. Non-sulfate sulfur in fine aerosols across the United States: Insight for organosulfate prevalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Kabindra M.; Peltier, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the discrepancies in long-term sulfur measurements from 2000 to 2012 by two separate speciation methods, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy and ion chromatography (IC) across the United States (334 sites). Overall, there was a good correlation between sulfur measurements by XRF spectroscopy and IC (R ≥ 0.90 for most of the sites). However, the inorganic sulfate measured by ion chromatography was not sufficient to account for all the sulfur measured by XRF spectroscopy at many of the sites. Discrepancies were observed with the high ratios of sulfur measured by XRF spectroscopy to that by IC. Such high ratios also exhibited seasonal variation, and differed across land use types; significant differences occurred at locations classified as forest, agriculture, and mobile, but not in locations classified as commercial, desert, industrial, and residential. On average, the excess, or non-sulfate, sulfur (unmeasured organic sulfur or other inorganic species of sulfur) was variable and observed as high as ∼13% of organic carbon and ∼2% of PM2.5. The contribution of such assumed organosulfur was larger in the eastern region than other geographical locations in the United States. Besides the temporal and spatial trends, the additional sulfur was found to be related to other factors such as aerosol acidity and emission sources. The results suggest that these unmeasured sulfur species could have significant contribution to aerosol burden, and the understanding of these could help to control PM2.5 levels and to assess other effects of sulfur aerosols.

  10. Non-sulfate sulfur in fine aerosols across the United States: Insight for organosulfate prevalence.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Kabindra M; Peltier, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the discrepancies in long-term sulfur measurements from 2000 to 2012 by two separate speciation methods, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy and ion chromatography (IC) across the United States (334 sites). Overall, there was a good correlation between sulfur measurements by XRF spectroscopy and IC (R ≥ 0.90 for most of the sites). However, the inorganic sulfate measured by ion chromatography was not sufficient to account for all the sulfur measured by XRF spectroscopy at many of the sites. Discrepancies were observed with the high ratios of sulfur measured by XRF spectroscopy to that by IC. Such high ratios also exhibited seasonal variation, and differed across land use types; significant differences occurred at locations classified as forest, agriculture, and mobile, but not in locations classified as commercial, desert, industrial, and residential. On average, the excess, or non-sulfate, sulfur (unmeasured organic sulfur or other inorganic species of sulfur) was variable and observed as high as ~13% of organic carbon and ~2% of PM2.5. The contribution of such assumed organosulfur was larger in the eastern region than other geographical locations in the United States. Besides the temporal and spatial trends, the additional sulfur was found to be related to other factors such as aerosol acidity and emission sources. The results suggest that these unmeasured sulfur species could have significant contribution to aerosol burden, and the understanding of these could help to control PM2.5 levels and to assess other effects of sulfur aerosols.

  11. [Effect of ammonium sulfate aerosol on the photochemical reaction of toluene/ NO(x)/air mixture].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Hao, Ji-Ming; Lü, Zi-Feng; Zhao, Zhe; Li, Jun-Hua

    2007-06-01

    The effect of ammonium sulfate aerosol on the photochemical reaction of toluene/NO(x)/air mixture was evaluated with Tsinghua Smog Chamber facility. The results indicate that the presence of concentrated preexisting ammonium sulfate aerosol shortens the time to reach maximum PM (particle matter) concentration and increases the aerosol yield of toluene. And under the presence of high concentrated ammonium sulfate aerosol seed, the concentration of aerosol does not have significant effects on NO(x), NO and O3 variation, but affects the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The SOA yield increases with the increasing initial ammonium sulfate seed concentration (< 160 microg x m(-3)). From the minimum 7.2% to the maximum 11.7%, the percentage increase of SOA yield is more than 60%.

  12. Characterizing the influence of anthropogenic emissions and transport variability on sulfate aerosol concentrations at Mauna Loa Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Lauren E.

    Sulfate aerosol in the atmosphere has substantial impacts on human health and environmental quality. Most notably, atmospheric sulfate has the potential to modify the earth's climate system through both direct and indirect radiative forcing mechanisms (Meehl et al., 2007). Emissions of sulfur dioxide, the primary precursor of sulfate aerosol, are now globally dominated by anthropogenic sources as a result of widespread fossil fuel combustion. Economic development in Asian countries since 1990 has contributed considerably to atmospheric sulfur loading, particularly China, which currently emits approximately 1/3 of global anthropogenic SO2 (Klimont et al., 2013). Observational and modeling studies have confirmed that anthropogenic pollutants from Asian sources can be transported long distances with important implications for future air quality and global climate change. Located in the remote Pacific Ocean (19.54°N, 155.58°W) at an elevation of 3.4 kilometers above sea level, Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) is an ideal measurement site for ground-based, free tropospheric observations and is well situated to experience influence from springtime Asian outflow. This study makes use of a 14-year data set of aerosol ionic composition, obtained at MLO by the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Daily filter samples of total aerosol concentrations were made during nighttime downslope (free-tropospheric) transport conditions, from 1995 to 2008, and were analyzed for aerosol-phase concentrations of the following species: nitrate (NO3-), sulfate (SO42-), methanesulfonate (MSA), chloride (Cl-), oxalate, sodium (Na+), ammonium (NH 4+), potassium (K+), magnesium (Mg 2+), and calcium (Ca2+). An understanding of the factors controlling seasonal and interannual variations in aerosol speciation and concentrations at this site is complicated by the relatively short lifetimes of aerosols, compared with greenhouse gases which have also been sampled over long time periods at MLO. Aerosol filter

  13. Biogenic, anthropogenic and sea salt sulfate size-segregated aerosols in the Arctic summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Norman, Ann-Lise; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Levasseur, Maurice; Thomas, Jennie L.

    2016-04-01

    Size-segregated aerosol sulfate concentrations were measured on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic during July 2014. The objective of this study was to utilize the isotopic composition of sulfate to address the contribution of anthropogenic and biogenic sources of aerosols to the growth of the different aerosol size fractions in the Arctic atmosphere. Non-sea-salt sulfate is divided into biogenic and anthropogenic sulfate using stable isotope apportionment techniques. A considerable amount of the average sulfate concentration in the fine aerosols with a diameter < 0.49 µm was from biogenic sources (> 63 %), which is higher than in previous Arctic studies measuring above the ocean during fall (< 15 %) (Rempillo et al., 2011) and total aerosol sulfate at higher latitudes at Alert in summer (> 30 %) (Norman et al., 1999). The anthropogenic sulfate concentration was less than that of biogenic sulfate, with potential sources being long-range transport and, more locally, the Amundsen's emissions. Despite attempts to minimize the influence of ship stack emissions, evidence from larger-sized particles demonstrates a contribution from local pollution. A comparison of δ34S values for SO2 and fine aerosols was used to show that gas-to-particle conversion likely occurred during most sampling periods. δ34S values for SO2 and fine aerosols were similar, suggesting the same source for SO2 and aerosol sulfate, except for two samples with a relatively high anthropogenic fraction in particles < 0.49 µm in diameter (15-17 and 17-19 July). The high biogenic fraction of sulfate fine aerosol and similar isotope ratio values of these particles and SO2 emphasize the role of marine organisms (e.g., phytoplankton, algae, bacteria) in the formation of fine particles above the Arctic Ocean during the productive summer months.

  14. The influence of cloud droplet heterogeneity on sulfate production mechanisms constrained by isotopic measurements of sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, B.; Allman, D. J.; Amos, H. M.; Fairlie, T. D.; Dachs, J.; Hegg, D.; Sletten, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Observations and modeling studies have shown that heterogeneity in fog and cloud drop size and chemical composition can significantly impact in-cloud sulfate production rates due to the strong pH dependence of the ozone oxidation pathway. Averaging cloud water pH tends to underestimate the fraction of S(IV) that is SO32- leading to underestimates of in-cloud sulfate production rates. Large scale models typically do not account for this heterogeneity due to the large computational expense associated with this calculation, and instead employ bulk calculations or assumptions of cloud water pH. Modeling studies have consistently shown that calculated sulfate production rates using bulk cloud pH treatments tend to underestimate in-cloud sulfate production rates compared to more explicit treatment of cloud drop heterogeneity by underestimating the ozone oxidation pathway. Here, we utilize a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and observations of the oxygen isotopic composition of sulfate aerosol collected during a ship cruise in the subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean to quantify sulfate formation pathways in the marine boundary layer. The oxygen isotopic composition of sulfate aerosol is particularly sensitive to the importance of the ozone oxidation pathway due to its large isotopic signature. We employ a model parameterization by Yuen et al. (1996) that accounts for the impact of alkaline, coarse-mode sea salt aerosols on in-cloud sulfate production rates. As sulfate formation in cloud droplets formed on alkaline coarse-mode sea salt aerosols is thought to be dominated by the ozone oxidation pathway, observations of the oxygen isotopic composition of sulfate aerosol provide a robust test of this parameterization. Including the Yuen et al. (1996) parameterization of cloud droplet heterogeneity improves the model's agreement with the observed sulfate oxygen isotopes. Accounting for the impact of cloud droplet heterogeneity on in-cloud sulfate production rates

  15. Pathways of sulfate enhancement by natural and anthropogenic mineral aerosols in China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Li, Mengmeng; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2014-12-27

    China, the world’s largest consumer of coal, emits approximately 30 million tons of sulfur dioxide (SO₂) per year. SO₂ is subsequently oxidized to sulfate in the atmosphere. However, large gaps exist between model-predicted and measured sulfate levels in China. Long-term field observations and numerical simulations were integrated to investigate the effect of mineral aerosols on sulfate formation. We found that mineral aerosols contributed a nationwide average of approximately 22% to sulfate production in 2006. The increased sulfate concentration was approximately 2 μg m⁻³ in the entire China. In East China and the Sichuan Basin, the increments reached 6.3 μg m⁻³ and 7.3 μg m⁻³, respectively. Mineral aerosols led to faster SO₂ oxidation through three pathways. First, more SO₂ was dissolved as cloud water alkalinity increased due to water-soluble mineral cations. Sulfate production was then enhanced through the aqueous-phase oxidation of S(IV) (dissolved sulfur in oxidation state +4). The contribution to the national sulfate production was 5%. Second, sulfate was enhanced through S(IV) catalyzed oxidation by transition metals. The contribution to the annual sulfate production was 8%, with 19% during the winter that decreased to 2% during the summer. Third, SO₂ reacts on the surface of mineral aerosols to produce sulfate. The contribution to the national average sulfate concentration was 9% with 16% during the winter and a negligible effect during the summer. The inclusion of mineral aerosols does resolve model discrepancies with sulfate observations in China, especially during the winter. These three pathways, which are not fully considered in most current chemistry-climate models, will significantly impact assessments regarding the effects of aerosol on climate change in China.

  16. Sulfur isotope measurements of submicrometer sulfate aerosol particles over the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Julie A.; Charlson, Robert J.; Bates, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    Stable isotopes were used to analyze the submicron-size sulfate aerosol particles in the atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean, together with the air-mass back trajectories, in order to test the hypothesis of Charlson et al. (1987) who suggested that, over the remote ocean areas, the primary source of atmospheric nonseasalt (NSS) sulfate is marine emissions of dimethylsulfide (DMS). The observed results of isotopic fractionation between the seawater sulfate and NSS sulfate fractions was found to be consistent with the isotopic fractionation predicted for the transformation of the seawater sulfate to the atmospheric NSS sulfate via a DMS path way, supporting the hypothesis of Charlson et al.

  17. Sensitivity of modelled sulfate aerosol and its radiative effect on climate to ocean DMS concentration and air-sea flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesdal, Jan-Erik; Christian, James R.; Monahan, Adam H.; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-09-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is a well-known marine trace gas that is emitted from the ocean and subsequently oxidizes to sulfate in the atmosphere. Sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere have direct and indirect effects on the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Thus, as a potential source of sulfate, ocean efflux of DMS needs to be accounted for in climate studies. Seawater concentration of DMS is highly variable in space and time, which in turn leads to high spatial and temporal variability in ocean DMS emissions. Because of sparse sampling (in both space and time), large uncertainties remain regarding ocean DMS concentration. In this study, we use an atmospheric general circulation model with explicit aerosol chemistry (CanAM4.1) and several climatologies of surface ocean DMS concentration to assess uncertainties about the climate impact of ocean DMS efflux. Despite substantial variation in the spatial pattern and seasonal evolution of simulated DMS fluxes, the global-mean radiative effect of sulfate is approximately linearly proportional to the global-mean surface flux of DMS; the spatial and temporal distribution of ocean DMS efflux has only a minor effect on the global radiation budget. The effect of the spatial structure, however, generates statistically significant changes in the global-mean concentrations of some aerosol species. The effect of seasonality on the net radiative effect is larger than that of spatial distribution and is significant at global scale.

  18. Quantifying the Indirect Effect of Sulfate Aerosol on Climate Change Through the Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadule, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Bopp, L.; Piao, S.; Ciais, P.

    2008-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases will continue to warm the Earth's climate in the coming century. Coupled climate-carbon models have demonstrated a significant climate-induced reduction of natural carbon sinks, which acts as a positive feedback on the atmospheric CO2 concentration (between +20 and +220 ppm in 2100, for the SRES A2 emission scenario). Sulfate aerosols are known to affect climate through a radiative direct effect and a series of indirect effects involving the atmospheric water cycle. However, the effects of sulfate aerosols and non-CO2 greenhouse gases were neglected in these coupled climate-carbon cycle models. Here we performed new coupled climate-carbon simulations wherein the evolution of sulfate aerosols and non-CO2 greenhouse gases were explicitly represented. We show a hitherto undocumented indirect effect of aerosols on climate, via the carbon cycle. While sulfate aerosols cool the climate by 0.79°C globally, this cooling reduces land carbon sinks, leaving additional CO2 in the atmosphere. At mid-to-high northern latitudes, the aerosol-induced cooling is responsible for a decline in photosynthesis and land carbon uptake (-63 PgC by 2100). On the other hand, a variety of processes yields increased tropical carbon uptake (+28 PgC) in response to aerosol induced cooling, which is insufficient to balance the decline in the northern hemisphere. Overall, including non- CO2 greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols, in coupled simulations, doubles the additional quantity of CO2 accumulating in the atmosphere due to climate change. Our results demonstrate that any climate mitigation policy that aims to reduce warming via sulfate aerosols must also account for their indirect warming effect, which arises from interactions between climate and the carbon cycle.

  19. [Tracing Sources of Sulfate Aerosol in Nanjing Northern Suburb Using Sulfur and Oxygen Isotopes].

    PubMed

    Wei, Ying; Guo, Zhao-bing; Ge, Xin; Zhu, Sheng-nan; Jiang, Wen-juan; Shi, Lei; Chen, Shu

    2015-04-01

    Abstract: To trace the sources of sulfate contributing to atmospheric aerosol, PM2.5 samples for isotopic analysis were collected in Nanjing northern suburb during January 2014. The sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions of sulfate from these samples were determined by EA-IRMS. Source identification and apportionment were carried out using stable isotopic and chemical evidences, combined with absolute principal component analysis (APCA) method. The Δ34S values of aerosol sulfate ranged from 2.7 per thousand to 6.4 per thousand, with an average of 5.0 per thousand ± 0.9 per thousand, while the Δ18O values ranged from 10.6 per thousand to 16.1 per thousand, with an average of 12.5 per thousand ± 1.37 per thousand. In conjunction with air mass trajectories, the results suggested that aerosol sulfates were controlled by a dominance of local anthropogenic sulfate, followed by the contributions of long-distance transported sulfate. There was a minor effect of some other low-Δ34S valued sulfates, which might be expected from biogenic sources. Absolute principal component analysis results showed that the contributions of anthropogenic sulfate and long-distance transported sulfate were 46.74% and 31.54%, respectively.

  20. Small volcanic eruptions and the stratospheric sulfate aerosol burden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, David M.

    2012-09-01

    Understanding of volcanic activity and its impacts on the atmosphere has evolved in discrete steps, associated with defining eruptions. The eruption of Krakatau, Indonesia, in August 1883 was the first whose global reach was recorded through observations of atmospheric phenomena around the world (Symons 1888). The rapid equatorial spread of Krakatau's ash cloud revealed new details of atmospheric circulation, while the vivid twilights and other optical phenomena were soon causally linked to the effects of particles and gases released from the volcano (e.g. Stothers 1996, Schroder 1999, Hamilton 2012). Later, eruptions of Agung, Bali (1963), El Chichón, Mexico (1982) and Pinatubo, Philippines (1991) led to a fuller understanding of how volcanic SO2 is transformed to a long-lived stratospheric sulfate aerosol, and its consequences (e.g. Meinel and Meinel 1967, Rampino and Self 1982, Hoffman and Rosen 1983, Bekki and Pyle 1994, McCormick et al 1995). While our ability to track the dispersal of volcanic emissions has been transformed since Pinatubo, with the launch of fleets of Earth-observing satellites (e.g. NASA's A-Train; ESA's MetOp) and burgeoning networks of ground-based remote-sensing instruments (e.g. lidar and sun-photometers; infrasound and lightning detection systems), there have been relatively few significant eruptions. Thus, there have been limited opportunities to test emerging hypotheses including, for example, the vexed question of the role of 'smaller' explosive eruptions in perturbations of the atmosphere—those that may just be large enough to reach the stratosphere (of size 'VEI 3', Newhall and Self 1982, Pyle 2000). Geological evidence, from ice-cores and historical eruptions, suggests that small explosive volcanic eruptions with the potential to transport material into the stratosphere should be frequent (5-10 per decade), and responsible for a significant proportion of the long-term time-averaged flux of volcanic sulfur into the stratosphere

  1. The role of sulfate aerosol in the formation of cloudiness over the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloyan, A. E.; Yermakov, A. N.; Arutyunyan, V. O.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the impact of sulfate aerosols on cloudiness formation over the sea in the middle troposphere and the involvement of these particles in the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the lower stratosphere. The first of these problems is solved using a combined model of moist convection and the formation of cloudiness and sulfate aerosols in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the sea, incorporating natural emissions of sulfur-containing compounds. We have found that a significant source of condensation nuclei in the troposphere is the photochemical transformation of biogenic dimethyl sulfide (in addition to NaCl). The results of numerical experiments indicate that the absence of sulfate aerosols hinders the cloudiness formation over the sea in the middle and upper troposphere. The problem of sulfate aerosol involvement in the formation of supercooled ternary solutions (STSs) (PSC Type Ib) in the lower stratosphere is solved using a mathematical model of global transport of multicomponent gas pollutants and aerosols in the atmosphere. Using the combined model, numerical experiments were performed for the winter season in both hemispheres. Sulfate aerosols were found to really participate in the formation of STS particles. Without their participation, the formation of STS particles in the lower stratosphere would be hindered. We present the results of numerical calculations and discuss the distribution of concentrations of gaseous nitric and sulfuric acids, as well as mass concentrations of these components in STS particles.

  2. Reactive nitrogen chemistry in aerosol water as a source of sulfate during haze events in China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yafang; Zheng, Guangjie; Wei, Chao; Mu, Qing; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Zhibin; Gao, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin; Carmichael, Gregory; Pöschl, Ulrich; Su, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Fine-particle pollution associated with winter haze threatens the health of more than 400 million people in the North China Plain. Sulfate is a major component of fine haze particles. Record sulfate concentrations of up to ~300 μg m−3 were observed during the January 2013 winter haze event in Beijing. State-of-the-art air quality models that rely on sulfate production mechanisms requiring photochemical oxidants cannot predict these high levels because of the weak photochemistry activity during haze events. We find that the missing source of sulfate and particulate matter can be explained by reactive nitrogen chemistry in aerosol water. The aerosol water serves as a reactor, where the alkaline aerosol components trap SO2, which is oxidized by NO2 to form sulfate, whereby high reaction rates are sustained by the high neutralizing capacity of the atmosphere in northern China. This mechanism is self-amplifying because higher aerosol mass concentration corresponds to higher aerosol water content, leading to faster sulfate production and more severe haze pollution. PMID:28028539

  3. Aerosol therapy in the equine species.

    PubMed

    Duvivier, D H; Votion, D; Vandenput, S; Lekeux, P

    1997-11-01

    Inhalation therapy plays an increasing role in the management of equine respiratory disorders. This alternative to systematic treatment permits a high concentration of medication to act locally while minimizing side effects and residues. In human medicine, literature in this field is prolific and continuously renewed, whereas in veterinary medicine, applications of aerosol therapy are less extensive. This review considers the principles of action of the different types of devices used for inhalation, i.e., nebulization, metered-dose inhalation and dry powder inhalation, describes the technical and practical requirements for their use in the equine species and considers the advantages and disadvantages of each inhalation device. The pharmacological agents currently administered to horses by inhalation are also discussed. Perspectives of aerosol therapy in the equine species, including aerosols already used in human medicine and their potential applications for horses are described.

  4. Satellite observations and EMAC model calculations of sulfate aerosols from Kilauea: a study of aerosol formation, processing, and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, Marloes; Beirle, Steffen; Brühl, Christoph; Dörner, Steffen; Pozzer, Andrea; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The currently most active volcano on Earth is Mount Kilauea on Hawaii, as it has been in a state of continuous eruption since 1983. The opening of a new vent in March 2008 caused half a year of strongly increased SO2 emissions, which in turn led to the formation of a sulfate plume with an extent of at least two thousand kilometers. The plume could be clearly identified from satellite measurements from March to November, 2008. The steady trade winds in the region and the lack of interfering sources allowed us to determine the life time of SO2 from Kilauea using only satellite-based measurements (no a priori or model information). The current investigation focuses on sulfate aerosols: their formation, processing and subsequent loss. Using space-based aerosol measurements by MODIS, we study the evolution of aerosol optical depth, which first increases as a function of distance from the volcano due to aerosol formation from SO2 oxidation, and subsequently decreases as aerosols are deposited to the surface. The outcome is compared to results from calculations using the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) model to test the state of understanding of the sulfate aerosol life cycle. For this comparison, a particular focus is on the role of clouds and wet removal processes.

  5. On numerical simulation of the global distribution of sulfate aerosol produced by a large volcanic eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Pudykiewicz, J.A.; Dastoor, A.P.

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic eruptions play an important role in the global sulfur cycle of the Earth`s atmosphere and can significantly perturb the global atmospheric chemistry. The large amount of sulfate aerosol produced by the oxidation of SO{sub 2} injected into the atmosphere during volcanic eruptions also has a relatively big influence on the radiative equilibrium of the Earth`s climatic system. The submicron particles of the sulfate aerosol reflect solar radiation more effectively than they trap radiation in the infrared range. The effect of this is observed as cooling of the Earth`s surface. The modification of the global radiation budget following volcanic eruption can subsequently cause significant fluctuations of atmospheric variables on a subclimatic scale. The resulting perturbation of weather patterns has been observed and well documented since the eruptions of Mt. Krakatau and Mt. Tambora. The impact of the sulfate aerosol from volcanic eruptions on the radiative equilibrium of the Earth`s atmosphere was also confirmed by the studies done with Global Circulation Models designed to simulate climate. The objective of the present paper is to present a simple and effective method to estimate the global distribution of the sulfate aerosol produced as a consequence of volcanic eruptions. In this study we will present results of the simulation of global distribution of sulfate aerosol from the eruption of Mt Pinatubo.

  6. Quantifying global atmospheric sulfate formation pathways utilizing observations and modeling of the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O) of sulfate aerosol (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, B.

    2010-12-01

    Sulfate is a major component of the atmospheric aerosol and drives the formation of new aerosol particles through nucleation. The implications for scattering of solar radiation and for cloud microphysics represent one of the largest uncertainties in current assessments of climate change. The specific formation pathway of secondary sulfate in the atmosphere has implications for climate, as only sulfate formed through gas-phase oxidation can nucleate new particles under favorable conditions, increasing aerosol number density. Sulfate produced in the aqueous phase is present in larger particles and does not lead to nucleation of new particles. The oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52 x δ18O) of sulfate aerosol can be used as a means to quantify various sulfate production mechanisms in the atmosphere. Large-scale models of the atmosphere typically include sulfate production in the gas-phase by the hydroxyl radical (OH) and in cloud droplet by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ozone (O3). Additional reaction pathways are considered minor and therefore neglected. While these models typically reproduce observations of sulfate aerosol concentration to within 20%, SO2 concentrations are overestimated by a factor of two or more. Here, I compare observations of the oxygen isotopic composition of sulfate aerosol collected at the surface at various locations around the world to calculated sulfate Δ17O in a global model. This model-measurement comparison is used to assess the global importance of sulfate production on alkaline sea-salt and dust aerosol, metal catalyzed oxidation by O2 in cloud droplets, and oxidation by halogen oxidizes. I will show how these additional sulfur oxidation pathways influence the global sulfur budget, to what degree they resolve the global model’s bias in SO2 concentrations, and how they influence the contribution of atmospheric sulfate produced in the gas-phase.

  7. Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption and Single-Scattering Albedo On Ambient Relative Humidity for Sulfate Aerosols with Black Carbon Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Hamill, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols frequently contain hygroscopic sulfate species and black carbon (soot) inclusions. In this paper we report results of a modeling study to determine the change in aerosol absorption due to increases in ambient relative humidity (RH), for three common sulfate species, assuming that the soot mass fraction is present as a single concentric core within each particle. Because of the lack of detailed knowledge about various input parameters to models describing internally mixed aerosol particle optics, we focus on results that were aimed at determining the maximum effect that particle humidification may have on aerosol light absorption. In the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm, maximum absorption humidification factors (ratio of wet to 'dry=30% RH' absorption) for single aerosol particles are found to be as large as 1.75 when the RH changes from 30 to 99.5%. Upon lesser humidification from 30 to 80% RH, absorption humidification for single particles is only as much as 1.2, even for the most favorable combination of initial ('dry') soot mass fraction and particle size. Integrated over monomodal lognormal particle size distributions, maximum absorption humidification factors range between 1.07 and 1.15 for humidification from 30 to 80% and between 1.1 and 1.35 for humidification from 30 to 95% RH for all species considered. The largest humidification factors at a wavelength of 450 nm are obtained for 'dry' particle size distributions that peak at a radius of 0.05 microns, while the absorption humidification factors at 700 nm are largest for 'dry' size distributions that are dominated by particles in the radius range of 0.06 to 0.08 microns. Single-scattering albedo estimates at ambient conditions are often based on absorption measurements at low RH (approx. 30%) and the assumption that aerosol absorption does not change upon humidification (i.e., absorption humidification equal to unity). Our modeling study suggests that this assumption alone can

  8. Intercomparison of Models Representing Direct Shortwave Radiative Forcing by Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucher, O.; Schwartz, S. E.; Ackerman, T. P.; Anderson, T. L.; Bergstrom, B.; Bonnel, B.; Dahlback, A.; Fouquart, Y.; Chylek, P.; Fu, Q.; Halthore, R. N.; Haywood, J. M.; Iversen, T.; Kato, S.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Knapp, K. R.; Lacis, A.; Laszlo, I.; Mishchenko, M. I.

    2000-01-01

    The importance of aerosols as agents of climate change has recently been highlighted. However, the magnitude of aerosol forcing by scattering of shortwave radiation (direct forcing) is still very uncertain even for the relatively well characterized sulfate aerosol. A potential source of uncertainty is in the model representation of aerosol optical properties and aerosol influences on radiative transfer in the atmosphere. Although radiative transfer methods and codes have been compared in the past, these comparisons have not focused on aerosol forcing (change in net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere). Here we report results of a project involving 12 groups using 15 models to examine radiative forcing by sulfate aerosol for a wide range of values of particle radius, aerosol optical depth, surface albedo, and solar zenith angle. Among the models that were employed were high and low spectral resolution models incorporating a variety of radiative transfer approximations as well as a line-by-line model. The normalized forcings (forcing per sulfate column burden) obtained with the several radiative transfer models were examined, and the discrepancies were characterized. All models simulate forcings of comparable amplitude and exhibit a similar dependence on input parameters. As expected for a non-light-absorbing aerosol, forcings were negative (cooling influence) except at high surface albedo combined with small solar zenith angle. The relative standard deviation of the zenith-angle-averaged normalized broadband forcing for 15 models-was 8% for particle radius near the maximum in this forcing (approx. 0.2 microns) and at low surface albedo. Somewhat greater model-to-model discrepancies were exhibited at specific solar zenith angles. Still greater discrepancies were exhibited at small particle radii and much greater discrepancies were exhibited at high surface albedos, at which the forcing changes sign; in these situations, however, the normalized forcing is

  9. Theoretical study on the reactivity of sulfate species with hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Amrani, A.; Zhang, T.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The abiotic, thermochemically controlled reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons, is termed thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), and is an important alteration process that affects petroleum accumulations in nature. Although TSR is commonly observed in high-temperature carbonate reservoirs, it has proven difficult to simulate in the laboratory under conditions resembling nature. The present study was designed to evaluate the relative reactivities of various sulfate species in order to provide greater insight into the mechanism of TSR and potentially to fill the gap between laboratory experimental data and geological observations. Accordingly, quantum mechanics density functional theory (DFT) was used to determine the activation energy required to reach a potential transition state for various aqueous systems involving simple hydrocarbons and different sulfate species. The entire reaction process that results in the reduction of sulfate to sulfide is far too complex to be modeled entirely; therefore, we examined what is believed to be the rate limiting step, namely, the reduction of sulfate S(VI) to sulfite S(IV). The results of the study show that water-solvated sulfate anions SO42 - are very stable due to their symmetrical molecular structure and spherical electronic distributions. Consequently, in the absence of catalysis, the reactivity of SO42 - is expected to be extremely low. However, both the protonation of sulfate to form bisulfate anions (HSO4-) and the formation of metal-sulfate contact ion-pairs could effectively destabilize the sulfate molecular structure, thereby making it more reactive. Previous reports of experimental simulations of TSR generally have involved the use of acidic solutions that contain elevated concentrations of HSO4- relative to SO42 -. However, in formation waters typically encountered in petroleum reservoirs, the concentration of HSO4- is likely to be significantly lower than the levels

  10. Theoretical study on the reactivity of sulfate species with hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Amrani, Alon; Zhang, Tongwei; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-09-01

    The abiotic, thermochemically controlled reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons, is termed thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), and is an important alteration process that affects petroleum accumulations in nature. Although TSR is commonly observed in high-temperature carbonate reservoirs, it has proven difficult to simulate in the laboratory under conditions resembling nature. The present study was designed to evaluate the relative reactivities of various sulfate species in order to provide greater insight into the mechanism of TSR and potentially to fill the gap between laboratory experimental data and geological observations. Accordingly, quantum mechanics density functional theory (DFT) was used to determine the activation energy required to reach a potential transition state for various aqueous systems involving simple hydrocarbons and different sulfate species. The entire reaction process that results in the reduction of sulfate to sulfide is far too complex to be modeled entirely; therefore, we examined what is believed to be the rate limiting step, namely, the reduction of sulfate S(VI) to sulfite S(IV). The results of the study show that water-solvated sulfate anions SO42- are very stable due to their symmetrical molecular structure and spherical electronic distributions. Consequently, in the absence of catalysis, the reactivity of SO42- is expected to be extremely low. However, both the protonation of sulfate to form bisulfate anions ( HSO4-) and the formation of metal-sulfate contact ion-pairs could effectively destabilize the sulfate molecular structure, thereby making it more reactive. Previous reports of experimental simulations of TSR generally have involved the use of acidic solutions that contain elevated concentrations of HSO4- relative to SO42-. However, in formation waters typically encountered in petroleum reservoirs, the concentration of HSO4- is likely to be significantly lower than the levels

  11. Antarctic polar stratospheric aerosols: The roles of nitrates, chlorides and sulfates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Goodman, J. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Verma, S.; Fong, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nitric and hydrochloric acids have been postulated to condense in the winter polar stratosphere to become an important component of polar stratospheric clouds. One implication is that the removal of NO(y) from the gas phase by this mechanism allows high Cl(x) concentrations to react with O3, because the formation of ClNO3 is inhibited. Contributions of NO3 and Cl to the stratospheric aerosol were determined during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment by testing for the presence of nitrates and chlorides in the condensed phase. Aerosol particles were collected on four 500 micron diameter gold wires, each pretreated differently to give results that were specific to certain physical and chemical aerosol properties. One wire was carbon-coated for concentration and size analyses by scanning electron microscopy; X-ray energy dispersive analyses permitted the detection of S and Cl in individual particles. Three more wires were coated with Nitron, barium chloride and silver nitrate, respectively, to detect nitrate, sulfate and chloride in aerosol particles. All three ions, viz., sulfates, nitrates and chlorides were detected in the Antarctic stratospheric aerosol. In terms of number concentrations, the aerosol was dominated by sulfates, followed by chlorides and nitrates. An inverse linear regression can be established between nitrate concentrations and ozone mixing ratio, and between temperature and nitrates.

  12. The role of anthropogenic species in Biogenic aerosol formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene is a widely recognized source of organic aerosol in the southeastern United States. Models have traditionally represented isoprene-derived aerosol as semivolatile species formed from the initial isoprene + OH reaction. Recent laboratory and field studies indicate later g...

  13. Effect of sulfate aerosol on tropospheric NOx and ozone budgets: Model simulations and TOPSE evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Xuexi; Emmons, Louisa; Horowitz, Larry; Brasseur, Guy; Ridley, Brian; Atlas, Elliot; Stround, Craig; Hess, Peter; Klonecki, Andrzej; Madronich, Sasha; Talbot, Robert; Dibb, Jack

    2003-02-01

    The distributions of NOx and O3 are analyzed during TOPSE (Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox). In this study these data are compared with the calculations of a global chemical/transport model (Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART)). Specifically, the effect that hydrolysis of N2O5 on sulfate aerosols has on tropospheric NOx and O3 budgets is studied. The results show that without this heterogeneous reaction, the model significantly overestimates NOx concentrations at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) in winter and spring in comparison to the observations during TOPSE; with this reaction, modeled NOx concentrations are close to the measured values. This comparison provides evidence that the hydrolysis of N2O5 on sulfate aerosol plays an important role in controlling the tropospheric NOx and O3 budgets. The calculated reduction of NOx attributed to this reaction is 80 to 90% in winter at high latitudes over North America. Because of the reduction of NOx, O3 concentrations are also decreased. The maximum O3 reduction occurs in spring although the maximum NOx reduction occurs in winter when photochemical O3 production is relatively low. The uncertainties related to uptake coefficient and aerosol loading in the model is analyzed. The analysis indicates that the changes in NOx due to these uncertainties are much smaller than the impact of hydrolysis of N2O5 on sulfate aerosol. The effect that hydrolysis of N2O5 on global NOx and O3 budgets are also assessed by the model. The results suggest that in the Northern Hemisphere, the average NOx budget decreases 50% due to this reaction in winter and 5% in summer. The average O3 budget is reduced by 8% in winter and 6% in summer. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH), the sulfate aerosol loading is significantly smaller than in the Northern Hemisphere. As a result, sulfate aerosol has little impact on NOx and O3 budgets of the Southern Hemisphere.

  14. Comparison of normal and asthmatic subjects' responses to sulfate pollutant aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Morrow, P.E.; Hyde, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support an association between elevated levels of sulfates and acute respiratory disease. To determine if these pollutants produce airway hyperreactivity, 16 normal and 17 asthmatic subjects inhaled a control NaCl aerosol and the following sulfates: ammonium sulfate, sodium bisulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and sulfuric acid. A Lovelace generator produced particles with an average MMAD of approx. 1.0 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ approx. = 2.0) and concentrations of 0.1 and 1.0 mg/m/sup 3/. By double-blind randomization, all subjects breathed these aerosols for a 16-minute period. To determine if sulfate inhalation caused increased reactivity to a known bronchoconstrictor, all subjects inhaled carbachol following each 16-minute exposure. Before, during, and after exposure, pulmonary function studies were performed. When compared to NaCl, sulfate (1 mg/m/sup 3/) produced significant reductions in airway conductance and flow rates in asthmatics. The two most sensitive asthmatics demonstrated changes even at 0.1 mg/m/sup 3/ sulfate. To a far more significant degree, the bronchoconstrictor action of carbachol was potentiated by sulfates more or less in relation to their acidity in normals and asthmatics.

  15. TOTAL PARTICLE, SULFATE, AND ACIDIC AEROSOL EMISSIONS FROM KEROSENE SPACE HEATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chamber studies were conducted on four unvented kerosene space heaters to assess emissions of total particle, sulfate, and acidic aerosol. The heaters tested represented four burner designs currently in use by the public. Kerosene space heaters are a potential source of fine part...

  16. Using stable isotopes to trace sources and formation processes of sulfate aerosols from Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaokun; Guo, Qingjun; Liu, Congqiang; Fu, Pingqing; Strauss, Harald; Yang, Junxing; Hu, Jian; Wei, Lianfang; Ren, Hong; Peters, Marc; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan

    2016-07-01

    Particulate pollution from anthropogenic and natural sources is a severe problem in China. Sulfur and oxygen isotopes of aerosol sulfate (δ34Ssulfate and δ18Osulfate) and water-soluble ions in aerosols collected from 2012 to 2014 in Beijing are being utilized to identify their sources and assess seasonal trends. The mean δ34S value of aerosol sulfate is similar to that of coal from North China, indicating that coal combustion is a significant contributor to atmospheric sulfate. The δ34Ssulfate and δ18Osulfate values are positively correlated and display an obvious seasonality (high in winter and low in summer). Although an influence of meteorological conditions to this seasonality in isotopic composition cannot be ruled out, the isotopic evidence suggests that the observed seasonality reflects temporal variations in the two main contributions to Beijing aerosol sulfate, notably biogenic sulfur emissions in the summer and the increasing coal consumption in winter. Our results clearly reveal that a reduction in the use of fossil fuels and the application of desulfurization technology will be important for effectively reducing sulfur emissions to the Beijing atmosphere.

  17. Using stable isotopes to trace sources and formation processes of sulfate aerosols from Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaokun; Guo, Qingjun; Liu, Congqiang; Fu, Pingqing; Strauss, Harald; Yang, Junxing; Hu, Jian; Wei, Lianfang; Ren, Hong; Peters, Marc; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    Particulate pollution from anthropogenic and natural sources is a severe problem in China. Sulfur and oxygen isotopes of aerosol sulfate (δ34Ssulfate and δ18Osulfate) and water-soluble ions in aerosols collected from 2012 to 2014 in Beijing are being utilized to identify their sources and assess seasonal trends. The mean δ34S value of aerosol sulfate is similar to that of coal from North China, indicating that coal combustion is a significant contributor to atmospheric sulfate. The δ34Ssulfate and δ18Osulfate values are positively correlated and display an obvious seasonality (high in winter and low in summer). Although an influence of meteorological conditions to this seasonality in isotopic composition cannot be ruled out, the isotopic evidence suggests that the observed seasonality reflects temporal variations in the two main contributions to Beijing aerosol sulfate, notably biogenic sulfur emissions in the summer and the increasing coal consumption in winter. Our results clearly reveal that a reduction in the use of fossil fuels and the application of desulfurization technology will be important for effectively reducing sulfur emissions to the Beijing atmosphere. PMID:27435991

  18. Delineating the effect of El-Nino Southern Oscillations using oxygen and sulfur isotope anomalies of sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abaunza Quintero, M. M.; Jackson, T.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols, unlike greenhouse gases, contribute to global cooling by acting as cloud condensation nuclei in the troposphere and by directly reflecting solar radiation in the stratosphere. To understand the long-term effect of natural and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol on the climate cycle, it is critical to obtain a clear picture of the factors controlling the transport and transformation of sulfate aerosols. We have employed both oxygen triple isotopes and sulfur quadruple isotopes on sulfates from Antarctic ice samples to define the oxidation history, long range transport dynamics, and sources of sulfate aerosols over time. The measurements are used to deconvolve the impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol composition. Sulfate aerosols were extracted from a snow pit at the South Pole (1979-2002) with a high resolution temporal (6 month) record of the winter and summer seasons covering two largest volcanic events, Pinatubo and El-chichon and three largest ENSO events of the century. All three oxygen and four sulfur isotopes were measured on the extracted sulfate (Shaheen et al., 2013). The high temperature pyrolysis (1000oC) of silver sulfate yielded O2 and SO2. The oxygen triple isotopic composition of the O2 gas was used to determine the oxidation history of sulfate aerosol and SO2 gas obtained during this reaction was utilized to measure sulfur quadruple isotopes following appropriate reaction chemistry (Farquhar et al., 2001). The data revealed that oxygen isotope anomalies in Antarctic aerosols (Δ17O = 0.8-3.7‰) from 1990 to 2001 are strongly linked to the variation in ozone levels in the upper stratosphere/lower stratosphere. The variations in ozone levels are reflective of the intensity of the ENSO events and changes in relative humidity in the atmosphere during this time period. Sulfate concentrations and sulfur quadruple isotopic composition and associated anomalies were used to elucidate the sources of

  19. Stratospheric dynamics and midlatitude jets under geoengineering with space mirrors and sulfate and titania aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, A. J.; Charlton-Perez, A. J.; Highwood, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    The impact on the dynamics of the stratosphere of three approaches to geoengineering by solar radiation management is investigated using idealized simulations of a global climate model. The approaches are geoengineering with sulfate aerosols, titania aerosols, and reduction in total solar irradiance (representing mirrors placed in space). If it were possible to use stratospheric aerosols to counterbalance the surface warming produced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, tropical lower stratospheric radiative heating would drive a thermal wind response which would intensify the stratospheric polar vortices. In the Northern Hemisphere this intensification results in strong dynamical cooling of the polar stratosphere. Northern Hemisphere stratospheric sudden warming events become rare (one and two in 65 years for sulfate and titania, respectively). The intensification of the polar vortices results in a poleward shift of the tropospheric midlatitude jets in winter. The aerosol radiative heating enhances the tropical upwelling in the lower stratosphere, influencing the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation. In contrast, solar dimming does not produce heating of the tropical lower stratosphere, and so there is little intensification of the polar vortex and no enhanced tropical upwelling. The dynamical response to titania aerosol is qualitatively similar to the response to sulfate.

  20. Volatility of organic aerosol: evaporation of ammonium sulfate/succinic acid aqueous solution droplets.

    PubMed

    Yli-Juuti, Taina; Zardini, Alessandro A; Eriksson, Axel C; Hansen, Anne Maria K; Pagels, Joakim H; Swietlicki, Erik; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Glasius, Marianne; Worsnop, Douglas R; Riipinen, Ilona; Bilde, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Condensation and evaporation modify the properties and effects of atmospheric aerosol particles. We studied the evaporation of aqueous succinic acid and succinic acid/ammonium sulfate droplets to obtain insights on the effect of ammonium sulfate on the gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric organic acids. Droplet evaporation in a laminar flow tube was measured in a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. A wide range of droplet compositions was investigated, and for some of the experiments the composition was tracked using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The measured evaporation was compared to model predictions where the ammonium sulfate was assumed not to directly affect succinic acid evaporation. The model captured the evaporation rates for droplets with large organic content but overestimated the droplet size change when the molar concentration of succinic acid was similar to or lower than that of ammonium sulfate, suggesting that ammonium sulfate enhances the partitioning of dicarboxylic acids to aqueous particles more than currently expected from simple mixture thermodynamics. If extrapolated to the real atmosphere, these results imply enhanced partitioning of secondary organic compounds to particulate phase in environments dominated by inorganic aerosol.

  1. Equilibrium size of atmospheric aerosol sulfates as a function of the relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutrakis, Petros; Wolfson, Jack M.; Spengler, John D.; Stern, Bonnie; Franklin, Claire A.

    1989-05-01

    Size-fractionated acid aerosols were collected, using a microorifice cascade impactor, during the summer of 1986 in Dunnville, Ontario, as part of the Canadian Children Acute Respiratory Effects Study (CARES), sponsored by the Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada. Sulfate and hydrogen ions showed similar size distributions. The molar ratio of H+/SO42- varied little with particle size, but there was a considerable time-dependent variation in aerosol acid content. It was also found that there is a distinct relationship between the geometric mean aerodynamic diameter of sulfate, da, and ambient relative humidity (RH). Atmospheric sulfate particle sizes observed in this study were slightly higher than those found in laboratory experiments at corresponding humidities. However, considering the uncertainties involved, the agreement between the field and laboratory data was remarkable.

  2. Condensed nitrate, sulfate, and chloride in Antarctic stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Toon, O. B.; Ferry, G. V.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Starr, W. L.; Chan, K. R.; Goodman, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    The 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, in which the NO3, Cl, and SO4 contents of stratospheric aerosols were estimated, is discussed. The aerosol size and chemical composition measurements were carried out on samples collected during August 17 to September 4, 1987. The data indicate that condensed nitrate is found below a threshold temperature of 193.6 + or - 3.0 K, which is generally found at latitudes exceeding 64 deg S. A negative correlation exists between condensed nitrate and ozone correlation.

  3. Modeling the spectral optical properties of ammonium sulfate and biomass burning aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.; Chuang, C.C.; Grossman, A.S.; Penner, J.E.

    1997-09-01

    The importance of including the global and regional radiative effects of aerosols in climate models has increasingly been realized. Accurate modeling of solar radiative forcing due to aerosols from anthropogenic sulfate and biomass burning emissions requires adequate spectral resolution and treatment of spatial and temporal variability. The variation of aerosol spectral optical properties with local relative humidity and dry aerosol composition must be considered. Because the cost of directly including Mie calculations within a climate model is prohibitive, parameterizations from offline calculations must be used. Starting from a log-normal size distribution of dry ammonium sulfate, we developed optical properties for tropospheric sulfate aerosol at 15 relative humidities up to 99 percent. The resulting aerosol size distributions were then used to calculate bulk optical properties at wavelengths between 0.175 {micro}m and 4 {micro}m. Finally, functional fits of optical properties were made for each of 12 wavelength bands as a function of relative humidity. Significant variations in optical properties occurred across the total solar spectrum. Relative increases in specific extinction and asymmetry factor with increasing relative humidity became larger at longer wavelengths. Significant variation in single-scattering albedo was found only in the longest near-IR band. This is also the band with the lowest albedo. A similar treatment was done for aerosols from biomass burning. In this case, size distributions were taken as having two carbonaceous size modes and a larger dust mode. The two carbonaceous modes were considered to be humidity dependent. Equilibrium size distributions and compositions were calculated for 15 relative humidities and five black carbon fractions. Mie calculations and Chandrasekhar averages of optical properties were done for each of the resulting 75 cases. Finally, fits were made for each of 12 spectral bands as functions of relative humidity

  4. Nucleation and growth of sulfate aerosol in coal-fired power plant plumes: Sensitivity to background aerosol and meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, R. G.; Pierce, J. R.; Brock, C. A.; Reed, M. K.; Crawford, J. H.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huey, L. G.; Nowak, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    New-particle formation in the plumes of coal-fired power plants and other anthropogenic sulfur sources may be an important source of particles in the atmosphere. It remains unclear, however, how best to reproduce this formation in global and regional aerosol models with grid-box lengths that are 10s of kilometers and larger. The predictive power of these models is thus limited by the resultant uncertainties in aerosol size distributions. In this paper, we focus on sub-grid sulfate aerosol processes within coal-fired power plant plumes: the sub-grid oxidation of SO2 with condensation of H2SO4 onto newly-formed and pre-existing particles. We have developed a modeling framework with aerosol microphysics in the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM), a Large-Eddy Simulation/Cloud-Resolving Model (LES/CRM). The model is evaluated against aircraft observations of new-particle formation in two different power-plant plumes and reproduces the major features of the observations. We show how the effective downwind plume aerosol emissions can be greatly modified by both meteorological and background aerosol conditions. In general, new particle formation and growth is greatly reduced during polluted conditions due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface area for H2SO4 condensation and particle coagulation. The new-particle formation and growth rates are also a strong function of the amount of sunlight and NOx since both control OH concentrations. The results of this study highlight the importance for improved sub-grid particle formation schemes in regional and global aerosol models.

  5. Nucleation and growth of sulfate aerosol in coal-fired power plant plumes: sensitivity to background aerosol and meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, R. G.; Pierce, J. R.; Brock, C. A.; Reed, M. K.; Crawford, J. H.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huey, L. G.; Nowak, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    New-particle formation in the plumes of coal-fired power plants and other anthropogenic sulfur sources may be an important source of particles in the atmosphere. It remains unclear, however, how best to reproduce this formation in global and regional aerosol models with grid-box lengths that are 10s of kilometers and larger. The predictive power of these models is thus limited by the resultant uncertainties in aerosol size distributions. In this paper, we focus on sub-grid sulfate aerosol processes within coal-fired power plant plumes: the sub-grid oxidation of SO2 with condensation of H2SO4 onto newly-formed and pre-existing particles. We have developed a modeling framework with aerosol microphysics in the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM), a Large-Eddy Simulation/Cloud-Resolving Model (LES/CRM). The model is evaluated against aircraft observations of new-particle formation in two different power-plant plumes and reproduces the major features of the observations. We show how the downwind plume aerosols can be greatly modified by both meteorological and background aerosol conditions. In general, new-particle formation and growth is greatly reduced during polluted conditions due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface area for H2SO4 condensation and particle coagulation. The new-particle formation and growth rates are also a strong function of the amount of sunlight and NOx since both control OH concentrations. The results of this study highlight the importance for improved sub-grid particle formation schemes in regional and global aerosol models.

  6. Nucleation and growth of sulfate aerosol in coal-fired power plant plumes: sensitivity to background aerosol and meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, R. G.; Pierce, J. R.; Brock, C. A.; Reed, M. K.; Crawford, J. H.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huey, L. G.; Nowak, J. B.

    2011-09-01

    New-particle formation in the plumes of coal-fired power plants and other anthropogenic sulfur sources may be an important source of particles in the atmosphere. It remains unclear, however, how best to reproduce this formation in global and regional aerosol models with grid-box lengths that are 10 s of kilometers and larger. The predictive power of these models is thus limited by the resultant uncertainties in aerosol size distributions. In this paper, we focus on sub-grid sulfate aerosol processes within coal-fired power plant plumes: the sub-grid oxidation of SO2 with condensation of H2SO4 onto newly-formed and pre-existing particles. We have developed a modeling framework with aerosol microphysics in the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM), a Large-Eddy Simulation/Cloud-Resolving Model (LES/CRM). The model is evaluated against aircraft observations of new-particle formation in two different power-plant plumes and reproduces the major features of the observations. We show how the downwind plume aerosols can be greatly modified by both meteorological and background aerosol conditions. In general, new-particle formation and growth is greatly reduced during polluted conditions due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface area for H2SO4 condensation and particle coagulation. The new-particle formation and growth rates are also a strong function of the amount of sunlight and NOx since both control OH concentrations. The results of this study highlight the importance for improved sub-grid particle formation schemes in regional and global aerosol models.

  7. Evidence for surface nucleation: efflorescence of ammonium sulfate and coated ammonium sulfate aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, V. Gabriela; Marcolli, Claudia; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Zuend, Andreas; Peter, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and can undergo different phase transitions, such as deliquescence and efflorescence. Using optical microscopy, we investigated the efflorescence of ammonium sulfate (AS) in supersaturated AS and 1:1 and 8:1 (by weight) poly(ethylene glycol)-400 (PEG-400)/AS particles, which were deposited as droplets with diameters in the 16 - 35 μm range on a hydrophobically coated slide. The PEG-400/AS particles that are exposed to decreasing relative humidity (RH) exhibit a liquid-liquid phase separation below 90 % RH with the PEG-400 phase surrounding the aqueous AS inner phase (Marcolli and Krieger, 2006; Ciobanu et al., 2009). Pure AS particles effloresced in the RH range from 36.3 to 43.7 % RH, in agreement with literature data (31 - 48 % RH). In contrast, 1:1 PEG-400/AS particles with diameters of the AS phase from 7.2 - 19.2 μm effloresced between 26.8 - 33.9 % RH and 8:1 PEG-400/AS particles with diameters of the AS phase from 1.8 - 7.3 μm between 24.3 - 29.3 % RH. Such low efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) values have never been reached before for AS particles of this size range. We show that neither a potential inhibition of water evaporation via anomalously slow diffusion through the PEG coating, nor the presence of low amounts of PEG-400 in the AS phase, nor different timescales between various experimental techniques could possibly explain the low AS ERH values of PEG-400/AS particles in our setup. High-speed photography of the efflorescence process allowed to monitor the proceeding of the AS crystallization fronts within the particles with millisecond time resolution. The nucleation locations were deduced based on the initial crystals growth locations. Statistical analysis of 31 and 19 efflorescence events for pure AS and 1:1 PEG-400/AS particles, respectively, identified the air/droplet/substrate contact line and the air/droplet interface as preferred nucleation locations in the case of pure AS particles

  8. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  9. An aerosol climatology for a rapidly growing arid region (southern Arizona): Major aerosol species and remotely sensed aerosol properties

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Wonaschütz, Anna; Jarjour, Elias G.; Hashimoto, Bryce I.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Betterton, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a comprehensive characterization of atmospheric aerosol particle properties in relation to meteorological and back trajectory data in the southern Arizona region, which includes two of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States (Phoenix and Tucson). Multiple data sets (MODIS, AERONET, OMI/TOMS, MISR, GOCART, ground-based aerosol measurements) are used to examine monthly trends in aerosol composition, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and aerosol size. Fine soil, sulfate, and organics dominate PM2.5 mass in the region. Dust strongly influences the region between March and July owing to the dry and hot meteorological conditions and back trajectory patterns. Because monsoon precipitation begins typically in July, dust levels decrease, while AOD, sulfate, and organic aerosol reach their maximum levels because of summertime photochemistry and monsoon moisture. Evidence points to biogenic volatile organic compounds being a significant source of secondary organic aerosol in this region. Biomass burning also is shown to be a major contributor to the carbonaceous aerosol budget in the region, leading to enhanced organic and elemental carbon levels aloft at a sky-island site north of Tucson (Mt. Lemmon). Phoenix exhibits different monthly trends for aerosol components in comparison with the other sites owing to the strong influence of fossil carbon and anthropogenic dust. Trend analyses between 1988 and 2009 indicate that the strongest statistically significant trends are reductions in sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon, and increases in fine soil during the spring (March–May) at select sites. These results can be explained by population growth, land-use changes, and improved source controls. PMID:24707452

  10. Impacts of Sulfate Seed Acidity and Water Content on Isoprene Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2015-11-17

    The effects of particle-phase water and the acidity of pre-existing sulfate seed particles on the formation of isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was generated from the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a flow tube reactor at 70% relative humidity (RH) and room temperature in the presence of three different sulfate seeds (effloresced and deliquesced ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) under low NOx conditions. High OH exposure conditions lead to little isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA being generated. The primary result is that particle-phase water had the largest effect on the amount of SOA formed, with 60% more SOA formation occurring with deliquesced ammonium sulfate seeds as compared to that on effloresced ones. The additional organic material was highly oxidized. Although the amount of SOA formed did not exhibit a dependence on the range of seed particle acidity examined, perhaps because of the low amount of IEPOX SOA, the levels of high-molecular-weight material increased with acidity. While the uptake of organics was partially reversible under drying, the results nevertheless indicate that particle-phase water enhanced the amount of organic aerosol material formed and that the RH cycling of sulfate particles may mediate the extent of isoprene SOA formation in the atmosphere.

  11. Impact of extreme amounts of stratospheric sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Arfeuille, F.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Luo, B.; Rozanov, E.; Peter, T.

    2012-12-01

    Geoengineering by injection of sulfur (S) into the stratosphere is among the most promising methods of solar radiation management (SRM) techniques (Royal Society, 2009). However, recent work shows that formation of very large particles and removal processes might be fast, so that efficient SRM would require extreme S-injections. In this study we investigate two such extreme scenarios with continuous sulfur injection of 20 Mt S/a at 30S-30N at 20-26 km and 75 Mt S/a at the Equator at 20 km. We model these scenarios using the chemistry-climate model SOCOL forced by the 2D AER spectral aerosol model (SPARC, 2006). The aerosol model includes S chemistry and microphysics, including nucleation, condensation, evaporation, coagulation and sedimentation. Our results show that these extreme scenarios lead shifts in climate regimes such as a poleward expansion of the Hadley cell in the southern hemisphere. Furthermore, the net SW flux anomalies are about -4 W/m2 and -6.5 W/m2 for the discussed two extreme scenarios. This suggests that 40 Mt S/a (injected at the Equator at 20 km) is required to achieve -4W/m2, which is thought to be required to compensate the forcing due to a CO2 doubling. However, our results indicate a much smaller cooling effect than suggested by Niemeier et al.,(2011). The calculations of radiative forcing directly from aerosols suggest that this discrepancy is mainly due to the differences in the particle size distributions, as Niemeier et al. (2011) used a simplifying modal approach with 3 lognormal modes.

  12. Evaluating Ammonium, Nitrate and Sulfate Aerosols in 3-Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezuman, Keren; Bauer, Susanne E.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    The effect aerosols have on climate and air quality is a func-on of their chemical composi-on, concentra-on and spa-al distribu-on. These parameters are controlled by emissions, heterogeneous and homogeneous chemistry, where thermodynamics plays a key role, transport, which includes stratospheric-­- tropospheric exchange, and deposi-onal sinks. In this work we demonstrate the effect of some of these processes on the SO4-NH4­-NO3 system using the GISS ModelE2 Global Circula-on Model (GCM).

  13. Uptake of Organic Vapors by Sulfate Aerosols: Physical and Chemical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Iraci, L.T.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    While it is known that upper tropospheric sulfate particles contain a significant amount of organic matter, both the source of the organic fraction and its form in solution are unknown. These studies explore how the chemical characteristics of the molecules and surfaces in question affect heterogeneous interactions. The solubilities of acetaldehyde [CH3CHO] and ethanol [CH3CH20H] in cold, aqueous sulfuric acid solutions have been measured by Knudsen cell studies. Henry's law solubility coefficients range from 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) M/atm for acetaldehyde, and from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) M/atm for ethanol under upper tropospheric conditions (210-240 K, 40-80 wt. % H2S04). The multiple solvation pathways (protonation, enolization, etc.) available to these compounds in acidic aqueous environments will be discussed. Preliminary results from the interaction of acetaldehyde with solutions of formaldehyde in sulfuric acid will be presented as well. The physical and chemical processes that affect organic uptake by aqueous aerosols will be explored, with the aim of evaluating organic species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  14. Aerosol distributions and radiative forcing over the Asian Pacific region simulated by Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Toshihiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Higurashi, Akiko; Ohta, Sachio; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2003-12-01

    A three-dimensional aerosol transport-radiation model coupled with a general circulation model, Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS), simulates atmospheric aerosol distributions and optical properties. The simulated results are compared with aerosol sampling and optical observations from ground, aircraft, and satellite acquired by intensive observation campaigns over east Asia in spring 2001. Temporal variations of the aerosol concentrations, optical thickness, and Ångström exponent are in good agreement between the simulation and observations. The midrange values of the Ångström exponent, even at the Asian dust storm events over the outflow regions, suggest that the contribution of the anthropogenic aerosol, such as carbonaceous and sulfate, to the total optical thickness is of an order comparable to that of the Asian dust. The radiative forcing by the aerosol direct and indirect effects is also calculated. The negative direct radiative forcing is simulated to be over -10 W m-2 at the tropopause in the air mass during the large-scale dust storm, to which both anthropogenic aerosols and Asian dust contribute almost equivalently. The direct radiative forcing, however, largely depends on the cloud water content and the vertical profiles of aerosol and cloud. The simulation shows that not only sulfate and sea salt aerosols but also black carbon and soil dust aerosols, which absorb solar and thermal radiation, make strong negative radiative forcing by the direct effect at the surface, which may exceed the positive forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases over the east Asian region.

  15. Effects of sulfate aerosol forcing on East Asian summer monsoon for 1985-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjoong J.; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Park, Rokjin J.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the effect of anthropogenic aerosol forcing on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1. One control and two sensitivity model experiments were conducted in order to diagnose the separate roles played by sea surface temperature (SST) variations and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol forcing changes in East Asia. We find that the SST variation has been a major driver for the observed weakening of the EASM, whereas the effect of the anthropogenic aerosol forcing has been opposite and has slightly intensified the EASM over the recent decades. The reinforcement of the EASM results from radiative cooling by the sulfate aerosol forcing, which decelerates the jet stream around the jet's exit region. Subsequently, the secondary circulation induced by such a change in the jet stream leads to the increase in precipitation around 18-23°N. This result indicates that the increase in anthropogenic emissions over East Asia may play a role in compensating for the weakening of the EASM caused by the SST forcing.

  16. Microphysical and compositional influences on shortwave radiative forcing of climate by sulfate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S F; Wagener, Richard; Nemesure, S

    1995-01-01

    Anthropogenic sulfate aerosols scatter shortwave (solar) radiation incident upon the atmosphere, thereby exerting a cooling influence on climate relative to pre-industrial times. Previous estimates of this forcing place its global and annual average value at about -1 W m{sup -2}, uncertain to a factor of somewhat more than 2, comparable in magnitude to greenhouse gas forcing over the same period but opposite in sign and much more uncertain. Key sources of uncertainty are atmospheric chemistry factors (yield, residence time), and microphysical factors (scattering efficiency, upscatter fraction, and the dependence of these quantities on particle size and relative humidity, RH). This paper examines these microphysical influences to identify properties required to obtain more a accurate description of this forcing. The mass scattering efficiency exhibits a maximum at a particle diameter ({approximately}0.5 M) roughly equal to the wavelength of maximum power in the solar spectrum and roughly equal to diameter typical of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. Particle size, and hence mass scattering efficiency, increase with increasing on RH because of accretion of water by deliquescent salt aerosols. For example the scattering efficiency of aqueous (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} (dry radius 0.2 {mu}m) increases from 8 to 80 m{sup 2}/g (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) as RH increases from 39 to 97%. The sensitivity of forcing to particle dry mass and relative humidity suggest the need to explicitly represent these properties if the sulfate aerosol forcing is to be accurately described in climate models.

  17. Assessment of the first indirect radiative effect of ammonium-sulfate-nitrate aerosols in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Skorokhod, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    A physically based cloud nucleation parameterization was introduced into an optical properties/radiative transfer module incorporated with the off-line air quality modeling system Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS)-Models-3 Community Multi Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) to investigate the distribution features of the first indirect radiative effects of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium-sulfate-nitrate (ASN) over East Asia for the years of 2005, 2010, and 2013. The relationship between aerosol particles and cloud droplet number concentration could be properly described by this parameterization because the simulated cloud fraction and cloud liquid water path were generally reliable compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrieved data. Simulation results showed that the strong effect of indirect forcing was mainly concentrated in Southeast China, the East China Sea, the Yellow Sea, and the Sea of Japan. The highest indirect radiative forcing of ASN reached -3.47 W m-2 over Southeast China and was obviously larger than the global mean of the indirect forcing of all anthropogenic aerosols. In addition, sulfate provided about half of the contribution to the ASN indirect forcing effect. However, the effect caused by nitrate was weak because the mass burden of nitrate was very low during summer, whereas the cloud fraction was the highest. The analysis indicated that even though the interannual variation of indirect forcing magnitude generally followed the trend of aerosol mass burden from 2005 to 2013, the cloud fraction was an important factor that determined the distribution pattern of indirect forcing. The heaviest aerosol loading in North China did not cause a strong radiative effect because of the low cloud fraction over this region.

  18. Evaluating the potential influence of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols on air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauzerall, D. L.; Liu, J.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we compare the potential influence of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols on the air quality of continental regions. We use a global chemical transport model, Model of Ozone and Related Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2), to quantify the source-receptor relationships of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols among ten regions in 2000. In order to compare the importance of foreign emissions relative to domestic emissions and estimate the effect of future changes in emissions on human exposure, we define an "influence potential" (IP). The IP quantifies the human exposure that occurs in a receptor region as a result of a unit of SO2 emissions from a source region. We find that due to the non-linear nature of sulfate production, regions with low SO2 emissions usually have large domestic IP, and vice versa. An exception is East Asia (EA), which has both high SO2 emissions and relatively large domestic IP, mostly caused by the spatial coincidence of emissions and population. We find that intercontinental IPs are usually less than domestic IPs by 1-3 orders of magnitude. SO2 emissions from the Middle East (ME) and Europe (EU) have the largest potential to influence populations in surrounding regions. By comparing the IP ratios (IPR) between foreign and domestic SO2 emissions, we find that the IPR values range from 0.00001 to 0.16 and change with season. Therefore, if reducing human exposure to sulfate aerosols is the objective, all regions should first focus on reducing domestic SO2 emissions. In addition, we find that relatively high IPR values exist among the EU, ME, the former Soviet Union (FSU) and African (AF) regions. Therefore, based on the IP and IPR values, we conclude that a regional agreement among EA countries, and an inter-regional agreement among EU, ME, FSU and north AF regions to control sulfur emissions would benefit public health in these regions.

  19. Potential influence of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols on air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we compare the potential influence of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols on the air quality of (different) continental regions. We use a global chemical transport model, Model of Ozone and Related Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2), to quantify the source receptor relationships of inter-continental transport of sulfate aerosols among ten regions in 2000. In order to compare the importance of foreign with domestic emissions and to estimate the effect of future changes in emissions on human exposure, we define an 'influence potential' (IP). The IP quantifies the human exposure that occurs in a receptor region as a result of a unit of SO2 emissions from a source region. We find that due to the non-linear nature of sulfate production, regions with low SO2 emissions usually have large domestic IP, and vice versa. An exception is East Asia (EA), which has both high SO2 emissions and relatively large domestic IP, mostly caused by the spatial coincidence of emissions and population. We find that inter-continental IPs are usually less than domestic IPs by 1 3 orders of magnitude. SO2 emissions from the Middle East (ME) and Europe (EU) have the largest potential to influence populations in surrounding regions. By comparing the IP ratios (IPR) between foreign and domestic SO2 emissions, we find that the IPR values range from 0.000 01 to 0.16 and change with season. Therefore, if reducing human exposure to sulfate aerosols is the objective, all regions should first focus on reducing domestic SO2 emissions. In addition, we find that relatively high IPR values exist among the EU, ME, the former Soviet Union (FSU) and African (AF) regions. Therefore, on the basis of the IP and IPR values, we conclude that a regional agreement among EA countries, and an inter-regional agreement among EU, ME, FSU and (north) AF regions to control sulfur emissions could benefit public health in these regions.

  20. Effects of ammonium sulfate aerosols on vegetation—II. Mode of entry and responses of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmur, Nicholas F.; Evans, Lance S.; Cunningham, Elizabeth A.

    These experiments were designed to provide information on the rates of aerosol deposition, mode of entry, and effects of deposition of submicrometer ammonium sulfate aerosols on foliage of Phaseolus vulgaris L. A deposition velocity of 3.2 × 10 3cms-1 was constant during 3-week exposures of plants to aerosol concentrations of 26mg m -3 (i.e. about two orders of magnitude above ambient episode concentrations). Mean deposition rate on foliage was 4.1 × 10 -11 μg cm -2s -1. Visible injury symptoms included leaf chlorosis, necrosis and loss of turgor. Chlorosis was most frequent near leaf margins causing epinasty and near major veins. Internal injury occurred initially in spongy mesophyll cells. Eventually abaxial epidermal and palisade parenchyma cells were injured. These results suggest that submicrometer aerosols enter abaxial stomata and affect more internal cells before affecting leaf surface cells. Exposure to aerosols decreased both abaxial and adaxial leaf resistances markedly. Although visible injury to foliage occurred, no changes in dry mass of roots and shoots or leaf area occurred. These results suggest that for the plant developmental stage studied, while leaf resistances decreased and cellular injury occurred in foliage, these factors were not significantly related to plant growth and development.

  1. Cloud condensation nucleus activity of secondary organic aerosol particles mixed with sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephanie M.; Rosenoern, Thomas; Shilling, John E.; Chen, Qi; Martin, Scot T.

    2007-12-01

    The cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of organic-sulfate particles was investigated using a steady-state environmental chamber. The organic component consisted of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated in the dark from 24 +/- 2 ppb α-pinene for conditions of 300 +/- 5 ppb ozone, 40 +/- 2% relative humidity, and 25 +/- 1°C, with the organic mass loading in the chamber ranging from 23 to 37 μg m-3. CCN analysis was performed for 80- to 150-nm particles having variable organic-sulfate volume fractions, which were estimated from the diameter of the organic-sulfate particle relative to that of the seed as well as independently from mass spectra. Critical supersaturation, which increased for greater SOA volume fraction and smaller particle diameter, was well predicted by a Köhler model having two components, one for ammonium sulfate and another for SOA. The entire data set could be successfully modeled by a single suite of effective chemical parameters for SOA. The results suggest that the effects of limited organic solubility in mixed SOA-sulfate particles may be reliably omitted in the treatment of cloud droplet formation.

  2. Microphysical and compositional influences on shortwave radiative forcing of climate by sulfate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.; Wagener, R.; Nemesure, S.

    1995-02-01

    Anthropogenic sulfate aerosols scatter shortwave (solar) radiation iincident upon the atmosphere, thereby exerting a cooling influence on climate relative to pre-industrial times. Previous estimates of this forcing place its global and annual average value at about {minus}1 W M{sup {minus}2}, uncertain to a factor of somewhat more than 2, comparable in magnitude to greenhouse gas forcing over the same period but opposite in sign and much more uncertain. Key sources of uncertainty are atmospheric chemistry factors (yield, residence time), and microphysical factors (scattering efficiency, upscatter fraction, and the dependence of these quantities on particle size and relative humidity, RH). This paper examines these microphysical influences to indentify properties required to obtain more a accurate description of this forcing. The mass scattering efficiency exhibits a maximum at a particle diameter ({approximately}0.5 {mu}m) roughly equal to the wavelength of maximum power in the solar spectrum and roughly equal to diameter typical of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. Particle size, and hence mass scattering efficiency, increase with increasing on RH because of accretion of water by deliquescent salt aerosols.

  3. Inability of stratospheric sulfate aerosol injections to preserve the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, K. E.; Battisti, D. S.; Bitz, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    Injection of sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere has the potential to reduce the climate impacts of global warming, including sea level rise (SLR). However, changes in atmospheric and oceanic circulation that can significantly influence the rate of basal melting of Antarctic marine ice shelves and the associated SLR have not previously been considered. Here we use a fully coupled global climate model to investigate whether rapidly increasing stratospheric sulfate aerosol concentrations after a period of global warming could preserve Antarctic ice sheets by cooling subsurface ocean temperatures. We contrast this climate engineering method with an alternative strategy in which all greenhouse gases (GHG) are returned to preindustrial levels. We find that the rapid addition of a stratospheric aerosol layer does not effectively counteract surface and upper level atmospheric circulation changes caused by increasing GHGs, resulting in continued upwelling of warm water in proximity of ice shelves, especially in the vicinity of the already unstable Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica. By contrast, removal of GHGs restores the circulation, yielding relatively cooler subsurface ocean temperatures to better preserve West Antarctica.

  4. Simulated responses of terrestrial aridity to black carbon and sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Gettelman, A.; Xu, Y.; Fu, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Aridity index (AI), defined as the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (PET), is a measure of the dryness of terrestrial climate. Global climate models generally project future decreases of AI (drying) associated with global warming scenarios driven by increasing greenhouse gas and declining aerosols. Given their different effects in the climate system, scattering and absorbing aerosols may affect AI differently. Here we explore the terrestrial aridity responses to anthropogenic black carbon (BC) and sulfate (SO4) aerosols with Community Earth System Model simulations. Positive BC radiative forcing decreases precipitation averaged over global land at a rate of 0.9%/°C of global mean surface temperature increase (moderate drying), while BC radiative forcing increases PET by 1.0%/°C (also drying). BC leads to a global decrease of 1.9%/°C in AI (drying). SO4 forcing is negative and causes precipitation a decrease at a rate of 6.7%/°C cooling (strong drying). PET also decreases in response to SO4 aerosol cooling by 6.3%/°C cooling (contributing to moistening). Thus, SO4 cooling leads to a small decrease in AI (drying) by 0.4%/°C cooling. Despite the opposite effects on global mean temperature, BC and SO4 both contribute to the twentieth century drying (AI decrease). Sensitivity test indicates that surface temperature and surface available energy changes dominate BC- and SO4-induced PET changes.

  5. Effective Henry's Law constant measurements for glyoxal in model aerosols containing sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, C. J.; Waxman, E.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A. S.; Noziere, B.; Hoffmann, T.; Volkamer, R.

    2011-12-01

    Traditional models represent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation based on the gas-phase oxidation of a limited set of precursor molecules. However, these models tend to under-estimate the amounts and degree of oxygenation of actual SOA, indicating missing processes. One such source that has become increasingly important in recent years is glyoxal (CHOCHO, the smallest alpha-dicarbonyl). Unlike traditional SOA precursors, glyoxal forms SOA by partitioning to the aqueous phase according to Henry's Law. This work presents an analysis of Henry's Law constants for glyoxal uptake to laboratory-generated aerosols in a dynamically coupled gas-aerosol system. We combine CU LED-CE-DOAS measurements of gas-phase glyoxal with online HR-Tof-AMS and time-resolved HPLC ESI MS/MS particle-phase measurements to characterize the time resolved evolution of glyoxal partitioning, and relate molecular-specific measurements to AMS mass spectra. The experiments were performed in the simulation chamber facility at PSI, Switzerland, and investigate ammonium sulfate (AS), and mixed AS / fulvic acid seed aerosols under relative humidity conditions ranging from 50 to 85% RH. The Henry's Law and effective Henry's Law constants are compared with other values reported in the literature.

  6. Effective Henry's Law constant measurements for glyoxal in model aerosols containing sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, C.; Waxman, E.; Slowik, J.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Noziere, B.; Hoffmann, T.; Volkamer, R.

    2012-04-01

    Traditional models represent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation based on the gas-phase oxidation of a limited set of precursor molecules. However, these models tend to under-estimate the amounts and degree of oxygenation of actual SOA, indicating missing processes. One such source that has become increasingly important in recent years is glyoxal (CHOCHO, the smallest alpha-dicarbonyl). Unlike traditional SOA precursors, glyoxal forms SOA by partitioning to the aqueous phase according to Henry's Law. This work presents an analysis of Henry's Law constants for glyoxal uptake to laboratory-generated aerosols in a dynamically coupled gas-aerosol system. We combine CU LED-CE-DOAS measurements of gas-phase glyoxal with online HR-Tof-AMS and time-resolved HPLC ESI MS/MS particle-phase measurements to characterize the time resolved evolution of glyoxal partitioning, and relate molecular-specific measurements to AMS mass spectra. The experiments were performed in the simulation chamber facility at PSI, Switzerland, and investigate ammonium sulfate (AS), and mixed AS / fulvic acid seed aerosols under relative humidity conditions ranging from 50 to 85% RH. The Henry's Law and effective Henry's Law constants are compared with other values reported in the literature.

  7. Solid ammonium sulfate aerosols as ice nuclei: a pathway for cirrus cloud formation.

    PubMed

    Abbatt, J P D; Benz, S; Cziczo, D J; Kanji, Z; Lohmann, U; Möhler, O

    2006-09-22

    Laboratory measurements support a cirrus cloud formation pathway involving heterogeneous ice nucleation by solid ammonium sulfate aerosols. Ice formation occurs at low ice-saturation ratios consistent with the formation of continental cirrus and an interhemispheric asymmetry observed for cloud onset. In a climate model, this mechanism provides a widespread source of ice nuclei and leads to fewer but larger ice crystals as compared with a homogeneous freezing scenario. This reduces both the cloud albedo and the longwave heating by cirrus. With the global ammonia budget dominated by agricultural practices, this pathway might further couple anthropogenic activity to the climate system.

  8. Hygroscopicity of organic compounds from biomass burning and their influence on the water uptake of mixed organic ammonium sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Zuend, A.; Wang, W. G.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ge, M. F.

    2014-10-01

    Hygroscopic behavior of organic compounds, including levoglucosan, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and humic acid, as well as their effects on the hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulfate (AS) in internally mixed particles are studied by a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The organic compounds used represent pyrolysis products of wood that are emitted from biomass burning sources. It is found that humic acid aerosol particles only slightly take up water, starting at RH (relative humidity) above ~70%. This is contrasted by the continuous water absorption of levoglucosan aerosol particles in the range 5-90% RH. However, no hygroscopic growth is observed for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid aerosol particles. Predicted water uptake using the ideal solution theory, the AIOMFAC model and the E-AIM (with UNIFAC) model are consistent with measured hygroscopic growth factors of levoglucosan. However, the use of these models without consideration of crystalline organic phases is not appropriate to describe the hygroscopicity of organics that do not exhibit continuous water uptake, such as 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and humic acid. Mixed aerosol particles consisting of ammonium sulfate and levoglucosan, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, or humic acid with different organic mass fractions, take up a reduced amount of water above 80% RH (above AS deliquescence) relative to pure ammonium sulfate aerosol particles of the same mass. Hygroscopic growth of mixtures of ammonium sulfate and levoglucosan with different organic mass fractions agree well with the predictions of the thermodynamic models. Use of the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relation and AIOMFAC model lead to good agreement with measured growth factors of mixtures of ammonium sulfate with 4-hydroxybenzoic acid assuming an insoluble organic phase. Deviations of model predictions from the HTDMA measurement are mainly due to the occurrence of a microscopical solid phase restructuring at increased humidity (morphology

  9. Sulfate Aerosol Control of Tropical Atlantic Climate over the Twentieth Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C.-Y.; Chiang, J. C. H.; Wehner, M. F.; Friedman, A. R.; Ruedy, R.

    2011-01-01

    The tropical Atlantic interhemispheric gradient in sea surface temperature significantly influences the rainfall climate of the tropical Atlantic sector, including droughts over West Africa and Northeast Brazil. This gradient exhibits a secular trend from the beginning of the twentieth century until the 1980s, with stronger warming in the south relative to the north. This trend behavior is on top of a multi-decadal variation associated with the Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation. A similar long-term forced trend is found in a multimodel ensemble of forced twentieth-century climate simulations. Through examining the distribution of the trend slopes in the multimodel twentieth-century and preindustrial models, the authors conclude that the observed trend in the gradient is unlikely to arise purely from natural variations; this study suggests that at least half the observed trend is a forced response to twentieth-century climate forcings. Further analysis using twentieth-century single-forcing runs indicates that sulfate aerosol forcing is the predominant cause of the multimodel trend. The authors conclude that anthropogenic sulfate aerosol emissions, originating predominantly from the Northern Hemisphere, may have significantly altered the tropical Atlantic rainfall climate over the twentieth century

  10. Effects of sulfate aerosol on the central Pennsylvania surface shortwave radiation budget. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Guimond, P.W.

    1994-12-01

    Surface radiation measurements are taken simultaneously with measurements of meteorological variables including temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and visibility to evaluate the impact of sulfate haze on the surface radiation budget. A relationship is sought between flux losses due only to aerosol and relative humidity, visibility or both, with the goal of facilitating parameterization of sulfate hazes by climate modelers. At the same time, a rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) is compared with a more costly sun photometer to determine the feasibility of substituting the former for the latter in future research. It is found that depletion of surface radiation due to aerosol is typically ten to twenty percent of initial insolation, and that the losses can be correlated with zenith angle, relative humidity and optical depth. In the case of flux loss as a function of optical depth, the two are related in a nearly linear fashion. It is also discovered that the RSR has a predictable error owing to a wider field of view than the sun photometer, and can be used as a replacement for the former by correcting for the error.

  11. Aerosol pH buffering in the southeastern US: Fine particles remain highly acidic despite large reductions in sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Guo, H.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    pH is a critical aerosol property that impacts many atmospheric processes, including biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation, gas-particle phase partitioning, and mineral dust or redox metal mobilization. Particle pH has also been linked to adverse health effects. Using a comprehensive data set from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) as the basis for thermodynamic modeling, we have shown that particles are currently highly acidic in the southeastern US, with pH between 0 and 2. Sulfate and ammonium are the main acid-base components that determine particle pH in this region, however they have different sources and their concentrations are changing. Over 15 years of network data show that sulfur dioxide emission reductions have resulted in a roughly 70 percent decrease in sulfate, whereas ammonia emissions, mainly link to agricultural activities, have been largely steady, as have gas phase ammonia concentrations. This has led to the view that particles are becoming more neutralized. However, sensitivity analysis, based on thermodynamic modeling, to changing sulfate concentrations indicates that particles have remained highly acidic over the past decade, despite the large reductions in sulfate. Furthermore, anticipated continued reductions of sulfate and relatively constant ammonia emissions into the future will not significantly change particle pH until sulfate drops to clean continental background levels. The result reshapes our expectation of future particle pH and implies that atmospheric processes and adverse health effects linked to particle acidity will remain unchanged for some time into the future.

  12. The formation of sulfate and elemental sulfur aerosols under varying laboratory conditions: implications for early earth.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, H Langley; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Trainer, Melissa G; Farmer, Delphine K; Jimenez, Jose L; McKay, Christopher P; Toon, Owen B; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2010-10-01

    The presence of sulfur mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) in sediments more than 2.45 × 10(9) years old is thought to be evidence for an early anoxic atmosphere. Photolysis of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) by UV light with λ < 220 nm has been shown in models and some initial laboratory studies to create a S-MIF; however, sulfur must leave the atmosphere in at least two chemically different forms to preserve any S-MIF signature. Two commonly cited examples of chemically different sulfur species that could have exited the atmosphere are elemental sulfur (S(8)) and sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) aerosols. Here, we use real-time aerosol mass spectrometry to directly detect the sulfur-containing aerosols formed when SO(2) either photolyzes at wavelengths from 115 to 400 nm, to simulate the UV solar spectrum, or interacts with high-energy electrons, to simulate lightning. We found that sulfur-containing aerosols form under all laboratory conditions. Further, the addition of a reducing gas, in our experiments hydrogen (H(2)) or methane (CH(4)), increased the formation of S(8). With UV photolysis, formation of S(8) aerosols is highly dependent on the initial SO(2) pressure; and S(8) is only formed at a 2% SO(2) mixing ratio and greater in the absence of a reductant, and at a 0.2% SO(2) mixing ratio and greater in the presence of 1000 ppmv CH(4). We also found that organosulfur compounds are formed from the photolysis of CH(4) and moderate amounts of SO(2). The implications for sulfur aerosols on early Earth are discussed. Key Words: S-MIF-Archean atmosphere-Early Earth-Sulfur aerosols.

  13. Tales of volcanoes and El-Nino southern oscillations with the oxygen isotope anomaly of sulfate aerosol.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Robina; Abauanza, Mariana; Jackson, Teresa L; McCabe, Justin; Savarino, Joel; Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    The ability of sulfate aerosols to reflect solar radiation and simultaneously act as cloud condensation nuclei renders them central players in the global climate system. The oxidation of S(IV) compounds and their transport as stable S(VI) in the Earth's system are intricately linked to planetary scale processes, and precise characterization of the overall process requires a detailed understanding of the linkage between climate dynamics and the chemistry leading to the product sulfate. This paper reports a high-resolution, 22-y (1980-2002) record of the oxygen-triple isotopic composition of sulfate (SO4) aerosols retrieved from a snow pit at the South Pole. Observed variation in the O-isotopic anomaly of SO4 aerosol is linked to the ozone variation in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere via the Ozone El-Niño Southern Oscillations (ENSO) Index (OEI). Higher (17)O values (3.3‰, 4.5‰, and 4.2‰) were observed during the three largest ENSO events of the past 2 decades. Volcanic events inject significant quantities of SO4 aerosol into the stratosphere, which are known to affect ENSO strength by modulating stratospheric ozone levels (OEI = 6 and (17)O = 3.3‰, OEI = 11 and (17)O = 4.5‰) and normal oxidative pathways. Our high-resolution data indicated that (17)O of sulfate aerosols can record extreme phases of naturally occurring climate cycles, such as ENSOs, which couple variations in the ozone levels in the atmosphere and the hydrosphere via temperature driven changes in relative humidity levels. A longer term, higher resolution oxygen-triple isotope analysis of sulfate aerosols from ice cores, encompassing more ENSO periods, is required to reconstruct paleo-ENSO events and paleotropical ozone variations.

  14. Tales of volcanoes and El-Niño southern oscillations with the oxygen isotope anomaly of sulfate aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Robina; Abauanza, Mariana; Jackson, Teresa L.; McCabe, Justin; Savarino, Joel; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of sulfate aerosols to reflect solar radiation and simultaneously act as cloud condensation nuclei renders them central players in the global climate system. The oxidation of S(IV) compounds and their transport as stable S(VI) in the Earth’s system are intricately linked to planetary scale processes, and precise characterization of the overall process requires a detailed understanding of the linkage between climate dynamics and the chemistry leading to the product sulfate. This paper reports a high-resolution, 22-y (1980–2002) record of the oxygen-triple isotopic composition of sulfate (SO4) aerosols retrieved from a snow pit at the South Pole. Observed variation in the O-isotopic anomaly of SO4 aerosol is linked to the ozone variation in the tropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere via the Ozone El-Niño Southern Oscillations (ENSO) Index (OEI). Higher ∆17O values (3.3‰, 4.5‰, and 4.2‰) were observed during the three largest ENSO events of the past 2 decades. Volcanic events inject significant quantities of SO4 aerosol into the stratosphere, which are known to affect ENSO strength by modulating stratospheric ozone levels (OEI = 6 and ∆17O = 3.3‰, OEI = 11 and ∆17O = 4.5‰) and normal oxidative pathways. Our high-resolution data indicated that ∆17O of sulfate aerosols can record extreme phases of naturally occurring climate cycles, such as ENSOs, which couple variations in the ozone levels in the atmosphere and the hydrosphere via temperature driven changes in relative humidity levels. A longer term, higher resolution oxygen-triple isotope analysis of sulfate aerosols from ice cores, encompassing more ENSO periods, is required to reconstruct paleo-ENSO events and paleotropical ozone variations. PMID:23447567

  15. Direct shortwave forcing of climate by anthropogenic sulfate aerosol: Sensitivity to particle size, composition, and relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Nemesure, S.; Wagener, R.; Schwartz, S.E.

    1996-04-01

    Recent estimates of global or hemispheric average forcing of climate by anthropogenic sulfate aerosol due to scattering of shortwave radiation are uncertain by more than a factor of 2. This paper examines the sensitivity of forcing to these microphysical properties for the purposes of obtaining a better understanding of the properties required to reduce the uncertainty in the forcing.

  16. A reduced-form approach to characterizing sulfate aerosol effects on climate in integrated assessment models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wigley, T.M.L.

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this study was to devise a methodology for estimating the spatial patterns of future climate change accounting for the effects of both greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols under a wide range of emissions scenarios, using the results of General Circulation Models.

  17. Isotopic constraints on the role of hypohalous acids in sulfate aerosol formation in the remote marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qianjie; Geng, Lei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Xie, Zhouqing; Kang, Hui; Dachs, Jordi; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Schauer, Andrew J.; Camp, Madeline G.; Alexander, Becky

    2016-09-01

    Sulfate is an important component of global atmospheric aerosol, and has partially compensated for greenhouse gas-induced warming during the industrial period. The magnitude of direct and indirect radiative forcing of aerosols since preindustrial times is a large uncertainty in climate models, which has been attributed largely to uncertainties in the preindustrial environment. Here, we report observations of the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O) of sulfate aerosol collected in the remote marine boundary layer (MBL) in spring and summer in order to evaluate sulfate production mechanisms in pristine-like environments. Model-aided analysis of the observations suggests that 33-50 % of sulfate in the MBL is formed via oxidation by hypohalous acids (HOX = HOBr + HOCl), a production mechanism typically excluded in large-scale models due to uncertainties in the reaction rates, which are due mainly to uncertainties in reactive halogen concentrations. Based on the estimated fraction of sulfate formed via HOX oxidation, we further estimate that daily-averaged HOX mixing ratios on the order of 0.01-0.1 parts per trillion (ppt = pmol/mol) in the remote MBL during spring and summer are sufficient to explain the observations.

  18. The Formation of Sulfate and Elemental Sulfur Aerosols Under Varying Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, H. Langley; Hasenkopf, Christa A.; Trainer, Melissa G.; Farmer, Delphine K.; Jimenez, Jose L.; McKay, Christopher P.; Toon, Owen B.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of sulfur mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) in sediments more than 2.45 x 10(exp 9) years old is thought to be evidence for an early anoxic atmosphere. Photolysis of sulfur dioxide (SO2) by UV light with lambda < 220 nm has been shown in models and some initial laboratory studies to create a S-MIF; however, sulfur must leave the atmosphere in at least two chemically different forms to preserve any S-MIF signature. Two commonly cited examples of chemically different sulfur species that could have exited the atmosphere are elemental sulfur (S8) and sulfuric acid (H2S04) aerosols. Here, we use real-time aerosol mass spectrometry to directly detect the sulfur-containing aerosols formed when SO2 either photolyzes at wavelengths from 115 to 400 nm, to simulate the UV solar spectrum, or interacts with high-energy electrons, to simulate lightning. We found that sulfur-containing aerosols form under all laboratory conditions. Further, the addition of a reducing gas, in our experiments hydrogen (H2) or methane (CH4), increased the formation of S8. With UV photolysis, formation of S8 aerosols is highly dependent on the initial SO2 pressure; and S8 is only formed at a 2% SO2 mixing ratio and greater in the absence of a reductant, and at a 0.2% SO2 mixing ratio and greater in the presence of 1000 ppmv CH4. We also found that organosulfur compounds are formed from the photolysis of CH4 and moderate amounts of SO2, The implications for sulfur aerosols on early Earth are discussed.

  19. Direct comparison of the hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride aerosol at relative humidities approaching saturation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jim S; Wills, Jon B; Reid, Jonathan P; Wang, Liangyu; Topping, David O; Butler, Jason R; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2010-12-09

    Holographic optical tweezers are used to make comparative measurements of the hygroscopic properties of single component aqueous aerosol containing sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate over a range of relative humidity from 84% to 96%. The change in RH over the course of the experiment is monitored precisely using a sodium chloride probe droplet with accuracy better than ±0.09%. The measurements are used to assess the accuracy of thermodynamic treatments of the relationship between water activity and solute mass fraction with particular attention focused on the dilute solute limit approaching saturation vapor pressure. The consistency of the frequently used Clegg-Brimblecombe-Wexler (CBW) treatment for predicting the hygroscopic properties of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol is confirmed. Measurements of the equilibrium size of ammonium sulfate aerosol are found to agree with predictions to within an uncertainty of ±0.2%. Given the accuracy of treating equilibrium composition, the inconsistencies highlighted in recent calibration measurements of critical supersaturations of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol cannot be attributed to uncertainties associated with the thermodynamic predictions and must have an alternative origin. It is concluded that the CBW treatment can allow the critical supersaturation to be estimated for sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol with an accuracy of better than ±0.002% in RH. This corresponds to an uncertainty of ≤1% in the critical supersaturation for typical supersaturations of 0.2% and above. This supports the view that these systems can be used to accurately calibrate instruments that measure cloud condensation nuclei concentrations at selected supersaturations. These measurements represent the first study in which the equilibrium properties of two particles of chemically distinct composition have been compared simultaneously and directly alongside each other in the same environment.

  20. Soluble species in the Arctic summer troposphere - Acidic gases, aerosols, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale spatial distribution from 0.15-to 6 km altitude in the North American Arctic troposphere of several soluble acidic gases and major aerosol species during the summertime is reported. The distribution is found to be compositionally consistent on a large spatial scale. The summertime troposphere is an acidic environment, with HCOOH and CH3COOH the principal acidic gases while acidic sulfate aerosols dominate the particulate phase. There appears to be a surface source of NH3 over the pack ice which may originate from decay of dead marine organisms on the ice surface, evolution from surface ocean waters in open ice leads, or release from rotting sea ice. At low altitude over the pack ice this NH34 appears to partially neutralize aerosol acidity. Over sub-Arctic tundra in southeastern Alaska, inputs of marine biogenic sulfur from the Bering Sea appear to be an important source of boundary layer aerosol SO4(2-). The rainwater acidity over the tundra is typical of remote regions.

  1. Soluble species in the Arctic summer troposphere - acidic gases, aerosols, and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, R.W.; Vijgen, A.S.; Harriss, R.C. Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA )

    1992-10-01

    The large-scale spatial distribution from 0.15-to 6 km altitude in the North American Arctic troposphere of several soluble acidic gases and major aerosol species during the summertime is reported. The distribution is found to be compositionally consistent on a large spatial scale. The summertime troposphere is an acidic environment, with HCOOH and CH3COOH the principal acidic gases while acidic sulfate aerosols dominate the particulate phase. There appears to be a surface source of NH3 over the pack ice which may originate from decay of dead marine organisms on the ice surface, evolution from surface ocean waters in open ice leads, or release from rotting sea ice. At low altitude over the pack ice this NH34 appears to partially neutralize aerosol acidity. Over sub-Arctic tundra in southeastern Alaska, inputs of marine biogenic sulfur from the Bering Sea appear to be an important source of boundary layer aerosol SO4(2-). The rainwater acidity over the tundra is typical of remote regions. 61 refs.

  2. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Chestnut, L.G.; Watkins, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  3. Measurement of mass distribution of chemical species in aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    Aerosols may be generated through the nebulizing of solutions and the evaporation of their solvent, leaving the dry solute particles. Attention is presently given to a method for the direct determination of the masses of chemical species in individual aerosol particles on a continuous, real-time basis, using mass spectrometry. After the aerosol particles are introduced into the ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, the particles impinge on a hot rhenium filament in the mass spectrometer's ion source. The resulting vapor plume is ionized by electron bombardment, and a pulse of ions is generated by each particle. The intensities of different masses in the ion pulses can then be measured by the mass spectrometer.

  4. SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM THE OXIDATION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN THE PRESENCE OF DRY SUBMICRON AMMONIUM SULFATE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine formation of secondary organic aerosols. A smog chamber system was developed for studying gas-aerosol interactions in a dynamic flow reactor. These experiments were conducted to investigate the fate of gas and aerosol phase compounds ...

  5. Water-Soluble Organic Species in Biomass Burning Aerosols in Southern Africa: Their Chemical Identification and Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Magi, B.

    2001-12-01

    During the SAFARI-2000 field campaign, 14 aerosol samples were collected from an aircraft in plumes from biomass fires (under both flaming and smoldering conditions), at various distances from the fire source. Also collected were 36 aerosol samples in haze layers ranging from the surface to 16,000 feet, some of which could be associated with specific fires. The samples were collected on teflon membrane filters (lower size limit of about 30nm in diameter) which were analyzed for total aerosol mass loading and chemical composition using several analytical techniques. Particular effort was made to speciate the water-soluble portion of the aerosol organics. Seven organic acids and seven carbohydrate species (and their possible stereoisomers) were identified and quantified, along with three inorganic anions and five inorganic cations. The identified organic species accounted for up to 32% of the total aerosol mass; compared with concurrent total carbon and organic carbon measurements, the identified organics constituted at least 5% to 30% of the mass of the total aerosol organics. A number of conspicuous spatial distribution patterns were observed for these species. For instance, using K+ to correct for dilution, it was found that gluconate, oxalate, succinate, and glutarate, along with sulfate and nitrate, all increased significantly in mass concentration from the fire source going downwind. This suggests secondary formation of these species during aerosol aging. On the other hand, formate and acetate showed decreasing trends downwind, probably due to the loss of these volatile species to the gas phase. Another striking pattern is that anhydrosugars (e.g. levoglucosan) had the highest aerosol mass fraction near smoldering fires but a very low fraction in the haze layers, whereas, dicarboxylic acids showed an almost opposite trend. This implies possible chemical reaction processes converting intermediate organic products, such as levoglucosan, to smaller products like

  6. A Quarter Century Record of Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosol: implication for the past, present and future climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abaunza, M.; Jackson, T. L.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Stratospheric sulfate aerosol (SSA) plays an important role in the earth climate system by reflecting solar radiation making it an attractive candidate in geoengineering to counter greenhouse warming. However, these planetary scales perturbations demand a priori understanding of SSA over a longer time period to resolve anthropogenic and natural perturbations to the delicate and thin layers- SSA and ozone layers. Here we present a quarter century high resolution seasonal record of SSA and its linkage to the ozone layer. Sulfate was extracted from a (1x1m) and 25m deep snow pit at the South Pole. The combination of cations, anions, O-triple isotopes and S-quadruple isotope measurements allowed us to deconvolve the oxidation history of SSA and tease out natural and anthropogenic components. The period (1980 to 2002) encompasses the largest volcanic eruptions of the century, El-Chichon, Pinatubo, Cerro Hudson and the three largest El-Nino Southern Oscillation events. The highest O-isotope anomaly (∆17O = 3.7‰) in SSA was observed during the super ENSO event (1997-98) and recorded changes in ozone levels of the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (1). ENSO is another flavor of natural climate variability and is important as it links hydrosphere and the atmosphere in unique ways controlling rainfall and temperature. The highest S-isotope anomaly was observed in 1998-99 and records changes in atmospheric dynamics and transport of sulfur compounds to the stratosphere following intense wild fires as a consequence of the Super ENSO event. The highest S-isotopic anomaly (∆33S = +2.26‰ and ∆36S= +0.51 ‰) is ~ 3 times higher compared to the Pinatubo signal, the largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. The pattern of S-isotope anomalies in this period fits within the pre-Cambrian record of S-isotopes in three billion year old rock. The generation of such a large S-isotope anomaly in the present day oxygen rich atmosphere may have implications for the

  7. Photoreactivity of condensed species on Titan's aerosols analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Benjamin; Gudipati, Murthy; Carrasco, Nathalie

    2016-10-01

    Titan's aerosols formation is initiated in the upper atmospheric layers at about 1000 km by the dissociation and the ionization of N2 and CH4 by the VUV solar photons [1]. Then, they aggregate and sediment to the surface. The temperatures of the stratosphere and the troposphere [3] (measured by the HASI instrument onboard the Huygens probe [2]) allow the condensation of many volatile organics on the solid aerosols, forming organic ice coating on the aerosol polymers. We will present an experimental study simulating this process and discuss the photoreactivity of condensed species on Titan's aerosols analogues in the atmosphere and on the surface. We demonstrated experimentally that the organic aerosols, which cover the Titan's surface, drive the photoreactivity of condensed species such as acetylene when they are irradiated with long wavelength photons (λ > 300 nm). This result highlights that Titan's surface remains active despite the absorption of the most energetic photons by the atmosphere.AcknowledgmentsThis work is supported by NASA Solar System Workings grant " Photochemistry in Titan's Lower Atmosphere". The research work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. NC acknowledges the European Research Council for their financial support (ERC Starting Grant PRIMCHEM, grant agreement n°636829).References[1] Waite, J. H., et al., The process of Tholin formation in Titan's upper atmosphere, (2007), Science 316, 870-875.[2] Fulchignoni, M., et al., In situ measurements of the physical characteristics of Titan's environment, (2005), Nature 438, 785-791[3] Lavvas, P., et al., Condensation in Titan's atmosphere at the Huygens landing site, (2011), Icarus 215, 732-750.

  8. Large sulfur-isotope anomaly in nonvolcanic sulfate aerosol and its implications for the Archean atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Robina; Abaunza, Mariana M.; Jackson, Teresa L.; McCabe, Justin; Savarino, Joël; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur-isotopic anomalies have been used to trace the evolution of oxygen in the Precambrian atmosphere and to document past volcanic eruptions. High-precision sulfur quadruple isotope measurements of sulfate aerosols extracted from a snow pit at the South Pole (1984–2001) showed the highest S-isotopic anomalies (Δ33S = +1.66‰ and Δ36S = +2‰) in a nonvolcanic (1998–1999) period, similar in magnitude to Pinatubo and Agung, the largest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century. The highest isotopic anomaly may be produced from a combination of different stratospheric sources (sulfur dioxide and carbonyl sulfide) via SOx photochemistry, including photoexcitation and photodissociation. The source of anomaly is linked to super El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) (1997–1998)-induced changes in troposphere–stratosphere chemistry and dynamics. The data possess recurring negative S-isotope anomalies (Δ36S = −0.6 ± 0.2‰) in nonvolcanic and non-ENSO years, thus requiring a second source that may be tropospheric. The generation of nonvolcanic S-isotopic anomalies in an oxidizing atmosphere has implications for interpreting Archean sulfur deposits used to determine the redox state of the paleoatmosphere. PMID:25092338

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species in Combustion Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; See, S.

    2007-12-01

    Research on airborne particulate matter (PM) has received increased concern in recent years after it was identified as a major component of the air pollution mix that is strongly associated with premature mortality and morbidity. Particular attention has been paid to understanding the potential health impacts of fine particles (PM2.5), which primarily originate from combustion sources. One group of particulate-bound chemical components of health concern is reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ions such as hypochlorite ion (OCl-), free radicals such as hydroxyl radical (·OH) and superoxide anion (·O2-) which is both an ion and a radical. However, the formation of ROS in PM is not clearly understood yet. Furthermore, the concentration of ROS in combustion particles of different origin has not been quantified. The primary objective of this work is to study the effect of transition metals on the production of ROS in PM2.5 by determining the concentrations of ROS and metals. Both soluble and total metals were measured to evaluate their respective associations with ROS. PM2.5 samples were collected from several outdoor and indoor combustion sources, including those emitted from on-road vehicles, food cooking, incense sticks, and cigarette smoke. PM2.5 samples were also collected from the background air in both the ambient outdoor and indoor environments to assess the levels of particulate-bound transition metals and ROS with no combustion activities in the vicinity of sampling locations. Results obtained from this comprehensive study on particulate-bound ROS will be presented and discussed.

  10. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging of the morphology of submicrometer aerosol containing organic acids and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Veghte, Daniel P; Bittner, Danielle Rae; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2014-03-04

    The effects of aerosol particles on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry and climate are determined in part by the internal arrangement of compounds within the particles. To characterize the morphology of internally mixed aerosol particles in the accumulation mode size regime, we have used cryo-transmission electron microscopy to investigate the phase separation behavior of dry, submicrometer particles composed of ammonium sulfate mixed with carboxylic acids (adipic, azelaic, citric, glutaric, malonic, pimelic, suberic, and succinic acid). Determining the morphology of dry particles is important for understanding laboratory studies of aerosol optical properties, reactivity, and cloud condensation nucleus activity, results from field instruments where aerosol particles are dried prior to analysis, and atmospheric processes like deposition mode heterogeneous ice nucleation that occur on dried particles. We observe homogeneous morphologies for highly soluble organic compounds. For organic compounds with limited aqueous solubility, partially engulfed structures are observed. At intermediate aqueous solubilities, small particles are homogeneous and larger particles are partially engulfed. Results are compared to previous studies of liquid-liquid phase separation in supermicrometer particles and the impact of these dry particle morphologies on aerosol-climate interactions are discussed.

  11. Synergistic interaction of ozone and respirable aerosols on rat lungs. II. Synergy between ammonium sulfate aerosol and various concentrations of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, D.L.; Guth, D.J.; Last, J.A.

    1986-07-01

    Pulmonary responses after continuous exposure of rats to concentrations of ozone (O3) ranging from 0.12 to 0.64 ppm were quantified by measuring tissue collagen synthesis rate, tissue protein and DNA content, and various constituents of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. After 7 days of exposure to 0.64 ppm of O3, lung collagen synthesis rate and tissue content of protein and DNA were elevated. After shorter durations of exposure to 0.64 ppm of O3, significant elevations were observed in the protein content and the activities of lactate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase from lavage fluid. After exposure of rats to 0.20 ppm of O3 for 7 days, changes could be detected in both lung collagen synthesis rate and tissue protein content. Total lavagable protein content, a sensitive indicator for O3-induced effects upon the lung, was significantly elevated in lungs of rats exposed to 0.12 or 0.20 ppm of O3. To examine whether a synergistic interaction occurred between 0.20 or 0.64 ppm of O3 and acid aerosols, rats were continuously exposed to O3 with and without concurrent exposure to 5 mg/m3 of ammonium sulfate. A synergistic interaction between 0.20 ppm of O3 and ammonium sulfate aerosol was observed by measurement of total lavagable protein and of lung collagen synthesis rate. These results demonstrate that ammonium sulfate aerosol interacts synergistically with O3 at concentrations of O3 that approach ambient levels.

  12. Fingerprinting Volcanic and Anthropogenic Sulfur Dioxide in the Air: A 25 Year Record of Sulfate Aerosols from the South Pole Snowpit, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abaunza-Quintero, M.; Jackson, T. L.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols, unlike greenhouse gases, cause cooling effect (-0.4 ± 0.2 W.m-2) by scattering incoming solar radiation and by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (IPCC 2007). Volcanic eruptions with explosivity Indices >5 inject large amounts of SO2 and particles into the stratosphere causing a significant decrease in temperature. For example a 0.7oC decrease in Earth's temperature was observed following the Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Stratospheric injection of sulfate aerosols has been suggested as a geoengineering effort to mitigate global warming caused by a significant increase in greenhouse gases. To understand the impact of volcanic events on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer and subsequent changes in the dynamics of the upper atmosphere, a long term and high temporal resolution record of sulfate aerosol is needed. Here we present a 25 year (1978 to 2003) high resolution record of sulfate aerosols which covers largest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century namely, El-Chichón 1982 and Pinatubo 1991. Sulfate aerosol samples were obtained from a 1x1m snowpit at the South Pole, Antarctica with approximately 6 month time steps. Sulfate concentrations vary from 30 to 70 ppb depending on the season with exceptions during volcanic events which contributed a three to four folds increase in sulfate concentration Sulfate concentrations of120 ppb following El Chichón and 190 ppb after Pinatubo eruptions were observed. The oxygen isotopic anomaly varied from 0.7‰ to 3.9‰ with the highest anomaly occurring after the Pinatubo eruption. The positive Δ17O of sulfate derives from aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 and O3 oxidation and involves transfer of the isotopic anomaly from the oxidant to the product sulfate. Coupled with kinetic analysis the relative reaction rates the relative proportions of oxidation can be calculated. All other sulfate sources such as sea salt sulfates, primary sulfates from fossil fuel combustion, metal catalyzed oxidation of S

  13. Sensitivity of thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of UTLS secondary sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring upper-tropospheric-lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS sulfate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulfuric acid/water droplets, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulfate and bisulfate ions and the undissociated sulfuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulfuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interfering parameters like the ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile uncertainties

  14. Sulfated polysaccharides from the egg jelly layer are species-specific inducers of acrosomal reaction in sperms of sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Alves, A P; Mulloy, B; Diniz, J A; Mourão, P A

    1997-03-14

    We have characterized the fine structure of sulfated polysaccharides from the egg jelly layer of three species of sea urchins and tested the ability of these purified polysaccharides to induce the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa. The sea urchin Echinometra lucunter contains a homopolymer of 2-sulfated, 3-linked alpha-L-galactan. The species Arbacia lixula and Lytechinus variegatus contain linear sulfated alpha-L-fucans with regular tetrasaccharide repeating units. Each of these sulfated polysaccharides induces the acrosome reaction in conspecific but not in heterospecific spermatozoa. These results demonstrate that species specificity of fertilization in sea urchins depends in part on the fine structure of egg jelly sulfated polysaccharide.

  15. Mid-infrared extinction by sulfate aerosols from the Mt. Pinatubo eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Yue, G. K.; Gunson, M. R.; Zander, R.; Abrams, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction in the 750-3400/cm spectral region have been derived from 0.01/cm resolution stratospheric solar occultation spectra recorded by the ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) Fourier transform spectrometer about 9 1/2 months after the Mt Pinatubo volcanic eruption. Strong, broad aerosol features have been identified near 900, 1060, 1190, 1720, and 2900/cm below a tangent height of approximately 30 km. Aerosol extinction measurements derived from approximately 0.05/cm wide microwindows nearly free of telluric line absorption in the ATMOS spectra are compared with transmission calculations derived from aerosol size distribution profiles retrieved from correlative SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) II visible and near i.r. extinction measurements, seasonal and zonally averaged H2SO4 aerosol weight percentage profiles, and published sulfuric acid optical constants derived from room temperature laboratory measurements. The calculated shapes and positions of the aerosol features are generally consistent with the observations, thereby confirming that the aerosols are predominantly concentrated H2SO4-H2O droplets, but there are significant differences between the measured and calculated wavelength dependences of the aerosol extinction. We attribute these differences as primarily the result of errors in the calculated low temperature H2SO4-H2O optical constants. Errors in both the published room temperature optical constants and the limitations of the Lorentz-Lorenz relation are likely to be important.

  16. Soluble species in the Arctic summer troposphere: Acidic gases, aerosols, and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1992-10-01

    We report here the distribution of selected acidic gases and aerosol species in the North American Arctic and sub-Arctic summer troposphere. The summertime troposphere is an acidic environment, with HCOOH and CH3COOH the principal acidic gases and acidic sulfate aerosols dominating the particulate phase. Our data show that the acidic gas and aerosol composition is uniform on a large spatial scale. There appears to be a surface source of NH4+ over the Arctic Ocean pack ice which may reflect release of NH3 from decay of dead marine organisms on the ice surface near ice leads, release from rotting sea ice, or an upward flux from surface ocean waters in open ice leads. This NH3 appears to partially neutralize aerosol acidity in the boundary layer. Over sub-Arctic tundra in southwestern Alaska inputs of marine biogenic sulfur from the nearby Bering Sea appear to be an important source of boundary layer aerosol SO42-. While there were only minor effects on aerosol chemistry over the tundra from sea salt, the rainwater chemistry showed influence from marine aerosols which were apparently incorporated into air masses during frontal passages moving inland from the Bering Sea. The rainwater acidity over the tundra (pH 4.69) is typical of remote regions. The principal acidity components are H2SO4 and carboxylic acids, especially HCOOH. The carboxylic acids appear to have a strong continental biogenic source, but hydrocarbons of marine origin and emissions from forest fires may also be important. The wet deposition fluxes of NO3--N and SO42--S over sub-Arctic tundra during July-August 1988 were 2.1 and 2.4 mmol m-2 yr-1. Wet deposition of NO3- was nearly 3 times higher than the average NOy deposition flux, which is believed to represent primarily dry deposition of HNO3 (Bakwin et al., this issue). Our measurements indicate that the mid-troposphere in the Arctic is generally contaminated with low levels of anthropogenic pollutants even in summer when direct atmospheric coupling

  17. Online and offline mass spectrometric study of the impact of oxidation and ageing on glyoxal chemistry and uptake onto ammonium sulfate aerosols.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Baeza-Romero, M Teresa; Finessi, Emanuela; Rickard, Andrew R; Healy, Robert M; Peppe, Salvatore; Adams, Thomas J; Daniels, Mark J S; Ball, Stephen M; Goodall, Iain C A; Monks, Paul S; Borrás, Esther; Muñoz, Amalia

    2013-01-01

    Recent laboratory and modelling studies have shown that reactive uptake of low molecular weight alpha-dicarbonyls such as glyoxal (GLY) by aerosols is a potentially significant source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, previous studies disagree in the magnitude of the uptake of GLY, the mechanism involved and the physicochemical factors affecting particle formation. In this study, the chemistry of GLY with ammonium sulfate (AS) in both bulk laboratory solutions and in aerosol particles is investigated. For the first time, Aerosol Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), a single particle technique, is used together with offline (ESI-MS and LC-MS2) mass spectrometric techniques to investigate the change in composition of bulk solutions of GLY and AS resulting from aqueous photooxidation by OH and from ageing of the solutions in the dark. The mass spectral ions obtained in these laboratory studies were used as tracers of GLY uptake and chemistry in AS seed particles in a series of experiments carried out under dark and natural irradiated conditions at the outdoor European Photo-reactor (EUPHORE). Glyoxal oligomers formed were not detected by the ATOFMS, perhaps due to inefficient absorption at the laser wavelength. However, the presence of organic nitrogen compounds, formed by reaction of GLY with ammonia was confirmed, resulting in an increase in the absorption efficiency of the aerosol, and this increased the number of particles successfully ionised by the ATOFMS. A number of light absorbing organic nitrogen species, including 1H-imidazole, 1H-imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde, 2,2'-bis-imidazole and a glyoxal substituted 2,2'-bisimidazole, previously identified in aqueous laboratory solutions, were also identified in chamber aerosol and formed on atmospherically relevant timescales. An additional compound, predicted to be 1,2,5-oxadiazole, had an enhanced formation rate when the chamber was open and is predicted to be formed via a light activated pathway

  18. Characterization of particulate products for aging of ethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosol.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Jiahui; Cai, Shunyou; Liao, Yingmin; Zhao, Weixiong; Hu, Changjin; Gu, Xuejun; Fang, Li; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-09-01

    Aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from OH- initiated oxidation of ethylbenzene in the presence of high mass (100-300μg/m(3)) concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol was investigated in a home-made smog chamber in this study. The chemical composition of aged ethylbenzene SOA particles was measured using an aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS) coupled with a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Experimental results showed that nitrophenol, ethyl-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, methyl glyoxylic acid, 5-ethyl-6-oxo-2,4-hexadienoic acid, 2-ethyl-2,4-hexadiendioic acid, 2,3-dihydroxy-5-ethyl-6-oxo-4-hexenoic acid, 1H-imidazole, hydrated N-glyoxal substituted 1H-imidazole, hydrated glyoxal dimer substituted imidazole, 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde, N-glyoxal substituted hydrated 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde and high-molecular-weight (HMW) components were the predominant products in the aged particles. Compared to the previous aromatic SOA aging studies, imidazole compounds, which can absorb solar radiation effectively, were newly detected in aged ethylbenzene SOA in the presence of high concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol. These findings provide new information for discussing aromatic SOA aging mechanisms.

  19. Hygroscopicity of organic compounds from biomass burning and their influence on the water uptake of mixed organic-ammonium sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Zuend, A.; Wang, W. G.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ge, M. F.

    2014-05-01

    Hygroscopic behavior of organic compounds, including levoglucosan, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and humic acid, and their effects on the hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulfate (AS) in internally mixed particles are studied by a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The organic compounds used represent pyrolysis products of wood that are emitted from biomass burning sources. It is found that humic acid aerosol particles only slightly take up water, starting at RH above ∼70%. This is contrasted by the continuous water absorption of levoglucosan aerosol particles in the range 5-90% RH. However, no hygroscopic growth is observed for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid aerosol particles. Predicted water uptake using the ideal solution theory, the AIOMFAC model and the E-AIM (with UNIFAC) model are consistent with measured hygroscopic growth factors of levoglucosan. However, the use of these models without consideration of crystalline organic phases is not appropriate to describe the hygroscopicity of organics that do not exhibit continuous water uptake, such as 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and humic acid. Mixed aerosol particles consisting of ammonium sulfate and levoglucosan, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, or humic acid with different organic mass fractions, take up a reduced amount of water above 80% RH (above AS deliquescence) relative to pure ammonium sulfate aerosol particles of the same mass. Hygroscopic growth of mixtures of ammonium sulfate and levoglucosan with different organic mass fractions agree well with the predictions of the thermodynamic models. Use of the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) relation and AIOMFAC model lead to good agreement with measured growth factors of mixtures of ammonium sulfate with 4-hydrobenxybenzoic acid assuming an insoluble organic phase. Deviations of model predictions from the HTDMA measurement are mainly due to the occurrence of a microscopical solid phase restructuring at increased humidity (morphology effects), which are not

  20. Acute toxicity and effects analysis of endosulfan sulfate to freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Carriger, John F; Hoang, Tham C; Rand, Gary M; Gardinali, Piero R; Castro, Joffre

    2011-02-01

    Endosulfan sulfate is a persistent environmental metabolite of endosulfan, an organochlorine insecticide-acaricide presently registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. There is, however, limited acute fish toxicity data for endosulfan sulfate. This study determines the acute toxicity (LC₅₀s and LC₁₀s) of endosulfan sulfate to three inland Florida native fish species (mosquitofish [Gambusia affinis]; least killifish [Heterandria formosa]; and sailfin mollies [Poecilia latipinna]) as well as fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Ninety-six-h acute toxicity tests were conducted with each fish species under flow-through conditions. For all of the above-mentioned fish species, 96-h LC₅₀ estimates ranged from 2.1 to 3.5 μg/L endosulfan sulfate. The 96-h LC₁₀ estimates ranged from 0.8 to 2.1 μg/L endosulfan sulfate. Of all of the fish tested, the least killifish appeared to be the most sensitive to endosulfan sulfate exposure. The above-mentioned data were combined with previous acute toxicity data for endosulfan sulfate and freshwater fish for an effects analysis. The effects analysis estimated hazardous concentrations expected to exceed 5, 10, and 50% of the fish species' acute LC₅₀ or LC₁₀ values (HC₅, HC₁₀, and HC₅₀). The endosulfan sulfate freshwater-fish acute tests were also compared with the available freshwater-fish acute toxicity data for technical endosulfan. Technical endosulfan is a mixture of α- and β-endosulfan. The LC₅₀s had a wider range for technical endosulfan, and their distribution produced a lower HC₁₀ than for endosulfan sulfate. The number of freshwater-fish LC₅₀s for endosulfan sulfate is much smaller than the number available for technical endosulfan, reflecting priorities in examining the toxicity of the parent compounds of pesticides. The toxicity test results and effects analyses provided acute effect values for endosulfan sulfate and freshwater fish that might be applied

  1. Multiple Year-round Atmospheric Record of DMS, DMSO, Sulfurdioxide, Sea-salt and Sulfur (MSA and Non-sea-salt Sulfate) Aerosols at Dumont d'Urville (Antarctica) (December 1998-August 2002): Implications for Ice Core Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, M.; Jourdain, B.

    2002-12-01

    Since four years, year-round measurements of DMS and DMSO (3100 samples) using a gas chromatograph were achieved at Dumont d'Urville, a coastal Antarctic site. In addition to bulk aerosol composition ((MSA, non-sea-salt sulfate (nssSO42-)) and sea-salt) made on a daily basis since 1991, year-round studies of the size-segregated aerosol composition were achieved in 2000 and 2001. Together with denuder tube sampling (HCl and HNO3) these data permit to examine summer (chloride depletion relative to sodium) and winter (sulfate depletion relative to sodium and chloride) sea-salt aerosol fractionations in more detail than previously done from the single examination of bulk aerosol chemistry, allowing a better understanding of these processes which is required to quantify the sulfate fraction related to biogenic DMS emissions. It is found that HCl is present at levels close to 130 ng m-3 in summer in this region as result of an acidification of sea-salt aerosol by HNO3. Impactor data indicate a sulfate to sodium ratio of 0.13 (sulfate to chloride ratio of 0.06) on sea-salt aerosols from May to October. This sulfate depletion relative to sodium in airborne sea-salt aerosol is less pronounced at DDU than at other coastal Antarctic sites. This difference may result from either a less extended sea ice cover which controls the formation of a sea-salt aerosol source depleted in mirabilite or warmer temperatures which decrease the intensity of the fractionation process. Based on that, accurate determination of nssSO42- indicates winter levels ranging from 10 to 30 ng m-3 with a higher value (50 ng m-3) from 1992 to 1994 when the Pinatubo volcanic cloud was present. We discuss possible effects of the nighttime oxidation of DMS (still present in winter) to explain the presence of non-sea-salt sulfate (in the absence of MSA) in these regions at that season. Over the last 4 years summer levels of DMS, DMSO and MSA exhibit a large interannual variability with high values in January

  2. Contribution of fine particle sulfates to light scattering in St. Louis summer aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Vossler, T.L.; Macias, E.S.

    1986-12-01

    The contribution of fine particle (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ to total light scattering was calculated from measured sulfur size distributions and estimates of water that might be associated with this deliquescent species. The most common type of sulfur size distribution observed had a major sulfur mass peak between 0.5 and 1.0 ..mu..m in diameter and was associated with the highest levels of b/sub scat/. A less common type with no peak above 0.5 ..mu..m was associated only with low values of b/sub scat/. On average, (NH/sub 4/)SO/sub 4/ plus associated water contributed 68% of the total light scattering due to particles during the summer of 1984. The measured light scattering coefficient, b/sub scat/, and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ plus associated water were extremely well correlated. b/sub scat/ and total fine particle mass were not as well correlated, because the correlation between b/sub scat/ and non-sulfate fine mass was poor. The average calculated light scattering efficiency of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ plus water was 4.2 m/sup 2//g. The higher values were associated with sulfur size distributions with a major peak above 0.5 ..mu..m.

  3. Effects of sulfate ligand on uranyl carbonato surface species on ferrihydrite surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Yuji; Fuller, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding uranium (U) sorption processes in permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are critical in modeling reactive transport for evaluating PRB performance at the Fry Canyon demonstration site in Utah, USA. To gain insight into the U sequestration mechanism in the amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide (AFO)-coated gravel PRB, U(VI) sorption processes on ferrihydrite surfaces were studied in 0.01 M Na2SO4 solutions to simulate the major chemical composition of U-contaminatedgroundwater (i.e., [SO42-]~13 mM L-1) at the site. Uranyl sorption was greater at pH 7.5 than that at pH 4 in both air- and 2% pCO2-equilibrated systems. While there were negligible effects of sulfate ligands on the pH-dependent U(VI) sorption (<24 h) in both systems, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis showed sulfate ligand associated U(VI) surface species at the ferrihydrite–water interface. In air-equilibrated systems, binary and mono-sulfate U(VI) ternary surface species co-existed at pH 5.43. At pH 6.55–7.83, a mixture of mono-sulfate and bis-carbonato U(VI) ternary surface species became more important. At 2% pCO2, there was no contribution of sulfate ligands on the U(VI) ternary surface species. Instead, a mixture of bis-carbonato inner-sphere (38%) and tris-carbonato outer-sphere U(VI) ternary surface species (62%) was found at pH 7.62. The study suggests that the competitive ligand (bicarbonate and sulfate) coordination on U(VI) surface species might be important in evaluating the U solid-state speciation in the AFO PRB at the study site where pCO2 fluctuates between 1 and 2 pCO2%.

  4. Seasonal changes in Fe species and soluble Fe concentration in the atmosphere in the Northwest Pacific region based on the analysis of aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Kanai, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Zheng, G.; Marcus, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) can be a significant source of nutrition for phytoplankton inhabiting remote oceans, which in turn has a large influence on the Earth's climate. The bioavailability of Fe in aerosols depends mainly on the fraction of soluble Fe (= [FeSol]/[FeTotal], where [FeSol] and [FeTotal] are the atmospheric concentrations of soluble and total Fe, respectively). However, the numerous factors affecting the soluble Fe fraction have not been fully understood. In this study, the Fe species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentrations in aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan were investigated over a year (nine samples from December 2002 to October 2003) to identify the factors affecting the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean. The soluble Fe concentration in aerosols is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate originated from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. Moreover, the soluble Fe concentration is also correlated with the enrichment factors of vanadium and nickel emitted by fossil fuel combustion. These results suggest that the degree of Fe dissolution is influenced by the magnitude of anthropogenic activity, such as fossil fuel combustion. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was performed in this study to identify the Fe species in aerosols. The fitting of XAFS spectra coupled with micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) determined the main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba to be illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, the soluble Fe fraction in each sample measured by leaching experiments is closely correlated with the Fe(III) sulfate fraction determined by the XAFS spectrum fitting, suggesting that Fe(III) sulfate is the main soluble Fe in the ocean. Another possible factor that can control the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean is the total Fe(III) concentration in the atmosphere, which was high in spring due to the high

  5. Seasonal changes in Fe species and soluble Fe concentration in the atmosphere in the Northwest Pacific region based on the analysis of aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Kanai, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Zheng, G.; Marcus, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) can be a significant source of nutrition for phytoplankton inhabiting remote oceans, which in turn has a large influence on the Earth's climate. The bioavailability of Fe in aerosols depends mainly on the fraction of soluble Fe (= [FeSol]/[FeTotal], where [FeSol] and [FeTotal] are the atmospheric concentrations of soluble and total Fe, respectively). However, the numerous factors affecting the soluble Fe fraction have not been fully understood. In this study, the Fe species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentrations in aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan were investigated over a year (nine samples from December 2002 to October 2003) to identify the factors affecting the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean. The soluble Fe concentration in aerosols is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate originated from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. Moreover, the soluble Fe concentration is also correlated with the enrichment factors of vanadium and nickel emitted by fossil fuel combustion. These results suggest that the degree of Fe dissolution is influenced by the magnitude of anthropogenic activity, such as fossil fuel combustion. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was performed in order to identify the Fe species in aerosols. Fitting of XAFS spectra coupled with micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (μ-XRF) showed the main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba to be illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, the soluble Fe fraction in each sample measured by leaching experiments is closely correlated with the Fe(III) sulfate fraction determined by the XAFS spectrum fitting, suggesting that Fe(III) sulfate is the main soluble Fe in the ocean. Another possible factor that can control the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean is the total Fe(III) concentration in the atmosphere, which was high in spring due to the high mineral

  6. Estimation of sulfate trends at selected national park service sites: Does the wet deposition record parallel the aerosol record?

    SciTech Connect

    Shealy, R.T.; Bowersox, V.C.

    1997-12-31

    Recently temporal trends in sulfate concentration in fine-particle aerosols have been measured at a set of twelve National Park Service (NPS) sites using the Interagency Monitoring of Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network. Trends were computed for each climatological season over the period 1982-1993. The distribution of trend direction was nearly symmetric; of the 48 possible site-season combinations, 11 were negative, 8 positive, and the remainder exhibited no trend. These are surprising findings in the context of nearly constant SO{sub 2} emissions in the East over this period (EPA, 1991) and generally-decreasing trends over the entire US computed from wet deposition sulfate concentrations collected by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Of particular interest are the three largest positive trends: Grand Canyon exhibited a 4.2% increase in winter, Great Smoky Mountains had an increase of 3.9% in summer, and Shenandoah had an increase of 3.7% in summer, Recently, the latter two sites have been studied over a period more recent than the original study (1982-1995) and the trends are smaller, but they remain positive. It has been suggested that these findings are a statistical artifact: that in a large set of trend tests over many sites and seasons, a few will by chance be found to have statistically significant positive trends, even under the condition of no trends.A special study was undertaken using the subset of the NPS sites with co-located IMPROVE and NADP/NTN samplers. Direct comparison of aerosol sulfur and wet deposition sulfate trends is done to determine their relationship to each other. The NPS sites that qualify as candidates in the study are: Shenandoah, Great Smoky Mountains, Glacier, Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Mesa Verde, and Big Bend Parks.

  7. Infrared spectroscopic study of the effect of oleic acid on the deliquescence behaviour of ammonium sulfate aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Nájera, Juan J; Horn, Andrew B

    2009-01-21

    In order to accurately assess the impact of fatty acids on the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles, (NH4)2SO4 (ammonium sulfate) and oleic acid (cis-9-octadecenoic acid) were chosen to perform this study as components of the particle phase. Micron-sized (700-900 nm) particles containing (NH4)2SO4 and oleic acid were generated by nebulising aqueous solutions of (NH4)2SO4 and sodium oleate. In this study, the effect of oleic acid on the deliquescence phase transition of particles was investigated in a room temperature aerosol flow tube (AFT) system using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Particles morphologies and their chemical compositions were also analysed using a variety of techniques, including attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). The deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the (NH4)2SO4 component, determined at 81+/-2%, was slightly lowered or not affected by the presence of different thickness of oleic acid (21 nm, 44 nm and 109 nm) present in the particles. Analyses of the results presented here are consistent with earlier studies about the possible effects of water-insoluble fatty acids coatings on the phase transitions of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  8. Modeling sea salt and sulfate aerosol over the global oceans to understand the origins of marine cloud condensation nuclei and the impact of pollution on them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tianyi

    Over the oceans, anthropogenic aerosols compete with natural aerosols from sea spray and oceanic phytoplankton-derived sulfate to create cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). To understand the impact of pollution on the marine CCN, we need knowledge of both natural and anthropogenic aerosols. In this research, we model sea salt and sulfate aerosol in a coupled climate and sectional microphysical model, CAM/CARMA. We develop a sea salt source function, CMS, based upon several earlier source functions (Clarke, Monahan, and Smith). The CMS source function is capable of reproducing observed sea salt mass, optical depth and number concentration as well as the size distribution better than other source function choices we tried. However, as we note, it is also important to properly set the removal rate of the particles to reproduce the observed abundances. The simulated non-sea-salt sulfate mass agrees well with the observations. Direct emission of sulfate from sea spray is the largest source of marine sulfate aerosol and depends on the sea salt emission. Non-sea-salt sulfate from gas- and aqueous-phase conversion, together with sea salt, contributes to the marine CCN over the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere, while sea salt dominates the CCN over the Southern Ocean. Human impact on marine CCN extends to 45 oS. Anthropogenic sulfur emissions are responsible for about 35% of the surface layer CCN over the global oceans. With doubling the year 2000 anthropogenic sulfur emissions. Surface layer CCN increases by about 22% over the global oceans if sulfur emissions are doubled from. With no or double anthropogenic emissions, the changes in the surface layer CCN number over the Southern Hemisphere oceans are usually less than 10%.

  9. Stratospheric SO2 and sulfate aerosol: model simulations and satellite observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Bruehl, C.; Hoepfner, M.; Tost, H.

    2013-12-01

    A multiyear study with the atmospheric chemistry - general circulation model EMAC, applying a comprehensive aerosol module, demonstrates that the sulfur gases COS and SO2, the latter from low-latitude volcanic eruptions, predominantly control the stratospheric aerosol. The central role of COS for the non-volcanic background aerosol was recently corroborated by photolytic isotope measurements. Our results suggest that upper stratospheric SO2 can be simulated accurately only when a sulfur sink on meteoritic dust is included and the photolysis of gaseous H2SO4 in the near infrared is higher than assumed previously. We present simulations of the major atmospheric perturbation by Mt. Pinatubo in 1991, and the period from 1999 to 2009 with background aerosol, influenced by 6 medium-strength volcano eruptions. We show comparisons with satellite data for aerosol extinction (e.g. SAGE) and SO2 in the middle atmosphere (MIPAS). They confirm the interannual variability induced by the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, which is internally generated by the model. The model also realistically simulates the radiative effects of stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol, including influences on the dynamics. The medium strength volcanic eruptions of 2005 and 2006 exerted a non-negligible radiative forcing of up to -0.6 Wm-2 in the tropics, while the large Pinatubo eruption caused a maximum though short-term tropical forcing of about -10 Wm-2. The modeled stratospheric perturbations by volcanic SO2 and their climate impacts can be constrained by measured isotope anomalies produced by UV photolysis.

  10. A GCM study of effects of radiative forcing of sulfate aerosol on large scale circulation and rainfall in East Asia during boreal spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2007-12-01

    The effect of sulfate aerosol radiative forcing on spring rainfall in East Asia are studied based on numerical simulations with the NASA finite-volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM) forced with monthly varying three-dimensional aerosol distribution from the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). Result shows that radiative forcing of sulfate aerosol leads to cooling of the land surface and reduction in rainfall over central East Asia. The maximum reduction in precipitation is shifted northward relative to the maximum aerosol loading region as a result of dynamical feedback. The anomalous thermal gradient by aerosol cooling near the land surface, reduces the baroclinicity of the atmosphere, leading to a deceleration of the upper level westerly flow. The westerly deceleration induces, through ageostrophic wind adjustment, anomalous meridional secondary circulation at the entrance region of the East Asian jetstream, with strong sinking motion and suppressed precipitation near 30°N, coupled to weak rising motion and moderately enhanced precipitation over southern China and the South China Sea. These results suggest that the radiative forcing of aerosol through induced dynamical feedback with the atmospheric water cycle, may be a causal factor in the observed spring precipitation trend over East Asia.

  11. Importance of including ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) aerosols for ice cloud parameterization in GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, P. S.; Sud, Y. C.; Liu, X.; Walker, G. K.; Yang, R.; Wang, J.

    2010-02-01

    A common deficiency of many cloud-physics parameterizations including the NASA's microphysics of clouds with aerosol-cloud interactions (hereafter called McRAS-AC) is that they simulate lesser (larger) than the observed ice cloud particle number (size). A single column model (SCM) of McRAS-AC physics of the GEOS4 Global Circulation Model (GCM) together with an adiabatic parcel model (APM) for ice-cloud nucleation (IN) of aerosols were used to systematically examine the influence of introducing ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4 aerosols in McRAS-AC and its influence on the optical properties of both liquid and ice clouds. First an (NH4)2SO4 parameterization was included in the APM to assess its effect on clouds vis-à-vis that of the other aerosols. Subsequently, several evaluation tests were conducted over the ARM Southern Great Plain (SGP) and thirteen other locations (sorted into pristine and polluted conditions) distributed over marine and continental sites with the SCM. The statistics of the simulated cloud climatology were evaluated against the available ground and satellite data. The results showed that inclusion of (NH4)2SO4 into McRAS-AC of the SCM made a remarkable improvement in the simulated effective radius of ice cloud particulates. However, the corresponding ice-cloud optical thickness increased even more than the observed. This can be caused by lack of horizontal cloud advection not performed in the SCM. Adjusting the other tunable parameters such as precipitation efficiency can mitigate this deficiency. Inclusion of ice cloud particle splintering invoked empirically further reduced simulation biases. Overall, these changes make a substantial improvement in simulated cloud optical properties and cloud distribution particularly over the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the GCM.

  12. Condensational growth and trace species scavenging in stratospheric sulfuric acid/water aerosol droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompson, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in the environment. The composition of aerosols is believed to be a liquid solution of sulfuric acid and water with numerous trace species. Of these trace species, ozone in particular was recognized as being very important in its role of shielding the environment from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Also among the trace species are HCl and ClONO2, the so called chlorine reservoir species and various oxides of nitrogen. The quantity of stratospheric aerosol and its particle size distribution determines, to a large degree, the chemistry present in the stratosphere. Aerosols experience 3 types of growth: nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. The application of condensation investigations to the specific problem of stratospheric aerosols is discussed.

  13. Multiple Year-round Atmospheric Records of DMS, DMSO, Sea-salt and Sulfur (MSA and Non-sea-salt Sulfate) Aerosols at Dumont d'Urville (Antarctica) (December 1998-August 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, B.; Legrand, M.; Preunkert, S.

    2003-04-01

    Since 4 years, year-round measurements of DMS and DMSO (3100 samples) using a gas chromatograph were achieved at Dumont d'Urville, a coastal Antarctic site (66^o40'S, 140^o01'E). In addition to bulk aerosol composition (MSA, non-sea-salt sulfate (nssSO_42-) and sea-salt) investigated on a daily basis, year-round studies of the size-segregated aerosol composition were also achieved in 2000 and 2001 to examine the fractionation of sea-salt aerosol in winter (sulfate depletion relative to sodium and chloride) in more details than previously done from single examination of bulk aerosol chemistry. That permits a better quantification of the small non-sea-salt sulfate fraction in winter in these regions. The 4 years record shows a significant interannual variability of DMS, DMSO, MSA, and nssSO_42- levels in summer with lower values in January 1999 and 2001 (mean DMS, DMSO, MSA, and nssSO_42- values of 197, 3.2, 12, and 75 pptv, respectively) than in January 2000 and 2002 (mean values of 485, 12, 29, and 92 pptv, respectively). A similar interannual variability is depicted by the DMS oceanic content derived from SeaWIFS chlorophyll data of oceanic regions located between 50^o and 80^o S (100^o to 160^oE) (from 1 nM in January 1999 and 2001 to 2--3 nM in January 2000 and 2002). In winter DMS becomes the most abundant sulfur species (42 ± 30 pptv) compared to DMSO (˜1 pptv), MSA (˜0.3 pptv) and nssSO_42- (4 ± 1 pptv). These data allow us to discuss the night-time oxidation of DMS in winter in these regions.

  14. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  15. Ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry (IMS–MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    DOE PAGES

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; ...

    2016-07-25

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS–MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS–MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI–IMS–MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambientmore » field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS–MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS–MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS–MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS–MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of

  16. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect radiative effects of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yi; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2005-11-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmosphere general circulation model, with its new cloud scheme, is employed to study the indirect radiative effect of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol during the industrial period. The preindustrial and present-day monthly mean aerosol climatologies are generated from running the Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART) chemistry-transport model. The respective global annual mean sulfate burdens are 0.22 and 0.81 Tg S. Cloud droplet number concentrations are related to sulfate mass concentrations using an empirical relationship (Boucher and Lohmann, 1995). A distinction is made between "forcing" and flux change at the top of the atmosphere in this study. The simulations, performed with prescribed sea surface temperature, show that the first indirect "forcing" ("Twomey" effect) amounts to an annual mean of -1.5 W m-2, concentrated largely over the oceans in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The annual mean flux change owing to the response of the model to the first indirect effect is -1.4 W m-2, similar to the annual mean forcing. However, the model's response causes a rearrangement of cloud distribution as well as changes in longwave flux (smaller than solar flux changes). There is thus a differing geographical nature of the radiation field than for the forcing even though the global means are similar. The second indirect effect, which is necessarily an estimate made in terms of the model's response, amounts to -0.9 W m-2, but the statistical significance of the simulated geographical distribution of this effect is relatively low owing to the model's natural variability. Both the first and second effects are approximately linearly additive, giving rise to a combined annual mean flux change of -2.3 W m-2, with the NH responsible for 77% of the total flux change. Statistically significant model responses are obtained for the zonal mean total indirect effect in the entire NH and in the Southern Hemisphere low

  17. The impact of the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols on the subseasonal march of the East Asian subtropical summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongdong; Zhu, Bin; Jiang, Zhihong; Yang, Xiu-Qun; Zhu, Tong

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol emissions have rapidly increased in East Asia since the late 1970s. During the same period, the East Asian summer monsoon has shown a weakening trend. In this work, the direct effects (DE) of sulfate and black carbon (BC) aerosols on the subseasonal (pentad mean) march of the East Asian subtropical summer monsoon (EASSM) are investigated using an interactive global climate-chemistry model. The simulation results suggest that the DE of sulfate aerosols have a notable effect on the cooling of the low troposphere across the continent in spring and autumn, hence, changing the time of the seasonal transition of the zonal land-sea thermal contrast (ZTC). The DE of BC result in cooling of the low troposphere and heating of the middle troposphere, leading to a different impact than that caused by sulfates. The cooling of the surface and troposphere by sulfates leads to a delay in the warming of East Asian continent in spring and the EASSM onset time; it also accelerates the process of the continent turning colder and advances the retreat of the EASSM. The deeper heating in the middle-upper troposphere than the cooling in the low troposphere due to the DE of BC or the combination of both lead to an advance in the onset time of the monsoon caused by the continent turning warmer earlier in spring. In autumn, the same cooling effect by sulfates leads to the continent turning colder earlier, resulting in an advance in the retreat time.

  18. Evidence for anthropogenic impact on number concentration and sulfate content of cloud-processed aerosol particles over the North-Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dingenen, Rita; Raes, Frank; Jensen, Niels R.

    1995-10-01

    Aerosol properties were measured during two transects over the North Atlantic between Halifax (Nova Scotia, Canada) and the Moroccan coast. Measurements of the chemical composition of total aerosol, of the black carbon concentration and of the number size distributions with particle diameter Dp in the range 16 nm < Dp < 1 μm were made. The e-folding lifetime of the black carbon aerosol, coming from the northeast American continent and transported eastward over the ocean, was estimated to be 15 hours. The non-sea-salt (nss) fraction of the sulfate concentrations encountered during this campaign spans a 3 order of magnitude range (0.02 μm m-3 to 19 μm m-3) and shows a high correlation with black carbon. The measured bimodal aerosol size distributions were analysed in order to yield number concentrations of the nuclei and the accumulation mode (ACM), the latter being interpreted as cloud-processed particles and thus as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). A strong positive correlation was found between ACM number concentration and nss-sulfate load over the whole concentration range, i.e. for clean to polluted air masses. Furthermore, our regression between nss-sulfate and ACM number concentration also agrees well with results from other investigators where CCN or cloud droplet concentrations were related to nss-sulfate at a variety of geographical locations and degrees of pollution. The composite data set shows that the nss-sulfate-CCN relationship from baseline conditions to anthropogenically conditioned aerosol, happens via a smooth transition which can be described by a linear regression on a logarithmic scale.

  19. Hourly measurements of fine particulate sulfate and carbon aerosols at the Harvard-U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Supersite in Boston.

    PubMed

    Kang, Choong-Min; Koutrakis, Petros; Suh, Helen H

    2010-11-01

    Hourly concentrations of ambient fine particle sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols (elemental carbon [EC], organic carbon [OC], and black carbon [BC]) were measured at the Harvard-U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Supersite in Boston, MA, between January 2007 and October 2008. These hourly concentrations were compared with those made using integrated filter-based measurements over 6-day or 24-hr periods. For sulfate, the two measurement methods showed good agreement. Semicontinuous measurements of EC and OC also agreed (but not as well as for sulfate) with those obtained using 24-hr integrated filter-based and optical BC reference methods. During the study period, 24-hr PM2.5 (particulate matter [PM] < or = 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter) concentrations ranged from 1.4 to 37.6 microg/m3, with an average of 9.3 microg/m3. Sulfate as the equivalent of ammonium sulfate accounted for 39.1% of the PM2.5 mass, whereas EC and OC accounted for 4.2 and 35.2%, respectively. Hourly sulfate concentrations showed no distinct diurnal pattern, whereas hourly EC and BC concentrations peaked during the morning rush hour between 7:00 and 9:00 a.m. OC concentrations also exhibited nonpronounced, small peaks during the day, most likely related to traffic, secondary organic aerosol, and local sources, respectively.

  20. Properties of nitrate, sulfate and ammonium in typical polluted atmospheric aerosols (PM 10) in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Zhang; Yuesi, Wang; Tianxue, Wen; Yousef, Meslmani; Frank, Murray

    2007-03-01

    To gain an understanding of the characteristics of nitrate, sulfate and ammonium in the urban atmosphere of Beijing, an experiment was conducted in October 2004, using a method involving the rapid collection of particles and analysis using an ion chromatography system. The study shows that the mean concentration of water soluble ions (WSI) increased during heavily polluted weather, and this change in the concentration of pollutants was related to the meteorological background. The concentration of nitrate, sulfate and ammonium increased 7.9, 4.1 and 5.4 times, respectively, during heavily polluted periods. The concentration of nitrate increased most among the WSI in PM 10. The diurnal variations of nitrate, sulfate and ammonium in more polluted periods were different from those in less polluted periods. The highest concentration of nitrate (NO 3-), sulfate (SO 42-), and ammonium (NH 4+) appeared at 19:00 during more polluted periods. In contrast, the highest concentrations of these compounds occurred at noon during less polluted periods. A correlation analysis showed that NO 3-, SO 42-, NH 4+, nitrogen oxides (NO x) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) had significant positive correlations in more polluted periods. The transformation ratio from SO 2 and NO x to SO 42- and NO 3- was higher in more polluted than that in less polluted periods.

  1. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  2. Formation and Growth of Sulfate Aerosols in the Presence of Hydrocarbons: Results from the 2013 Summer Oil Sands FOSSILs Field Campaign, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, N.; Ghahremaninezhad, R.; Rempillo, O. T.; Norman, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur dioxide oxidation and the effect of oxidation products in formation and growth of aerosols have been studied widely. Despite this, significant gaps still exist in understanding the role of organic matter in SO2 oxidation. Organic molecules, such as Criegee radicals originating from biogenic sources, are expected to be important for SO2 oxidation in addition to organic molecules of anthropogenic origin. A study of SO2 and aerosol sulfate downwind of the oil sands region was conducted as part of the FOSSILS campaign in the summer of 2013 to better understand aerosol growth from SO2 oxidation in the presence of hydrocarbons and the distribution of sulfate in size-segregated aerosols. Hydrocarbons present in the atmosphere during the sampling campaign, collected using evacuated canisters, were characterized using a pre-concentration trap coupled to a GC-FID. The results from this campaign will be explored to determine SO2 oxidation pathways and the effects of oxidation products to aerosol formation and growth.

  3. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  4. The structure of sulfated polysaccharides ensures a carbohydrate-based mechanism for species recognition during sea urchin fertilization.

    PubMed

    Vilela-Silva, Ana-Cristina E S; Hirohashi, Noritaka; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of barriers to inter-specific hybridization is a crucial step in the fertilization of free spawning marine invertebrates. In sea urchins, molecular recognition between sperm and egg ensures species recognition. Here we review the sulfated polysaccharide-based mechanism of sperm-egg recognition in this model organism. The jelly surrounding sea urchin eggs is not a simple accessory structure; it is molecularly complex and intimately involved in gamete recognition. It contains sulfated polysaccharides, sialoglycans and peptides. The sulfated polysaccharides have unique structures, composed of repetitive units of alpha-L-fucose or alpha-L-galactose, which differ among species in the sulfation pattern and/or the position of the glycosidic linkage. The egg jelly sulfated polysaccharides show species-specificity in inducing the sperm acrosome reaction, which is regulated by the structure of the saccharide chain and its sulfation pattern. Other components of the egg jelly do not possess acrosome reaction inducing activity, but sialoglycans act in synergy with the sulfated polysaccharide, potentiating its activity. The system we describe establishes a new view of cell-cell interaction in the sea urchin model system. Here, structural changes in egg jelly polysaccharides modulate cell-cell recognition and species-specificity leading to exocytosis of the acrosome. Therefore, sulfated polysaccharides, in addition to their known functions as growth factors, coagulation factors and selectin binding partners, also function in fertilization. The differentiation of these molecules may play a role in sea urchin speciation.

  5. Formation of Secondary Particulate Matter by Reactions of Gas Phase Hexanal with Sulfate Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of secondary particulate matter from the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds can significantly contribute to the particulate burden, but the formation of organic secondary particulate matter is poorly understood. One way of producing organic secondary particulate matter is the oxidation of hydrocarbons with seven or more carbon atoms to get products with low vapor pressure. However, several recent reports suggest that relatively low molecular weight carbonyls can enter the particle phase by undergoing heterogeneous reactions. This may be a very important mechanism for the formation of organic secondary particulate matter. Atmospheric aldehydes are important carbonyls in the gas phase, which form via the oxidation of hydrocarbons emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this poster, we report the results on particle growth by the heterogeneous reactions of hexanal. A 5 L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is set up to conduct the reactions in the presence of seed aerosol particles of deliquesced ammonia bisulfate. Hexanal is added into CSTR by syringe pump, meanwhile the concentrations of hexanal are monitored with High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC 1050). A differential Mobility Analyzer (TSI 3071) set to an appropriate voltage is employed to obtain monodisperse aerosols, and another DMA associated with a Condensation Nuclear Counter (TSI 7610) is used to measure the secondary particle size distribution by the reaction in CSTR. This permits the sensitive determination of particle growth due to the heterogeneous reaction, very little growth occurs when hexanal added alone. Results for the simultaneous addition of hexanal and alcohols will also be presented.

  6. Biogenic emission of dimethylsulfide (DMS) from the North Yellow Sea, China and its contribution to sulfate in aerosol during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gui-Peng; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Su, Lu-Ping; Zhou, Li-Min

    Seawater, atmospheric dimethylsulfide (DMS) and aerosol compounds, potentially linked with DMS oxidation, such as methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO 42-) were determined in the North Yellow Sea, China during July-August, 2006. The concentrations of seawater and atmospheric DMS ranged from 2.01 to 11.79 nmol l -1 and from 1.68 to 8.26 nmol m -3, with average values of 6.20 nmol l -1 and 5.01 nmol m -3, respectively. Owing to the appreciable concentration gradient, DMS accumulated in the surface water was transferred into the atmosphere, leading to a net sea-to-air flux of 6.87 μmol m -2 d -1 during summer. In the surface seawater, high DMS values corresponded well with the concurrent increases in chlorophyll a levels and a significant correlation was observed between integrated DMS and chlorophyll a concentrations. In addition, the concentrations of MSA and nss-SO 42- measured in the aerosol samples ranged from 0.012 to 0.079 μg m -3 and from 3.82 to 11.72 μg m -3, with average values of 0.039 and 7.40 μg m -3, respectively. Based on the observed MSA, nss-SO 42- and their ratio, the relative biogenic sulfur contribution was estimated to range from 1.2% to 11.5%, implying the major contribution of anthropogenic source to sulfur budget in the study area.

  7. Uptake of Nitrate and Sulfate on Dust Aerosols during TRACE-P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol data collected near Asia on the DC-8 aircraft platform during TRACE-P has been examined for evidence of uptake of NO3(-) and SO4(-) on dust surfaces. Data is compared between a sector where dust was predominant and a sector where dust was less of an influence. Coincident with dust were higher mixing ratios of anthropogenic pollutants. HNO3, SO2, and CO were higher in the dust sector than the nondust sector by factors of 2.7, 6.2, and 1.5, respectively. The colocation of dust and pollution sources allowed for the uptake of NO3(-) and nss-SO4(-) on the coarse dust aerosols, increasing the mixing ratios of these particulates by factors of 5.7 and 2.6 on average. There was sufficient nss-SO4(-) to take up all of the NH4(+) present, with enough excess nss-SO4(-) to also react with dust CaCO3. This suggests that the enhanced NO3(-) was not in fine mode NH4NO3. Particulate NO3(-) (p-NO3(-)) constituted 54% of the total NO3(-), (t-NO3(-)) on average, reaching a maximum of 72% in the dust sector. In the nondust sector, p-NO3(-) contributed 37% to t-NO3(-), likely due to the abundance of sea salts there. In two other sectors where the influence of dust and sea salt were minimal, p-NO3(-), accounted for < 15% of t-NO3(-).

  8. In situ observations of aerosol and chlorine monoxide after the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo - Effect of reactions on sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Brock, C. A.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Baumgardner, D.; Dye, J. E.; Poole, L. R.; Woods, D. C.; Decoursey, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Highly resolved aerosol size distributions measured from high-altitude aircraft can be used to describe the effect of the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo on the stratospheric aerosol. In some air masses, aerosol mass mixing ratios increased by factors exceeding 100 and aerosol surface area concentrations increased by factors of 30 or more. Increases in aerosol surface area concentration were accompanied by increases in chlorine monoxide at mid-latitudes when confounding factors were controlled. This observation supports the assertion that reactions occurring on the aerosol can increase the fraction of stratospheric chlorine that occurs in ozone-destroying forms.

  9. Variations in the methanesulfonate to sulfate molar ratio in submicrometer marine aerosol particles over the south Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Timothy S.; Calhoun, Julie A.; Quinn, Patricia K.

    1992-01-01

    Seawater concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and atmospheric concentrations of DMS, sulfur dioxide, methanesulfonate (MSA), and non-sea-salt (nss) sulfate were measured over the eastern Pacific Ocean between 105 deg and 110 deg W from 20 deg N to 60 deg S during February and March 1989. Although the samples collected in the Southern Hemisphere appear to be of marine origin, no significant correlation was found between the latitudinal distributions of DMS, SO2, MSA, and nss SO4(2-). However, an inverse correlation was found between atmospheric temperature and the MSA to nss SO4(2-) molar ratio in submicrometer aerosol particles with a decrease in temperature corresponding to an increase in the molar ratio. Although this trend is consistent with laboratory results indicating the favored production of MSA at lower temperatures, it is contrary to Southern Hemisphere baseline station data. This suggests either a decrease in the supply of DMS relative to nonmarine sources of nss SO4(2-) at the baseline stations in winter or additional mechanisms that affect the relative production of MSA and nss SO4(2-).

  10. Heterogeneous Chemistry of HONO on Liquid Sulfuric Acid: A New Mechanism of Chlorine Activation on Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of nitrous acid (HONO) on liquid sulfuric acid (H2SO4) Was investigated at conditions that prevail in the stratosphere. The measured uptake coefficient (gamma) of HONO on H2SO4 increased with increasing acid content, ranging from 0.03 for 65 wt % to about 0.1 for 74 wt %. In the aqueous phase, HONO underwent irreversible reaction with H2SO4 to form nitrosylsulfuric acid (NO(+)HSO4(-). At temperatures below 230 K, NO(+)HSO4(-) was observed to be stable and accumulated in concentrated solutions (less than 70 wt % H2SO4) but was unstable and quickly regenerated HONO in dilute solutions (less than 70 wt %). HCl reacted with HONO dissolved in sulfuric acid, releasing gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). The reaction probability between HCl and HONO varied from 0.01 to 0.02 for 60-72 wt % H2SO4. In the stratosphere, ClNO photodissociates rapidly to yield atomic chlorine, which catalytically destroys ozone. Analysis of the laboratory data reveals that the reaction of HCl with HONO on sulfate aerosols can affect stratospheric ozone balance during elevated sulfuric acid loadings after volcanic eruptions or due to emissions from the projected high-speed civil transport (HSCT). The present results may have important implications on the assessment of environmental acceptability of HSCT.

  11. Balloon profiles of stratospheric NO2 and HNO3 for testing the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 on sulfate aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Allen, M.; Jaegle, L.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of stratospheric NO2, HNO3, HCl, and CH4 from 34 to 24 km were made in August 1992 from Palestine, Texas, using the Balloon-borne Laser In-Situ Sensor (BLISS) tunable diode laser spectrometer. Although the measurements of NO2, HNO3, and NO2/HNO3 agree well with gas-phase model calculations near 34 km where Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) 2 data show little sulfate aerosol, this is not true at the lower altitudes where SAGE 2 shows high aerosol loadings. At 24 km the BLISS NO2 and HNO3 measurements are 70% lower and 50% higher, respectively, than the gas phase model predictions, with a measured NO2/HNO3 ratio 5 times smaller. When the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 and ClONO2 on sulfate aerosol of surface area densities matching the SAGE 2 measurements is added to the model, good agreement with the BLISS measurements is found over the whole altitude range.

  12. Infrared spectroscopy of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, Th.; Sebald, H.

    2003-04-01

    In our large Aerosol Chamber at the FZ Jülich we apply HR FTIR absorption spectroscopy for the determination of trace gases. In the FTIR spectra we also observe broad absorptions of several 10 to a few 100 cm-1 widths that arise from species in the condensed aerosol phase: liquid H_2O, NO_3^-, SO_42-, HSO_4^-, or dicarboxylic acids. Moreover, the aerosol droplets caused extinctions over several 1000 cm-1 by IR scattering. This allows for in-situ observation of changes in the condensed aerosol phase e.g. on HNO_3 uptake, like the shift of the sulfate/bisulfate equilibrium or the growth by water condensation. The IR absorptions of the condensed aerosol phase provide useful extra information in process studies, if they can be quantified. Therefore the absorption cross section, respective, the absorption index which is the imaginary part of the complex refractive index is needed. We set up an aerosol flow tube in which IR spectroscopy on a 8 m light path and aerosol size distribution measurements in the range from 20 nm - 10 μm can be performed simultaneously. We measured sulfate aerosols at several relative humidities (dry, metastable, deliquescent). We will demonstrate an iterative procedure based on Mie calculations and Kramers Kronig transformation to retrieve the absorption index from the observed IR spectra and the corresponding size distribution (for dry ammonium sulfate). We will compare resulting absorption indices for aqueous sodium bisulfate aerosols at several relative humidties with thermodynamic model calculations for the Na^+/H^+/HSO_4^-/SO_42-/H_2O system.

  13. Simulations of Sulfate-Nitrate-Ammonium (SNA) aerosols during the extreme haze events over Northern China in 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dan; Liu, Zhiquan; Fast, Jerome D.; Ban, Junmei

    2016-08-30

    Extreme haze events have occurred frequently over China in recent years. Although many studies have investigated the formation mechanisms associated with PM2.5 for heavily polluted regions in China based on observational data, adequately predicting peak PM2.5 concentrations is still challenging for regional air quality models. In this study, we evaluate the performance of one configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and use the model to investigate the sensitivity of heterogeneous reactions on simulated peak sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium concentrations in the vicinity of Beijing during four extreme haze episodes in October 2014 over the North China Plain. The highest observed PM2.5 concentration of 469 μg m-3 occurred in Beijing. Comparisons with observations show that the model reproduced the temporal variability in PM2.5 with the highest PM2.5 values on polluted days (defined as days in which observed PM2.5 is greater than 75 μg m-3), but predictions of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium were too low on days with the highest observed concentrations. Observational data indicate that the sulfur/nitric oxidation rates are strongly correlated with relative humidity during periods of peak PM2.5; however, the model failed to reproduce the highest PM2.5 concentrations due to missing heterogeneous reactions. As the parameterizations of those reactions is not well established yet, estimates of SO2-to-H2SO4 and NO2/NO3-to-HNO3 reaction rates that depend on relative humidity were applied which improved the simulation of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium enhancement on polluted days in terms of both concentrations and partitioning among those species. Sensitivity simulations showed that the extremely high heterogeneous reaction rates and also higher emission rates than those reported in the emission inventory

  14. Simulations of sulfate-nitrate-ammonium (SNA) aerosols during the extreme haze events over northern China in October 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dan; Liu, Zhiquan; Fast, Jerome; Ban, Junmei

    2016-08-01

    Extreme haze events have occurred frequently over China in recent years. Although many studies have investigated the formation mechanisms associated with PM2.5 for heavily polluted regions in China based on observational data, adequately predicting peak PM2.5 concentrations is still challenging for regional air quality models. In this study, we evaluate the performance of one configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and use the model to investigate the sensitivity of heterogeneous reactions on simulated peak sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium concentrations in the vicinity of Beijing during four extreme haze episodes in October 2014 over the North China Plain. The highest observed PM2.5 concentration of 469 µg m-3 occurred in Beijing. Comparisons with observations show that the model reproduced the temporal variability in PM2.5 with the highest PM2.5 values on polluted days (defined as days in which observed PM2.5 is greater than 75 µg m-3), but predictions of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium were too low on days with the highest observed concentrations. Observational data indicate that the sulfur/nitric oxidation rates are strongly correlated with relative humidity during periods of peak PM2.5; however, the model failed to reproduce the highest PM2.5 concentrations due to missing heterogeneous/aqueous reactions. As the parameterizations of those heterogeneous reactions are not well established yet, estimates of SO2-to-H2SO4 and NO2/NO3-to-HNO3 reaction rates that depend on relative humidity were applied, which improved the simulation of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium enhancement on polluted days in terms of both concentrations and partitioning among those species. Sensitivity simulations showed that the extremely high heterogeneous reaction rates and also higher emission rates than those reported in the emission inventory were likely important factors contributing to those peak PM2.5 concentrations.

  15. Determination of aerosol ammonium using an aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delia, A. E.; Toohey, D. W.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2003-04-01

    The chemical composition of fine aerosols is a significant issue both because it influences the chemical and radiative properties of the aerosols, which in turn impact the regional and global climate and human health, and because it is difficult to measure accurately. The Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) developed by Aerodyne Research measures both chemical composition and aerodynamic size of submicron aerosols quantitatively. However, the measurement of aerosol ammonium is more difficult than that of the other major inorganic species, nitrate and sulfate, because of interferences in the mass spectrum from air and water. This presentation will describe the successful procedure developed for dealing with these interferences and accurately determining the ammonium mass. In addition, the application of this procedure to aerosols from a range of ambient conditions will be demonstrated using data from several field studies.

  16. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  17. Four dimensional variational data assimilation of species-resolved satellite-retrieved aerosol optical thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieradzik, Lars Peter; Elbern, Hendrik

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols play an increasingly important role in atmospheric modelling. They have a strong influence on the radiative transfer balance and a significant impact on human health. Their origin is various and so are its effects. Most of the measurement sites in Europe only account for an integrated aerosol load PMx (Particulate Matter of less than x μm in diameter) which does not give any qualitative information on the composition of the aerosol. Since very different constituents like mineral dust derived from desert storms and sea salt contribute to PMx it is necessary to make aerosol forcasts not only of load, but also type resolved. The source of information chosen for this study is the aerosol retrieval system SYNAER (SYNergetic AErosol Retrieval) from DLR-DFD that retrieves BLAOT (Boundary Layer Aerosol Optical Thickness) making use of both AATSR/SCIAMACHY and AVHRR/GOME-2 data respectively. Its strengths are a large spatial coverage, near real-time availability, and the classification of five intrinsic aerosol species, namely water-solubles, water-insolubles, soot, sea salt, and mineral dust which are furthermore size resolved in terms of modes. A widely known technique to enhance forecast skills of CTMs (Chemistry-Transport-Models) by ingesting in-situ and, especially, remote-sensing measurements is the method of four dimensional variational data assimilation (4Dvar). The EURAD-IM (EURopean Air pollution Dispersion - Inverse Model), containing a full adjoint gas-phase model, has been expanded with an adjoint of the MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe) to optimise initial and boundary values for aerosols using 4Dvar. A forward and an adjoint radiative transfer model is driven by the EURAD-IM as mapping between BLAOT and internal aerosol species. Furthermore, its condensation scheme has been bypassed by an HDMR (High-Dimensional-Model-Representation) to ensure differentiability, and a time saving online NMC-module for the generation of the background

  18. Global three-dimensional simulation and radiative forcing of various aerosol species with GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Toshihiko; Okamoto, Hajime; Numaguti, Atusi; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Higurashi, Akiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2001-02-01

    A global three-dimensional transport model that can simultaneously treat main tropospheric aerosols, i.e., carbonaceous (organic and black carbons), sulfate, soil dust, and sea salt, is developed. It is coupled with a Center for Climate System Research (CCSR)/National Institute for Enviormental Studies (NIES) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), and the meteorological field of wind, temperature, and specific humidity can be nudged by reanalysis data. Simulated results are compared with not only observations for aerosol concentrations but also the optical thickness and Angstrom exponent retrieved from remote sensing data such as National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). A general agreement is found between simulated results and observations spatially seasonally, and quantitatively. The present model is also coupled with the radiative process over both the solar and thermal regions. The annual and global mean radiative forcing by anthropogenic aerosols from fossil fuel sources is estimated to be -0.5 W m-2 over the clear sky for the direct effect and -2.0 W m-2 for the indirect effect.

  19. Real-time measurements of ammonia, acidic trace gases and water-soluble inorganic aerosol species at a rural site in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebs, I.; Meixner, F. X.; Slanina, J.; Otjes, R.; Jongejan, P.; Andreae, M. O.

    2004-06-01

    We measured the mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO2 and the corresponding water-soluble inorganic aerosol species, ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), chloride (Cl- and sulfate (SO42-), and their diel and seasonal variations at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin (Rondônia, Brazil). This study was conducted within the framework of LBA-SMOCC (Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was performed from 12 September to 14 November 2002, extending from the dry season (extensive biomass burning activity), through the transition period to the wet season (background conditions). Measurements were made continuously using a wet-annular denuder (WAD) in combination with a Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) followed by suitable on-line analysis. A detailed description and verification of the inlet system for simultaneous sampling of soluble gases and aerosol compounds is presented. Overall measurement uncertainties of the ambient mixing ratios usually remained below 15%. The limit of detection (LOD) was determined for each single data point measured during the field experiment. Median LOD values (3σ-definition) were ≤0.015ppb for acidic trace gases and aerosol anions and ≤0.118ppb for NH3 and aerosol NH4+. Mixing ratios of acidic trace gases remained below 1ppb throughout the measurement period, while NH3 levels were an order of magnitude higher. Accordingly, mixing ratios of NH4+ exceeded those of other inorganic aerosol contributors by a factor of 4 to 10. During the wet season, mixing ratios decreased by nearly a factor of 3 for all compounds compared to those observed when intensive biomass burning took place. Additionally, N-containing gas and aerosol species featured pronounced diel variations. This is attributed to strong relative

  20. Reactions of SIV species with organic compounds: formation mechanisms of organo-sulfur derivatives in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passananti, Monica; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; George, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have an important impact on climate, air quality and human health. However the chemical reactions involved in their formation and growth are not fully understood or well-constrained in climate models. It is well known that inorganic sulfur (mainly in oxidation states (+IV) and (+VI)) plays a key role in aerosol formation, for instance sulfuric acid is known to be a good nucleating gas. In addition, acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic compounds has shown to produce new particles, with a clear enhancement in the presence of ozone (Iinuma 2013). Organosulfates have been detected in tropospheric particles and aqueous phases, which suggests they are products of secondary organic aerosol formation process (Tolocka 2012). Originally, the production of organosulfates was explained by the esterification reaction of alcohols, but this reaction in atmosphere is kinetically negligible. Other formation pathways have been suggested such as hydrolysis of peroxides and reaction of organic matter with sulfite and sulfate radical anions (SO3-, SO4-) (Nozière 2010), but it remains unclear if these can completely explain atmospheric organo-sulfur aerosol loading. To better understand the formation of organo-sulfur compounds, we started to investigate the reactivity of SIV species (SO2 and SO32-) with respect to specific functional groups (organic acids and double bonds) on atmospherically relevant carboxylic acids and alkenes. The experiments were carried out in the homogeneous aqueous phase and at the solid-gas interface. A custom built coated-wall flow tube reactor was developed to control relativity humidity, SO2 concentration, temperature and gas flow rate. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction kinetics were measured and resulting products were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with an orbitrap mass spectrometer (LC-HR-MS). The experiments were performed with and without the presence of ozone in order to evaluate any

  1. Effect of nitrate and sulfate relative abundance in PM2.5 on liquid water content explored through half-hourly observations of inorganic soluble aerosols at a polluted receptor site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Griffith, Stephen M.; Yu, Xin; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2014-12-01

    Liquid water content (LWC) is the amount of liquid water on aerosols. It contributes to visibility degradation, provides a surface for gas condensation, and acts as a medium for heterogeneous gas/particle reactions. In this study, 520 half-hourly measurements of ionic chemical composition in PM2.5 at a receptor site in Hong Kong are used to investigate the dependence of LWC on ionic chemical composition, particularly on the relative abundance of sulfate and nitrate. LWC was estimated using a thermodynamic model (AIM-III). Within this data set of PM2.5 ionic compositions, LWC was highly correlated with the multivariate combination of sulfate and nitrate concentrations and RH (R2 = 0.90). The empirical linear regression result indicates that LWC is more sensitive to nitrate mass than sulfate. During a nitrate episode, the highest LWC (80.6 ± 17.9 μg m-3) was observed and the level was 70% higher than that during a sulfate episode despite a similar ionic PM2.5 mass concentration. A series of sensitivity tests were conducted to study LWC change as a function of the relative nitrate and sulfate abundance, the trend of which is expected to shift to more nitrate in China as a result of SO2 reduction and increase in NOx emission. Starting from a base case that uses the average of measured PM2.5 ionic chemical composition (63% SO42-, 11% NO3-, 19% NH4+, and 7% other ions) and an ionic equivalence ratio, [NH4+]/(2[SO42-] + [NO3-]), set constant to 0.72, the results show LWC would increase by 204% at RH = 40% when 50% of the SO42- is replaced by NO3- mass concentration. This is largely due to inhibition of (NH4)3H(SO4)2 crystallization while PM2.5 ionic species persist in the aqueous phase. At RH = 90%, LWC would increase by 12% when 50% of the SO42- is replaced by NO3- mass concentration. The results of this study highlight the important implications to aerosol chemistry and visibility degradation associated with LWC as a result of a shift in PM2.5 ionic chemical

  2. Role of sea ice and hemispheric circulation mode on sulphur oxidised compounds (Methanesulfonate and Sulfate) in the Artic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becagli, Silvia; Calzolai, Giulia; Dayan, Uri; Di Biagio, Claudia; di Sarra, Alcide; Frosini, Daniele; Mazzola, Mauro; Rugi, Francesco; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Vitale, Vito; Udisti, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    The recent decline in sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean is expected to affect the regional radiation budget and to influence the ocean-atmosphere exchange of dimethylsulfide (DMS), thus the amount of biogenic aerosols formed from its atmospheric oxidation, such as methanesulfonate (MS-) and non-sea salt sulphate (nssSO42-). This study examines the temporal evolution of atmospheric MS- and nssSO42-, as measured in atmospheric aerosols, at Ny-Ålesund, (78.9°N, 11.9°E, Svalbard islands) and Thule (76.5°N, 68.8°W, Greenland) during three years (2010-12). Aerosol sampling was carried out using a PM10 sampler with Teflon filters, and a 12-stage impactor (SDI, Small Deposit-area Impactor) with polycarbonate filters. Analyses were performed by ion chromatography, for ion composition, and ICP-SFMS, for selected metals; both techniques are sufficiently sensitive, accurate, and reproducible to be applied to very low atmospheric load of aerosol particles, typical of remote polar regions. The evolution of MS- and nssSO4 concentrations was analysed as a function of speciation (as acidic species or ammonium salt), size distribution, and airmass pathways. This study reveals that nssSO4 is meanly associated with long range transport from anthropic sources, and presents a relative maximum in spring. Conversely, MS- arises from natural local sources and shows a peak in mid-summer. A large interannual variability is observed in MS- concentration with values in spring-summer 2010 in both the stations higher than in the other summers. In the previous winter a larger sea ice extent and larger sea ice melting surface in the following spring were observed. Arrigo et al. (2008) have observed a 22% increase in the annual primary productivity, that has been attributed to a longer phytoplankton growing season connected with the progressive decline in sea ice coverage in the Arctic over the past decade. Modeling results (Gabric et al., 2005) suggest that an increase in DMS production would

  3. Aerosol optical depths and their contributing sources in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Chan, K. L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a quantitative investigation of the contributions of different aerosols to the aerosol optical depths (AODs) in Taiwan using a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and remote sensing measurements. The study focus is on the period from June 2012 to October 2013. Five different types of aerosols are investigated: sea salt, dust, sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon. Three of these aerosols, namely sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon, have significant anthropogenic sources. Model simulation results were compared with both ground based sun photometer measurements and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The model data shows good agreement with satellite observations (R = 0.72) and moderate correlation with sun photometer measurements (R = 0.52). Simulation results show the anthropogenic aerosols contribute ∼65% to the total AOD in Taipei, while natural originated aerosols only show a minor impact (∼35%). Among all the aerosols, sulfate is the dominating species, contributing 62.4% to the annual average total AOD. Organic carbon and black carbons respectively contribute 7.3% and 1.5% to the annual averaged total AOD. The annual average contributions of sea salt and dust aerosols to the total AOD are 26.4% and 2.4%, respectively. A sensitivity study was performed to identify the contributions of anthropogenic aerosol sources in each region to the AODs in Taipei. North-East Asia was identified as the major contributing source region of anthropogenic aerosols to Taipei, accounting for more than 50% of total sulfate, 32% of total organic carbon and 51% of total black carbon aerosols. South-East Asia is the second largest contributing source region, contributing 35%, 24% and 34% of total sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon aerosols, respectively. The aerosols from continents other than Asia only show minor impacts to the aerosol load in Taipei. In addition, a case study of a biomass

  4. Local and remote impacts of aerosol species on Indian summer monsoon rainfall in a GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Turner, Andrew; Highwood, Eleanor

    2016-04-01

    The HadGEM2 AGCM is used to determine the most important anthropogenic aerosols in the Indian monsoon using experiments in which observed trends in individual aerosol species are imposed. Sulphur dioxide (SD) emissions are shown to impact rainfall more strongly than black carbon (BC) aerosols, causing reduced rainfall especially over northern India. Significant perturbations due to BC are not noted until its emissions are scaled up in a sensitivity test, in which rainfall increases over northern India as a result of the Elevated Heat Pump mechanism, enhancing convection during the pre-monsoon and bringing forward the monsoon onset. Secondly, the impact of anthropogenic aerosols is compared to that of increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations and observed sea-surface temperature (SST) warming. The tropospheric temperature gradient driving the monsoon shows weakening when forced by either SD or imposed SST trends. However the observed SST trend is dominated by warming in the deep tropics; when the component of SST trend related to aerosol emissions is removed, further warming is found in the extratropical northern hemisphere that tends to offset monsoon weakening. This suggests caution is needed when using SST forcing as a proxy for greenhouse warming. Finally, aerosol emissions are decomposed into those from the Indian region and those elsewhere, in pairs of experiments with SD and BC. Both local and remote aerosol emissions are found to lead to rainfall changes over India; for SD, remote aerosols contribute around 75% of the rainfall decrease over India, while for BC the remote forcing is even more dominant.

  5. Effects of salbutamol aerosol combined with magnesium sulfate on T-lymphocyte subgroup and Th1/Th2 cytokines of pediatric asthma

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Min; Min, Jie; Guo, Fei; Zhang, Chong-Lin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of the intravenous infusion of salbutamol aerosol combined with magnesium sulfate in the treatment of pediatric asthma and the subsequent effects on the levels of T-lymphocyte subgroups and Th1/Th2 cytokines. A total of 86 patients with pediatric asthma, first diagnosed and treated at the Xuzhou Children's Hospital, were continuously selected and randomly divided into an observation group of 44 cases and control group of 42 cases. The patients in the control group were treated with budesonide atomization inhalation, while the children in the observation group were treated with intravenous infusion of salbutamol aerosol combined with magnesium sulfate. The therapeutic effects in the groups were compared. After treatment, the levels of serum CD3+ and CD8+ decreased when compared to before treatment; the levels of CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ also increased, but the observation group had more significant improvement. Differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). After treatment, the levels of serum interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) increased when compared to before, while levels of IL-4 and IL-6 decreased, and the observation group had more significant improvement. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). After treatment, the levels of VT, t-PTEF/t-E, MTIF/MTEF and TEF75/PTEF increased when compared to before; the observation group had more significant improvement. The differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The effective rate and degree of treatment for the observation group were significantly higher than those of the control group and differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The intravenous infusion of salbutamol aerosol combined with magnesium sulfate in the treatment of pediatric asthma can significantly improve therapeutic effects and lung functions, improve immune functions and relieve inflammatory reactions. Therefore, it indicates better clinical application and

  6. Present and potential future contributions of sulfate, black and organic carbon aerosols from China to global air quality, premature mortality and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikawa, E.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Liu, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols are harmful to human health and have both direct and indirect effects on climate. China is a major contributor to global emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a sulfate (SO42-) precursor, organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) aerosols. Although increasingly examined, the effect of present and potential future levels of these emissions on global premature mortality and climate change has not been well quantified. Through both direct and indirect effects, SO42- and OC exert negative radiative forcing (cooling) while BC exerts positive forcing (warming). We analyze the effect of China's emissions of SO2, SO42-, OC and BC in 2000 and for three emission scenarios in 2030 on global surface aerosol concentrations, premature mortality, and radiative forcing. Using global models of chemical transport (MOZART-2) and radiative transfer (GFDL RTM), and combining simulation results with gridded population data, mortality rates, and concentration-response relationships from the epidemiological literature, we estimate the contribution of Chinese aerosols to global annual premature mortality and to radiative forcing in 2000 and 2030. In 2000, we estimate these aerosols cause 385,320 premature deaths in China and an additional 18 240 globally. In 2030, aggressive emission controls lead to a reduction in premature deaths to 200,370 in China and 7,740 elsewhere, while under a high emissions scenario premature deaths would increase to 602,950 in China and to 29,750 elsewhere. Because the negative radiative forcing from SO42- and OC is larger than the positive forcing from BC, the Chinese aerosols lead to global net direct radiative forcing of -74 mW m-2 in 2000 and between -15 and -97 mW m-2 in 2030 based on the emissions scenario. Our analysis suggests that environmental policies that simultaneously improve public health and mitigate climate change would be highly beneficial (eg. reductions in BC emissions).

  7. Real-time measurements of ammonia, acidic trace gases and water-soluble inorganic aerosol species at a rural site in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebs, I.; Meixner, F. X.; Slanina, J.; Otjes, R.; Jongejan, P.; Andreae, M. O.

    2004-02-01

    We measured the mixing ratios of ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and the corresponding water-soluble inorganic aerosol species, ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), chloride (Cl-) and sulfate (SO42-), and their diel and seasonal variations at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin (Rondônia, Brazil). This study was conducted within the framework of LBA-SMOCC (Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate). Sampling was performed from 12 September to 14 November 2002, extending from the dry season (extensive biomass burning activity), through the transition period to the wet season (background conditions). Measurements were made continuously using a wet-annular denuder in combination with a Steam-Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) followed by suitable on-line analysis. A detailed description and verification of the inlet system for simultaneous sampling of soluble gases and aerosol compounds is presented. Overall measurement uncertainties of the ambient mixing ratios usually remained below 15%. The limit of detection (LOD) was determined for each single data point measured during the field experiment. Median LOD values (3σ-definition) were ≤0.015 ppb for acidic trace gases and aerosol anions and ≤0.118 ppb for NH3 and aerosol NH4+. Mixing ratios of acidic trace gases remained below 1ppb throughout the measurement period, while NH3 levels were an order of magnitude higher. Accordingly, mixing ratios of NH4+ exceeded those of other inorganic aerosol contributors by a factor of 4 to 10. During the wet season, mixing ratios decreased by nearly a factor of 3 for all compounds compared to those observed when intensive biomass burning took place. Additionally, N-containing gas and aerosol species featured pronounced diel variations. This is attributed to strong relative humidity and temperature variations between day and night as well as to

  8. Detection of cw-related species in complex aerosol particles deposited on surfaces with an ion trap-based aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, William A; Reilly, Pete; Whitten, William B

    2007-01-01

    A new type of aerosol mass spectrometer was developed by minimal modification of an existing commercial ion trap to analyze the semivolatile components of aerosols in real time. An aerodynamic lens-based inlet system created a well-collimated particle beam that impacted into the heated ionization volume of the commercial ion trap mass spectrometer. The semivolatile components of the aerosols were thermally vaporized and ionized by electron impact or chemical ionization in the source. The nascent ions were extracted and injected into the ion trap for mass analysis. The utility of this instrument was demonstrated by identifying semivolatile analytes in complex aerosols. This study is part of an ongoing effort to develop methods for identifying chemical species related to CW agent exposure. Our efforts focused on detection of CW-related species doped on omnipresent aerosols such as house dust particles vacuumed from various surfaces found in any office building. The doped aerosols were sampled directly into the inlet of our mass spectrometer from the vacuumed particle stream. The semivolatile analytes were deposited on house dust and identified by positive ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry up to 2.5 h after deposition. Our results suggest that the observed semivolatile species may have been chemisorbed on some of the particle surfaces in submonolayer concentrations and may remain hours after deposition. This research suggests that identification of trace CW agent-related species should be feasible by this technique.

  9. Formation of calcium sulfate through the aggregation of sub-3 nanometre primary species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawski, Tomasz M.; van Driessche, Alexander E. S.; Ossorio, Mercedes; Diego Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan; Besselink, Rogier; Benning, Liane G.

    2016-04-01

    The formation pathways of gypsum remain uncertain. Here, using truly in situ and fast time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering, we quantify the four-stage solution-based nucleation and growth of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), an important mineral phase on Earth and Mars. The reaction starts through the fast formation of well-defined, primary species of <3 nm in length (stage I), followed in stage II by their arrangement into domains. The variations in volume fractions and electron densities suggest that these fast forming primary species contain Ca-SO4-cores that self-assemble in stage III into large aggregates. Within the aggregates these well-defined primary species start to grow (stage IV), and fully crystalize into gypsum through a structural rearrangement. Our results allow for a quantitative understanding of how natural calcium sulfate deposits may form on Earth and how a terrestrially unstable phase-like bassanite can persist at low-water activities currently dominating the surface of Mars.

  10. Formation of calcium sulfate through the aggregation of sub-3 nanometre primary species

    PubMed Central

    Stawski, Tomasz M.; van Driessche, Alexander E.S.; Ossorio, Mercedes; Diego Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan; Besselink, Rogier; Benning, Liane G.

    2016-01-01

    The formation pathways of gypsum remain uncertain. Here, using truly in situ and fast time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering, we quantify the four-stage solution-based nucleation and growth of gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), an important mineral phase on Earth and Mars. The reaction starts through the fast formation of well-defined, primary species of <3 nm in length (stage I), followed in stage II by their arrangement into domains. The variations in volume fractions and electron densities suggest that these fast forming primary species contain Ca–SO4-cores that self-assemble in stage III into large aggregates. Within the aggregates these well-defined primary species start to grow (stage IV), and fully crystalize into gypsum through a structural rearrangement. Our results allow for a quantitative understanding of how natural calcium sulfate deposits may form on Earth and how a terrestrially unstable phase-like bassanite can persist at low-water activities currently dominating the surface of Mars. PMID:27034256

  11. Rare Isotope Insights into Supereruptions: Rare Sulfur and Triple Oxygen Isotope Geochemistry of Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols Absorbed on Volcanic Ash Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindeman, I. N.; Eiler, J.; Wing, B.; Farquhar, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present analyses of stable isotopic ratios of 17O/16O, 18O/16O, 34S/32S, and 33S/32S, 36S/32S of sulfate leached from volcanic ash of a series of well-known volcanic eruptions. This list covers much of the diversity of sizes and the character of volcanic eruptions. Particular emphasis is paid to the Lava Creek Tuff of Yellowstone and we present wide geographic sample coverage for this unit. This global dataset spans a significant range in δ34S, δ18O, and Δ17O of sulfate (29, 30 and 3.3 permil respectively) with oxygen isotopes recording mass-independent fractionation and sulfur isotopes exhibiting mass-dependent behavior. These ranges are defined by the isotopic compositions of products of large caldera forming eruptions. Proximal ignimbrites and coarse ash typically do not contain sulfate. The presence of sulfate with Δ17O > 0.2 permil is characteristic of small distal ash particles, suggesting that sulfate aerosols were scavenged after they underwent atmospheric photochemical reactions. Additionally, sediments that embed ash layers either do not contain sulfate or contain minor sulfate with Δ17O near 0 permil, suggesting that the observed sulfate in ash is of volcanic origin. Mass-dependent sulfur isotopic compositions suggest that sulfate-forming reactions did not involve photolysis of SO2, unlike the situation inferred for some pre-2.3 Ga sulfates or hypothesized to occur during the formation of sulfate associated with plinian eruptions that pierce the ozone layer. However, sulfate in the products of caldera-forming eruptions display a large δ34S range and fractionation relationships that do not follow equilibrium slopes of 0.515 and 1.90 for 33S/32S vs. 34S/32S and 36S/32S vs. 34S/32S, respectively. This implies that the sulfur isotopic characteristics of these sulfates were not set by a single stage, high-temperature equilibrium process in the volcanic plum. The data presented here are consistent with a single stage kinetic fractionation of sulfur

  12. Modeling of photolysis rates over Europe: impact on chemical gaseous species and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, E.; Sartelet, K.

    2011-02-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of photolysis rate calculation on simulated European air composition and air quality. In particular, the impact of the cloud parametrisation and the impact of aerosols on photolysis rates are analysed. Photolysis rates are simulated using the Fast-JX photolysis scheme and gas and aerosol concentrations over Europe are simulated with the regional chemistry-transport model Polair3D of the Polyphemus platform. The photolysis scheme is first used to update the clear-sky tabulation of photolysis rates used in the previous Polair3D version. Important differences in photolysis rates are simulated, mainly due to updated cross-sections and quantum yields in the Fast-JX scheme. In the previous Polair3D version, clouds were taken into account by multiplying the clear-sky photolysis rates by a correction factor. In the new version, clouds are taken into account more accurately by simulating them directly in the photolysis scheme. Differences in photolysis rates inside clouds can be large but outside clouds, and especially at the ground, differences are small. To take into account the impact of aerosols on photolysis rates, Polair3D and Fast-JX are coupled. Photolysis rates are updated every hour. Large impact on photolysis rates is observed at the ground, decreasing with altitude. The aerosol specie that impact the most photolysis rates is dust especially in south Europe. Strong impact is also observed over anthropogenic emission regions (Paris, The Po and the Ruhr Valley) where mainly nitrate and sulphate reduce the incoming radiation. Differences in photolysis rates lead to changes in gas concentrations, with the largest impact simulated on OH and NO concentrations. At the ground, monthly mean concentrations of both species are reduced over Europe by around 10 to 14% and their tropospheric burden by around 10%. The decrease in OH leads to an increase of the life-time of several species such as VOC. NO2 concentrations are not strongly impacted

  13. A pulsed electron beam synthesis of PEDOT conducting polymers by using sulfate radicals as oxidizing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletta, Cecilia; Cui, Zhenpeng; Dazzi, Alexandre; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Néron, Stéphane; Marignier, Jean-Louis; Remita, Samy

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an original radiolytic method, based on pulsed electron beam irradiation, is used for the synthesis of conducting PEDOT in an aqueous solution containing EDOT monomers in the presence of potassium persulfate, K2S2O8, at 0 °C. At this low temperature, EDOT monomers are not chemically oxidized by S2O82- anions, initiating PEDOT polymerization, but are rather oxidized by sulfate radicals, SO4•-, which are radiolytically generated by the reaction of solvated electrons, produced by water radiolysis, with persulfate anions. Successfully, as demonstrated by UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, irradiating the aqueous solution, by using a series of accumulated electron pulses, enables complete EDOT oxidation and quantitative in situ PEDOT polymerization through a step-by-step oxidation mechanism. The morphology of PEDOT polymers, mixed with unreacted K2S2O8 salt, is characterized by Cryo-TEM microscopy in aqueous solution and by SEM after deposition. Successfully, in the absence of any washing step, high resolution AFM microscopy, coupled with infrared nanospectroscopy, is used to discriminate between the organic polymers and the inorganic salt and to probe the local chemical composition of PEDOT nanostructures. The results demonstrate that PEDOT polymers form globular self-assembled nanostructures which preferentially adsorb onto unreacted K2S2O8 solid nanoplates. The present results first demonstrate the efficiency of sulfate radicals as oxidizing species for the preparation of nanostructured PEDOT polymers and second highlight the promising potentiality of electron accelerators in the field of conducting polymers synthesis.

  14. Aerosol-halogen interaction: Change of physico-chemical properties of SOA by naturally released halogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, J.; Balzer, N.; Buxmann, J.; Grothe, H.; Krüger, H.; Platt, U.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species are released by various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol or salt pans and salt lakes. These heterogeneous release mechanisms have been overlooked so far, although their potential of interaction with organic aerosols like Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA), Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) or Atmospheric Humic LIke Substances (HULIS) is completely unknown. Such reactions can constitute sources of gaseous organo-halogen compounds or halogenated organic particles in the atmospheric boundary layer. To study the interaction of organic aerosols with reactive halogen species (RHS), SOA was produced from α-pinene, catechol and guaiacol using an aerosol smog-chamber. The model SOAs were characterized in detail using a variety of physico-chemical methods (Ofner et al., 2011). Those aerosols were exposed to molecular halogens in the presence of UV/VIS irradiation and to halogens, released from simulated natural halogen sources like salt pans, in order to study the complex aerosol-halogen interaction. The heterogeneous reaction of RHS with those model aerosols leads to different gaseous species like CO2, CO and small reactive/toxic molecules like phosgene (COCl2). Hydrogen containing groups on the aerosol particles are destroyed to form HCl or HBr, and a significant formation of C-Br bonds could be verified in the particle phase. Carbonyl containing functional groups of the aerosol are strongly affected by the halogenation process. While changes of functional groups and gaseous species were visible using FTIR spectroscopy, optical properties were studied using Diffuse Reflectance UV/VIS spectroscopy. Overall, the optical properties of the processed organic aerosols are significantly changed. While chlorine causes a "bleaching" of the aerosol particles, bromine shifts the maximum of UV/VIS absorption to the red end of the UV/VIS spectrum. Further physico-chemical changes were recognized according to the aerosol size-distributions or the

  15. Present and potential future contributions of sulfate, black and organic carbon aerosols from China to global air quality, premature mortality and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikawa, Eri; Naik, Vaishali; Horowitz, Larry W.; Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.

    Aerosols are harmful to human health and have both direct and indirect effects on climate. China is a major contributor to global emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO 2), a sulfate (SO 42-) precursor, organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) aerosols. Although increasingly examined, the effect of present and potential future levels of these emissions on global premature mortality and climate change has not been well quantified. Through both direct radiative effects and indirect effects on clouds, SO 42- and OC exert negative radiative forcing (cooling) while BC exerts positive forcing (warming). We analyze the effect of China's emissions of SO 2, SO 42-, OC and BC in 2000 and for three emission scenarios in 2030 on global surface aerosol concentrations, premature mortality, and radiative forcing (RF). Using global models of chemical transport (MOZART-2) and radiative transfer (GFDL RTM), and combining simulation results with gridded population data, mortality rates, and concentration-response relationships from the epidemiological literature, we estimate the contribution of Chinese aerosols to global annual premature mortality and to RF in 2000 and 2030. In 2000, we estimate these aerosols cause approximately 470 000 premature deaths in China and an additional 30 000 deaths globally. In 2030, aggressive emission controls lead to a 50% reduction in premature deaths from the 2000 level to 240 000 in China and 10 000 elsewhere, while under a high emissions scenario premature deaths increase 50% from the 2000 level to 720 000 in China and to 40 000 elsewhere. Because the negative RF from SO 42- and OC is larger than the positive forcing from BC, Chinese aerosols lead to global net direct RF of -74 mW m -2 in 2000 and between -15 and -97 mW m -2 in 2030 depending on the emissions scenario. Our analysis indicates that increased effort to reduce greenhouse gases is essential to address climate change as China's anticipated reduction of aerosols will result in the

  16. Longwave radiative forcing by aqueous aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been focused on the role of aerosols in climatic change because of their potential cooling impacts due to light scattering. Recent advances in infrared spectroscopy using cylindrical internal reflectance have allowed the longwave absorption of dissolved aerosol species and the associated liquid water to be accurately determined and evaluated. Experimental measurements using these techniques have shown that dissolved sulfate, nitrate, and numerous other aerosol species will act to cause greenhouse effects. Preliminary calculations indicate that the longwave climate forcing (i.e., heating) for sulfate aerosol will be comparable in magnitude to the cooling effect produced by light scattering. However, more detailed modeling will clearly be needed to address the impact of the longwave forcing due to aerosols as a function of atmospheric height and composition. Their work has shown that aerosol composition will be important in determining longwave forcing, while shortwave forcing will be more related to the physical size of the aerosol droplets. On the basis of these studies, it is increasingly apparent that aerosols, fogs, and clouds play a key role in determining the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in controlling regional and global climates.

  17. Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile Aerosol and Trace-Species Emissions (EXCAVATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. E.; Branham, H.-S.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Miller, T. M.; Viggiano, A. A.; Blake, D. R.; Boudries, H.; Canagaratna, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile and Trace Species Emissions (EXCAVATE) was conducted at Langley Research Center (LaRC) in January 2002 and focused upon assaying the production of aerosols and aerosol precursors by a modern commercial aircraft, the Langley B757, during ground-based operation. Remaining uncertainty in the postcombustion fate of jet fuel sulfur contaminants, the need for data to test new theories of particle formation and growth within engine exhaust plumes, and the need for observations to develop air quality models for predicting pollution levels in airport terminal areas were the primary factors motivating the experiment. NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) and the Ultra Effect Engine Technology (UEET) Program sponsored the experiment which had the specific objectives of determining ion densities; the fraction of fuel S converted from S(IV) to S(VI); the concentration and speciation of volatile aerosols and black carbon; and gas-phase concentrations of long-chain hydrocarbon and PAH species, all as functions of engine power, fuel composition, and plume age.

  18. Species-dependent variation in sensitivity of Microcystis species to copper sulfate: implication in algal toxicity of copper and controls of blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haiming; Wei, Gaojie; Tan, Xiao; Li, Lin; Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Copper sulfate is a frequently used reagent for Microcystis blooms control but almost all the previous works have used Microcystis aeruginosa as the target organism to determine dosages. The aim of this study was to evaluate interspecific differences in the responses of various Microcystis species to varying Cu2+ concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.25, and 0.50 mg L‑1). The half maximal effective concentration values for M. aeruginosa, M. wesenbergii, M. flos-aquae, and M. viridis were 0.16, 0.09, 0.49, and 0.45 mg L‑1 Cu2+, respectively. This showed a species-dependent variation in the sensitivity of Microcystis species to copper sulfate. Malonaldehyde content did not decrease with increasing superoxide dismutase content induced by increasing Cu2+, suggesting that superoxide dismutase failed to reduce Cu2+ damage in Microcystis. Considering the risk of microcystin release when Microcystis membranes are destroyed as a result of Cu2+ treatment and the stimulation effects of a low level of Cu2+ on growth in various species, our results suggest that copper sulfate treatment for Microcystis control could be applied before midsummer when M. aeruginosa and M. viridis are not the dominant species and actual amount of Cu2+ used to control M. wesenbergii should be much greater than 0.10 mg L‑1.

  19. Species-dependent variation in sensitivity of Microcystis species to copper sulfate: implication in algal toxicity of copper and controls of blooms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiming; Wei, Gaojie; Tan, Xiao; Li, Lin; Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Copper sulfate is a frequently used reagent for Microcystis blooms control but almost all the previous works have used Microcystis aeruginosa as the target organism to determine dosages. The aim of this study was to evaluate interspecific differences in the responses of various Microcystis species to varying Cu2+ concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.25, and 0.50 mg L−1). The half maximal effective concentration values for M. aeruginosa, M. wesenbergii, M. flos-aquae, and M. viridis were 0.16, 0.09, 0.49, and 0.45 mg L−1 Cu2+, respectively. This showed a species-dependent variation in the sensitivity of Microcystis species to copper sulfate. Malonaldehyde content did not decrease with increasing superoxide dismutase content induced by increasing Cu2+, suggesting that superoxide dismutase failed to reduce Cu2+ damage in Microcystis. Considering the risk of microcystin release when Microcystis membranes are destroyed as a result of Cu2+ treatment and the stimulation effects of a low level of Cu2+ on growth in various species, our results suggest that copper sulfate treatment for Microcystis control could be applied before midsummer when M. aeruginosa and M. viridis are not the dominant species and actual amount of Cu2+ used to control M. wesenbergii should be much greater than 0.10 mg L−1. PMID:28079177

  20. Thermodynamic characterization of Mexico City aerosol during MILAGRO 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Sullivan, A.; Weber, R.; Vanreken, T.; Fischer, M.; Matías, E.; Moya, M.; Farmer, D.; Cohen, R. C.

    2007-06-01

    Fast measurements of aerosol and gas-phase constituents coupled with the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model are used to study the partitioning of semivolatile inorganic species and phase state of Mexico City aerosol sampled at the T1 site during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign. Overall, predicted semivolatile partitioning agrees well with measurements. PM2.5 is insensitive to changes in ammonia but is to acidic semivolatile species. Semi-volatile partitioning equilibrates on a timescale between 6 and 20 min. When the aerosol sulfate-to-nitrate molar ratio is less than 1, predictions improve substantially if the aerosol is assumed to follow the deliquescent phase diagram. Treating crustal species as "equivalent sodium" (rather than explicitly) in the thermodynamic equilibrium calculations introduces important biases in predicted aerosol water uptake, nitrate and ammonium; neglecting crustals further increases errors dramatically. This suggests that explicitly considering crustals in the thermodynamic calculations are required to accurately predict the partitioning and phase state of aerosols.

  1. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-04-01

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 ..mu..m were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO/sub 2/ laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m/sup 2//g at 1087 cm/sup -1/. The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10/sup -8/ cm/sup -1/. The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations.

  2. Potential for Sulfate Reduction in Mangrove Forest Soils: Comparison between Two Dominant Species of the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Melike; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2016-01-01

    Avicennia and Rhizophora are globally occurring mangrove genera with different traits that place them in different parts of the intertidal zone. It is generally accepted that the oxidizing capacity of Avicennia roots is larger than that of Rhizophora roots, which initiates more reduced conditions in the soil below the latter genus. We hypothesize that the more reduced conditions beneath Rhizophora stands lead to more active sulfate-reducing microbial communities compared to Avicennia stands. To test this hypothesis, we measured sulfate reduction traits in soil samples collected from neighboring Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle stands at three different locations in southern Florida. The traits measured were sulfate reduction rates (SRR) in flow-through reactors containing undisturbed soil layers in the absence and presence of easily degradable carbon compounds, copy numbers of the dsrB gene, which is specific for sulfate-reducing microorganisms, and numbers of sulfate-reducing cells that are able to grow in liquid medium on a mixture of acetate, propionate and lactate as electron donors. At the tidal locations Port of the Islands and South Hutchinson Islands, steady state SRR, dsrB gene copy numbers and numbers of culturable cells were higher at the A. germinans than at the R. mangle stands, although not significantly for the numbers at Port of the Islands. At the non-tidal location North Hutchinson Island, results are mixed with respect to these sulfate reduction traits. At all locations, the fraction of culturable cells were significantly higher at the R. mangle than at the A. germinans stands. The dynamics of the initial SRR implied a more in situ active sulfate-reducing community at the intertidal R. mangle stands. It was concluded that in agreement with our hypothesis R. mangle stands accommodate a more active sulfate-reducing community than A. germinans stands, but only at the tidal locations. The differences between R. mangle and A. germinans stands

  3. Theoretical estimation of equilibrium sulfur isotope fractionations among aqueous sulfite species: Implications for isotope models of microbial sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldridge, D. L.; Farquhar, J.; Guo, W.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfite (sensu lato), an intermediate in a variety sulfur redox processes, plays a particularly important role in microbial sulfate reduction. It exists intracellularly as multiple species between sets of enzymatic reactions that transform sulfate to sulfide, with the exact speciation depending on pH, T, and ionic strength. However, the complex speciation of sulfite is ignored in current isotope partitioning models of microbial sulfate reduction and simplified solely to the pyramidal SO32- (sulfite sensu stricto), due to a lack of appropriate constraints. We theoretically estimated the equilibrium sulfur isotope fractionations (33S/32S, 34S/32S, 36S/32S) among all documented sulfite species in aqueous solution, including sulfite (SO32-), bisulfite isomers and dimers ((HS)O3-, (HO)SO2-, S2O52-), and SO2(aq), through first principles quantum mechanical calculations. The calculations were performed at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level using cluster models with 30-40 water molecules surrounding the solute. Our calculated equilibrium fractionation factors compare well to the available experimental constraints and suggest that the minor and often-ignored tetrahedral (HS)O3- isomer of bisulfite strongly influences isotope partitioning behavior in the sulfite system under most environmentally relevant conditions, particularly fractionation magnitudes and unusual temperature dependence. For example, we predict that sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfite and bulk bisulfite in solution should have an apparent inverse temperature dependence due to the influence of (HS)O3- and its increased stability at higher temperatures. Our findings highlight the need to appropriately account for speciation/isomerization of sulfur species in sulfur isotope studies. We will also present similar calculation results of other aqueous sulfur compounds (e.g., H2S/HS-, SO42-, S2O32-, S3O62-, and poorly documented SO22- species), and discuss the implication of our results for microbial sulfate

  4. Iron Sulfides and Sulfur Species Produced at (001) Hematite Surfaces in the Presence of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Andrew L.; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Dohnalkova, Alice; McCready, David E.; Peyton, Brent M.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2001-01-01

    In the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) hematite (a-Fe2O3) dissolution is affected and hydrogen sulfide, the product of sulfate reduction is released. As a consequence, ferrous ions are free to react with excess H2S to form insoluble iron sulfides. X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate binding energies consistent with the iron sulfides having a pyrrhotite structure (Fe2p3/2 708.4 eV; S2p3/2 161.5 eV). Other sulfur species identified at the surface include sulfate, sulfite and polysulfides. X-ray diffraction suggests an unidentifiable crystal structure at the hematite surface develops within 3 months, HRTEM confirms the presence of a hexagonal structure again suggesting the formation of pyrrhotite. The identification of pyrrhotite is inconsistent with previous reports in which mackinawite and greigite were products of biological sulfate reduction (Rickard 1969; Herbert et al 1998). The apparent differences in stoiciometries may be related to the availability of Fe2+(aq.) at the mineral surface through respiratory iron reduction by subsurface bacteria. The significance of pyrrhotite and polysulfide production in relation to the S- and Fe-cycles and to trace metal bioavailability is discussed.

  5. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  6. Measurements of trace gas species and aerosols at three Siberian stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Davydov, Denis K.; Kozlov, Artem V.; Ivlev, Georgii A.; Pestunov, Dmitrii A.; Tolmachev, Gennadii N.; Fofonov, Alexander V.

    2014-05-01

    Siberia is of great importance to understand the climate change due to it covers about 10% of Earth's land surface and it has the largest area to be studied under the Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX). In the overview done by Kulmala et al. (2011) authors arrived at a conclusion that continuous and comprehensive measurements of GHGs and aerosols over Siberia are still lacking. Understanding the importance of this problem, in recent years the Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS established several monitoring stations for continuous measurements of aerosol and trace gas species to fill up this gap. In this paper we present some results of continuous measurements of trace gas species and aerosols carried out at three stations located in West Siberia. The first one is a so-called TOR-station located in the scientific campus of Tomsk (56° 28'41"N, 85° 03'15"E), the second one is the Base Experimental Complex (BEC, 56° 28'49"N, 85° 06'08"E) - in the eastern suburbs of Tomsk, and the third one is Fonovaya Observatory (56° 25'07"N, 84° 04'27"E) - in a rural area 60 km west of Tomsk. All equipment of the stations is fully automated and can be monitored via Internet. Gas analyzers are hourly calibrated against standard gas mixtures, micro-flux gas sources, or gas generators, depending on the instrument type and the gas to be detected. Aerosol measurements carried out continuously from March 2010 enabled a frequency and seasonal dependency of the new particle formation (NPF) events to be revealed. NPF events in Siberia are more often observed during spring (from March to May) and early autumn (secondary frequency peak in September). On average, NPF evens took place on 23-28 % of all days. This work was funded by Presidium of RAS (Program No. 4), Brunch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5), Interdisciplinary integration projects of Siberian Branch of RAS (No. 35, No. 70, No. 131), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants No 14

  7. Statistical analysis of aerosol species, trace gasses, and meteorology in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Binaku, Katrina; O'Brien, Timothy; Schmeling, Martina; Fosco, Tinamarie

    2013-09-01

    Both canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to atmospheric aerosol and trace gas concentrations and meteorological data collected in Chicago during the summer months of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Concentrations of ammonium, calcium, nitrate, sulfate, and oxalate particulate matter, as well as, meteorological parameters temperature, wind speed, wind direction, and humidity were subjected to CCA and PCA. Ozone and nitrogen oxide mixing ratios were also included in the data set. The purpose of statistical analysis was to determine the extent of existing linear relationship(s), or lack thereof, between meteorological parameters and pollutant concentrations in addition to reducing dimensionality of the original data to determine sources of pollutants. In CCA, the first three canonical variate pairs derived were statistically significant at the 0.05 level. Canonical correlation between the first canonical variate pair was 0.821, while correlations of the second and third canonical variate pairs were 0.562 and 0.461, respectively. The first canonical variate pair indicated that increasing temperatures resulted in high ozone mixing ratios, while the second canonical variate pair showed wind speed and humidity's influence on local ammonium concentrations. No new information was uncovered in the third variate pair. Canonical loadings were also interpreted for information regarding relationships between data sets. Four principal components (PCs), expressing 77.0 % of original data variance, were derived in PCA. Interpretation of PCs suggested significant production and/or transport of secondary aerosols in the region (PC1). Furthermore, photochemical production of ozone and wind speed's influence on pollutants were expressed (PC2) along with overall measure of local meteorology (PC3). In summary, CCA and PCA results combined were successful in uncovering linear relationships between meteorology and air pollutants in Chicago and

  8. Coupled Aerosol-Chemistry-Climate Twentieth-Century Transient Model Investigation: Trends in Short-Lived Species and Climate Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Dorothy; Bauer, Susanne E.; Del Genio, Anthony; Faluvegi, Greg; McConnell, Joseph R.; Menon, Surabi; Miller, Ronald L.; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Shindell, Drew

    2011-01-01

    The authors simulate transient twentieth-century climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, with aerosol and ozone chemistry fully coupled to one another and to climate including a full dynamic ocean. Aerosols include sulfate, black carbon (BC), organic carbon, nitrate, sea salt, and dust. Direct and BC snow-albedo radiative effects are included. Model BC and sulfur trends agree fairly well with records from Greenland and European ice cores and with sulfur deposition in North America; however, the model underestimates the sulfur decline at the end of the century in Greenland. Global BC effects peak early in the century (1940s); afterward the BC effects decrease at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere but continue to increase at lower latitudes. The largest increase in aerosol optical depth occurs in the middle of the century (1940s-80s) when sulfate forcing peaks and causes global dimming. After this, aerosols decrease in eastern North America and northern Eurasia leading to regional positive forcing changes and brightening. These surface forcing changes have the correct trend but are too weak. Over the century, the net aerosol direct effect is -0.41 Watts per square meter, the BC-albedo effect is -0.02 Watts per square meter, and the net ozone forcing is +0.24 Watts per square meter. The model polar stratospheric ozone depletion develops, beginning in the 1970s. Concurrently, the sea salt load and negative radiative flux increase over the oceans around Antarctica. Net warming over the century is modeled fairly well; however, the model fails to capture the dynamics of the observedmidcentury cooling followed by the late century warming.Over the century, 20% of Arctic warming and snow ice cover loss is attributed to the BC albedo effect. However, the decrease in this effect at the end of the century contributes to Arctic cooling. To test the climate responses to sulfate and BC pollution, two experiments were branched from 1970 that removed

  9. Determination of the passing efficiency for aerosol chemical species through a typical aircraft-mounted, diffuser-type aerosol inlet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.; Norton, Richard B.

    1998-04-01

    To assess the particle transmission efficiency of a conventional aircraft-mounted, diffuser-type inlet (CI), a new design inlet containing an internal filter basket assembly (aerosol filter inlet, or AFI) was constructed. All interior surfaces of the AFI were covered with filter material, and air was actively pulled through these filter walls during aerosol sampling. The AFI was demonstrated in the laboratory to trap nearly all particles entering its nozzle orifice, so it was considered usable as a baseline to judge the performance of other inlets. Wind tunnel studies were conducted at three different wind velocities that approximated typical research aircraft speeds. As wind velocity increased, particle transmission through the CI relative to the AFI decreased, as evidenced by chemical analysis of the filter deposits. Aircraft studies of the two inlets showed that particle transmission varied significantly with the measured species. Typical coarse-particle species such as Ca++, Mg++, Na+ and K+ showed 50-90% mass losses through a conventional diffuser-type inlet/curved intake tube system. Predominantly fine particle species such as SO4= and NH4+ passed the CI system with much higher efficiencies, with aerosol mass losses of 0-26% for most flights. Since the AFI traps nearly all particles aspirated into its nozzle orifice, these values indicate that on average, 80-90% of the SO4= and NH4+ aerosol mass passes through the CI and curved intake tube during airborne sampling. This finding suggests that the capability to sample fine (i.e., submicrometer) aerosols from aircraft is perhaps not as bad as has been previously reported, given that adequate attention is paid to inlet design, location, and orientation issues.

  10. Ecophysiological Evidence that Achromatium oxaliferum Is Responsible for the Oxidation of Reduced Sulfur Species to Sulfate in a Freshwater Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Gray, N. D.; Pickup, R. W.; Jones, J. G.; Head, I. M.

    1997-01-01

    Achromatium oxaliferum is a large, morphologically conspicuous, sediment-dwelling bacterium. The organism has yet to be cultured in the laboratory, and very little is known about its physiology. The presence of intracellular inclusions of calcite and sulfur have given rise to speculation that the bacterium is involved in the carbon and sulfur cycles in the sediments where it is found. Depth profiles of oxygen concentration and A. oxaliferum cell numbers in a freshwater sediment revealed that the A. oxaliferum population spanned the oxic-anoxic boundary in the top 3 to 4 cm of sediments. Some of the A. oxaliferum cells resided at depths where no oxygen was detectable, suggesting that these cells may be capable of anaerobic metabolism. The distributions of solid-phase and dissolved inorganic sulfur species in the sediment revealed that A. oxaliferum was most abundant where sulfur cycling was most intense. The sediment was characterized by low concentrations of free sulfide. However, a comparison of sulfate reduction rates in sediment cores incubated with either oxic or anoxic overlying water indicated that the oxidative and reductive components of the sulfur cycle were tightly coupled in the A. oxaliferum-bearing sediment. A positive correlation between pore water sulfate concentration and A. oxaliferum numbers was observed in field data collected over an 18-month period, suggesting a possible link between A. oxaliferum numbers and the oxidation of reduced sulfur species to sulfate. The field data were supported by laboratory incubation experiments in which sodium molybdate-treated sediment cores were augmented with highly purified suspensions of A. oxaliferum cells. Under oxic conditions, rates of sulfate production in the presence of sodium molybdate were found to correlate strongly with the number of cells added to sediment cores, providing further evidence for a role for A. oxaliferum in the oxidation of reduced sulfur. PMID:16535604

  11. Aerosol species concentrations and source apportionment of ammonia at Rocky Mountain National Park.

    PubMed

    Malm, William C; Schichtel, Bret A; Barna, Michael G; Gebhart, Kristi A; Rodriguez, Marco A; Collett, Jeffrey L; Carrico, Christian M; Benedict, Katherine B; Prenni, Anthony J; Kreidenweis, Sonia M

    2013-11-01

    Changes in ecosystem function at Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) are occurring because of emissions of nitrogen and sulfate species along the Front Range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, as well as sources farther east and west. The nitrogen compounds include both oxidized and reduced nitrogen. A year-long monitoring program of various oxidized and reduced nitrogen species was initiated to better understand their origins as well as the complex chemistry occurring during transport from source to receptor. Specifically the goals of the study were to characterize the atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen species in gaseous, particulate, and aqueous phases (precipitation and clouds) along the east and west sides of the Continental Divide; identify the relative contributions to atmospheric nitrogen species in RMNP from within and outside of the state of Colorado; identify the relative contributions to atmospheric nitrogen species in RMNP from emission sources along the Colorado Front Range versus other areas within Colorado; and identify the relative contributions to atmospheric nitrogen species from mobile sources, agricultural activities, and large and small point sources within the state of Colorado. Measured ammonia concentrations are combined with modeled releases of conservative tracers from ammonia source regions around the United States to apportion ammonia to its respective sources, using receptor modeling tools.

  12. Global modeling of nitrate and ammonium aerosols using EQSAM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, particles suspending in air, are important as they affect human health, air quality, and visibility as well as climate. Sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and sodium are among the most important inorganic aerosol species in the atmosphere. These compounds are hygroscopic and absorb water under almost all ambient environmental conditions. The uptake of water alters the aerosol size, and causes water to become the constituent with the largest atmospheric aerosol mass, especially when the aerosols grow into fog, haze or clouds. Furthermore, several global model studies have demonstrated that rapid increases in nitrogen emissions could produce enough nitrate in aerosols to offset the expected decline in sulfate forcing by 2100 for the extreme IPCC A2 scenario (Bauer et al., 2007). Although nitrate and ammonium were identified as significant anthropogenic sources of aerosols by a number of modeling studies, most global aerosol models still exclude ammonium-nitrate when the direct aerosol forcing is studied. In this study, the computationally efficient equilibrium model, EQSAM3, is incorporated into the UMICH-IMPACT-nitrate model using the hybrid dynamical solution method (Feng and Penner, 2007). The partitioning of nitrate and ammonium along with the corresponding water uptake is evaluated by comparing the model to the EQUISOLVE II method used in Feng and Penner (2007). The model is also evaluated by comparison with the AERONET data base and satellite-based aerosol optical depths.

  13. A TEST OF THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM MODELS AND 3-D AIR QUALITY MODELS FOR PREDICTIONS OF AEROSOL NO3-

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inorganic species of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium constitute a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols. The behavior of nitrate is one of the most intriguing aspects of inorganic atmospheric aerosols because particulate nitrate concentrations depend not only on the amount of ...

  14. Water-soluble ions species of size-resolved aerosols: Implications for the atmospheric acidity in São Paulo megacity, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira-Filho, Marcelo; Pedrotti, Jairo J.; Fornaro, Adalgiza

    2016-11-01

    Over the last decade, an increase of ammonium salts in atmospheric deposition has been reported worldwide, especially in megacities. The present study aims to give a better comprehension analysis about particulate matter acidity in São Paulo megacity (MASP), Brazil. Size-resolved aerosols were sampled in MASP, during 2012 winter, showing a bimodal mass concentration distribution, with sulfate concentration exceeding 3.40 μg m- 3, which accounted for over 25% of PM0.56 mass. Regarding the relative distribution of ionic species, 90% of NH4+ levels, were restricted to smaller than 1 μm diameter range. The average neutralization index for PM < 1 μm was 0.62, which indicated an ammonia-limiting atmosphere due to partial neutralization of atmospheric acids. Particles of the accumulation mode presented more acid behavior than other aerosol fractions, with pH value as low as 4.15 in PM0.56. The total neutralization index registered the lowest value for PM0.56, but it did not respond promptly to aerosol variations as the E-AIM model predictions. The highest discrepancies between the acidity proxies occurred in the smaller fractions of particulate matter, especially in the after-filter (AF) stage (diameter < 0.020 μm). In addition, AF stage had the highest contribution to PM total mass, about 14% for all the stages analyzed. Such contribution indicates that acidity in ultrafine particles are still mixed for the MASP and need further investigation.

  15. Dimethyl Sulfide Emissions from Dairies and Agriculture as a Potential Contributor to Sulfate Aerosols in the California Central Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebel, E.; Marrero, J. E.; Bertram, T. H.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Whole air samples have been collected throughout Southern California during the previous five years of the NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP). During a flight over the Salton Sea in 2014, higher concentrations of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a known marine emitted gas, were observed over neighboring agricultural land than over the sea itself. A comparison of DMS to methyl iodide, another known marine emitted gas, showed minimal correlation, revealing that DMS was being emitted from local sources. Ground samples at the Salton Sea verified that the DMS was not transported from the Pacific Ocean. Previous SARP studies have shown that DMS is emitted from dairies. The enhancements in ethanol (another dairy tracer) and DMS in several airborne samples collected south of the Salton Sea suggest dairy emissions of the observed DMS. DMS is a compound of interest because its oxidation can form cloud condensation nuclei. Based on data from all six SARP flights between 2009-2014, we propose that dairy and farming emissions of DMS in the San Joaquin Valley may be impacting aerosol loading in this region. A simple model that takes into account the particulate matter mass loadings was used to calculate the percent contribution of DMS to aerosol formation for the San Joaquin Valley.

  16. Absorbing aerosols over Asia: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2008-11-01

    Forcing by absorbing atmospheric black carbon (BC) tends to heat the atmosphere, cool the surface, and reduce the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes. BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates and the hydrologic cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain concerning the increases in (1) the total amount of all aerosol species and (2) the amount of aerosol absorption that may have occurred over the 1950-1990 period. Focusing on south and east Asia, the sensitivity of a general circulation model's climate response (with prescribed sea surface temperatures and aerosol distributions) to such changes is investigated by considering a range of both aerosol absorption and aerosol extinction optical depth increases. We include direct and semidirect aerosol effects only. Precipitation changes are less sensitive to changes in aerosol absorption optical depth at lower aerosol loadings. At higher-extinction optical depths, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of absorbing aerosols and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation in northwestern India. In contrast, the presence of increases in only scattering aerosols weakens the monsoonal circulation and inhibits precipitation here. Cloud amount changes can enhance or counteract surface solar flux reduction depending on the aerosol loading and absorption, with the changes also influencing the surface temperature and the surface energy balance. The results have implications for aerosol reduction strategies in the future that seek to mitigate air pollution concerns. At higher optical depths, if absorbing aerosol is present, reduction of scattering aerosol alone has a reduced effect on precipitation changes, implying that reductions in BC aerosols should be undertaken at the same time as reductions in sulfate aerosols.

  17. Measurement of acidic aerosol species in eastern Europe: implications for air pollution epidemiology.

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, M; Dumyahn, T S; Spengler, J D; Gutschmidt, K; Heinrich, J; Wichmann, H E

    1995-01-01

    A large number of studies have indicated associations between particulate air pollution and adverse health outcomes. Wintertime air pollution in particular has been associated with increased mortality. Identification of causal constituents of inhalable particulate matter has been elusive, although one candidate has been the acidity of the aerosol. Here we report measurements of acidic aerosol species made for approximately 1.5 years in Erfurt, Germany, and Sokolov, Czech Republic. In both locations, the burning of high-sulfur coal is the primary source of ambient air pollution. Twenty-four-hour average measurements were made for PM10, [particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter (da) < or = 10 microns], as well as fine particle (da < 2.5 microns) H+ and SO4(2-) for the entire study. Additionally, separate day and night measurements of fine particle H+, SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ and the gases, SO2, HNO3, HONO, and NH3 were collected with an annular denuder/filter pack system over a 7-month (late winter-summer) period with additional measurements during pollution episodes the following winter. At both sites, 24-hr SO2 (mean concentrations of 52 micrograms/m3, with peak levels of > 585 micrograms/m3) and PM10 (mean concentration 60 micrograms m3) concentrations were quite high. However, aerosol SO4(2-) concentrations (mean concentration of approximately 10 micrograms/m3) were not as great as expected given the high SO2 concentrations, and acidity was very low (mean concentration of < 1 microgram/m3, with peak levels of only 7 micrograms/m3). Low acidity is likely to be the result of NH3 neutralization and slow conversion of SO2 to SO4(2-).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7656878

  18. Iron sulfides and sulfur species produced at hematite surfaces in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Andrew L.; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Dohnalkova, Alice; McCready, David; Peyton, Brent M.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2001-01-01

    In the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria ( Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) hematite (α-Fe 2O 3) dissolution is affected potentially by a combination of enzymatic (hydrogenase) reduction and hydrogen sulfide oxidation. As a consequence, ferrous ions are free to react with excess H 2S to form insoluble ferrous sulfides. X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate binding energies similar to ferrous sulfides having pyrrhotite-like structures (Fe2 p3/2 708.4 eV; S2 p3/2 161.5 eV). Other sulfur species identified at the surface include sulfate, sulfite and polysulfides. Thin film X-ray diffraction identifies a limited number of peaks, the principal one of which may be assigned to the hexagonal pyrrhotite (102) peak (d = 2.09 Å; 2θ = 43.22°), at the hematite surface within 3 months exposure to sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy identifies the presence of a hexagonal structure associated with observed crystallites. Although none of the analytical techniques employed provide unequivocal evidence as to the nature of the ferrous sulfide formed in the presence of SRB at hematite surfaces, we conclude from the available evidence that a pyrrhotite stiochiometry and structure is the best description of the sulfides we observe. Such ferrous sulfide production is inconsistent with previous reports in which mackinawite and greigite were products of biological sulfate reduction (Rickard 1969a; Herbert et al., 1998; Benning et al., 1999). The apparent differences in stoichiometry may be related to sulfide activity at the mineral surface, controlled in part by H 2S autooxidation in the presence of iron oxides. Due to the relative stability of pyrrhotite at low temperatures, ferrous sulfide dissolution is likely to be reduced compared to the more commonly observed products of SRB activity. Additionally, biogenic pyrrhotite formation will also have implications for geomagnetic field behavior of sediments.

  19. Background error covariance with balance constraints for aerosol species and applications in variational data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Zengliang; Hao, Zilong; Li, Yi; Pan, Xiaobin; You, Wei; Li, Zhijin; Chen, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Balance constraints are important for background error covariance (BEC) in data assimilation to spread information between different variables and produce balance analysis fields. Using statistical regression, we develop a balance constraint for the BEC of aerosol variables and apply it to a three-dimensional variational data assimilation system in the WRF/Chem model; 1-month forecasts from the WRF/Chem model are employed for BEC statistics. The cross-correlations between the different species are generally high. The largest correlation occurs between elemental carbon and organic carbon with as large as 0.9. After using the balance constraints, the correlations between the unbalanced variables reduce to less than 0.2. A set of data assimilation and forecasting experiments is performed. In these experiments, surface PM2.5 concentrations and speciated concentrations along aircraft flight tracks are assimilated. The analysis increments with the balance constraints show spatial distributions more complex than those without the balance constraints, which is a consequence of the spreading of observation information across variables due to the balance constraints. The forecast skills with the balance constraints show substantial and durable improvements from the 2nd hour to the 16th hour compared with the forecast skills without the balance constraints. The results suggest that the developed balance constraints are important for the aerosol assimilation and forecasting.

  20. Secondary Aerosol: Precursors and Formation Mechanisms. Technical Report on Grant

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein-Lloyd, Judith B

    2009-05-04

    This project focused on studying trace gases that participate in chemical reactions that form atmospheric aerosols. Ammonium sulfate is a major constituent of these tiny particles, and one important pathway to sulfate formation is oxidation of dissolved sulfur dioxide by hydrogen peroxide in cloud, fog and rainwater. Sulfate aerosols influence the number and size of cloud droplets, and since these factors determine cloud radiative properties, sulfate aerosols also influence climate. Peroxide measurements, in conjunction with those of other gaseous species, can used to distinguish the contribution of in-cloud reaction to new sulfate aerosol formation from gas-phase nucleation reactions. This will lead to more reliable global climate models. We constructed and tested a new 4-channel fluorescence detector for airborne detection of peroxides. We integrated the instrument on the G-1 in January, 2006 and took a test flight in anticipation of the MAX-Mex field program, where we planned to fly under pressurized conditions for the first time. We participated in the 2006 Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) - Megacity Aerosol EXperiment Mexico City (MAX-Mex) field measurement campaign. Peroxide instrumentation was deployed on the DOE G-1 research aircraft based in Veracruz, and at the surface site at Tecamac University.

  1. Microcalorimetric studies of the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria: comparison of the growth parameters of some Desulfovibrio species.

    PubMed Central

    Traore, A S; Hatchikian, C E; Le Gall, J; Belaich, J P

    1982-01-01

    We performed a comparative study of the growth energetics of some species of Desulfovibrio by measuring microcalorimetric and molar growth yield values. Lactate and pyruvate were used as energy sources for sulfate reduction. On lactate-sulfate media Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway, Desulfovibrio gigas, and Desulfovibrio africanus exhibited molar growth yields of 4.1 +/- 0.6, 3.7 +/- 1.7, and 1.8 +/- 0.1 g/mol, respectively, whereas on pyruvate-sulfate media the molar growth yields were higher (8.5 +/- 0.8, 7.7 +/- 1.6, and 3.5 +/- 0.5 g/mol, respectively). Thus, we found that D. africanus was the least efficient species in converting energy into cell material. The uncoupling of energy in this strain was obvious since its catabolic activities were high compared with those of the two other strains. The enthalpy changes associated with lactate and pyruvate metabolism were -49 +/- 0.7 and -70.2 +/- 6.0 jK/mol, respectively, for D. desulfuricans, -76.6 +/- 1.8 and -91.2 +/- 1.1 kJ/mol, respectively, for D. gigas, and -78.8 +/- 7.2 and -88.0 +/- 6.2 kJ/mol, respectively, for D. africanus. D. gigas and D. africanus produced only acetate, CO2 and hydrogen sulfide as metabolic end products. In addition to these normal end products, D. desulfuricans Norway produced a small amount of butanol. This butanol production was interpreted as reflecting a regulatory system of electron flow during the catabolism of both substrates. Such metabolism was comparable to that reported for D. vulgaris, which lost part of the reducing power of its energy sources through hydrogen evolution. PMID:7056697

  2. Glucosamine sulfate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glucosamine Sulphate KCl, Glucosamine-6-Phosphate, GS, Mono-Sulfated Saccharide, Poly-(1->3)-N-Acetyl-2-Amino- ... Sulfate de Glucosamine, Sulfate de Glucosamine 2KCl, SG, Sulfated Monosaccharide, Sulfated Saccharide, Sulfato de Glucosamina. Glucosamine Hydrochloride ...

  3. Anthropogenic Aerosols in Asia, Radiative Forcing, and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Bollasina, M. A.; Ming, Y.; Ocko, I.; Persad, G.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols arising as a result of human-induced emissions in Asia form a key 'driver' in causing pollution and in the forcing of anthropogenic climate change. The manner of the forced climate change is sensitive to the scattering and absorption properties of the aerosols and the aerosol-cloud microphysical interactions. Using the NOAA/ GFDL global climate models and observations from multiple platforms, we investigate the radiative perturbations due to the 20th Century sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resultant impacts on surface temperature, tropical precipitation, Indian monsoon, hemispheric circulation, and atmospheric and oceanic heat transports. The influence of the aerosol species has many contrasts with that due to the anthropogenic well-mixed greenhouse gas emissions e.g., the asymmetry in the hemispheric climate response, but is subject to larger uncertainties. The aerosol forcing expected in the future indicates a significant control on the 21st Century anthropogenic climate change in Asia.

  4. Sensitivity of scattering and absorbing aerosol direct radiative forcing to physical climate factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Ilissa B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul; Ming, Yi; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2012-10-01

    The direct radiative forcing of the climate system includes effects due to scattering and absorbing aerosols. This study explores how important physical climate characteristics contribute to the magnitudes of the direct radiative forcings (DRF) from anthropogenic sulfate, black carbon, and organic carbon. For this purpose, we employ the GFDL CM2.1 global climate model, which has reasonable aerosol concentrations and reconstruction of twentieth-century climate change. Sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols constitute the most important anthropogenic aerosol perturbations to the climate system and provide striking contrasts between primarily scattering (sulfate and organic carbon) and primarily absorbing (black carbon) species. The quantitative roles of cloud coverage, surface albedo, and relative humidity in governing the sign and magnitude of all-sky top-of-atmosphere (TOA) forcings are examined. Clouds reduce the global mean sulfate TOA DRF by almost 50%, reduce the global mean organic carbon TOA DRF by more than 30%, and increase the global mean black carbon TOA DRF by almost 80%. Sulfate forcing is increased by over 50% as a result of hygroscopic growth, while high-albedo surfaces are found to have only a minor (less than 10%) impact on all global mean forcings. Although the radiative forcing magnitudes are subject to uncertainties in the state of mixing of the aerosol species, it is clear that fundamental physical climate characteristics play a large role in governing aerosol direct radiative forcing magnitudes.

  5. Effects of ammonium sulfate aerosol exposure on lung structure of normal and elastase-impaired rats and guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.H.; Buschbom, R.L.; Cannon, W.C.; Lauhala, K.E.; Miller, F.J.; Graham, J.A.; Smith, L.G.

    1984-04-01

    Rats and guinea pigs, pretreated with intratracheally administered elastase or saline, were exposed to 1.03 mg/m/sup 3/ (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/; MMAD, 0.42 ..mu..m. Identically treated controls were sham exposed. Measurements and evaluation of structural changes were conducted using morphometric techniques on SEM photographs and by applying subjective ratings. Pathology studies were conducted by light and electron microscopy. All examination methods confirmed elastase-induced emphysema, which was aggravated by (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ exposure in the rat. Ammonium sulfate exposure of saline-treated animals produced measurable degrees of enlargement of alveoli, and alveolar ducts and sacs. Electron microscopy revealed increased interstitial collagen in affected lung areas of elastase-treated, (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/-exposed animals. Alveolar-pore size was significantly increased in elastase-treated animals (control and exposed) but not in saline-treated, exposed animals. The data suggest a possible difference between elastase and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in the mechanisms responsible for the increased diameter of alveolar structures. Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of nonciliated epithelial cells of the small airways and of the Type II alveolar cells were observed in otherwise untreated guinea pigs exposed to (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ but not in elastase-treated guinea pigs, nor in any of the rats. 12 references.

  6. Evaluation of multistep derivatization methods for identification and quantification of oxygenated species in organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Flores, Rosa M; Doskey, Paul V

    2015-10-30

    Two, 3-step methods for derivatizing mono- and multi-functional species with carbonyl (CO), carboxylic acid (-COOH), and alcohol (-OH) moieties were compared and optimized. In Method 1, the CO, -COOH, and -OH moieties were converted (1) to methyloximes (R-CN-OCH3) with O-methylhydroxylamine hydrochloride (MHA), (2) to methyl esters (OC-R-OCH3) with (trimethylsilyl)diazomethane in methanol (TMSD/MeOH), and (3) to trimethylsilyl ethers [R-OSi(CH3)3] with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS), respectively. Steps 1 and 3 of both methods were identical; however, in Step 2 of Method 2, -COOH moieties were derivatized with 10% (v/v) boron trifluoride (BF3) in MeOH or n-butanol (n-BuOH). The BF3/MeOH and BF3/n-BuOH were ineffective at converting species with more than 2-OH moieties. Average standard deviations for derivatization of 36 model compounds by the 3-step methods using TMSD/MeOH and BF3/(MeOH) were 7.4 and 14.8%, respectively. Average derivatization efficiencies for Methods 1 and 2 were 88.0 and 114%, respectively. Despite the lower average derivatization efficiency of Method 1, distinct advantages included a greater certainty of derivatization yield for the entire suite of mono- and multi-functional species and fewer processing steps for sequential derivatization. Detection limits for Method 1 using GC×GC-ToF-MS were 0.3-54pgm(-3). Approximately 100 oxygenated organic species were identified and quantified in aerosol filtered from 39m(3) of air in an urban location. Levels of species were 0.013-17ngm(-3) and were nearly all above the Method 1 limit of detection.

  7. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China, to investigate the role of fireworks (FW) and secondary aerosol in particulate pollution during the Chinese Spring Festival of 2013. Three FW events, exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5), were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW were shown to have a large impact on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in submicron aerosol (PM1), of which FW organics appeared to be emitted mainly in secondary, with its mass spectrum resembling that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated the total PM1 mass on average, accounting for 63-82% during nine PEs in this study. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. Primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction being in cooking organic aerosol (OA; 69%), in nitrogen monoxide (54%), and in coal combustion OA (28%). Secondary sulfate, however, remained only slightly changed, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. Our results have significant implications for controlling local primary source emissions during PEs, e.g., cooking and traffic activities. Controlling these factors might have a limited effect on improving air quality in the megacity of Beijing, due to the dominance of SPM from regional transport in aerosol particle composition.

  8. Analysis of Ambient Aerosol Measurements During PROPHET 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delia, A. E.; Garland, R.; Toohey, D. W.; Worsnop, D. R.; Allen, J. O.; Carroll, M. A.; Fortner, E.; Hengel, S.; Lilly, M.; Moody, J.; Huey, G.; Tanner, D.

    2002-12-01

    Aerosol size and composition were measured using an aerosol mass spectrometer, developed by Aerodyne Research, Inc., during PROPHET 2001 (Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemistry, Emissions and Transport). Our purpose in this study was to characterize chemical composition and size of ambient aerosols, investigate the effects of transport, and study aerosol microphysics. The site is located in a remote forested area of northern Michigan at the University of Michigan Biological Station, far from any large urban areas and surrounded primarily by deciduous forests. The aerosols at this site can be cataloged into four classes. The two principal classes are distinguished by meteorological conditions. Clean, northerly airflow produced low aerosol mass loadings dominated by organic species. More polluted southerly airflow brought higher aerosol mass loadings dominated by sulfate with an organic contribution. Under both of these conditions, aerosol existed almost entirely in the accumulation size mode of 300-600 nm. In addition to these principal aerosol types, small particle growth was observed on several occasions. It appears that these events occurred primarily during periods of low aerosol mass loading (i.e., northerly airflow) when the low aerosol number provided an opportunity for new particle formation and rapid growth. On at least one occasion, it appears that a large plume of sulfur dioxide that was converted to sulfuric acid near the site may be responsible for new particle formation. The fourth type of aerosol consisted of short events dominated by organic species, apparently diesel exhaust caused by local truck traffic. In addition to the overall aerosol characterization, comparisons with other measurements that affected the aerosol composition or characterized the air masses will be presented and the implications of these results for regional transport of aerosols will be discussed.

  9. Halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA) formation and decarboxylation of carboxylic acids by reactive halogen species - a time-resolved aerosol flow-reactor study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2013-04-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) are released to the atmosphere from various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol and salt lakes. Recent studies (Cai et al., 2006 and 2008, Ofner et al., 2012) indicate that RHS are able to interact with SOA precursors similarly to common atmospheric oxidizing gases like OH radicals and ozone. The reaction of RHS with SOA precursors like terpenes forms so-called halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA). On the other hand, RHS are also able to change the composition of functional groups, e.g. to initiate the decarboxylation of carboxylic acids (Ofner et al., 2012). The present study uses a 50 cm aerosol flow-reactor, equipped with a solar simulator to investigate the time-resolved evolution and transformation of vibrational features in the mid-infrared region. The aerosol flow-reactor is coupled to a home-made multi-reflection cell (Ofner et al., 2010), integrated into a Bruker IFS 113v FTIR spectrometer. The reactor is operated with an inlet feed (organic compound) and a surrounding feed (reactive halogen species). The moveable inlet of the flow reactor allows us to vary reaction times between a few seconds and up to about 3 minutes. Saturated vapours of different SOA precursors and carboxylic acids were fed into the flow reactor using the moveable inlet. The surrounding feed inside the flow reactor was a mixture of zero air with molecular chlorine as the precursor for the formation of reactive halogen species. Using this setup, the formation of halogen-induced organic aerosol could be monitored with a high time resolution using FTIR spectroscopy. XOA formation is characterized by hydrogen-atom abstraction, carbon-chlorine bond formation and later, even formation of carboxylic acids. Several changes of the entire structure of the organic precursor, caused by the reaction of RHS, are visible. While XOA formation is a very fast process, the decarboxylation of carboxylic acids, induced by RHS is rather slow. However, XOA formation

  10. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 32; Estimates of AOD Trends (2002 - 2012) Over the World's Major Cities Based on the MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provencal, Simon; Kishcha, Pavel; Elhacham, Emily; daSilva, Arlindo M.; Alpert, Pinhas; Suarez, Max J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office has extended the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) tool with five atmospheric aerosol species (sulfates, organic carbon, black carbon, mineral dust and sea salt). This inclusion of aerosol reanalysis data is now known as MERRAero. This study analyses a ten-year period (July 2002 - June 2012) MERRAero aerosol reanalysis applied to the study of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and its trends for the aforementioned aerosol species over the world's major cities (with a population of over 2 million inhabitants). We found that a proportion of various aerosol species in total AOD exhibited a geographical dependence. Cities in industrialized regions (North America, Europe, central and eastern Asia) are characterized by a strong proportion of sulfate aerosols. Organic carbon aerosols are dominant over cities which are located in regions where biomass burning frequently occurs (South America and southern Africa). Mineral dust dominates other aerosol species in cities located in proximity to the major deserts (northern Africa and western Asia). Sea salt aerosols are prominent in coastal cities but are dominant aerosol species in very few of them. AOD trends are declining over cities in North America, Europe and Japan, as a result of effective air quality regulation. By contrast, the economic boom in China and India has led to increasing AOD trends over most cities in these two highly-populated countries. Increasing AOD trends over cities in the Middle East are caused by increasing desert dust.

  11. In situ measurements of the non-sulfate fraction of volcanic aerosol following the Pinatubo (1991) and Kelud (2014) eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshler, Terry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Fairlie, T. Duncan

    2016-04-01

    In situ size resolved particle concentration observations, from instruments with ambient intakes and with heated intakes, following the eruptions of Pinatubo in 1991 and Kelud in 2014 are used to infer characteristics of the mixing state of the particles, of their gravitational sorting, and of the evolution of the non-volatile component. This approach was used for measurements from Laramie, Wyoming (41°N), 30-50 days following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (15°N) in June 1991, and for measurements from Darwin, Australia (11°S), 90 days following the eruption of Mt Kelud (8°S) in February 2014. Following the Pinatubo eruption the particles appear to be internally mixed. Above 20 km the ash appears as 0.25 μm radius particles carried within a 0.5 μm radius particle, indicating the ash is ~15% (20%) of the particle volume (mass). Following the Kelud eruption, the solid particles appear to have persisted just above the tropopause for at least three months. These measurements suggest the particles are externally mixed with almost exclusively sulfate particles, < 0.15 μm, in the upper portion of the volcanic layer, 19-22 km. A second layer at 17-19 km contains particles > 0.25 μm which are almost exclusively non-volatile. These sizes for the ash are similar to the non-volatile cores observed above 20 km following Pinatubo. In both cases the observations show clear evidence of gravitational sorting of the particles. The lapse rate of the heated to ambient concentration ratio had a very characteristic decreasing ratio as altitude increases. Initially the slopes were quite steep and nearly the same for all particle sizes, suggesting rapid sorting by terminal velocity with the denser particles with non-volatile cores moving to the bottom of the layer. As the larger particles were lost the slopes became less steep and there was a separation between the slopes for the various particle sizes, with the smallest particles displaying the least differences between the top

  12. Climate effects of anthropogenic sulfate: Simulations from a coupled chemistry/climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Walton, J.J.

    1993-09-01

    In this paper, we use a more comprehensive approach by coupling a climate model with a 3-D global chemistry model to investigate the forcing by anthropogenic aerosol sulfate. The chemistry model treats the global-scale transport, transformation, and removal of SO{sub 2}, DMS and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} species in the atmosphere. The mass concentration of anthropogenic sulfate from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning is calculated in the chemistry model and provided to the climate model where it affects the shortwave radiation. We also investigate the effect, with cloud nucleation parameterized in terms of local aerosol number, sulfate mass concentration and updraft velocity. Our simulations indicate that anthropogenic sulfate may result in important increases in reflected solar radiation, which would mask locally the radiative forcing from increased greenhouse gases. Uncertainties in these results will be discussed.

  13. Linking biogenic hydrocarbons to biogenic aerosol in the Borneo rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Robinson, N.; Ward, M. W.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.

    2013-07-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds are though to contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation in the tropics, but understanding the process of these transformations has proved difficult, due to the complexity of the chemistry involved and very low concentrations. Aerosols from above a South East Asian tropical rainforest in Borneo were characterised using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry, high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) techniques. Oxygenated compounds were identified in ambient organic aerosol that could be directly traced back to isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpene emissions, by combining field data on chemical structures with mass spectral data generated from synthetically produced products created in a simulation chamber. Eighteen oxygenated species of biogenic origin were identified in the rainforest aerosol from the precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, α-terpinene and β-caryophyllene. The observations provide the unambiguous field detection of monoterpene and sesquiterpene oxidation products in SOA above a pristine tropical rainforest. The presence of 2-methyltetrol organosulfates and an associated sulfated dimer provides direct evidence that isoprene in the presence of sulfate aerosol can make a contribution to biogenic organic aerosol above tropical forests. High-resolution mass spectrometry indicates that sulfur can also be incorporated into oxidation products arising from monoterpene precursors in tropical aerosol.

  14. Linking biogenic hydrocarbons to biogenic aerosol in the Borneo rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Robinson, N.; Ward, M. W.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.

    2013-11-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds are though to contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation in the tropics, but understanding these transformation processes has proved difficult, due to the complexity of the chemistry involved and very low concentrations. Aerosols from above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest in Borneo were characterised using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry, high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS) techniques. Oxygenated compounds were identified in ambient organic aerosol that could be directly traced back to isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpene emissions, by combining field data on chemical structures with mass spectral data generated from synthetically produced products created in a simulation chamber. Eighteen oxygenated species of biogenic origin were identified in the rainforest aerosol from the precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, α-terpinene and β-caryophyllene. The observations provide the unambiguous field detection of monoterpene and sesquiterpene oxidation products in SOA above a pristine tropical rainforest. The presence of 2-methyl tetrol organosulfates and an associated sulfated dimer provides direct evidence that isoprene in the presence of sulfate aerosol can make a contribution to biogenic organic aerosol above tropical forests. High-resolution mass spectrometry indicates that sulfur can also be incorporated into oxidation products arising from monoterpene precursors in tropical aerosol.

  15. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  16. Online Simulations and Forecasts of the Global Aerosol Distribution in the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We present an analysis of simulations of the global aerosol system in the NASA GEOS-5 transport, radiation, and chemistry model. The model includes representations of all major tropospheric aerosol species, including dust, sea salt, black carbon, particulate organic matter, and sulfates. The aerosols are run online for the period 2000 through 2005 in a simulation driven by assimilated meteorology from the NASA Goddard Data Assimilation System. Aerosol surface mass concentrations are compared with existing long-term surface measurement networks. Aerosol optical thickness is compared with ground-based AERONET sun photometry and space-based retrievals from MODIS, MISR, and OMI. Particular emphasis is placed here on consistent sampling of model and satellite aerosol optical thickness to account for diurnal variations in aerosol optical properties. Additionally, we illustrate the use of this system for providing chemical weather forecasts in support of various NASA and community field missions.

  17. Temporal Variation of Aerosol Properties at a Rural Continental Site and Study of Aerosol Evolution through Growth Law Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jian; Collins, Don; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Ferrare, Richard A.; Gasparini, Roberto; Jonsson, Haflidi; Ogren, John; Sheridan, Patrick; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol size distributions were measured by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft during 16 flights at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern central Oklahoma as part of the Aerosol Intensive Operation period in May, 2003. During the same period a second SMPS was deployed at a surface station and provided continuous measurements. Combined with trace gas measurements at the SGP site and back-trajectory analysis, the aerosol size distributions provided insights into the sources of aerosols observed at the SGP site. High particle concentrations, observed mostly during daytime, were well correlated with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) mixing ratios, suggesting nucleation involving sulfuric acid is likely the main source of newly formed particles at the SGP. Aerosols within plumes originating from wildfires in Central America were measured at the surface site. Vertically compact aerosol layers, which can be traced back to forest fires in East Asia, were intercepted at altitudes over 3000 meters. Analyses of size dependent particle growth rates for four periods during which high cloud coverage was observed indicate growth dominated by volume controlled reactions. Sulfate accounts for 50% to 72% of the increase in aerosol volume concentration; the rest of the volume concentration increase was likely due to secondary organic species. The growth law analyses and meteorological conditions indicate that the sulfate was produced mainly through aqueous oxidation of SO2 in clouds droplets and hydrated aerosol particles.

  18. Organic aerosols associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by water-soluble PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Fang, Ting; Xu, Lu; Peltier, Richard E; Russell, Armistead G; Ng, Nga Lee; Weber, Rodney J

    2015-04-07

    We compare the relative toxicity of various organic aerosol (OA) components identified by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) based on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ambient fine aerosols were collected from urban (three in Atlanta, GA and one in Birmingham, AL) and rural (Yorkville, GA and Centerville, AL) sites in the Southeastern United States. The ROS generating capability of the water-soluble fraction of the particles was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Water-soluble PM extracts were further separated into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions using a C-18 column, and both fractions were analyzed for DTT activity and water-soluble metals. Organic aerosol composition was measured at selected sites using a high-resolution time-of-flight AMS. Positive matrix factorization of the AMS spectra resolved the organic aerosol into isoprene-derived OA (Isop_OA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), less-oxidized oxygenated OA, (LO-OOA), more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), cooking OA (COA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA). The association of the DTT activity of water-soluble PM2.5 (WS_DTT) with these factors was investigated by linear regression techniques. BBOA and MO-OOA were most consistently linked with WS_DTT, with intrinsic water-soluble activities of 151 ± 20 and 36 ± 22 pmol/min/μg, respectively. Although less toxic, MO-OOA was most widespread, contributing to WS_DTT activity at all sites and during all seasons. WS_DTT activity was least associated with biogenic secondary organic aerosol. The OA components contributing to WS_DTT were humic-like substances (HULIS), which are abundantly emitted in biomass burning (BBOA) and include highly oxidized OA from multiple sources (MO-OOA). Overall, OA contributed approximately 60% to the WS_DTT activity, with the remaining probably from water-soluble metals, which were mostly associated with the hydrophilic WS_DTT fraction.

  19. The direct radiative forcing effects of aerosols on the climate in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hui

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used to explore the influence of aerosol direct radiative effects on regional climate of California. Aerosol data is provided by the MOZART global chemistry transport model and includes sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust and sea salt. To investigate the sensitivity of aerosol radiative effects to different aerosol species and to the quantity of sulfate and dust, tests are conducted by using different combinations of aerosols and by resetting the quantity of sulfate and dust. The model results show that all the considered aerosols could have a cooling effect of one half to one degree in terms of temperature and that dust and sulfate are the most important aerosols. However, large uncertainties exist. The results suggest that the dust from MOZART is greatly overestimated over the simulation domain. The single scattering albedo (SSA) values of dust used in some global climate models are likely underestimated compared to recent studies on dust optical properties and could result in overestimating the corresponding cooling effects by approximately 0.1 degree. Large uncertainties exist in estimating the roles of different forcing factors which are causing the observed temperature change in the past century in California.

  20. Quantification of environmentally persistent free radicals and reactive oxygen species in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arangio, Andrea M.; Tong, Haijie; Socorro, Joanna; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-10-01

    Fine particulate matter plays a central role in the adverse health effects of air pollution. Inhalation and deposition of aerosol particles in the respiratory tract can lead to the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause oxidative stress. In this study, we have detected and quantified a wide range of particle-associated radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Ambient particle samples were collected using a cascade impactor at a semi-urban site in central Europe, Mainz, Germany, in May-June 2015. Concentrations of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR), most likely semiquinone radicals, were found to be in the range of (1-7) × 1011 spins µg-1 for particles in the accumulation mode, whereas coarse particles with a diameter larger than 1 µm did not contain substantial amounts of EPFR. Using a spin trapping technique followed by deconvolution of EPR spectra, we have also characterized and quantified ROS, including OH, superoxide (O2-) and carbon- and oxygen-centered organic radicals, which were formed upon extraction of the particle samples in water. Total ROS amounts of (0.1-3) × 1011 spins µg-1 were released by submicron particle samples and the relative contributions of OH, O2-, C-centered and O-centered organic radicals were ˜ 11-31, ˜ 2-8, ˜ 41-72 and ˜ 0-25 %, respectively, depending on particle sizes. OH was the dominant species for coarse particles. Based on comparisons of the EPR spectra of ambient particulate matter with those of mixtures of organic hydroperoxides, quinones and iron ions followed by chemical analysis using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we suggest that the particle-associated ROS were formed by decomposition of organic hydroperoxides interacting with transition metal ions and quinones contained in atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS).

  1. Asian Aerosols: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosol heats the atmosphere while simultaneously cooling the surface and reducing latent and sensible heat fluxes from the land. Recent studies have shown that absorbing BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates, including modification of the hydrological cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain with regards to (a) the total amount of all aerosol species and (b) the amount of aerosol absorption. Here we present a GCM sensitivity study focusing on the influences due to total aerosol amount and aerosol absorption in the south and east Asian regions. Six experiments are conducted to test the equilibrium response of the GFDL AM2 GCM (under conditions of prescribed, observed sea surface temperatures) to (i) changes in aerosol absorption caused by changes in BC aerosol amount, and (ii) aerosol extinction optical depth increases corresponding to the year 1990 relative to a control case of 1950. In order to systematically explore the uncertainties in aerosol loading and absorption, the sensitivity experiments are classified into four regimes: low extinction optical depth, low absorption; low extinction optical depth, high absorption; high extinction optical depth, low absorption; and high extinction optical depth, high absorption. Changes in surface temperature and changes in the hydrological cycle are generally insignificant when lower aerosol extinction optical depths are considered. For higher extinction optical depths, the change in the modeled regional circulation relative to the control circulation over south and east Asia is affected by the amount of aerosol absorption and contrasts sharply to the regional circulation change associated with increasing only scattering aerosols. When increasing absorbing aerosols over the region, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of the absorbing aerosol and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation rate

  2. Balloon observations of organic and inorganic chlorine in the stratosphere: the role of HClO4 production on sulfate aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaegle, L.; Yung, Y. L.; Toon, G. C.; Sen, B.; Blavier, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of stratospheric organic and inorganic chlorine were made in September 1993 out of Fort Sumner, New Mexico, using JPL balloon-borne MkIV interferometer. Between 15 and 20 km, a significant fraction (20-60%) of the inorganic chlorine could not be accounted for by the sum of measured HCl, ClONO2, and HOCl. Laboratory measurements of the reaction of ClO radicals on sulfuric acid solutions have indicated that, along with HCl, small amounts of perchloric acid, HClO4, were formed. Very little is known about the fate of HClO4 in the stratosphere and we use a photochemical box model to determine the impact of this new species on the partitioning of inorganic chlorine in the stratosphere. Assuming that HClO4 is photochemically stable, it is shown that in the enhanced aerosol loading conditions resulting from Mt. Pinatubo's eruption, HClO4 could represent a significant reservoir of chlorine in the lower stratosphere, sequestering up to 0.2 ppbv (or 50%) of the total inorganic chlorine at 16 km. The occurrence of this new species could bring to closure the inorganic chlorine budget deficiency made apparent by recent ER-2 aircraft in situ measurements of HCl.

  3. Balloon observations of organic and inorganic chlorine in the stratosphere: the role of HClO4 production on sulfate aerosols.

    PubMed

    Jaegle, L; Yung, Y L; Toon, G C; Sen, B; Blavier, J F

    1996-07-01

    Simultaneous observations of stratospheric organic and inorganic chlorine were made in September 1993 out of Fort Sumner, New Mexico, using JPL balloon-borne MkIV interferometer. Between 15 and 20 km, a significant fraction (20-60%) of the inorganic chlorine could not be accounted for by the sum of measured HCl, ClONO2, and HOCl. Laboratory measurements of the reaction of ClO radicals on sulfuric acid solutions have indicated that, along with HCl, small amounts of perchloric acid, HClO4, were formed. Very little is known about the fate of HClO4 in the stratosphere and we use a photochemical box model to determine the impact of this new species on the partitioning of inorganic chlorine in the stratosphere. Assuming that HClO4 is photochemically stable, it is shown that in the enhanced aerosol loading conditions resulting from Mt. Pinatubo's eruption, HClO4 could represent a significant reservoir of chlorine in the lower stratosphere, sequestering up to 0.2 ppbv (or 50%) of the total inorganic chlorine at 16 km. The occurrence of this new species could bring to closure the inorganic chlorine budget deficiency made apparent by recent ER-2 aircraft in situ measurements of HCl.

  4. Change in global aerosol composition since preindustrial times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridis, K.; Krol, M.; Dentener, F. J.; Balkanski, Y.; Lathière, J.; Metzger, S.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Kanakidou, M.

    2006-06-01

    To elucidate human induced changes of aerosol load and composition in the atmosphere, a coupled aerosol and gas-phase chemistry transport model of the troposphere and lower stratosphere has been used. This is the first 3-d modeling study that focuses on aerosol chemical composition change since preindustrial times considering the secondary organic aerosol formation together with all other main aerosol components including nitrate. In particular, we evaluate non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO4=), ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), black carbon (BC), sea-salt, dust, primary and secondary organics (POA and SOA) with a focus on the importance of secondary organic aerosols. Our calculations show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) has increased by about 21% since preindustrial times. This enhancement of AOD is attributed to a rise in the atmospheric load of BC, nss-SO4=, NO3-, POA and SOA by factors of 3.3, 2.6, 2.7, 2.3 and 1.2, respectively, whereas we assumed that the natural dust and sea-salt sources remained constant. The nowadays increase in carbonaceous aerosol loading is dampened by a 34-42% faster conversion of hydrophobic to hydrophilic carbonaceous aerosol leading to higher removal rates. These changes between the various aerosol components resulted in significant modifications of the aerosol chemical composition. The relative importance of the various aerosol components is critical for the aerosol climatic effect, since atmospheric aerosols behave differently when their chemical composition changes. According to this study, the aerosol composition changed significantly over the different continents and with height since preindustrial times. The presence of anthropogenically emitted primary particles in the atmosphere facilitates the condensation of the semi-volatile species that form SOA onto the aerosol phase, particularly in the boundary layer. The SOA burden that is dominated by the natural component has increased by 24% while its contribution to the AOD has

  5. Change in global aerosol composition since preindustrial times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridis, K.; Krol, M.; Dentener, F. J.; Balkanski, Y.; Lathière, J.; Metzger, S.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Kanakidou, M.

    2006-11-01

    To elucidate human induced changes of aerosol load and composition in the atmosphere, a coupled aerosol and gas-phase chemistry transport model of the troposphere and lower stratosphere has been used. The present 3-D modeling study focuses on aerosol chemical composition change since preindustrial times considering the secondary organic aerosol formation together with all other main aerosol components including nitrate. In particular, we evaluate non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO4=), ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), black carbon (BC), sea-salt, dust, primary and secondary organics (POA and SOA) with a focus on the importance of secondary organic aerosols. Our calculations show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) has increased by about 21% since preindustrial times. This enhancement of AOD is attributed to a rise in the atmospheric load of BC, nss-SO4=, NO3aerosol loading is dampened by a 34-42% faster conversion of hydrophobic to hydrophilic carbonaceous aerosol leading to higher removal rates. These changes between the various aerosol components resulted in significant modifications of the aerosol chemical composition. The relative importance of the various aerosol components is critical for the aerosol climatic effect, since atmospheric aerosols behave differently when their chemical composition changes. According to this study, the aerosol composition changed significantly over the different continents and with height since preindustrial times. The presence of anthropogenically emitted primary particles in the atmosphere facilitates the condensation of the semi-volatile species that form SOA onto the aerosol phase, particularly in the boundary layer. The SOA burden that is dominated by the natural component has increased by 24% while its contribution to the AOD has increased

  6. Efficacy of RNA interference knockdown using aerosolized short interfering RNAs bound to nanoparticles in three diverse aphid species.

    PubMed

    Thairu, M W; Skidmore, I H; Bansal, R; Nováková, E; Hansen, T E; Li-Byarlay, H; Wickline, S A; Hansen, A K

    2017-03-17

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a promising method for validating gene function; however, its utility in nonmodel insects has proven problematic, with delivery methods being one of the main obstacles. This study investigates a novel method of RNAi delivery in aphids, the aerosolization of short interfering RNA (siRNA)-nanoparticle complexes. By using nanoparticles as a siRNA carrier, the likelihood of cellular uptake is increased, when compared to methods previously used in insects. To determine the efficacy of this RNAi delivery system, siRNAs were aerosolized with and without nanoparticles in three aphid species: Acyrthosiphon pisum, Aphis glycines and Schizaphis graminum. The genes targeted for knockdown were carotene dehydrogenase (tor), which is important for pigmentation in Ac. pisum, and branched chain-amino acid transaminase (bcat), which is essential in the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids in all three aphid species. Overall, we observed modest gene knockdown of tor in Ac. pisum and moderate gene knockdown of bcat in Ap. glycines along with its associated phenotype. We also determined that the nanoparticle emulsion significantly increased the efficacy of gene knockdown. Overall, these results suggest that the aerosolized siRNA-nanoparticle delivery method is a promising new high-throughput and non-invasive RNAi delivery method in some aphid species.

  7. Simultaneous reductions in emissions of black carbon and co-emitted species will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in the short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate atmosphere-only model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero with prescribed sea surface temperature and sea ice cover, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with recent past year 2000 levels if the emissions of only BC are reduced to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial~for the mitigation of global warming. However, both aerosol negative direct and indirect radiative effects are weakened when BC and its co-emitted species (sulfur dioxide and organic carbon) are simultaneously reduced. Relative to year 2000 levels, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 if the emissions of all these aerosols are decreased to the levels projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  8. Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 1. Ambient aerosol characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth; Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Gross, Deborah S.; Ameth, Almut; Holst, Thomas; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2009-07-10

    Sub-Arctic aerosol was sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Research Station Stordalen field site operated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Located in northern Sweden at 68º latitude and 385 meters above sea level (msl), this site is classified as a semi-continuous permafrost mire. Number density, size distribution, cloud condensation nucleus properties, and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol were determined. Backtrajectories showed that three distinct airmasses were present over Stordalen during the sampling period. Aerosol properties changed and correlated with airmass origin to the south, northeast, or west. We observe that Arctic aerosol is not compositionally unlike that found in the free troposphere at mid-latitudes. Internal mixtures of sulfates and organics, many on insoluble biomass burning and/or elemental carbon cores, dominate the number density of particles from ~200 to 2000 nm aerodynamic diameter. Mineral dust which had taken up gas phase species was observed in all airmasses. Sea salt, and the extent to which it had lost volatile components, was the aerosol type that most varied with airmass.

  9. Thermodynamic characterization of Mexico City aerosol during MILAGRO 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Sullivan, A.; Weber, R.; van Reken, T.; Fischer, M.; Matías, E.; Moya, M.; Farmer, D.; Cohen, R. C.

    2009-03-01

    Fast measurements of aerosol and gas-phase constituents coupled with the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model are used to study the partitioning of semivolatile inorganic species and phase state of Mexico City aerosol sampled at the T1 site during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign. Overall, predicted semivolatile partitioning agrees well with measurements. PM2.5 is insensitive to changes in ammonia but is to acidic semivolatile species. For particle sizes up to 1μm diameter, semi-volatile partitioning requires 15-30 min to equilibrate; longer time is typically required during the night and early morning hours. Aerosol and gas-phase speciation always exhibits substantial temporal variability, so that aerosol composition measurements (bulk or size-resolved) obtained over large integration periods are not reflective of its true state. When the aerosol sulfate-to-nitrate molar ratio is less than unity, predictions improve substantially if the aerosol is assumed to follow the deliquescent phase diagram. Treating crustal species as "equivalent sodium" (rather than explicitly) in the thermodynamic equilibrium calculations introduces important biases in predicted aerosol water uptake, nitrate and ammonium; neglecting crustals further increases errors dramatically. This suggests that explicitly considering crustals in the thermodynamic calculations is required to accurately predict the partitioning and phase state of aerosols.

  10. The use of ambient measurements to identify which precursor species limit aerosol nitrate formation.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C L; Roth, P M; Tanenbaum, S J; Ziman, S D; Seinfeld, J H

    2000-12-01

    A thermodynamic equilibrium model was used to investigate the response of aerosol NO3 to changes in concentrations of HNO3, NH3, and H2SO4. Over a range of temperatures and relative humidities (RHs), two parameters provided sufficient information for indicating the qualitative response of aerosol NO3. The first was the excess of aerosol NH4+ plus gas-phase NH3 over the sum of HNO3, particulate NO3, and particulate SO4(2-) concentrations. The second was the ratio of particulate to total NO3 concentrations. Computation of these quantities from ambient measurements provides a means to rapidly analyze large numbers of samples and identify cases in which inorganic aerosol NO3 formation is limited by the availability of NH3. Example calculations are presented using data from three field studies. The predictions of the indicator variables and the equilibrium model are compared.

  11. Sensitivity of high-spectral resolution and broadband thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of secondary sulfate aerosols in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The observation of upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols (SSA) and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations (with better spatial resolution than limb observations) is a fundamental tool to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Thermal infrared (TIR) observations are sensitive to the chemical composition of the aerosols due to the strong spectral variations of the imaginary part of the refractive index in this band and, correspondingly, of the absorption, as a function of the composition Then, these observations are, in principle, well adapted to detect and characterize UTLS SSA. Unfortunately, the exploitation of nadir TIR observations for sulfate aerosol layer monitoring is today very limited. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of TIR satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS SSA layers. The sulfate aerosol particles are assumed as binary systems of sulfuric acid/water solution droplets, with varying sulphuric acid mixing ratios. The extinction properties of the SSA, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. High-spectral resolution pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on

  12. An automated online instrument to quantify aerosol-bound reactive oxygen species (ROS) for ambient measurement and health-relevant aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wragg, Francis P. H.; Fuller, Stephen J.; Freshwater, Ray; Green, David C.; Kelly, Frank J.; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The adverse health effects associated with ambient aerosol particles have been well documented, but it is still unclear which aerosol properties are most important for their negative health impact. Some studies suggest the oxidative effects of particle-bound reactive oxygen species (ROS) are potential major contributors to the toxicity of particles. Traditional ROS measurement techniques are labour-intensive, give poor temporal resolution and generally have significant delays between aerosol sampling and ROS analysis. However, many oxidising particle components are reactive and thus potentially short-lived. Thus, a technique to quantify particle-bound ROS online would be beneficial to quantify also the short-lived ROS components. We introduce a new portable instrument to allow online, continuous measurement of particle-bound ROS using a chemical assay of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), via fluorescence spectroscopy. All components of the new instrument are attached to a containing shell, resulting in a compact system capable of automated continuous field deployment over many hours or days. From laboratory measurements, the instrument was found to have a detection limit of ˜ 4 nmol [H2O2] equivalents per cubic metre (m3) air, a dynamic range up to at least ˜ 2000 nmol [H2O2] equivalents per m3 air and a time resolution of ≤ 12 min. The instrument allows for ˜ 16 h automated measurement if unattended and shows a fast response to changes in concentrations of laboratory-generated oxidised organic aerosol. The instrument was deployed at an urban site in London, and particulate ROS levels of up to 24 nmol [H2O2] equivalents per m3 air were detected with PM2.5 concentrations up to 28 µg m-3. The new and portable Online Particle-bound ROS Instrument (OPROSI) allows fast-response quantification; this is important due to the potentially short-lived nature of particle-bound ROS as well as fast-changing atmospheric conditions

  13. Properties and sources of individual particles and some chemical species in the aerosol of a metropolitan underground railway station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salma, Imre; Pósfai, Mihály; Kovács, Kristóf; Kuzmann, Ernő; Homonnay, Zoltán; Posta, József

    Aerosol samples in PM 10-2.0 and PM 2.0 size fractions were collected on the platform of a metropolitan underground railway station in central Budapest. Individual aerosol particles were studied using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and electron diffraction. The bulk aerosol samples were investigated by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, and they were subjected to chemical speciation analysis for Cr. The particles were classified into groups of iron oxides and iron, carbonates, silicates, quartz and carbonaceous debris. Electron micrographs showed that the Fe-rich particles in the PM 2.0 size fraction typically consisted of aggregates of nano-sized hematite crystals that were randomly oriented, had round shapes and diameters of 5-15 nm. In addition to hematite, a minor fraction of the iron oxide particles also contained magnetite. In addition, the PM 2.0-fraction particles typically had a rugged surface with layered or granular morphologies. Mössbauer spectroscopy suggested that hematite was a major Fe-bearing species in the PM 10-2.0 size fraction; its mass contribution to the Fe was 36%. Further constituents (ferrite, carbides and FeOOH) were also identified. The water soluble amounts of Cr for the underground railway station and city center were similar. In the PM 10-2.0 size fraction, practically all dissolved Cr had an oxidation state of three, which corresponds to ambient conditions. In the PM 2.0 size fraction, however, approximately 7% of the dissolved Cr was present as Cr(VI), which was different from that for the urban aerosol. It is suggested that the increased adverse health effects of aerosol particles in metros with respect to ambient outdoor particles is linked to the differences in the oxidation states, surface properties or morphologies.

  14. Hazardous components and health effects of atmospheric aerosol particles: reactive oxygen species, soot, polycyclic aromatic compounds and allergenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Selzle, Kathrin; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    This review outlines recent advances in the investigation of the chemical properties, molecular interactions and health effects of hazardous compounds in atmospheric aerosols, in particular reactive oxygen species (ROS), soot, polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and allergenic proteins. Epidemiological studies show correlations between air particulate matter and adverse health effects of air pollution including allergy, asthma, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, but the causative relations and mechanisms of interaction on the molecular level are still unclear. ROS generated by photochemical and heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere seem to play a key role in aerosol health effects and provide a direct link between atmospheric and physiological multiphase processes. Soot and PACs can trigger formation of ROS in vivo, leading to inflammation and cellular damage. PACs as well as allergenic proteins are efficiently oxygenated and nitrated upon exposure to ozone and nitrogen dioxide, which leads to an enhancement of their toxicity and allergenicity.

  15. Analysis of anions in ambient aerosols by microchip capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; MacDonald, David A; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Hering, Susanne V; Collett, Jeffrey L; Henry, Charles S

    2006-11-01

    We describe a microchip capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of nitrate and sulfate in ambient aerosols. Investigating the chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles is essential for understanding their sources and effects. Significant progress has been made towards developing mass spectrometry-based instrumentation for rapid qualitative analysis of aerosols. Alternative methods for rapid quantification of selected high abundance compounds are needed to augment the capacity for widespread routine analysis. Such methods could provide much higher temporal and spatial resolution than can be achieved currently. Inorganic anions comprise a large percentage of particulate mass, with nitrate and sulfate among the most abundant species. While ion chromatography has proven very useful for analyzing extracts of time-integrated ambient aerosol samples collected on filters and for semi-continuous, on-line particle composition measurements, there is a growing need for development of new compact, inexpensive approaches to routine on-line aerosol ion analysis for deployment in spatially dense, atmospheric measurement networks. Microchip capillary electrophoresis provides the necessary speed and portability to address this need. In this report, on-column contact conductivity detection is used with hydrodynamic injection to create a simple microchip instrument for analysis of nitrate and sulfate. On-column contact conductivity detection was achieved using a Pd decoupler placed upstream from the working electrodes. Microchips containing two Au or Pd working electrodes showed a good linear range (5-500 microM) and low limits-of-detection for sulfate and nitrate, with Au providing the lowest detection limits (1 microM) for both ions. The completed microchip system was used to analyze ambient aerosol filter samples. Nitrate and sulfate concentrations measured by the microchip matched the concentrations measured by ion chromatography.

  16. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China to investigate the aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival, 2013. Three fireworks (FW) events exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5) were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW showed major impacts on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in PM1, of which the FW organics appeared to be mainly secondary with its mass spectrum resembling to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated PM1 accounting for 63-82% during the nine PEs observed. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than that during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impacts of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. The primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction for cooking OA (69%), nitrogen monoxide (54%), and coal combustion OA (28%). The secondary sulfate, however, remained minor change, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. These results have significant implications that controlling local primary source emissions, e.g., cooking and traffic activities, might have limited effects on improving air quality during PEs when SPM that is formed over regional scales dominates aerosol particle composition.

  17. Estimates of aerosol species scattering characteristics as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, William C.; Day, Derek E.

    The absorption of water by ambient aerosols can significantly increase the light scattering coefficient and thereby affect issues such as visibility and climate forcing. Although water absorption by inorganic compounds and mixtures of inorganic compounds can often be modeled with adequate certainty for most applications, modeling water uptake by organic aerosols at present is speculative. In this paper, we present data in the form of f (RH)=b scat(RH)/b scat,dry , where bscat(RH) is the scattering coefficient measured at some relative humidity (RH)>20% and bscat,dry is the scattering coefficient measured at RH <20%. The f(RH) has been measured at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee and at Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The f(RH) curves obtained from these two sites, which show distinctly different aerosol composition and average RH values, are compared. We also present comparisons between the measured water uptake by ambient aerosol with modeled water uptake by inorganic compounds to estimate the water uptake by organic aerosol.

  18. Chondroitin sulfate

    MedlinePlus

    ... in combination with glucosamine sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor. Some people also inject chondroitin sulfate into the ... in combination with glucosamine sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor seems to reduce arthritis symptoms. However, any symptom ...

  19. Formic Sulfuric Anhydride: a New Chemical Species with Possible Implications for Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, Becca; Dewberry, Chris; Leopold, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Aerosols are important players in the Earth's atmosphere, affecting climate, cloud formation, and human health. In this work, we report the discovery of a previously unknown molecule, formic sulfuric anhydride (FSA), that may influence the formation and composition of atmospheric aerosol particles. Five isotopologues of FSA have been observed by microwave spectroscopy and further characterized using DFT calculations. The system has dipole moment components along all three inertial axes, and indeed a, b, and c-type transitions have been observed. A π2 + π2 + σ2 cycloaddition reaction between SO3 and HCOOH is proposed as a possible mechanism for the formation of FSA and calculations indicate that the transformation is effectively barrierless. Facile formation of the anhydride followed by hydrolysis in small water-containing clusters or liquid droplets may provide a mechanism of incorporating volatile organics into atmospheric aerosol. We suggest that FSA and its derivatives be considered in future atmospheric and climate models.

  20. E-Cigarette Aerosol Exposure Induces Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Damage, and Cell Death in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Chastain; Majeste, Andrew; Hanus, Jakub; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-12-01

    Cigarette smoking remains one of the leading causes of preventable death worldwide. Vascular cell death and dysfunction is a central or exacerbating component in the majority of cigarette smoking related pathologies. The recent development of the electronic nicotine delivery systems known as e-cigarettes provides an alternative to conventional cigarette smoking; however, the potential vascular health risks of e-cigarette use remain unclear. This study evaluates the effects of e-cigarette aerosol extract (EAE) and conventional cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). A laboratory apparatus was designed to produce extracts from e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes according to established protocols for cigarette smoking. EAE or conventional CSE was applied to human vascular endothelial cells for 4-72 h, dependent on the assay. Treated cells were assayed for reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, cell viability, and markers of programmed cell death pathways. Additionally, the anti-oxidants α-tocopherol and n-acetyl-l-cysteine were used to attempt to rescue e-cigarette induced cell death. Our results indicate that e-cigarette aerosol is capable of inducing reactive oxygen species, causing DNA damage, and significantly reducing cell viability in a concentration dependent fashion. Immunofluorescent and flow cytometry analysis indicate that both the apoptosis and programmed necrosis pathways are triggered by e-cigarette aerosol treatment. Additionally, anti-oxidant treatment provides a partial rescue of the induced cell death, indicating that reactive oxygen species play a causal role in e-cigarette induced cytotoxicity.

  1. Influences of external vs. core-shell mixing on aerosol optical properties at various relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties of external and core-shell mixtures of aerosol species present in the atmosphere are calculated in this study for different relative humidities. Core-shell Mie calculations are performed using the values of radii, refractive indices and densities of aerosol species that act as core and shell, and the core-shell radius ratio. The single scattering albedo (SSA) is higher when the absorbing species (black carbon, BC) is the core, while for a sulfate core SSA does not vary significantly as the BC in the shell dominates the absorption. Absorption gets enhanced in core-shell mixing of absorbing and scattering aerosols when compared to their external mixture. Thus, SSA is significantly lower for a core-shell mixture than their external mixture. SSA is more sensitive to core-shell ratio than mode radius when BC is the core. The extinction coefficient, SSA and asymmetry parameter are higher for external mixing when compared to BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell), and water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) mixtures in the relative humidity range of 0 to 90%. Spectral SSA exhibits the behaviour of the species which acts as a shell in core-shell mixing. The asymmetry parameter for an external mixture of water soluble aerosol and BC is higher than BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell) mixing and increases as function of relative humidity. The asymmetry parameter for the water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) is independent of relative humidity as BC is hydrophobic. The asymmetry parameter of the core-shell mixture decreases when BC aerosols are involved in mixing, as the asymmetry parameter of BC is lower. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) of core-shell mixtures increases at a higher rate when the relative humidity exceeds 70% in continental clean and urban aerosol models, whereas AOD remains the same when the relative humidity exceeds 50% in maritime aerosol models. The SSA for continental aerosols varies for core-shell mixing of water soluble

  2. Water-soluble Organic Components in Aerosols Associated with Savanna Fires in Southern Africa: Identification, Evolution and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Song; Hegg, Dean A.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Magi, Brian I.; Sadilek, Martin

    2003-01-01

    During the SAFARI 2000 field campaign, both smoke aerosols from savanna fires and haze aerosols in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere were collected from an aircraft in southern Africa. These aerosol samples were analyzed for their water-soluble chemical components, particularly the organic species. A novel technique, electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry, was used concurrently with an ion chromatography system to analyze for carbohydrate species. Seven carbohydrates, seven organic acids, five metallic elements, and three inorganic anions were identified and quantified. On the average, these 22 species comprised 36% and 27% of the total aerosol mass in haze and smoke aerosols, respectively. For the smoke aerosols, levoglucosan was the most abundant carbohydrate species, while gluconic acid was tentatively identified as the most abundant organic acid. The mass abundance and possible source of each class of identified species are discussed, along with their possible formation pathways. The combustion phase of a fire had an impact on the chemical composition of the emitted aerosols. Secondary formation of sulfate, nitrate, levoglucosan, and several organic acids occurred during the initial aging of smoke aerosols. It is likely that under certain conditions, some carbohydrate species in smoke aerosols, such as levoglucosan, were converted to organic acids during upward transport.

  3. Analysis of DIAL/HSRL aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles during the SEAC4RS campaign with an aerosol assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C. J.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Randles, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We retrieve aerosol concentrations and optical information from vertical profiles of airborne 532 nm extinction and 532 and 1064 nm backscatter measurements made during the SEAC4RS summer 2013 campaign. The observations are from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) on board the NASA DC-8. Instead of retrieving information about aerosol microphysical properties such as indexes of refraction, we seek information more directly applicable to an aerosol transport model - in our case the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) module used in the GEOS-5 Earth modeling system. A joint atmosphere/aerosol mini-reanalysis was performed for the SEAC4RS period using GEOS-5. The meteorological reanalysis followed the MERRA-2 atmospheric reanalysis protocol, and aerosol information from MODIS, MISR, and AERONET provided a constraint on the simulated aerosol optical depth (i.e., total column loading of aerosols). We focus on the simulated concentrations of 10 relevant aerosol species simulated by the GOCART module: dust, sulfate, and organic and black carbon. Our first retrieval algorithm starts with the SEAC4RS mini-reanalysis and adjusts the concentration of each GOCART aerosol species so that differences between the observed and simulated backscatter and extinction measurements are minimized. In this case, too often we are unable to simulate the observations by simple adjustment of the aerosol concentrations. A second retrieval approach adjusts both the aerosol concentrations and the optical parameters (i.e., assigned mass extinction efficiency) associated with each GOCART species. We present results from DC-8 flights over smoke from forest fires over the western US using both retrieval approaches. Finally, we compare our retrieved quantities with in-situ observations of aerosol absorption, scattering, and mass concentrations at flight altitude.

  4. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent photochemical production of secondary organic aerosol in mesocosm studies of temperate and tropical plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; Alfarra, M. R.; McFiggans, G.; Carr, T.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Capes, G.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula) and three Southeast Asian tropical plant species (Ficus cyathistipula, Ficus benjamina and Caryota millis) from the pantropical fig and palm genera were grown in a purpose-built and environment-controlled whole-tree chamber. The volatile organic compounds emitted from these trees were characterised and fed into a linked photochemical reaction chamber where they underwent photo-oxidation under a range of controlled conditions (relative humidity or RH ~65-89%, volatile organic compound-to-NOx or VOC / NOx ~3-9 and NOx ~2 ppbV). Both the gas phase and the aerosol phase of the reaction chamber were monitored in detail using a comprehensive suite of on-line and off-line chemical and physical measurement techniques. Silver birch was found to be a high monoterpene and sesquiterpene but low isoprene emitter, and its emissions were observed to produce measurable amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via both nucleation and condensation onto pre-existing seed aerosol (YSOA 26-39%). In contrast, all three tropical species were found to be high isoprene emitters with trace emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In tropical plant experiments without seed aerosol there was no measurable SOA nucleation, but aerosol mass was shown to increase when seed aerosol was present. Although principally isoprene emitting, the aerosol mass produced from tropical fig was mostly consistent (i.e. in 78 out of 120 aerosol mass calculations using plausible parameter sets of various precursor specific yields) with condensation of photo-oxidation products of the minor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) co-emitted; no significant aerosol yield from condensation of isoprene oxidation products was required in the interpretations of the experimental results. This finding is in line with previous reports of organic aerosol loadings consistent with production from minor biogenic VOCs co-emitted with isoprene in principally isoprene-emitting landscapes in Southeast

  5. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  6. Operational aerosol and dust storm forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, D. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Liu, M.; Walker, A. L.

    2009-03-01

    The U. S. Navy now conducts operational forecasting of aerosols and dust storms on global and regional scales. The Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) is run four times per day and produces 6-day forecasts of sulfate, smoke, dust and sea salt aerosol concentrations and visibility for the entire globe. The Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS®) is run twice daily for Southwest Asia and produces 3-day forecasts of dust, smoke, and visibility. The graphical output from these models is available on the Internet (www.nrlmry.navy.mil/aerosol/). The aerosol optical properties are calculated for each specie for each forecast output time and used for sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval corrections, regional electro-optical (EO) propagation assessments, and the development of satellite algorithms. NAAPS daily aerosol optical depth (AOD) values are compared with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD values. Visibility forecasts are compared quantitatively with surface synoptic reports.

  7. Solar Occultation Constellation for Retrieving Aerosols and Trace Element Species (SOCRATES) Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Fish, C. S.; Gordley, L. L.; Fromm, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of SOCRATES is to quantify the critical role of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) in the climate system. The mission would provide, for the first time, the suite of measurements required to quantify stratosphere/troposphere exchange (STE) pathways and their contribution to UTLS composition, and to evaluate the radiative forcing implications of potential changes in STE pathways with climate change. The discrimination and quantification of STE pathways requires simultaneous measurement of several key trace gases and aerosols with high precision, accuracy, and vertical resolution. Furthermore, aerosol and clouds, often present in the UTLS, complicate the measurement of trace gases. The SOCRATES sensor is a 23-channel Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR), referred to as GLO (GFCR Limb solar Occultation), with heritage from HALOE on UARS, and SOFIE on AIM. GLO measures aerosol extinction from 0.45 to 3.88 μm, important radiatively active gases in the UTLS (H2O, O3, CH4, N2O), key tracers of STE (HCN, CO, HDO), gases important in stratospheric O3 chemistry (HCl and HF), and temperature from cloud top to 50 km at a vertical resolution of 1 km. Improved pointing knowledge will provide dramatically better retrieval precision in the UTLS, even in the presence of aerosols, than possible with HALOE. In addition, the GLO form factor is only a few percent of that of HALOE, and costs for a constellation of GLO sensors is within the cost cap of a NASA Venture mission. The SOCRATES mission concept is an 8-element constellation of autonomous CubeSats, each mated with a GLO sensor, deployed from a single launch vehicle. The SOCRATES/GLO approach reaps the advantages of solar occultation: high precision and accuracy; robust calibration; and high vertical resolution, while mitigating the sparse coverage of a single solar occultation sensor. We present the SOCRATES science case, and key elements of the SOCRATES mission and GLO instrument concepts.

  8. Solar Occultation Constellation for Retrieving Aerosols and Trace Element Species (SOCRATES): Proposed Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordley, L. L.; Bailey, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of SOCRATES is to resolve the critical but underexplored role of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) in climate change. The mission would provide the suite of measurements required to quantify UTLS transport pathways and their contribution to UTLS composition, and to evaluate the radiative forcing implications of changes in UTLS composition forced by expected changes in these pathways as the climate evolves. The discrimination and quantification of UTLS transport pathways requires simultaneous measurement of several key trace gases and aerosols with high precision, accuracy, and vertical resolution. Furthermore, aerosols and clouds, often present in the UTLS, complicate the measurement of trace gases. The SOCRATES sensor is a 23-channel Gas Filter Correlation Radiometer (GFCR), referred to as GLO (GFCR Limb solar Occultation), with heritage from HALOE on UARS, and SOFIE on AIM. GLO measures aerosol extinction from 0.45 to 3.88 μm, important radiatively active gases in the UTLS (H2O, O3, CH4, N2O), key tracers of UTLS transport (HCN, CO, HDO), gases important in stratospheric O3 chemistry (HCl and HF), and temperature from cloud top to 50 km at a vertical resolution of < 1 km. Improved pointing knowledge will provide dramatically better retrieval precision in the UTLS, even in the presence of aerosols, than possible with HALOE. In addition, the GLO form factor is only of order 10% of that of HALOE, and costs for a constellation of GLO sensors is within the cost cap of a NASA Earth Venture mission. The SOCRATES mission concept is a 6-element constellation of autonomous small satellites, each mated with a GLO sensor, and deployed from a single launch vehicle. The SOCRATES/GLO approach reaps the advantages of solar occultation: high precision and accuracy; robust calibration; and high vertical resolution, while mitigating the sparse coverage of a single solar occultation sensor. We present the SOCRATES science case, and key elements of the

  9. Measurements of HNO3, SO2 High Resolution Aerosol SO4 (sup 2-), and Selected Aerosol Species Aboard the NASA DC-8 Aircraft: During the Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific Airborne Mission (TRACE-P)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    2004-01-01

    The UNH investigation during TRACE-P provided measurements of selected acidic gases and aerosol species aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. Our investigation focused on measuring HNO3, SO2, and fine (less than 2 microns) aerosol SO4(sup 2-) with two minute time resolution in near-real-time. We also quantified mixing ratios of aerosol ionic species, and aerosol (210)Pb and (7)Be collected onto bulk filters at better than 10 minute resolution. This suite of measurements contributed extensively to achieving the principal objectives of TRACE-P. In the context of the full data set collected by experimental teams on the DC-8, our observations provide a solid basis for assessing decadal changes in the chemical composition and source strength of Asian continental outflow. This region of the Pacific should be impacted profoundly by Asian emissions at this time with significant degradation of air quality over the next few decades. Atmospheric measurements in the western Pacific region will provide a valuable time series to help quantify the impact of Asian anthropogenic activities. Our data also provide important insight into the chemical and physical processes transforming Asian outflow during transport over the Pacific, particularly uptake and reactions of soluble gases on aerosol particles. In addition, the TRACE-P data set provide strong constraints for assessing and improving the chemical fields simulated by chemical transport models.

  10. Chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol in the troposphere over the Hudson Bay lowlands and Quebec-Labrador regions of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzelska, K.; Talbot, R. W.; Klemm, K.; Lefer, B.; Klemm, O.; Gregory, G. L.; Anderson, B.; Barrie, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols were collected in the boundary layer and free troposphere over continental and coastal subarctic regions of Canada during the July-August 1990 joint U.S.-Canadian Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) SB/Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES). The samples were analyzed for the following water soluble species: sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium, sodium, chloride, oxalate, methylsulfonate, and total amine nitrogen. Ammonium and sulfate were the major water soluble components of these aerosols. The nearly neutral (overall) chemical composition of summertime aerosol particles contrasts their strongly acidic wintertime composition. Aerosol samples were separated into several air mass categories and characterized in terms of chemical composition, associated mixing ratios of gaseous compounds, and meteorological parameters. The fundamental category represented particles associated with"background"air masses. The summertime atmospheric aerosols in background air over the North American subarctic and Arctic regions were characterized by relatively small and spatially uniform mixing ratios of the measured species. These aerosol particles were aged to the extent that they had lost their primary source signature. The chemical profile of the background air aerosols was frequently modified by additions from biomass fire plumes, aged tropical marine air, and intrusions of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric air. Aerosols in boundary layer background air over the boreal forested region of Quebec-Labrador had significantly larger mixing ratios of ammonium and sulfate relative to the Hudson Bay region. This may reflect infiltration of anthropogenic pollution or be due to natural emissions from this region.

  11. Chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol in the troposphere over the Hudson Bay lowlands and Quebec-Labrador regions of Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorzelska, K.; Talbot, R. W.; Klemm, K.; Lefer, B.; Klemm, O.; Gregory, G. L.; Anderson, B.; Barrie, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols were collected in the boundary layer and free troposphere over continental and coastal subarctic regions of Canada during the July - August 1990 joint U.S.-Canadian Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B/Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES). The samples were analyzed for the following water soluble species: sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium, sodium, chloride, oxalate, methylsulfonate, and total amine nitrogen. Ammonium and sulfate were the major water soluble components of these aerosols. The nearly neutral (overall) chemical composition of summertime aerosol particles contrasts their strongly acidic wintertime composition. Aerosol samples were separated into several air mass categories and characterized in terms of chemical composition, associated mixing ratios of gaseous compounds, and meteorological parameters. The fundamental category represented particles associated with 'background' air masses. The summertime atmospheric aerosols in background air over the North American subarctic and Arctic regions were characterized by relatively small and spatially uniform mixing ratios of the measured species. These aerosol particles were aged to the extent that they had lost their primary source signature. The chemical profile of the background air aerosols was frequently modified by additions from biomass fire plumes, aged tropical marine air, and intrusions of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric air. Aerosols in boundary layer background air over the boreal forest region of Quebec-Labrador had significantly larger mixing ratios of ammonium and sulfate relative to the Hudson Bay region. This may reflect infiltration of anthropogenic pollution or be due to natural emissions from this region.

  12. Single-Species Aerosol Coagulation and Deposition with Arbitrary Size Resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    SAJO, ERNO

    2012-07-31

    Version 00 SAEROSA solves the dynamic aerosol coagulation and deposition problem with arbitrary computational precision under a variety of conditions. The code includes numerous user-selectable coagulation kernels, alone or in combinations, and permits an arbitrary initial size distribution. Many parameter combinations and what-if scenarios under user control are possible. The output gives the particle size distribution suspended in the carrier fluid initially and after the desired aerosol aging time in terms of both differential and integral aerosol volume concentrations. An auxiliary routine designed for the Mac OSX environment provides plotting capability. The output can be further processed by e.g., spreadsheets. The code has been benchmarked against three computer models, including MAEROS, and analytical models with excellent agreement. The test cases also included scenarios where previously published computational coagulation models lack capabilities or exhibit numerical instabilities. These included narrow, delta function, and non-lognormal initial size distributions, and further conditions, such as the presence of simultaneous coagulation mechanisms, including electrostatic effects, spanning multiple flow-regimes.

  13. Modeling and analysis of aerosol processes in an interactive chemistry general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sunita; Boucher, O.; Reddy, M. S.; Upadhyaya, H. C.; Le van, P.; Binkowski, F. S.; Sharma, O. P.

    2007-02-01

    An "online" aerosol dynamics and chemistry module is included in the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique general circulation model (LMDZ), so that the chemical species are advected at each dynamical time step and evolve through chemical and physical processes that have been parameterized consistently with the meteorology. These processes include anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, over 50 gas/aqueous phase chemical reactions, transport due to advection, vertical diffusion and convection, dry deposition and wet scavenging. We have introduced a size-resolved representation of aerosols which undergo various processes such as coagulation, nucleation and dry and wet scavenging. The model considers 16 prognostic tracers: water vapor, liquid water, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), methanesulphonic acid (MSA), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOX), carbon monoxide (CO), nitric acid (HNO3), ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), sulfate mass and number for Aitken and accumulation modes. The scheme accounts for two-way interactions between tropospheric chemistry and aerosols. The oxidants and chemical species fields that represent the sulfate aerosol formation are evolved interactively with the model dynamics. A detailed description on the coupled climate-chemistry interactive module is presented with the evaluation of chemical species in winter and summer seasons. Aqueous phase reactions in cloud accounted for 71% of sulfate production rate, while only 45% of the sulfate burden in the troposphere is derived from in-cloud oxidation.

  14. Contribution of the Pacific Coast Area to Particulate Sulfate in the Western United States Based on Trajectory Regression Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Dubois, D.; Pitchford, M.; Green, M.; Etyemezian, V.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can significantly reduce visibility and result in regional haze. The Clean Air Act amendments established a national visibility goal to remedy existing impairment and prevent future impairment in Federal Class I areas (national parks and wilderness areas designated by Congress), most of which are in the western U.S. In order to identify the major source regions of the atmospheric aerosols in the Class I areas of the western United States, backtrajectories are calculated for each Western Regional Air Partnership (WRAP) Class I area every three hours at three starting heights (10, 500, 1500m) for the years 2000-2002 using the NOAA HYSPLIT v4.6 model. Under the concept that the amount of time air spends over a region determines that region's contribution to the sulfate concentration measured at the receptor site, multiple-linear regression between the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) measured sulfate concentration and the residence time in the pre-defined potential source regions was conducted for each Class I area. The results suggest that sulfate aerosol can be transported over long distances and impact large areas. Shipping and other port emissions from the Pacific Coast area are estimated to have significant contributions to atmospheric sulfate aerosol concentrations in large areas of the western United States. On average, 11 to 15 percent of the sulfate is attributed to the Pacific Coast area for all WRAP continental IMPROVE sites studied. The Pacific Coast area contributes about 50 percent to ambient sulfate for the major port areas of southern California based on the regression. These analyses suggest that shipping / port emissions need to be considered in the development of efficient control strategies for reducing the concentrations of sulfate and other aerosol species.

  15. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds and subsequent photochemical production of secondary organic aerosol in mesocosm studies of temperate and tropical plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; Alfarra, M. R.; McFiggans, G.; Carr, T.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Capes, G.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pugh, T. A. M.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    Silver birch (Betula pendula) and three Southeast Asian tropical plant species (Ficus cyathistipula, Ficus benjamina and Caryota millis) from the pantropical fig and palm genera were grown in a purpose-built and environment-controlled whole-tree chamber. The volatile organic compounds emitted from these trees were characterised and fed into a linked photochemical reaction chamber where they underwent photooxidation under a range of controlled conditions (RH ∼65-89%, VOC/NOx ∼3-9 and NOx ∼2 ppbV). Both the gas phase and the aerosol phase of the reaction chamber were monitored in detail using a comprehensive suite of on-line and off-line, chemical and physical measurement techniques. Silver birch was found to be a high monoterpene and sesquiterpene, but low isoprene emitter, and its emissions were observed to produce measureable amounts of SOA via both nucleation and condensation onto pre-existing seed aerosol (YSOA 26-39%). In contrast, all three tropical species were found to be high isoprene emitters with trace emissions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. In tropical plant experiments without seed aerosol there was no measurable SOA nucleation, but aerosol mass was shown to increase when seed aerosol was present. Although principally isoprene emitting, the aerosol mass produced from tropical fig was mostly consistent (i.e., in 78 out of 120 aerosol mass calculations using plausible parameter sets of various precursor specific yields) with condensation of photooxidation products of the minor VOCs co-emitted; no significant aerosol yield from condensation of isoprene oxidation products was required in the interpretations of the experimental results. This finding is in line with previous reports of organic aerosol loadings consistent with production from minor biogenic VOCs co-emitted with isoprene in principally-isoprene emitting landscapes in Southeast Asia. Moreover, in general the amount of aerosol mass produced from the emissions of the principally

  16. Global measurements of gaseous and aerosol trace species in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere from daily flights of 747 airliners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Extensive measurements include ozone, carbon monoxide, water vapor, and aerosol and condensation nuclei number density. Less extensive measurements include chlorofluoromethanes, sulfates and nitrates. Certain meteorological and flight information are also recorded at the time of these measurements. World routes range in latitude from about 60 deg N near North America to about 40 deg S over Australia and 23 deg S over South America. Typical data show significant changes in ozone, carbon monoxide, and water vapor when crossing the tropopause either during changes in altitude or at cruise altitude. These gases as well as light scattering particles and condensation nuclei exhibit considerable variability along a flight route.

  17. Release of Reactive Halogen Species from Sea-Salt Aerosols under Tropospheric Conditions with/without the Influence of Organic Matter in Smog-Chamber Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, N.; Behnke, W.; Bleicher, S.; Krueger, H.; Ofner, J.; Siekmann, F.; Zetzsch, C.

    2008-12-01

    Experiments to investigate the release of reactive halogen species from sea-salt aerosol and the influence of organic matter were performed in an aerosol smog-chamber (3500 l), made of Teflon film (FEP 200A, Dupont). Smog chamber facilities at lowered temperature (coolable down to -25°C) enable us to simulate these reactions under polar, tropospheric conditions. First experiments were performed to investigate the production of atomic Br and Cl without the impact of organic aerosol. Br and Cl play an important role in atmospheric ozone depletion, particularly regarding ozone depletion events (bromine explosion) during polar spring. In these studies, the aerosol was generated by atomizing salt solutions containing the typical Br/Cl ratio of 1/660 in seawater by an ultrasonic nebulizer and increasing the Br content up to sixfold. To ensure the aqueous surface of the aerosol, the experiments were performed at relative humidities above 76%. We determined the atomic Cl and OH-radical concentrations from the simultaneous consumption of four reference hydrocarbons. The Br-radical concentration was calculated on the basis of ozone depletion. Organic aerosol may take part in these reaction cycles by halogenation and production of volatile organic halogens. Further experiments are planned to add organic aerosol for mechanistic and kinetic studies on the influence of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and humic-like substances (HULIS) on bromine explosion. The formation of the secondary organic aerosol and the determination of possible halogenated gaseous and solid organic products will be studied using longpath-FTIR, DRIFTS, ATR-FTIR, GC-FID, GC-ECD, GC-MS, TPD-MS and DMA-CNC.

  18. Lagrangian Sampling of 3-D Air Quality Model Results for Regional Transport Contributions to Sulfate Aerosol Concentrations at Baltimore, MD in Summer of 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lagrangian method provides estimates of the chemical and physical evolution of air arriving in the daytime boundary layer at Baltimore. Study results indicate a dominant role for regional transport contributions of those days when sulfate air pollution is highest in Baltimor...

  19. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  20. Detailed mass size distributions of atmospheric aerosol species in the Negev desert, Israel, during ARACHNE-96

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, Willy; Ptasinski, Jacek; Cafmeyer, Jan

    1999-04-01

    As part of the 1996 summer intensive of the Aerosol, RAdiation and CHemistry Experiment (ARACHNE-96), the mass size distribution of various airborne particulate elements was studied at a remote site in the Negev Desert, Israel. Aerosol collections were made with 8-stage PIXE International cascade impactors (PCIs) and 12-stage small deposit area low pressure impactors (SDIs) and the samples were analyzed by PIXE for about 20 elements. The mineral elements (Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe) exhibited a unimodal size distribution which peaked at about 6 μm, but the contribution of particles larger than 10 μm was clearly more pronounced during the day than during night. Sulphur and Br had a tendency to exhibit two modes in the submicrometer size range, with diameters at about 0.3 and 0.6 μm, respectively. The elements V and Ni, which are indicators of residual fuel burning, showed essentially one fine mode (at 0.3 μm) in addition to a coarse mode which represented the mineral dust contribution. Overall, good agreement was observed between the mass size distributions from the PCI and SDI devices. The PCI was superior to the SDI for studying the size distribution in the coarse size range, but the SDI was clearly superior for unravelling the various modes in the submicrometer size range.

  1. Long term aerosol and trace gas measurements in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-04-01

    The central region of the Amazonian forest is a pristine region in terms of aerosol and trace gases concentrations. In the wet season, Amazonia is actually one of the cleanest continental region we can observe on Earth. A long term observational program started 20 years ago, and show important features of this pristine region. Several sites were used, between then ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) and ZF2 ecological research site, both 70-150 Km North of Manaus, receiving air masses that traveled over 1500 km of pristine tropical forests. The sites are GAW regional monitoring stations. Aerosol chemical composition (OC/EC and trace elements) is being analysed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors). VOCs are measured using PTR-MS, while CO, O3 and CO2 are routinely measured. Aerosol absorption is being studied with AE33 aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using TSI and Ecotech nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizer at each site. Lidars measure the aerosol column up to 12 Km providing the vertical profile of aerosol extinction. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sun photometers. In the wet season, organic aerosol comprises 75-85% of fine aerosol, and sulfate and nitrate concentrations are very low (1-3 percent). Aerosols are dominated by biogenic primary particles as well as SOA from biogenic precursors. Black carbon in the wet season accounts for 5-9% of fine mode aerosol. Ozone in the wet season peaks at 10-12 ppb at the middle of the day, while carbon monoxide averages at 50-80 ppb. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is a low 0.05 to 0.1 at 550 nm in the wet season. Sahara dust transport events sporadically enhance the concentration of soil dust aerosols and black carbon. In the dry season (August-December), long range transported

  2. Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol during MILAGRO 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Sullivan, A.; Weber, R.; VanReken, T.; Fischer, M.; Matias, E.; Moya, M.; Farmer, D.; Cohen, R.C.

    2008-12-05

    Fast measurements of aerosol and gas-phase constituents coupled with the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model are used to study the partitioning of semivolatile inorganic species and phase state of Mexico City aerosol sampled at the T1 site during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign. Overall, predicted semivolatile partitioning agrees well with measurements. PM{sub 2.5} is insensitive to changes in ammonia but is to acidic semivolatile species. For particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m diameter, semi-volatile partitioning requires 30-60 min to equilibrate; longer time is typically required during the night and early morning hours. When the aerosol sulfate-to-nitrate molar ratio is less than unity, predictions improve substantially if the aerosol is assumed to follow the deliquescent phase diagram. Treating crustal species as 'equivalent sodium' (rather than explicitly) in the thermodynamic equilibrium calculations introduces important biases in predicted aerosol water uptake, nitrate and ammonium; neglecting crustals further increases errors dramatically. This suggests that explicitly considering crustals in the thermodynamic calculations is required to accurately predict the partitioning and phase state of aerosols.

  3. Examining the role of NOx and acidity on organic aerosol formation through predictions of key isoprene aerosol species in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene is a significant contributor to organic aerosol in the Southeastern United States. Later generation isoprene products, specifically isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) and methacryloylperoxynitrate (MPAN), have been identified as SOA precursors. The contribution of each pathway ...

  4. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  5. Analysis of organic and inorganic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosol using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Richard E.; Tyler, Bonnie J.

    This work explores the utility of time-of-flight static secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) for the analysis of the surface organic layer on individual atmospheric aerosol particles. The surface sensitivity and minimal fragmentation available with TOF-SIMS suggest that it can be a powerful tool for the examination of the organic and inorganic species on the surface of individual particles. Cascade impactors were used to collect aerosol from summer 2000 Montana forest fires, winter snowmobile samples in Yellowstone National Park, Hawaiian lava and sea salt, from an Asian Dust event reaching Salt Lake City, Utah in April 2001 and from Salt Lake Valley summer urban aerosol. TOF-SIMS analysis and multivariate statistical techniques combined gave chemical and morphological information about the particles. Surfaces of the aerosol from forest fires, snowmobile exhaust, and sea salt were all dominated by aliphatic hydrocarbons and their amphiphilic derivatives. Each source showed a different organic chemical signature. The extent and composition of the organics layer which typically covers the surface of atmospheric particles are expected to effect all of the surface related aerosol properties such as health effects, the ability of the particle to activate and form cloud droplets, and the aggregation of particles as well as reactions between the particle and gas phase species.

  6. Speciation and water soluble fraction of iron in aerosols from various sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kurisu, M.; Uematsu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient and has been identified as a limiting factor for phytoplankton growth in high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the ocean. In the North Pacific, three sources of iron (Fe) transported via. atmosphere can be suggested: (i) mineral dust from East Asia, (ii) anthropogenic Fe, and (iii) aerosols from volcanic origin. Considering these different sources, Fe can be found and transported in a variety of chemical forms, both water-soluble and -insoluble. It is generally believed that only the soluble fraction of Fe can be considered as bioavailable for phytoplankton. To assess the biogeochemical impact of the atmospheric input, attempt was made to determine Fe species by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and its water solubility, in particular to compare the three sources. Iron species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentration in aerosol collected at Tsukuba (Japan) through a year were investigated to compare the contributions of mineral dust and anthropogenic components. It was found that the concentration of soluble Fe in aerosol is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate which originate from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. XAS analysis showed that main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba were illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, soluble Fe fraction is closely correlated with that of Fe(III) sulfate. In spite of supply of high concentrations of Fe in mineral dust from East Asia, it was found that anthropogenic fraction is important due to its high water solubility by the presence of Fe(III) sulfate. Marine aerosol samples originated from volcanic ash were collected in the western North Pacific during KH-08-2 cruise (August, 2008). XAS analysis suggested that Fe species of volcanic ashes changed during the long-range transport, while dissolution experiment showed that Fe solubility of the marine aerosol is larger than

  7. Characterization of radicals and high-molecular weight species from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction and ambient aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Jelica

    Secondary organic aerosol formed during oxidation of different volatile organic compounds is composed from a number of final and intermediate reaction products. The final products include compounds in both low and high molecular weight range called also oligomer species. These compounds can be highly volatile, as well as being semi- or low-volatility compounds. This study characterized intermediate reactive radical products formed from previously often studied alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. In order to passivate those radical species nitrone spin traps were used. 5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-3H-pyrrole-N-oxide (DMPO), and 5-dietoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) traps were able to successfully trap oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals produced from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. Electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative ion mode with mass spectrometry (MS) detection was used to scan spectra of formed spin trap adducts and the tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) to elucidate its structures as well as structures of captured radicals. The same method was applied to analyze radical species present in ambient PM2.5 samples. Few carbon- (alkyl) and oxygen- (alkoxyl) centered radicals were captured with DMPO and DEPMPO traps. The second part of this study was focused on high molecular weight (high-MW) species formed from the same reaction (alpha-pinene/ozone), but found also in fine particulate matter fractions of ambient samples. LC/MS/MS analysis of dimer species from chamber study revealed fragments that can originate from peroxide structures. Proposed reaction for these peroxide dimer formation is self reaction of two peroxyl radicals, followed by the loss of oxygen molecule. These findings emphasize the role of peroxyl (ROO) radicals in formation of high-MW products and are in line with the high O:C ratio results reported in other studies. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) extracts of three size fractions of the ambient aerosol, PM1--2.5, PM0.1--1, and PM<0

  8. Global modeling of tropospheric iodine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwen, Tomás. M.; Evans, Mat J.; Spracklen, Dominick V.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Chance, Rosie; Baker, Alex R.; Schmidt, Johan A.; Breider, Thomas J.

    2016-09-01

    Natural aerosols play a central role in the Earth system. The conversion of dimethyl sulfide to sulfuric acid is the dominant source of oceanic secondary aerosol. Ocean emitted iodine can also produce aerosol. Using a GEOS-Chem model, we present a simulation of iodine aerosol. The simulation compares well with the limited observational data set. Iodine aerosol concentrations are highest in the tropical marine boundary layer (MBL) averaging 5.2 ng (I) m-3 with monthly maximum concentrations of 90 ng (I) m-3. These masses are small compared to sulfate (0.75% of MBL burden, up to 11% regionally) but are more significant compared to dimethyl sulfide sourced sulfate (3% of the MBL burden, up to 101% regionally). In the preindustrial, iodine aerosol makes up 0.88% of the MBL burden sulfate mass and regionally up to 21%. Iodine aerosol may be an important regional mechanism for ocean-atmosphere interaction.

  9. Speciation of 127I and 129I in atmospheric aerosols at Risø, Denmark: insight into sources of iodine isotopes and their species transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. Y.; Hou, X. L.; Xu, S.

    2015-09-01

    Speciation analysis of iodine in aerosols is a very useful approach for understanding geochemical cycling of iodine in the atmosphere. In this study, overall iodine species, including water-soluble iodine species (iodide, iodate and water-soluble organic iodine), NaOH-soluble iodine and insoluble iodine have been determined for 129I and 127I in the aerosols collected at Risø, Denmark, between March and May 2011 (shortly after the Fukushima nuclear accident) and in December 2014. The measured concentrations of total iodine are in the range of 1.04-2.48 ng m-3 for 127I and (11.3-97.0) × 105 atoms m-3 for 129I, and 129I / 127I atomic ratios of (17.8-86.8) × 10-8. The contribution of Fukushima-derived 129I (peak value of 6.3 × 104 atoms m-3) is estimated to be negligible (less than 6 %) compared to the total 129I concentration in northern Europe. The concentrations and species of 129I and 127I in the aerosols are found to be strongly related to their sources and atmospheric pathways. Aerosols that were transported over the contaminated ocean, contained higher amounts of 129I than aerosols transported over the European continent. The high 129I concentrations of the marine aerosols are attributed to secondary emission from heavily 129I-contaminated seawater rather than primary gaseous release from nuclear reprocessing plants. Water-soluble iodine was found to be a minor fraction to total iodine for both 127I (7.8-13.7 %) and 129I (6.5-14.1 %) in ocean-derived aerosols, but accounted for 20.2-30.3 % for 127I and 25.6-29.5 % for 129I in land-derived aerosols. Iodide was the predominant form of water-soluble iodine, accounting for more than 97 % of the water-soluble iodine. NaOH-soluble iodine seems to be independent of the sources of aerosols. The significant proportion of 129I and 127I found in NaOH-soluble fractions is likely bound with organic substances. In contrast to water-soluble iodine however, the sources of air masses exerted distinct influences on insoluble

  10. Speciation of 127I and 129I in atmospheric aerosols at Risø, Denmark: insight into sources of iodine isotopes and their species transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Luyuan; Hou, Xiaolin; Xu, Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Speciation analysis of iodine in aerosols is a very useful approach for understanding geochemical cycling of iodine in the atmosphere. In this study, overall iodine species, including water-soluble iodine species (iodide, iodate and water-soluble organic iodine), NaOH-soluble iodine, and insoluble iodine have been determined for 129I and 127I in the aerosols collected at Risø, Denmark, during March and May 2011 (shortly after the Fukushima nuclear accident) and in December 2014. The measured concentrations of total iodine are in the range of 1.04-2.48 ng m-3 for 127I and (11.3-97.0) × 105 atoms m-3 for 129I, corresponding to 129I / 127I atomic ratios of (17.8-86.8) × 10-8. The contribution of Fukushima-derived 129I (peak value of 6.3 × 104 atoms m-3) is estimated to be negligible (less than 6 %) compared to the total 129I concentration in northern Europe. The concentrations and species of 129I and 127I in the aerosols are found to be strongly related to their sources and atmospheric pathways. Aerosols that were transported over the contaminated seas contained higher concentrations of 129I than aerosols transported over the European continent. The high 129I concentrations of the marine aerosols are attributed to secondary emission of marine discharged 129I in the contaminated seawater in the North Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, English Channel, Kattegat, etc., rather than direct gaseous release from the European nuclear reprocessing plants (NRPs). Water-soluble iodine was found to be a minor fraction to the total iodine for both 127I (7.8-13.7 %) and 129I (6.5-14.1 %) in ocean-derived aerosols, but accounted for 20.2-30.3 % for 127I and 25.6-29.5 % for 129I in land-derived aerosols. Iodide was the predominant form of water-soluble iodine, accounting for more than 97 % of the water-soluble iodine. NaOH-soluble iodine seems to be independent of the sources of aerosols. The significant proportion of 129I and 127I found in NaOH-soluble fractions is likely bound with

  11. Representation and evaluation of aerosol mixing state in a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Prather, K. A.; Ault, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere are composed out of multiple chemical species. The aerosol mixing state is an important aerosol property that will determine the interaction of aerosols with the climate system via radiative forcings and cloud activation. Through the introduction of aerosol microphysics into climate models, aerosol mixing state is by now taken into account to a certain extend in climate models, and evaluation of mixing state is the next challenge. Here we use data from the Aerosol Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) and compare the results to the GISS-modelE-MATRIX model, a global climate model including a detailed aerosol micro-physical scheme. We use data from various field campaigns probing, urban, rural and maritime air masses and compare those to climatological and nudged simulations for the years 2005 to 2009. ATOFMS provides information about the size distributions of several mixing state classes, including the chemical components of black and organic carbon, sulfates, dust and salts. MATRIX simulates 16 aerosol populations, which definitions are based on mixing state. We have grouped ATOFMS and MATRIX data into similar mixing state classes and compare the size resolved number concentrations against each other. As a first result we find that climatological simulations are rather difficult to evaluate with field data, and that nudged simulations give a much better agreement. However this is not just caused by the better fit of natural - meteorological driven - aerosol components, but also due to the interaction between meteorology and aerosol formation. The model seems to get the right amount of mixing state of black carbon material with sulfate and organic components, but seems to always overestimate the fraction of black carbon that is externally mixed. In order to understand this bias between model and the ATOFMS data, we will look into microphysical processes near emission sources and investigate the climate relevance of these sub

  12. On the contribution of organics to the North East Atlantic aerosol number concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, Jakub; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Monahan, Ciaran; Beddows, David; O'Dowd, Colin

    2012-12-01

    k-means statistical-cluster analysis of submicron aerosol size distributions is combined with coincident humidity tandem differential mobility analyser data, leading to five unique aerosol categories for hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs): low sea-salt background marine, high sea-salt background marine, coastal nucleation, open ocean nucleation and anthropogenically influenced scenarios. When considering only marine conditions, and generic aerosol species associated with this environment (e.g. non-sea-salt sulfate, sea-salt, partly soluble organic matter and water insoluble organic matter), the two-year annual average contribution to aerosol number concentration from the different generic species was made up as follows: 46% (30-54%) of partially modified ammonium sulfate particles; 23% (11-40%) of partially modified sea-salt; and the remaining 31% (25-35%) contribution attributed to two distinct organic species as evidenced by different, but low, HGFs. The analysis reveals that on annual timescales, ˜30% of the submicron marine aerosol number concentration is sourced from predominantly organic aerosol while 60% of the anthropogenic aerosol number is predominantly organic. Coastal nucleation events show the highest contribution of the lowest HGF mode (1.19), although this contribution is more likely to be influenced by inorganic iodine oxides. While organic mass internally mixed with inorganic salts will lower the activation potential of these mixed aerosol types, thereby potentially reducing the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), pure organic water soluble particles are still likely to be activated into cloud droplets, thereby increasing the concentration of CCN. A combination of dynamics and aerosol concentrations will determine which effect will prevail under given conditions.

  13. FTIR Analysis of Functional Groups in Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, S. M.; McKenzie, G.; Dransfield, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are suspensions of particulate matter composed of compounds formed from chemical reactions of organic species in the atmosphere. Atmospheric particulate matter can have impacts on climate, the environment and human health. Standardized techniques to analyze the characteristics and composition of complex secondary organic aerosols are necessary to further investigate the formation of SOA and provide a better understanding of the reaction pathways of organic species in the atmosphere. While Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can provide detailed information about the elemental composition of a sample, it reveals little about the chemical moieties which make up the particles. This work probes aerosol particles deposited on Teflon filters using FTIR, based on the protocols of Russell, et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, 2009) and the spectral fitting algorithm of Takahama, et al (submitted, 2012). To validate the necessary calibration curves for the analysis of complex samples, primary aerosols of key compounds (e.g., citric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium benzoate) were generated, and the accumulated masses of the aerosol samples were related to their IR absorption intensity. These validated calibration curves were then used to classify and quantify functional groups in SOA samples generated in chamber studies by MIT's Kroll group. The fitting algorithm currently quantifies the following functionalities: alcohols, alkanes, alkenes, amines, aromatics, carbonyls and carboxylic acids.

  14. Ice nucleation in internally mixed ammonium sulfate/dicarboxylic acid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Matthew E.; Garland, Rebecca M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2004-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that tropospheric sulfate aerosols commonly contain 50% or more by mass organic species. The influence of these organics on the chemical and physical properties of sulfate aerosols is not fully established. Using an aerosol flow tube technique, we have determined ice nucleation temperatures for particles composed of ammonium sulfate and mixtures of ammonium sulfate with a series of dicarboxylic acids. A calibration curve was developed to allow us to convert the freezing temperatures to a saturation ratio required for ice nucleation. At levels detectable by our experimental technique we find that the freezing temperatures and critical ice saturation ratios of each system were identical, for a given water activity of the solution, even though the solutions contained varying fractions of inorganic and organic components. Further experiments showed that the freezing behavior of pure dicarboxylic acid particles was identical to that of the other systems studied if the water activity was identical. Although the apparent freezing temperatures reported here are substantially warmer than those predicted by the water activity based nucleation theory of T. Koop et al., we find that solution water activity defined the freezing conditions for the systems studied here.

  15. Identification of nitrogenous organic species in Titan aerosols analogs: Nitrogen fixation routes in early atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2013-09-01

    Titan, an icy world surrounded by auburn organic haze, is considered as one of the best targets for studying abiotic planetary organic chemistry. In spite of a great many efforts being made, the chemistry in Titan’s atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of Titan aerosols analogs (tholin) by NMR and identified hexamethylenetetramine as a dominant small molecule in Titan tholin. Here we report a more complete and definitive structural investigation of the small molecule inventory in Titan tholin. We identified several nitrogenous organic molecules including cyanamide, guanidine, 2-cyanoguanidine, melamine, N‧-cyanoformamidine and 1,2,4-triazole in Titan tholin by using NMR and GC-MS and standard sample comparison. The structural characteristics of these molecules suggest a possible formation pathway from the reaction of HCN and NH3, both of which are known to exist in appreciable density in the atmosphere and were tentatively detected by the Huygens probe.

  16. Aerosol particles at a high-altitude site on the Southeast Tibetan Plateau, China: Implications for pollution transport from South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhuzi; Cao, Junji; Shen, Zhenxing; Xu, Baiqing; Zhu, Chongshu; Chen, L.-W. Antony; Su, Xiaoli; Liu, Suixin; Han, Yongming; Wang, Gehui; Ho, Kinfai

    2013-10-01

    aerosol samples were collected from 16 July 2008 to 26 July 2009 at Lulang, a high-altitude (>3300m above sea level) site on the southeast Tibetan Plateau (TP); objectives were to determine chemical characteristics of the aerosol and identify its major sources. We report aerosol (total suspended particulate, TSP) mass levels and the concentrations of selected elements, carbonaceous species, and water-soluble inorganic ions. Significant buildup of aerosol mass and chemical species (organic carbon, element carbon, nitrate, and sulfate) occurred during the premonsoon, while lower concentrations were observed during the monsoon. Seasonal variations in aerosol and chemical species were driven by precipitation scavenging and atmospheric circulation. Two kinds of high-aerosol episodes were observed: one was enriched with dust indicators (Fe and Ca2+), and the other was enhanced with organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), SO42-, NO3-, and Fe. The TSP loadings during the latter were 3 to 6 times those on normal days. The greatest aerosol optical depths (National Centers for Environmental Protection/National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis) occurred upwind, in eastern India and Bangladesh, and trajectory analysis indicates that air pollutants were transported from the southwest. Northwesterly winds brought high levels of natural emissions (Fe, Ca2+) and low levels of pollutants (SO42-, NO3-, K+, and EC); this was consistent with high aerosol optical depths over the western deserts and Gobi. Our work provides evidence that both geological and pollution aerosols from surrounding regions impact the aerosol population of the TP.

  17. Airborne Fungi in Sahara Dust Aerosols Reaching the Eastern Caribbean: II. Species Identification Using Molecular Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Mota, A.; Betancourt, C.; Detres, Y.; Armstrong, R.

    2003-12-01

    Fungi samples from filters collected in Castle Bruce, Dominica from March through July 2002, were previously purified and identified to genus level using classic macroscopic and microscopic techniques. A total of 105 isolated colonies were cultured in liquid media and the mycelial mats used for DNA extraction. PCR was used to amplify the ITS region of the rDNA using the ITS1 and ITS4 primers. Both strands of the amplified products were sequenced and the final identification to species level was completed by a GenBank search. Fourteen different species and one fungal endophyte were identified from genders Aspergillus,Penicillium, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Curvularia and Phanerochaete. Some of these species such as A. fumigatus, A. japonicus, P. citrinum and C. cladosporoides are known to cause respiratory disorders in humans. A. fumigatus causes an aggressive pulmonary allergic response that might result in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Other species such as F. equiseti and C. brachyspora are plant pathogens affecting economically important crops. Sahara dust is an important source of fungal spores of species that are not common in the Caribbean region.

  18. The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in northern and southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Seinfeld, John H.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2012-11-21

    Carbonaceous aerosols impact climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation, and hence play a major, although highly uncertain, role in global radiative forcing. Commonly, ambient carbonaceous aerosols are internally mixed with secondary species such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium, which influence their climate impacts through optical properties, hygroscopicity, and atmospheric lifetime. Aircraft-aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (A-ATOFMS), which measures single-particle mixing state, was used to determine the fraction of organic and soot aerosols that were internally mixed and the variability of their mixing state in California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaigns in the late spring and early summer of 2010. Nearly 88% of all A-ATOFMS measured particles (100-1000 nm in diameter) were internally mixed with secondary species, with 96% and 75% of particles internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate in southern and northern California, respectively. Even though atmospheric particle composition in both regions was primarily influenced by urban sources, the mixing state was found to vary greatly, with nitrate and soot being the dominant species in southern California, and sulfate and organic carbon in northern California. Furthermore, mixing state varied temporally in northern California, with soot becoming the prevalent particle type towards the end of the study as regional pollution levels increased. The results from these studies demonstrate that the majority of ambient carbonaceous particles are internally mixed and are heavily influenced by secondary species that are most predominant in each region. Based on these findings, considerations of regionally dominant sources and secondary species, as well as temporal variations of aerosol physical and optical properties, will be required to obtain more accurate predictions of the

  19. The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in northern and southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, J. F.; Suski, K.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Zaveri, R. A.; Prather, K. A.

    2012-11-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols impact climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation, and hence play a major, although highly uncertain, role in global radiative forcing. Commonly, ambient carbonaceous aerosols are internally mixed with secondary species such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium, which influences their optical properties, hygroscopicity, and atmospheric lifetime, thus impacting climate forcing. Aircraft-aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (A-ATOFMS), which measures single-particle mixing state, was used to determine the fraction of organic and soot aerosols that are internally mixed and the variability of their mixing state in California during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaigns in the late spring and early summer of 2010. Nearly 88% of all A-ATOFMS measured particles (100-1000 nm in diameter) were internally mixed with secondary species, with 96% and 75% of particles internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate in southern and northern California, respectively. Even though atmospheric particle composition in both regions was primarily influenced by urban sources, the mixing state was found to vary greatly, with nitrate and soot being the dominant species in southern California, and sulfate and organic carbon in northern California. Furthermore, mixing state varied temporally in northern California, with soot becoming the prevalent particle type towards the end of the study as regional pollution levels increased. The results from these studies demonstrate that the majority of ambient carbonaceous particles in California are internally mixed and are heavily influenced by secondary species that are most prevalent in the particular region. Based on these findings, considerations of regionally dominant sources and secondary species, as well as temporal variations of aerosol physical and optical properties, will be required to obtain more

  20. The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in Northern and Southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, J. F.; Suski, K.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Zaveri, R. A.; Prather, K. A.

    2012-07-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols impact climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation, and hence play a major, although highly uncertain, role in global radiative forcing. Commonly, ambient carbonaceous aerosols are internally mixed with secondary species such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium, which influences their optical properties, hygroscopicity, and atmospheric lifetime, thus impacting climate forcing. Aircraft-aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (A-ATOFMS), which measures single-particle mixing state, was used to determine the fraction of organic and soot aerosols that are internally mixed and the variability of their mixing state in California during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaigns in the late spring and early summer of 2010. Nearly 88% of all A-ATOFMS measured particles (100-1000 nm in diameter) were internally mixed with secondary species, with 96% and 75% of particles internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate in Southern and Northern California, respectively. Even though atmospheric particle composition in both regions was primarily influenced by urban sources, the mixing state was found to vary greatly, with nitrate and soot being the dominant species in Southern California, and sulfate and organic carbon in Northern California. Furthermore, mixing state varied temporally in Northern California, with soot becoming the prevalent particle type towards the end of the study as regional pollution levels increased. The results from these studies demonstrate that the majority of ambient carbonaceous particles in California are internally mixed and are heavily influenced by secondary species that are most prevalent in the particular region. Based on these findings, considerations of regionally dominant sources and secondary species, as well as temporal variations of aerosol physical and optical properties, will be required to obtain more

  1. Anthropogenic Sulfate, Clouds, and Climate Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Steven J.

    1997-01-01

    This research work is a joint effort between research groups at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Virginia Tech University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Texas A&M University. It has been jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In this research, a detailed tropospheric aerosol-chemistry model that predicts oxidant concentrations as well as concentrations of sulfur dioxide and sulfate aerosols has been coupled to a general circulation model that distinguishes between cloud water mass and cloud droplet number. The coupled model system has been first validated and then used to estimate the radiative impact of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. Both the direct radiative impact of the aerosols and their indirect impact through their influence on cloud droplet number are represented by distinguishing between sulfuric acid vapor and fresh and aged sulfate aerosols, and by parameterizing cloud droplet nucleation in terms of vertical velocity and the number concentration of aged sulfur aerosols. Natural sulfate aerosols, dust, and carbonaceous and nitrate aerosols and their influence on the radiative impact of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, through competition as cloud condensation nuclei, will also be simulated. Parallel simulations with and without anthropogenic sulfur emissions are performed for a global domain. The objectives of the research are: To couple a state-of-the-art tropospheric aerosol-chemistry model with a global climate model. To use field and satellite measurements to evaluate the treatment of tropospheric chemistry and aerosol physics in the coupled model. To use the coupled model to simulate the radiative (and ultimately climatic) impacts of anthropogenic sulfur emissions.

  2. Vertical distribution of non-volatile species of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol observed by balloon-borne optical particle counter above Ny-Aalesund, Norway in the winter of 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, K.; Hayashi, M.; Shibata, T.; Neuber, R.; Ruhe, W.

    2015-12-01

    The polar lower stratosphere is the sink area of stratospheric global circulation. The composition, concentration and size distribution of aerosol in the polar stratosphere are considered to be strongly influenced by the transportations from mid-latitude to polar region and exchange of stratosphere to troposphere. In order to study the aerosol composition and size distribution in the Arctic stratosphere and the relationship between their aerosol microphysical properties and transport process, we carried out balloon-borne measurement of aerosol volatility above Ny-Aalesund, Norway in the winter of 2015. In our observation, two optical particle counters and a thermo denuder were suspended by one rubber balloon. A particle counter measured the heated aerosol size distribution (after heating at the temperature of 300 degree by the thermo denuder) and the other measured the ambient aerosol size distribution during the observation. The observation was carried out on 15 January, 2015. Balloon arrived at the height of 30km and detailed information of aerosol size distributions in upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for both heated aerosol and ambient aerosol were obtained. As a Result, the number ratio of non-volatile particles to ambient aerosol particles in lower stratosphere (11-15km) showed different feature in particle size range of fine mode (0.3aerosol particles were 1-3% in fine mode range and 7-20% in coarse mode range. They suggested that fine particles are composed dominantly of volatile species (probably sulfuric acid), and coarse particles are composed of non-volatile species such as minerals, sea-salts. In our presentation, we show the obtained aerosol size distribution and discuss the aerosol compositions and their transport process.

  3. Near-real time infrared observations of acidic sulfates in /open quotes/clean/close quotes/ air at Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Kumar, R.

    1988-01-01

    Sulfuric acid and its partially or completely neutralized salts with ammonia are believed to result from the oxidation of sulfur dioxide in cloud water and in other heterogeneous media present in the atmosphere. Due to the natural abundance of ammonia and the ubiquitous presence of sulfur in the atmosphere, (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ is commonly the dominant chemical species in the ambient aerosol. The amounts of ammonium sulfates are expected to be very low in areas far removed from anthropogenic emissions of sulfur dioxide. The chemical composition of submicrometer aerosol particles was determined at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) on Mauna Loa in Hawaii during an eight-day period in August 1986. The MLO site was selected for this measurement because it is the only ground-based aerosol observatory in the remote Pacific Ocean that allows extended sampling of aerosols in the free troposphere. Measurements were made using an attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) impactor system. The impactor collects size-fractionated submicrometer particles for analysis by ATR infrared spectroscopy. The collected samples were analyzed using an on-site Perkin Elmer dispersive infrared spectrophotometer. Infrared absorption spectra (4000 to 250 cm/sup /minus/1/) of the samples were obtained within minutes after the ATR substrates were removed from the impactor. Absorbances were measured for sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium. Acidic sulfate showed infrared absorbances at 600 cm/sup /minus/1/ and 1210 cm/sup /minus/1/ in addition. Results showed that ammonium sulfate was the dominant chemical species in the submicrometer particles. Over half of the nearly 40 samples collected showed an acidic sulfate component. Consecutive samples were found to change from completely neutralized ammonium sulfate to acidic ammonium sulfates in a two-hour time interval. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Analysis of inorganic mercury species associated with airborne particulate matter/aerosols: method development.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinbin; Lu, Julia Y; Grègoire, D Conrad; Hao, Yingjie; Banic, Catharine M; Schroeder, William H

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a method for speciation of Hg associated with airborne particulate matter. This method uses a mini-sampler for sample collection and analysis, thermal desorption for separating Hg species, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for identification and quantification of Hg. Coal fly ash spiked with different Hg compounds (e.g. Hg0, HgCl2, HgO, and HgS) was used for qualitative calibration. A standard reference material with a certified value for Hg concentration was used to evaluate the method. When the temperature of the furnace was programmed at a linear rate of increase of 50 degrees min(-1), different Hg compounds could clearly be separated. Three airborne particulate matter samples were collected in parallel in Toronto, ON, Canada and analyzed using this method. Reproducible results were obtained and Hg0, HgCl2, HgO, and HgS species from these samples were detected.

  5. A Study of Stratospheric Aerosols and Their Effect on Inorganic Chlorine Partitioning Using Balloon, In Situ, and Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterman, G. B.; Salawitch, R. J.; Sen, B.; Toon, G. C.

    1999-01-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on the surface of aerosols lead to a decrease in the concentration of nitrogen radicals and an increase in the concentration of chlorine and hydrogen radical species. As a consequence, enhanced sulfate aerosol levels in the lower stratosphere resulting from volcanic eruptions lead to lower concentrations of ozone due to more rapid loss by chlorine and hydrogen radicals. This study focuses on continuing the effort to quantify the effect of sulfate aerosols on the partitioning of inorganic chlorine species at midlatitudes. The study begins with an examination of balloon-borne measurements of key chlorine species obtained by the JPL MkIV interferometer for different aerosol loading conditions. A detailed comparison of the response of HCl to variations in aerosol surface area observed by MkIV, ER-2 instruments, HALOE, and ATMOS is carried out by examining HCl vs CH4 correlation diagrams, since CH4 is the only tracer measured on each platform. Finally, the consistency between theory and observed changes in ClO and HCl due to variations in aerosol surface area is examined.

  6. An Investigation of Aerosol Measurements from the Halogen Occultation Experiment: Validation, Size Distributions, Composition, and Relation to Other Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, Terry; Hervig, Mark E.

    1998-01-01

    The efforts envisioned within the original proposal (accepted February 1994) and the extension of this proposal (accepted February 1997) included measurement validations, the retrieval of aerosol size distributions and distribution moments, aerosol correction studies, and investigations of polar stratospheric clouds. A majority of the results from this grant have been published. The principal results from this grant are discussed.

  7. Season - dependent and source-influenced aerosol in Northern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovicheva, Olga; Makshtas, Alexander; Bogorodsky, Peter; Eleftheriadis, Kostantinos; Diapouli, Evangelia; Shonia, Natalia; Uttal, Taneil

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol may serve as a tracer of arctic pollution, allowing a link to climate response if its major characteristics relating to natural and anthropogeneous sources are defined. It has been shown that BC and sulfates are the most important aerosol constituents measured in the Arctic boundary layer; these species demonstrate similar seasonal variations with a peak during winter to early spring and a minimum in summer. Long - time gap in consistent aerosol observations in the Russian Arctic strongly limits the assessment of air pollution and climate impacts. On-line monitoring, sampling, and analyses of atmospheric aerosols were carried out at the Tiksi Hydrometeorological Observatory, Northern Siberia, during one year from September 2014 to 2015. Physico-chemical characterization combining aethalometry, thermo-optical analysis, and analytical chemistry was used in order to identify the seasonal variability of aerosols and to link their composition to possible sources, as well as to characterize the differences in aerosol chemical composition between natural background conditions and BC-pollution episodes. The present study reports the first results from the Tiksi Observatory on season-dependent and source-influenced characteristics of aerosol species, such as carbon fractions (OC, EC), inorganic and organic functionalities of chemical compounds, sulfates, nitrates and other ion components, and elements. In addition, data obtained by individual particles analysis provide insight into micromarkers of combustion sources. Aerosol at the Tiksi Observatory is found to be originated from natural marine, biogenic, and continental sources as well as influenced by local residential activity and regional pollution. Characterization of aerosols during OC and BC-pollution episodes, combined with analysis of the wind direction, atmosphere stability, and air mass trajectories, allows for the identification of the sources which are responsible for the emission of hazardous compounds

  8. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. Intercomparison of two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21) indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the filter-adjusted continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Correlations of the ACSM NR-PM1 (non-refractory particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 1 μm) plus elemental carbon (EC) with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM2.5 and Federal Reference Method (FRM) PM1 mass are strong with r2 > 0.7 and r2 > 0.8, respectively. Discrepancies might be attributed to evaporative losses of semi-volatile species from the filter measurements used to adjust the collocated continuous measurements. This suggests that adjusting the ambient aerosol continuous measurements with results from filter analysis introduced additional bias to the measurements. We also recommend to calibrate the ambient aerosol monitoring instruments using aerosol standards rather than gas-phase standards. The fitting approach for ACSM relative ionization for sulfate was shown to improve the comparisons between ACSM and collocated measurements in the absence of calibrated values, suggesting the importance of adding sulfate calibration into the ACSM calibration routine.

  9. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) at the rural site Back Garden (BG), located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the Southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8±8.4 μg m-3 and 13.5±8.7 μg m-3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva)~200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300-700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions). The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly correlated with the reference spectra of fulvic acid, an indicator of aged and

  10. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-07-01

    Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) at the rural site Back Garden (BG), located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8 ± 8.4 μg m-3 and 13.5 ± 8.7 μg m-3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva) ∼200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300-700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions). The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly correlated with the reference spectra of fulvic acid, an indicator of aged and

  11. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes During Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, K. M.; Chin, Mian

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  12. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes during Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Chin, Mian; Kim, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and.black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  13. Aerosol optical depth, aerosol composition and air pollution during summer and winter conditions in Budapest.

    PubMed

    Alföldy, B; Osán, J; Tóth, Z; Török, S; Harbusch, A; Jahn, C; Emeis, S; Schäfer, K

    2007-09-20

    The dependence of aerosol optical depth (AOD) on air particulate concentrations in the mixing layer height (MLH) was studied in Budapest in July 2003 and January 2004. During the campaigns gaseous (CO, SO(2), NO(x), O(3)), solid components (PM(2.5), PM(10)), as well as ionic species (ammonium, sulfate and nitrate) were measured at several urban and suburban sites. Additional data were collected from the Budapest air quality monitoring network. AOD was measured by a ground-based sun photometer. The mixing layer height and other common meteorological parameters were recorded. A linear relationship was found between the AOD and the columnar aerosol burden; the best linear fit (R(2)=0.96) was obtained for the secondary sulfate aerosol due to its mostly homogeneous spatial distribution and its optically active size range. The linear relationship is less pronounced for the PM(2.5) and PM(10) fractions since local emissions are very heterogeneous in time and space. The results indicate the importance of the mixing layer height in determining pollutant concentrations. During the winter campaign, when the boundary layer decreases to levels in between the altitudes of the sampling stations, measured concentrations showed significant differences due to different local sources and long-range transport. In the MLH time series unexpected nocturnal peaks were observed. The nocturnal increase of the MLH coincided with decreasing concentrations of all pollutants except for ozone; the ozone concentration increase indicates nocturnal vertical mixing between different air layers.

  14. Spatial variation of biogenic sulfur in the south Yellow Sea and the East China Sea during summer and its contribution to atmospheric sulfate aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-Hui; Yang, Gui-Peng; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Yang, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Spatial distributions of biogenic sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), dissolved and particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPd and DMSPp) were investigated in the South Yellow Sea (SYS) and the East China Sea (ECS) in July 2011. The concentrations of DMS and DMSPp were significantly correlated with the levels of chlorophyll a in the surface water. Simultaneously, relatively high ratio values of DMSP/chlorophyll a and DMS/chlorophyll a occurred in the areas where the phytoplankton community was dominated by dinoflagellates. The DMSPp and chlorophyll a size-fractionation showed that larger nanoplankton (5-20 μm) was the most important producer of DMSPp in the study area. The vertical profiles of DMS and DMSP were characterized by a maximum at the upper layer and the bottom concentrations were also relatively higher compared with the overlying layer of the bottom. In addition, a positive linear correlation was observed between dissolved dimethylsulfoxide (DMSOd) and DMS concentrations in the surface waters. The sea-to-air fluxes of DMS in the study area were estimated to be from 0.03 to 102.35 μmol m(-2) d(-1) with a mean of 16.73 μmol m(-2) d(-1) and the contribution of biogenic non-sea-salt SO4(2-) (nss-SO4(2-)) to the measured total nss-SO4(2-) in the atmospheric aerosol over the study area varied from 1.42% to 30.98%, with an average of 8.2%.

  15. Trace Gas/Aerosol Interactions and GMI Modeling Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Das, Bigyani; Bergmann, Dan; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Strahan, Susan; Wang, Minghuai; Feng, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Current global aerosol models use different physical and chemical schemes and parameters, different meteorological fields, and often different emission sources. Since the physical and chemical parameterization schemes are often tuned to obtain results that are consistent with observations, it is difficult to assess the true uncertainty due to meteorology alone. Under the framework of the NASA global modeling initiative (GMI), the differences and uncertainties in aerosol simulations (for sulfate, organic carbon, black carbon, dust and sea salt) solely due to different meteorological fields are analyzed and quantified. Three meteorological datasets available from the NASA DAO GCM, the GISS-II' GCM, and the NASA finite volume GCM (FVGCM) are used to drive the same aerosol model. The global sulfate and mineral dust burdens with FVGCM fields are 40% and 20% less than those with DAO and GISS fields, respectively due to its heavier rainfall. Meanwhile, the sea salt burden predicted with FVGCM fields is 56% and 43% higher than those with DAO and GISS, respectively, due to its stronger convection especially over the Southern Hemispheric Ocean. Sulfate concentrations at the surface in the Northern Hemisphere extratropics and in the middle to upper troposphere differ by more than a factor of 3 between the three meteorological datasets. The agreement between model calculated and observed aerosol concentrations in the industrial regions (e.g., North America and Europe) is quite similar for all three meteorological datasets. Away from the source regions, however, the comparisons with observations differ greatly for DAO, FVGCM and GISS, and the performance of the model using different datasets varies largely depending on sites and species. Global annual average aerosol optical depth at 550 nm is 0.120-0.131 for the three meteorological datasets.

  16. Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 2. Hygroscopic growth properties

    SciTech Connect

    Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Friedman, Beth; Gross, Deborah S.; Weingartner, E.; Lohmann, U.; Spichtinger, Peter; Gysel, Martin; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2009-07-10

    Sub-arctic aerosols were sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Scientific Research Station Stordalen site in northern Sweden with an instrument setup consisting of a custom-built Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) connected in series to a single particle mass spectrometer. Aerosol chemical composition in the form of bipolar single particle mass spectra was determined as a function of hygroscopic growth both in situ and in real time. The HTDMA was deployed at a relative humidity of 82% and particles with a dry mobility diameter of 260 nm were selected. Aerosols from two distinct airmasses were analyzed during the sampling period. Sea salt aerosols were found to be the dominant particle group with the highest hygroscopicity. High intensities of sodium and related peaks in the mass spectra were identified as exclusive markers for large hygroscopic growth. Particles from biomass combustion were found to be the least hygroscopic aerosol category. Species normally considered soluble (e.g., sulfates and nitrates) were found in particles ranging from high to low hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the signal intensities of the peaks related to these species did not correlate with hygroscopicity.

  17. Hygroscopic and phase separation properties of ammonium sulfate/organic/water ternary solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadowicz, M. A.; Proud, S. R.; Seppalainen, S. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are often partially or completely composed of inorganic salts, such as ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and therefore exhibit hygroscopic properties. Many inorganic salts have well-defined deliquescence and efflorescence points at which they take up and lose water, respectively. Deliquescence and efflorescence of simple inorganic salt particles have been investigated by a variety of methods, such as IR spectroscopy, tandem mobility analysis and electrodynamic balance. Field measurements have shown that atmospheric aerosols are not typically pure inorganic salt, instead they often also contain organic species. There is ample evidence from laboratory studies that suggests that mixed particles exist in a phase-separated state, with an aqueous inorganic core and organic shell. Although phase separation has not been measured in situ, there is no reason it would not also take place in the atmosphere. Many recent studies have focused on microscopy techniques that require deposition of the aerosol on a glass slide, possibly changing its surface properties. Here, we investigate the deliquescence and efflorescence points, phase separation and ability to exchange gas-phase components of mixed organic and inorganic aerosol using a flow tube coupled with FTIR spectroscopy. Ammonium sulfate aerosol mixed with organic polyols with different O : C ratios, including 1,4-butanediol, glycerol, 1,2,6-hexanetriol, 1,2-hexanediol, and 1,5-pentanediol have been investigated. Those constituents correspond to materials found in the atmosphere in great abundance, and therefore, particles prepared in this study should mimic atmospheric mixed phase aerosol particles. The results of this study tend to be in agreement with previous microscopy experiments, with several key differences, which possibly reveal a size-dependent effect on phase separation in organic/inorganic aerosol particles.

  18. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter surveys the analytical techniques used to determine the concentrations of aerosol mass and its chemical components. The techniques surveyed include mass, major ions (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), organic carbon, elemental carbon, and trace elements. As reported in...

  19. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  20. Simulation of the interannual variations of aerosols in China: role of variations in meteorological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Q.; Liao, H.

    2014-05-01

    We used the nested grid version of the global three-dimensional Goddard Earth Observing System chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to examine the interannual variations (IAVs) of aerosols over heavily polluted regions in China for years 2004-2012. The role of variations in meteorological parameters was quantified by a simulation with fixed anthropogenic emissions at year 2006 levels and changes in meteorological parameters over 2004-2012. Simulated PM2.5 (particles with a diameter of 2.5 μm or less) aerosol concentrations exhibited large IAVs in North China (NC, 32-42° N, 110-120° E), with regionally averaged absolute percent departure from the mean (APDM) values of 17, 14, 14, and 11% in December-January-February (DJF), March-April-May (MAM), June-July-August (JJA), and September-October-November (SON), respectively. Over South China (SC, 22-32° N, 110-120° E), the IAVs in PM2.5 were found to be the largest in JJA, with the regional mean APDM values of 14% in JJA and of about 9% in other seasons. Concentrations of PM2.5 over the Sichuan Basin (SCB, 27-33° N, 102-110° E) were simulated to have the smallest IAVs among the polluted regions examined in this work, with the APDM values of 8-9% in all seasons. All aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon) were simulated to have the largest IAVs over NC in DJF, corresponding to the large variations in meteorological parameters over NC in this season. Process analyses were performed to identify the key meteorological parameters that determined the IAVs of different aerosol species in different regions. While the variations in temperature and specific humidity, which influenced the gas-phase formation of sulfate, jointly determined the IAVs of sulfate over NC in both DJF and JJA, wind (or convergence of wind) in DJF and precipitation in JJA were the dominant meteorological factors to influence IAVs of sulfate over SC and the SCB. The IAVs in temperature and specific humidity

  1. Solar geoengineering using solid aerosol in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenstein, D. K.; Keith, D. W.; Dykema, J. A.

    2015-10-01

    Solid aerosol particles have long been proposed as an alternative to sulfate aerosols for solar geoengineering. Any solid aerosol introduced into the stratosphere would be subject to coagulation with itself, producing fractal aggregates, and with the natural sulfate aerosol, producing liquid-coated solids. Solid aerosols that are coated with sulfate and/or have formed aggregates may have very different scattering properties and chemical behavior than uncoated non-aggregated monomers do. We use a two-dimensional (2-D) chemistry-transport-aerosol model to capture the dynamics of interacting solid and liquid aerosols in the stratosphere. As an example, we apply the model to the possible use of alumina and diamond particles for solar geoengineering. For 240 nm radius alumina particles, for example, an injection rate of 4 Tg yr-1 produces a global-average shortwave radiative forcing of -1.2 W m-2 and minimal self-coagulation of alumina although almost all alumina outside the tropics is coated with sulfate. For the same radiative forcing, these solid aerosols can produce less ozone loss, less stratospheric heating, and less forward scattering than sulfate aerosols do. Our results suggest that appropriately sized alumina, diamond or similar high-index particles may have less severe technology-specific risks than sulfate aerosols do. These results, particularly the ozone response, are subject to large uncertainties due to the limited data on the rate constants of reactions on the dry surfaces.

  2. Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Eaton, Brian

    2012-10-01

    The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosol on solar and infrared radiation through droplet and crystal nucleation on aerosol, and semidirect effects through the influence of solar absorption on the distribution of clouds. A three-mode representation of the aerosol in version 5.1 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.1) yields global annual mean radiative forcing estimates for each of these forcing mechanisms that are within 0.1 W m–2 of estimates using a more complex seven-mode representation that distinguishes between fresh and aged black carbon and primary organic matter. Simulating fresh black carbon particles separately from internally mixed accumulation mode particles is found to be important only near fossil fuel sources. In addition to the usual large indirect effect on solar radiation, this study finds an unexpectedly large positive longwave indirect effect (because of enhanced cirrus produced by homogenous nucleation of ice crystals on anthropogenic sulfate), small shortwave and longwave semidirect effects, and a small direct effect (because of cancelation and interactions of direct effects of black carbon and sulfate). Differences between the threemode and seven-mode versions are significantly larger (up to 0.2 W m–2) when the hygroscopicity of primary organic matter is decreased from 0.1 to 0 and transfer of the primary carbonaceous aerosol to the accumulation mode in the seven-mode version requires more hygroscopic material coating the primary particles. Radiative forcing by cloudborne anthropogenic black carbon is only 20.07 W m–2.

  3. Gaseous (DMS, MSA, SO2, H2SO4 and DMSO) and particulate (sulfate and methanesulfonate) sulfur species over the northeastern coast of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardouki, H.; Berresheim, H.; Vrekoussis, M.; Sciare, J.; Kouvarakis, G.; Oikonomou, K.; Schneider, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2003-07-01

    A detailed study of the levels, the temporal and diurnal variability of the main compounds involved in the biogenic sulfur cycle was carried out in Crete (Eastern Mediterranean) during the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) field experiment in July-August 2001. Intensive measurements of gaseous dimethylsulfide (DMS), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfuric (H2SO4) and methanesulfonic acids (MSA) and particulate sulfate (SO42-) and methanesulfonate (MS-) have been performed during the campaign. Dimethylsulfide (DMS) levels ranged from 2.9 to 136 pmol · mol-1 (mean value of 21.7 pmol · mol-1) and showed a clear diurnal variation with daytime maximum. During nighttime DMS levels fall close or below the detection limit of 2 pmol ·mol-1. Concurrent measurements of OH and NO3 radicals during the campaign indicate that NO3 levels can explain most of the observed diurnal variation of DMS. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) ranged between 0.02 and 10.1 pmol · mol-1 (mean value of 1.7 pmol · mol-1) and presents a diurnal variation similar to that of DMS. SO2 levels ranged from 220 to 2970 pmol · mol-1 (mean value of 1030 pmol · mol-1), while nss-SO42- and MS- ranged from 330 to 7100 pmol · mol-1, (mean value of 1440 pmol · mol-1) and 1.1 to 37.5 pmol · mol- (mean value of 11.5 pmol · mol-1) respectively. Of particular interest are the measurements of gaseous MSA and H2SO4. MSA ranged from below the detection limit (3×104) to 3.7×107 molecules cm-3, whereas H2SO4 ranged between 1×105 and 9.0×107 molecules cm-3. The measured H2SO4 maxima are among the highest reported in literature and can be attributed to high insolation, absence of precipitation and increased SO2 levels in the area. From the concurrent SO2, OH, and H2SO4 measurements a sticking coefficient of 0.52±0.28 was calculated for H2SO4. From the concurrent MSA, OH, and DMS measurements the yield of gaseous MSA from the OH-initiated oxidation of DMS was calculated to range between 0

  4. Gaseous (DMS, MSA, SO2, H2SO4 and DMSO) and particulate (sulfate and methanesulfonate) sulfur species over the northeastern coast of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardouki, H.; Berresheim, H.; Vrekoussis, M.; Sciare, J.; Kouvarakis, G.; Oikonomou, K.; Schneider, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2003-10-01

    A detailed study of the levels, the temporal and diurnal variability of the main compounds involved in the biogenic sulfur cycle was carried out in Crete (Eastern Mediterranean) during the Mediterranean Intensive Oxidant Study (MINOS) field experiment in July-August 2001. Intensive measurements of gaseous dimethylsulfide (DMS), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), sulfuric (H2SO4) and methanesulfonic acids (MSA) and particulate sulfate (SO42-) and methanesulfonate (MS-) have been performed during the campaign. Dimethylsulfide (DMS) levels ranged from 2.9 to 136 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 21.7 pmol·mol-1) and showed a clear diurnal variation with daytime maximum. During nighttime DMS levels fall close or below the detection limit of 2 pmol·mol-1. Concurrent measurements of OH and NO3 radicals during the campaign indicate that NO3 levels can explain most of the observed diurnal variation of DMS. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) ranged between 0.02 and 10.1 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 1.7 pmol·mol-1) and presents a diurnal variation similar to that of DMS. SO2 levels ranged from 220 to 2970 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 1030 pmol·mol-1), while nss-SO42- and MS- ranged from 330 to 7100 pmol·mol-1, (mean value of 1440 pmol·mol-1) and 1.1 to 37.5 pmol·mol-1 (mean value of 11.5 pmol·mol-1) respectively. Of particular interest are the measurements of gaseous MSA and H2SO4. MSA ranged from below the detection limit (3x104) to 3.7x107 molecules cm-3, whereas H2SO4 ranged between 1x105 and 9.0x107 molecules cm-3. The measured H2SO4 maxima are among the highest reported in literature and can be attributed to high insolation, absence of precipitation and increased SO2 levels in the area. From the concurrent SO2, OH, and H2SO4 measurements a sticking coefficient of 0.52±0.28 was calculated for H2SO4. From the concurrent MSA, OH, and DMS measurements the yield of gaseous MSA from the OH-initiated oxidation of DMS was calculated to range between 0.1-0.4%. This low MSA

  5. Linking Aerosol Source Activities to Present and Future Climate Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Streets, D.; Menon, S.; Unger, N.

    2007-05-01

    Aerosol source sectors (transport, power, industry, residential, biomass burning) generate distinct mixtures of aerosol species. These mixtures in turn have different effects on climate. As sectoral emissions change in coming decades, whether by regulation or not, it is helpful to link pollution from source types to climate consequences. We do so, using our global (GISS GCM) aerosol model for present and future IPCC SRES scenarios. According to our model, residential and transport sectors have net positive 1995 aerosol forcings (0.04 and 0.03 W m-2) due to their large black carbon contents. However, the sulfate-dominated power and industry sectors have net negative 1995 forcings (-0.10 and -0.09 W m-2). Due to the near-balance of absorbing and scattering components, biomass burning forcing is small. For the 2050 SRES A1B scenario, the net (negative) aerosol forcing is double 1995 due primarily to increased sulfur emissions in the industry and power sectors. For 2050 B1 the net (negative) forcing decreases relative to 1995, as sulfur emissions are reduced. Both future scenarios project decreasing residential emissions. Yet transport emissions are expected to remain significant and thus become the dominant source of warming aerosols in the future. Aerosol pollution is projected to shift southward relative to the present, as the current industrialized regions generally reduce emissions and tropical and southern hemispheric regions continue to develop. Similar to these SRES scenarios, IIASA scenarios project a decline in residential emissions; however IIASA is more optimistic about transport sector emissions reductions. We will conduct present-day climate experiments, including aerosol direct and indirect effects, to study impacts of power and transport sectors on climate features such as air temperature and hydrologic cycle.

  6. A comprehensive climatology of Arctic aerosol properties on the North Slope of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, Jessie; de Boer, Gijs; Shupe, Matthew; McComiskey, Allison

    2016-04-01

    Evaluating aerosol properties has implications for the formation of Arctic clouds, resulting in impacts on cloud lifetime, precipitation processes, and radiative forcing. There are many remaining uncertainties and large discrepancies regarding modeled and observed Arctic aerosol properties, illustrating the need for more detailed observations to improve simulations of Arctic aerosol and more generally, projections of the components of the aerosol-driven processes that impact sea ice loss/gain. In particular, the sources and climatic effects of Arctic aerosol particles are severely understudied. Here, we present a comprehensive, long-term record of aerosol observations from the North Slope of Alaska baseline site at Barrow. These measurements include sub- and supermicron (up to 10 μm) total mass and number concentrations, sub- and supermicron soluble inorganic and organic ion concentrations, submicron metal concentrations, submicron particle size distributions, and sub- and supermicron absorption and scattering properties. Aerosol extinction and number concentration measurements extend back to 1976, while the remaining measurements were implemented since. Corroboration between the chemical, physical, and optical property measurements is evident during periods of overlapping observations, demonstrating the reliability of the measurements. During the Arctic Haze in the winter/spring, high concentrations of long-range transported submicron sea salt, mineral dust, industrial metals, pollution (non-sea salt sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), and biomass burning species are observed concurrent with higher concentrations of particles with sizes that span the submicron range, enhanced absorption and scattering coefficients, and largest Ångström exponents. The summer is characterized by high concentrations of small biogenic aerosols (< 100 nm) and low extinction coefficients. Fall is characterized by clean conditions, with supermicron sea salt representing the dominant aerosol

  7. Synergetic formation of secondary inorganic and organic aerosol: effect of SO2 and NH3 on particle formation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Biwu; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Sun, Yele; Jiang, Jingkun; Li, Junhua; Hao, Jiming

    2016-11-01

    The effects of SO2 and NH3 on secondary organic aerosol formation have rarely been investigated together, while the interactive effects between inorganic and organic species under highly complex pollution conditions remain uncertain. Here we studied the effects of SO2 and NH3 on secondary aerosol formation in the photooxidation system of toluene/NOx in the presence or absence of Al2O3 seed aerosols in a 2 m3 smog chamber. The presence of SO2 increased new particle formation and particle growth significantly, regardless of whether NH3 was present. Sulfate, organic aerosol, nitrate, and ammonium were all found to increase linearly with increasing SO2 concentrations. The increases in these four species were more obvious under NH3-rich conditions, and the generation of nitrate, ammonium, and organic aerosol increased more significantly than sulfate with respect to SO2 concentration, while sulfate was the most sensitive species under NH3-poor conditions. The synergistic effects between SO2 and NH3 in the heterogeneous process contributed greatly to secondary aerosol formation. Specifically, the generation of NH4NO3 was found to be highly dependent on the surface area concentration of suspended particles, and increased most significantly with SO2 concentration among the four species under NH3-rich conditions. Meanwhile, the absorbed NH3 might provide a liquid surface layer for the absorption and subsequent reaction of SO2 and organic products and, therefore, enhance sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. This effect mainly occurred in the heterogeneous process and resulted in a significantly higher growth rate of seed aerosols compared to without NH3. By applying positive matrix factorisation (PMF) analysis to the AMS data, two factors were identified for the generated SOA. One factor, assigned to less-oxidised organic aerosol and some oligomers, increased with increasing SO2 under NH3-poor conditions, mainly due to the well-known acid catalytic effect of

  8. Microanalysis of the aerosol collected over south-central New Mexico during the alive field experiment, May-December 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.; Schnell, Russel C.; Kahl, Jonathan D.; Boatman, Joe F.; Garvey, Dennis M.

    Thirty-eight size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in the lower troposphere over the high desert of south-central New Mexico, using cascade impactors mounted onboard two research aircraft. Four of these samples were collected in early May, sixteen in mid-July, and the remaining ones in December 1989, during three segments of the ALIVE field initiative. Analytical electron microscope analyses of aerosol deposits and individual particles from these samples were performed to physically and chemically characterize the major particulate species present in the aerosol. Air-mass trajectories arriving at the sampling area in the May program were quite different from those calculated for the July period. In general, the May trajectories showed strong westerly winds, while the July winds were weaker and southerly, consistently passing over or very near the border cities of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Aerosol samples collected during the May period were predominantly fine (0.1-0.5 μm dia.), liquid H 2SO 4 droplets. Samples from the July experiment were comprised mostly of fine, solid (NH 4) 2SO 4 or mostly neutralized sulfate particles. In both sampling periods, numerous other particle classes were observed, including many types with probable terrestrial or anthropogenic sources. The numbers of these particles, however, were small when compared with the sulfates. Composite particle types, including sulfate/crustal and sulfate/carbonaceous, were also found to be present. The major differences in aerosol composition between the May and July samples (i.e. the extensive neutralization of sulfates in the July samples) can be explained by considering the different aerosol transport pathways and the proximity of the July aerosol to the El Paso/Juarez urban plume. Winds during the December experiment were quite variable, and may have contributed to the widely varying aerosol compositions observed in these samples. When the aircraft sampled the El Paso

  9. Pseudodesulfovibrio indicus gen. nov., sp. nov., a piezophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from the Indian Ocean and reclassification of four species of the genus Desulfovibrio.

    PubMed

    Cao, Junwei; Gayet, Nicolas; Zeng, Xiang; Shao, Zongze; Jebbar, Mohamed; Alain, Karine

    2016-10-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain J2T, was isolated from a serpentinized peridotite sample from the Indian Ocean. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain J2T clustered with the genus Desulfovibrio within the family Desulfovibrionaceae, but it showed low similarity (87.95 %) to the type species Desulfovibrio desulfuricans DSM 642T. It was most closely related to Desulfovibrio portus MSL79T (96.96 %), followed by Desulfovibrio aespoeensis Aspo-2T (96.11 %), Desulfovibrio piezophilus C1TLV30T (96.04 %) and Desulfovibrio profundus DSM 11384T (95.17 %). Other available sequences shared less than 93.33 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Cells were Gram-staining-negative, anaerobic, motile vibrios (2-6×0.4-0.6 µm). Growth was observed at salinities ranging from 0.2 to 6 % (optimum 2.5 %), from pH 5 to 8 (optimum pH 6.5-7) and at temperatures between 9 and 40 °C (optimum 30-35 °C). J2T was piezophilic, growing optimally at 10 MPa (range 0-30 MPa). J2T used lactate, malate, pyruvate, formate and hydrogen as energy sources. Sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, fumarate and nitrate were used as terminal electron acceptors. Lactate and pyruvate were fermented. The main fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0, summed feature 9 (iso-C17 : 1ω9c and/or C16 : 0 10-methyl) and iso-C17 : 0. The DNA G+C content of strain J2T was 63.5 mol%. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain J2T represents a novel species of a novel genus in the family Desulfovibrionaceae, for which the name Pseudodesulfovibrio indicus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain J2T (=MCCC 1A01867T = DSM 101483T). We also propose the reclassification of D. piezophilus as Pseudodesulfovibrio piezophilus comb. nov., D. profundus as Pseudodesulfovibrio profundus comb. nov., D. portus as Pseudodesulfovibrio portus comb. nov. and D. aespoeensis as Pseudodesulfovibrio aespoeensis comb. nov.

  10. Formation and Processing of Organic Aerosols Measured by a Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Decarlo, P. F.; Denlea, E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Brock, C. A.; Degouw, J. A.; Flocke, F.; Gallar, C.; Holloway, J. S.; Neuman, J. A.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Trainer, M. K.; Warneke, C.; Wollny, A. G.; Zhang, W.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2007-12-01

    Formation of particulate matter is common in areas with high emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), NOx, and SO2. These particles have lifetimes of days to weeks, and thus can have both local and regional effects on visibility, air quality, and human health as well as direct and indirect effects on climate. During TexAQS 2006, mass concentrations of non-refractory inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and total organics in submicron aerosols were measured by a Compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) onboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft. In this presentation, we analyze composition changes of organic aerosols in different air masses. We examine organic mass spectra along with simultaneous measurements of VOCs and their oxidation products in order to determine the contribution of anthropogenic and biogenic sources to the aerosol organic mass. These measurements were performed in plumes intercepted during the daytime north of Houston where large isoprene emissions were observed. Furthermore, the fresh hydrocarbon-like (HOA) and processed oxygenated-like organics (OOA) fractions of the total organic aerosol mass in several plumes transected during daytime and nighttime are presented and compared. We will also discuss differences in correlations between organic aerosol composition markers and primary or secondary gas-phase species in different plumes.

  11. Some environmental considerations relating to the interaction of the solid rocket motor exhaust with the atmosphere: Predicted chemical composition of exhaust species and predicted conditions for the formation of HCl aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The exhaust products of a solid rocket motor using as propellant 14% binder, 16% aluminum, and 70% (wt) ammonium perchlorate consist of hydrogen chloride, water, alumina, and other compounds. The equilibrium and some frozen compositions of the chemical species upon interaction with the atmosphere were computed. The conditions under which hydrogen chloride interacts with the water vapor in humid air to form an aerosol containing hydrochloric acid were computed for various weight ratios of air/exhaust products. These computations were also performed for the case of a combined SRM and hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine. Regimes of temperature and relative humidity where this aerosol is expected were identified. Within these regimes, the concentration of HCL in the aerosol and weight fraction of aerosol to gas phase were plotted. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation was found to be particularly likely in cool humid weather.

  12. Characterization and quantification of aerosol chemical species present below and within cloud over an eastern Himalayan high altitude hill station in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arindam; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Sarkar, Chirantan; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji

    2016-07-01

    There are two main processes through which aerosols and gases get scavenged by rain called below-cloud scavenging or "washout" and in-cloud scavenging or "rainout". The first process refers to the washout of the aerosols and gases present below the cloud during precipitation events by raindrops along their fall. The second process corresponds to the condensation of water vapor on aerosol particles during the formation of cloud droplets and incorporation of gases surrounding the droplets by aqueous-phase reactions. However, the most efficient pathway to remove the atmospheric pollutants is below cloud scavenging which is a major pointer of ecosystem, biogeochemical cycle as well as the climate change. A study has been conducted in 2014 and 2015 monsoon (June-September) in Darjeeling (27.01 ° N, 88.15 ° E), a high altitude (2200 m asl) hill station over eastern Himalaya in India. The study was focused on the below-cloud and in-cloud scavenging of various aerosol ionic species. Attempt was also made to estimate the contribution of in-cloud scavenging and below-cloud scavenging by collecting rain samples sequentially for different rain events. Sea-salt (Na+, sea-Mg2+, Cl- and sea-SO4 2-) and soil dust (non-sea Ca2+, non-sea-Mg2+) species show sharp decrease in concentration for each of the rain sample. This indicates that these species were mostly accumulated below the cloud and washed out during rain. Their concentrations were thus decreased sharply as rains progressed. On the other hand, non-SO4-2 and NH4+ showed different behavior. Their concentrations decreased sharply at the initial stage of the rain and then remained almost constant with rainfall. This explains wash out of these two species at the initial stage of the rain and their contribution from "within the cloud". NH4 + and non-sea-SO4 2- could thus act as cloud condensation nuclei over this part of Himalaya. A strong correlation between these two species indicates their association as (NH4)2SO4. Acidity

  13. Lagrangian Displacement Ensembles for Aerosol Data Assimilation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, A.; Colarco, P. R.; Govindaraju, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    A challenge common to many constituent data assimilation applications is the fact that one observes a much smaller fraction of the phase space that one wishes to estimate. For example, remotely-sensed estimates of the column average concentrations are available, while one is faced with the problem of estimating 3D concentractions for initializing a prognostic model. This problem is exarcebated in the the case of aerosols because the observable Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is not only a column integrated quantity, but it also sums over a large number of species (dust, sea-salt, carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols). An aerosol transport model when driven by high-resolution, state-of-the-art analysis of meterorological fields and realistc emissions can produce skillful forecasts even when no aerosol data is assimilated. The main task of aerosol data assimilation is to address the bias arising from innacurate emissions, and the Lagrangian misplacement of plumes induced by errors in the driving meterorological fields. As long as one decouples the meteorological and aerosol assimilation as we do here, the classic baroclinic growth of errors is no longer the main order of business. We will describe and aerosol data assimilation scheme in which the anaysis update step is conducted in observation space, using an adaptive maximum-likelihood scheme for estimating background errors in AOD space. This scheme includes explicit sequential bias estimation as in Dee and da Silva (1998). Unlikely existing aerosol data assimiltion schemes we do not obtain analysis increments of the 3D concentrations by scalling the background profiles. Instead, we explore the Langrangian characteristics of the problem for generating local displacement ensembles. These high-resolution, state-dependent ensembles are then used to parameterize the background errors and generate 3D aerosol increments. The algorithm has computational complexity comparable to the forecasting step by the aerosol transport model

  14. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol, in particular, has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  15. MIRAGE: Model Description and Evaluation of Aerosols and Trace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zhang, Yang; Saylor, Rick D.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bian, Xindi; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2004-10-27

    The MIRAGE (Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges) modeling system, designed to study the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the global environment, is described. MIRAGE consists of a chemical transport model coupled on line with a global climate model. The chemical transport model simulates trace gases, aerosol number, and aerosol chemical component mass [sulfate, MSA, organic matter, black carbon (BC), sea salt, mineral dust] for four aerosol modes (Aitken, accumulation, coarse sea salt, coarse mineral dust) using the modal aerosol dynamics approach. Cloud-phase and interstitial aerosol are predicted separately. The climate model, based on the CCM2, has physically-based treatments of aerosol direct and indirect forcing. Stratiform cloud water and droplet number are simulated using a bulk microphysics parameterization that includes aerosol activation. Aerosol and trace gas species simulated by MIRAGE are presented and evaluated using surface and aircraft measurements. Surface-level SO2 in N. American and European source regions is higher than observed. SO2 above the boundary layer is in better agreement with observations, and surface-level SO2 at marine locations is somewhat lower than observed. Comparison with other models suggests insufficient SO2 dry deposition; increasing the deposition velocity improves simulated SO2. Surface-level sulfate in N. American and European source regions is in good agreement with observations, although the seasonal cycle in Europe is stronger than observed. Surface-level sulfate at high-latitude and marine locations, and sulfate above the boundary layer, are higher than observed. This is attributed primarily to insufficient wet removal; increasing the wet removal improves simulated sulfate at remote locations and aloft. Because of the high sulfate bias, radiative forcing estimates for anthropogenic sulfur in Ghan et al. [2001c] are probably too high. Surface-level DMS is {approx}40% higher than observed

  16. Aerosol Modeling for the Global Model Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an aerosol module to be used within the framework of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The model development work will be preformed jointly by the University of Michigan and AER, using existing aerosol models at the two institutions as starting points. The GMI aerosol model will be tested, evaluated against observations, and then applied to assessment of the effects of aircraft sulfur emissions as needed by the NASA Subsonic Assessment in 2001. The work includes the following tasks: 1. Implementation of the sulfur cycle within GMI, including sources, sinks, and aqueous conversion of sulfur. Aerosol modules will be added as they are developed and the GMI schedule permits. 2. Addition of aerosol types other than sulfate particles, including dust, soot, organic carbon, and black carbon. 3. Development of new and more efficient parameterizations for treating sulfate aerosol nucleation, condensation, and coagulation among different particle sizes and types.

  17. Diethyl sulfate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Diethyl sulfate ; CASRN 64 - 67 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  18. Barium Sulfate

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses a computer to put together x-ray images to create cross-sectional or three dimensional pictures of the inside of the body). Barium sulfate is in a class of medications called radiopaque contrast media. It works by coating the esophagus, stomach, or ...

  19. Dimethyl sulfate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dimethyl sulfate ; CASRN 77 - 78 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  20. Real-time measurement of aerosol black carbon during the Carbonaceous Species Methods Comparison Study, Citrus College, Glendora, California, August 12-21, 1986: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.D.A.; Novakov, T.

    1987-11-01

    During the period August 12-21, 1986, the Atmospheric Aerosol Research Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory participated in the Carbonaceous Species Method Comparison Study (CSMCS) conducted at Citrus College, Glendora, California. The equipment that we used was the aethalometer, an instrument developed at LBL that measures the concentration of aerosol black carbon in real time. In this report we present our results from that study in the form of 1-minute, 1-hour, and multi-hour average concentrations. We found concentrations generally ranging from 2 to 5 ..mu..g (BC)m/sup 3/, usually with increases in the morning traffic hours. We also observed short-duration (2-15 min) peaks in the black carbon concentration that could be directly attributed to the activity of vehicles in a delivery area less than 50 m from the study site. We conclude that mobile sources were the major contributor to the short- and medium-term variability of aerosol black carbon measured at this site. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. On the source of organic acid aerosol layers above clouds.

    PubMed

    Sorooshian, Armin; Lu, Miao-Ling; Brechtel, Fred J; Jonsson, Haflidi; Feingold, Graham; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2007-07-01

    During the July 2005 Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and the August-September 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS), the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter probed aerosols and cumulus clouds in the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of northern California and in southeastern Texas, respectively. An on-board particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) quantified inorganic and organic acid species with < or = 5-min time resolution. Ubiquitous organic aerosol layers above cloud with enhanced organic acid levels were observed in both locations. The data suggest that aqueous-phase reactions to produce organic acids, mainly oxalic acid, followed by droplet evaporation is a source of elevated organic acid aerosol levels above cloud. Oxalic acid is observed to be produced more efficiently relative to sulfate as the cloud liquid water content increases, corresponding to larger and less acidic droplets. As derived from large eddy simulations of stratocumulus underthe conditions of MASE, both Lagrangian trajectory analysis and diurnal cloudtop evolution provide evidence that a significant fraction of the aerosol mass concentration above cloud can be accounted for by evaporated droplet residual particles. Methanesulfonate data suggest that entrainment of free tropospheric aerosol can also be a source of organic acids above boundary layer clouds.

  2. Impact of dimethylsulfide chemistry on sulfate over the Northern Hemisphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate aerosol forms from the gas- and aqueous-phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide and is an important component of atmospheric aerosols. Dimethylsulfide (DMS) present in sea-water can be emitted into the atmosphere which can then react with atmospheric oxidants to produce sulfur ...

  3. Composition and physical properties of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer and the North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B; Neely, Ryan R; Martinsson, Bengt G; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A M

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies revealed layers of enhanced aerosol scattering in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Asia (Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)) and North America (North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer (NATAL)). We use a sectional aerosol model (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA)) coupled with the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1) to explore the composition and optical properties of these aerosol layers. The observed aerosol extinction enhancement is reproduced by CESM1/CARMA. Both model and observations indicate a strong gradient of the sulfur-to-carbon ratio from Europe to the Asia on constant pressure surfaces. We found that the ATAL is mostly composed of sulfates, surface-emitted organics, and secondary organics; the NATAL is mostly composed of sulfates and secondary organics. The model also suggests that emission increases in Asia between 2000 and 2010 led to an increase of aerosol optical depth of the ATAL by 0.002 on average which is consistent with observations. Key Points The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer is composed of sulfate, primary organics, and secondary organics The North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer is mostly composed of sulfate and secondary organics Aerosol Optical Depth of Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer increases by 0.002 from 2000 to 2010 PMID:26709320

  4. Chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol in the troposphere over the Hudson Bay lowlands and Quebec-Labrador regions of Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Gorzelska, K.; Talbot, R.W.; Lefer, B.; Klemm, K.; Klemm, O.; Gregory, G.L.; Anderson, B.; Barrie, L.A.

    1994-01-20

    Atmospheric aerosols were collected in the boundary layer and free troposphere over continental and coastal subarctic regions of Canada during the July-August 1990 joint US-Canadian Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B/Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES). The samples were analyzed for the following water soluble species: sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium, sodium, chloride, oxalate, methylsulfonate, and total amine nitrogen. Ammonium and sulfate were the major water soluble components of these aerosols. The nearly neutral (overall) chemical composition of summertime aerosol particles contrasts their strongly acidic wintertime composition. Aerosol samples were separated into several air mass categories and characterized in terms of chemical composition, associated mixing ratios of gaseous compounds, and meteorological parameters. The fundamental category represented particles associated with {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} air masses. The summertime atmospheric aerosols in background air over the North American subarctic and Arctic regions were characterized by relatively small and spatially uniform mixing ratios of the measured species. These aerosol particles were aged to the extent that they had lost their primary source signature. The chemical profile of the background air aerosols was frequently modified by additions from biomass fire plumes, aged tropical marine air, and intrusions of upper troposphere/lower stratospheric air. Aerosols in boundary layer background air over the boreal forested region of Quebec-Labrador had significantly larger mixing ratios of ammonium and sulfate relative to the Hudson Bay region. This may reflect infiltration of anthropogenic pollution or be due to natural emissions from this region. 71 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Quantifying trace gas uptake to tropospheric aerosol: recent advances and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Abbatt, J P D; Lee, A K Y; Thornton, J A

    2012-10-07

    The interactions of trace gases with tropospheric aerosol can have significant effects on both gas phase and aerosol composition. In turn, this may affect the atmospheric oxidizing capacity, aerosol hygroscopicity and optical properties, and the lifetimes of trace aerosol species. Through the detailed description of specific reaction systems, this review article illustrates how detailed experimental studies of gas-particle interactions lead to both a comprehensive understanding of the underlying physical chemistry as well as accurate parameterizations for atmospheric modeling. The reaction systems studied illustrate the complexity in the field: (i) N(2)O(5) uptake, presented as a benchmark multiphase system, can lead to both NO(x) loss and halogen activation, (ii) loss of HO(2) on aqueous particles is surprisingly poorly studied given its potential importance for HO(x) loss, (iii) uptake of HNO(3) by marine aerosol and heterogeneous oxidation of organic-bearing particles are examples of how gas-particle interactions can lead to substantial alteration of aerosol composition, and (iv) the uptake of glyoxal to ammonium sulfate aerosol leads to highly complex particle-phase chemistry. In addition, for the first time, this article presents the challenges that must be addressed in the design and interpretation of atmospheric gas-to-particle uptake experiments.

  6. Evaluation of the Global Aerosol Distribution Simulated in the NASA GEOS-5 Near-realtime Forecasting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Welton, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System climate model and data assimilation system (GEOS-5) has been providing near-realtime forecasts of global aerosol distributions since 2007. The aerosol module, based on the NASA Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport model (GOCART), is run online in GEOS-5 and treats the sources, sinks, and chemical evolution of dust, sea salt, sulfate, and black and organic carbon aerosol species. Previously these forecasts have had as their focus various NASA field campaigns (e.g., TC4, ARCTAS, GloPac). Since 2009 a version of this system has produced global aerosol and meteorological forecasts at approximately 0.25 degree horizontal spatial resolution. In this paper we perform the first systematic evaluation of the current generation, near-realtime GEOS-5 aerosol forecasting system. Aerosol fields are compared to ground-based (e.g., AERONET) and satellite aerosol remote sensing observations (e.g., MODIS, MISR, CALIPSO). The modeling system and evaluation strategy are discussed, and overall model performance and biases are assessed.

  7. Observations and regional modeling of aerosol optical properties, speciation and size distribution over Northern Africa and western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, Laurent; Siour, Guillaume; Mailler, Sylvain; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    The aerosol speciation and size distribution is modeled during the summer 2013 and over a large area encompassing Africa, Mediterranean and western Europe. The modeled aerosol is compared to available measurements such as the AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size distribution (ASD) and the EMEP network for surface concentrations of particulate matter PM2.5, PM10 and inorganic species (nitrate, sulfate and ammonium). The main goal of this study is to quantify the model ability to realistically model the speciation and size distribution of the aerosol. Results first showed that the long-range transport pathways are well reproduced and mainly constituted by mineral dust: spatial correlation is ≈ 0.9 for AOD and Ångström exponent, when temporal correlations show that the day-to-day variability is more difficult to reproduce. Over Europe, PM2.5 and PM10 have a mean temporal correlation of ≈ 0.4 but the lowest spatial correlation ( ≈ 0.25 and 0.62, respectively), showing that the fine particles are not well localized or transported. Being short-lived species, the uncertainties on meteorology and emissions induce these lowest scores. However, time series of PM2.5 with the speciation show a good agreement between model and measurements and are useful for discriminating the aerosol composition. Using a classification from the south (Africa) to the north (northern Europe), it is shown that mineral dust relative mass contribution decreases from 50 to 10 % when nitrate increases from 0 to 20 % and all other species, sulfate, sea salt, ammonium, elemental carbon, primary organic matter, are constant. The secondary organic aerosol contribution is between 10 and 20 % with a maximum at the latitude of the Mediterranean Sea (Spanish stations). For inorganic species, it is shown that nitrate, sulfate and ammonium have a mean temporal correlation of 0.25, 0.37 and 0.17, respectively. The spatial correlation is better (0.25, 0.5 and 0.87), showing that the mean

  8. Resuspension of Aerosol Particles from Evaporated Rain Drops to the Coarse Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Ganguly, D.; Singh, B.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation scavenging (i.e., wet removal) has long been recognized as one of the major removal processes for tropospheric aerosol particles, and the dominant one for accumulation-mode size particles. When rain drops evaporate, the aerosol material contained in drops is resuspended, and this process has received much less attention. Unlike the resuspension from evaporated cloud droplets, the aerosol particles resuspended from evaporated rain drops have much larger sizes than most of the aerosol particles that acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), became cloud borne, and then were collected by rain drops, because each rain drop generally collects thousands of cloud droplets. Here we present some aspects of this resuspension process obtained from modeling studies. First, we investigate some details of the process using a simple drop-size resolved model of raindrop evaporation in sub-saturated air below cloud base. Using these results, we then investigate different treatments of this process in a global aerosol and climate model that employs a modal aerosol representation. Compared to the model's original treatment of this process in which rain-borne aerosol is resuspended to the mode that it came from with its original size, the new treatment that resuspends to the coarse mode produces notable reductions in global CCN concentrations, as well as sulfate, black carbon, and organic aerosol mass, because the resuspended aerosol particles have much shorter lifetimes due to their larger sizes. Somewhat surprisingly, there are also notable reductions in coarse-mode sea salt and mineral dust burdens. These species are resuspended to the coarse mode in both the original and new treatments, but these resuspended particles are fewer in number and larger in size in the new treatment. This finding highlights some issues of the modal aerosol treatment for coarse mode particles.

  9. Towards an Understanding of Aerosol Redistribution by Shallow Cumulus Clouds with a Focus on Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Murphy, S. M.; Ervens, B.; Chuang, P. Y.; Feingold, G.; Jonsson, H. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2010-12-01

    The extent to which clouds alter the vertical distribution of aerosols and concentrations of various inorganic and organic species has important implications for gas phase chemistry, air quality, and radiative forcing of climate. Models have been shown to inaccurately predict the vertical concentrations of organic aerosol mass and its oxidation state, especially in the free troposphere, where measurements usually exceed predictions of mass and underestimate O:C ratios. This work uses an airborne data set from the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) to address the convective redistribution of aerosols by small cumulus clouds, and also to quantify the contribution of aqueous chemistry to the vertical profiles of inorganic and organic particle species. There is evidence for convective pumping of aerosols in regions above cloud tops, where enhanced particle concentrations are observed in addition to high levels of sulfate and organics. Pre-conditioned areas in clear air that were recently processed by clouds exhibit enhanced levels of sulfate and organic acids as compared to other clear air regions. There is a trend towards enrichment of water-soluble organic aerosols (relative to both total organic and inorganic mass) as a function of both altitude (up to 4 km) and relative humidity. The most plausible explanation is that these species are produced by multi-phase chemistry. Modeling analysis will be presented to constrain the chemical aging processes in clouds and aqueous particles in the summertime southeastern Texas atmosphere. The usefulness of utilizing aerosol tracers for estimating the vertical profile of convective mass flux due to clouds is also explored.

  10. Speciation of the major inorganic salts in atmospheric aerosols of Beijing, China: Measurements and comparison with model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Ci, Zhijia; Guo, Jia; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-05-01

    In the winter and summer of 2013-2014, we used a sampling system, which consists of annular denuder, back-up filter and thermal desorption set-up, to measure the speciation of major inorganic salts in aerosols and the associated trace gases in Beijing. This sampling system can separate volatile ammonium salts (NH4NO3 and NH4Cl) from non-volatile ammonium salts ((NH4)2SO4), as well as the non-volatile nitrate and chloride. The measurement data was used as input of a thermodynamic equilibrium model (ISORROPIA II) to investigate the gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics. Results show that (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and NH4Cl were the major inorganic salts in aerosols and mainly existed in the fine particles. The sulfate, nitrate and chloride associated with crustal ions were also important in Beijing where mineral dust concentrations were high. About 19% of sulfate in winter and 11% of sulfate in summer were associated with crustal ions and originated from heterogeneous reactions or direct emissions. The non-volatile nitrate contributed about 33% and 15% of nitrate in winter and summer, respectively. Theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for NH4NO3 and NH4Cl suggest that the gaseous precursors were sufficient to form stable volatile ammonium salts in winter, whereas the internal mixing with sulfate and crustal species were important for the formation of volatile ammonium salts in summer. The results of the thermodynamic equilibrium model reasonably agreed with the measurements of aerosols and gases, but large discrepancy existed in predicting the speciation of inorganic ammonium salts. This indicates that the assumption on crustal species in the model was important for obtaining better understanding on gas-aerosol partitioning and improving the model prediction.

  11. Biomass burning as an important source of reactive oxygen species associated with the atmospheric aerosols in Southeastern United States - Implications for health effects of ambient particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, V.; Weber, R. J. J.; Fang, T.; Xu, L.; Ng, N. L.; Russell, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the potential of water-soluble fraction of atmospheric fine aerosols in the southeastern US to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS-generation potential of particles was quantified by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay and involved analysis of fine particulate matter (PM) extracted from high-volume quartz filters (23 h integrated daily samples) collected for one year at various sites in different environmental settings in the southeast, including three urban Atlanta sites, and one rural site in Yorkville. Water-soluble PM extracts were further separated into the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions using a C-18 column, and both fractions were analyzed for the DTT activity. Organic aerosol (OA) composition was measured at selected sites using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrophotometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The various factors of the organic aerosols, i.e. Isoprene OA (Isop-OA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), less-oxidized oxygenated OA, (LO-OOA), more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA), cooking OA (COA), and biomass burning OA (BBOA) were also resolved, and their ability to generate ROS investigated by linear regression techniques. Among all OA factors, BBOA was most consistently associated with ROS, with the highest intrinsic DTT activity of 151±20 pmol/min/μg. The water-soluble bioavailable fraction of BBOA-DTT activity is 2-3 times higher than the reported total-DTT activity of diesel exhaust particles. The total contribution of various aerosol sources to the ROS generating potential was also determined by the positive matrix factorization approach. Interestingly, biomass burning appears as the strongest source of ROS generation, with its annual contribution of 35 % to DTT activity; the contribution was higher in winter (47 %), than summer (24 %) and fall (17 %) seasons. The good agreement between the hydrophobic DTT activity with that estimated from the summed OA components, indicates that humic-like substances (HULIS), which are abundantly emitted

  12. Impact of interannual variations in sources of insoluble aerosol species on orographic precipitation over California's central Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, J. M.; Ault, A. P.; White, A. B.; Neiman, P. J.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, P.; Prather, K. A.

    2015-06-01

    Aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) have the potential to profoundly influence precipitation processes. Furthermore, changes in orographic precipitation have broad implications for reservoir storage and flood risks. As part of the CalWater field campaign (2009-2011), the variability and associated impacts of different aerosol sources on precipitation were investigated in the California Sierra Nevada using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer for precipitation chemistry, S-band profiling radar for precipitation classification, remote sensing measurements of cloud properties, and surface meteorological measurements. The composition of insoluble residues in precipitation samples collected at a surface site contained mostly local biomass burning and long-range-transported dust and biological particles (2009), local sources of biomass burning and pollution (2010), and long-range transport (2011). Although differences in the sources of insoluble residues were observed from year to year, the most consistent source of dust and biological residues were associated with storms consisting of deep convective cloud systems with significant quantities of precipitation initiated in the ice phase. Further, biological residues were dominant (up to 40%) during storms with relatively warm cloud temperatures (up to -15 °C), supporting the important role bioparticles can play as ice nucleating particles. On the other hand, lower percentages of residues from local biomass burning and pollution were observed over the three winter seasons (on average 31 and 9%, respectively). When precipitation quantities were relatively low, these insoluble residues most likely served as CCN, forming smaller more numerous cloud droplets at the base of shallow cloud systems, and resulting in less efficient riming processes. Ultimately, the goal is to use such observations to improve the mechanistic linkages between aerosol sources and precipitation processes

  13. Effect of topography on sulfate redistribution in Cumulonimbus cloud development.

    PubMed

    Vujović, Dragana; Vučković, Vladan; Curić, Mlađen

    2014-03-01

    An aqueous chemical module is created and included into a complex three-dimensional atmospheric cloud-resolving mesoscale model. In the chemical module, oxidation of S(IV) by ozone and hydrogen peroxide in cloud-water and rainwater, as important process of the sulfate production is included. To examine the impact of topography on the sulfate redistribution in a clean and a polluted environment, the complex topography of Serbia is included in the model. Numerical simulations of an isolated summer Cumulonimbus cloud shows that thunderstorms generate very strong vertical sulfate redistribution from the planetary boundary layer to the upper troposphere. This redistribution is sensitive to cloud dynamics, while cloud microphysics and precipitation determine wet removal of the chemical species. In simulations with realistic topography, the chemical species are transported over larger distances close to the surface, while in the upper atmosphere, there is no difference compared to the simulations without topography. The sensitivity tests of cloud chemistry to the physical processes are made. Omission of nucleation and impact scavenging of aerosols in the model simulations shows that 75.8 and 62.5 % of total sulfur mass deposited in the base experiment for the clean and the polluted environment, respectively, is the result of other processes. Exclusion of oxidation accounted for 19.2 and 37.7 % of total sulfur deposited for clean and polluted environment. Ignoring the ice phase almost not change mass of deposited sulfur: there is an increase of 2.9 and 1.5 % for clean and polluted atmosphere, respectively. Real topography conditions affect the sulfate redistribution in the sense of greater possibilities of transport. Numerical simulations without real topography give an artificial increase of deposited sulfur mass of about 25-30 %.

  14. Aerosol Observability and Predictability: From Research to Operations for Chemical Weather Forecasting. Lagrangian Displacement Ensembles for Aerosol Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    da Silva, Arlindo

    2010-01-01

    A challenge common to many constituent data assimilation applications is the fact that one observes a much smaller fraction of the phase space that one wishes to estimate. For example, remotely sensed estimates of the column average concentrations are available, while one is faced with the problem of estimating 3D concentrations for initializing a prognostic model. This problem is exacerbated in the case of aerosols because the observable Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is not only a column integrated quantity, but it also sums over a large number of species (dust, sea-salt, carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols. An aerosol transport model when driven by high-resolution, state-of-the-art analysis of meteorological fields and realistic emissions can produce skillful forecasts even when no aerosol data is assimilated. The main task of aerosol data assimilation is to address the bias arising from inaccurate emissions, and Lagrangian misplacement of plumes induced by errors in the driving meteorological fields. As long as one decouples the meteorological and aerosol assimilation as we do here, the classic baroclinic growth of error is no longer the main order of business. We will describe an aerosol data assimilation scheme in which the analysis update step is conducted in observation space, using an adaptive maximum-likelihood scheme for estimating background errors in AOD space. This scheme includes e explicit sequential bias estimation as in Dee and da Silva. Unlikely existing aerosol data assimilation schemes we do not obtain analysis increments of the 3D concentrations by scaling the background profiles. Instead we explore the Lagrangian characteristics of the problem for generating local displacement ensembles. These high-resolution state-dependent ensembles are then used to parameterize the background errors and generate 3D aerosol increments. The algorithm has computational complexity running at a resolution of 1/4 degree, globally. We will present the result of

  15. Indoxyl sulfate potentiates endothelial dysfunction via reciprocal role for reactive oxygen species and RhoA/ROCK signaling in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shuang; Mao, Xiaodong; Guo, Hengjiang; Wang, Li; Li, Zezheng; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Yunman; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2017-03-13

    Accumulative indoxyl sulfate (IS) retained in chronic kidney disease (CKD) can potentiate vascular endothelial dysfunction, and herein, we aim at elucidating the underlying mechanisms from the perspective of possible association between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RhoA/ROCK pathway. IS-treated nephrectomized rats are administered with antioxidants including NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, SOD analog tempol, and mitochondrion-targeted SOD mimetic mito-TEMPO to scavenge ROS, or ROCK inhibitor fasudil to obstruct RhoA/ROCK pathway. First, we find in response to IS stimulation, antioxidants treatments suppress increased aortic ROCK activity and expression levels. Additionally, ROCK blockade prevent IS-induced increased NADPH oxidase expression (mainly p22phox and p47phox), mitochondrial and intracellular ROS (superoxide and hydrogen peroxide) generation, and decreased Cu/Zn-SOD expression in thoracic aortas. Apocynin, mito-TEMPO, and tempol also reverse these markers of oxidative stress. These results suggest that IS induces excessive ROS production and ROCK activation involving a circuitous relationship in which ROS activate ROCK and ROCK promotes ROS overproduction. Finally, ROS and ROCK depletion attenuate IS-induced decrease in nitric oxide (NO) production and eNOS expression levels, and alleviate impaired vasomotor responses including increased vasocontraction to phenylephrine and decreased vasorelaxation to acetylcholine, thereby preventing cardiovascular complications accompanied by CKD. Taken together, excessive ROS derived from NADPH oxidase and mitochondria coordinate with RhoA/ROCK activation in a form of positive reciprocal relationship to induce endothelial dysfunction through disturbing endothelium-dependent NO signaling upon IS stimulation in CKD status.

  16. Distributions of Beryllium 7 and Lead 210, and Soluble Aerosol-Associated Ionic Species Over the Western Pacific: PEM West B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didd, J. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Lefer, B. L.; Scheuer, E.; Gregory, G. L.; Browell, E. V.; Sandholm, S. T.; Singh, H. B.

    1997-01-01

    Aerosol sampling for the determination of the concentrations of soluble ionic species and the natural radionuclides Be-7 and Pb-210 was conducted from the NASA DC-8 over the western Pacific as part of GTE/PEM-West B during February - March 1994. Concentrations of most soluble ionic species in the free troposphere were higher in samples collected on flights originating from Hong Kong and Japan than those collected further east over the open ocean. In both regions the measured concentrations were higher than those found during PEM-West A (fall 1991). Activities of Pb-210 tracer of air masses influenced by sources on the Asian continent, showed the same patterns. These data indicate the effect of stronger continental outflow from Asia over the western Pacific during the spring compared to fall season. For readily scavenged aerosol-associated species and soluble acidic gases the strongest indications of Asian outflow were restricted to altitudes below 6 km. The distribution of the continental tracer Pb-210 was also compared to those of a large number of gas phase species measured on the DC-8. Relatively strong correlations were found with O3 and peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN), but only during the flights over the remote Pacific. During PEM-West A, similar correlations were seen, but they were stronger near Asia. We believe that these correlations are a signature of continental air that has been processed by deep wet convection over land before being advected over the ocean. One flight over the Sea of Japan provided the opportunity to sample upper troposphere/lower stratosphere air in and around a tropopause fold. Concentrations of Be-7 reached 7 pCi/cu m STP, and peak O3, mixing ratios of 480 ppb were encountered at 10.7 km. The Be-7 data are used to estimate the fraction of stratospheric air mixed down into the troposphere by circulation in the fold.

  17. Distributions of Beryllium 7 and Lead 210, and Soluble Aerosol-Associated Ionic Species Over the Western Pacific: PEM West B, February - March 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibb, J. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Lefer, B. L.; Scheuer, E.; Gregory, G. L.; Browell, E. V.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Singh, H. B.

    1997-01-01

    Aerosol sampling for the determination of the concentrations of soluble ionic species and the natural radionuclides Be-7 and Pb-210 was conducted from the NASA DC-8 over the western Pacific as part of GTE/PEM-West B during February - March 1994. Concentrations of most soluble ionic species in the free troposphere were higher in samples collected on flights originating from Hong Kong and Japan than those collected further east over the open ocean. In both regions the measured concentrations were higher than those found during PEM-West A (fall 1991). Activities of Pb-210, a tracer of air masses influenced by sources on the Asian continent, showed the same patterns. These data indicate the effect of stronger continental outflow from Asia over the western Pacific during the spring compared to fall season. For readily scavenged aerosol-associated species and soluble acidic gases the strongest indications of Asian outflow were restricted to altitudes below 6 km. The distribution of the continental tracer Pb-210 was also compared to those of a large number of gas phase species measured on the DC-8. Relatively strong correlations were found with O3, and peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN), but only during the flights over the remote Pacific. During PEM-West A, similar correlations were seen, but they were stronger near Asia. We believe that correlations are a signature of continental air that has been processed by deep wet convection over land before being advected over the ocean. One flight over the Sea of Japan provided the opportunity to sample upper troposphere/lower stratosphere air in and around a tropopause fold. Concentrations of Be-7 reached 7 pCi/cu m STP, and peak O3, mixing ratios of 480 ppb were encountered at 10.7 km. The Be-7 data are used to estimate the fraction of stratospheric air mixed down into the troposphere by circulation in the fold.

  18. Using high time resolution aerosol and number size distribution measurements to estimate atmospheric extinction.

    PubMed

    Malm, William C; McMeeking, Gavin R; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Levin, Ezra; Carrico, Christian M; Day, Derek E; Collett, Jeffrey L; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy P; Raja, Suresh

    2009-09-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park is experiencing reduced visibility and changes in ecosystem function due to increasing levels of oxidized and reduced nitrogen. The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS) study was initiated to better understand the origins of sulfur and nitrogen species as well as the complex chemistry occurring during transport from source to receptor. As part of the study, a monitoring program was initiated for two 1-month time periods--one during the spring and the other during late summer/fall. The monitoring program included intensive high time resolution concentration measurements of aerosol number size distribution, inorganic anions, and cations, and 24-hr time resolution of PM2.5 and PM10 mass, sulfate, nitrate, carbon, and soil-related elements concentrations. These data are combined to estimate high time resolution concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol mass and fine mass species estimates of ammoniated sulfate, nitrate, and organic and elemental carbon. Hour-by-hour extinction budgets are calculated by using these species concentration estimates and measurements of size distribution and assuming internal and external particle mixtures. Summer extinction was on average about 3 times higher than spring extinction. During spring months, sulfates, nitrates, carbon mass, and PM10 - PM2.5 mass contributed approximately equal amounts of extinction, whereas during the summer months, carbonaceous material extinction was 2-3 times higher than other species.

  19. Sulfation of von Willebrand factor

    SciTech Connect

    Carew, J.A.; Browning, P.J.; Lynch, D.C. )

    1990-12-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein essential for normal hemostasis. We have discovered that cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells incorporate inorganic sulfate into vWF. Following immunoisolation and analysis by polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis, metabolically labeled vWF was found to have incorporated (35S)-sulfate into all secreted multimer species. The time course of incorporation shows that sulfation occurs late in the biosynthesis of vWF, near the point at which multimerization occurs. Quantitative analysis suggests the presence, on average, of one molecule of sulfate per mature vWF subunit. Virtually all the detectable sulfate is released from the mature vWF subunit by treatment with endoglycosidases that remove asparagine-linked carbohydrates. Sulfated carbohydrate was localized first to the N-terminal half of the mature subunit (amino acids 1 through 1,365) by partial proteolytic digestion with protease V8; and subsequently to a smaller fragment within this region (amino acids 273 through 511) by sequential digestions with protease V8 and trypsin. Thus, the carbohydrate at asparagine 384 and/or 468 appears to be the site of sulfate modification. Sodium chlorate, an inhibitor of adenosine triphosphate-sulfurylase, blocks sulfation of vWF without affecting either the ability of vWF to assemble into high molecular weight multimers or the ability of vWF multimers to enter Weible-Palade bodies. The stability of vWF multimers in the presence of an endothelial cell monolayer also was unaffected by the sulfation state. Additionally, we have found that the cleaved propeptide of vWF is sulfated on asparagine-linked carbohydrate.

  20. Effects of seed aerosols on the growth of secondary organic aerosols from the photooxidation of toluene.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-qing; Wang, Zhen-ya; Huang, Ming-qiang; Fang, Li; Zhang, Wei-jun

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (.OH)-initiated photooxidation reaction of toluene was carried out in a self-made smog chamber. Four individual seed aerosols such as ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, sodium silicate and calcium chloride, were introduced into the chamber to assess their influence on the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). It was found that the low concentration of seed aerosols might lead to high concentration of SOA particles. Seed aerosols would promote rates of SOA formation at the start of the reaction and inhibit its formation rate with prolonging the reaction time. In the case of ca. 9000 pt/cm3 seed aerosol load, the addition of sodium silicate induced a same effect on the SOA formation as ammonium nitrate. The influence of the four individual seed aerosols on the generation of SOA decreased in the order of calcium chloride>sodium silicate and ammonium nitrate>ammonium sulfate.

  1. Chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol constituents from isoprene ozonolysis in the presence of acidic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted into Earth's atmosphere and is predominantly derived from terrestrial vegetation. Prior studies have focused largely on the hydroxyl (OH) radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and have demonstrated that highly oxidized compounds, such as isoprene-derived epoxides, enhance the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) through heterogeneous (multiphase) reactions on acidified sulfate aerosol. However, studies on the impact of acidified sulfate aerosol on SOA formation from isoprene ozonolysis are lacking and the current work systematically examines this reaction. SOA was generated in an indoor smog chamber from isoprene ozonolysis under dark conditions in the presence of non-acidified or acidified sulfate seed aerosol. The effect of OH radicals on SOA chemical composition was investigated using diethyl ether as an OH radical scavenger. Aerosols were collected and chemically characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS). Analysis revealed the formation of highly oxidized compounds, including organosulfates (OSs) and 2-methylterols, which were significantly enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol. OSs identified in the chamber experiments were also observed and quantified in summertime fine aerosol collected from two rural locations in the southeastern United States during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS).

  2. Sulfate in air and snow at the South Pole: Implications for transport and deposition at sites with low snow accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Susan; Warren, Stephen G.; Charlson, Robert J.

    2000-09-01

    Air and surface snow were sampled at Amundsen-Scott Station at the South Pole from July through December of 1992. Four-day averages of non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO4=) aerosol show a strong seasonal trend, increasing by a factor of about 30 from winter to summer as oceanic biogenic sources become more active and atmospheric transport pathways change. Three-dimensional sampling of small-scale surface topography (sastrugi) provides evidence supporting wind pumping and filtration of aerosol by snow as a significant mechanism for dry deposition at this site. The estimated monthly flux of nss-SO4= to the snow surface also increases from winter to spring, but by only a factor of 2, suggesting that the efficiency of deposition for this aerosol-borne species from the near-surface air to the snow is greater in winter. The strong surface-based temperature inversion in winter inhibits vertical motion and may limit the rate of delivery of aerosol to the boundary layer from the free troposphere. Because the snow surface is a sink for aerosol, near-surface measurements of aerosol in the stable inversion layer may not be representative of the free troposphere. Air and snow data in summer (when the inversion is weak) are used to estimate a tropospheric residence time of 4-20 days for nss SO4=.

  3. Relative toxicity of inhaled metal sulfate salts for pulmonary macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Skornik, W.A.; Brain, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    The effects of metal sulfate aerosols on respiratory defense mechanisms in hamsters were studied. Pulmonary macrophage phagocytic rates were measured by determining the in vivo uptake of radioactive colloidal gold (/sup 198/Au) 1, 24, or 48 h after a single 4-h exposure. The concentrations of sulfate aerosols causing a 50% inhibition in pulmonary macrophage endocytosis (EC/sub 50/) were determined. When hamsters were exposed for 4 h to cupric sulfate (greater than or equal to 4.8 mg/m/sup 3/), zinc sulfate (greater than or equal to 3.1 mg/m/sup 3/), ferric sulfate (greater than or equal to 7.8 mg/m/sup 3/), or zinc ammonium sulfate (greater than or equal to 10.0 mg/m/sup 3/), macrophage endocytosis was significantly reduced 1 h after exposure compared with that in unexposed control animals. Although the response was variable, 24 h after exposures to the higher sulfate concentrations the percent of gold ingested by pulmonary macrophages remained depressed. By 48 h, the rate of macrophage endocytosis in hamsters had returned to normal control values except in hamsters exposed to 4.8 mg/m/sup 3/ cupric sulfate or 9.8 mg/m/sup 3/ ferric sulfate. These hamsters showed significant increases in phagocytosis. The EC/sub 50/ values in milligrams of sulfate per cubic meter for cupric sulfate, zinc sulfate, ferric sulfate, and zinc ammonium sulfate were 2.7, 4.5, 7.5, and 17.9, respectively. These results are negatively correlated with the ranking of sulfates using the criteria of relative irritant potency, as measured by increases in pulmonary flow resistance. Thus, rankings of related chemical structures are not absolute. Their relative toxicities vary depending on the end point selected.

  4. Relative toxicity of inhaled metal sulfate salts for pulmonary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Skornik, W A; Brain, J D

    1983-08-01

    The effects of metal sulfate aerosols on respiratory defense mechanisms in hamsters were studied. Pulmonary macrophage phagocytic rates were measured by determining the in vivo uptake of radioactive colloidal gold (198Au) 1, 24, or 48 h after a single 4-h exposure. The concentrations of sulfate aerosols causing a 50% inhibition in pulmonary macrophage endocytosis (EC50) were determined. When hamsters were exposed for 4 h to cupric sulfate (greater than or equal to 4.8 mg/m3), zinc sulfate (greater than or equal to 3.1 mg/m3), ferric sulfate (greater than or equal to 7.8 mg/m3), or zinc ammonium sulfate (greater than or equal to 10.0 mg/m3), macrophage endocytosis was significantly reduced 1 h after exposure compared with that in unexposed control animals. Although the response was variable, 24 h after exposures to the higher sulfate concentrations the percent of gold ingested by pulmonary macrophages remained depressed. By 48 h, the rate of macrophage endocytosis in hamsters had returned to normal control values except in hamsters exposed to 4.8 mg/m3 cupric sulfate or 9.8 mg/m3 ferric sulfate. These hamsters showed significant increases in phagocytosis. The EC50 values in milligrams of sulfate per cubic meter for cupric sulfate, zinc sulfate, ferric sulfate, and zinc ammonium sulfate were 2.7, 4.5, 7.5, and 17.9, respectively. These results are negatively correlated with the ranking of sulfates using the criteria of relative irritant potency, as measured by increases in pulmonary flow resistance. Thus, rankings of related chemical structures are not absolute. Their relative toxicities vary depending on the end point selected.

  5. Global Impacts of Gas-Phase Chemistry-Aerosol Interactions on Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.

    2005-01-01

    We present here a first global modeling study on the influence of gas-phase chemistry/aerosol interactions on estimates of anthropogenic forcing by tropospheric O3 and aerosols. Concentrations of gas-phase species and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust aerosols in the preindustrial, present-day, and year 2100 (IPCC SRES A2) atmospheres are simulated online in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model II' (GISS GCM II'). With fully coupled chemistry and aerosols, the preindustrial, presentday, and year 2100 global burdens of tropospheric ozone are predicted to be 190, 319, and 519 Tg, respectively. The burdens of sulfate, nitrate, black carbon, and organic carbon are predicted respectively to be 0.32. 0.18, 0.01, 0.33 Tg in preindustrial time, 1.40, 0.48, 0.23, 1.60 Tg in presentday, and 1.37, 1.97, 0.54, 3.31 Tg in year 2100. Anthropogenic O3 is predicted to have a globally and annually averaged present-day forcing of +0.22 W m(sup -2) and year 2100 forcing of +0.57 W m(sup -2) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Net anthropogenic TOA forcing by internally mixed sulfate, nitrate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosols is estimated to be virtually zero in the present-day and +0.34 W m(sup -2) in year 2100, whereas it is predicted to be -0.39 W m(sup -2) in present-day and -0.61 W m(sup -2) in year 2100 if the aerosols are externally mixed. Heterogeneous reactions are shown to be important in affecting anthropogenic forcing. When reactions of N2O5, NO3, NO2, and HO2 on aerosols are accounted for, TOA anthropogenic O3 forcing is less by 20-45% in present-day and by 20-32% in year 2100 at mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, as compared with values predicted in the absence of heterogeneous gas aerosol reactions. Mineral dust uptake of HNO3 and O3 is shown to have practically no influence on anthropogenic O3 forcing. Heterogeneous reactions of N2Os

  6. Small molecules as tracers in atmospheric secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ge

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), formed from in-air oxidation of volatile organic compounds, greatly affects human health and climate. Although substantial research has been devoted to SOA formation and evolution, the modeled and lab-generated SOA are still low in mass and degree of oxidation compared to ambient measurements. In order to compensate for these discrepancies, the aqueous processing pathway has been brought to attention. The atmospheric waters serve as aqueous reaction media for dissolved organics to undergo further oxidation, oligomerization, or other functionalization reactions, which decreases the vapor pressure while increasing the oxidation state of carbon atoms. Field evidence for aqueous processing requires the identification of tracer products such as organosulfates. We synthesized the standards for two organosulfates, glycolic acid sulfate and lactic acid sulfate, in order to measure their aerosol-state concentration from five distinct locations via filter samples. The water-extracted filter samples were analyzed by LC-MS. Lactic acid sulfate and glycolic acid sulfate were detected in urban locations in the United States, Mexico City, and Pakistan with varied concentrations, indicating their potential as tracers. We studied the aqueous processing reaction between glyoxal and nitrogen-containing species such as ammonium and amines exclusively by NMR spectrometry. The reaction products formic acid and several imidazoles along with the quantified kinetics were reported. The brown carbon generated from these reactions were quantified optically by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The organic-phase reaction between oxygen molecule and alkenes photosensitized by alpha-dicarbonyls were studied in the same manner. We observed the fast kinetics transferring alkenes to epoxides under simulated sunlight. Statistical estimations indicate a very effective conversion of aerosol-phase alkenes to epoxides, potentially forming organosulfates in a deliquescence event and

  7. Contribution of water-soluble and insoluble components and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the reactive oxygen species-generating potential of fine ambient aerosols.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal; Rico-Martinez, Roberto; Kotra, Neel; King, Laura; Liu, Jiumeng; Snell, Terry W; Weber, Rodney J

    2012-10-16

    Relative contributions of water- and methanol-soluble compounds and their hydrophobic/hydrophilic subfractions to the ROS (reactive oxygen species)-generating potential of ambient fine aerosols (D(p) < 2.5 μm) are assessed. ROS-generating (or oxidative) potential of the particulate matter (PM) was measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Particles were collected on quartz filters (N = 8) at an urban site near central Atlanta during January-February 2012 using a PM(2.5) high-volume sampler. Filter punches were extracted separately in both water and methanol. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions were then subsequently segregated via a C-18 solid phase extraction column. The DTT assay response was significantly higher for the methanol extract, and for both extracts a substantial fraction of PM oxidative potential was associated with the hydrophobic compounds as evident from a substantial attenuation in DTT response after passing PM extracts through the C-18 column (64% for water and 83% for methanol extract; both median values). The DTT activities of water and methanol extracts were correlated with the water-soluble (R = 0.86) and water-insoluble organic carbon (R = 0.94) contents of the PM, respectively. Brown carbon (BrC), which predominantly represents the hydrophobic organic fraction (referred to as humic-like substances, HULIS), was also correlated with DTT activity in both the water (R = 0.78) and methanol extracts (R = 0.83). Oxidative potential was not correlated with any metals measured in the extracts. These findings suggest that the hydrophobic components of both water-soluble and insoluble organic aerosols substantially contribute to the oxidative properties of ambient PM. Further investigation of these hydrophobic organic compounds could help identify sources of a significant fraction of ambient aerosol toxicity.

  8. Chemical characterization of biogenic secondary organic aerosol generated from plant emissions under baseline and stressed conditions: inter- and intra-species variability for six coniferous species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Wen, M.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-04-01

    The largest global source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere is derived from the oxidation of biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. Alterations to the biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) profile could impact the characteristics of the SOA formed from those emissions. This study investigated the impacts of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on the composition of SOA derived from real plant emissions. Herbivory was simulated via application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a proxy compound. Experiments were repeated under pre- and post-treatment conditions for six different coniferous plant types. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the plants were oxidized to form SOA via dark ozone-initiated chemistry. The SOA chemical composition was measured using a Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS). The aerosol mass spectra of pre-treatment biogenic SOA from all plant types tended to be similar with correlations usually greater than or equal to 0.90. The presence of a stressor produced characteristic differences in the SOA mass spectra. Specifically, the following m/z were identified as a possible biogenic stress AMS marker with the corresponding HR ion(s) shown in parentheses: m/z 31 (CH3O+), m/z 58 (C2H2O2+, C3H6O+), m/z 29 (C2H5+), m/z 57 (C3H5O+), m/z 59 (C2H3O2+, C3H7O+), m/z 71 (C3H3O2+, C4H7O+), and m/z 83 (C5H7O+). The first aerosol mass spectrum of SOA generated from the oxidation of the plant stress hormone, MeJA, is also presented. Elemental analysis results demonstrated an O : C range of baseline biogenic SOA between 0.3 and 0.47. The O : C of standard MeJA SOA was 0.52. Results presented here could be used to help identify a biogenic plant stress marker in ambient data sets collected in forest environments.

  9. Chemical characterization of biogenic secondary organic aerosol generated from plant emissions under baseline and stressed conditions: inter- and intra-species variability for six coniferous species

    DOE PAGES

    Faiola, C. L.; Wen, M.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-04-01

    The largest global source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere is derived from the oxidation of biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. Alterations to the biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) profile could impact the characteristics of the SOA formed from those emissions. This study investigated the impacts of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on the composition of SOA derived from real plant emissions. Herbivory was simulated via application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a proxy compound. Experiments were repeated under pre- andmore » post-treatment conditions for six different coniferous plant types. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the plants were oxidized to form SOA via dark ozone-initiated chemistry. The SOA chemical composition was measured using a Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS). The aerosol mass spectra of pre-treatment biogenic SOA from all plant types tended to be similar with correlations usually greater than or equal to 0.90. The presence of a stressor produced characteristic differences in the SOA mass spectra. Specifically, the following m/z were identified as a possible biogenic stress AMS marker with the corresponding HR ion(s) shown in parentheses: m/z 31 (CH3O+), m/z 58 (C2H2O2+, C3H6O+), m/z 29 (C2H5+), m/z 57 (C3H5O+), m/z 59 (C2H3O2+, C3H7O+), m/z 71 (C3H3O2+, C4H7O+), and m/z 83 (C5H7O+). The first aerosol mass spectrum of SOA generated from the oxidation of the plant stress hormone, MeJA, is also presented. Elemental analysis results demonstrated an O : C range of baseline biogenic SOA between 0.3 and 0.47. The O : C of standard MeJA SOA was 0.52. Results presented here could be used to help identify a biogenic plant stress marker in ambient data sets collected in forest environments.« less

  10. Hygroscopic and phase separation properties of ammonium sulfate/organics/water ternary solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadowicz, M. A.; Proud, S. R.; Seppalainen, S. S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are often partially or completely composed of inorganic salts, such as ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and therefore exhibit hygroscopic properties. Many inorganic salts have well-defined deliquescence and efflorescence points at which they take up and lose water, respectively. Field measurements have shown that atmospheric aerosols are not typically pure inorganic salt, instead, they often also contain organic species. There is ample evidence from laboratory studies that suggests that mixed particles exist in a phase-separated state, with an aqueous inorganic core and organic shell. Although phase separation has not been measured in situ, there is no reason it would not also take place in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the deliquescence and efflorescence points, phase separation and ability to exchange gas-phase components of mixed organic and inorganic aerosol using a flow tube coupled with FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy. Ammonium sulfate aerosol mixed with organic polyols with different O : C ratios, including 1,4-butanediol, glycerol, 1,2,6-hexanetriol, 1,2-hexanediol, and 1,5-pentanediol have been investigated. Those constituents correspond to materials found in the atmosphere in great abundance and, therefore, particles prepared in this study should mimic atmospheric mixed-phase aerosol particles. Some results of this study tend to be in agreement with previous microscopy experiments, but others, such as phase separation properties of 1,2,6-hexanetriol, do not agree with previous work. Because the particles studied in this experiment are of a smaller size than those used in microscopy studies, the discrepancies found could be a size-related effect.

  11. The boiling point of stratospheric aerosols.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A photoelectric particle counter was used for the measurement of aerosol boiling points. The operational principle involves raising the temperature of the aerosol by vigorously heating a portion of the intake tube. At or above the boiling point, the particles disintegrate rather quickly, and a noticeable effect on the size distribution and concentration is observed. Stratospheric aerosols appear to have the same volatility as a solution of 75% sulfuric acid. Chemical analysis of the aerosols indicates that there are other substances present, but that the sulfate radical is apparently the major constituent.

  12. Sources and characteristics of sub-micron aerosols in the San Joaquin Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Brioude, J.; Brock, C. A.; de Gouw, J. A.; Hall, K.; Holloway, J. S.; Neuman, J.; Nowak, J. B.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Parrish, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    The NOAA WP-3D aircraft performed several flights in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV), California during the CalNex-2010 (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field project in May-June 2010. SJV is generally a rural valley, with a high concentration of feedlots and agricultural sites as well as urbanized centers such as Fresno and Bakersfield. Preliminary results on size-resolved chemical composition of sub-micron aerosols measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measurements of trace gases affecting secondary production of aerosols, and FLEXPART back trajectory analyses are presented in order to identify sources of aerosols transported to or produced in the valley. Observed enhancements in various trace gases and aerosol species indicate a mixed influence from urban, industrial, and animal feedlots in the SJV. Three distinct observations suggest a complex transport pattern of pollutants with different origins to and within the valley: 1) CO and NOx mixing ratios were prominent downwind of the urban areas in the valley; 2) SO2, aerosol organics and sulfate were higher closer to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains on the east of the valley; 3) high concentration of aerosol phase ammonium and nitrate were observed in NH3-rich air masses, directly downwind of the feedlots in the central part of the valley. Aerosol enhancements in each of these air mass categories relative to the background determine the relative contribution and significance of different sources to aerosol loadings in the valley. Differences in VOC measurements and meteorology will be explored to investigate the observed variation in characteristics of organics on different days.

  13. Identification of nitrogenous organic species in Titan aerosols analogs: Implication for prebiotic chemistry on Titan and early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-08-01

    Titan has a significant atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane with a significant organic haze component. Its nitrogen-rich atmosphere, abundant organics, and liquid surface make this moon of interest as a prebiotic laboratory at the planetary scale and one of the best targets for studying prebiotic planetary organic chemistry. In our previous work, we have investigated the chemical composition of Titan aerosol analogs (tholins) and identified a variety of nitrogenous organic molecules. Here we continue our structural investigation and identify four important prebiotic molecules in Titan tholins using NMR, GC-MS and standard sample comparison, including aminoacetonitrile, succinonitrile, acetoguanamine and adenine. On the basis of their structural characteristics, we suggest their formation pathways via simple precursors including methanimine (CH2NH), HCN, NH3, CH3CN and C2H2 in laboratory N2sbnd CH4 plasma or potentially in Titan’s atmosphere. Among these molecules, aminoacetonitrile is a potential precursor of amino acids and peptides, while adenine is a necessary ingredient for DNA and RNA. The identification of these molecules in Titan’s organic aerosol analogs increases our knowledge of Titan’s organic chemistry and its prebiotic implications.

  14. Regional source identification of atmospheric aerosols in Beijing based on sulfur isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lianfang, Wei; Pingqing, Fu; Xiaokun, Han; Qingjun, Guo; Yele, Sun; Zifa, Wang

    2016-04-01

    65 daily PM2.5 (aerosol particle with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) samples were collected from an urban site in Beijing in four months representing the four seasons between September 2013 and July 2014. Inorganic ions, organic/elemental carbon and stable sulfur isotopes of sulfate aerosols were analyzed systematically. The "fingerprint" characteristics of the stable sulfur isotopic composition, together with trajectory clustering modeled by HYSPLIT-4 and potential source contribution function (PSCF), were employed for identifying potential regional sources. Results obviously exhibited the distinctive seasonality for various aerosol speciation associated with PM2.5 in Beijing with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic matter, and element carbon being the dominant species. Elevated chloride associated with higher concentration of organics were found in autumn and winter, due to enhanced coal combustion emissions. The δ34S values of Beijing aerosol samples ranged from 2.94‰ to 10.2‰ with an average value of 6.18±1.87‰ indicating that the major sulfur source is direct fossil fuel burning-related emissions. Owning to a temperature-dependent fractionation and elevated biogenic sources of isotopically light sulfur in summer, the δ34S values had significant seasonal variations with a winter maximum ( 8.6‰)and a summer minimum ( 5.0‰). The results of trajectory clustering and the PSCF method demonstrated that higher concentrations of sulfate with lower sulfur isotope ratios ( 4.83‰) were associated with air masses from the south, southeast or east, whereas lower sulfate concentrations with higher δ34S values ( 6.69‰) when the air masses were mainly from north or northwest. These results suggested two main different kinds of regional coal combustion sources contributed to the pollution in Beijing.

  15. Highly time-resolved urban aerosol characteristics during springtime in Yangtze River Delta, China: insights from soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Ge, Xinlei; Chen, Yanfang; Shen, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Yele; Xu, Jianzhong; Ge, Shun; Yu, Huan; Chen, Mindong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the Aerodyne soot particle - aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was deployed for the first time during the spring of 2015 in urban Nanjing, a megacity in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of China, for online characterization of the submicron aerosols (PM1). The SP-AMS enables real-time and fast quantification of refractory black carbon (rBC) simultaneously with other non-refractory species (ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and organics). The average PM1 concentration was found to be 28.2 µg m-3, with organics (45 %) as the most abundant component, following by sulfate (19.3 %), nitrate (13.6 %), ammonium (11.1 %), rBC (9.7 %), and chloride (1.3 %). These PM1 species together can reconstruct ˜ 44 % of the light extinction during this campaign based on the IMPROVE method. Chemically resolved mass-based size distributions revealed that small particles especially ultrafine ones (< 100 nm vacuum aerodynamic diameter) were dominated by organics and rBC, while large particles had significant contributions from secondary inorganic species. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) yielded four OA subcomponents, including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking-related OA (COA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), and low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Overall, secondary organic aerosol (SOA, equal to the sum of SV-OOA and LV-OOA) dominated the total OA mass (55.5 %), but primary organic aerosol (POA, equal to the sum of HOA and COA) can outweigh SOA in the early morning and evening due to enhanced human activities. High OA concentrations were often associated with high mass fractions of POA and rBC, indicating the important role of anthropogenic emissions during heavy pollution events. The diurnal cycles of nitrate, chloride, and SV-OOA both showed good anti-correlations with air temperatures, suggesting their variations were likely driven by thermodynamic equilibria and gas-to-particle partitioning. On the other hand, in contrast to other species

  16. Climate Change and Aerosol Feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Ann-Lise

    2008-05-01

    Climate instability is expected as mixing ratios of greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere increase. The current trend in rising temperature can be related to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. However, this trend may change as feedback mechanisms amplify; one of the least-understood aspects of climate change. Formation of cloud condensation nuclei from rising sulfate concentrations in the atmosphere may counteract the current warming trend. A key point is where the sulfate, and cloud condensation nuclei are formed. Is cloud formation widespread or localized near sulfate emission sources? A major source of atmospheric sulfate is dimethylsulfide, a compound related to biotic turnover in the surface ocean that constitutes a widespread natural source of aerosols over the remote ocean. A second major source contributing a significant proportion of atmospheric sulfate in the northern hemisphere is produced over continents from industrial activities and fossil fuel combustion. Distinguishing the source of sulfate in well-mixed air is important so that relationships with cloud formation, sea-ice in polar regions, and albedo can be explored. This distinction in sulfate sources can be achieved using isotope apportionment techniques. Recent measurements show an increase in biogenic sulfate coincident with rising temperatures in the Arctic and large amounts sulfur from DMS oxidation over the Atlantic, potentially indicating a widespread biotic feedback to warming over northern oceans.

  17. Seasonality of the mass concentration and chemical composition of aerosols around an urbanized basin in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. C.-K.; Hsu, W.-C.; Chang, S.-Y.; Chen, W.-N.; Chen, M.-J.; Huang, W.-R.; Huang, S.-H.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Chang, S.-C.; Lee, C.-T.; Liu, S.-C.

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated seasonal variations in the mass concentration and chemical composition of ambient aerosols observed at three stations (coastal, mountainous, and downtown sites) in northern Taiwan from March 2009 to February 2012. The results show that the major aerosol components include ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, sea salt, dust, organic carbon, and elemental carbon, whereas the mass fraction of each species depends on the sampling location and season. A significant correlation (r = 0.7-0.8) was observed in aerosol concentrations measured at the respective stations, indicating that aerosol concentrations were dominated by regional-scale factors. Ammonium, sulfate, and nitrate consistently reached respective peak values in the spring in conjunction with dust particle levels. This shows that the transport of dust and particulate air pollutants from the Asian continent has affected the atmospheric environment in this area. Distinct seasonality was observed for sea salt and secondary organic carbon (SOC): sea salt levels peaked in the autumn, whereas SOC levels peaked in the summer, implying that their sources were regulated by independent seasonal factors. Correlation between sea salt concentration and surface wind speed was derived from coastal measurements and showed a high value for the wind speed sensitivity parameter of around 0.37 for our location. In addition, it was revealed that the SOC concentration in aerosols was positively correlated with oxidant photolysis index (Ox × UVB), suggesting that the SOC seasonality was dominated by hydroxyl radical production.

  18. Airborne minerals and related aerosol particles: Effects on climate and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Buseck, Peter R.; Pósfai, Mihály

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the troposphere and exert an important influence on global climate and the environment. They affect climate through scattering, transmission, and absorption of radiation as well as by acting as nuclei for cloud formation. A significant fraction of the aerosol particle burden consists of minerals, and most of the remainder— whether natural or anthropogenic—consists of materials that can be studied by the same methods as are used for fine-grained minerals. Our emphasis is on the study and character of the individual particles. Sulfate particles are the main cooling agents among aerosols; we found that in the remote oceanic atmosphere a significant fraction is aggregated with soot, a material that can diminish the cooling effect of sulfate. Our results suggest oxidization of SO2 may have occurred on soot surfaces, implying that even in the remote marine troposphere soot provided nuclei for heterogeneous sulfate formation. Sea salt is the dominant aerosol species (by mass) above the oceans. In addition to being important light scatterers and contributors to cloud condensation nuclei, sea-salt particles also provide large surface areas for heterogeneous atmospheric reactions. Minerals comprise the dominant mass fraction of the atmospheric aerosol burden. As all geologists know, they are a highly heterogeneous mixture. However, among atmospheric scientists they are commonly treated as a fairly uniform group, and one whose interaction with radiation is widely assumed to be unpredictable. Given their abundances, large total surface areas, and reactivities, their role in influencing climate will require increased attention as climate models are refined. PMID:10097046

  19. Organic aerosols and inorganic species from post-harvest agricultural-waste burning emissions over northern India: impact on mass absorption efficiency of elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Darshan

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 2.5 μm), collected from a source region [Patiala: 30.2 °N; 76.3 °E; 250 m above mean sea level] of emissions from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy-residue) burning in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), North India, has been studied for its chemical composition and impact on regional atmospheric radiative forcing. On average, organic aerosol mass accounts for 63% of PM2.5, whereas the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) is ∼3.5%. Sulphate, nitrate and ammonium contribute up to ∼85% of the total water-soluble inorganic species (WSIS), which constitutes ∼23% of PM2.5. The potassium-to-organic carbon ratio from paddy-residue burning emissions (KBB(+)/OC: 0.05 ± 0.01) is quite similar to that reported from Amazonian and Savanna forest-fires; whereas non-sea-salt-sulphate-to-OC ratio (nss-SO4(2-)/OC: 0.21) and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratio of 2.6 are significantly higher (by factor of 5 to 8). The mass absorption efficiency of EC (3.8 ± 1.3 m(2) g(-1)) shows significant decrease with a parallel increase in the concentrations of organic aerosols and scattering species (sulphate and nitrate). A cross plot of OC/EC and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratios show distinct differences for post-harvest burning emissions from paddy-residue as compared to those from fossil-fuel combustion sources in south-east Asia.

  20. Enhancing non-refractory aerosol apportionment from an urban industrial site through receptor modeling of complete high time-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M. L.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Slowik, J. G.; Jeong, C.-H.; Healy, R. M.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Brook, J. R.; Evans, G. J.

    2014-08-01

    Receptor modeling was performed on quadrupole unit mass resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) sub-micron particulate matter (PM) chemical speciation measurements from Windsor, Ontario, an industrial city situated across the Detroit River from Detroit, Michigan. Aerosol and trace gas measurements were collected on board Environment Canada's Canadian Regional and Urban Investigation System for Environmental Research (CRUISER) mobile laboratory. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was performed on the AMS full particle-phase mass spectrum (PMFFull MS) encompassing both organic and inorganic components. This approach compared to the more common method of analyzing only the organic mass spectra (PMFOrg MS). PMF of the full mass spectrum revealed that variability in the non-refractory sub-micron aerosol concentration and composition was best explained by six factors: an amine-containing factor (Amine); an ammonium sulfate- and oxygenated organic aerosol-containing factor (Sulfate-OA); an ammonium nitrate- and oxygenated organic aerosol-containing factor (Nitrate-OA); an ammonium chloride-containing factor (Chloride); a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factor; and a moderately oxygenated organic aerosol factor (OOA). PMF of the organic mass spectrum revealed three factors of similar composition to some of those revealed through PMFFull MS: Amine, HOA and OOA. Including both the inorganic and organic mass proved to be a beneficial approach to analyzing the unit mass resolution AMS data for several reasons. First, it provided a method for potentially calculating more accurate sub-micron PM mass concentrations, particularly when unusual factors are present, in this case the Amine factor. As this method does not rely on a priori knowledge of chemical species, it circumvents the need for any adjustments to the traditional AMS species fragmentation patterns to account for atypical species, and can thus lead to more complete factor profiles. It is expected that this

  1. Aerosol formation in basaltic lava fountaining: Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Martin, Robert S.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2012-10-01

    A short-lived episode of basaltic lava fountaining at Eyjafjallajökull volcano (March - April 2010) produced a low-altitude, ash-poor plume. We measured the composition of aerosol particles (sampled using a cascade impactor and filter packs), gases (sampled using filter packs), and volatile species scavenged by scoria and external water in order to investigate the formation and speciation of near-source aerosol (<2 min from emission). Samples were analyzed for volatile species (S, Cl and F) and metals (Na, K, Ca and Mg). The aerosol mass showed two unusual features: the prevalent size mode was finer than typically found in volcanic plumes (˜0.2μm, compared to >0.4 μm), and its composition was dominated by chloride rather than sulfate. We used two thermodynamic equilibrium models (E-AIM and HSC Chemistry v5.1) to show that the formation of particulate Cl- by condensation of HCl gas is more responsive to changes in ambient temperature than the oxidation of SO2 to SO42-, so that a low SO42-/Cl- ratio in aerosol particles is characteristic of volcanic emissions in cold climates. Field measurements suggested that the efficiency of SO2 to SO42- conversion inside the vent increased with lower explosivity. Volatiles adsorbed on the surface of scoria had significantly higher SO42-/halogen molar ratios than the aerosol samples. Several potential explanations for these differences are discussed.

  2. Reactions and mass spectra of complex particles using Aerosol CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, John D.; Smith, Geoffrey D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is used both on- and off-line for the analysis of complex laboratory-generated and ambient particles. One of the primary advantages of Aerosol CIMS is the low degree of ion fragmentation, making this technique well suited for investigating the reactivity of complex particles. To demonstrate the usefulness of this "soft" ionization, particles generated from meat cooking were reacted with ozone and the composition was monitored as a function of reaction time. Two distinct kinetic regimes were observed with most of the oleic acid in these particles reacting quickly but with 30% appearing to be trapped in the complex mixture. Additionally, detection limits are measured to be sufficiently low (100-200 ng/m3) to detect some of the more abundant constituents in ambient particles, including sulfate, which is measured in real-time at 1.2 [mu]g/m3. To better characterize complex aerosols from a variety of sources, a novel off-line collection method was also developed in which non-volatile and semi-volatile organics are desorbed from particles and concentrated in a cold U-tube. Desorption from the U-tube followed by analysis with Aerosol CIMS revealed significant amounts of nicotine in cigarette smoke and levoglucosan in oak and pine smoke, suggesting that this may be a useful technique for monitoring particle tracer species. Additionally, secondary organic aerosol formed from the reaction of ozone with R-limonene and volatile organics from orange peel were analyzed off-line showing large molecular weight products (m/z > 300 amu) that may indicate the formation of oligomers. Finally, mass spectra of ambient aerosol collected offline reveal a complex mixture of what appears to be highly processed organics, some of which may contain nitrogen.

  3. Applications of UV Scattering and Absorbing Aerosol Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M.; Beirle, S.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosols cause a substantial amount of radiative forcing, but quantifying this amount is difficult: determining aerosol concentrations in the atmosphere and, especially, characterizing their (optical) properties, has proved to be quite a challenge. A good way to monitor aerosol characteristics on a global scale is to perform satellite remote sensing. Most satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms are based on fitting of aerosol-induced changes in earth reflectance, which are usually subtle and have a smooth wavelength dependence. In such algorithms certain aerosol models are assumed, where optical parameters such as single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter and size parameter (or Angstrom exponent) are defined. Another, semi-quantitative technique for detecting aerosols is the calculation of UV Aerosol Indices (UVAI). The Absorbing and Scattering Aerosol Indices detect "UV-absorbing" aerosols (most notably mineral dust, black and brown carbon particles) and "scattering" aerosols (sulfate and secondary organic aerosol particles), respectively. UVAI are essentially a measure of the contrast between two wavelengths in the UV range. The advantages of UVAI are: they can be determined in the presence of clouds, they are rather insensitive to surface type, and they are very sensitive to aerosols. The Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) has been in use for over a decade, and the Scattering Aerosol Index (SAI) was recently introduced by our group. Whereas the AAI is mainly used to detect desert dust and biomass burning plumes, the SAI can be used to study regions with high concentrations of non-absorbing aerosols, either anthropogenic (e.g. sulfate aerosols in eastern China) or biogenic (e.g. secondary organic aerosols formed from VOCs emitted by plants). Here we will present our recent UVAI results from SCIAMACHY: we will discuss the seasonal trend of SAI, and correlate our UVAI data with other datasets such as trace gases (HCHO, NO2, CO) and fire counts from the (A

  4. Particle-Resolved Modeling of Aerosol Mixing State in an Evolving Ship Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, N. S.; Tian, J.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Schlager, H.; Petzold, A.

    2011-12-01

    The aerosol mixing state is important since it impacts the particles' optical and CCN properties and thereby their climate impact. It evolves continuously during the particles' residence time in the atmosphere as a result of coagulation with other particles and condensation of secondary aerosol species. This evolution is challenging to represent in traditional aerosol models since they require the representation of a multi-dimensional particle distribution. While modal or sectional aerosol representations cannot practically resolve the aerosol mixing state for more than a few species, particle-resolved models store the composition of many individual aerosol particles directly. They thus sample the high-dimensional composition state space very efficiently and so can deal with tens of species, fully resolving the mixing state. Here we use the capabilities of the particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC to simulate the evolution of particulate matter emitted from marine diesel engines and compare the results to aircraft measurements made in the English Channel in 2007 as part of the European campaign QUANTIFY. The model was initialized with values of gas concentrations and particle size distributions and compositions representing fresh ship emissions. These values were obtained from a test rig study in the European project HERCULES in 2006 using a serial four-stroke marine diesel engine operating on high-sulfur heavy fuel oil. The freshly emitted particles consisted of sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon and ash. We then tracked the particle population for several hours as it evolved undergoing coagulation, dilution with the background air, and chemical transformations in the aerosol and gas phase. This simulation was used to compute the evolution of CCN properties and optical properties of the plume on a per-particle basis. We compared our results to size-resolved data of aged ship plumes from the QUANTIFY Study in 2007 and showed that the model was able to reproduce

  5. Semi-quantitative characterisation of ambient ultrafine aerosols resulting from emissions of coal fired power stations.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, J T; Bridgman, H A; Buhre, B J P; Gupta, R P; Nelson, P F; Wall, T F

    2008-02-25

    Emissions from coal fired power stations are known to be a significant anthropogenic source of fine atmospheric particles, both through direct primary emissions and secondary formation of sulfate and nitrate from emissions of gaseous precursors. However, there is relatively little information available in the literature regarding the contribution emissions make to the ambient aerosol, particularly in the ultrafine size range. In this study, the contribution of emissions to particles smaller than 0.3 mum in the ambient aerosol was examined at a sampling site 7 km from two large Australian coal fired power stations equipped with fabric filters. A novel approach was employed using conditional sampling based on sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) as an indicator species, and a relatively new sampler, the TSI Nanometer Aerosol Sampler. Samples were collected on transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids and examined using a combination of TEM imaging and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis for qualitative chemical analysis. The ultrafine aerosol in low SO(2) conditions was dominated by diesel soot from vehicle emissions, while significant quantities of particles, which were unstable under the electron beam, were observed in the high SO(2) samples. The behaviour of these particles was consistent with literature accounts of sulfate and nitrate species, believed to have been derived from precursor emissions from the power stations. A significant carbon peak was noted in the residues from the evaporated particles, suggesting that some secondary organic aerosol formation may also have been catalysed by these acid seed particles. No primary particulate material was observed in the minus 0.3 mum fraction. The results of this study indicate the contribution of species more commonly associated with gas to particle conversion may be more significant than expected, even close to source.

  6. Unified Aerosol Microphysics for NWP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Specifically, the goal is to develop a COAMPS that is capable of simulating the full range of interactions between aerosol particles, clouds , and radiative...aerosol species that are responsible for degradation of Electro- Optical (EO) propagation or that modify cloud behavior and lifetime. Report...enabling new development of more complex cloud -aerosol interactions. The work on this project has been divided into two phases, an investigation phase

  7. Size-resolved airborne particulate oxalic and related secondary organic aerosol species in the urban atmosphere of Chengdu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chunlei; Wang, Gehui; Meng, Jingjing; Wang, Qiyuan; Cao, Junji; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Jiayuan

    2015-07-01

    Size-segregated (9-stages) airborne particles during winter in Chengdu city of China were collected on a day/night basis and determined for dicarboxylic acids (diacids), ketocarboxylic acids (ketoacids), α-dicarbonyls, inorganic ions, and water-soluble organic carbon and nitrogen (WSOC and WSON). Diacid concentration was higher in nighttime (1831 ± 607 ng m- 3) than in daytime (1532 ± 196 ng m- 3), whereas ketoacids and dicarbonyls showed little diurnal difference. Most of the organic compounds were enriched in the fine mode (< 2.1 μm) with a peak at the size range of 0.7-2.1 μm. In contrast, phthalic acid (Ph) and glyoxal (Gly) presented two equivalent peaks in the fine and coarse modes, which is at least in part due to the gas-phase oxidation of precursors and a subsequent partitioning into pre-existing particles. Liquid water content (LWC) of the fine mode particles was three times higher in nighttime than in daytime. The calculated in-situ pH (pHis) indicated that all the fine mode aerosols were acidic during the sampling period and more acidic in daytime than in nighttime. Robust correlations of the ratios of glyoxal/oxalic acid (Gly/C2) and glyoxylic acid/oxalic acid (ωC2/C2) with LWC in the samples suggest that the enhancement of LWC is favorable for oxidation of Gly and ωC2 to produce C2. Abundant K+ and Cl- in the fine mode particles and the strong correlations of K+ with WSOC, WSON and C2 indicate that secondary organic aerosols in the city are significantly affected by biomass burning emission.

  8. Ferric sulfates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the possible existence of ferric sulfato complexes and hydroxo ferric sulfate minerals in the permafrost of Mars. A sequential combination of ten unique conditions during the cooling history of Mars is suggested which is believed to have generated an environment within Martian permafrost that has stabilized Fe(3+)-SO4(2-)-bearing species. It is argued that minerals belonging to the jarosite and copiapite groups could be present in Martian regolith analyzed in the Viking XRF measurements at Chryse and Utopia, and that maghemite suspected to be coating the Viking magnet arrays is a hydrolysate of dissolved ferric sulfato complexes from exposed Martian permafrost.

  9. Continuous measurements at the urban roadside in an Asian megacity by Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM): particulate matter characteristics during fall and winter seasons in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Lee, B. P.; Huang, D.; Jie Li, Y.; Schurman, M. I.; Louie, P. K. K.; Luk, C.; Chan, C. K.

    2016-02-01

    Non-refractory submicron aerosol is characterized using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) in the fall and winter seasons of 2013 on the roadside in an Asian megacity environment in Hong Kong. Organic aerosol (OA), characterized by application of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), and sulfate are found to be dominant. Traffic-related organic aerosol shows good correlation with other vehicle-related species, and cooking aerosol displays clear mealtime concentration maxima and association with surface winds from restaurant areas. Contributions of individual species and OA factors to high NR-PM1 are analyzed for hourly data and daily data; while cooking emissions in OA contribute to high hourly concentrations, particularly during mealtimes, secondary organic aerosol components are responsible for episodic events and high day-to-day PM concentrations. Clean periods are either associated with precipitation, which reduces secondary OA with a lesser impact on primary organics, or clean oceanic air masses with reduced long-range transport and better dilution of local pollution. Haze events are connected with increases in contribution of secondary organic aerosol, from 30 to 50 % among total non-refractory organics, and the influence of continental air masses.

  10. Continuous measurements at the urban roadside in an Asian Megacity by Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM): particulate matter characteristics during fall and winter seasons in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Lee, B. P.; Huang, D.; Li, Y. J.; Schurman, M. I.; Louie, P. K. K.; Luk, C.; Chan, C. K.

    2015-07-01

    Non-refractory submicron aerosol is characterized using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) in the fall and winter seasons of 2013 at the roadside in an Asian megacity environment in Hong Kong. Organic aerosol (OA), characterized by application of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), and sulfate are found dominant. Traffic-related organic aerosol shows good correlation with other vehicle-related species, and cooking aerosol displays clear meal-time concentration maxima and association with surface winds from restaurant areas. Contributions of individual species and OA factors to high NR-PM1 are analyzed for hourly data and daily data; while cooking emissions in OA contribute to high hourly concentrations, particularly during meal times, secondary organic aerosol components are responsible for episodic events and high day-to-day PM concentrations. Clean periods are either associated with precipitation, which reduces secondary OA with a~lesser impact on primary organics, or clean oceanic air masses with reduced long-range transport and better dilution of local pollution. Haze events are connected with increases in contribution of secondary organic aerosol, from 30 to 50 % among total non-refractory organics, and influence of continental air masses.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Free Tropospheric Aerosol Collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P. J.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Jacques, H.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M.; Ampadu, M.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory (38°28'15''N, 28°24'14''W; 2225 m amsl) on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic ~3900 km east and downwind of North America. Filter-collected aerosol during summer 2012 was analyzed for organic and elemental carbon, and inorganic ions. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 μg m-3. Organic aerosol contributed the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol was positively correlated with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) from 9/24 and 9/25 aerosol samples collected during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR MS. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the air masses were very aged (> 12 days). About 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra between m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. WSOC have an average O/C ratio of ~0.45, relatively low compared to O/C ratios of other aged aerosol which might be the result of evaporation and fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplumes and MODIS fire counts. This was confirmed with WSOC biomass burning markers and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of biomass burning phenolic species suggests that the aerosol collected at Pico had undergone cloud processing. The air masses on 9/25 were more aged (~15 days) and influenced by marine emissions, as indicated by organosulfates and species characteristic for marine aerosol (e.g. fatty acids). The change in air masses for

  12. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  13. Visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon Nationl Park: 1. Properties observed by high resolution gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A.; Mason-Jones, M.; Mason-Jones, H. |

    1995-12-31

    During the summer of 1989, an air monitoring program was established within the Grand Canyon and on the South Rim to define summertime organic aerosol concentration and composition as a function of elevation in the canyon. Supporting information was collected on the composition of the inorganic portion of the atmospheric aerosol to help place the relative importance of organics in perspective. The present paper describes the ambient air monitoring experiment, quantifies the bulk chemical composition of the fine (dp< 2.1=135m) and total aerosol components, distinguishes carbonaceous aerosols according to their organic carbon, elemental carbon and carbonate content, and then examines those characteristics of the organic aerosol that can be defined via capillary gas chromatography using flame ionization detection (GC-FID). At both Indian Gardens (in-canyon, IG) and at Hopi Point (South Rim, HP), the largest contributors to the fine aerosol consist of sulfate and associated ammonium ion plus aerosol carbon species. At IG, sulfate and ammonium ion account for 25.5% and 7.5% of the fine aerosol, respectively, nearly equaled by the 29.9% of the sample composed of organic compounds and 1% contributed by elemental carbon. Somewhat more than half of the fine aerosol at HP can be explained by sulfate ion, ammonium ion, organic compounds and elemental carbon, again with roughly equal mass concentrations due to the ionic versus carbonaceous components. Monthly average mass concentrations for fine aerosol organics were 1.1 = B5gm -3(IG) and 1.3 =135gm-3 (HP), while the total organics monthly average mass concentrations were 1.9 =135gm-3 (IG) and 2.1 =135gm-3 (HP). The fraction of aerosol organics that could be evaluated by GC-FID (elutable organics) constituted 27% to 53% of the total organics mass collected as fine or total aerosol. For the fine particle monthly composites, the elutable organics were present in mass concentrations of 0.28 =B5gm-3 (IG) and 0.46 =135gm-3 (HP).

  14. Quantifying the Aerosol Semi-Direct Effect in the NASA GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randles, Cynthia A.; Colarco, Peter R.; daSilva, Arlindo

    2011-01-01

    Aerosols such as black carbon, dust, and some organic carbon species both scatter and absorb incoming solar radiation. This direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) redistributes solar energy both by cooling the surface and warming the atmosphere. As a result, these aerosols affect atmospheric stability and cloud cover (the semi-direct effect, or SDE). Furthermore, in regions with persistent high loadings of absorbing aerosols (e.g. Asia), regional circulation patterns may be altered, potentially resulting in changes in precipitation patterns. Here we investigate aerosol-climate coupling using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), in which we have implemented an online version of the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. GOCART includes representations of the sources, sinks, and chemical transformation of externally mixed dust, sea salt, sulfate, and carbonaceous aerosols. We examine a series of free-running ensemble climate simulations of the present-day period (2000-2009) forced by observed sea surface temperatures to determine the impact of aerosols on the model climate. The SDE and response of each simulation is determined by differencing with respect to the control simulation (no aerosol forcing). In a free-running model, any estimate of the SDE includes changes in clouds due both to atmospheric heating from aerosols and changes in circulation. To try and quantify the SDE without these circulation changes we then examine the DARF and SDE in GEOS-5 with prescribed meteorological analyses introduced by the MERRA analysis. By doing so, we are able to examine changes in model clouds that occur on shorter scales (six hours). In the GEOS-5 data assimilation system (DAS), the analysis is defined as the best estimate of the atmospheric state at any given time, and it is determined by optimally combining a first-guess short-term GCM forecast with all available

  15. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Herein is reported activities to support the characterization of the aerosol in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) collected during the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) missions in 1994. Through a companion proposal, another group was to measure the size distribution of aerosols in the 0.008 to 2 micrometer diameter range and to collect for us impactor samples of particles larger than about 0.02 gm. In the first year, we conducted laboratory studies related to particulate deposition patterns on our collection substrates, and have performed the analysis of many ASHOE/MAESA aerosol samples from 1994 using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). We have been building an "aerosol climatology" with these data that documents the types and relative abundances of particles observed at different latitudes and altitudes. The second year (and non-funded extension periods) saw continued analyses of impactor aerosol samples, including more ASHOE/MAESA samples, some northern hemisphere samples from the NASA Stratospheric Photochemistry Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) program for comparison, and a few aerosol samples from the NASA Stratospheric TRacers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) program. A high-resolution field emission microscope was used for the analysis and re-analysis of a number of samples to determine if this instrument was superior in performance to our conventional electron microscope. In addition, some basic laboratory studies were conducted to determine the minimum detectable and analyzable particle size for different types of aerosols. In all, 61 aerosol samples were analyzed, with a total of over 30,000 individual particle analyses. In all analyzed samples, sulfate particles comprised the major aerosol number fraction. It must be stressed that particles composed of more than one species, for example sulfate and organic carbon, were classified

  16. Climate Response to Warm Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Comparisons With Direct Aerosol and Long-Lived Greenhouse Gas Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Ming, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We employ the NOAA/ GFDL global atmospheric model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean to investigate the mechanisms and quantitative aspects underlying the radiative perturbations and climate response arising due to cloud-aerosol interactions in low-lying clouds. The aerosol species considered include sulfate, sea-salt and carbonaceous species, whose space-time distributions are determined offline by the MOZART 2 chemistry- transport model based on emissions data. The model's prognostic cloud scheme of liquid water and amount is expanded to include cloud droplet concentration in a way that importantly allows them to be computed using the same large-scale and convective updraft velocity field. The equilibrium response of the model's global climate system to the change in aerosols from pre- industrial to present-day is evaluated, in terms of the forcing applied and the role of the large- and cloud-scale feedback mechanisms. The cloud characteristics simulated are compared against observations, while the model's response is compared with that obtained from using a diagnostic aerosol-cloud relationship to highlight the significance of specific cloud microphysical processes. The spatial distributions of the thermal and hydrologic responses are also compared with those resulting from simulations performed for the pre-industrial to present-day direct aerosol effect. The temperature responses in the low and high latitudes, including changes in the large-scale precipitation pattern, are contrasted with those due to the well-mixed greenhouse gases. The forcing-response relationship is examined for the radiative perturbations investigated, with surface radiative forcing included in these considerations. We finally investigate the concept of linear additivity of the responses in various climate variables for the set of radiative perturbations considered above, extending from the global- and zonal-mean to continental scales.

  17. Effects of aerosols on tropospheric oxidants: A global model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Xuexi; Brasseur, Guy; Emmons, Louisa; Horowitz, Larry; Kinnison, Douglas

    2001-10-01

    The global distributions of sulfate and soot particles in the atmosphere are calculated, and the effect of aerosol particles on tropospheric oxidants is studied using a global chemical/transport/aerosol model. The model is developed in the framework of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) global three-dimensional chemical/transport model (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART)). In addition to the gas-phase photochemistry implemented in the MOZART model, the present study also accounts for the formation of sulfate and black carbon aerosols as well as for heterogeneous reactions on particles. The simulated global sulfate aerosol distributions and seasonal variation are compared with observations. The seasonal variation of sulfate aerosols is in agreement with measurements, except in the Arctic region. The calculated vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol agree well with the observations over North America. In the case of black carbon the calculated surface distribution is in fair agreement with observations. The effects of aerosol formation and heterogeneous reactions on the surface of sulfate aerosols are studied. The model calculations show the following: (1) The concentration of H2O2 is reduced when sulfate aerosols are formed due to the reaction of SO2 + H2O2 in cloud droplets. The gas-phase reaction SO2 + OH converts OH to HO2, but the reduction of OH and enhancement of HO2 are insignificant (<3%). (2) The heterogeneous reaction of HO2 on the surface of sulfate aerosols produces up to 10% reduction of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) with an uptake coefficient of 0.2. However, this uptake coefficient could be overestimated, and the results should be regard as an upper limit estimation. (3) The N2O5 reaction on the surface of sulfate aerosols leads to an 80% reduction of NOx at middle to high latitudes during winter. Because ozone production efficiency is low in winter, ozone decreases by only 10% as a result of this reaction. However

  18. Multi-year Cluster Analyses of CALIPSO Aerosol Layer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, A. H.; Sumner, A. J.; Vaughan, M.

    2013-12-01

    points within each cluster along with geographical map overlays shows that the clusters formed contained combinations or mixtures of the six types in CALIPSO Level 2 data. These results suggest a larger number of aerosol types, possibly involving combinations of the six types in the current CALIPSO subtyping algorithms, or a smaller number of base species, e.g., sulfate, black carbon, seasalt and dust.

  19. Climate impact of biofuels in shipping: global model studies of the aerosol indirect effect.

    PubMed

    Righi, Mattia; Klinger, Carolin; Eyring, Veronika; Hendricks, Johannes; Lauer, Axel; Petzold, Andreas

    2011-04-15

    Aerosol emissions from international shipping are recognized to have a large impact on the Earth's radiation budget, directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and indirectly by altering cloud properties. New regulations have recently been approved by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) aiming at progressive reductions of the maximum sulfur content allowed in marine fuels from current 4.5% by mass down to 0.5% in 2020, with more restrictive limits already applied in some coastal regions. In this context, we use a global bottom-up algorithm to calculate geographically resolved emission inventories of gaseous (NO(x), CO, SO(2)) and aerosol (black carbon, organic matter, sulfate) species for different kinds of low-sulfur fuels in shipping. We apply these inventories to study the resulting changes in radiative forcing, attributed to particles from shipping, with the global aerosol-climate model EMAC-MADE. The emission factors for the different fuels are based on measurements at a test bed of a large diesel engine. We consider both fossil fuel (marine gas oil) and biofuels (palm and soy bean oil) as a substitute for heavy fuel oil in the current (2006) fleet and compare their climate impact to that resulting from heavy fuel oil use. Our simulations suggest that ship-induced surface level concentrations of sulfate aerosol are strongly reduced, up to about 40-60% in the high-traffic regions. This clearly has positive consequences for pollution reduction in the vicinity of major harbors. Additionally, such reductions in the aerosol loading lead to a decrease of a factor of 3-4 in the indirect global aerosol effect induced by emissions from international shipping.

  20. Explicit Simulation of Aerosol Physics in a Cloud-Resolving Model: Aerosol Transport and Processing in the Free Troposphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekman, Annica M. L.; Wang, Chien; Ström, Johan; Krejci, Radovan

    2006-02-01

    Large concentrations of small aerosols have been previously observed in the vicinity of anvils of convective clouds. A 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) including an explicit size-resolving aerosol module has been used to examine the origin of these aerosols. Five different types of aerosols are considered: nucleation mode sulfate aerosols (here defined by 0 d 5.84 nm), Aitken mode sulfate aerosols (here defined by 5.84 nm d 31.0 nm), accumulation mode sulfate aerosols (here defined by d 31.0 nm), mixed aerosols, and black carbon aerosols.The model results suggest that approximately 10% of the initial boundary layer number concentration of Aitken mode aerosols and black carbon aerosols are present at the top of the convective cloud as the cloud reaches its decaying state. The simulated average number concentration of Aitken mode aerosols in the cloud anvil (1.6 × 104 cm-3) is in the same order of magnitude as observations. Thus, the model results strongly suggest that vertical convective transport, particularly during the active period of the convection, is responsible for a major part of the appearance of high concentrations of small aerosols (corresponding to the Aitken mode in the model) observed in the vicinity of cloud anvils.There is some formation of new aerosols within the cloud, but the formation is small. Nucleation mode aerosols are also efficiently scavenged through impaction scavenging by precipitation. Accumulation mode and mixed mode aerosols are efficiently scavenged through nucleation scavenging and their concentrations in the cloud anvil are either very low (mixed mode) or practically zero (accumulation mode).In addition to the 3D CRM, a box model, including important features of the aerosol module of the 3D model, has been used to study the formation of new aerosols after the cloud has evaporated. The possibility of these aerosols to grow to suitable cloud condensation or ice nuclei size is also examined. Concentrations of nucleation mode aerosols

  1. Aerosol Composition, Chemistry, and Source Characterization during the 2008 VOCALS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Springston, S.; Jayne, J. T.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Hubbe, J.; Alexander, L.; Brioude, J.; Spak, S.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Kleinman, L. I.; Daum, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    Chemical composition of fine aerosol particles over the northern Chilean coastal waters was determined on board the US DOE G-1 aircraft during the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) field experiment between October 16 and November 15, 2008. Chemical species determined included SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and total organics (Org) using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, and SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, Na+, Cl-, CH3SO3-, Mg2+, Ca2+, and K+ using a particle-into-liquid sampler-ion chromatography technique. The results show the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non-sea-salt SO42- followed by Na+, Cl-, Org, NO3-, and NH4+, in decreasing importance; CH3SO3-, Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their respective limits of detection. The SO42- aerosols were strongly acidic as the equivalent NH4+ to SO42- ratio was only ~0.25 on average. NaCl particles, presumably of sea-salt origin, showed chloride deficits but retained Cl- typically more than half the equivalency of Na+, and are believed to be externally mixed with the acidic sulfate aerosols. Nitrate was observed only on sea-salt particles, consistent with adsorption of HNO3 on non-acidic sea-salt aerosols, responsible partly for the Cl- deficit. Dust particles appeared to play a minor role judging from the small volume differences between that derived from the observed mass concentrations and that calculated based on particle size distributions. Because SO42- concentrations in the study domain were substantial (~0.5 - ~3 μg/m3) with a strong gradient (highest near the shore decreasing with distance from land), and the ocean-emitted dimethylsulfide and its unique oxidation product, CH3SO3-, were very low (i.e., ≤ 40 parts per trillion and <0.05 μg/m3, respectively), the observed SO42- aerosols are believed to be primarily of terrestrial origin. Back trajectory calculations indicate sulfur emissions from smelters and power plants along coastal regions of Peru and Chile are the main sources of these SO4

  2. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  3. Lidar detection of high concentrations of ozone and aerosol transported from northeastern Asia over Saga, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Osamu; Sakai, Tetsu; Izumi, Toshiharu; Nagai, Tomohiro; Morino, Isamu; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Deushi, Makoto; Yumimoto, Keiya; Maki, Takashi; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Akaho, Taiga; Okumura, Hiroshi; Arai, Kohei; Nakatsuru, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2017-02-01

    To validate products of the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), we observed vertical profiles of aerosols, thin cirrus clouds, and tropospheric ozone with a mobile-lidar system that consisted of a two-wavelength (532 and 1064 nm) polarization lidar and a tropospheric ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We used these lidars to make continuous measurements over Saga (33.24° N, 130.29° E) during 20-31 March 2015. High ozone and high aerosol concentrations were observed almost simultaneously in the altitude range 0.5-1.5 km from 03:00 to 20:00 Japan Standard Time (JST) on 22 March 2015. The maximum ozone volume mixing ratio was ˜ 110 ppbv. The maxima of the aerosol extinction coefficient and optical depth at 532 nm were 1.2 km-1 and 2.1, respectively. Backward trajectory analysis and the simulations by the Model of Aerosol Species IN the Global AtmospheRe (MASINGAR) mk-2 and the Meteorological Research Institute Chemistry-Climate Model, version 2 (MRI-CCM2), indicated that mineral dust particles from the Gobi Desert and an air mass with high ozone and aerosol (mainly sulfate) concentrations that originated from the North China Plain could have been transported over the measurement site within about 2 days. These high ozone and aerosol concentrations impacted surface air quality substantially in the afternoon of 22 March 2015. After some modifications of its physical and chemical parameters, MRI-CCM2 approximately reproduced the high ozone volume mixing ratio. MASINGAR mk-2 successfully predicted high aerosol concentrations, but the predicted peak aerosol optical thickness was about one-third of the observed value.

  4. Recent updates in the aerosol model of C-IFS and their impact on skill scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Hauglustaine, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The Composition-Integrated Forecast System (C-IFS) is a global atmospheric composition forecasting tool, run by ECMWF within the framework of the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Services (CAMS). The aerosol model of C-IFS is a simple bulk scheme that forecasts 5 species: dust, sea-salt, black carbon, organic matter and sulfates. Three bins represent the dust and sea-salt, for the super-coarse, coarse and fine mode of these species (Morcrette et al., 2009). This talk will present recent updates of the aerosol model, and also introduce coming upgrades. It will also present evaluations of these scores against AERONET observations. Next cycle of the C-IFS will include a mass fixer, because the semi-Lagrangian advection scheme used in C-IFS is not mass-conservative. This modification has a negligible impact for most species except for black carbon and organic matter; it allows to close the budgets between sources and sinks in the diagnostics. Dust emissions have been tuned to favor the emissions of large particles, which were under-represented. This brought an overall decrease of the burden of dust aerosol and improved scores especially close to source regions. The biomass-burning aerosol emissions are now emitted at an injection height that is provided by a new version of the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS). This brought a small increase in biomass burning aerosols, and a better representation of some large fire events. Lastly, SO2 emissions are now provided by the MACCity dataset instead of and older version of the EDGAR dataset. The seasonal and yearly variability of SO2 emissions are better captured by the MACCity dataset; the use of which brought significant improvements of the forecasts against observations. Upcoming upgrades of the aerosol model of C-IFS consist mainly in the overhaul of the representation of secondary aerosols. Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production will be dynamically estimated by scaling them on CO fluxes. This approach has been

  5. Uptake of CF3COOH in Upper Tropospheric Sulfate Particles: Effects of Fluorination on the Accommodation of Oxygenated Organic Vapors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulbaek Andersen, M. P.; Nielsen, O. J.; Michelsen, R. R.; Iraci, L. T.

    2005-12-01

    Recognition of the adverse impact of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) release into the atmosphere has led to an international effort to replace CFCs with environmentally acceptable alternatives. Laboratory studies indicate that some of these, including HFC-134a, degrade to yield trifluoroacetyl halides of the form CF3C(O)X. Hydrolysis of trifluoroacetyl halides in cloud water is expected to form trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Although TFA is produced in aqueous phase chemistry, is highly soluble and also partitions into the water phase, the evaporation of cloud droplets can relocate TFA to the gas phase where it can react with OH radicals. Still this reaction is slow and can only account for to account for <10-20% of the tropospheric loss of TFA. The main atmospheric fate of TFA is believed to be wet and dry deposition to the surface. Submicrometer aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the upper troposphere where they drive such processes as cloud droplet condensation and scattering of incoming solar radiation, and have impact on regional and global climate. While these particles are known to be predominantly sulfuric acid solutions, neutralized with different amounts of ammonia depending on their location and history, their trace composition is largely uncertain. Organic species may be the controlling factor in many processes of interest, and thus identifying organic components and their sources is important for understanding the role of aerosols in the troposphere. While studies show that cloud and fog water will act as a sink for atmospheric TFA, an accurate knowledge of the Henry's law coefficient is required to assess gas/liquid partitioning in upper tropospheric sulfate aerosols, where the temperature and liquid phase pH is much lower. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the role of upper tropospheric sulfate aerosols as a potential sink for TFA, and more generally, the effects of fluorine substitution on uptake of organic compounds into upper tropospheric aerosols

  6. Identification of absorbing organic (brown carbon) aerosols through Sun Photometry: results from AEROCAN / AERONET stations in high Arctic and urban Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, G. H.; Chaubey, J. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Hayes, P.; Atkinson, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Light absorbing organic aerosols or brown carbon (BrC) aerosols are prominent species influencing the absorbing aerosol optical depth (AAOD) of the total aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the UV wavelength region. They, along with dust, play an important role in modifying the spectral AAOD and the spectral AOD in the UV region: this property can be used to discriminate BrC aerosols from both weakly absorbing aerosols such as sulfates as well as strongly absorbing aerosols such as black carbon (BC). In this study we use available AERONET inversions (level 1.5) retrieved for the measuring period from 2009 to 2013, for the Arctic region (Eureka, Barrow and Hornsund), Urban/ Industrial regions (Kanpur, Beijing), and the forest regions (Alta Foresta and Mongu), to identify BrC aerosols. Using Dubovik's inversion algorithm results, we analyzed parameters that were sensitive to BrC presence, notably AAOD, AAODBrC estimated using the approach of Arola et al. [2011], the fine-mode-aerosol absorption derivative (αf, abs) and the fine-mode-aerosol absorption 2nd derivative (αf, abs'), all computed at a near UV wavelength (440 nm). Temporal trends of these parameters were investigated for all test stations and compared to available volume sampling surface data as a means of validating / evaluating the sensitivity of ostensible sunphotometer indicators of BrC aerosols to the presence of BrC as measured using independent indicators. Reference: Arola, A., Schuster, G., Myhre, G., Kazadzis, S., Dey, S., and Tripathi, S. N.: Inferring absorbing organic carbon content from AERONET data, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 215-225, doi:10.5194/acp-11-215-2011, 2011

  7. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04), and negligible (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) ship influence. Application of

  8. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B; Bardeen, Charles G; Mills, Michael J; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M; Neely, Ryan R

    2015-06-01

    A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size-resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1-CARMA is approximately ∼2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial-temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground-based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ∼32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data.

  9. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme

    PubMed Central

    Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Mills, Michael J.; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M.; Neely, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size‐resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1‐CARMA is approximately ∼2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three‐mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1‐MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven‐mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1‐MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial‐temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground‐based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ∼32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data. PMID:27668039

  10. Distribution of sulfur aerosol precursors in the SPCZ released by continuous volcanic degassing at Ambrym, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Jérôme; Menkes, Christophe; Bani, Philipson; Marchesiello, Patrick; Curci, Gabriele; Grell, Georg A.; Frouin, Robert

    2016-08-01

    volcanic species across the South Pacific atmosphere. For example, in the tropical cloudy air, the sulfate production in the aqueous phase is very efficient, resulting in the formation of a large cloud of highly scattering sulfate aerosols advected horizontally to Eastern Indonesia, in agreement with the AOD feature captured by MODIS/Aqua, but missed in CALIOP/CALIPSO (lidar) products. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that aerosol re-suspension due to evaporating droplets is a significant pathway for the supply of volcanic sulfur species in the remote marine boundary layer. By strongly modulating the irreversible loss due to wet scavenging, this aerosol process has a similar influence on the sulfur burden as natural emission from volcanoes or biogenic sources like dimethyl sulfate (DMS). The results emphasize the importance of MVA passive degassing and SPCZ dynamics on the aerosol background, and raise questions about potential impacts on the local climate and marine ecosystems.

  11. Nucleation and Growth of Stratospheric Aerosols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    phase constituents can be removed from partici- pating in further homogeneous reaction mechanisms. Furthermore, although no definitive evidence currently...during periods of large volcanic eruptions sulfate aerosol is generated by an in situ oxidation mechanism rather than by simple input of tephra from the...reach a peak concentration. Tephra are known to settle out relatively rapidly, and it must be concluded that this increase in sulfate concentration is

  12. Fog Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET, Including Occurrences During Major Air Pollution Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Li, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, T.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A. T.; Schafer, J.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2015-12-01

    The modification of aerosol optical properties due to interaction with fog is examined from measurements made by sun/sky radiometers at several AERONET sites. Retrieved total column volume size distributions for cases identified as aerosol modified by fog often show very a large 'middle mode' submicron radius (~0.4 to 0.5 microns), which is typically seen as a component of a bimodal sub-micron distribution. These middle mode sized particles are often called cloud-processed or residual aerosol. This bimodal accumulation mode distribution may be due to one mode (the larger one) from fog-processed aerosol and the other from interstitial aerosol, or possibly from two different aerosol species (differing chemical composition) with differing hygroscopic growth factors. The size of the fine mode particles from AERONET retrieved for these cases exceeds the size of sub-micron sized particles retrieved for nearly all other aerosol types, suggesting significant modification of aerosols within the fog or cloud environment. In-situ measured aerosol size distributions made during other fog events are compared to the AERONET retrievals, and show close agreement in the residual mode particle size. Almucantar retrievals are analyzed from the Kanpur site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in India (fog in January), Beijing (fog in winter), Fresno, CA in the San Joaquin Valley (fog in winter), South Korea (Yellow Sea fog in spring), Arica on the northern coast of Chile (stratocumulus), and several other sites with aerosol observations made after fog dissipated. Additionally, several major air pollution events are discussed where extremely high aerosol concentrations were measured at the surface and during which fog also occurred, resulting in the detection very large fine mode aerosols (residual mode) from AERONET retrievals in some of these events. Low wind speeds that occurred during these events were conducive to both pollutant accumulation and also fog formation. The presence of fog then

  13. Processing of Ambient Aerosols During Fog Events: Role of Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Gupta, T.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bhattu, D.

    2013-12-01

    Fog is a major processing and removal agent of ambient aerosols. Enhanced secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production has been reported during fog events indicating major role of aqueous processing. Present study was carried out in a heavily polluted city of Kanpur situated in Indo-Gangetic plain of India,from 02- 18 Nov, 2012 and then from 22 Dec, 2012 to 10 January, 2013. 12 fog events were identified from 22 Dec to 10 January based on low visibility (< 300 m) with high liquid water content (~ 0.04 g/m3) and termed as foggy period while remaining as non-foggy period. Foggy period typically showed very high RH (~95%), low temperatures (~2-6°C) compared to non-foggy period. An array of instruments were deployed during this campaign for real time measurement of aerosol physico-chemical properties - High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), Cloud Combination Probe (CCP), Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCN), fog water collector and Vaisala RH & T sensor. Average aerosol loading during foggy period was 104×44 μg/m3, much higher than 73×49 μg/m3of non-foggy period, but during actual fog events the loading reduced to 85×23 μg/m3 indicating overall aerosol removal by fog. Overall aerosol composition during both the period was dominated by organics which constitutes about 60-70% of the total AMS mass followed by nitrate, but during foggy period sulfate was found to be increased many fold.HR analysis of AMS data revealed noticeable differences in the diurnal average values of O:C ratio between foggy and non -foggy period. Although diurnal O:C ratio was highest around noontime for both period but during fog events, night to early morning O:C ratio was 0.51×0.04, higher than that of non-foggy period 0.44×0.07, clearly indicating enhanced oxidation. AMS data also showed that mode size of all the species specially of organics and sulphate had shifted to a higher diameter during foggy period, an

  14. Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Z.N.; Kogan, Y.L.; Lilly, D.K.

    1996-04-01

    During the last decade much attention has been focused on anthropogenic aerosols and their radiative influence on the global climate. Charlson et al. and Penner et al. have demonstrated that tropospheric aerosols and particularly anthropogenic sulfate aerosols may significantly contribute to the radiative forcing exerting a cooling influence on climate (-1 to -2 W/m{sup 2}) which is comparable in magnitude to greenhouse forcing, but opposite in sign. Aerosol particles affect the earth`s radiative budget either directly by scattering and absorption of solar radiation by themselves or indirectly by altering the cloud radiative properties through changes in cloud microstructure. Marine stratocumulus cloud layers and their possible cooling influence on the atmosphere as a result of pollution are of special interest because of their high reflectivity, durability, and large global cover. We present an estimate of thet aerosol indirect effect, or, forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate aerosols.

  15. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Submicron Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S.; George, I. J.; Brooks, B.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    OH and HO2 (HOx) radicals are closely coupled and OH is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere and controls the concentrations of many trace species. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict HOx concentrations. However, some field measurement studies have reported significantly lower HO2 radical concentrations than calculated by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms. Although the inclusion of halogen chemistry into the mechanisms can explain much of the differences in the marine boundary layer (MBL) (1,2), HO2 uptake by aerosols has been suggested as a possible sink in the MBL (2), the Arctic troposphere (3) and the upper troposphere (4). There have been very few laboratory studies (5,6) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for a variety of atmospherically relevant inorganic and organic aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube combined with a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. The sensitive FAGE cell allowed low HO2 concentrations (108-109 molecule cm-3) to be injected into the flow tube using a moveable injector. By moving the injector along the flow tube, position dependent HO2 decays were able to be recorded which when plotted against the total aerosol surface area allowed an uptake coefficient to be obtained. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser or by homogeneous nucleation and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer. The HO2 uptake coefficient (γ) was measured at room temperature for dry inorganic salts and dry organics (γ< 0.004), wet inorganic salts and wet organics (γ= 0.002-0.005), wet copper doped ammonium sulfate aerosols (γ= 0.28± 0.05) and ammonium sulfate aerosols doped with different molar amounts of iron (γ= 0.003-0.06). The pH dependence of the HO2 uptake coefficient was investigated, however no

  16. High Resolution Aerosol Modeling: Decadal Changes in Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C C; Govindasamy, B; Cameron-Smith, P J; Rotman, D A

    2005-02-01

    The Atmospheric Science Division of LLNL has performed high-resolution calculations of direct sulfate forcing using a DOE-provided computer resource at NERSC. We integrated our global chemistry-aerosol model (IMPACT) with the LLNL high-resolution global climate model (horizontal resolution as high as 100 km) to examine the temporal evolution of sulfate forcing since 1950. We note that all previous assessments of sulfate forcing reported in IPCC (2001) were based on global models with coarse spatial resolutions ({approx} 300 km or even coarser). However, the short lifetime of aerosols ({approx} days) results in large spatial and temporal variations of radiative forcing by sulfate. As a result, global climate models with coarse resolutions do not accurately simulate sulfate forcing on regional scales. It requires much finer spatial resolutions in order to address the effects of regional anthropogenic SO{sub 2} emissions on the global atmosphere as well as the effects of long-range transport of sulfate aerosols on the regional climate forcing. By taking advantage of the tera-scale computer resources at NERSC, we simulated the historic direct sulfate forcing at much finer spatial resolutions than ever attempted before. Furthermore, we performed high-resolution chemistry simulations and saved monthly averaged oxidant fields, which will be used in subsequent simulations of sulfate aerosol formation and their radiative impact.

  17. Emission controls versus meteorological conditions in determining aerosol concentrations in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhao, C.; Zhang, M.; Wang, Y.

    2011-06-01

    A series of emission control measures were undertaken in Beijing and the adjacent provinces in China during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on 8-24 August 2008. This provides a unique opportunity for investigating the effectiveness of emission controls on air pollution in Beijing. We conducted a series of numerical experiments over East Asia for the period of July to September 2008 using a coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem). Model can generally reproduce the observed variation of aerosol concentrations. Consistent with observations, modeled concentrations of aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, total particulate matter) in Beijing were decreased by 30-50 % during the Olympic period compared to the other periods in July and August in 2008 and the same period in 2007. Model results indicate that emission controls were effective in reducing the aerosol concentrations by comparing simulations with and without emission controls. However, our analysis suggests that meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction and precipitation) are at least as important as