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Sample records for aerosol spectrometer cas

  1. In-Situ Microphysical Measurements In Rocket Plumes With The Cloud And Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, G.; Baumgardner, D.; Avallone, L.; Kalnajs, L.; Herman, R.; Ross, M.; Thompson, T.; Toohey, D.

    2005-12-01

    High resolution, single particle measurements have been made in rocket plumes using an optical particle spectrometer that measures diameters from 0.5 to 44 um. The Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) measures the light scattered in two directions from individual particles that pass through a focused, 680 nm laser beam and we derive the diameter, shape and composition from this information. The CAS was mounted on the NASA WB57-F aircraft as part of the Plume Ultrafast Measurements Acquisition (PUMA) project, an experiment funded by NSF and NASA to study the chemistry and microphysics of rocket plumes. Measurements were first made in a plume generated by an Atlas IIAS rocket in May, 2004 and again in July, 2005 in the plume formed from the exhaust of the solid state boosters used to launch the space shuttle Discovery into orbit. The microstructure of the two plumes and the characteristics of their particles were distinctly different. The two cases had similar maximum concentrations of 300 cm-3, but the space shuttle particles were on average larger and a greater percentage of them were irregular in shape. An analysis of the distance between particles suggests clustering because of the non-Poisson shape of the frequency distribution of inter-arrival times.

  2. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  3. Electrical aerosol spectrometer of Tartu University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Mirme, A.; Tamm, E.

    The electrical aerosol spectrometer (EAS) of the parallel measuring principle at Tartu University is an efficient instrument for rapid measurement of the unstable size spectrum of aerosol particles. The measuring range from 10 nm to 10 μm is achieved by simultaneously using a pair of differential mobility analyzers with two different particle chargers. The particle spectrum is calculated and measurement errors are estimated in real time by using a least-squares method. Experimental calibration ensures reliability of measurement. The instrument is well suited for continuous monitoring of atmospheric aerosol.

  4. Multi-channel electric aerosol spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirme, A.; Noppel, M.; Peil, I.; Salm, J.; Tamm, E.; Tammet, H.

    Multi-channel electric mobility spectrometry is a most efficient technique for the rapid measurement of an unstable aerosol particle size spectrum. The measuring range of the spectrometer from 10 microns to 10 microns is achieved by applying diffusional and field charging mechanisms simultaneously. On-line data processing is carried out with a microcomputer. Experimental calibration ensures correctness of measurement.

  5. A wide spectral range photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Haisch, C; Menzenbach, P; Bladt, H; Niessner, R

    2012-11-01

    A photoacoustic spectrometer for the measurement of aerosol absorption spectra, based on the excitation of a pulsed nanosecond optical parametrical oscillator (OPO), will be introduced. This spectrometer is working at ambient pressure and can be used to detect and characterize different classes of aerosols. The spectrometer features a spectral range of 410 to 2500 nm and a sensitivity of 2.5 × 10(-7) m(-1) at 550 nm. A full characterization of the system in the visible spectral range is demonstrated, and the potential of the system for near IR measurement is discussed. In the example of different kinds of soot particles, the performance of the spectrometer was assessed. As we demonstrate, it is possible to determine a specific optical absorption per particle by a combination of the new spectrometer with an aerosol particle counter. PMID:23035870

  6. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  7. AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION WITH CENTRIFUCAL AEROSOL SPECTROMETERS: THEORY AND EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general mathematical model describing the motion of particles in aerosol centrifuges has been developed. t has been validated by comparisons of theoretically predicted calibration sites with experimental data from tests sizing aerosols in instruments of three different spiral d...

  8. A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S. ); Weiss, R.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Co-Alignment System (CAS) study. Report on task 1-3. [Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope and Spectrometer pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a suitable coalignment system (CAS) for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope and Spectrometer (SEUTS) is presented. The CAS provides offset adjustment capabilities to SEUTS which will be mounted on a single large pointing system with other devices. The suitability of existing designs is determined and modifications are suggested.

  10. Comprehensive Measurement of Atmospheric Aerosols with a Wide Range Aerosol Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keck, L.; Pesch, M.; Grimm, H.

    2011-07-01

    A wide range aerosol spectrometer (WRAS) was used for comprehensive long term measurements of aerosol size distributions. The system combines the results of an optical aerosol spectrometer with the results of a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to record essentially the full size range (5 nm - 32 μm) of atmospheric particles in 72 channels. Measurements were carried out over one year (2009) at the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW)-Station Hohenpeißenberg, Bavaria. Total particle number concentrations obtained from the aerosol size distributions were compared to the total number concentrations measured by a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC). The comparison showed an excellent agreement of the data. The high time resolution of 5 minutes allows the combination of the measured size distributions with meteorological data and correlations to gaseous pollutants (CO, NOx and SO2). A good correlation of particle number and CO concentrations was found for long distance transported small particles, which were probably mainly soot particles. Correlations to NOx were observed for aerosols from local sources such as traffic emissions. The formation of secondary aerosols from gaseous precursors was also observed. Episodes of relatively high concentration of particles in the range of 2-3 μm were probably caused by pollen.

  11. Airborne Coarse Mode Aerosol Measurements with the CAS-DPOL Instrument: Effects of Particle Shape and Refractive Index and Implications for Radiative Transfer Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, D. N.; Weinzierl, B.; Gasteiger, J.; Spanu, A.; Freudenthaler, V.; Gross, S.

    2015-12-01

    Each year huge amounts of mineral dust are mobilized in deserts and arid regions of the world and transported over large distances forming thick elevated aerosol layers with a substantial fraction of coarse mode particles. Optical properties of mineral dust, including the absorptive refractive index of some components, cause a significant effect on the atmospheric radiative energy balance from optical to infrared wavelengths. The aerosol characteristics, in particular its coarse mode size distribution, are modified during long-range transport by aging and deposition processes. This also affects the aerosol optical properties and therefore the effect on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties are essential to characterize those effects in order to be implemented in global climate models in parametrized form. However, in-situ measurements of airborne coarse mode aerosols such as mineral dust and volcanic ash are challenging and the measurements are usually affected by substantial uncertainties. In this work we use airborne measurements of mineral dust from our optical light-scattering spectrometer CAS-DPOL during SALTRACE 2013 to discuss the analysis of such data. We cover the effects of varying refractive index and particle shapes and develop recommendations for the configuration of the CAS-DPOL for aerosol studies. We also present an inversion method to derive coarse mode size distributions from light-scattering probes for mixtures of non-spherical, absorbing aerosols. The size distributions retrieved from the in-situ measurements are then validated using an independent analysis with a combination of sun-photometer and lidar data. We apply these methods to investigate the Saharan mineral dust particle size distributions measured on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean and discuss the influence of aerosol aging on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. With this example we also assess how the uncertainties

  12. Overview of submicron aerosol characterization in China using an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; He, L.; Gong, Z.; Hu, M.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    China is one of the most rapidly developing countries in the world, but in the meantime it is suffering from severe air pollution due to heavy industrial/metropolitan emissions. Most previous aerosol studies in China were based on filter sampling followed by laboratory analysis, which provided datasets at a coarse time resolution like a day. The coarse time resolution of the aerosol datasets cannot match the actual faster variation of aerosol properties in the real atmosphere, which strongly favors highly time-resolved on-line measurement techniques. In recent years, our group deployed an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) in different ambient atmospheres in China, including Beijing (urban), Shanghai (urban), Shenzhen (urban), Jiaxing (suburban), and Kaiping (rural). In this presentation, we will overview these on-line AMS measurement results to characterize the properties of submicron particles in China atmosphere, such as chemical composition, size distribution, diurnal variation, elemental composition, primary and secondary organic aerosol constitution, etc. The newly-developed AMS-PMF modeling techniques were utilized to quantitatively differentiate the contributions from fossil fuel combustion, cooking emissions, biomass burning, as well as secondary organic aerosol to ambient organic aerosol loadings in China. These AMS results have provided new outlook of the formation mechanisms of high aerosol pollution in China.

  13. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  14. Ambient Aerosol in Southeast Asia: High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Measurements Over Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Dimarco, C.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Farmer, D.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The emission of organic compounds in the troposphere is important factor in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). A very large proportion of organic material emitted globally is estimated to arise from biogenic sources, with almost half coming from tropical and sub-tropical forests. Preliminary analyses of leave cuvette emission studies suggest that oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is a significantly larger source of isoprene than tropical forest. Much larger sources of isoprene over oil palm allied with a larger anthropogenic component of local emissions contrast greatly with the remote tropical forest environment and therefore the character of SOA formed may differ significantly. These issues, allied with the high price of palm oil on international markets leading to increased use of land for oil palm production, could give rise to rapidly changing chemical and aerosol regimes in the tropics. It is therefore important to understand the current emissions and composition of organic aerosol over all important land-uses in the tropical environment. This in turn will lead to a greater understanding of the present, and to an improvement in predictive capacity for the future system. To help address these issues, a high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in the Sabahmas (PPB OIL) oil palm plantation near Lahad Datu, in Eastern Sabah, as part of the field component of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) project, part of the UK NERC APPRAISE program. This project was allied closely with measurements made of similar chemical species and aerosol components at a forest site in the Danum Valley as part of the UK Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest (OP3) project. Measurements of submicron non- refractory aerosol composition are presented along with some preliminary analysis of chemically resolved aerosol fluxes made with a new eddy covariance system, based on the

  15. Laboratory and field measurements of organic aerosols with the photoionization aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Matthew A.

    Analytical methods developed to sample and characterize ambient organic aerosols often face the trade-off between long sampling times and the loss of detailed information regarding specific chemical species present. The soft, universal ionization scheme of the Photoionization Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (PIAMS) allows for identification of various chemical compounds by a signature ion, often the molecular ion. The goal of this thesis work is to apply PIAMS to both laboratory and field experiments to answer questions regarding the formation, composition, and behavior of organic aerosols. To achieve this goal, a variety of hardware and software upgrades were administered to PIAMS to optimize the instrument. Data collection and processing software were either refined or built from the ground up to simplify difficult or monotonous tasks. Additional components were added to PIAMS with the intent to automate the instrument, enhance the results, and make the instrument more rugged and user-friendly. These changes, combined with the application of an external particle concentration system (mini-Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System, m-VACES), allowed PIAMS to be suitable for field measurements of organic aerosols. Two such field campaigns were completed, both at the State of Delaware Air Quality Monitoring Site in Wilmington, Delaware: a one week period in June, 2006, and an 18 day period in October and November of 2007. A sampling method developed was capable of collecting sufficient ambient organic aerosol and analyzing it with a time resolution of 3.5 minutes. Because of this method, short term concentration changes of individual species can be tracked. Combined with meteorological data, the behavior of these species can be analyzed as a function of time or wind direction. Many compounds are found at enhanced levels during the evening/night-time hours; potentially due to the combined effects of temperature inversion, and fresh emissions in a cooler environment

  16. Calibration correction of an active scattering spectrometer probe to account for refractive index of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Overbeck, V. R.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Russell, P. B.; Ferry, G. V.

    1990-01-01

    The use of the active scattering spectrometer probe (ASAS-X) to measure sulfuric acid aerosols on U-2 and ER-2 research aircraft has yielded results that are at times ambiguous due to the dependence of particles' optical signatures on refractive index as well as physical dimensions. The calibration correction of the ASAS-X optical spectrometer probe for stratospheric aerosol studies is validated through an independent and simultaneous sampling of the particles with impactors; sizing and counting of particles on SEM images yields total particle areas and volumes. Upon correction of calibration in light of these data, spectrometer results averaged over four size distributions are found to agree with similarly averaged impactor results to within a few percent: indicating that the optical properties or chemical composition of the sample aerosol must be known in order to achieve accurate optical aerosol spectrometer size analysis.

  17. Characterization of aerosol composition, concentrations, and sources at Baengnyeong Island, Korea using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehyoung; Choi, Jinsoo; Lee, Gangwoong; Ahn, Junyoung; Park, Jin Soo; Atwood, Samuel A.; Schurman, Misha; Choi, Yongjoo; Chung, Yoomi; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-11-01

    To improve understanding of the sources and chemical properties of particulate pollutants on the western side of the Korean Peninsula, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measured non-refractory fine (PM1) particles from May to November, 2011 at Baengnyeong Island, South Korea. Organic matter and sulfate were generally the most abundant species and exhibited maximum concentrations of 36 μg/m3 and 39 μg/m3, respectively. Nitrate concentrations peaked at 32 μg/m3 but were typically much lower than sulfate and organic matter concentrations. May, September, October, and November featured the highest monthly average concentrations, with lower concentrations typically observed from June through August. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis and individual case studies revealed that transport from eastern China, an area with high SO2 emissions, was associated with high particulate sulfate concentrations at the measurement site. Observed sulfate aerosol sometimes was fully neutralized by ammonium but often was acidic; the average ammonium to sulfate molar ratio was 1.49. Measured species size distributions revealed a range of sulfate particle size distributions with modes between 100 and 600 nm. Organic aerosol source regions were widespread, including contributions from eastern China and South Korea. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis indicated three "factors," or types of organic aerosol, comprising one primary, hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and two oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) components, including a more oxidized (MO-OOA) and a less oxidized (LO-OOA) oxidized organic aerosol. On average, HOA and OOA contributed 21% and 79% of the organic mass (OM), respectively, with the MO-OOA fraction nearly three times as abundant as the LO-OOA fraction. Biomass burning contributions to observed OM were low during the late spring/early summer agricultural burning season in eastern China, since

  18. TIME-OF-FLIGHT AEROSOL BEAM SPECTROMETER FOR PARTICLE SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time-of-flight aerosol beam spectrometer (TOFABS) is described. The instrument has been designed and constructed to perform in situ real time measurements of the aerodynamic size of individual aerosol particles in the range 0.3 to 10 micrometers diameter. The measurement method...

  19. Characterization of a Photoacoustic Aerosol Absorption Spectrometer for Aircraft-based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. J.; Wagner, N. L.; Richardson, M.; Brock, C. A.; Murphy, D. M.; Adler, G.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol directly impacts the Earth's climate through extinction of incoming and outgoing radiation. The optical extinction is due to both scattering and absorption. In situ measurements of aerosol extinction and scattering are well established and have uncertainties less than 5%. However measurements of aerosol absorption typically have uncertainties of 20-30%. Development and characterization of more accurate and precise instrumentation for measurement of aerosol absorption will enable a deeper understand of significance and spatial distribution of black and brown carbon aerosol, the effect of atmospheric processes on aerosol optical properties, and influence of aerosol optical properties on direct radiative forcing. Here, we present a detailed characterization of a photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer designed for deployment aboard research aircraft. The spectrometer operates at three colors across the visible spectrum and is calibrated in the field using ozone. The field calibration is validated in the laboratory using synthetic aerosol and simultaneous measurements of extinction and scattering. In addition, the sensitivity of the instrument is characterized under conditions typically encountered during aircraft sampling e.g. as a function of changing pressure. We will apply this instrument characterization to ambient aerosol absorption data collected during the SENEX and SEAC4RS aircraft based field campaigns.

  20. Light extinction by secondary organic aerosol: an intercomparison of three broadband cavity spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, R. M.; Ball, S. M.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.-P.; Heitmann, U.; Jones, R. L.; Platt, U.; Pöhler, D.; Ruth, A. A.; Shillings, A. J. L.; Thieser, J.; Wahner, A.; Venables, D. S.

    2013-11-01

    Broadband optical cavity spectrometers are maturing as a technology for trace-gas detection, but only recently have they been used to retrieve the extinction coefficient of aerosols. Sensitive broadband extinction measurements allow explicit separation of gas and particle phase spectral contributions, as well as continuous spectral measurements of aerosol extinction in favourable cases. In this work, we report an intercomparison study of the aerosol extinction coefficients measured by three such instruments: a broadband cavity ring-down spectrometer (BBCRDS), a cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectrometer (CE-DOAS), and an incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (IBBCEAS). Experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR atmospheric simulation chamber as part of the NO3Comp campaign to compare the measurement capabilities of NO3 and N2O5 instrumentation. Aerosol extinction coefficients between 655 and 690 nm are reported for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed by the NO3 oxidation of β-pinene under dry and humid conditions. Despite different measurement approaches and spectral analysis procedures, the three instruments retrieved aerosol extinction coefficients that were in close agreement. The refractive index of SOA formed from the β-pinene + NO3 reaction was 1.61, and was not measurably affected by the chamber humidity or by aging of the aerosol over several hours. This refractive index is significantly larger than SOA refractive indices observed in other studies of OH and ozone-initiated terpene oxidations, and may be caused by the large proportion of organic nitrates in the particle phase. In an experiment involving ammonium sulfate particles, the aerosol extinction coefficients as measured by IBBCEAS were found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated using the Mie theory. The results of the study demonstrate the potential of broadband cavity spectrometers for determining the optical properties of aerosols.

  1. Light extinction by Secondary Organic Aerosol: an intercomparison of three broadband cavity spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, R. M.; Ball, S. M.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.-P.; Heitmann, U.; Jones, R. L.; Platt, U.; Pöhler, D.; Ruth, A. A.; Shillings, A. J. L.; Thieser, J.; Wahner, A.; Venables, D. S.

    2013-07-01

    Broadband optical cavity spectrometers are maturing as a technology for trace gas detection, but only recently have they been used to retrieve the extinction coefficient of aerosols. Sensitive broadband extinction measurements allow explicit separation of gas and particle phase spectral contributions, as well as continuous spectral measurements of aerosol extinction in favourable cases. In this work, we report an intercomparison study of the aerosol extinction coefficients measured by three such instruments: a broadband cavity ring-down spectrometer (BBCRDS), a cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectrometer (CE-DOAS), and an incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (IBBCEAS). Experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR atmospheric simulation chamber as part of the NO3Comp campaign to compare the measurement capabilities of NO3 and N2O5 instrumentation. Aerosol extinction coefficients between 655 and 690 nm are reported for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed by the NO3 oxidation of β-pinene under dry and humid conditions. Despite different measurement approaches and spectral analysis procedures, the three instruments retrieved aerosol extinction coefficients that were in close agreement. The refractive index of SOA formed from the β-pinene + NO3 reaction was 1.61, and was not measurably affected by the chamber humidity or by aging of the aerosol over several hours. This refractive index is significantly larger than SOA refractive indices observed in other studies of OH and ozone-initiated terpene oxidations, and may be caused by the large proportion of organic nitrates in the particle phase. In an experiment involving ammonium sulphate particles the aerosol extinction coefficients as measured by IBBCEAS were found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated using Mie theory. The results of the study demonstrate the potential of broadband cavity spectrometers for determining the optical properties of aerosols.

  2. Characterization of organic aerosols in Beijing using an aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junke; Wang, Yuesi; Huang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zirui; Ji, Dongsheng; Sun, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Fine particle of organic aerosol (OA), mostly arising from pollution, are abundant in Beijing. To achieve a better understanding of the difference in OA in summer and autumn, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Research Inc., USA) was deployed in urban Beijing in August and October 2012. The mean OA mass concentration in autumn was 30±30 μg m-3, which was higher than in summer (13±6.9 μg m-3). The elemental analysis found that OA was more aged in summer (oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios were 0.41 and 0.32 for summer and autumn, respectively). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis identified three and five components in summer and autumn, respectively. In summer, an oxygenated OA (OOA), a cooking-emission-related OA (COA), and a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) were indentified. Meanwhile, the OOA was separated into LV-OOA (low-volatility OOA) and SV-OOA (semi-volatile OOA); and in autumn, a nitrogen-containing OA (NOA) was also found. The SOA (secondary OA) was always the most important OA component, accounting for 55% of the OA in the two seasons. Back trajectory clustering analysis found that the origin of the air masses was more complex in summer. Southerly air masses in both seasons were associated with the highest OA loading, while northerly air masses were associated with the lowest OA loading. A preliminary study of OA components, especially the POA (primary OA), in different periods found that the HOA and COA all decreased during the National Day holiday period, and HOA decreased at weekends compared with weekdays.

  3. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Single particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been estimated using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulphate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal/optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and ten discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. Potassium content was used to identify particles associated with biomass combustion. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorization, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulphate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA/EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidized OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of primary and

  4. Quantitative determination of carbonaceous particle mixing state in Paris using single-particle mass spectrometer and aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Crippa, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Evans, G. J.; Wenger, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    Single-particle mixing state information can be a powerful tool for assessing the relative impact of local and regional sources of ambient particulate matter in urban environments. However, quantitative mixing state data are challenging to obtain using single-particle mass spectrometers. In this study, the quantitative chemical composition of carbonaceous single particles has been determined using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) as part of the MEGAPOLI 2010 winter campaign in Paris, France. Relative peak areas of marker ions for elemental carbon (EC), organic aerosol (OA), ammonium, nitrate, sulfate and potassium were compared with concurrent measurements from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS), a thermal-optical OCEC analyser and a particle into liquid sampler coupled with ion chromatography (PILS-IC). ATOFMS-derived estimated mass concentrations reproduced the variability of these species well (R2 = 0.67-0.78), and 10 discrete mixing states for carbonaceous particles were identified and quantified. The chemical mixing state of HR-ToF-AMS organic aerosol factors, resolved using positive matrix factorisation, was also investigated through comparison with the ATOFMS dataset. The results indicate that hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) detected in Paris is associated with two EC-rich mixing states which differ in their relative sulfate content, while fresh biomass burning OA (BBOA) is associated with two mixing states which differ significantly in their OA / EC ratios. Aged biomass burning OA (OOA2-BBOA) was found to be significantly internally mixed with nitrate, while secondary, oxidised OA (OOA) was associated with five particle mixing states, each exhibiting different relative secondary inorganic ion content. Externally mixed secondary organic aerosol was not observed. These findings demonstrate the range of primary and secondary organic aerosol mixing states in Paris. Examination of the temporal

  5. Using Raman-lidar-based regularized microphysical retrievals and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer measurements for the characterization of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, Stefanos; Nicolae, Doina; Böckmann, Christine; Vasilescu, Jeni; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Labzovskii, Lev; Toanca, Florica; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2015-10-01

    In this work we extract the microphysical properties of aerosols for a collection of measurement cases with low volume depolarization ratio originating from fire sources captured by the Raman lidar located at the National Institute of Optoelectronics (INOE) in Bucharest. Our algorithm was tested not only for pure smoke but also for mixed smoke and urban aerosols of variable age and growth. Applying a sensitivity analysis on initial parameter settings of our retrieval code was proved vital for producing semi-automatized retrievals with a hybrid regularization method developed at the Institute of Mathematics of Potsdam University. A direct quantitative comparison of the retrieved microphysical properties with measurements from a Compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (CToF-AMS) is used to validate our algorithm. Microphysical retrievals performed with sun photometer data are also used to explore our results. Focusing on the fine mode we observed remarkable similarities between the retrieved size distribution and the one measured by the AMS. More complicated atmospheric structures and the factor of absorption appear to depend more on particle radius being subject to variation. A good correlation was found between the aerosol effective radius and particle age, using the ratio of lidar ratios (LR: aerosol extinction to backscatter ratios) as an indicator for the latter. Finally, the dependence on relative humidity of aerosol effective radii measured on the ground and within the layers aloft show similar patterns.

  6. Sun and aureole spectrometer for airborne measurements to derive aerosol optical properties.

    PubMed

    Asseng, Hagen; Ruhtz, Thomas; Fischer, Jürgen

    2004-04-01

    We have designed an airborne spectrometer system for the simultaneous measurement of the direct Sun irradiance and aureole radiance. The instrument is based on diffraction grating spectrometers with linear image sensors. It is robust, lightweight, compact, and reliable, characteristics that are important for airborne applications. The multispectral radiation measurements are used to derive optical properties of tropospheric aerosols. We extract the altitude dependence of the aerosol volume scattering function and of the aerosol optical depth by using flight patterns with descents and ascents ranging from the surface level to the top of the boundary layer. The extinction coefficient and the product of single scattering albedo and phase function of separate layers can be derived from the airborne measurements. PMID:15074425

  7. An Airborne A-Band Spectrometer for Remote Sensing Of Aerosol and Cloud Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Michael; Hostetler, Chris; Poole, Lamont; Holden, Carl; Rault, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric remote sensing with the O2 A-band has a relatively long history, but most of these studies were attempting to estimate surface pressure or cloud-top pressure. Recent conceptual studies have demonstrated the potential of spaceborne high spectral resolution O2 A-band spectrometers for retrieval of aerosol and cloud optical properties. The physical rationale of this new approach is that information on the scattering properties of the atmosphere is embedded in the detailed line structure of the O2 A-band reflected radiance spectrum. The key to extracting this information is to measure the radiance spectrum at very high spectral resolution. Instrument performance requirement studies indicate that, in addition to high spectral resolution, the successful retrieval of aerosol and cloud properties from A-band radiance spectra will also require high radiometric accuracy, instrument stability, and high signal-to-noise measurements. To experimentally assess the capabilities of this promising new remote sensing application, the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an airborne high spectral resolution A-band spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a plane holographic grating with a folded Littrow geometry to achieve high spectral resolution (0.5 cm-1) and low stray light in a compact package. This instrument will be flown in a series of field campaigns beginning in 2001 to evaluate the overall feasibility of this new technique. Results from these campaigns should be particularly valuable for future spaceborne applications of A-band spectrometers for aerosol and cloud retrievals.

  8. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  9. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment. PMID:26368414

  10. Preliminary Results of Aerosol Chemical Composition Measurements in the Gulf of Maine with an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2002-12-01

    The New England Air Quality Study is a multi-institutional research project to improve understanding of the atmospheric processes that control the production and distribution of air pollutants in the New England region. During July-August, 2002 a large, collaborative, intensive period of atmospheric measurement and model comparisons took place. As part of this study, an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed aboard the NOAA ship RONALD H. BROWN in the Gulf of Maine. The AMS measures semi-volatile components of aerosol particles with aerodynamic diameters between roughly 40 and 1500 nm. During this study, the AMS collected 2-minute averaged particle mass spectra as well as speciated organic, sulfate, and nitrate size distributions. Sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium nitrate components of the aerosol, which are relatively non-volatile at the AMS heater temperature, were not detected with the AMS. A wide variety of air masses were sampled during the intensive period, including clean marine, clean continental, and polluted continental air masses. In general, the volatile particle composition was mostly organic and sulfate with lesser amounts of nitrate. Furthermore, particle mass loadings typically peaked around 400-600 nm in aerodynamic diameter. Several events with high aerosol organic, sulfate, and/or nitrate mass loadings were observed and the atmospheric processes that cause them will be discussed.

  11. Dual-aureole and sun spectrometer system for airborne measurements of aerosol optical properties.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Paul; Ruhtz, Thomas; Preusker, Rene; Fischer, Jürgen

    2007-12-10

    We have designed an airborne spectrometer system for the simultaneous measurement of the direct sun irradiance and the aureole radiance in two different solid angles. The high-resolution spectral radiation measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties. Combined measurements in two solid angles provide better information about the aerosol type without additional and elaborate measuring geometries. It is even possible to discriminate between absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol types. Furthermore, they allow to apply additional calibration methods and simplify the detection of contaminated data (e.g., by thin cirrus clouds). For the characterization of the detected aerosol type a new index is introduced that is the slope of the aerosol phase function in the forward scattering region. The instrumentation is a flexible modular setup, which has already been successfully applied in airborne and ground-based field campaigns. We describe the setup as well as the calibration of the instrument. In addition, example vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties--including the aureole measurements--are shown and discussed. PMID:18071387

  12. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) at the rural site Back Garden (BG), located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the Southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8±8.4 μg m-3 and 13.5±8.7 μg m-3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva)~200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300-700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions). The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly correlated with the reference spectra of fulvic acid, an indicator of aged and

  13. Characterization and source apportionment of submicron aerosol with aerosol mass spectrometer during the PRIDE-PRD 2006 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, R.; Takegawa, N.; Zheng, M.; Kondo, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Gong, Y.; Lu, K.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2011-07-01

    Size-resolved chemical compositions of non-refractory submicron aerosol were measured using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) at the rural site Back Garden (BG), located ~50 km northwest of Guangzhou in July 2006. This paper characterized the submicron aerosol particles of regional air pollution in Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the southern China. Organics and sulfate dominated the submicron aerosol compositions, with average mass concentrations of 11.8 ± 8.4 μg m-3 and 13.5 ± 8.7 μg m-3, respectively. Unlike other air masses, the air masses originated from Southeast-South and passing through the PRD urban areas exhibited distinct bimodal size distribution characteristics for both organics and sulfate: the first mode peaked at vacuum aerodynamic diameters (Dva) ∼200 nm and the second mode occurred at Dva from 300-700 nm. With the information from AMS, it was found from this study that the first mode of organics in PRD regional air masses was contributed by both secondary organic aerosol formation and combustion-related emissions, which is different from most findings in other urban areas (first mode of organics primarily from combustion-related emissions). The analysis of AMS mass spectra data by positive matrix factorization (PMF) model identified three sources of submicron organic aerosol including hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA). The strong correlation between HOA and EC indicated primary combustion emissions as the major source of HOA while a close correlation between SV-OOA and semi-volatile secondary species nitrate as well as between LV-OOA and nonvolatile secondary species sulfate suggested secondary aerosol formation as the major source of SV-OOA and LV-OOA at the BG site. However, LV-OOA was more aged than SV-OOA as its spectra was highly correlated with the reference spectra of fulvic acid, an indicator of aged and

  14. Complex refractive indices of aerosols retrieved by continuous wave-cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lang-Yona, N; Rudich, Y; Segre, E; Dinar, E; Abo-Riziq, A

    2009-03-01

    The major uncertainties associated with the direct impact of aerosols on climate call for fast and accurate characterization of their optical properties. Cavity ring down (CRD) spectroscopy provides highly sensitive measurement of aerosols' extinction coefficients from which the complex refractive index (RI) of the aerosol may be retrieved accurately for spherical particles of known size and number density, thus it is possible to calculate the single scattering albedo and other atmospherically relevant optical parameters. We present a CRD system employing continuous wave (CW) single mode laser. The single mode laser and the high repetition rate obtained significantly improve the sensitivity and reliability of the system, compared to a pulsed laser CRD setup. The detection limit of the CW-CRD system is between 6.67 x 10(-10) cm(-1) for an empty cavity and 3.63 x 10(-9) cm(-1) for 1000 particles per cm(3) inside the cavity, at a 400 Hz sampling and averaging of 2000 shots for one sample measurement taken in 5 s. For typical pulsed-CRD, the detection limit for an empty cavity is less than 3.8 x 10(-9) cm(-1) for 1000 shots averaged over 100 s at 10 Hz. The system was tested for stability, accuracy, and RI retrievals for scattering and absorbing laboratory-generated aerosols. Specifically, the retrieved extinction remains very stable for long measurement times (1 h) with an order of magnitude change in aerosol number concentration. In addition, the optical cross section (sigma(ext)) of a 400 nm polystyrene latex sphere (PSL) was determined within 2% error compared to the calculated value based on Mie theory. The complex RI of PSL, nigrosin, and ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols were determined by measuring the extinction efficiency (Q(ext)) as a function of the size parameter ((piD)/lambda) and found to be in very good agreement with literature values. A mismatch in the retrieved RI of Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) compared to a previous study was observed and is

  15. Factor analysis of combined organic and inorganic aerosol mass spectra from high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Yang, T.; Ng, N. L.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2012-09-01

    Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to the merged high resolution mass spectra of organic and inorganic aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements to investigate the sources and evolution processes of submicron aerosols in New York City in summer 2009. This new approach is able to study the distribution of organic and inorganic species in different types of aerosols, the acidity of organic aerosol (OA) factors, and the fragment ion patterns related to photochemical processing. In this study, PMF analysis of the unified AMS spectral matrix resolved 8 factors. The hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and cooking OA (COA) factors contain negligible amounts of inorganic species. The two factors that are primarily ammonium sulfate (SO4-OA) and ammonium nitrate (NO3-OA), respectively, are overall neutralized. Among all OA factors the organic fraction of SO4-OA shows the highest degree of oxidation (O/C = 0.69). Two semi-volatile oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, i.e., a less oxidized (LO-OOA) and a more oxidized (MO-OOA), were also identified. MO-OOA represents local photochemical products with a diurnal profile exhibiting a pronounced noon peak, consistent with those of formaldehyde (HCHO) and Ox(= O3 + NO2). The NO+/NO2+ ion ratio in MO-OOA is much higher than that in NO3-OA and in pure ammonium nitrate, indicating the formation of organic nitrates. The nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) factor contains ~25% of acidic inorganic salts, suggesting the formation of secondary OA via acid-base reactions of amines. The size distributions of OA factors derived from the size-resolved mass spectra show distinct diurnal evolving behaviors but overall a progressing evolution from smaller to larger particle mode as the oxidation degree of OA increases. Our results demonstrate that PMF analysis of the unified aerosol mass spectral matrix which contains both inorganic and organic aerosol signals may enable the deconvolution of more OA factors and gain more insights into the

  16. Measurement of internal and external mixtures of test aerosols with a new Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2015-04-01

    The mixing state of atmospheric aerosol particles is a very important property affecting processes such as CCN activation and scattering and absorption of light by the particles, but is challenging to determine. A new Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (LAAPTOF, AeroMegt GmbH) was tested with regards to its capability of measuring internal and external mixture of aerosols using laboratory generated particles. To create the external mixture, solutions of three different salts in deionized water, and a suspension of carbon black (Cabot Corporation) in a mixture of isopropanol and water were nebulized and individually dried, before being passed into a small mixing chamber. To create the internal mixture, equal parts of each solution/suspension were mixed, fed into a single nebulizer, nebulized and dried. The LAAPTOF sampled from the mixing chamber and recorded mass spectra of individual particles. The analysis shows a heterogeneous ensemble of single particle spectra for the external mixture, and a homogeneous ensemble of spectra for the internal mixture. The ability of a fuzzy clustering algorithm to resolve the difference between the two mixing states was also tested.

  17. Response of an aerosol mass spectrometer to organonitrates and organosulfates and implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Farmer, D K; Matsunaga, A; Docherty, K S; Surratt, J D; Seinfeld, J H; Ziemann, P J; Jimenez, J L

    2010-04-13

    Organonitrates (ON) are important products of gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere; some models predict, and laboratory studies show, the formation of large, multifunctional ON with vapor pressures low enough to partition to the particle phase. Organosulfates (OS) have also been recently detected in secondary organic aerosol. Despite their potential importance, ON and OS remain a nearly unexplored aspect of atmospheric chemistry because few studies have quantified particulate ON or OS in ambient air. We report the response of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to aerosol ON and OS standards and mixtures. We quantify the potentially substantial underestimation of organic aerosol O/C, commonly used as a metric for aging, and N/C. Most of the ON-nitrogen appears as NO(x)+ ions in the AMS, which are typically dominated by inorganic nitrate. Minor organonitrogen ions are observed although their identity and intensity vary between standards. We evaluate the potential for using NO(x)+ fragment ratios, organonitrogen ions, HNO(3)+ ions, the ammonium balance of the nominally inorganic ions, and comparison to ion-chromatography instruments to constrain the concentrations of ON for ambient datasets, and apply these techniques to a field study in Riverside, CA. OS manifests as separate organic and sulfate components in the AMS with minimal organosulfur fragments and little difference in fragmentation from inorganic sulfate. The low thermal stability of ON and OS likely causes similar detection difficulties for other aerosol mass spectrometers using vaporization and/or ionization techniques with similar or larger energy, which has likely led to an underappreciation of these species. PMID:20194777

  18. Factor analysis of combined organic and inorganic aerosol mass spectra from high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Yang, T.; Ng, N. L.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2012-05-01

    The high resolution mass spectra of organic and inorganic aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements were first combined into positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis to investigate the sources and evolution processes of atmospheric aerosols. The new approach is able to study the mixing of organic aerosols (OA) and inorganic species, the acidity of OA factors, and the fragment ion patterns related to photochemical processing. In this study, PMF analysis of the unified AMS spectral matrices resolved 8 factors for the submicron aerosols measured at Queens College in New York City in summer 2009. The hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and cooking OA (COA) contain very minor inorganic species, indicating the different sources and mixing characteristics between primary OA and secondary species. The two factors that are primarily ammonium sulfate (SO4-OA) and ammonium nitrate (NO3-OA), respectively, are overall neutralized, of which the OA in SO4-OA shows the highest oxidation state (O/C = 0.69) among OA factors. The semi-volatile oxygenated OA comprises two components, i.e., a less oxidized (LO-OOA) and a more oxidized (MO-OOA). The MO-OOA represents a local photochemical product with the diurnal profile exhibiting a pronounced noon peak, consistent with those of formaldehyde (HCHO) and Ox (= O3+NO2). The much higher NO+/NO2+ fragment ion ratio in MO-OOA than that from ammonium nitrate alone provides evidence for the formation of organic nitrates. The amine-related nitrogen-enriched OA (NOA) contains ~25% of acidic inorganic salts, elucidating the formation of secondary OA from amines in acidic environments. The size distributions derived from 3-dimensional size-resolved mass spectra show distinct diurnal evolving behaviors for different OA factors, but overall a progressing evolution from smaller to larger particle mode as a function of oxidation states. Our results demonstrate that PMF analysis by incorporating inorganic aerosols is of importance for

  19. Fast Airborne Aerosol Size and Chemistry Measurements with the High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Dunlea, E. J.; Kimmel, J. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Sueper, D.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Emmons, L.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Collins,D. R.; Knapp, D.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka,D. D.; Campos,T.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The concentration, size, and composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM(sub l)) was measured over Mexico City and central Mexico with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) onboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft as part of the MILAGRO field campaign. This was the first aircraft deployment of the HR-ToF-AMS. During the campaign the instrument performed very well, and provided 12 s data. The aerosol mass from the AMS correlates strongly with other aerosol measurements on board the aircraft. Organic aerosol (OA) species dominate the NR-PM(sub l) mass. OA correlates strongly with CO and HCN indicating that pollution (mostly secondary OA, SOA) and biomass burning (BB) are the main OA sources. The OA to CO ratio indicates a typical value for aged air of around 80 microg/cubic m (STP) ppm(exp -1). This is within the range observed in outflow from the Northeastern US, which could be due to a compensating effect between higher BB but lower biogenic VOC emissions during this study. The O/C atomic ratio for OA is calculated from the HR mass spectra and shows a clear increase with photochemical age, as SOA forms rapidly and quickly overwhelms primary urban OA, consistent with Volkamer et al. (2006) and Kleinman et al. (2008). The stability of the OA/CO while O/C increases with photochemical age implies a net loss of carbon from the OA. BB OA is marked by signals at m/z 60 and 73, and also by a signal enhancement at large m/z indicative of larger molecules or more resistance to fragmentation. The main inorganic components show different spatial patterns and size distributions. Sulfate is regional in nature with clear volcanic and petrochemical/power plant sources, while the urban area is not a major regional source for this species. Nitrate is enhanced significantly in the urban area and immediate outflow, and is strongly correlated with CO indicating a strong urban source. The importance of nitrate decreases with distance from the city

  20. Remote sensing of cloud, aerosol, and water vapor properties from the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Menzel, W. Paul; Tanre, Didier D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe the status of MODIS-N and its companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning spectrometer with 32 uniformly spaced channels between 0.410 and 0.875 micron. They review the various methods being developed for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties using MODIS, placing primary emphasis on the principal atmospheric applications of determining the optical, microphysical, and physical properties of clouds and aerosol particles from spectral reflection and thermal emission measurements. In addition to cloud and aerosol properties, MODIS-N will be used for determining the total precipitable water vapor and atmospheric stability. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products are described, together with an example of their application to aircraft and/or satellite measurements.

  1. Detection of cw-related species in complex aerosol particles deposited on surfaces with an ion trap-based aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, William A; Reilly, Pete; Whitten, William B

    2007-01-01

    A new type of aerosol mass spectrometer was developed by minimal modification of an existing commercial ion trap to analyze the semivolatile components of aerosols in real time. An aerodynamic lens-based inlet system created a well-collimated particle beam that impacted into the heated ionization volume of the commercial ion trap mass spectrometer. The semivolatile components of the aerosols were thermally vaporized and ionized by electron impact or chemical ionization in the source. The nascent ions were extracted and injected into the ion trap for mass analysis. The utility of this instrument was demonstrated by identifying semivolatile analytes in complex aerosols. This study is part of an ongoing effort to develop methods for identifying chemical species related to CW agent exposure. Our efforts focused on detection of CW-related species doped on omnipresent aerosols such as house dust particles vacuumed from various surfaces found in any office building. The doped aerosols were sampled directly into the inlet of our mass spectrometer from the vacuumed particle stream. The semivolatile analytes were deposited on house dust and identified by positive ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry up to 2.5 h after deposition. Our results suggest that the observed semivolatile species may have been chemisorbed on some of the particle surfaces in submonolayer concentrations and may remain hours after deposition. This research suggests that identification of trace CW agent-related species should be feasible by this technique.

  2. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML), equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE) - a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz) of gaseous pollutants (e.g. HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc.), black carbon (BC), and particle number concentrations and size distributions. Particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with high traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and oxygenated OA (OOA) showed much smoother variations indicating minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60%) with HOA accounting for a major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ∼120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum aerodynamic diameter, Dva), respectively. OOA and inorganic species appear to be

  3. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires Part 2: Analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieshop, A. P.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2008-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA) in dilute wood smoke by exposing emissions from soft- and hard-wood fires to UV light in a smog chamber. This paper focuses on changes in OA composition measured using a unit mass resolution quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). The results highlight how photochemical processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass, the volatility and the level of oxygenation of biomass-burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, more than doubling the primary contribution after a few hours of aging under typical summertime conditions. Aging decreased the OA volatility of the total OA as measured with a thermodenuder; it also made the OA progressively more oxygenated in every experiment. With explicit knowledge of the condensed-phase mass spectrum (MS) of the primary emissions from each fire, each MS can be decomposed into primary and residual spectra throughout the experiment. The residual spectra provide an estimate of the composition of the photochemically produced OA. These spectra are also very similar to those of the oxygenated OA that dominates ambient AMS datasets. In addition, aged wood smoke spectra are shown to be similar to those from OA created by photo-oxidized dilute diesel exhaust and aged biomass-burning OA measured in urban and remote locations. This demonstrates that the oxygenated OA observed in the atmosphere can be produced by photochemical aging of dilute emissions from combustion of fuels containing both modern and fossil carbon.

  4. Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

    2008-06-19

    During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

  5. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schladitz, A.; Merkel, M.; Bastian, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-12-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The aim of the new feature is to conduct unattended quality control experiments under field conditions at remote air quality monitoring or research stations. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter removing the diffusive particles approximately smaller than 25 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. The other feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. An exemplary one-year data set is presented for the measurement site Annaberg-Buchholz as part of the Saxon air quality monitoring network. The total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer overestimates the particle number concentration by only 2% (grand average offset). Furthermore, tolerance criteria are presented to judge the performance of the mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the particle number concentration. An upgrade of a mobility particle size spectrometer with an automated function control enhances the quality of long-term particle number size distribution measurements. Quality assured measurements are a precondition for intercomparison studies of different sites. Comparable measurements will improve cohort health and also climate-relevant research studies.

  6. On the Interpretation of Oxygenated Organic Aerosols (and their Subtypes) Arising from Factor Analysis of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. L.; Zhang, Q.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Kroll, J.; Mohr, C.; Allan, J. D.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Zhang et al. (ES&T 2005; ACP 2005) first performed factor analysis (FA) of Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) complete organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra. This study showed that an oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) factor accounted for 2/3 of the OA mass at an urban site in Pittsburgh and strongly linked OOA to secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Many subsequent studies and the application of more powerful solution algorithms such as Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to the same FA problem have demonstrated the importance of OOA at most locations (e.g. Volkamer et al., GRL, 2006; Zhang et al., GRL, 2007; Lanz et al., ACP, 2007 and ES&T, 2008; Ulbrich et al., ACPD, 2008). Multiple studies have also identified several subtypes of OOA (e.g. OOA-1 and OOA-2). This type of analysis offers new insights because it provides some chemical resolution on the total OA mass with high time and size resolution, and bypasses the limitations of techniques that only analyze tracers and which may favor more reduced species. However the chemical resolution is limited and careful interpretation of the FA output is required, including the use of database spectra, time series of external tracers, tracer ratios, back-trajectory analyses, size- distribution analyses, etc. This presentation will address the interpretation of total OOA and its subfactors across a large range of locations in urban, suburban, rural, remote, and forested areas, and will compare with the results of other source apportionment techniques. Based on data from multiple datasets we conclude that (1) anthropogenic SOA in and downwind of urban areas is an important source of OOA; (2) motor vehicles, meat cooking, and trash burning are unlikely to be sources of primary OOA; (3) SOA from biogenic and biomass burning precursors are also clear sources of OOA; (4) primary biomass burning OA (P-BBOA) typically shows significant differences with ambient OOA factors; (5) heterogeneous oxidation of urban POA may give rise to

  7. Identification and quantification of organic aerosol from cooking and other sources in Barcelona using aerosol mass spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Richter, R.; Reche, C.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Seco, R.; Peñuelas, J.; Jiménez, J. L.; Crippa, M.; Zimmermann, R.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2011-10-01

    PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <1 μm) non-refractory components and black carbon were measured continuously together with additional parameters at an urban background site in Barcelona, Spain, during March 2009 (campaign DAURE, Determination of the sources of atmospheric Aerosols in Urban and Rural Environments in the western Mediterranean). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was conducted on the organic aerosol (OA) data matrix measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer, on both unit mass (UMR) and high resolution (HR) data. Five factors or sources could be identified: LV-OOA (low-volatility oxygenated OA), related to regional, aged secondary OA; SV-OOA (semi-volatile oxygenated OA), a fresher oxygenated OA; HOA (hydrocarbon-like OA, related to traffic emissions); BBOA (biomass burning OA) from domestic heating or agricultural biomass burning activities; and COA (cooking OA). LV-OOA contributed 28% to OA, SV-OOA 27%, COA 17%, HOA 16%, and BBOA 11%. The COA HR spectrum contained substantial signal from oxygenated ions (O/C: 0.21) whereas the HR HOA spectrum had almost exclusively contributions from chemically reduced ions (O/C: 0.03). If we assume that the carbon in HOA is fossil while that in COA and BBOA is modern, primary OA in Barcelona contains a surprisingly high fraction (59%) of non-fossil carbon. This paper presents a method for estimating cooking organic aerosol in ambient datasets based on the fractions of organic mass fragments at m/z 55 and 57: their data points fall into a V-shape in a scatter plot, with strongly influenced HOA data aligned to the right arm and strongly influenced COA data points aligned to the left arm. HR data show that this differentiation is mainly driven by the oxygen-containing ions C3H3O+ and C3H5O+, even though their contributions to m/z 55 and 57 are low compared to the reduced ions C4H7+ and C4H9+. A simple estimation method based on the organic mass fragments at m/z 55, 57, and 44 is developed here and

  8. Identification and quantification of organic aerosol from cooking and other sources in Barcelona using aerosol mass spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Richter, R.; Reche, C.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Seco, R.; Peñuelas, J.; Jiménez, J. L.; Crippa, M.; Zimmermann, R.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2012-02-01

    PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <1 μm) non-refractory components and black carbon were measured continuously together with additional air quality and atmospheric parameters at an urban background site in Barcelona, Spain, during March 2009 (campaign DAURE, Determination of the sources of atmospheric Aerosols in Urban and Rural Environments in the western Mediterranean). Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was conducted on the organic aerosol (OA) data matrix measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer, on both unit mass (UMR) and high resolution (HR) data. Five factors or sources could be identified: LV-OOA (low-volatility oxygenated OA), related to regional, aged secondary OA; SV-OOA (semi-volatile oxygenated OA), a fresher oxygenated OA; HOA (hydrocarbon-like OA, related to traffic emissions); BBOA (biomass burning OA) from domestic heating or agricultural biomass burning activities; and COA (cooking OA). LV-OOA contributed 28% to OA, SV-OOA 27%, COA 17%, HOA 16%, and BBOA 11%. The COA HR spectrum contained substantial signal from oxygenated ions (O:C: 0.21) whereas the HR HOA spectrum had almost exclusively contributions from chemically reduced ions (O:C: 0.03). If we assume that the carbon in HOA is fossil while that in COA and BBOA is modern, primary OA in Barcelona contains a surprisingly high fraction (59%) of non-fossil carbon. This paper presents a method for estimating cooking organic aerosol in ambient datasets based on the fractions of organic mass fragments at m/z 55 and 57: their data points fall into a V-shape in a scatter plot, with strongly influenced HOA data aligned to the right arm and strongly influenced COA data points aligned to the left arm. HR data show that this differentiation is mainly driven by the oxygen-containing ions C3H3O+ and C3H5O+, even though their contributions to m/z 55 and 57 are low compared to the reduced ions C4H7+ and C4H9+. A simple estimation method based on the markers m/z 55, 57, and 44 is

  9. Effect of Vaporizer Temperature on Ambient Non-Refractory Submicron Aerosol Composition and Mass Spectra Measured by the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS) are routinely operated with a constant vaporizer temperature (Tvap) of 600oC in order to facilitate quantitative detection of non-refractory submicron (NR-PM1) species. By analogy with other thermal desorption instrument...

  10. A smog chamber study coupling a photoionization aerosol electron/ion spectrometer to VUV synchrotron radiation: organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosol analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza-Romero, María Teresa; Gaie-Levrel, Francois; Mahjoub, Ahmed; López-Arza, Vicente; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    A reaction chamber was coupled to a photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on an electron/ion coincidence scheme and applied for on-line analysis of organic and inorganic-organic mixed aerosols using synchrotron tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons as the ionization source. In this proof of principle study, both aerosol and gas phase were detected simultaneously but could be differentiated. Present results and perspectives for improvement for this set-up are shown in the study of ozonolysis ([O3] = 0.13-3 ppm) of α-pinene (2-3 ppm), and the uptake of glyoxal upon ammonium sulphate. In this work the ozone concentration was monitored in real time, together with the particle size distributions and chemical composition, the latter taking advantage of the coincidence spectrometer and the tuneability of the synchrotron radiation as a soft VUV ionization source.

  11. Field-deployable, high-resolution, time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    DeCarlo, Peter F; Kimmel, Joel R; Trimborn, Achim; Northway, Megan J; Jayne, John T; Aiken, Allison C; Gonin, Marc; Fuhrer, Katrin; Horvath, Thomas; Docherty, Kenneth S; Worsnop, Doug R; Jimenez, Jose L

    2006-12-15

    The development of a new high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is reported. The high-resolution capabilities of this instrument allow the direct separation of most ions from inorganic and organic species at the same nominal m/z, the quantification of several types of organic fragments (CxHy, CxHyOz, CxHyNp, CxHyOzNp), and the direct identification of organic nitrogen and organosulfur content. This real-time instrument is field-deployable, and its high time resolution (0.5 Hz has been demonstrated) makes it well-suited for studies in which time resolution is critical, such as aircraft studies. The instrument has two ion optical modes: a single-reflection configuration offers higher sensitivity and lower resolving power (up to approximately 2100 at m/z 200), and a two-reflectron configuration yields higher resolving power (up to approximately 4300 at m/z 200) with lower sensitivity. The instrument also allows the determination of the size distributions of all ions. One-minute detection limits for submicrometer aerosol are <0.04 microg m(-3) for all species in the high-sensitivity mode and <0.4 microg m(-3) in the high-resolution mode. Examples of ambient aerosol data are presented from the SOAR-1 study in Riverside, CA, in which the spectra of ambient organic species are dominated by CxHy and CxHyOz fragments, and different organic and inorganic fragments at the same nominal m/z show different size distributions. Data are also presented from the MIRAGE C-130 aircraft study near Mexico City, showing high correlation with independent measurements of surrogate aerosol mass concentration. PMID:17165817

  12. Demonstration of a VUV lamp photoionization source for improvedorganic speciation in an aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.J.; Jayne, J.T.; Toohey, D.W.; Canagaratna, M.R.; Trimborn, A.; Akiyama, K-I.; Shimono, A.; Jimenez, J.L.; DeCarlo, P.F.; Wilson, K.R.; Worsnop, D.R.

    2007-10-03

    In recent years, the Aerodyne AerosolMass Spectrometer(AMS) has become a widely used tool for determining aerosol sizedistributions and chemical composition for non-refractory inorganic andorganic aerosol. The current version of the AMS uses a combination offlash thermal vaporization and 70 eV electron impact (EI) ionization.However, EI causes extensive fragmentation and mass spectra of organicaerosols are difficult to deconvolute because they are composites of theoverlapping fragmentation patterns of all species present. Previous AMSstudies have been limited to classifying organics in broad categoriessuch as oxidized and hydrocarbon-like." In this manuscript we present newefforts to gain more information about organic aerosol composition byemploying the softer technique of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization ina Time-of-Flight AMS (ToF-AMS). In our novel design a VUV lamp is placedin direct proximity of the ionization region of the AMS, with only awindow separating the lamp and the ionizer. This design allows foralternation of photoionization and electron impact ionization within thesame instrument on the timescale of minutes. Thus, the EI-basedquantification capability of the AMS is retained while improved spectralinterpretation is made possible by combined analysis of the complementaryVUV and EI ionization spectra. Photoionization and electron impactionization spectra are compared for a number of compounds including oleicacid, long chain hydrocarbons, and cigarette smoke. In general, the VUVspectra contain much less fragmentation than the EI spectra and for manycompounds the parent ion is the dominant ion in the VUV spectrum. As anexample of the usefulness of the integration of PI within the fullcapability of the ToF-AMS, size distributions and size-segregated massspectra are examined for the cigarette smoke analysis. As a finalevaluation of the new VUV module, spectra for oleic acid are compared tosimilar experiments conducted using the tunable VUV radiation

  13. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  14. Laboratory investigation of photochemical oxidation of organic aerosol from wood fires 2: analysis of aerosol mass spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieshop, A. P.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2009-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of photo-oxidation on organic aerosol (OA) in dilute wood smoke by exposing emissions from soft- and hard-wood fires to UV light in a smog chamber. This paper focuses on changes in OA composition measured using a unit-mass-resolution quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). The results highlight how photochemical processing can lead to considerable evolution of the mass, volatility and level of oxygenation of biomass-burning OA. Photochemical oxidation produced substantial new OA, more than doubling the OA mass after a few hours of aging under typical summertime conditions. Aging also decreased the volatility of the OA and made it progressively more oxygenated. The results also illustrate strengths of, and challenges with, using AMS data for source apportionment analysis. For example, the mass spectra of fresh and aged BBOA are distinct from fresh motor-vehicle emissions. The mass spectra of the secondary OA produced from aging wood smoke are very similar to those of the oxygenated OA (OOA) that dominates ambient AMS datasets, further reinforcing the connection between OOA and OA formed from photo-chemistry. In addition, aged wood smoke spectra are similar to those from OA created by photo-oxidizing dilute diesel exhaust. This demonstrates that the OOA observed in the atmosphere can be produced by photochemical aging of dilute emissions from different types of combustion systems operating on fuels with modern or fossil carbon. Since OOA is frequently the dominant component of ambient OA, the similarity of spectra of aged emissions from different sources represents an important challenge for AMS-based source apportionment studies.

  15. Characterization of aerosol-containing chemical simulant clouds using a sensitive, thermal infrared imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jeffrey L.; D'Amico, Francis M.; Kolodzey, Steven J.; Qian, Jun; Polak, Mark L.; Westerberg, Karl; Chang, Clement S.

    2011-05-01

    A sensitive, ground-based thermal imaging spectrometer was deployed at the Army's Dugway Proving Ground to remotely monitor explosively released chemical-warfare-agent-simulant clouds from stand-off ranges of a few kilometers. The sensor has 128 spectral bands covering the 7.6 to 13.5 micron region. The measured cloud spectra clearly showed scattering of high-elevation-angle sky radiance by liquid aerosols or dust in the clouds: we present arguments that show why the scattering is most likely due to dust. This observation has significant implications for early detection of dust-laden chemical clouds. On one hand, detection algorithms must properly account for the scattered radiation component, which would include out-of-scene radiation components as well as a dust signature; on the other hand, this scattering gives rise to an enhanced "delta-T" for detection by a ground-based sensor.

  16. Thermal Emission Spectrometer Results: Mars Atmospheric Thermal Structure and Aerosol Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Infrared spectra returned by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are well suited for retrieval of the thermal structure and the distribution of aerosols in the Martian atmosphere. Combined nadir- and limb-viewing spectra allow global monitoring of the atmosphere up to 0.01 mbar (65 km). We report here on the atmospheric thermal structure and the distribution of aerosols as observed thus far during the mapping phase of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. Zonal and temporal mean cross sections are used to examine the seasonal evolution of atmospheric temperatures and zonal winds during a period extending from northern hemisphere mid-summer through vernal equinox (L(sub s) = 104-360 deg). Temperature maps at selected pressure levels provide a characterization of planetary-scale waves. Retrieved atmospheric infrared dust opacity maps show the formation and evolution of regional dust storms during southern hemisphere summer. Response of the atmospheric thermal structure to the changing dust loading is observed. Maps of water-ice clouds as viewed in the thermal infrared are presented along with seasonal trends of infrared water-ice opacity. Uses of these observations for diagnostic studies of the dynamics of the atmosphere are discussed.

  17. Laboratory Testing and Calibration of the Nuclei-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    This grant was awarded to complete testing and calibration of a new instrument, the nuclei-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), following its use in the WB-57F Aerosol Measurement (WAM) campaign in early 1998. The N-MASS measures the size distribution of particles in the 4-60 nm diameter range with 1-Hz response at typical free tropospheric conditions. Specific tasks to have been completed under the auspices of this award were: 1) to experimentally determine the instrumental sampling efficiency; 2) to determine the effects of varying temperatures and flows on N-MASS performance; and 3) to calibrate the N-MASS at typical flight conditions as operated in WAM. The work outlined above has been completed, and a journal manuscript based on this work and that describes the performance of the N-MASS is in preparation. Following a brief description of the principles of operation of the instrument, the major findings of this study are described.

  18. Calibrations and Comparisons of Aerosol Spectrometers linking Ground and Airborne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, C.; Brock, C. A.; Erdesz, F.

    2015-12-01

    The nucleation-mode aerosol size spectrometer (NMASS), a fast-time response instrument measuring aerosol size distributions between 5 and 60nm, is to sample in the boundary layer and free troposphere on NASA's Atmospheric Tomography mission (ATom), providing contiguous data with global coverage in all four seasons. In preparation for this the NMASS is calibrated for the expected flight conditions and compatibility studies are made with ground-based instrumentation. The NMASS is comprised of 5 parallel condensation particle counters (CPCs) using perfluoro-tributylamine as a working fluid. Understanding the variation of CPC counting efficiencies with respect to the chemical composition of the sample is important for accurate data analysis and can be used to give indirect information about sample chemical composition. This variation is strongly dependent on the working fluid. The absolute responses and associated variations of the NMASS to ammonium sulfate and limonene ozonolysis products, compounds pertinent to the composition of particles nucleated in the free troposphere and boundary later, are compared to those of butanol, diethylene-glycol and water based CPCs, which are more commonly used in ground-based measurements. While fast time-response is key to measuring aerosol size distributions on flights, high size-resolution is often prioritized for ground-based measurements, and so a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) is commonly used. Inter-comparison between NMASS and SMPS data is non-trivial because of the different working principles and resolutions of the instruments and yet it is vital, for example, for understanding the sources of particles observed during flights and the global relevance of phenomena observed from field stations and in chambers. We report compatibility studies on inversions of data from the SMPS and NMASS, evaluating temporal and spatial resolution and sources of uncertainty.

  19. Detection, identification, and estimation of biological aerosols and vapors with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Avishai; Ren, Hsuan

    2003-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The purpose of the first experiment was to detect and identify Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger (BG) bioaerosol spores and kaolin dust in an open-air release for which the thermal contrast between the aerosol temperature and background brightness temperature is small. The second experiment estimated the concentration of a small amount of triethyl phosphate (TEP) vapor in a closed chamber in which an external blackbody radiation source was used and where the thermal contrast was large. The deduced BG (TEP) extinction spectrum (identification) showed an excellent match to the library BG (TEP) extinction spectrum. Analysis of the time sequence of the measurements coincided well with the presence (detection) of the BG during the measurements, and the estimated concentration of time-dependent TEP vapor was excellent. The data were analyzed with hyperspectral detection, identification, and estimation algorithms. The algorithms were based on radiative transfer theory and statistical signal-processing methods. A subspace orthogonal projection operator was used to statistically subtract the large thermal background contribution to the measurements, and a robust maximum-likelihood solution was used to deduce the target (aerosol or vapor cloud) spectrum and estimate its mass-column concentration. A Gaussian-mixture probability model for the deduced mass-column concentration was computed with an expectation-maximization algorithm to produce the detection threshold, the probability of detection, and the probability of false alarm. The results of this study are encouraging, as they suggest for the first time to the authors' knowledge the feasibility of detecting biological aerosols with passive FTIR sensors.

  20. Detection, identification, and estimation of biological aerosols and vapors with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Ren, Hsuan

    2003-08-20

    Two experiments were conducted with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The purpose of the first experiment was to detect and identify Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger (BG) bioaerosol spores and kaolin dust in an open-air release for which the thermal contrast between the aerosol temperature and background brightness temperature is small. The second experiment estimated the concentration of a small amount of triethyl phosphate (TEP) vapor in a closed chamber in which an external blackbody radiation source was used and where the thermal contrast was large. The deduced BG (TEP) extinction spectrum (identification) showed an excellent match to the library BG (TEP) extinction spectrum. Analysis of the time sequence of the measurements coincided well with the presence (detection) of the BG during the measurements, and the estimated concentration of time-dependent TEP vapor was excellent. The data were analyzed with hyperspectral detection, identification, and estimation algorithms. The algorithms were based on radiative transfer theory and statistical signal-processing methods. A subspace orthogonal projection operator was used to statistically subtract the large thermal background contribution to the measurements, and a robust maximum-likelihood solution was used to deduce the target (aerosol or vapor cloud) spectrum and estimate its mass-column concentration. A Gaussian-mixture probability model for the deduced mass-column concentration was computed with an expectation-maximization algorithm to produce the detection threshold, the probability of detection, and the probability of false alarm. The results of this study are encouraging, as they suggest for the first time to the authors' knowledge the feasibility of detecting biological aerosols with passive FTIR sensors. PMID:12952336

  1. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) observations of increases in Asian aerosol in winter from 1979 to 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, Steven T.; Torres, O.; Smith, Steven J.

    2004-12-01

    Emission inventories indicate that the largest increases in SO{sub 2} emissions have occurred in Asia during the last 20 years. By inference, largest increases in aerosol, produced primarily by the conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate, should have occurred in Asia during the same time period. Decadal changes in regional aerosol optical depths are calculated by analyzing Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) vertical aerosol optical depths (converted to 550 nm) from 1979 to 2000 on a 1{sup o} by 1{sup o} global grid. The anthropogenic component of the TOMS aerosol record is maximized by examining the seasonal cycles of desert dust and Boreal fire smoke, and identifying the months of the year for which the desert dust and Boreal fire smoke are least conspicuous. Gobi and Taklimakan desert dust in Asia is prevalent in the TOMS record during spring, and eastern Siberian smoke from Boreal forest fires is prevalent during summer. Aerosol trends are calculated on a regional basis during winter (November-February) to maximize the anthropogenic component of the aerosol record. Large increases in aerosol optical depths between 1979 and 2000 are present over the China coastal plain and the Ganges river basin in India. Aerosol increased by 17% per decade during winter over the China coastal plain, while SO{sub 2} emissions over the same geographical region increased by 33% per decade.

  2. A study of aerosol optical properties using a lightweight optical particle spectrometer and sun photometer from an unmanned aerial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Gao, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    A miniaturized printed optical particle spectrometer (POPS) and sun photometer (miniSASP) have been developed recently for unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and balloon applications. Here we present the first scientific data recorded by the POPS and miniSASP from a Manta UAS during a field campaign on Svalbard, Norway, in April 2015. As part of a payload composed of five different aerosol instruments (absorption photometer, condensation particle counter, filter sampler, miniSASP and POPS) we collected particle size distributions, the optical depth (OD) and the sky brightness from 0 to 3000 m altitude. The complementary measurement approaches of the miniSASP and POPS allow us to calculate aerosol optical properties such as the aerosol optical depth and the angstrom exponent or the asymmetry parameter independently. We discuss deviation between results with respect to aerosol properties, e.g. hygroscopicity and absorption, as well as instrumental limitations.

  3. Remote sensing of cloud, aerosol and water vapor properties from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) is an Earth-viewing sensor being developed as a facility instrument for the Earth Observing System (EOS) to be launched in the late 1990s. MODIS consists of two separate instruments that scan a swath width sufficient to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, Sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. Of primary interest for studies of atmospheric physics is the MODIS-N (nadir) instrument which will provide images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 micrometers with spatial resoulutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to enable advanced studies of land, ocean and atmosperhic processes. The intent of this lecture is to describe the current status of MODIS-N and its companion instrument MODIS-T (tilt), a tiltable cross-track scanning radiometer with 32 uniformly spaced channels between 0.410 and 0.875 micrometers, and to describe the physical principles behind the development of MODIS for the remote sensing of atmospheric properties. Primary emphasis will be placed on the main atmospheric applications of determining the optical, microphysical and physical properties of clouds and aerosol particles form spectral-reflection and thermal-emission measurements. In addition to cloud and aerosol properties, MODIS-N will be utilized for the determination of the total precipitable water vapor over land and atmospheric stability. The physical principles behind the determination of each of these atmospheric products will be described herein.

  4. Fullerene Soot in Eastern China Air: Results from Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Ge, X.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.; Yu, H.; Sun, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; Collier, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present for the first time, the observation and quantification of fullerenes in ambient airborne particulate using an Aerodyne Soot Particle - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) deployed during 2015 winter in suburban Nanjing, a megacity in eastern China. The laser desorption and electron impact ionization techniques employed by the SP-AMS allow us to differentiate various fullerenes from other aerosol components. Mass spectrum of the identified fullerene soot is consisted by a series of high molecular weight carbon clusters (up to m/z of 2000 in this study), almost identical to the spectral features of commercially available fullerene soot, both with C70 and C60 clusters as the first and second most abundant species. This type of soot was observed throughout the entire study period, with an average mass loading of 0.18 μg/m3, accounting for 6.4% of the black carbon mass, 1.2% of the total organic mass. Temporal variation and diurnal pattern of fullerene soot are overall similar to those of black carbon, but are clearly different in some periods. Combining the positive matrix factorization, back-trajectory and analyses of the meteorological parameters, we identified the petrochemical industrial plants situating upwind from the sampling site, as the major source of fullerene soot. In this regard, our findings imply the ubiquitous presence of fullerene soot in ambient air of industry-influenced area, especially the oil and gas production regions. This study also offers new insights into the characterization of fullerenes from other environmental samples via the advanced SP-AMS technique.

  5. Aerosol Particle Size Retrievals from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, S.; Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    During the extended mission of the Mars Reconnaisance Orbiter, the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has made periodic limb-viewing geometry observations of the Martian atmosphere. Sufficient radiance is typically available to produce a vertical distribution of dust and water ice aerosols from the surface to approximately 50 km altitude. Radiative transfer modeling is conducted to achieve a best fit between the observed and modeled spectrum. The spherical geometry of the limb-viewing geometry is handled using a pseudo-spherical approximation that is computationally efficient and accurate to within a few percent of a Monte Carlo method for the geometries observed. Different particle sizes of dust and water ice have unique extinction coefficients across the visible and near-infrared portion of the spectrum observed by CRISM. We use a wide range of wavelengths across the CRISM spectrum to conduct the retrieval. Here we provide initial results on the retrieval of dust and water ice particle sizes over the duration of the CRISM limb-viewing observations.

  6. A study on the temporal and spatial variability of absorbing aerosols using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2009-05-01

    Absorbing aerosols, especially mineral dust and black carbon, play key roles in climate change by absorbing solar radiation, heating the atmosphere, and contributing to global warming. In this paper, we first examine the consistency of the Aerosol Index (AI) product as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) instruments and then analyze these AI data sets to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of UV absorbing aerosols. In contrast to the trend in aerosol optical depth found in the advanced very high-resolution radiometer data, no obvious long-term trend in absorbing aerosols is observed from the time series of AI records. The comparison between the mean annual cycle in the two data sets shows that the cycles agree very well both globally and regionally, indicating a consistency between the AI products from TOMS and OMI. Varimax rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of detrended, deseasonalized AI data proves to be successful in isolating major dust and biomass burning source regions, as well as dust transport. Finally, we find that large, individual events, such as the Kuwait oil fire and Australian smoke plum, are isolated in individual higher-order principal components.

  7. The mathematical principles and design of the NAIS - a spectrometer for the measurement of cluster ion and nanometer aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirme, S.; Mirme, A.

    2011-12-01

    The paper describes the Nanometer aerosol and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) - a multi-channel aerosol instrument capable of measuring the distribution of ions (charged particles and cluster ions) of both polarities in the electric mobility range from 3.2 to 0.0013 cm2 V-1 s-1 and the distribution of aerosol particles in the size range from 2.0 to 40 nm. We introduce the principles of design, data processing and spectrum deconvolution of the instrument.

  8. Wavelength dependence of dust aerosol single scattering albedo as observed by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Smith, M. D.; Clancy, R. T.; Arvidson, R.; Kahre, M.; Seelos, F.; Murchie, S.; Savijärvi, H.

    2009-06-01

    Observations by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer (CRISM) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) over the range 440-2920 nm of the very dusty Martian atmosphere of the 2007 planet-encircling dust event are combined with those made by both Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) to better characterize the single scattering albedo (ω 0) of Martian dust aerosols. Using the diagnostic geometry of the CRISM emission phase function (EPF) sequences and the “ground truth” connection provided at both MER locations allows one to more effectively isolate the single scattering albedo (ω 0). This approach eliminates a significant portion of the type of uncertainty involved in many of the earlier radiative transfer analyses. Furthermore, the use of a “first principles” or microphysical representation of the aerosol scattering properties offers a direct path to produce a set of complex refractive indices (m = n + ik) that are consistent with the retrieved ω 0 values. We consider a family of effective particle radii: 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8 μm. The resulting set of model data comparisons, ω 0, and m are presented along with an assessment of potential sources of error and uncertainty. We discuss our results within the context of previous work, including the apparent dichotomy of the literature values: “dark” (solar band ω 0 = 0.89-0.90) and “bright” (solar band ω 0 = 0.92-0.94). Previous work suggests that a mean radius of 1.8 μm is representative for the conditions sampled by the CRISM observations. Using the m for this case and a smaller effective particle radius more appropriate for diffuse dust conditions (1.4 μm), we examine EPF-derived optical depths relative to the MER 880 nm optical depths. Finally, we explore the potential impact of the resulting brighter solar band ω 0 of 0.94 to atmospheric temperatures in the planetary boundary layer.

  9. Peak fitting and integration uncertainties for the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Othman, A.; Haskins, J. D.; Allan, J. D.; Sierau, B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Lohmann, U.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The errors inherent in the fitting and integration of the pseudo-Gaussian ion peaks in Aerodyne High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-AMS's) have not been previously addressed as a source of imprecision for these instruments. This manuscript evaluates the significance of these uncertainties and proposes a method for their estimation in routine data analysis. Peak-fitting uncertainties, the most complex source of integration uncertainties, are found to be dominated by errors in m/z calibration. These calibration errors comprise significant amounts of both imprecision and bias, and vary in magnitude from ion to ion. The magnitude of these m/z calibration errors is estimated for an exemplary data set, and used to construct a Monte Carlo model which reproduced well the observed trends in fits to the real data. The empirically-constrained model is used to show that the imprecision in the fitted height of isolated peaks scales linearly with the peak height (i.e., as n1), thus contributing a constant-relative-imprecision term to the overall uncertainty. This constant relative imprecision term dominates the Poisson counting imprecision term (which scales as n0.5) at high signals. The previous HR-AMS uncertainty model therefore underestimates the overall fitting imprecision. The constant relative imprecision in fitted peak height for isolated peaks in the exemplary data set was estimated as ~4% and the overall peak-integration imprecision was approximately 5%. We illustrate the importance of this constant relative imprecision term by performing Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) on a~synthetic HR-AMS data set with and without its inclusion. Finally, the ability of an empirically-constrained Monte Carlo approach to estimate the fitting imprecision for an arbitrary number of known overlapping peaks is demonstrated. Software is available upon request to estimate these error terms in new data sets.

  10. Multi-wavelength measurements of aerosol optical absorption coefficients using a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Yao; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-06-01

    The atmospheric aerosol absorption capacity is a critical parameter determining its direct and indirect effects on climate. Accurate measurement is highly desired for the study of the radiative budget of the Earth. A multi-wavelength (405 nm, 532 nm, 780 nm) aerosol absorption meter based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) invovling a single cylindrical acoustic resonator is developed for measuring the aerosol optical absorption coefficients (OACs). A sensitivity of 1.3 Mm-1 (at 532 nm) is demonstrated. The aerosol absorption meter is successfully tested through measuring the OACs of atmospheric nigrosin and ambient aerosols in the suburbs of Hefei city. The absorption cross section and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) for ambient aerosol are determined for characterizing the component of the ambient aerosol.

  11. A broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer for measuring the extinction of aerosols at blue and near-UV wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venables, Dean; Fullam, Donovan; Hoa Le, Phuoc; Chen, Jun; Böge, Olaf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer for sensitive extinction measurements of aerosols. The instrument is distinguished by its broad and continuous spectral coverage from the near-UV to blue wavelengths (ca. 320 to 450 nm). The short wavelength region has been little explored compared to visible wavelengths, but is important because (1) brown carbon (BrC) absorbs strongly in this wavelength region, and (2) absorption of near-UV radiation in the atmosphere alters the photolysis rate of the key atmospheric species O3, NO2, and HONO, with implications for air quality and atmospheric oxidation capacity. The instrument performance and the effect of a switchable in-line filter are characterised. Early results using the instrument in the TROPOS atmospheric simulation chamber are presented. These experiments include studies of secondary organic aerosol formation (SOA), and biomass burning experiments of rice and wheat straw, followed by experiments simulating particle aging under daytime and nighttime conditions.

  12. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-28

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is

  13. The real part of the refractive indices and effective densities for chemically segregated ambient aerosols in Guangzhou measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guohua; Bi, Xinhui; Qiu, Ning; Han, Bingxue; Lin, Qinhao; Peng, Long; Chen, Duohong; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Ping'an; Sheng, Guoying; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge on the microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols is essential to better evaluate their radiative forcing. This paper presents an estimate of the real part of the refractive indices (n) and effective densities (ρeff) of chemically segregated atmospheric aerosols in Guangzhou, China. Vacuum aerodynamic diameter, chemical compositions, and light-scattering intensities of individual particles were simultaneously measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) during the fall of 2012. On the basis of Mie theory, n at a wavelength of 532 nm and ρeff were estimated for 17 particle types in four categories: organics (OC), elemental carbon (EC), internally mixed EC and OC (ECOC), and Metal-rich. The results indicate the presence of spherical or nearly spherical shapes for the majority of particle types, whose partial scattering cross-section versus sizes were well fitted to Mie theoretical modeling results. While sharing n in a narrow range (1.47-1.53), majority of particle types exhibited a wide range of ρeff (0.87-1.51 g cm-3). The OC group is associated with the lowest ρeff (0.87-1.07 g cm-3), and the Metal-rich group with the highest ones (1.29-1.51 g cm-3). It is noteworthy that a specific EC type exhibits a complex scattering curve versus size due to the presence of both compact and irregularly shaped particles. Overall, the results on the detailed relationship between physical and chemical properties benefits future research on the impact of aerosols on visibility and climate.

  14. Retrieving aerosol optical depth and type in the boundary layer over land and ocean from simultaneous GOME spectrometer and ATSR-2 radiometer measurements, 1, Method description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; Schroedter, M.; Gesell, G.

    2002-11-01

    A new aerosol retrieval method called Synergetic Aerosol Retrieval (SYNAER), using simultaneous measurements of the radiometer Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR-2) and the spectrometer Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) in the visible and near-infrared spectra, was developed. Both instruments are flown onboard the European Remote Sensing (ERS-2) satellite. SYNAER delivers boundary layer aerosol optical thickness (BLAOT) and aerosol type both over land and over ocean, the latter as BLAOT percentage of six representative components from the Optical Parameters of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) data set. The high spatial resolution of ATSR-2 permits accurate cloud detection. It allows BLAOT calculation over automatically selected dark pixels and surface albedo correction for a set of boundary layer aerosol mixtures. After spatial integration and colocation to GOME pixels, these parameters are used to simulate GOME spectra for the same set of aerosol mixtures. A least squares fit of these spectra to the measured and cloud-corrected GOME spectrum chooses the aerosol mixture. First validation studies are presented in part 2 of this paper [, 2002]. The method will be used for the future sensor pairs Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY)/Advanced ATSR (AATSR) on Envisat and GOME-2/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on METOP. Thus, SYNAER holds the potential to extract a long-term climatological data set.

  15. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  16. The mathematical principles and design of the NAIS - a spectrometer for the measurement of cluster ion and nanometer aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirme, S.; Mirme, A.

    2013-04-01

    The paper describes the Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) - a multichannel aerosol instrument capable of measuring the distribution of ions (charged particles and cluster ions) of both polarities in the electric mobility range from 3.2 to 0.0013 cm2 V-1 s-1 and the distribution of aerosol particles in the size range from 2.0 to 40 nm. We introduce the principles of design, data processing and spectrum deconvolution of the instrument.

  17. Characterizing particulate matter emissions from vehicles: chassis-dynamometer tests using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S.; Zhang, Q.; Forestieri, S.; Kleeman, M.; Cappa, C. D.; Kuwayama, T.

    2012-12-01

    During September of 2011 a suite of real-time instruments was used to sample vehicle emissions at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Schmidt facility in El Monte, CA. A representative fleet of 8 spark ignition gasoline vehicles, a diesel passenger vehicle, a gasoline direct-injection vehicle and an ultra-low emissions vehicle were tested on a chassis dynamometer. The emissions were sampled into the facility's standard CVS tunnel and diluted to atmospherically relevant levels (5-30 μg/m3) while controlling other factors such as relative humidity or background black carbon particulate loading concentrations. An Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-MS) was among the real-time instruments used and sampled vehicle emissions at 10 second time resolution in order to characterize the non-refractory organic and inorganic particulate matter (PM). PM composition and concentration were tracked throughout the cold start driving cycle which included periods of fast acceleration and high velocity cruise control, meant to recreate typical commuter driving behavior. Variations in inorganic and organic PM composition for a given vehicle throughout the driving cycle as well as for various vehicles with differing emissions loading were characterized. Differences in PM composition for a given vehicle whose emissions are being exposed to differing experimental conditions such as varying relative humidity will also be reported. In conjunction with measurements from a Multi Wavelength Photoacoustic Black Carbon Spectrometer (MWPA-BC) and real-time gas measurements from the CARB facility, we determine the real-time emission ratios of primary organic aerosols (POA) with respect to BC and common combustion gas phase pollutants and compared to different vehicle driving conditions. The results of these tests offer the vehicle emissions community a first time glimpse at the real-time behavior of vehicle PM emissions for a variety of conditions and

  18. The white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS) - a novel airborne system to characterize aerosol hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Wehrle, G.; Gysel, M.; Zieger, P.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-02-01

    Aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth at enhanced relative humidity (RH), which leads to changes in their optical properties. We developed the white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS), a new instrument to investigate the particles' hygroscopic growth. Here we present a detailed technical description and characterization of the WHOPS in laboratory and field experiments. The WHOPS consists of a differential mobility analyzer, a humidifier/bypass and a white-light aerosol spectrometer (WELAS) connected in series to provide fast measurements of particle hygroscopicity at subsaturated RH and optical properties on airborne platforms. The WELAS employs a white-light source to minimize ambiguities in the optical particle sizing. In contrast to other hygroscopicity instruments, the WHOPS retrieves information of relatively large particles (i.e., diameter D > 280 nm), therefore investigating the more optically relevant size ranges. The effective index of refraction of the dry particles is retrieved from the optical diameter measured for size-selected aerosol samples with a well-defined dry mobility diameter. The data analysis approach for the optical sizing and retrieval of the index of refraction was extensively tested in laboratory experiments with polystyrene latex size standards and ammonium sulfate particles of different diameters. The hygroscopic growth factor (GF) distribution and aerosol mixing state is inferred from the optical size distribution measured for the size-selected and humidified aerosol sample. Laboratory experiments with pure ammonium sulfate particles revealed good agreement with Köhler theory (mean bias of ~3% and maximal deviation of 8% for GFs at RH = 95%). During first airborne measurements in the Netherlands, GFs (mean value of the GF distribution) at RH = 95% between 1.79 and 2.43 with a median of 2.02 were observed for particles with a dry diameter of 500 nm. This corresponds to hygroscopicity parameters (κ

  19. Dust transport over the eastern Mediterranean derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Aerosol Robotic Network, and surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Kubilay, N.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Vardavas, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-02-01

    Multiyear surface PM10 measurements performed on Crete Island, Greece, have been used in conjunction with satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) and ground-based remote sensing measurements (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)) to enhance our understanding of the evolution of mineral dust events over the eastern Mediterranean. An analysis of southerly air masses at altitudes of 1000 and 3000 m over a 5 year period (2000-2005), showed that dust can potentially arrive over Crete, either simultaneously in the lower free troposphere and inside the boundary layer (vertical extended transport (VET)) or initially into the free troposphere with the heavier particles gradually being scavenged inside the boundary layer (free troposphere transport (FTT)). Both pathways present significant seasonal variations but on an annual basis contribute almost equally to the dust transport in the area. During VET the aerosol index (AI) derived from TOMS was significantly correlated with surface PM10, and in general AI was found to be adequate for the characterization of dust loadings over the eastern Mediterranean on a climatological basis. A significant covariance between PM10 and AOT was observed during VET as well, indicating that AOT levels from AERONET may be estimated by PM10 levels at the surface. Surface measurements are thus crucial for the validation of remote sensing measurements and hence are a powerful tool for the investigation of the impact of aerosols on climate.

  20. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements by Airborne Sun Photometer in SOLVE II: Comparisons to SAGE III, POAM III and Airborne Spectrometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Ramirez, S.; Yee, J-H.; Swartz, W.; Shetter, R.

    2004-01-01

    The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) measured solar-beam transmission on the NASA DC-8 during the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II). This paper presents AATS-14 results for multiwavelength aerosol optical depth (AOD), including its spatial structure and comparisons to results from two satellite sensors and another DC-8 instrument. These are the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III), the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement III (POAM III) and the Direct beam Irradiance Airborne Spectrometer (DIAS).

  1. Characterization of submicron aerosols during a serious pollution month in Beijing (2013) using an aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. K.; Sun, Y.; Liu, Z. R.; Ji, D. S.; Hu, B.; Liu, Q.; Wang, Y. S.

    2013-07-01

    In January 2013, Beijing experienced several serious haze events. To achieve a better understanding of the characteristics, sources and processes of aerosols during this month, an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at an urban site between 1 January and 1 February 2013 to obtain the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron particles (NR-PM1). During this period, the mean measured NR-PM1 mass concentration was 87.4 μg m-3 and was composed of organics (49.8%), sulfate (21.4%), nitrate (14.6%), ammonium (10.4%), and chloride (3.8%). Moreover, inorganic matter, such as sulfate and nitrate comprised an increasing fraction of the NR-PM1 load as NR-PM1 loading increased, denoting their key roles in particulate pollution during this month. The average size distributions of the species were all dominated by an accumulation mode peaking at approximately 600 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter and organics characterized by an additional smaller size (∼200 nm). Elemental analyses showed that the average O/C, H/C, and N/C (molar ratio) of organic matter were 0.34, 1.44 and 0.015, respectively, corresponding to an OM/OC ratio (mass ratio of organic matter to organic carbon) of 1.60. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analyses of the high-resolution organic mass spectral dataset differentiated the organic aerosol into four components, i.e., oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA), cooking-related (COA), nitrogen-containing (NOA) and hydrocarbon-like (HOA), which on average accounted for 40.0, 23.4, 18.1 and 18.5% of the total organic mass, respectively. Back trajectory clustering analyses indicated that the WNW air masses were associated with the highest NR-PM1 pollution during the campaign. Aerosol particles in southern air masses were especially rich in inorganic and oxidized organic species, whereas northern air masses contained a large fraction of primary species.

  2. Development Of A Supercontinuum Based Photoacoustic Aerosol Light Absorption And Albedo Spectrometer (PALAAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ian J.

    Aerosols are a major contributor to the global radiation budget because they modify the planetary albedo with their optical properties. These optical properties need to be measured and understood, ideally at multiple wavelengths. This thesis describes the ongoing development of a supercontinuum based multi-wavelength photoacoustic instrument to measure the light absorption and scattering coefficients of aerosols. Collimation techniques for supercontinuum sources using lens-based and off-axis parabolic mirror-based collimators were evaluated and it was determined that the off-axis mirror had superior collimation abilities for multi-spectral beams. A proof of concept supercontinuum-based photoacoustic instrument was developed using sequential measurements at multiple wavelengths. The instrument data were in good agreement with those from a commercial 3-wavelength photoacoustic instrument and the novel instrument had minimum detectable absorption and scattering coefficients of better than 4 Mm-1 and 21 Mm-1, respectively. The instrument however suffered from poor temporal resolution due to the sequential measurement and required the development of an aerosol delivery system to deliver a slowly varying aerosol concentration. In response, a spectral modulator has been developed to frequency encode different wavelength bands for simultaneous measurement with a photoacoustic instrumen.

  3. Performance of a focused cavity aerosol spectrometer for measurements in the stratosphere of particle size in the 0.06-2.0-micrometer-diameter range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonsson, H. H.; Wilson, J. C.; Brock, C. A.; Knollenberg, R. G.; Newton, R.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Borrmann, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Pueschel, R.

    1995-01-01

    A focused cavity aerosol spectrometer aboard a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft provided high-resolution measurements of the size of the stratospheric particles in the 0.06-2.0-micrometer-diameter range in flights following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. Effects of anisokinetic sampling and evaporation in the sampling system were accounted for by means adapted and specifically developed for this instrument. Calibrations with monodisperse aerosol particles provided the instrument's response matrix, which upon inversion during data reduction yielded the particle size distributions. The resultant dataset is internally consistent and generally shows agreement to within a factor of 2 with comparable measurements simultaneously obtained by a condensation nuclei counter, a forward-scattering spectrometer probe, and aerosol particle impactors, as well as with nearby extinction profiles obtained by satellite measurements and with lidar measurements of backscatter.

  4. Sources and characteristics of fine particles over the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea using online single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huaiyu; Zheng, Mei; Yan, Caiqing; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2015-03-01

    Marine aerosols over the East China Seas are heavily polluted by continental sources. During the Chinese Comprehensive Ocean Experiment in November 2012, size and mass spectra of individual atmospheric particles in the size range from 0.2 to 2.0 μm were measured on board by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). The average hourly particle number (PN) was around 4560±3240 in the South Yellow Sea (SYS), 2900±3970 in the North Yellow Sea (NYS), and 1700±2220 in the Bohai Sea (BS). PN in NYS and BS varied greatly over 3 orders of magnitude, while that in SYS varied slightly. The size distributions were fitted with two log-normal modes. Accumulation mode dominated in NYS and BS, especially during episodic periods. Coarse mode particles played an important role in SYS. Particles were classified using an adaptive resonance theory based neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Six particle types were identified with secondary-containing, aged sea-salt, soot-like, biomass burning, fresh sea-salt, and lead-containing particles accounting for 32%, 21%, 18%, 16%, 4%, and 3% of total PN, respectively. Aerosols in BS were relatively enriched in particles from anthropogenic sources compared to SYS, probably due to emissions from more developed upwind regions and indicating stronger influence of continental outflow on marine environment. Variation of source types depended mainly on origins of transported air masses. This study examined rapid changes in PN, size distribution and source types of fine particles in marine atmospheres. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-time-resolution source apportionment by ART-2a. PMID:25766014

  5. Mass-analysis of Charged Aerosol Particles in a PMSE/NLC Layer by a Rocket-borne Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.; Knappmiller, S.; Kohnert, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Holzworth, R.; Shimogawa, M.; Friedrich, M.; Gumbel, J.; Khaplanov, M.; Megner, L.; Baumgarten, G.; Latteck, R.; Rapp, M.; Hoppe, U.

    2007-12-01

    The first of two "MASS" (Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer) rockets was launched from the Andoya Rocket Range at 22:51 UTC on 3 August 2007 into PMSE and NLC approximately 26 minutes after an AIM satellite overpass. The sun was 4 degrees below the horizon and the local riometer indicated that the ionospheric conditions were rather quiet, i.e., day time conditions as far as negative cluster ions are concerned. NLC were seen in the previous hour at 83 km by the ALOMAR RMR lidar pointed along the rocket trajectory and were detected at the same altitude by rocket-borne photometer measurements. The rocket carried an electrostatic mass analyzer for the charged fraction of the aerosol particles and both forward and aft deployable electric field booms. The mass analyzer was mounted on the tip of the payload and pointed in the ram direction. It has a forward inlet slit with area of 25 square centimeters and side vents for air exit. Aerosol particles with different ranges of charge-to-mass ratio are collected within the instrument housing on two sets of four biased collector plates, with one set for positive particles and one set for negative particles. A preliminary analysis of the data shows the density of negative particles with radius greater than 3 nm rising sharply at 83 and continuing to 89 km, collocated with PMSE detected by the ALWIN radar. Particles with 1-2 nm radii with both signs of charge and positive particles with less than1 nm radius were detected at 86-88 km. Initial charge-density estimates are several thousands per cubic centimeter for each of these size ranges. The E field booms detected significant potential variations in the PMSE/NLC region. Further analysis will examine in more detail the effects of aerodynamics, payload charging, and spurious charge generation by particle impacts.

  6. Characterization of a real-time tracer for isoprene epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; de Sá, S. S.; McKinney, K.; Martin, S. T.; Hu, M.; Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Riva, M.; Surratt, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Isaacman-Van Wertz, G.; Yee, L. D.; Goldstein, A. H.; Carbone, S.; Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Docherty, K. S.; Alexander, M. L.; Robinson, N. H.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Paulot, F.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of organic aerosol (OA) in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS), 78 % of PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA is accounted by the measured IEPOX-SOA molecular tracers (2-methyltetrols, C5-Triols, and IEPOX-derived organosulfate and its dimers), making it the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. An enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O (fC5H6O= C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber, and source data sets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1 ‰ (‰ = parts per thousand) is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning, and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.6 ‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0 ‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7 ‰), which leaves some room to separate both contributions to OA. Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2 ‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12-40 ‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown to reflect

  7. Characterization of a real-time tracer for isoprene epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; et al

    2015-10-23

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of organic aerosol (OA) in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS), 78 % of PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA is accountedmore » by the measured IEPOX-SOA molecular tracers (2-methyltetrols, C5-Triols, and IEPOX-derived organosulfate and its dimers), making it the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. An enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O (fC5H6O= C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber, and source data sets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1 ‰ (‰ = parts per thousand) is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning, and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.6 ‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0 ‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7 ‰), which leaves some room to separate both contributions to OA. Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2 ‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12–40 ‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown

  8. Photoacoustic spectrometer with a calculable cell constant for measurements of gases and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Havey, Daniel K; Bueno, Pedro A; Gillis, Keith A; Hodges, Joseph T; Mulholland, George W; van Zee, Roger D; Zachariah, Michael R

    2010-10-01

    We benchmark the performance of a photoacoustic spectrometer with a calculable cell constant in applications related to climate change measurements. As presently implemented, this spectrometer has a detection limit of 3.1 × 10(-9) W cm(-1) Hz(-1/2) for absorption by a gas and 1.5 × 10(-8) W cm(-1) Hz(-1/2) for soot particles. Nonstatistical uncertainty limited the accuracy of the instrument to ∼1%, and measurements of the concentration of CO(2) in laboratory air agreed with measurements made using a cavity ring-down spectrometer, to within 1%. Measurements of the enhanced absorption resulting from ultrathin (<5 nm), nonabsorbing coatings on nanoscale soot particles demonstrate the sensitivity of this instrument. Together, these measurements show the instrument's ability to quantitatively measure the absorption coefficient for species of interest to the climate and atmospheric science communities. Because the system constant is known, in most applications the acoustic response of this instrument need not be calibrated against a sample of known optical density, a decided advantage in field applications. Routine enhancements, such as improved processing of the photoacoustic signal and higher laser beam power, should further increase the instrument's precision and sensitivity. PMID:20804170

  9. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML), equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE) - a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz) of gaseous pollutants (e.g., HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc.), black carbon (BC), and particle number concentrations and size distributions. The particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with highest traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and oxygenated OA (OOA) showed much smoother variations - with minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60%) with HOA being the major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ~120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum aerodynamic diameter, Dva), respectively. OOA and inorganic species appear to be

  10. Column-integrated aerosol optical properties from ground-based spectroradiometer measurements at Barrax (Spain) during the Digital Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Experiment (DAISEX) campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrós, Roberto; Martinez-Lozano, Jose A.; Utrillas, Maria P.; Gómez-Amo, José L.; Tena, Fernando

    2003-09-01

    The Digital Airborne Imaging Spectrometer Experiment (DAISEX) was carried out for the European Space Agency (ESA) in order to develop the potential of spaceborne imaging spectroscopy for a range of different scientific applications. DAISEX involved simultaneous data acquisitions using different airborne imaging spectrometers over test sites in southeast Spain (Barrax) and the Upper Rhine valley (Colmar, France, and Hartheim, Germany). This paper presents the results corresponding to the column-integrated aerosol optical properties from ground-based spectroradiometer measurements over the Barrax area during the DAISEX campaign days in the years 1998, 1999, and 2000. The instruments used for spectral irradiance measurements were two Licor 1800 and one Optronic OL-754 spectroradiometers. The analysis of the spectral aerosol optical depth in the visible range shows in all cases the predominance of the coarse-particle mode over the fine-particle mode. The analysis of the back trajectories of the air masses indicates a predominance of marine-type aerosols in the lower atmospheric layers in all cases. Overall, the results obtained show that during the DAISEX there was a combination of maritime aerosols with smaller continental aerosols.

  11. Aerosol and Surface Parameter Retrievals for a Multi-Angle, Multiband Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This software retrieves the surface and atmosphere parameters of multi-angle, multiband spectra. The synthetic spectra are generated by applying the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model, and a single-scattering dominated atmosphere model to surface reflectance data from Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The aerosol physical model uses a single scattering approximation using Rayleigh scattering molecules, and Henyey-Greenstein aerosols. The surface and atmosphere parameters of the models are retrieved using the Lavenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The software can retrieve the surface and atmosphere parameters with two different scales. The surface parameters are retrieved pixel-by-pixel while the atmosphere parameters are retrieved for a group of pixels where the same atmosphere model parameters are applied. This two-scale approach allows one to select the natural scale of the atmosphere properties relative to surface properties. The software also takes advantage of an intelligent initial condition given by the solution of the neighbor pixels.

  12. Mixing state of particles with secondary species by single particle aerosol mass spectrometer in an atmospheric pollution event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lingling; Chen, Jinsheng

    2016-04-01

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was used to characterize size distribution, chemical composition, and mixing state of particles in an atmospheric pollution event during 20 Oct. - 5 Nov., 2015 in Xiamen, Southeast China. A total of 533,012 particle mass spectra were obtained and clustered into six groups, comprising of industry metal (4.5%), dust particles (2.6%), carbonaceous species (70.7%), K-Rich particles (20.7%), seasalt (0.6%) and other particles (0.9%). Carbonaceous species were further divided into EC (70.6%), OC (28.5%), and mixed ECOC (0.9%). There were 61.7%, 58.3%, 4.0%, and 14.6% of particles internally mixed with sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and C2H3O, respectively, indicating that these particles had undergone significant aging processing. Sulfate was preferentially mixed with carbonaceous particles, while nitrate tended to mix with metal-containing and dust particles. Compared to clear days, the fractions of EC-, metal- and dust particles remarkably increased, while the fraction of OC-containing particles decreased in pollution days. The mixing state of particles, excepted for OC-containing particles with secondary species was much stronger in pollution days than that in clear days, which revealed the significant influence of secondary particles in atmospheric pollution. The different activity of OC-containing particles might be related to their much smaller aerodynamic diameter. These results could improve our understanding of aerosol characteristics and could be helpful to further investigate the atmospheric process of particles.

  13. Electrical Mobility Spectrometer Using a Diethylene Glycol Condensation Particle Counter for Measurement of Aerosol Size Distributions Down to 1 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; Attoui, M.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-02-01

    We report a new scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) for measuring number size distributions of particles down to {approx}1 nm mobility diameter. This SMPS includes an aerosol charger, a TSI 3085 nano differential mobility analyzer (nanoDMA), an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid, and a conventional butanol CPC (the 'booster') to detect the small droplets leaving the DEG UCPC. The response of the DEG UCPC to negatively charged sodium chloride particles with mobility diameters ranging from 1-6 nm was measured. The sensitivity of the DEG UCPC to particle composition was also studied by comparing its response to positively charged 1.47 and 1.70 nm tetra-alkyl ammonium ions, sodium chloride, and silver particles. A high resolution differential mobility analyzer was used to generate the test particles. These results show that the response of this UCPC to sub-2 nm particles is sensitive to particle composition. The applicability of the new SMPS for atmospheric measurement was demonstrated during the Nucleation and Cloud Condensation Nuclei (NCCN) field campaign (Atlanta, Georgia, summer 2009). We operated the instrument at saturator and condenser temperatures that allowed the efficient detection of sodium chloride particles but not of air ions having the same mobility. We found that particles as small as 1 nm were detected during nucleation events but not at other times. Factors affecting size distribution measurements, including aerosol charging in the 1-10 nm size range, are discussed. For the charger used in this study, bipolar charging was found to be more effective for sub-2 nm particles than unipolar charging. No ion induced nucleation inside the charger was observed during the NCCN campaign.

  14. Comparison of three techniques for analysis of data from an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorio, Chiara; Tapparo, Andrea; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Harrison, Roy M.; Beddows, David C. S.; Di Marco, Chiara; Nemitz, Eiko

    2012-12-01

    The Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) is one of few instruments able to measure the size and mass spectra of individual airborne particles with high temporal resolution. Data analysis is challenging and in the present study, we apply three different techniques (PMF, ART-2a and K-means) to a regional ATOFMS dataset collected at Harwell, UK. For the first time, Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was directly applied to single particle mass spectra as opposed to clusters already generated by the other methods. The analysis was performed on a total of 56,898 single particle mass spectra allowing the extraction of 10 factors, their temporal trends and size distributions, named CNO-COOH (cyanide, oxidized organic nitrogen and carboxylic acids), SUL (sulphate), NH4-OOA (ammonium and oxidized organic aerosol), NaCl, EC+ (elemental carbon positive fragments), OC-Arom (aromatic organic carbon), EC- (elemental carbon negative fragments), K (potassium), NIT (nitrate) and OC-CHNO (organic nitrogen). The 10 factor solution from single particle PMF analysis explained 45% of variance of the total dataset, but the factors are well defined from a chemical point of view. Different EC and OC components were separated: fresh EC (factor EC-) from aged EC (factor EC+) and different organic families (factors NH4-OOA, OC-Arom, OC-CHNO and CNO-COOH). A comparison was conducted between PMF, K-means cluster analysis and the ART-2a artificial neural network. K-means and ART-2a give broadly overlapping results (with 9 clusters, each describing the full composition of a particle type), while PMF, by effecting spectral deconvolution, was able to extract and separate the different chemical species contributing to particles, but loses some information on internal mixing. Relationships were also examined between the estimated volumes of ATOFMS PMF factors and species concentrations measured independently by GRAEGOR and AMS instruments, showing generally moderate to strong

  15. Characterization of a real-time tracer for Isoprene Epoxydiols-derived Secondary Organic Aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; de Sá, S. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hu, M.; Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Riva, M.; Surratt, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Isaacman-Van Wertz, G.; Yee, L. D.; Goldstein, A. H.; Carbone, S.; Artaxo, P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Docherty, K. S.; Robinson, N. H.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Paulot, F.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-04-01

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene low-NO oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of OA in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the SOAS study, 78% of IEPOX-SOA is accounted for the measured molecular tracers, making it the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. Enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O ( fC5H6O = C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber and source datasets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1‰ is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.8‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7‰). Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12-40‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown to reflect large variations in its detailed molecular composition. The low fC5H6O (< 3‰) observed in non IEPOX-derived isoprene-SOA indicates that this tracer ion is specifically enhanced from IEPOX-SOA, and is not a tracer for all SOA from

  16. Characterization of a real-time tracer for Isoprene Epoxydiols-derived Secondary Organic Aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; et al

    2015-04-16

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene low-NO oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of OA in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the SOAS study, 78% of IEPOX-SOA is accounted for the measured molecular tracers, making itmore » the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. Enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O ( fC5H6O = C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber and source datasets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1‰ is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.8‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7‰). Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12–40‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown to reflect large variations in its detailed molecular composition. The low fC5H6O (< 3‰) observed in non IEPOX-derived isoprene-SOA indicates that this tracer ion is specifically enhanced from IEPOX-SOA, and is not a tracer for all SOA

  17. Preliminary Observations of organic gas-particle partitioning from biomass combustion smoke using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.; Sullivan, A. P.; Carrico, C. M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E.; Malm, W. C.; Lincoln, E.; Wold, C. E.; Hao, W.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols play important roles in adverse health effects, indirect and direct forcing of Earth’s climate, and visibility degradation. Biomass burning emissions from wild and prescribed fires can make a significant contribution to ambient aerosol mass in many locations and seasons. In order to better understand the chemical properties of particles produced by combustion of wild land fuels, an experiment was conducted in 2009 at the U.S. Forest Service/United States Department of Agriculture (USFS/USDA) Fire Science Laboratory (FSL) located in Missoula, Montana, to measure volatility of open biomass burning emissions for a variety of fuel types. Both isothermal and temperature-dependent volatilization were studied, using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) coupled with thermal denuder. Small quantities (200-800g) of various fuel types, primarily from the U.S., were burned in a large combustion chamber and diluted in two stages in continuous-flow residence chambers. The partitioning of particulate organic mass concentrations by the HR-ToF-AMS was evaluated for each fuel type using nominal dilution ratios characterized both by measuring flow rates in continuous-flow residence chambers and from the concentrations of several conserved tracers. The volatility of biomass burning smoke was found to vary across fuel types. Up to ~60% volatile loss of organic matter was observed as a result of dilution for some smoke samples (e.g., Lodgepole pine and Ponderosa pine). We will investigate relationships between volatility and several parameters such as the absolute mass concentration and chemical composition. We will also examine the behavior of biomass burning tracers, such as AMS m/z 60, under dilution conditions. Previous studies (e.g. Lee et al., AS&T 2010 and Aiken et al., ACP 2009) have observed a strong relationship between OA and AMS m/z 60 in fresh biomass burning smoke. We will examine whether this relationship is altered

  18. Aerosol Extinction and Single Scattering Albedo Downwind of the Summer 2008 California Wildfires Measured With Photoacoustic Spectrometers and Sunphotometers From 355 nm to 1047 nm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Gyawali, M. S.; Arnold, I. J.

    2008-12-01

    Hundreds of wildfires in Northern California were sparked by lightning during the summer of 2008, resulting in downwind smoke for much of June and July associated with the flaming and smoldering stages of the fires. These fires are consistent with a growing trend towards increasing biomass burning worldwide. Climate impacts from the smoke depend critically on the smoke amount and aerosol optical properties. We report comparison of aerosol optics measurements in Reno Nevada made during the very smoky summer month of July with the relatively clean, average month of August. Photoacoustic instruments equipped with integrating nephelometers were used to measure aerosol light scattering and absorption at wavelengths of 355 nm, 405 nm, 532 nm, 870 nm, and 1047 nm. Total aerosol optical depth was measured with a sun photometer operating at 430nm, 470nm, 530nm, 660nm, 870nm and 950nm. A spectrometer based sun photometer with an operating range from 390nm to 880 nm was also used for a few days as well. These measurements document the intensity of the smoke optical impacts downwind. They are processed further to reveal a strong variation of the aerosol light absorption on wavelength, indicating the presence of light absorbing organic material and perhaps wavelength dependent absorption caused by black carbon particles coated with organic and inorganic particulate matter. On the day with most smoke in Reno (July 10, 2008) Angstrom coefficients for absorption as high as 3.6 were found for wavelengths of 405 nm and 870 nm, with the corresponding single scattering albedo near 0.92 at 405 nm. Aerosol optical depths of 3.5 were found for 430 nm on July 10th from the sun photometer measurements. A roughly fourfold increase in aerosol optical quantities was observed between the months of July and August 2008, attesting to the large average effects of biomass aerosols from the California wildfires.

  19. Design Of A Novel Open-Path Aerosol Extinction Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer And Initial Data From Deployment At NOAA's Atmospheric Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, T. D.; Wagner, N. L.; Richardson, M.; Law, D. C.; Wolfe, D. E.; Brock, C. A.; Erdesz, F.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to frame effective climate change policy depends strongly on reducing the uncertainty in aerosol radiative forcing, which is currently nearly as great as best estimates of its magnitude. Achieving this goal will require significant progress in measuring aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo and the effect of relative humidity on these properties for both fine and coarse particles. However both ground- and space-based instruments fail or are highly biased in the presence of clouds, severely limiting quantitative estimates of the radiative effects of aerosols where they are advected over low-level clouds. Moreover, many in situ aerosol measurements exclude the coarse fraction, which can be very important in and downwind of desert regions. By measuring the decay rate of a pulsed laser in an optically resonant cavity, cavity ringdown spectrometers (CRDSs) have been employed successfully in measuring aerosol extinction for particles in relative humidities below 90%. At very high humidities (as found in and near clouds), however, existing CRDSs perform poorly, diverging significantly from theoretical extinction values as humidities approach 100%. The new open-path aerosol extinction CRDS described in this poster measures extinction as aerosol is drawn through the sample cavity directly without inlets or tubing for channeling the flow, which cause particle losses, condensation at high RH and other artifacts. This poster presents the key elements of the new open-path CRDS design as well as comparisons with an earlier generation closed-path CRDS and preliminary data obtained during a field study at the 300 meter tower at NOAA's Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in Colorado.

  20. El Chichon and 'mystery cloud' aerosols between 30 and 55 km Global observations from the SME visible spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    Visible limb radiances measured by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) are used to obtain volume scattering ratios for aerosol loading in the 30-55 km altitude range of the stratosphere. Global maps of these ratios are presented for the period January 1982 to August 1984. Significant aerosol scattering from the 'mystery cloud' and El Chichon aerosol layers are found above 30 km. A timescale of approximately 2 months between the appearance of the aerosol at 30.5 km and at 37.5 km is consistent with vertical transport of aerosol or vapor by eddy diffusion above 30 km. An anticorrelation exists between aerosol scattering and stratospheric temperatures. Periods of lower stratospheric temperatures may account for the formation of aerosol between 40 and 55 km altitude.

  1. Initial Assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-Based Aerosol Retrieval: Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-10-24

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) being developed for airborne measurements will offer retrievals of aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. In this study, we assess the expected accuracy of the 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval and its sensitivity to major sources of anticipated perturbations in the 4STAR measurements by adapting a theoretical approach previously developed for the AERONET measurements. The major anticipated perturbations are (1) an apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles associated with the necessarily compact design of the 4STAR and (2) and an offset (i.e. uncertainty) of sky radiance calibration independent of scattering angle. The assessment is performed through application of the operational AERONET aerosol retrieval and constructed synthetic 4STAR-like data. Particular attention is given to the impact of these perturbations on the upwelling and downwelling broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing at the bottom and top of the atmosphere. The results from this study suggest that limitations in the accuracy of 4STAR-retrieved particle size distributions and scattering phase functions have diminished impact on the accuracy of retrieved bulk microphysical parameters, permitting quite accurate retrievals of properties including the effective radius (up to 10%, or 0.03), and the radiatively important optical properties, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 6%, or ±0.04). Also, the obtained results indicate that the uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol optical properties are quite small in the context of the calculated fluxes and direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 15%, or 3 Wm-2).

  2. In-Flight Chemical Composition Observations of Aircraft Emissions using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Commercial aircraft are an important source of aerosols to the upper troposphere. The microphysical and chemical properties of these emitted aerosols govern their ability to act as ice nuclei, both in near-field contrails and for cirrus formation downstream. During the ACCESS-II (Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions) campaign, NASA DC-8 CFM56-2-C1 engine emissions were sampled systematically at a range of cruise-relevant thrust levels and at several altitudes. Sampling was done aboard the NASA HU-25 Falcon aircraft, which was equipped with a suite of aerosol and gas-phase instruments focused on assessing the effects of burning different fuel mixtures on aerosol properties and their associated contrails. Here we present in-flight measurements of particle chemical composition made by a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The AMS was able to sufficiently resolve near-field (within 100m) aircraft emissions plumes. Low-sulfur HEFA (hydro-processed esters and fatty-acids) and JetA fuels yielded particles that contained 11 and 8% sulfate, respectively, compared to 30% sulfate contribution for traditional JetA fuel. Each of the fuels produced organic aerosol with similarly low oxygen content. Lubrication oils, which are not a combustion product but result from leaks in the engine, were likely a dominant fraction of the measured organic mass based on mass-spectral marker analysis. These results are compared to similar engine conditions from ground-based testing.

  3. Evidence for Natural Variability in Marine Stratocumulus Cloud Properties Due to Cloud-Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Bruce; Sharon, Tarah; Jonsson, Haf; Minnis, Patrick; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, aircraft observations from the Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter are used to characterize the variability in drizzle, cloud, and aerosol properties associated with cloud rifts and the surrounding solid clouds observed off the coast of California. A flight made on 16 July 1999 provided measurements directly across an interface between solid and rift cloud conditions. Aircraft instrumentation allowed for measurements of aerosol, cloud droplet, and drizzle spectra. CCN concentrations were measured in addition to standard thermodynamic variables and the winds. A Forward Scatter Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) measured size distribution of cloud-sized droplets. A Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) was used to measure distributions of drizzle-sized droplets. Aerosol distributions were obtained from a Cloud Aerosol Scatterprobe (CAS). The CAS probe measured aerosols, cloud droplets and drizzle-sized drops; for this study. The CAS probe was used to measure aerosols in the size range of 0.5 micron - 1 micron. Smaller aerosols were characterized using an Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) sensor. The CPC was used to measure particles with diameters greater than 0.003 micron. By subtracting different count concentrations measured with the CPC, this probe was capable of identifying ultrafine particles those falling in the size range of 3 nanometers - 7 nanometers that are believed to be associated with new particle production.

  4. Estimation of aerosol optical depth and additional atmospheric parameters for the calculation of apparent reflectance from radiance measured by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Roberts, Dar A.

    1993-01-01

    The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) measures spatial images of the total upwelling spectral radiance from 400 to 2500 nm through 10 nm spectral channels. Quantitative research and application objectives for surface investigations require inversion of the measured radiance of surface reflectance or surface leaving radiance. To calculate apparent surface reflectance, estimates of atmospheric water vapor abundance, cirrus cloud effects, surface pressure elevation, and aerosol optical depth are required. Algorithms for the estimation of these atmospheric parameters from the AVIRIS data themselves are described. From these atmospheric parameters we show an example of the calculation of apparent surface reflectance from the AVIRIS-measured radiance using a radiative transfer code.

  5. Collection efficiency of the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-05-26

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of two. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  6. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-18

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  7. Integrated Analyses of Multiple Worldwide Aerosol Mass Spectrometer Datasets for Improved Understanding of Aerosol Sources and Processes and for Comparison with Global Models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi; Jose, Jimenez Luis

    2014-04-28

    The AMS is the only current instrument that provides real-time, quantitative, and size-resolved data on submicron non-refractory aerosol species with a time resolution of a few minutes or better. The AMS field data are multidimensional and massive, containing extremely rich information on aerosol chemistry, microphysics and dynamics—basic information that is required to evaluate and quantify the radiative climate forcing of atmospheric aerosols. The high time resolution of the AMS data also reveals details of aerosol dynamic variations that are vital to understanding the physico-chemical processes of atmospheric aerosols that govern aerosol properties relevant to the climate. There are two primary objectives of this 3-year project. Our first objective is to perform highly integrated analysis of dozens of AMS datasets acquired from various urban, forested, coastal, marine, mountain peak, and rural/remote locations around the world and synthesize and inter-compare results with a focus on the sources and the physico-chemical processes that govern aerosol properties relevant to aerosol climate forcing. Our second objective is to support our collaboration with global aerosol modelers, in which we will supply the size-resolved aerosol composition and temporal variation data (via a public web interface) and our analysis results for use in model testing and validation and for translation of the rich AMS database into model constraints that can improve climate forcing simulations. Several prominent global aerosol modelers have expressed enthusiastic support for this collaboration. The specific tasks that we propose to accomplish include 1) to develop, validate, and apply multivariate analysis techniques for improved characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosols; 2) to evaluate aerosol source regions and relative contributions based on back-trajectory integration (PSCF method); 3) to summarize and synthesize submicron aerosol information, including

  8. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part 2: Intercomparison of ME-2 organic source apportionment results from 15 individual, co-located aerosol mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, R.; Crenn, V.; Setyan, A.; Belis, C. A.; Canonaco, F.; Favez, O.; Riffault, V.; Slowik, J. G.; Aas, W.; Aijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Bonnaire, N.; Bozzetti, C.; Bressi, M.; Carbone, C.; Coz, E.; Croteau, P. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Lunder, C. R.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Sciare, J.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-06-01

    Chemically resolved atmospheric aerosol data sets from the largest intercomparison of the Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitors (ACSMs) performed to date were collected at the French atmospheric supersite SIRTA. In total 13 quadrupole ACSMs (Q-ACSM) from the European ACTRIS ACSM network, one time-of-flight ACSM (ToF-ACSM), and one high-resolution ToF aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were operated in parallel for about 3 weeks in November and December~2013. Part 1 of this study reports on the accuracy and precision of the instruments for all the measured species. In this work we report on the intercomparison of organic components and the results from factor analysis source apportionment by positive matrix factorisation (PMF) utilising the multilinear engine 2 (ME-2). Except for the organic contribution of mass-to-charge ratio m/z 44 to the total organics (f44), which varied by factors between 0.6 and 1.3 compared to the mean, the peaks in the organic mass spectra were similar among instruments. The m/z 44 differences in the spectra resulted in a variable f44 in the source profiles extracted by ME-2, but had only a minor influence on the extracted mass contributions of the sources. The presented source apportionment yielded four factors for all 15 instruments: hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), cooking-related organic aerosol (COA), biomass burning-related organic aerosol (BBOA) and secondary oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA). ME-2 boundary conditions (profile constraints) were optimised individually by means of correlation to external data in order to achieve equivalent / comparable solutions for all ACSM instruments and the results are discussed together with the investigation of the influence of alternative anchors (reference profiles). A comparison of the ME-2 source apportionment output of all 15 instruments resulted in relative standard deviations (SD) from the mean between 13.7 and 22.7 % of the source's average mass contribution depending on the

  9. Single particles measured by a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during SENEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Welti, A.; Sueper, D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Single particles in the eastern US were characterized by a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (LS-ToF-AMS) onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during the Southeastern Nexus (SENEX) campaign. Single particle data were collected for 30 seconds every 5 minutes. Aerosols larger than 200-300 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter can be optically detected by the 405 nm crystal laser and trigger the saving of single particle mass spectra. The measured single particles are internally-mixed as expected. The single particles were classified as prompt, delayed, and null based on the chemical ion signal arrival time difference between prediction from the light scattering signal and measurement by mass spectrometer and the presence or absence of a mass spectrum. On average the number fraction of particles detected as prompt, delayed, and null (no spectrum) is about 30%, 10%, and 60%. The number fraction of these three particle types varied with aerosol size, chemical composition and the investigation region and will be discussed in detail. For example, the number fraction of prompt particles was significantly higher for the flight to the Pennsylvania natural gas shale region on July 6, 2013, which is probably related to the chemical composition (more acidic) and phase of the ambient particles. These particle types and detection efficiency are related to the bouncing effect on the vaporizer and may provide insight into the non-unit AMS collection efficiency. Moreover, most of the particles larger than 800 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter sized with the traditional AMS PToF mode are delayed particles and their mass spectral signals appear to be affected by this process.

  10. Single particle characterization using a light scattering module coupled to a time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Canagaratna, Manjula; Jayne, J. T.; Kimmel, Joel; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alexander, M. L.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Davidovits, Paul

    2009-10-01

    To accurately model the radiative forcing of aerosol particles, one must measure in real-time the size, shape, density, chemical composition, and mixing state of ambient particles. This is a formidable challenge because the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol particles are highly complex, dependent on the emission sources, the geography and meteorology of the surroundings, and the gas phase composition of the regional atmosphere.

  11. Application of FIGAERO (Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsol) coupled to a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer to field and chamber organic aerosol: Implications for carboxylic acid formation and gas-particle partitioning from monoterpene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Thornton, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present measurements of a large suite of gas and particle phase carboxylic acid containing compounds made with a Filter Inlet for Gas and AEROsol (FIGAERO) coupled to a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. A prototype operated with acetate negative ion proton transfer chemistry was deployed on the Julich Plant Atmosphere Chamber to study a-pinene oxidation, and a modified version was deployed at the SMEAR II forest station in Hyytiälä, Finland and SOAS, in Brent Alabama. We focus here on results from JPAC and Hyytiälä, where we utilized the same ionization method most selective towards carboxylic acids. In all locations, 100's of organic acid compounds were observed in the gas and particles and many of the same composition acids detected in the gas-phase were detected in the particles upon temperature programmed thermal desorption. Particulate organics detected by FIGAERO are highly correlated with organic aerosol mass measured by an AMS, providing additional volatility and molecular level information about collected aerosol. The fraction of a given compound measured in the particle phase follows expected trends with elemental composition, but many compounds would not be well described by an absorptive partitioning model assuming unity activity coefficients. Moreover the detailed structure in the thermal desorption signals reveals a contribution from thermal decomposition of large molecular weight organics and or oligomers with implications for partitioning measurements and model validation

  12. Investigations of primary and secondary particulate matter of different wood combustion appliances with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heringa, M. F.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Tritscher, T.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Richter, R.; Wehrle, G.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-06-01

    A series of photo-oxidation smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation from two different log wood burners and a residential pellet burner under different burning conditions: starting and flaming phase. Emissions were sampled from the chimney and injected into the smog chamber leading to primary organic aerosol (POA) concentrations comparable to ambient levels. The composition of the aerosol was measured by an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) and black carbon (BC) instrumentation. The primary emissions were then exposed to xenon light to initiate photo-chemistry and subsequent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production. After correcting for wall losses, the average increase in organic matter (OM) concentrations by SOA formation for the starting and flaming phase experiments with the two log wood burners was found to be a factor of 4.1±1.4 after five hours of aging. No SOA formation was observed for the stable burning phase of the pellet burner. The startup emissions of the pellet burner showed an increase in OM concentration by a factor of 3.3. Including the measured SOA formation potential, average emission factors of BC+POA+SOA, calculated from CO2 emission, were found to be in the range of 0.04 to 3.9 g/kg wood for the stable burning pellet burner and an old log wood burner during startup respectively. SOA contributed significantly to the ion C2H4O2+ at mass to charge ratio m/z 60, a commonly used marker for primary emissions of wood burning. This contribution at m/z 60 can overcompensate for the degradation of levoglucosan leading to an overestimation of the contribution of wood burning or biomass burning to the total OM. The primary organic emissions from the three different burners showed a wide range in O:C atomic ratio (0.19-0.60) for the starting and flaming conditions, which also increased during aging. Primary wood burning emissions have a

  13. Wavelength-Dependent Optical Absorption Properties of Artificial and Atmospheric Aerosol Measured by a Multi-Wavelength Photoacoustic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-12-01

    Various aspects of the photoacoustic (PA) detection method are discussed from the point of view of developing it into a routine tool for measuring the wavelength-dependent optical absorption coefficient of artificial and atmospheric aerosol. The discussion includes the issues of calibration, cross-sensitivity to gaseous molecules, background PA signal subtraction, and size-dependent particle losses within the PA system. The results in this paper are based on a recently developed four-wavelength PA system, which has operational wavelengths in the near-infrared, in the visible, and in the ultraviolet. The measured spectra of artificial and atmospheric aerosol prove the outstanding applicability of the presented PA system.

  14. Characterization of ambient aerosols during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centreville, AL with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer Basak Karakurt Cevik1, Yu Jun Leong1, Carlos Hernandez1, Robert Griffin1 1 Rice University, CEE Department, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakurt Cevik, B.; Leong, Y.; Hernandez, C.; Griffin, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    An Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a Brechtel Manufacturing, Inc. particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) were deployed at a rural location in Centreville, AL, from 1 June to 15 July 2013 as a part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). PILS samples were analyzed with Dionex ion chromatographs. The data will allow us to characterize the temporal characteristics of the concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory (NR) chemical species in the ambient submicron particles. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates that the sub-micron particulate matter is highly dominated by organic matter with a relatively high state of oxidation and it is followed by smaller contributions from sulfate and ammonium. In order to investigate the processes and sources that lead to observed aerosol concentrations at the site, the time series will be analyzed in conjunction with additional trace gas, aerosol, and meteorological measurements. The region is known to have high biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions and many of these biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) are important secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors. Preliminary data from the HR-ToF-AMS indicates the importance of oxidized organic aerosol during SOAS. The study will also focus on the importance of the SOA in the total organic fraction and the effect of atmospheric processing on the chemical composition of the organic fraction.

  15. Investigations of primary and secondary particulate matter of different wood combustion appliances with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heringa, M. F.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Tritscher, T.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Richter, R.; Wehrle, G.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-03-01

    A series of photo-oxidation smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation from two different log wood burners and a residential pellet burner under different burning conditions: starting and flaming phase. Emissions were sampled from the chimney and injected into the smog chamber leading to primary organic aerosol (POA) concentrations comparable to ambient levels. The composition of the aerosol was measured by an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) and black carbon (BC) instrumentation. The primary emissions were then exposed to xenon light to initiate photo-chemistry and subsequent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production. After correcting for wall losses, the average increase in organic matter (OM) concentrations by SOA formation for the starting and flaming phase experiments with the two logwood burners was found to be a factor of 4.1 ± 1.4 after five hours of aging. No SOA formation was observed for the stable burning phase of the pellet burner. The startup emissions of the pellet burner showed an increase in OM concentration by a factor of 3.3. Average emission factors of BC + POA + SOA, calculated from CO2 emission, were found to be in the range of 0.04 to 3.9 g kg-1 wood for the stable burning pellet burner and an old log wood burner during startup respectively. SOA contributed significantly to the ion C2H4O2+ at mass to charge ratio m/z 60, a commonly used marker for primary emissions of wood burning. The primary organic emissions from the three different burners showed a wide range in O/C atomic ratio (0.19-0.60) for the starting and flaming conditions, which also increased during aging. Primary wood burning emissions have a rather low relative contribution at m/z 43 (f43) to the total organic mass spectrum. The non-oxidized fragment C3H7+ has a considerable contribution at m/z 43 for the fresh OA with an increasing contribution of the oxygenated

  16. Optical-chemical-microphysical relationships and closure studies for mixed carbonaceous aerosols observed at Jeju Island; 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer, particle sizing, and filter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Stone, E. A.; Schauer, J. J.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S. C.

    2010-11-01

    Transport of aerosols in pollution plumes from the mainland Asian continent was observed in situ at Jeju, South Korea during the Cheju Asian Brown Cloud Plume-Asian Monsoon Experiment (CAPMEX) field campaign throughout August and September 2008 using a 3-laser photoacoustic spectrometer (PASS-3), chemical filter analysis, and size distributions. The PASS-3 directly measures the effects of morphology (e.g. coatings) on light absorption that traditional filter-based instruments are unable to address. Transport of mixed sulfate, carbonaceous, and nitrate aerosols from various Asian pollution plumes to Jeju accounted for 74% of the deployment days, showing large variations in their measured chemical and optical properties. Analysis of eight distinct episodes, spanning wide ranges of chemical composition, optical properties, and source regions, reveals that episodes with higher organic carbon (OC)/sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-)/SO42- composition ratios exhibit lower single scatter albedo at shorter wavelengths (ω405). We infer complex refractive indices (n-ik) as a function of wavelength for the high, intermediate, and low OC/SO42- pollution episodes by using the observed particle size distributions and the measured optical properties. The smallest mean particle diameter corresponds to the high OC/SO42- aerosol episode. The imaginary part of the refractive index (k) is greater for the high OC/SO42- episode at all wavelengths. A distinct, sharp increase in k at short wavelength implies enhanced light absorption by OC, which accounts for 50% of the light absorption at 405 nm, in the high OC/SO42- episode. Idealized analysis indicates increased absorption at 781 nm by factors greater than 3 relative to denuded black carbon in the laboratory. We hypothesize that coatings of black carbon cores are the mechanism of this enhancement. This implies that climate warming and atmospheric heating rates from black carbon particles can be significantly larger than have been

  17. Dual-wavelength-excitation single-particle fluorescence spectrometer/particle sorter for real-time measurement of organic carbon and biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Pinnick, Ron G.; Hill, Steven C.; Huang, Hermes; Chang, Richard K.

    2008-10-01

    We report the development of a Single-Particle Fluorescence Spectrometer (SPFS) system capable of measuring two UV-laser excited fluorescence spectra from a single particle on-the-fly. The two dispersed fluorescence spectra are obtained from excitation by two lasers at different wavelengths (263 nm and 351 nm). The SPFS samples single particles with sizes primarily in the 1-10 μm range. The fluorescence spectra are recorded from 280 nm to 600 nm (in 20 channels) for 263 nm excitation and from 370 nm to 700 nm (in 22 channels) for 351 nm excitation. The elastic scattering (channel 4 and 9) is also recorded for sizing each particle. A time stamp for single particles is marked with a variable time interval resolution from 10 ms to 10 minutes. The SPFS employs a virtual-impactor concentrator to concentrate respirable-sized particles with a resulting (size-dependent) effective flow rate of around 100 liters/min. The SPFS can measure single-particle spectra at a maximum rate of 90,000/sec, although the highest rates we have experienced for the ambient are only several hundred/sec. When the SPFS is combined with an aerodynamic deflector (puffer) to sort particles according to their fluorescence spectral characteristics, the SPFS/puffer system can selectively deflect and collect an enriched sample of targeted particles (at rates limited by the puffer) of 1200 particles/sec, for further examination. In laboratory tests, aerosol particles with similar UV-LIF spectra (e.g. B. subtilis and E.coli) are puffed into the reservoir of a micro-fluidic cell, where fluorescent-labeled antibodies bind to them and were classified by their labeled fluorescence. Measurements of the background ambient aerosol with the SPFS system made at sites with different regional climate (Connecticut, Maryland, and New Mexico) were clustered (unstructured hierarchical analysis) into 8-10 groups, with over 90% of all the fluorescent particles contained within these clusters (threshold dot product=0

  18. Cluster Analysis of the Organic Peaks in Bulk Mass Spectra Obtained During the 2002 New England Air Quality Study with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Bahreini, R.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Goldan, P. D.; Kuster, W. C.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Roberts, J. M.; Meagher, J. F.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Marchewka, M.; Bertman, S. B.; Middlebrook, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    We applied hierarchical cluster analysis to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) bulk mass spectral dataset collected aboard the NOAA research vessel R. H. Brown during the 2002 New England Air Quality Study off the east coast of the United States. Emphasizing the organic peaks, the cluster analysis yielded a series of categories that are distinguishable with respect to their mass spectra and their occurrence as a function of time. The differences between the categories mainly arise from relative intensity changes rather than from the presence or absence of specific peaks. The most frequent category exhibits a strong signal at m/z 44 and represents oxidized organic matter probably originating from both anthropogenic as well as biogenic sources. On the basis of spectral and trace gas correlations, the second most common category with strong signals at m/z 29, 43, and 44 contains contributions from isoprene oxidation products. The third through the fifth most common categories have peak patterns characteristic of monoterpene oxidation products and were most frequently observed when air masses from monoterpene rich regions were sampled. Taken together, the second through the fifth most common categories represent on average 17% of the total organic mass that stems likely from biogenic sources during the ship's cruise. These numbers have to be viewed as lower limits since the most common category was attributed to anthropogenic sources for this calculation. The cluster analysis was also very effective in identifying a few contaminated mass spectra that were not removed during pre-processing. This study demonstrates that hierarchical clustering is a useful tool to analyze the complex patterns of the organic peaks in bulk aerosol mass spectra from a field study.

  19. A new application of hierarchical cluster analysis to investigate organic peaks in bulk mass spectra obtained with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Marcolli, C.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Bahreini, R.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Goldan, P. D.; Kuster, W. C.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Roberts, J. M.; Meagher, J. F.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Marchewka, M. L.; Bertman, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    We applied hierarchical cluster analysis to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) bulk mass spectral dataset collected aboard the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the 2002 New England Air Quality Study off the east coast of the United States. Emphasizing the organic peaks, the cluster analysis yielded a series of categories that are distinguishable with respect to their mass spectra and their occurrence as a function of time. The differences between the categories mainly arise from relative intensity changes rather than from the presence or absence of specific peaks. The most frequent category exhibits a strong signal at m/z 44 and represents oxidized organic matter probably originating from both anthropogenic as well as biogenic sources. On the basis of spectral and trace gas correlations, the second most common category with strong signals at m/z 29, 43, and 44 contains contributions from isoprene oxidation products. The third through the fifth most common categories have peak patterns characteristic of monoterpene oxidation products and were most frequently observed when air masses from monoterpene rich regions were sampled. Taken together, the second through the fifth most common categories represent on average 17% of the total organic mass that stems likely from biogenic sources during the ship's cruise. These numbers have to be viewed as lower limits since the most common category was attributed to anthropogenic sources for this calculation. The cluster analysis was also very effective in identifying a few contaminated mass spectra that were not removed during pre-processing. This study demonstrates that hierarchical clustering is a useful tool to analyze the complex patterns of the organic peaks in bulk aerosol mass spectra from a field study.

  20. Preliminary Observations of Particulate Matter at Baeng-Yeong Island, Korea, with a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lee, T.; Lee, S.; Kim, J.; Jang, S.; Lee, D.; Ahn, J.; Jeon, H.; Lee, G.; Collett, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Rapid industrial growth in China has resulted in large emissions of anthropogenic air pollutants in the past decade. Since the predominant regional winds near the Korean Peninsula are westerly throughout the year, except for summer, transport of air pollution from eastern China is a concern to neighboring countries such as South Korea and Japan and even to more distant regions such as the western United States. In order to improve understanding of the characteristics of pollutant transport from a variety of source regions to Korea, intensive field measurements were conducted from August - October 2010 at Baeng-Yeong Island, Korea. Baeng-Yeong Island is located in the sea west of the Korean Peninsula, approximately 180 km from the Shandong Peninsula. The island is situated close to the North Korea-South Korea Border. Under varying transport conditions, therefore, the island is predominantly influenced by emissions from China, North Korea or South Korea. An Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed on the island to provide insight into particle size distributions and non-refractory fine particle composition, including concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and organic carbon, with 5 minute time resolution. Many periods during the early part of the study were dominated by carbonaceous and sulfate aerosol. Increasing sulfate and organic concentrations were associated with changes in air transport patterns to the site. The presentation will provide an overview of the composition of particulate matter measured on the island and examine how changes in composition and species concentrations are related to changes in regional transport patterns as represented by the NOAA HYSPLIT model.

  1. [Analysis of Single Particle Aging and Mixing State at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zi-long; Zeng, Li-mm; Dong, I-Iua-Bin; Li, Mei; Zhu, Tong

    2016-04-15

    To characterize the size distribution and chemical ompsitins f abiet prtices t a agicuturesit intheNorh o Chinese Plain, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from June 30 to July 8, 2013. A total of 230,152 particles in the size range of 0.2-2.0 pm were chemically analyzed with both positive and negative ion spectra. The results revealed that aerosol could he classified into eight dominant groups, including elemental carbon (EC, 55.5%), organic carbon (OC, 10.7%), alkalis (Na-K, 17.4%), other metals (1.7%), Fe-rich (6.3%), Pb-rich (3.1%), dust (4.8%), and other (0.8%). The observed eight types of particles contained secondary components such as 46NO2-, 62NO3-, 96SO3-, 96SO4-, 97HSO4-, showing that they probably went through different aging processes. The analysis of particle size distribution showed that 700-800 nm was the peak value of all particles, and that dust and Fe particles were mainly in the coarse size range. EC particles subtype group research revealed EC particles tended to be aging with the above mentioned secondary ions and eventually led to a particle type conversion from EC to the less aging ECN and the more serious aging ECS, the diurnal variation of which was obviously negatively correlated, and there was a possibility of forming OC/EC mixture with the adsorption of secondary organic matter on EC surface. PMID:27548937

  2. Chemical Characteristics of Particulate Matter from Vehicle emission using High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, T.; Lee, T.; Kang, S.; Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Son, J.; Yoo, H. M.; Kim, K.; Park, G.

    2015-12-01

    Car emissions are major contributors of particulate matter (PM) in the urban environment and effects of air pollution, climate change, and human activities. By increasing of interest in research of car emission for assessment of the PM control, it became require to understand the chemical composition and characteristics of the car exhaust gases and particulate matter. To understand car emission characteristics of PM, we will study PM of car emissions for five driving modes (National Institute Environmental Research (NIER)-5, NIER-9, NIER-12, NIER-14) and three fixed speed driving modes (30km/h, 70km/h, 110km/h) using different fuel types (gasoline, diesel, and LPG) at Transportation Pollution Research Center (TPRC) of NIER in Incheon, South Korea. PM chemical composition of car emission was measured for concentrations of organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, PAHs, oxidation states and size distribution using an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) on real-time. In the study, organics concentration was dominated for all cases of driving modes and the concentration of organics was increased in 110km/h fixed speed mode for gasoline and diesel. The presentation will provide an overview of the chemical composition of PM in the car emissions.

  3. Characterising coarse PBA dynamics in real-time above and below a tropical rainforest canopy using a dual channel UV fluorescence aerosol spectrometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabey, A.; Gallagher, M. W.; Burgess, R.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.,; Kaye, P. H.; Stanley, W. R.; Davies, F.; Foot, V. E.

    2009-04-01

    single-particle dual channel UV fluorescence spectrometer (Kaye et al., 2008) capable of detecting PBA by inducing fluorescence in two so-called biofluorophores - one present during metabolism and the other an amino acid - in the particle size range 1 m < Dp < 20 m. Real-time PBA measurements were performed above and below the canopy of a tropical rainforest in Borneo, Malaysia as part of the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes (OP3) and the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES) projects. PBA were found to dominate the coarse loading at Dp > 2 m. In qualitative agreement with measurements of culturable airborne material in a tropical forest's understory (Gilbert, 2005) a diurnal cycle of PBA number concentration is present, reaching a maximum of ~4000 l-1 at local midnight and falling to ~100 l-1 around midday. The role of the planetary boundary layer's collapse and re-establishment in dictating this variation in is also investigated using LIDAR data. Transient PBA concentration spikes lasting several minutes are superposed on the smooth underlying diurnal variation and occur at similar times each day. Nucleopore filter samples were also taken in-situ and analysed under an Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) in Manchester. The images obtained showed the PBA fraction to be dominated by fungal spores of diameter 2-5 m, from various species including ABM. Since such species tend to release spores in bursts at regular times this appears to account for the PBA concentration spikes.

  4. [Characteristics and Formation Mechanism of a Multi-Day Haze in the Winter of Shijiazhuang Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SPAMS)].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-bo; Ren, Yi-bin; Hong, Gang; Lu, Na; Li, Zhi-guo; Li, Lei; Li, Hui-lai; Jin, Wei

    2015-11-01

    A multi-day haze episode occurred in Shijiazhuang during November 18-26, 2014. The characteristics were studied based on the data collected by the single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) located in the automatic monitoring station (20 meters) of Shijiazhuang. In accordance with the source spectral library of atmospheric pollutant emissions in Shijiazhuang, the main sources were distinguished and analyzed. The mass concentration of particulate matters and meteorological conditions being taken in account, the causes of haze in winter were also studied. It turned out that fine particulate matters in the Shijiazhuang air were mainly from 7 different sources: the tracer ion of coal source was Al; the tracer ions of industry sources were OC, Fe, and Pb; the tracer ion of motor vehicle tail gas source was EC; the tracer ions of dust source were Al, Ca and Si; the tracer ions of biomass burning source were K and levoglucosan; the tracer ions of pure secondary inorganic source were SO4-, NO2-, and NO3-, and the tracer ion of dining source was HOC. Of the above mentioned, OC, HOC, EC, HEC, ECOC, rich potassium particles minerals and heavy metals were 8 dominant polluting groups in hazy days. OC and ECOC particles were the majority, which accounted for more than 50% and 20% of the overall measured particles. OC particles were mainly discharged from coal combustion and industrial processes, and ECOC particles were mainly from coal combustion and vehicle exhaust emissions. When haze occurred in Shijiazhuang the proportion of pollutant particles of NH4+, SO4- , NO2- and NO3- increased, of which NH4+ was the most sharply increased. The mixed degree between EC, OC and NH4+, So4-, NO3- in the haze was higher than usual, of which NH4+ was the most sharply increased. In the static and stable weather gaseous (SO2, NO(x), NH3, VOCs) pollutants and particles were difficult to spread and accumulated rapidly, which were discharged from coal combustion, the process of the medical

  5. Development of a new corona discharge based ion source for high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer to measure gaseous H2SO4 and aerosol sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Yang, Dongsen; Ma, Yan; Chen, Mindong; Cheng, Jin; Li, Shizheng; Wang, Ming

    2015-10-01

    A new corona discharge (CD) based ion source was developed for a commercial high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) (Aerodyne Research Inc.) to measure both gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and aerosol sulfate after thermal desorption. Nitrate core ions (NO3-) were used as reagent ions and were generated by a negative discharge in zero air followed by addition of excess nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to convert primary ions and hydroxyl radicals (OH) into NO3- ions and nitric acid (HNO3). The CD-HRToF-CIMS showed no detectable interference from hundreds parts per billion by volume (ppbv) of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Unlike the atmospheric pressure ionization (API) ToF-CIMS, the CD ion source was integrated onto the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) chamber and which made it possible to measure aerosol sulfate by coupling to a filter inlet for gases and aerosols (FIGAERO). Moreover, compared with a quadrupole-based mass spectrometer, the desired HSO4- signal was detected by its exact mass of m/z 96.960, which was well resolved from the potential interferences of HCO3-ṡ(H2O)2 (m/z 97.014) and O-ṡH2OṡHNO3 (m/z 97.002). In this work, using laboratory-generated standards the CD-HRToF-CIMS was demonstrated to be able to detect as low as 3.1 × 105 molecules cm-3 gaseous H2SO4 and 0.5 μg m-3 ammonium sulfate based on 10-s integration time and two times of the baseline noise. The CD ion source had the advantages of low cost and a simple but robust structure. Since the system was non-radioactive and did not require corrosive HNO3 gas, it can be readily field deployed. The CD-HRToF-CIMS can be a powerful tool for both field and laboratory studies of aerosol formation mechanism and the chemical processes that were critical to understand the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  6. Spectral characterisation of mineralogical components of dust, HULIS and winter time aerosol using multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer. A laboratory and a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, Tibor; Utry, Noémi; Filep, Ágnes; Tátrai, Dávid; Bozóki, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol can interact with solar radiation via scattering and absorption. The back scattering fraction of incoming solar irradiation has cooling effect, while the forward scattering redistributes electromagnetic energy into the atmosphere. The photon energy transformed into thermal energy via the light absorption, therefore the absorption process heating absorbing particles and also their surroundings While scattering can be measured fairly accurately, the assessment of the radiative effect of light absorption by aerosol can only be determined with limited accuracy, in part, because of the lack of reliable instrument for absorption measurement. The photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy is the only method that can measure light absorption by aerosol in-situ (without sampling artifacts) with high sensitivity and temporal resolution, but not widespread in its application yet. Recently, multi-wavelength photoacoustic instruments including excitation at UVs have become available and open up a new perspective on in-situ investigation of light absorption by aerosol as well as its wavelength dependency. In this study we present novel results of an in-situ study of aerosol light absorption measurement of re-dispersed mineralogical composition of dust such as illit, caolinite, quartz, rutile, limestone, hematite and HULIS aerosols using state-of-the-art multi-wavelength photoacoustic instrument (4λ-PAS). We experimentally demonstrated that the absorption feature of MAC (mass specific aerosol absorption) could be used as chemically selective parameter. We also demonstrated the results of an in-situ winter time ambient aerosol measurement. The hourly concentration of trace elements(i.e. K, Ca, Fe, and Si), gaseous pollutants (CO and NOx), as well as the size distribution of ambient aerosol were also analyzed during the measurement campaign. The levoglucosan measurement was made to confirm that the daily fluctuation of ambient AAE (absorption Angstrom Exponent) governed by the

  7. Analysis of secondary organic aerosol using a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueggemann, M.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the development and characterization of a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor (MOVI) which is coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI-IT/MS), and its application in laboratory and field measurements. The MOVI-APCI-IT/MS allows the quantification of organic acids and other oxidation products of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on a semi-continuous basis. Furthermore, the vapor pressure and saturation concentration of the particle components can be estimated. The MOVI was first described in 2010 by Yatavelli and Thornton (Yatavelli and Thornton, 2010). It is a single stage, multi-nozzle impactor with 100 nozzles, each having a diameter of 150 μm. At a flow-rate of 10 L·min-1 air is drawn through the MOVI and particles are collected on a deposition plate. The cut-point diameter (d50, diameter of 50% collection efficiency) is at 130 nm. A low pressure-drop of only 5.3% of atmospheric pressure behind the nozzles allows collecting not only low-volatile but even semi-volatile compounds, which are an important part of SOA. After collecting particles hydrocarbon-free synthetic air is led over the collection surface into the APCI-IT/MS and the collection surface is heated up to 120 ° C in less than 200 s, volatilizing the sampled SOA. The vaporized compounds are transferred into the ion source and subsequently analyzed by mass spectrometry. Due to the soft ionization at atmospheric pressure the obtained mass spectra show only low fragmentations and can easily be interpreted. In laboratory experiments the MOVI-APCI-IT/MS was used for the chemical analysis of SOA generated from α-pinene-ozonolysis in a smog chamber. The limit of detection was found at 7.3 ng for pinic acid. The vapor pressure log p0 and the saturation concentration C25* for pinic acid were calculated from the desorption temperature using the method presented by Faulhaber et al. (Faulhaber et al., 2009

  8. Characteristics of submicron particulate matter at the urban roadside in downtown Hong Kong—Overview of 4 months of continuous high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Berto P.; Li, Yong Jie; Yu, Jian Zhen; Louie, Peter K. K.; Chan, Chak K.

    2015-07-01

    Hong Kong, one of the world's most densely populated cities and an international financial center, has been suffering from traffic-related air pollution. This study presents the first real-time high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry measurements of submicron nonrefractory particulate matter (NR-PM1) at the urban roadside in Hong Kong from March to July 2013 with the aim to identify major sources, to assess local and nonlocal emissions, and to characterize trends at different time scales. Organics were dominant, with fresh primary organic aerosol representing two thirds of the total measured organics. Cooking contributions in organic aerosol were assessed directly for the first time in Hong Kong and exceeded those related to vehicles although traffic was still the major PM1 source when elemental carbon was included. These findings were supported by additional measurements including traffic data, elemental/organic carbon, and VOC data. Springtime concentrations were about double of those in summer, due to a strong seasonal transition which affected meteorological conditions and street-level circulation. Local formation of secondary species was not clearly discernible in either season. The elemental composition of organic aerosol remained stable with similar elemental ratios across the covered seasons: OM/OC: 1.49 ± 0.13, O/C: 0.25 ± 0.10, H/C: 1.68 ± 0.08 for spring and OM/OC: 1.43 ± 0.14, O/C: 0.21 ± 0.11, H/C: 1.69 ± 0.08 for summer. Diurnal changes in H/C and O/C as a result of mixing of primary organic aerosol and secondary organic aerosol were evident in the van Krevelen plot.

  9. [CAS General Standards 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) is to promote the improvement of programs and services to enhance the quality of student learning and development. CAS is a consortium of professional associations who work collaboratively to develop and promulgate standards and guidelines and to encourage…

  10. Measuring the temporal evolution of aerosol composition in a remote marine environment influenced by Saharan dust outflow using a new single particle mass spectrometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Nicholas; Williams, Paul; Flynn, Michael; Taylor, Jonathan; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Refractory material constitutes a significant fraction of the atmospheric aerosol burden and has a strong influence on climate through the direct radiative effect and aerosol-cloud interactions, particularly in cold and mixed phase clouds. Composition of refractory aerosols is traditionally measured using off-line analytical techniques such as filter analyses. However, when using off-line techniques the temporal evolution of the data set is lost, meaning the measurements are difficult to relate to atmospheric processes. Recently, single particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) has proven a useful tool for the on-line study of refractory aerosols with the ability to probe size resolved chemical composition with high temporal resolution on a particle by particle basis. A new Laser Ablation Aerosol Time-of-Flight (LAAP-TOF) SPMS instrument with a modified optical detection system was deployed for ground based measurements at Praia, Cape Verde during the Ice in Cloud - Dust (ICE-D) multi-platform campaign in August 2015. A primary aim of the project was to evaluate the impact of Saharan dust on ice nucleation in mixed phase clouds. The instrument was operated over a 16 day period in which several hundred thousand single particle mass spectra were obtained from air masses with back trajectories traversing the Mid-Atlantic, Sahara Desert and West Africa. The data presented indicate external mixtures of sea salt and silicate mineral dust internally mixed with secondary species that are consistent with long range transport to a remote marine environment. The composition and size distributions measured with the LAAP-TOF are compared with measurements from an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), and data from SEM-EDX analysis of filter samples. The particle number fraction identified as silicate mineral from the mass spectra correlates with a fraction of the incandescent particles measured with the SP2. We discuss the suitability of the modified

  11. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Kahl, W.K.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Marlar, T.A.; Cunningham, J.P.

    1998-05-19

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays. 6 figs.

  12. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  13. Reconciliation of coarse mode sea-salt aerosol particle size measurements and parameterizations at a subtropical ocean receptor site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jeffrey S.; Brooks, Barbara; Crahan, Katie K.; Hegg, Dean A.; Eck, Thomas F.; O'Neill, Norm; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Reid, Elizabeth A.; Anderson, Kenneth D.

    2006-01-01

    In August/September of 2001, the R/P FLIP and CIRPAS Twin Otter research aircraft were deployed to the eastern coast of Oahu, Hawaii, as part of the Rough Evaporation Duct (RED) experiment. Goals included the study of the air/sea exchange, turbulence, and sea-salt aerosol particle characteristics at the subtropical marine Pacific site. Here we examine coarse mode particle size distributions. Similar to what has been shown for airborne dust, optical particle counters such as the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP), Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CSASP) and the Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) within the Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS) instrument systematically overestimate particle size, and consequently volume, for sea salt particles. Ground-based aerodynamic particle sizers (APS) and AERONET inversions yield much more reasonable results. A wing pod mounted APS gave mixed results and may not be appropriate for marine boundary layer studies. Relating our findings to previous studies does much to explain the bulk of the differences in the literature and leads us to conclude that the largest uncertainty facing flux and airborne cloud/aerosol interaction studies is likely due to the instrumentation itself. To our knowledge, there does not exist an in situ aircraft system that adequately measures the ambient volume distribution of coarse mode sea salt particles. Most empirically based sea salt flux parameterizations can trace their heritage to a clearly biased measurement technique. The current "state of the art" in this field prevents any true form of clear sky radiative "closure" for clean marine environments.

  14. Tropopsheric Aerosol Chemistry via Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    A broad overview of size resolved aerosol chemistry in urban, rural and remote regions is evolving from deployment of aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) throughout the northern hemisphere. Using thermal vaporization and electron impact ionization as universal detector of non-refractory inorganic and organic composition, the accumulation of AMS results represent a library of mass spectral signatures of aerosol chemistry. For organics in particular, mass spectral factor analysis provides a procedure for classifying (and simplifying) complex mixtures composed of the hundreds or thousands of individual compounds. Correlations with parallel gas and aerosol measurements (e.g. GC/MS, HNMR, FTIR) supply additional chemical information needed to interpret mass spectra. The challenge is to separate primary and secondary; anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources - and subsequent - transformations of aerosol chemistry and microphysics.

  15. Airborne Aerosol In situ Measurements during TCAP: A Closure Study of Total Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Chand, Duli; Shilling, John E.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Barnard, James C.; Sedlacek, Art; Schmid, Beat

    2015-07-31

    We present here a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. The synergistically employed aircraft data involve aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical components and ambient relative humidity measurements. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of the complementary chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total aerosol scattering is demonstrated for different ambient conditions with a wide range of relative humidities (from 5 to 80%) using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft during the recent Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these three types of data employed are: (1) size distributions measured by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS; 0.06-1 µm), a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP; 0.1-3 µm) and a Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS; 0.6- >10 µm), (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS; 0.06-0.6 µm) and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2; 0.06-0.6 µm), and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a TSI integrating nephelometer at three wavelengths (0.45, 0.55, 0.7 µm) and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system at three RHs (near 45%, 65% and 90%) at a single wavelength (0.525 µm). We demonstrate that good agreement (~10% on average) between the observed and calculated scattering at these three wavelengths can be obtained using the best available chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction and using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40

  16. An Investigation of Aerosol and Ozone Measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer: Validation and Relation to Other Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, Terry

    1997-01-01

    Throughout this study we focused on comparisons of CLAES and in situ measurements of ozone and aerosol extinction. Thus the comparison is between satellite data representative of large spatial regions and in situ data representative of nearly point samples. Both instruments provide vertical profiles, but the region of overlap is limited to between approximately 10 and 100 mb. CLAES Version 7 ozone measurements have been compared to electrochemical cell ozonesonde measurements over McMurdo Station, Antarctica (78 deg S, 167 deg E), Dumont d'Urville, Antarctica (66.7 deg S, 140 deg E), Laramie, Wyoming (41 deg N, 106 deg W), and Bear Island, Norway (74.3 deg N, 19 deg E). Comparisons were made between vertical ozone profiles, and between integrated column ozone over the region of overlap of the measurements. Comparisons using CLAES Version 8 data are underway. CLAES Version 8 aerosol extinction measurements at all wavelengths have also been compared to University of Wyoming aerosol extinctions over McMurdo Station, Antarctica, and over Laramie, Wyoming. Coincidences in all cases were determined by minimizing the distance between the CLAES observations and the surface station, and the time separation between the satellite and in situ measurements.

  17. Characterization of the organic matter in submicron urban aerosols using a Thermo-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTR-TOF-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Christian Mark; Ho, T.-T.; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Chen, M.-J.; Huang, W.-R.; Huang, S.-H.

    2016-09-01

    Organic matter is the most complicated and unresolved major component of atmospheric aerosol particles. Its sources and global budget are still highly uncertain and thereby necessitate further research efforts with state-of-the-art instrument. This study employed a Thermo-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTR-TOF-MS) for characterization of ambient organic aerosols. First, five authentic standard substances, which include phthalic acid, levoglucosan, arabitol, cis-pinonic acid and glutaric acid, were utilized to examine the response of the instrument. The results demonstrated the linearity of the TD-PTR-TOF-MS signals against a range of mass loading of specific species on filters. However, it was found that significant fragmentation happened to those challenging compounds, although the proton-transfer-reaction (PTR) was recognized as a soft ionization technique. Consequently, quantitative characterization of aerosols with the TD-PTR-TOF-MS depended on the availability of the fragmentation pattern in mass spectra and the recovery rate with the quantification ion peak(s). The instrument was further deployed to analyze a subset of submicron aerosol samples collected at the TARO (Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory) in Taipei, Taiwan during August 2013. The results were compared with the measurements from a conventional DRI thermo-optical carbon analyzer. The inter-comparison indicated that the TD-PTR-TOF-MS underestimated the mass of total organic matter (TOM) in aerosol samples by 27%. The underestimation was most likely due to the thermo-decomposition during desorption processes and fragmentation in PTR drift tube, where undetectable fragments were formed. Besides, condensation loss of low vapor pressure species in the transfer components was also responsible for the underestimation to a certain degree. Nevertheless, it was showed that the sum of the mass concentrations of the major detected ion peaks correlated strongly

  18. On-Line Measurement of Beryllium, Chromium, and Mercury by Using Aerosol Beam Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectrometer and TIme-Integrated Filter Sampling and Reference Method

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.-D.; Vannice, R.W.

    2003-05-20

    A novel real-time monitor for aerosol particles has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The instrument is designed to perform in-situ measurement for the elemental composition of aerosol particles in flue gas. They had tested this monitor at the Eastman Chemical Company in July 2001 taking advantage of the emissions from a waste incinerator operated by the company as the background. To investigate the behavior and response of the monitor under simulated/known conditions, stock solutions of prepared metal concentration(s) were nebulized to provide spikes for the instrument testing. Strengths of the solutions were designed such that a reference method (RM) was able to collect sufficient material on filter samples that were analyzed in a laboratory to produce 30-minute average data points. Parallel aerosol measurements were performed by using the ORNL instrument. Recorded signal of an individual element was processed and the concentration calculated from a calibration curve established prior to the campaign. RM data were able to reflect the loads simulated in the spiked waste stream. However, it missed one beryllium sample. The possibility of bias exists in the RM determination of chromium that could lead to erroneous comparison between the RM and the real-time monitoring data. With the real-time detection capability, the ORNL instrument was able to reveal the emission variation by making seven measurements within a 30-minute cycle. The ability of the instrument also enables the reconstruction of the baseline chromium emission concentration. The measurements for mercury by both methods are in good agreement.

  19. On-Line Measurements of Beryllium, Chromium, and Mercury by Using Aerosol Beam Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectrometer and Time-Integrated Filter Sampling Reference Method

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.D.

    2003-05-15

    A novel real-time monitor for aerosol particles has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The instrument is designed to perform in-situ measurement for the elemental composition of aerosol particles in flue gas. We had tested this monitor at the Eastman Chemical Company in July 2001 taking advantage of the emissions from a waste incinerator operated by the company as the background. To investigate the behavior and response of the monitor under simulated/known conditions, stock solutions of prepared metal concentration(s) were nebulized to provide spikes for the instrument testing. Strengths of the solutions were designed such that a reference method (RM) was able to collect sufficient material on filter samples that were subsequently analyzed in a laboratory to produce 30-minute average data points. Parallel aerosol measurements were performed by using the ORNL instrument. Recorded signal of an individual element was processed and the concentration calculated from a calibration curve established prior to the campaign. RM data were able to reflect the loads simulated in the spiked waste stream. However, it missed one beryllium sample. The possibility of bias exists in the RM determination of chromium that could lead to erroneous comparison between the RM and the real-time monitoring data. With the real-time detection capability, the ORNL instrument was able to reveal the emission variation by making seven measurements within a 30-minute cycle. The ability of the instrument also enables the reconstruction of the baseline chromium emission concentration. The measurements for mercury by both methods are in good agreement.

  20. Correlation spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Flemming, Jeb H.; Jones, Gary D.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  1. Laboratory and Field Characterizations of a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) Collector Module for a Chemical Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CI-TOFMS) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Vogel, A.; Massoli, P.; Lambe, A. T.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Kroll, J. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) collector module is an add-on for Chemical Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CI-TOFMS) instruments. The FIGAERO enables simultaneous real-time chemical analysis of trace gases and particles in ambient air. The collector module described here is modelled after the University of Washington (UW) design of Lopez-Hilfikeret al., 2014. The collector module mounts directly to the front of the CI-TOFMS ion molecule reactor, replacing the standard gas phase inlet. Automated operation follows a two-step sequence alternating between gas and particle sampling. Gas and particle flows are sampled through separate inlet lines. Software provides automated control of the ARI FIGAERO and determines which inlet line is sampled into ion molecule reaction region. While in the gas phase measuring position particles are separately collected on a filter. After sufficient particle collection, heated clean nitrogen is passed over the filter to desorb the particles on the filter. The thermally desorbed material is then measured with the CI-TOFMS. Though conceptually similar, the ARI FIGAERO is mechanically different enough from the UW design that it requires its own performance assessment. Presented here is the characterization of the ARI FIGAERO collector module. The FIGAERO performance is assessed by using laboratory, chamber, and field data collected using iodide as the reagent ion to examine detection sensitivity, quantification limits, and time response. Lopez-Hilfiker et al., "A novel method for online analysis of gas and particle composition: description and evaluation of a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO)", Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 983-1001 (2014)

  2. Multidimensional spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zanni, Martin Thomas; Damrauer, Niels H.

    2010-07-20

    A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

  3. Identification of oxidized organic atmospheric species during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) using a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (IMS-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Surratt, J. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from the field deployment of a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). IMS-TOF is a 2-dimensional analysis method, which separates gas-phase ions by mobility prior to determination of mass-to-charge ratio by mass spectrometry. Ion mobility is a unique physical property that is determined by the collisional cross section of an ion. Because mobility depends on size and shape, the IMS measurement is able to resolve isomers and isobaric compounds. Additionally, trends in IMS-TOF data space can be used to identify relationships between ions, such as common functionality or polymeric series. During SOAS we interfaced the IMS-TOF to a nitrate ion (NO3-) chemical ionization source that enables the selective ionization of highly oxidized gas phase species (those having a high O:C ratio) through clustering with the reagent ion. Highly oxidized products of terpenes and isoprene are important secondary organic aerosol precursors (SOA) that play an uncertain but important role in particle-phase chemistry. We present several case studies of atmospheric events during SOAS that exhibited elevated concentrations of sulfuric acid and/or organics. These events exhibited a rise in particle number and provide an opportunity to examine the role that organic species may have in local atmospheric new particle formation events. We also present the results from the field deployment and subsequent laboratory studies utilizing a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor as the inlet for the CI-IMS-TOF. The reactor draws in ambient air and exposes it to high concentrations of the OH radical, created by photolysis O3 in the presence of water. The highly oxidized products are then sampled directly by the CI-IMS-TOF. We performed several experiments including placing pine and deciduous plants directly in front of the reactor opening and observed large increases in the number and

  4. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Barkal, Amira A; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K; Sherwood, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  5. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  6. Investigation of the spectral responses of laser generated aerosol from household coals using a state-of-the-art multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, Tibor; Utry, Noemi; Pinter, Mate; Kiss-Albert, Gergely; Smausz, Tomi; Konya, Zoltan; Hopp, Bela; Szabo, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of the inherent, spectral features of laser generated and chemically characterized residential coal aerosols generated in our recently introduced laser ablation based LAC generator. The optical absorption and the scattering features of the generated aerosol were investigated by our state-of-the-art multi wavelength PAS instrument (4λ-PAS) and a multi wavelength cosinus sensor (Aurora 3000). The quantified wavelength dependency (AAE and SAE) are deduced from the measured data. Finally, relationship between the optical and the thermochemical characteristics is revealed. Atmospheric light absorbing carbonaceous particulate matter (LAC) is in the middle of scientific interest especially because of its climatic and adverse health relevance. The latest scientific assessments identified atmospheric soot as the second most important anthropogenic emission regarding its climatic effect and as one of the most harmful atmospheric constituents based on its health aspects. LAC dominantly originates from anthropogenic sources, so its real time and selective identification is also essential for the means of its legal regulation. Despite of its significance the inherent properties of LAC are rarely described and the available data is widely spread even in the case of the most intensively studied black or elementary carbon. Therefore, the investigation of the inherent climate and health relevant properties of atmospheric soot is a highly actual issue. Moreover investigation of the optical and toxic properties of LAC originating from the combustion of household coals is almost completely missing from literature. There are two major reasons for that. Firstly, the characteristic parameters of soot are complex and vary in a wide range and depend not only on the initial burning conditions and the type of fuels but also the ambient factors. The other is the lack of a soot standard material and a generator which are suitable for modelling the real atmospheric

  7. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  8. Mass Spectrometer for Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria and other micro-organisms identified continously with aid of new technique for producing samples for mass spectrometer. Technique generates aerosol of organisms and feeds to spectrometer. Given species of organism produces characteristic set of peaks in mass spectrum and thereby identified. Technique useful for monitoring bacterial makeup in environmental studies and in places where cleanliness is essential, such as hospital operating rooms, breweries, and pharmaceutical plants.

  9. Multiaperture Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, Rudolf A.; Pagano, Robert J.; O'Callaghan, Fred G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed multiaperture spectrometer containing single grating provides high spectral resolution over broad spectrum. Produces parallel line images, each of which highly spectrally resolved display of intensity vs. wavelength in wavelength band of one of orders of spectrum produced by grating. Advantages; convenient two-dimensional spectral image, fewer components, and greater efficiency.

  10. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Wolf, Michael A.; Umbarger, C. John

    1985-01-01

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  11. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1981-11-03

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun is described that includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  12. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  13. The Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old…

  14. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  15. Dual nuclease activity of a Cas2 protein in CRISPR-Cas subtype I-B of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Bhuvan; Ghosh, Karukriti Kaushik; Fernandes, Gary; Kumar, Pankaj; Gogoi, Prerana; Kumar, Manish

    2016-04-01

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 carries a set of cas genes associated with CRISPR-Cas subtype I-B. Herein, we report for the first time active transcription of a set of cas genes (cas1 to cas8) of L. interrogans where cas4, cas1, cas2 and cas6, cas3, cas8, cas7, cas5 are clustered together in two independent operons. As an initial step toward comprehensive understanding of CRISPR-Cas system in spirochete, the biochemical study of one of the core Leptospira Cas2 proteins (Lep_Cas2) showed nuclease activity on both DNA and RNA in a nonspecific manner. Additionally, unlike other known Cas2 proteins, Lep_Cas2 showed metal-independent RNase activity and preferential activity on RNA over DNA. These results provide insight for understanding Cas2 diversity existing in the prokaryotic adaptive immune system. PMID:26950513

  16. Measuring Sodium Chloride Contents of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Amount of sodium chloride in individual aerosol particles measured in real time by analyzer that includes mass spectrometer. Analyzer used to determine mass distributions of active agents in therapeutic or diagnostic aerosols derived from saline solutions and in analyzing ocean spray. Aerosol particles composed of sodium chloride introduced into oven, where individually vaporized on hot wall. Vapor molecules thermally dissociated, and some of resulting sodium atoms ionized on wall. Ions leave oven in burst and analyzed by spectrometer, which is set to monitor sodium-ion intensity.

  17. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  18. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  19. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  20. The GeoTASO airborne spectrometer project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, J. W.; Delker, T.; Good, W.; Ruppert, L.; Murcray, F.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Nowlan, C.; Janz, S. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Pickering, K. E.; Kowalewski, M.; Wang, J.

    2014-10-01

    The NASA ESTO-funded Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) development project demonstrates a reconfigurable multi-order airborne spectrometer and tests the performance of spectra separation and filtering on the sensor spectral measurements and subsequent trace gas and aerosol retrievals. The activities support mission risk reduction for the UV-Visible air quality measurements from geostationary orbit for the TEMPO and GEMS missions1 . The project helps advance the retrieval algorithm readiness through retrieval performance tests using scene data taken with varying sensor parameters. We report initial results of the project.

  1. Exploiting CRISPR/Cas systems for biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Timothy R.; Weiss, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The Cas9 endonuclease is the central component of the Type II CRISPR/Cas system, a prokaryotic adaptive restriction system against invading nucleic acids, such as those originating from bacteriophages and plasmids. Recently, this RNA-directed DNA endonuclease has been harnessed to target DNA sequences of interest. Here, we review the development of Cas9 as an important tool to not only edit the genomes of a number of different prokaryotic and eukaryotic species, but also as an efficient system for site-specific transcriptional repression or activation. Additionally, a specific Cas9 protein has been observed to target an RNA substrate, suggesting that Cas9 may have the ability to be programmed to target RNA as well. Cas proteins from other CRISPR/Cas subtypes may also be exploited in this regard. Thus, CRISPR/Cas systems represent an effective and versatile biotechnological tool, which will have significant impact on future advancements in genome engineering. PMID:24323919

  2. CAS-Induced Difficulties in Learning Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankvist, Uffe Thomas; Misfeldt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    In recent years computer algebra systems (CAS) have become an integrated part of the upper secondary school mathematics program. Despite the many positive possibilities of CAS, there also seems to be a flip side of the coin in relation to actual difficulties in learning mathematics, not least because a strong dependence on CAS for mathematical…

  3. "CAS" Statement of Shared Ethical Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) has served as a voice for quality assurance and promulgation of standards in higher education for over 25 years. CAS was established to promote inter-association efforts to address quality assurance, student learning, and professional integrity. CAS includes membership of over…

  4. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  5. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

    1999-01-01

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  6. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  7. Compact Infrared Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2009-01-01

    Concentric spectrometer forms are advantageous for constructing a variety of systems spanning the entire visible to infrared range. Spectrometer examples are given, including broadband or high resolution forms. Some issues associated with the Dyson catadioptric type are also discussed.

  8. The Backscatter Cloud Probe - a compact low-profile autonomous optical spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beswick, K.; Baumgardner, D.; Gallagher, M.; Newton, R.

    2013-08-01

    A compact (500 cm3), lightweight (500 g), near-field, single particle backscattering optical spectrometer is described that mounts flush with the skin of an aircraft and measures the concentration and optical equivalent diameter of particles from 5 to 75 μm. The Backscatter Cloud Probe (BCP) was designed as a real-time qualitative cloud detector primarily for data quality control of trace gas instruments developed for the climate monitoring instrument packages that are being installed on commercial passenger aircraft as part of the European Union In-Service Aircraft for a Global Observing System (IAGOS) program (http://www.iagos.org/). Subsequent evaluations of the BCP measurements on a number of research aircraft, however, have revealed it capable of delivering quantitative particle data products including size distributions, liquid water content and other information on cloud properties. We demonstrate the instrument's capability for delivering useful long-term climatological information, across a wide range of environmental conditions. The BCP has been evaluated by comparing its measurements with those from other cloud particle spectrometers on research aircraft and several BCPs are currently flying on commercial A340/A330 Airbus passenger airliners. The design and calibration of the BCP is described in this presentation, along with an evaluation of measurements made on the research and commercial aircraft. Comparisons of the BCP with two other cloud spectrometers, the Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) and the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS), show that the BCP size distributions agree well with those from the other two, given the intrinsic limitations and uncertainties related to the three instruments. Preliminary results from more than 7000 h of airborne measurements by the BCP on two Airbus A-340s operating on routine global traffic routes (one Lufthansa, the other China Airlines) show that more than 340 h of

  9. Toward Creating A Global Retrospective Climatology of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Robert J.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are thought to cause a significant direct and indirect climate forcing, but the magnitude of this forcing remains highly uncertain because of poor knowledge of global aerosol characteristics and their temporal changes. The standard long-term global product, the one-channel Advanced Very-High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aerosol optical thickness over the ocean, relies on a single predefined aerosol model and can be inaccurate in many cases. Furthermore, it provides no information on aerosol column number density, thus making it impossible to estimate the indirect aerosol effect on climate. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data can be used to detect absorbing aerosols over land, but are insensitive to aerosols located below one kilometer. It is thus clear that innovative approaches must be employed in order to extract a more quantitative and accurate aerosol climatology from available satellite and other measurements, thus enabling more reliable estimates of the direct and indirect aerosol forcings. The Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP) was established in 1998 as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX). Its main objective is to analyze satellite radiance measurements and field observations to infer the global distribution of aerosols, their properties, and their seasonal and interannual variations. The overall goal is to develop advanced global aerosol climatologies for the period of satellite data and to make the aerosol climatologies broadly available through the GACP web site.

  10. CAS-1 lunar soil simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yongchun; Wang, Shijie; Ouyang, Ziyuan; Zou, Yongliao; Liu, Jianzhong; Li, Chunlai; Li, Xiongyao; Feng, Junming

    2009-02-01

    Lunar soil simulant is a geochemical reproduction of lunar regolith, and is needed for lunar science and engineering researches. This paper describes a new lunar soil simulant, CAS-1, prepared by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, to support lunar orbiter, soft-landing mission and sample return missions of China’s Lunar Exploration Program, which is scheduled for 2004 2020. Such simulants should match the samples returned from the Moon, all collected from the lunar regolith rather than outcrops. The average mineral and chemical composition of lunar soil sample returned from the Apollo 14 mission, which landed on the Fra Mauro Formation, is chosen as the model for the CAS-1 simulant. Source material for this simulant was a low-Ti basaltic scoria dated at 1600 years from the late Quaternary volcanic area in the Changbai Mountains of northeast China. The main minerals of this rock are pyroxene, olivine, and minor plagioclase, and about 20 40% modal glass. The scoria was analyzed by XRF and found to be chemically similar to Apollo 14 lunar sample 14163. It was crushed in an impact mill with a resulting median particle size 85.9 μm, similar to Apollo soils. Bulk density, shear resistance, complex permittivity, and reflectance spectra were also similar to Apollo 14 soil. We conclude that CAS-1 is an ideal lunar soil simulant for science and engineering research of future lunar exploration program.

  11. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  12. SoFi, an IGOR-based interface for the efficient use of the generalized multilinear engine (ME-2) for the source apportionment: ME-2 application to aerosol mass spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonaco, F.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2013-12-01

    Source apportionment using the bilinear model through a multilinear engine (ME-2) was successfully applied to non-refractory organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra collected during the winter of 2011 and 2012 in Zurich, Switzerland using the aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM). Five factors were identified: low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), semivolatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking OA (COA) and biomass burning OA (BBOA). A graphical user interface SoFi (Source Finder) was developed at PSI in order to facilitate the testing of different rotational techniques available within the ME-2 engine by providing a priori factor profiles for some or all of the expected factors. ME-2 was used to test the positive matrix factorization (PMF) model, the fully constrained chemical mass balance (CMB) model, and partially constrained models utilizing a values and pulling equations. Within the set of model solutions determined to be environmentally reasonable, BBOA and SV-OOA factor mass spectra and time series showed the greatest variability. This variability represents the uncertainty in the model solution and indicates that analysis of model rotations provides a useful approach for assessing the uncertainty of bilinear source apportionment models.

  13. Expanding CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing Capacity in Zebrafish Using SaCas9

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Chen, Cheng; Han, Yuxiang; Chen, Zelin; Lu, Xiaochan; Liang, Fang; Li, Song; Qin, Wei; Lin, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    The type II CRISPR/Cas9 system has been used widely for genome editing in zebrafish. However, the requirement for the 5′-NGG-3′ protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) of Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) limits its targeting sequences. Here, we report that a Cas9 ortholog from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9), and its KKH variant, successfully induced targeted mutagenesis with high frequency in zebrafish. Confirming previous findings, the SpCas9 variant, VQR, can also induce targeted mutations in zebrafish. Bioinformatics analysis of these new Cas targets suggests that the number of available target sites in the zebrafish genome can be greatly expanded. Collectively, the expanded target repertoire of Cas9 in zebrafish should further facilitate the utility of this organism for genetic studies of vertebrate biology. PMID:27317783

  14. Expanding CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing Capacity in Zebrafish Using SaCas9.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Chen, Cheng; Han, Yuxiang; Chen, Zelin; Lu, Xiaochan; Liang, Fang; Li, Song; Qin, Wei; Lin, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    The type II CRISPR/Cas9 system has been used widely for genome editing in zebrafish. However, the requirement for the 5'-NGG-3' protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) of Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) limits its targeting sequences. Here, we report that a Cas9 ortholog from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9), and its KKH variant, successfully induced targeted mutagenesis with high frequency in zebrafish. Confirming previous findings, the SpCas9 variant, VQR, can also induce targeted mutations in zebrafish. Bioinformatics analysis of these new Cas targets suggests that the number of available target sites in the zebrafish genome can be greatly expanded. Collectively, the expanded target repertoire of Cas9 in zebrafish should further facilitate the utility of this organism for genetic studies of vertebrate biology. PMID:27317783

  15. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  16. Deriving the concentration of airborne ash with a CAS-DPOL instrument: assessing uncertainties introduced by the instrument design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanu, Antonio; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Freudenthaler, Volker; Sauer, Daniel; Gasteiger, Josef

    2016-04-01

    sensitive to the sample flow and on the mechanical instrument design. Using a fluid dynamics model coupled with an optical model we analyze the effects of instrument design on the measurement, identify measurement uncertainties and recommend strategies to reduce the uncertainties. The two main results are that the optical design of the CAS-DPOL aerosol spectrometer can lead to an under-counting bias of up to 40% for larger particles and an over-counting bias of 20%-30% for smaller particles. Secondly, depending on how the instrument is mounted on the plane, the sampling can be subject to a significantly larger size selection bias than typically recognized, especially if the mounting leads to irregular sampling conditions. To correct both problems a new correction algorithm is described generalizing the results also to other optical particle counters. Finally, a comparison study is presented showing the effects on mass estimation and radiative forcing for uncorrected and corrected data also stating the resulting uncertainty.

  17. Aerosol volatility in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, S. A. K.; ńijälä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; Junninen, H.; Virkkula, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-04-01

    Climate and health effects of atmospheric aerosols are determined by their properties such as their chemical composition. Aerosol chemical composition can be studied indirectly by measuring volatility of aerosol particles. The volatility of submicron aerosol particles (20-500 nm) was studied in a boreal forest site at SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station (Vesala et al., 1998) in Hyytiälä, Finland, during 01/2008-05/2010. The instrument used for the measurements was VDMPS (Volatility Differential Mobility Particle Sizer), which consists of two separate instruments: DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, Aalto et al., 2001) and TD (Thermodenuder, Wehner et al., 2002). Aerosol evaporation was examined by heating the aerosol and comparing the total aerosol mass before and after heating. In the VDMPS system ambient aerosol sample was heated up to temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 280 °C. The higher the heating temperature was the more aerosol material was evaporated. There was a non-volatile residual present in aerosol particles when heated up to 280 °C. This residual explained (20±8)% of the total aerosol mass. Aerosol non-volatile mass fraction was highest during winter and smallest during summer months. The role of black carbon in the observed non-volatile residual was determined. Black carbon explained 40 to 90% of the non-volatile mass. Especially during colder seasons noticeable amount of non-volatile material, something else than black carbon, was observed. According to Kalberer et al. (2004) some atmospheric organic species can form polymers that have high evaporation temperatures. Also low-volatile organic salts may contribute to the non-volatile aerosol (Smith et al., 2010). Aerosol mass composition measured directly with AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, Jayne et al., 2000) was analyzed in order to examine the properties of the non-volatile material (other than black carbon). The AMS measurements were performed

  18. Spherical grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh; Clemens, J. Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We describe designs for spectrometers employing convex dispersers. The Offner spectrometer was the first such instrument; it has almost exclusively been employed on satellite platforms, and has had little impact on ground-based instruments. We have learned how to fabricate curved Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings and, in contrast to the planar gratings of traditional spectrometers, describe how such devices can be used in optical/infrared spectrometers designed specifically for curved diffraction gratings. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are highly efficient compared to conventional surface relief gratings; they have become the disperser of choice in optical / NIR spectrometers. The advantage of spectrometers with curved VPH dispersers is the very small number of optical elements used (the simplest comprising a grating and a spherical mirror), as well as illumination of mirrors off axis, resulting in greater efficiency and reduction in size. We describe a "Half Offner" spectrometer, an even simpler version of the Offner spectrometer. We present an entirely novel design, the Spherical Transmission Grating Spectrometer (STGS), and discuss exemplary applications, including a design for a double-beam spectrometer without any requirement for a dichroic. This paradigm change in spectrometer design offers an alternative to all-refractive astronomical spectrometer designs, using expensive, fragile lens elements fabricated from CaF2 or even more exotic materials. The unobscured mirror layout avoids a major drawback of the previous generation of catadioptric spectrometer designs. We describe laboratory measurements of the efficiency and image quality of a curved VPH grating in a STGS design, demonstrating, simultaneously, efficiency comparable to planar VPH gratings along with good image quality. The stage is now set for construction of a prototype instrument with impressive performance.

  19. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  20. Aerosol Climate Time Series in ESA Aerosol_cci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Thomas; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Pinnock, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Aerosol_cci (2010 - 2017) conducts intensive work to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors. Meanwhile, full mission time series of 2 GCOS-required aerosol parameters are completely validated and released: Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from dual view ATSR-2 / AATSR radiometers (3 algorithms, 1995 - 2012), and stratospheric extinction profiles from star occultation GOMOS spectrometer (2002 - 2012). Additionally, a 35-year multi-sensor time series of the qualitative Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) together with sensitivity information and an AAI model simulator is available. Complementary aerosol properties requested by GCOS are in a "round robin" phase, where various algorithms are inter-compared: fine mode AOD, mineral dust AOD (from the thermal IASI spectrometer, but also from ATSR instruments and the POLDER sensor), absorption information and aerosol layer height. As a quasi-reference for validation in few selected regions with sparse ground-based observations the multi-pixel GRASP algorithm for the POLDER instrument is used. Validation of first dataset versions (vs. AERONET, MAN) and inter-comparison to other satellite datasets (MODIS, MISR, SeaWIFS) proved the high quality of the available datasets comparable to other satellite retrievals and revealed needs for algorithm improvement (for example for higher AOD values) which were taken into account for a reprocessing. The datasets contain pixel level uncertainty estimates which were also validated and improved in the reprocessing. For the three ATSR algorithms the use of an ensemble method was tested. The paper will summarize and discuss the status of dataset reprocessing and validation. The focus will be on the ATSR, GOMOS and IASI datasets. Pixel level uncertainties validation will be summarized and discussed including unknown components and their potential usefulness and limitations. Opportunities for time series extension

  1. CAS as Environments for Implementing Mathematical Microworlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpers, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether computer algebra systems (CAS) are suitable environments for implementing mathematical microworlds. Recalls what constitutes a microworld and explores how CAS can be used for implementation, stating potentials as well as limitations. Provides as an example the microworld "Formula 1", implemented in Maple Software. (Author/KHR)

  2. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part I: Reproducibility of concentration and fragment results from 13 individual Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors (Q-ACSM) and consistency with Time-of-Flight ACSM (ToF-ACSM), High Resolution ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and other co-located instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenn, V.; Sciare, J.; Croteau, P. L.; Verlhac, S.; Fröhlich, R.; Belis, C. A.; Aas, W.; Äijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Baisnée, D.; Bonnaire, N.; Bressi, M.; Canagaratna, M.; Canonaco, F.; Carbone, C.; Cavalli, F.; Coz, E.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Lunder, C.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petit, J.-E.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Riffault, V.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Slowik, J. G.; Setyan, A.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Favez, O.

    2015-07-01

    As part of the European ACTRIS project, the first large Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM) intercomparison study was conducted in the region of Paris for three weeks during the late fall-early winter period (November-December 2013). The first week was dedicated to tuning and calibration of each instrument whereas the second and third were dedicated to side-by-side comparison in ambient conditions with co-located instruments providing independent information on submicron aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties. Near real-time measurements of the major chemical species (organic matter, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride) in the non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) were obtained here from 13 Q-ACSM. The results show that these instruments can produce highly comparable and robust measurements of the NR-PM1 total mass and its major components. Taking the median of the 13 Q-ACSM as a reference for this study, strong correlations (r2 > 0.9) were observed systematically for each individual ACSM across all chemical families except for chloride for which three ACSMs showing weak correlations partly due to the very low concentrations during the study. Reproducibility expanded uncertainties of Q-ACSM concentration measurements were determined using appropriate methodologies defined by the International Standard Organization (ISO 17025) and were found to be of 9, 15, 19, 28 and 36 % for NR-PM1, nitrate, organic matter, sulfate and ammonium respectively. However, discrepancies were observed in the relative concentrations of the constituent mass fragments for each chemical component. In particular, significant differences were observed for the organic fragment at mass-to-charge ratio 44, which is a key parameter describing the oxidation state of organic aerosol. Following this first major intercomparison exercise of a large number of ACSMs, detailed intercomparison results are presented as well as a discussion of some recommendations

  3. CAS

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, B.; Pomeroy, G. )

    1989-12-02

    The Security Alarm System is a data acquisition and control system which collects data from intrusion sensors and displays the information in a real-time environment for operators. The Access Control System monitors and controls the movement of personnel with the use of card readers and biometrics hand readers.

  4. Formation of highly oxygenated organic aerosol in the atmosphere: Insights from the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Lea; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Donahue, Neil M.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2010-12-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiments (FAME-08 and FAME-09), which were part of the EUCAARI intensive campaigns. Quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMSs) were employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the OA. The experiments provide unique insights into ambient oxidation of aerosol by measuring at the same site but under different photochemical conditions. NR-PM1 concentrations were about a factor of three lower during FAME-09 (winter) than during FAME-08 (summer). The OA sampled was significantly less oxidized and more variable in composition during the winter than during the early summer. Lower OH concentrations in the winter were the main difference between the two campaigns, suggesting that atmospheric formation of highly oxygenated OA is associated with homogeneous photochemical aging.

  5. Final Technical Report [Toward Simultaneous Single-Particle Chemical and Optical Characterization: Development of a Multi-Angle Optical Scattering Module for the Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Steven

    2013-10-22

    This project was an initial effort to investigate the feasibility of an instrument combining real-time atmospheric particle composition measurements using an ATOFMS (Atmospheric Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer) such as those performed by Prather’s group at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) with multi-wavelength scattering measurements of the type investigated by Sorensen et al., of Kansas State University (KSU). In this Phase I effort we proposed to investigate near-angle scattering and the possibility of integration of a multi-wavelength scattering instrument into the UCSD ATOFMS. After an initial optical design and calculations, we discovered issues with the theory of measurement and with mechanical integration. Evidence emerged that the method of multi-wavelength scattering is only efficacious for spherical particles, while most atmospheric particles are non-spherical fractal aggregates. We also determined that the integration of the detector into existing ATOFMS instruments would be severely limited by volume constraints, and additional volume would require prohibitive additional pumping compared with the existing ATOFMS systems. Based on this evidence, we decided not to pursue a Phase II effort.

  6. Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, M; Springston, S; Koontz, A; Aiken, A

    2013-01-17

    The photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS) measures light absorption by aerosol particles. As the particles pass through a laser beam, the absorbed energy heats the particles and in turn the surrounding air, which sets off a pressure wave that can be detected by a microphone. The PASS instruments deployed by ARM can also simultaneously measure the scattered laser light at three wavelengths and therefore provide a direct measure of the single-scattering albedo. The Operator Manual for the PASS-3100 is included here with the permission of Droplet Measurement Technologies, the instrument’s manufacturer.

  7. Thermal emission spectrometer experiment - Mars Observer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Anderson, Donald L.; Chase, Stillman C.; Clark, Roger N.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Malin, Michael C.; Pearl, John C.; Carpenter, James; Bandiera, Nuno; Brown, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the thermal emission spectrometer (TES) designed for the Mars Observer mission. The TES measurements of the surface and the atmosphere of Mars will be used to determine and map the composition of the surface rocks, minerals, and the condensates. Examples of information that will be obtained from TES data include mineral abundance maps, condensate properties and their distribution in time and space, aerosol properties and their distribution in time and space, the rock abundance, the polar energy balance, and properties of gaseous species. Where appropriate, these derived parameters will be distributed in the form of gridded map, to allow direct comparison with other derived data sets.

  8. Particulate contamination spectrometer. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R. J.; Boyd, B. A.; Linford, R. M. F.

    1975-01-01

    A laser particulate spectrometer (LPS) system was developed to measure the size and speed distributions of particulate (dusts, aerosols, ice particles, etc.) contaminants. Detection of the particulates was achieved by means of light scattering and extinction effects using a single laser beam to cover a size range of 0.8 to 275 microns diameter and a speed range of 0.2 to 20 meter/second. The LPS system was designed to operate in the high vacuum environment of a space simulation chamber with cold shroud temperatures ranging from 77 to 300 K.

  9. The Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, E.; Harris, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a quadrupole mass spectrometer for experiments in an advanced-teaching laboratory. Discusses the theory of operation of the spectrometer and the factors affecting the resolution. Some examples of mass spectra obtained with this instrument are presented and discussed. (LC)

  10. Differential Moessbauer spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kurinyi, Yu.A.; Grotov, Yu.D.

    1988-07-01

    A spectrometer is described that permits hardware differentiation of spectra with respect to the energy of gamma radiation, specimen temperature, etc. Differentiation is performed by secondary modulation of source motion with subsequent phase-sensitive detection at the harmonics. The spectrometer is CAMAC-compatible and permits simultaneous measurement of the first four harmonics.

  11. Environmental Characterization of GLOBAL Sources of Atmospheric Soil DUST Identified with the NIMBUS 7 Total OZONE Mapping SPECTROMETER (toms) Absorbing Aerosol Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Nicholson, Sharon E.; Gill, Thomas E.

    2002-02-01

    We use the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) sensor on the Nimbus 7 satellite to map the global distribution of major atmospheric dust sources with the goal of identifying common environmental characteristics. The largest and most persistent sources are located in the Northern Hemisphere, mainly in a broad "dust belt" that extends from the west coast of North Africa, over the Middle East, Central and South Asia, to China. There is remarkably little large-scale dust activity outside this region. In particular, the Southern Hemisphere is devoid of major dust activity. Dust sources, regardless of size or strength, can usually be associated with topographical lows located in arid regions with annual rainfall under 200-250 mm. Although the source regions themselves are arid or hyperarid, the action of water is evident from the presence of ephemeral streams, rivers, lakes, and playas. Most major sources have been intermittently flooded through the Quaternary as evidenced by deep alluvial deposits. Many sources are associated with areas where human impacts are well documented, e.g., the Caspian and Aral Seas, Tigris-Euphrates River Basin, southwestern North America, and the loess lands in China. Nonetheless, the largest and most active sources are located in truly remote areas where there is little or no human activity. Thus, on a global scale, dust mobilization appears to be dominated by natural sources. Dust activity is extremely sensitive to many environmental parameters. The identification of major sources will enable us to focus on critical regions and to characterize emission rates in response to environmental conditions. With such knowledge we will be better able to improve global dust models and to assess the effects of climate change on emissions in the future. It will also facilitate the interpretation of the paleoclimate record based on dust contained in ocean sediments and ice cores.

  12. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  13. Online Aerosol Size and Composition Measurements in Coastal Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Giordano, M.; Kalnajs, L.; Johnson, A.; Davis, S. M.; Deshler, T.; Toohey, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the chemical and radiative balance of the Antarctic atmosphere. Aerosols are both a source and sink of gas phase constituents, as well as a transport mechanism for oceanic chemical species into the continental interior. The interaction between aerosols, the gas phase, sea ice and the snow pack is complex and not well understood. Recent observations of ozone depletion events coupled with submicron aerosol mass increase highlight the interaction between the gas and particle phases. These interactions can lead to aerosol formation as well as the deposition of trace elements to the snow pack. To determine the composition and source regions of aerosols in the coastal Antarctic atmosphere, a suite of instruments was deployed in the 2014 Antarctic measurement season including a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS), Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), Ozone analyzer, Scanning Electrical Mobility Sizer (SEMS), and Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS). Measurements of gas phase constituents and aerosol composition were interpreted in the context of back trajectories and local meteorological conditions to link the measured air masses to their source regions.

  14. RXTE Observations of Cas A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.; Lingenfelter, R. E.; Heindl, W. A.; Blanco, P. R.; Pelling, M. R.; Gruber, D. E.; Allen, G. E.; Jahoda, K.; Swank, J. H.; Woosley, S. E.; Nomoto, K.; Higdon, J. C.; Dermer, Charles D. (Editor); Strickman, Mark S. (Editor); Kurfess, James D. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The exciting detection by the COMPTEL instrument of the 1157 keV Ti-44 line from the supernova remnant Cas A sets important new constraints on supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis. The Ti-44 decay also produces x-ray lines at 68 and 78 keV, whose flux should be essentially the same as that of the gamma ray line. The revised COMPTEL flux of 4 x l0(exp -5) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) is very near the sensitivity limit for line detection by the HEXTE instrument on RXTE. We report on the results from two RXTE observations - 20 ks during In Orbit Checkout in January 1996 and 200 ks in April 1996. We also find a strong continuum emission suggesting cosmic ray electron acceleration in the remnant.

  15. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. (a) Full coverage. Full coverage requires that the business unit comply with all of the CAS specified in part...

  16. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. (a) Full coverage. Full coverage requires that the business unit comply with all of the CAS specified in part...

  17. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Types of CAS coverage. 9903... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. (a) Full coverage. Full coverage requires that the business unit comply with all of the CAS specified in part...

  18. Assisting Students' Cognitive Strategies with the Use of CAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarvari, Csaba; Lavicza, Zsolt; Klincsik, Mihaly

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines various cognitive strategies applied while CAS (Computer Algebra System) are used in undergraduate-level engineering mathematics teaching and learning. We posed some questions in relation to such CAS use: What kind of tools can CAS offer to enhance different cognitive strategies of students? How can the use of CAS widen the…

  19. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. (a) Full coverage. Full coverage requires that the business unit comply with all of the CAS specified in part...

  20. Multislit optimized spectrometer for ocean color remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, Tim; Hardesty, Chuck; Davis, Curtiss O.; Tufillaro, Nicholas; Stephens, Michelle; Good, William; Spuhler, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The National Research Council's recommended NASA Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) science mission's purpose is to identify "human versus natural sources of aerosols and ozone precursors, track air pollution transport, and study the dynamics of coastal ecosystems, river plumes and tidal fronts." To achieve these goals two imaging spectrometers are planned, one optimized for atmospheric science and the other for ocean science. The NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) awarded the Multislit Optimized Spectrometer (MOS) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to advance a unique dispersive spectrometer concept in support of the GEO-CAPE ocean science mission. MOS is a spatial multiplexing imaging spectrometer that simultaneously generates hyperspectral data cubes from multiple ground locations enabling a smaller sensor with faster revisit times compared to traditional concepts. This paper outlines the science, motivation, requirements, goals, and status of the MOS program.

  1. A newly discovered Bordetella species carries a transcriptionally active CRISPR-Cas with a small Cas9 endonuclease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Cas9 endonuclease of the Type II-a clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), of Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) has been adapted as a widely used tool for genome editing and genome engineering. Herein, we describe a gene encoding a novel Cas9 ortholog (BpsuCas9) and th...

  2. The SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Sorri, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Greenlees, P. T.; Butler, P. A.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Cox, D. M.; Cresswell, J. R.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Mistry, A.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Rahkila, P.; Sampson, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Seddon, D. A.; Simpson, J.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.

    2014-03-01

    The SAGE spectrometer has been constructed for in-beam nuclear structure studies. SAGE combines a Ge-detector array and an electron spectrometer for detection of -rays and internal conversion electrons, respectively, and allows simultaneous observation of both electrons and -rays emitted from excited nuclei. SAGE is set up in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä and works in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled recoil separator and the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer allowing the use of the recoil-decay tagging method.

  3. In-situ droplet monitoring for self-tuning spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, Akbar; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Kahen, Kaveh

    2010-09-28

    A laser scattering based imaging technique is utilized in order to visualize the aerosol droplets in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch from an aerosol source to the site of analytical measurements. The resulting snapshots provide key information about the spatial distribution of the aerosol introduced by direct and indirect injection devices: 1) a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN); 2) a large-bore DIHEN (LB-DIHEN); and 3) a PFA microflow nebulizer with a PFA Scott-type spray chamber. Moreover, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the in-situ behavior of the aerosol before interaction with, for example, plasma, while the individual surviving droplets are explored by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Further, the velocity distribution of the surviving droplets demonstrates the importance of the initial droplet velocities in complete desolvation of the aerosol for optimum analytical performance in ICP spectrometries. These new observations are important in the design of the next-generation direct injection devices for lower sample consumption, higher sensitivity, lower noise levels, suppressed matrix effects, and for developing smart spectrometers. For example, a controller can be provided to control the output of the aerosol source by controlling the configuration of the source or the gas flow rate via feedback information concerning the aerosol.

  4. Retrieval of Aerosol Height with TROPOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, A. F. J.; de Haan, J. F.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    The Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI), to be launched in 2015, will feature a new aerosol product providing the height of aerosol layers. Aerosol Layer Height will be one of two aerosol products, the other one being the Absorbing Aerosol Index. TROPOMI is a UV-VIS-NIR imaging spectrometer with daily global coverage. It will be part of ESA's Sentinel-5 Precursor mission. Algorithm development for the aerosol height product is currently underway at KNMI. In this presentation we will introduce the algorithm, highlight some of the development issues and discuss possible applications and example aerosol cases. Aerosol height observations from the near-infrared wavelength range will improve retrieval of other aerosol properties, particularly retrieval of absorption optical thickness. An increase in absorption in the ultraviolet wavelength range can be due to a higher imaginary part of the refractive index or to the aerosol layer being at a higher altitude. Independent height observations will therefore further constrain retrieval of the single scattering albedo. Furthermore, aerosol profile information is an important parameter when estimating radiative forcings and climate impacts of aerosol, it is a significant source of uncertainty in trace gas retrieval and it helps in understanding atmospheric transport mechanisms. Finally, timely available, global observations of aerosol height will be of interest to aviation safety agencies. The retrieval algorithm for aerosol height will be based on absorption by oxygen in the A-band (759-770 nm). Aerosols are assumed to be contained in a single layer. A spectral fit of reflectance (resolution 0.5 nm) across the absorption band provides layer height. The retrieval method will be optimal estimation to ensure a proper error analysis. Sensitivity studies have indicated that accuracy and precision of retrieved height for cloud-free scenes will be well below the TROPOMI science requirements (1 km). They have also shown that

  5. Airborne Aerosol Closure Studies During PRIDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, Beat; Reid, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    The Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE) was conducted during June/July of 2000 to study the properties of Saharan dust aerosols transported across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean Islands. During PRIDE, the NASA Ames Research Center six-channel (380 - 1020 nm) airborne autotracking sunphotometer (AATS-6) was operated aboard a Piper Navajo airplane alongside a suite of in situ aerosol instruments. The in situ aerosol instrumentation relevant to this paper included a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP-100) and a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP), covering the radius range of approx. 0.05 to 10 microns. The simultaneous and collocated measurement of multi-spectral aerosol optical depth and in situ particle size distribution data permits a variety of closure studies. For example, vertical profiles of aerosol optical depth obtained during local aircraft ascents and descents can be differentiated with respect to altitude and compared to extinction profiles calculated using the in situ particle size distribution data (and reasonable estimates of the aerosol index of refraction). Additionally, aerosol extinction (optical depth) spectra can be inverted to retrieve estimates of the particle size distributions, which can be compared directly to the in situ size distributions. In this paper we will report on such closure studies using data from a select number of vertical profiles at Cabras Island, Puerto Rico, including measurements in distinct Saharan Dust Layers. Preliminary results show good agreement to within 30% between mid-visible aerosol extinction derived from the AATS-6 optical depth profiles and extinction profiles forward calculated using 60s-average in situ particle size distributions and standard Saharan dust aerosol refractive indices published in the literature. In agreement with tendencies observed in previous studies, our initial results show an underestimate of aerosol extinction calculated based on the in situ size distributions

  6. V723 Cas a borderline classical nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedjung, M.; Iijima, T.

    2002-11-01

    V723 Cas had a light curve similar to that of HR Del before maximum, with a very slow pre-maximum rise, explained according to [2] by the presence of an optically thin wind before maximum unlike the optically thick wind generally seen for classical novae after maximum. Examination of the Fe II emission lines by the SAC method, is compatible with this also having been the case for V723 Cas.

  7. Composite Spectrometer Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Page, N. A.; Rodgers, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Efficient linear dispersive element for spectrometer instruments achieved using several different glasses in multiple-element prism. Good results obtained in both two-and three-element prisms using variety of different glass materials.

  8. The SLIM spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Kevin M; Ingle, James D

    2003-01-01

    A new spectrometer, here denoted the SLIM (simple, low-power, inexpensive, microcontroller-based) spectrometer, was developed that exploits the small size and low cost of solid-state electronic devices. In this device, light-emitting diodes (LED), single-chip integrated circuit photodetectors, embedded microcontrollers, and batteries replace traditional optoelectronic components, computers, and power supplies. This approach results in complete customizable spectrometers that are considerably less expensive and smaller than traditional instrumentation. The performance of the SLIM spectrometer, configured with a flow cell, was evaluated and compared to that of a commercial spectrophotometer. Thionine was the analyte, and the detection limit was approximately 0.2 microM with a 1.5-mm-path length flow cell. Nonlinearity due to the broad emission profile of the LED light sources is discussed. PMID:12530815

  9. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.

    1993-09-13

    This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

  10. The imaging spectrometer approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    Two important sensor design drivers are the requirement for spatial registration of the spectral components and the implementation of the advanced multispectral capability, including spectral band width, number of bands and programmability. The dispersive approach, fundamental to the imaging spectrometer concept, achieves these capabilities by utilizing a spectrometer to disperse the spectral content while preserving the spatial identity of the information in the cross-track direction. Area array detectors in the spectrometer focal plane detect and store the spatial and multispectral content for each line of the image. The choice of spectral bands, image IFOV and swath width is implemented by programmed readout of the focal plane. These choices in conjunction with data compression are used to match the output data rate with the telemetry link capability. Progress in the key technologies of optics, focal plane detector arrays, onboard processing, and focal plane cooling supports the viability of the imaging spectrometer approach.

  11. Microbolometer imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William R; Hook, Simon J; Shoen, Steven M

    2012-03-01

    Newly developed, high-performance, long-wave- and mid-wave-IR Dyson spectrometers offer a compact, low-distortion, broadband, imaging spectrometer design. The design is further accentuated when coupled to microbolometer array technology. This novel coupling allows radiometric and spectral measurements of high-temperature targets. It also serves to be unique since it allows for the system to be aligned warm. This eliminates the need for cryogenic temperature cycling. Proof of concept results are shown for a spectrometer with a 7.5 to 12.0 μm spectral range and approximately 20 nm per spectral band (~200 bands). Results presented in this Letter show performance for remote hot targets (>200 °C) using an engineering grade spectrometer and IR commercial lens assembly. PMID:22378399

  12. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  13. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  14. Aerosols of Mongolian arid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golobokova, L.; Marinayte, I.; Zhamsueva, G.

    2012-04-01

    Sampling was performed in July-August 2005-2010 at Station Sain Shand (44°54'N, 110°07'E) in the Gobi desert (1000 m a.s.l.), West Mongolia. Aerosol samples were collected with a high volume sampler PM 10 (Andersen Instruments Inc., USA) onto Whatman-41 filters. The substance was extracted from the filters by de-ionized water. The solution was screened through an acetate-cellulose filter with 0.2 micron pore size. Ions of ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium, as well as sulphate ions, nitrate ions, hydrocarbonate, chloride ions were determined in the filtrate by means of an atomic adsorption spectrometer Carl Zeiss Jena (Germany), a high performance liquid chromatographer «Milichrome A-02» (Russia), and an ionic chromatographer ICS-3000 (Dionex, USA). The PAH fraction was separated from aerosol samples using hexane extraction at room temperature under UV environment. The extract was concentrated to 0.1-0.2 ml and analysed by a mass-spectrometer "Agilent, GC 6890, MSD 5973 Network". Analysis of concentrations of aerosols components, their correlation ratios, and meteorological modeling show that the main factor affecting chemical composition of aerosols is a flow of contaminants transferred by air masses to the sampling area mainly from the south and south-east, as well as wind conditions of the area, dust storms in particular. Sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium are major ions in aerosol particles at Station Sain Shand. Dust-borne aerosol is known to be a sorbent for both mineral and organic admixtures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) being among superecotoxicants play an important role among resistant organic substances. PAH concentrations were determined in the samples collected in 2010. All aerosol samples contained dominant PAHs with 5-6 benzene rings ( (benze(k)fluoranthen, benze(b)flouranthen, benze(a)pyren, benze(?)pyren, perylene, benze(g,h,i)perylene, and indene(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene). Their total quantity varied between 42 and 90

  15. Characterization of Cas9-Guide RNA Orthologs.

    PubMed

    Braff, Jonathan L; Yaung, Stephanie J; Esvelt, Kevin M; Church, George M

    2016-01-01

    In light of the multitude of new Cas9-mediated functionalities, the ability to carry out multiple Cas9-enabled processes simultaneously and in a single cell is becoming increasingly valuable. Accomplishing this aim requires a set of Cas9-guide RNA (gRNA) pairings that are functionally independent and insulated from one another. For instance, two such protein-gRNA complexes would allow for concurrent activation and editing at independent target sites in the same cell. The problem of establishing orthogonal CRISPR systems can be decomposed into three stages. First, putatively orthogonal systems must be identified with an emphasis on minimizing sequence similarity of the Cas9 protein and its associated RNAs. Second, the systems must be characterized well enough to effectively express and target the systems using gRNAs. Third, the systems should be established as orthogonal to one another by testing for activity and cross talk. Here, we describe the value of these orthogonal CRISPR systems, outline steps for selecting and characterizing potentially orthogonal Cas9-gRNA pairs, and discuss considerations for the desired specificity in Cas9-coupled functions. PMID:27140923

  16. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  17. The Caspian Sea-Hindu Kush Index (CasHKI): A regulatory factor for dust activity over southwest Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Houssos, E. E.; Rashki, A.; Francois, P.; Legrand, M.; Goto, D.; Bartzokas, A.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Takemura, T.

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the modulation in dust activity over southwest (SW) Asia attributed to changes in the mean sea level pressure (MSLP) between the Caspian Sea (CS) and Hindu Kush (HK) during the summer months (June-July-August-September, JJAS) of the period 2000-2014. The MSLP anomalies obtained via NCEP/NCAR re-analysis are evaluated via a new climatology index, the Caspian Sea-Hindu Kush Index (CasHKI), which is defined as CasHKI = MSLPanom.CS - MSLPanom.HK, over specific domains taken over the CS and HK. The changes in CasHKI intensity are examined against dust activity and rainfall distributions over south Asia. The satellite remote sensing (Meteosat, OMI, MODIS) analyses show that high CasHKI values corresponding to enhanced pressure gradient between the CS and the HK, are associated with intensification of northerly winds, increased dust emissions and transportation over SW Asia and north Arabian Sea. In contrast, variations in CasHKI intensity do not seem to have a significant effect on the Indian summer monsoon. Only a slight decrease of precipitation over the southern Indian peninsula and the neighboring oceanic areas and an increase of precipitation along the Ganges Basin and Himalayan range are found to be related to high CasHKI values. Model (MIROC-SPRINTARS) simulations of dust concentration and dust AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) over SW Asia are consistent with the satellite observations, highlighting for the first time the modulation of the SW Asian dust activity by CasHKI.

  18. In Situ Chemical Characterization of Organic Aerosol Surfaces using Direct Analysis in Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M.; Nah, T.; Wilson, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    Obtaining in situ information on the molecular composition of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding the sources, formation mechanisms, aging and physiochemical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Most recently, we have used Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART), which is a "soft" atmospheric pressure ionization technique, for in situ chemical characterization of a variety of laboratory generated organic aerosol and heterogeneous processing oleic acid aerosol. A stream of aerosol particles is crossed with a thermal flow of metastable He atoms (produced by the DART source) in front of an inlet of a mass spectrometer. The thermally desorbed analytes are subsequently ionized with minimal fragmentation by reactive species in the DART ionization source (e.g., metastable He atoms). The ion signal scales with the aerosol surface area rather than aerosol volume, suggesting that aerosol particles are not completely vaporized in the ionization region. The DART can thus measure the chemical composition as a function of aerosol depth. Probing aerosol depth is determined by the thermal desorption rates of aerosol particles. Here, we investigate how the experimental parameters (e.g., DART gas temperature and residence time) and the physiochemical properties of aerosol particles (e.g., enthalpy of vaporization) affect the probing aerosol depth and the desorption-ionization mechanism of aerosol particles in the DART using a series of model organic compounds. We also demonstrate the potential application of DART for in situ chemically analyzing wet aerosol particles undergoing oxidation reactions.

  19. Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: the Finokalia aerosol measurement experiment-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Kostenidou, E.; Lanz, V. A.; Bougiatioti, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2008 (FAME-2008), which was part of the EUCAARI intensive campaign of May 2008. The site at Finokalia is influenced by air masses from different source regions, including long-range transport of pollution from continental Europe. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the organic aerosol. Factor analysis was used to gain insights into the processes and sources affecting the OA composition. The particles were internally mixed and liquid. The largest fraction of the dry NR-PM1 sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organics and a small amount of nitrate. The variability in OA composition could be explained with two factors of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) with differing extents of oxidation but similar volatility. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) was not detected. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation in the bulk composition of NR-PM1 such as total sulfate or total organic aerosol concentrations. However, the OA composition exhibited statistically significant diurnal variation with more oxidized OA in the afternoon. The organic aerosol was highly oxidized, regardless of the source region. Total OA concentrations also varied little with time of day, suggesting that local sources had only a small effect on OA concentrations measured at Finokalia. The aerosol was transported for about one day before arriving at the site, corresponding to an OH exposure of approximately 4×1011 molecules cm-3 s. The constant extent of oxidation suggests that atmospheric aging results in a highly oxidized OA at these OH exposures, regardless of the aerosol source.

  20. Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Kostenidou, E.; Lanz, V. A.; Bougiatioti, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-05-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2008 (FAME-2008), which was part of the EUCAARI intensive campaign of May 2008. The site at Finokalia is influenced by air masses from different source regions, including long-range transport of pollution from continental Europe. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the organic aerosol. Factor analysis was used to gain insights into the processes and sources affecting the OA composition. The particles were internally mixed and liquid. The largest fraction of the dry NR-PM1 sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organics and a small amount of nitrate. The variability in OA composition could be explained with two factors of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) with differing extents of oxidation but similar volatility. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) was not detected. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation in the bulk composition of NR-PM1 such as total sulfate or total organic aerosol concentrations. However, the OA composition exhibited statistically significant diurnal variation with more oxidized OA in the afternoon. The organic aerosol was highly oxidized, regardless of the source region. Total OA concentrations also varied little with source region, suggesting that local sources had only a small effect on OA concentrations measured at Finokalia. The aerosol was transported for about one day before arriving at the site, corresponding to an OH exposure of approximately 4×1011 molecules cm-3 s. The constant extent of oxidation suggests that atmospheric aging results in a highly oxidized OA at these OH exposures, regardless of the aerosol source.

  1. Putting the CAS Standards to Work. Training Manual for the CAS Self Assessment Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerian, Jean M.; Miller, Theodore K., Ed.

    These 18 self-assessment guides and training manual from the Council for the Advancement of Standards (CAS) for Student Services/Development Programs translate the CAS Standards and Guidelines of 1986 into a format for self-study purposes. These self-study guides allow an institution to assure compliance with minimally-acceptable practice, gain an…

  2. An aerosol absorption remote sensing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, P.; Winker, D. M.; Hu, Y.; Trepte, C. R.; Lucker, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol absorption plays an important role in the climate by modulating atmospheric radiative forcing processes. Unfortunately aerosol absorption is very difficult to obtain via satellite remote sensing techniques. In this work we have built an algorithm to obtain aerosol absorption optical depth using both measurements from a passive O2 A-band spectrometer and an active lidar. The instrument protocols for these two satellite instruments are the O2 A-band spectrometer onboard the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) and the CALIOP onboard CALIPSO. The aerosol height and typing information is obtained from the CALIOP measurement. The aerosol extinction and absorption optical depths are then retrieved by fitting the forward model simulations to the O2 A-band spectrometer measurements. The forward model simulates the scattering and absorption of solar light at high spectral resolution in the O2 A-band region. The O2 and other gas absorption coefficients near 0.76 micron are calculated by either the line-by-line code (for instance, the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator) or the OCO2 ABSCO Look-Up-Table. The line parameters used are from the HITRAN 2008 database (http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/hitran/). The multiple light scattering by molecules, aerosols, and clouds is handled by the radiative transfer model based on the successive order of scattering method (Zhai et al, JQSRT, Vol. 111, pp. 1025-1040, 2010). The code is parallelized with Message Passing Interface (MPI) for better efficiency. The aerosol model is based on Shettle and Fenn (AFGL-TR 790214, 1979) with variant relative humidity. The vertical distribution of the aerosols and clouds will be read in from the CALIPSO product (http://www-calipso.larc.nasa.gov). The surface albedo is estimated by the continuum of the three bands of OCO2 payloads. Sensitivity study shows that the Gaussian quadrature (stream) number should be at least 12 to ensure the reflectance error is within 0.5% at the top of the atmosphere

  3. Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols, defined as particles and droplets suspended in air, are always present in the atmosphere. They are part of the earth-atmosphere climate system, because they interact with both incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. They do this directly through scattering and absorption, and indirectly through effects on clouds. Submicrometer aerosols usually predominate in terms of number of particles per unit volume of air. They have dimensions close to the wavelengths of visible light, and thus scatter radiation from the sun very effectively. They are produced in the atmosphere by chemical reactions of sulfur-, nitrogen- and carbon-containing gases of both natural and anthropogenic origins. Light absorption is dominated by particles containing elemental carbon (soot), produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and by biomass burning. Light-scattering dominates globally, although absorption can be significant at high latitudes, particularly over highly reflective snow- or ice-covered surfaces. Other aerosol substances that may be locally important are those from volcanic eruptions, wildfires and windblown dust.

  4. Synthesizing Scientific Progress: Outcomes from US EPA’s Carbonaceous Aerosols and Source Apportionment STAR Grants

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACTA number of studies in the past decade have transformed the way we think about atmospheric aerosols. The advances include, but are not limited to, source apportionment of organics using aerosol mass spectrometer data, the volatility basis set approach, quantifying isopre...

  5. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  6. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  7. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  8. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  9. Comparison of imaging spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C

    2000-01-09

    Realistic signal to noise performance estimates for the various types of instruments being considered for NGST are compared, based on the point source detection values quoted in the available ISIM final reports. The corresponding sensitivity of the various types of spectrometers operating in a full field imaging mode, for both emission line objects and broad spectral distribution objects, is computed and displayed. For the purpose of seeing the earliest galaxies, or the faintest possible emission line sources, the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer emerges superior to all others, by orders of magnitude in speed.

  10. Evolution of the Physicochemical and Activation Properties of Aerosols within Smoke Plumes during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Wang, J.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Shilling, J. E.; Fortner, E.; Chand, D.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Kleinman, L. I.; Senum, G.; Schmid, B.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning from wildfires and controlled agricultural burns are known to be a major source of fine particles and organic aerosols at northern temperate latitudes during the summer months. However, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol during transport and the potential impact of this evolution on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity has rarely been studied for these events. During the DOE-sponsored Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) conducted in the summer and fall of 2013, over 30 research flights sampled biomass burning plumes from wildfires in the Northwestern United States and agricultural burns in the Mid-South region of the United States. A large suite of instruments aboard the DOE G-1 (Gulfstream-1) measured the chemical, physical, and optical properties of biomass burning aerosol with an emphasis on black carbon. A Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS), Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A), and Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP) were used to measure the aerosol size distribution from 15 - 3,000 nm at 1-Hz. A dual column CCN counter measured the CCN number concentration at supersaturations of 0.25% and 0.50% at a time resolution of 1-Hz and the aerosol chemical composition was measured using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS, Aerodyne, Inc). The SP-AMS was operated in two modes: (i) as a traditional high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.), which measured chemical composition of non-refractory aerosols and (ii) as the SP-AMS which measured chemical composition of the refractory black carbon-containing (rBC) particle coating and rBC aerosol mass. Utilizing the aforementioned measurements, a CCN closure study is used to investigate the emitted aerosol hygroscopicity, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol, and the potential impacts on cloud microphysics from the different fuel sources.

  11. Aureole lidar: instrument design, data analysis, and comparison with aircraft spectrometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Hooper, W P

    1993-07-20

    A lidar system is developed to map extinction under the flight path of a P-3 aircraft. With a modified Cassegrainian telescope, signals from both wide and narrow fields of view are detected. The wide field-of-view detector senses the aureole signal generated by sea surface reflection and aerosol forward scattering. The narrow field-of-view detector senses the backscattering profile and the direct reflection off the sea surface. Optical depth and extinction profiles are derived from these signals. In comparisons made beween in situ aerosol-size spectrometer and lidar measurements, lidar profiles are smaller in magnitude but similar in shape to the spectrometer profiles. PMID:20830043

  12. SAGE II aerosol validation - Selected altitude measurements, including particle micromeasurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Russell, Philip B.; Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Ferry, Guy V.; Livingston, John M.; Rosen, James N.; Osborn, Mary T.; Kritz, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The validity of particulate extinction coefficients derived from limb path solar radiance measurements obtained during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II is tested. The SAGE II measurements are compared with correlative aerosol measurements taken during January 1985, August 1985, and July 1986 with impactors, laser spectrometers, and filter samplers on a U-2 aircraft, an upward pointing lidar on a P-3 aircraft, and balloon-borne optical particle counters. The data for July 29, 1986 are discussed in detail. The aerosol measurements taken on this day at an altitude of 20.5 km produce particulate extinction values which validate the SAGE II values for similar wavelengths.

  13. Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    FTS could generate higher resolution data products faster and more often for proposed atmospheric science missions in the next millennium. The result would be an increased ability to provide the science community with improved global imaging, better global weather and climate forecasting models, and an unprecedented capability to monitor gases and aerosols.

  14. Biogenic Contributions to Summertime Arctic Aerosol: Observations of Aerosol Composition from the Netcare 2014 Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Burkart, J.; Koellner, F.; Schneider, J.; Bozem, H.; Hoor, P. M.; Brauner, R.; Herber, A. B.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic is a complex and poorly studied aerosol environment, impacted by strong anthropogenic contributions during winter months and by regional sources in cleaner summer months. In order to gain a predictive understanding of the changing climate in this region, it is necessary to understand the balance between these two aerosol sources to clarify how aerosol might be altered by or contribute to climate change. We present results of vertically resolved, submicron aerosol composition from an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) during the NETCARE 2014 Polar6 aircraft campaign. The campaign was based in the high Arctic, at Resolute, NU (74°N), allowing measurements from 60 to 2900 meters over ice, open water and near the ice-edge. Concurrent measurements aboard the Polar6 included ultrafine and accumulation mode particle number and size, cloud condensation nuclei concentrations, trace gas concentrations and single particle composition. Aerosol vertical profiles measured by the AMS can be broadly characterized into two regimes corresponding to different meteorological conditions: the first with very low aerosol loading (<0.1 μg/m3) at low altitudes compared to that aloft and high numbers of nucleation mode particles, and the second with higher concentrations at lower levels. This second regime was associated with low concentrations of nucleation mode particles, and higher observable levels of methane sulphonic acid (MSA) from AMS measurements at low altitudes. MSA, produced during the oxidation of dimethyl sulphide, is a marker for the contribution of ocean-derived biogenic sulphur to particulate sulphur and could be identified and quantified using the high-resolution AMS. MSA to sulphate ratios were observed to increase towards lower altitudes, suggesting a contribution to aerosol loading from the ocean. In addition, we present measurements of aerosol neutralization and the characteristics of organic aerosol that relate to the growth of

  15. Seasonal variation of atmospheric aerosols and its impact on aerosol radiation forcing over Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Srivastava, M. K.; Bano, T.; Nath, S.; Tanwar, R. S.; Singh, R.

    Seasonal variability in suspended particulate matter concentration optical properties of aerosol and radiation flux have been studied for Delhi station India using long-term data that comprised of ground based and satellite-borne observations Ground based measurements were taken by a hand-held portable spectrometer MICROTOPS II Solar Light Co Inc USA operating at central wavelengths 340 500 675 870 and 1020 nms FWHM pm 2-10 nm The global radiation flux was measured using the CM-21 pyranometer Kipp and Zonen Germany for wavelength range 305-2800 nm The flux for 290-320 nm wavelength range was measured using UV-Biometer Solar Light Co Inc USA The seasonal change in radiative forcing due to seasonal variability in number density and character of the aerosols is done using Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Radiation Transfer model SBDART Since the chemical character of the dominating aerosols for different season was not readily available an estimation of the aerosol composition was done using Optical Properties of Aerosols and Cloud OPAC model The output of the OPAC model gives the required parameters for the estimation of radiation forcing by SBDART These include single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter Initial results reveal three specific seasonal characteristics of aerosols pre-monsoon post monsoon and the winter excluding monsoon period when data is highly irregular due to predominantly cloudy conditions and heavy downpour During pre-monsoon high aerosol optical depth AOD and near zero often

  16. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  17. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  18. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  19. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  20. 48 CFR 970.3002 - CAS program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CAS program requirements. 970.3002 Section 970.3002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY....3002 CAS program requirements....

  1. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  2. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  3. Initial steps of aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, M.; Laakso, L.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Riipinen, I.; Dal Maso, M.; Anttila, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Hõrrak, U.; Vana, M.; Tammet, H.

    2004-12-01

    The formation and growth of atmospheric aerosols depend on several steps, namely nucleation, initial steps of growth and subsequent - mainly condensational - growth. This work focuses on the initial steps of growth, meaning the growth right after nucleation, where the interplay of curvature effects and thermodynamics has a significant role on the growth kinetics. More specifically, we investigate how ion clusters and aerosol particles grow from 1.5 nm to 20 nm (diameter) in atmospheric conditions using experimental data obtained by air ion and aerosol spectrometers. The measurements have been performed at a boreal forest site in Finland. The observed trend that the growth rate seems to increase as a function of size can be used to investigate possible growth mechanisms. Such a growth rate is consistent with a recently suggested nano-Köhler mechanism, in which growth is activated at a certain size with respect to condensation of organic vapors. The results also imply that charge-enhanced growth associated with ion-mediated nucleation plays only a minor role in the initial steps of growth, since it would imply a clear decrease of the growth rate with size. Finally, further evidence was obtained on the earlier suggestion that atmospheric nucleation and the subsequent growth of fresh nuclei are likely to be uncoupled phenomena via different participating vapors.

  4. Initial steps of aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, O.; Laakso, L.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Riipinen, I.; Dal Maso, M.; Anttila, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Hõrrak, U.; Vana, M.; Tammet, H.

    2004-09-01

    The formation and growth of atmospheric aerosols depend on several steps, namely nucleation, initial steps of growth and subsequent - mainly condensational - growth. This work focuses on the initial steps of growth, meaning the growth right after nucleation, where the interplay of curvature effects and thermodynamics has a significant role on the growth kinetics. More specifically, we investigate how ion clusters and aerosol particles grow from 1.5 nm to 20 nm in atmospheric conditions using experimental data obtained by air ion and aerosol spectrometers. The measurements have been performed at a boreal forest site in Finland. The observed trend that the growth rate seems to increase as a function of size can be used to investigate possible growth mechanisms. Such a growth rate is consistent with a recently suggested nano-Köhler mechanism, in which growth is activated at a certain size with respect to condensation of organic vapors. The results also imply that charge-enhance growth associated with ion-mediated nucleation plays only a minor role in the initial steps of growth, since it would imply a clear decrease of the growth rate with size. Finally, further evidence was obtained on the earlier suggestion that atmospheric nucleation and the subsequent growth of fresh nuclei are likely to be uncoupled phenomena via different participating vapors.

  5. CRISPR-Cas: Revolutionising genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Samantha Anne; Pepper, Michael Sean

    2016-09-01

    The ability to permanently alter or repair the human genome has been the subject of a number of science fiction films, but with the recent advent of several customisable sequence-specific endonuclease technologies, genome engineering looks set to become a clinical reality in the near future. This article discusses recent advancements in the technology called 'clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated genes' (CRISPR-Cas), the potential of CRISPR-Cas to revolutionise molecular medicine, and the ethical and regulatory hurdles facing its application. PMID:27601107

  6. Mass Spectrometers in Space!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system over several decades has benefitted greatly from the sensitive chemical analyses offered by spaceflight mass spectrometers. When dealing with an unknown environment, the broadband detection capabilities of mass analyzers have proven extremely valuable in determining the composition and thereby the basic nature of space environments, including the outer reaches of Earth s atmosphere, interplanetary space, the Moon, and the planets and their satellites. Numerous mass analyzer types, including quadrupole, monopole, sector, ion trap, and time-of-flight have been incorporated in flight instruments and delivered robotically to a variety of planetary environments. All such instruments went through a rigorous process of application-specific development, often including significant miniaturization, testing, and qualification for the space environment. Upcoming missions to Mars and opportunities for missions to Venus, Europa, Saturn, Titan, asteroids, and comets provide new challenges for flight mass spectrometers that push to state of the art in fundamental analytical technique. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on the recently-launch Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission incorporates a quadrupole analyzer to support direct evolved gas as well as gas chromatograph-based analysis of martian rocks and atmosphere, seeking signs of a past or present habitable environment. A next-generation linear ion trap mass spectrometer, using both electron impact and laser ionization, is being incorporated into the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument, which will be flown to Mars in 2018. These and other mass spectrometers and mission concepts at various stages of development will be described.

  7. Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the global atmospheric changes is difficult with today's current technology. However, with high resolution and nearly continuous observations from a satellite, it's possible to transform our understanding of the atmosphere. To enable the next generation of atmospheric science, a new class of orbiting atmospheric sensors is being developed. The foundation of this advanced concept is the Fourier Transform Spectrometer, or FTS.

  8. Cyclotrons as mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.

    1984-04-01

    The principles and design choices for cyclotrons as mass spectrometers are described. They are illustrated by examples of cyclotrons developed by various groups for this purpose. The use of present high energy cyclotrons for mass spectrometry is also described. 28 references, 12 figures.

  9. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Prew, Michelle S.; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Topkar, Ved; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P.W.; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2015-01-01

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing1, 2, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM)3–6. As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-Seq analysis7. In addition, we identified and characterized another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also found that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities. PMID:26098369

  10. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities.

    PubMed

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Topkar, Ved V; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P W; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2015-07-23

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome-editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-seq analysis. In addition, we identify and characterize another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also find that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities. PMID:26098369

  11. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  12. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  13. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  14. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  15. 48 CFR 9903.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CAS applicability. 9903... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-1 CAS applicability. (a) This subsection describes the rules for determining whether a proposed contract or subcontract is exempt from...

  16. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  17. 48 CFR 9903.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CAS applicability. 9903... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-1 CAS applicability. (a) This subsection describes the rules for determining whether a proposed contract or subcontract is exempt from...

  18. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  19. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  20. 48 CFR 9903.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CAS applicability. 9903... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-1 CAS applicability. (a) This subsection describes the rules for determining whether a proposed contract or subcontract is exempt from...

  1. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  2. 48 CFR 9903.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true CAS applicability. 9903.201... ACCOUNTING STANDARDS CONTRACT COVERAGE CAS Program Requirements 9903.201-1 CAS applicability. (a) This subsection describes the rules for determining whether a proposed contract or subcontract is exempt from...

  3. 48 CFR 30.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-2 Types of CAS coverage. See 48 CFR 9903.201-2 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Types of CAS coverage....

  4. 48 CFR 30.201-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Program Requirements 30.201-1 CAS applicability. See 48 CFR 9903.201-1 (FAR appendix). ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CAS applicability....

  5. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Riipinen, I.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-07-01

    A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD) was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008). A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model. Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements. The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species.

  6. Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Timothy Onasch

    2009-09-09

    This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements

  7. LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION OF ULTRAFINE AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-line analysis of ultrafine aerosol particle in the 12 to 150 nm size range is performed by
    laser desorption/ionization. Particles are size selected with a differential mobility analyzer and then
    sent into a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer where they are ablated w...

  8. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  9. Structural plasticity and in vivo activity of Cas1 from the type I-F CRISPR-Cas system.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Max E; Nakatani, Yoshio; Staals, Raymond H J; Kieper, Sebastian N; Opel-Reading, Helen K; McKenzie, Rebecca E; Fineran, Peter C; Krause, Kurt L

    2016-04-15

    CRISPR-Cas systems are adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes that provide protection against viruses and other foreign DNA. In the adaptation stage, foreign DNA is integrated into CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) arrays as new spacers. These spacers are used in the interference stage to guide effector CRISPR associated (Cas) protein(s) to target complementary foreign invading DNA. Cas1 is the integrase enzyme that is central to the catalysis of spacer integration. There are many diverse types of CRISPR-Cas systems, including type I-F systems, which are typified by a unique Cas1-Cas2-3 adaptation complex. In the present study we characterize the Cas1 protein of the potato phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, an important model organism for understanding spacer acquisition in type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems. We demonstrate by mutagenesis that Cas1 is essential for adaptation in vivo and requires a conserved aspartic acid residue. By X-ray crystallography, we show that although P. atrosepticum Cas1 adopts a fold conserved among other Cas1 proteins, it possesses remarkable asymmetry as a result of structural plasticity. In particular, we resolve for the first time a flexible, asymmetric loop that may be unique to type I-F Cas1 proteins, and we discuss the implications of these structural features for DNA binding and enzymatic activity. PMID:26929403

  10. Historic light curve of V890 Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesci, R.

    2016-05-01

    The variability of V890 Cas is studied with 87 -band plates of the Asiago archive. The star shows variations of about 5 mag with an average magnitude =13 and a period of 486 days. An 5.0 color index is also derived near the maximum luminosity.

  11. Using the CAS Standards in Assessment Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the use of professional standards of practice in assessment and of the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS). It outlines a model for conducting program self-studies and discusses the importance of implementing change based on assessment results.

  12. Lessons Learned on Management of CAS Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyadjieff, Kiril

    1995-01-01

    Computer-assisted studies (CAS) attract foreign language professionals' attention due to the reliability of personal computers, the decreasing cost of available technology, and the new generation of students for whom electronic media are a familiar habitat. This article focuses on a project of the Defense Language Institute that produced over…

  13. Synergic use of TOMS and Aeronet Observations for Characterization of Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Siniuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  14. Smartphone spectrometer for colorimetric biosensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Peng; Tran, Nhung Thi; Zhang, Jinling; Chia, Wei Sheng; Boujday, Souhir; Liedberg, Bo

    2016-05-23

    We report on a smartphone spectrometer for colorimetric biosensing applications. The spectrometer relies on a sample cell with an integrated grating substrate, and the smartphone's built-in light-emitting diode flash and camera. The feasibility of the smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated for detection of glucose and human cardiac troponin I, the latter in conjunction with peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles. PMID:27163736

  15. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  16. Simulation of the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. M.; Konki, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hauschild, K.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sorri, J.

    2015-06-01

    The SAGE spectrometer combines a Ge-detector array with a Si detector to allow simultaneous detection of γ-rays and electrons. A comprehensive GEANT4 simulation package of the SAGE spectrometer has been developed with the ability to simulate the expected datasets based on user input files. The measured performance of the spectrometer is compared to the results obtained from the simulations.

  17. CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly) method of constructing megabase-sized DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianting; Wu, Ronghai; Xue, Xiaoli; Qin, Zhongjun

    2016-08-19

    Current DNA assembly methods for preparing highly purified linear subassemblies require complex and time-consuming in vitro manipulations that hinder their ability to construct megabase-sized DNAs (e.g. synthetic genomes). We have developed a new method designated 'CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly)' that directly uses large circular DNAs in a one-step in vivo assembly process. The large circular DNAs are co-introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae by protoplast fusion, and they are cleaved by RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to release the linear DNA segments for subsequent assembly by the endogenous homologous recombination system. The CasHRA method allows efficient assembly of multiple large DNA segments in vivo; thus, this approach should be useful in the last stage of genome construction. As a proof of concept, we combined CasHRA with an upstream assembly method (Gibson procedure of genome assembly) and successfully constructed a 1.03 Mb MGE-syn1.0 (Minimal Genome of Escherichia coli) that contained 449 essential genes and 267 important growth genes. We expect that CasHRA will be widely used in megabase-sized genome constructions. PMID:27220470

  18. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  19. Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.; Carter, M.R.; Fields, D.J.; Hernandez, J.

    1993-04-14

    The operating principles of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of such instruments with respect to alternative imaging spectrometers are discussed. The primary advantages of the IFTS are the capacity to acquire more than an order of magnitude more spectral channels than alternative systems with more than an order of magnitude greater etendue than for alternative systems. The primary disadvantage of IFTS, or FTS in general, is the sensitivity to temporal fluctuations, either random or periodic. Data from the IRIFTS (ir IFTS) prototype instrument, sensitive in the infrared, are presented having a spectral sensitivity of 0.01 absorbance units, a spectral resolution of 6 cm{sup {minus}1} over the range 0 to 7899 cm{sup {minus}1}, and a spatial resolution of 2.5 mr.

  20. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  1. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcutt, Simon; Taylor, Fredric; Ade, Peter; Kunde, Virgil; Jennings, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) is a remote sensing instrument to be flown on the Cassini orbiter. It contains two Fourier transform spectrometers covering wavelengths of 7-1000 microns. The instrument is expected to have higher spectral resolution, smaller field of view, and better signal-to-noise performance than its counterpart, IRIS, on the Voyager missions. These improvements allow the study of the variability of the composition and temperature of the atmospheres of both Saturn and Titan with latitude, longitude and height, as well as allowing the possibility of discovery of previously undetected chemical species in these atmospheres. The long wavelengths accessible to CIRS allow sounding deeper into both atmospheres than was possible with IRIS.

  2. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  3. Ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M. (Inventor); Clay, D. R.; Goldstein, B. E.; Goldstein, R.

    1984-01-01

    An ion mass spectrometer is described which detects and indicates the characteristics of ions received over a wide angle, and which indicates the mass to charge ratio, the energy, and the direction of each detected ion. The spectrometer includes a magnetic analyzer having a sector magnet that passes ions received over a wide angle, and an electrostatic analyzer positioned to receive ions passing through the magnetic analyzer. The electrostatic analyzer includes a two dimensional ion sensor at one wall of the analyzer chamber, that senses not only the lengthwise position of the detected ion to indicate its mass to charge ratio, but also detects the ion position along the width of the chamber to indicate the direction in which the ion was traveling.

  4. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  5. Controlling UCAVs by JTACs in CAS missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaş, A. E.

    2014-06-01

    By means of evolving technology, capabilities of UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)s are increasing rapidly. This development provides UAVs to be used in many different areas. One of these areas is CAS (Close Air Support) mission. UAVs have several advantages compared to manned aircraft, however there are also some problematic areas. The remote controlling of these vehicles from thousands of nautical miles away via satellite may lead to various problems both ethical and tactical aspects. Therefore, CAS missions require a good level of ALI (Air-Land Integration), a high SA (situational awareness) and precision engagement. In fact, there is an aware friendly element in the target area in CAS missions, unlike the other UAV operations. This element is an Airman called JTAC (Joint Terminal Attack Controller). Unlike the JTAC, UAV operators are too far away from target area and use the limited FOV (Field of View) provided by camera and some other sensor data. In this study, target area situational awareness of a UAV operator and a JTAC, in a high-risk mission for friendly ground forces and civilians such as CAS, are compared. As a result of this comparison, answer to the question who should control the UCAV (Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle) in which circumstances is sought. A literature review is made in UAV and CAS fields and recent air operations are examined. The control of UCAV by the JTAC is assessed by SWOT analysis and as a result it is deduced that both control methods can be used in different situations within the framework of the ROE (Rules Of Engagement) is reached.

  6. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, William J. (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250.degree. C., and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  7. The Cryogenic Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Simpson, Janet P.; Rubin, Robert H.

    1995-01-01

    The Cryogenic Grating Spectrometer (CGS) first flew on the KAO in 1982 December and has been open to guest investigators since 1984 October. In the past 12 years it has completed over 100 research flights supporting 13 different principal investigators studying a variety of objects. We briefly describe the instrument, its capabilities and accomplishments, and acknowledge the people who have contributed to its development and operation.

  8. Spherical electrostatic electron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.-S.; Kolk, B.; Kachnowski, T.; Trooster, J.; Benczer-Koller, N.

    1982-06-01

    A high transmission, low energy spherical electrostatic electron spectrometer particularly suited to the geometry required for Mössbauer-conversion electron spectroscopy was built. A transmission of 13% at an energy resolution of 2% was obtained with an 0.5 cm diameter source of 13.6 keV electrons. Applications to the study of hyperfine interactions of surfaces and interfaces are discussed.

  9. Does the Madden-Julian Oscillation Influence Aerosol Variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, B.; Waliser, D. E.; Kahn, R. A.; Li, Q.; Yung, Y. L.; Tyranowski, T.; Geogdzhayev, I. V.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Torres, O.; Smirnov, A.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the modulation of aerosols by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) using satellite-based global aerosol products, including aerosol index (AI) from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on Nimbus-7, and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA satellites. A composite analysis is performed for boreal winter, and the global pentad rainfall data from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) are used to identify MJO events. The MJO composites exhibit large variations in the TOMS AI and MODIS/AVHRR AOT over the equatorial Indian and western Pacific Oceans where MJO convection is active, as well as the tropical Africa and Atlantic Ocean where MJO convection is relatively weak but the background aerosol level is relatively high. A strong inverse linear relationship between the TOMS AI and rainfall anomalies, but a weaker, less coherent positive correlation between the MODIS/AVHRR AOT and rainfall anomalies, were found. The Aerosol Robotic Network AOT pattern at Kaashidoo (73.5°E, 4.9°N) and Nauru (167°E, 0.5°S) is more consistent with MODIS and AVHRR. These results indicate a connection between the MJO, its associated rainfall and circulation variability, and the observed aerosol variations. Several physical and non-physical factors that may contribute to the observed aerosol-rainfall relationship, such as aerosol humidification effect, wet deposition, surface wind speed, phytoplankton, different sensor sensitivities (absorbing versus non-absorbing aerosols and upper versus lower tropospheric aerosols), sampling issue, and cloud contamination, are discussed. However, a clear causal explanation for the observed patterns remains elusive. Further investigation is needed to unravel this complex aerosol-rainfall relationship.

  10. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  11. In vivo genome editing using Staphylococcus aureus Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Yan, Winston X.; Scott, David A.; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Kriz, Andrea J.; Zetsche, Bernd; Shalem, Ophir; Wu, Xuebing; Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene; Sharp, Phillip A.; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 has emerged as a versatile genome-editing platform. However, the size of the commonly used Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) limits its utility for basic research and therapeutic applications that employ the highly versatile adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery vehicle. Here, we characterize six smaller Cas9 orthologs and show that Cas9 from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9) can edit the genome with efficiencies similar to those of SpCas9, while being >1kb shorter. We packaged SaCas9 and its sgRNA expression cassette into a single AAV vector and targeted the cholesterol regulatory gene Pcsk9 in the mouse liver. Within one week of injection, we observed >40% gene modification, accompanied by significant reductions in serum Pcsk9 and total cholesterol levels. We further demonstrate the power of using BLESS to assess the genome-wide targeting specificity of SaCas9 and SpCas9, and show that SaCas9 can mediate genome editing in vivo with high specificity. PMID:25830891

  12. Structure and Engineering of Francisella novicida Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Hisato; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Horii, Takuro; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Kimura, Mika; Hsu, Patrick D.; Nakane, Takanori; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Hatada, Izuho; Zhang, Feng; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 cleaves double-stranded DNA targets complementary to the guide RNA, and has been applied to programmable genome editing. Cas9-mediated cleavage requires a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) juxtaposed with the DNA target sequence, thus constricting the range of targetable sites. Here, we report the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structures of Cas9 from Francisella novicida (FnCas9), one of the largest Cas9 orthologs, in complex with a guide RNA and its PAM-containing DNA targets. A structural comparison of FnCas9 with other Cas9 orthologs revealed striking conserved and divergent features among distantly related CRISPR-Cas9 systems. We found that FnCas9 recognizes the 5′-NGG-3′ PAM, and used the structural information to create a variant that can recognize the more relaxed 5′-YG-3′ PAM. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pre-assembled FnCas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes can be microinjected into mouse zygotes to edit endogenous sites with the 5′-YG-3′ PAMs, thus expanding the target space of the CRISPR-Cas9 toolbox. PMID:26875867

  13. Structure and Engineering of Francisella novicida Cas9.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hisato; Gootenberg, Jonathan S; Horii, Takuro; Abudayyeh, Omar O; Kimura, Mika; Hsu, Patrick D; Nakane, Takanori; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Hatada, Izuho; Zhang, Feng; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-02-25

    The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 cleaves double-stranded DNA targets complementary to the guide RNA and has been applied to programmable genome editing. Cas9-mediated cleavage requires a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) juxtaposed with the DNA target sequence, thus constricting the range of targetable sites. Here, we report the 1.7 Å resolution crystal structures of Cas9 from Francisella novicida (FnCas9), one of the largest Cas9 orthologs, in complex with a guide RNA and its PAM-containing DNA targets. A structural comparison of FnCas9 with other Cas9 orthologs revealed striking conserved and divergent features among distantly related CRISPR-Cas9 systems. We found that FnCas9 recognizes the 5'-NGG-3' PAM, and used the structural information to create a variant that can recognize the more relaxed 5'-YG-3' PAM. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the FnCas9-ribonucleoprotein complex can be microinjected into mouse zygotes to edit endogenous sites with the 5'-YG-3' PAM, thus expanding the target space of the CRISPR-Cas9 toolbox. PMID:26875867

  14. Photoactivatable CRISPR-Cas9 for optogenetic genome editing.

    PubMed

    Nihongaki, Yuta; Kawano, Fuun; Nakajima, Takahiro; Sato, Moritoshi

    2015-07-01

    We describe an engineered photoactivatable Cas9 (paCas9) that enables optogenetic control of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in human cells. paCas9 consists of split Cas9 fragments and photoinducible dimerization domains named Magnets. In response to blue light irradiation, paCas9 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells induces targeted genome sequence modifications through both nonhomologous end joining and homology-directed repair pathways. Genome editing activity can be switched off simply by extinguishing the light. We also demonstrate activation of paCas9 in spatial patterns determined by the sites of irradiation. Optogenetic control of targeted genome editing should facilitate improved understanding of complex gene networks and could prove useful in biomedical applications. PMID:26076431

  15. Intercomparison of aerosol instruments: number concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, E O; Sinclair, D; Tu, K W; Hinchliffe, L; Franklin, H

    1982-05-01

    An intercomparison of aerosol instruments conducted February 23-27, 1981, at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) focused on five instruments: the Pollak and TSI condensation nucleus counters; the Active Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer (ASAS-X); and two aerosol electrometers. Test aerosols of sodium chloride and ammonium fluorescein generated by nebulization/electrostatic classification were used to obtain 195 lines of comparison data. Concentrations measured by the ASAS-X and the TSI aerosol electrometer averaged respectively 1.388 and 1.581 times that measured by the Pollak. These ratios were very stable during the week and there was little effect of particle size or material. Most other comparisons were equally stable. However, a review of past work at EML and elsewhere led to the disturbing conclusion that these ratios may change from year to year, or from season to season. A filter sample was taken from microscopy, concurrent with readings from the ASAS-X and the TSI condensation nucleus counters. In this sample, the two instruments differed by 20%. Within its 20% uncertainty, the filter result matched both the TSI and ASAS-X readings.

  16. Mass spectrometers: instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooks, R. G.; Hoke, S. H., II; Morand, K. L.; Lammert, S. A.

    1992-09-01

    Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the past three years are reviewed. The subject is characterized by an enormous diversity of designs, a high degree of competition between different laboratories working with either different or similar techniques and by extremely rapid progress in improving analytical performance. Instruments can be grouped into genealogical charts based on their physical and conceptual interrelationships. This is illustrated using mass analyzers of different types. The time course of development of particular instrumental concepts is illustrated in terms of the s-curves typical of cell growth. Examples are given of instruments which are at the exponential, linear and mature growth stages. The prime examples used are respectively: (i) hybrid instruments designed to study reactive collisions of ions with surfaces: (ii) the Paul ion trap; and (iii) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the area of ion/surface collisions, reactive collisions such as hydrogen radical abstraction from the surface by the impinging ion are studied. They are shown to depend upon the chemical nature of the surface through the use of experiments which utilize self-assembled monolayers as surfaces. The internal energy deposited during surface-induced dissociation upon collision with different surfaces in a BEEQ instrument is also discussed. Attention is also given to a second area of emerging instrumentation, namely technology which allows mass spectrometers to be used for on-line monitoring of fluid streams. A summary of recent improvements in the performance of the rapidly developing quadrupole ion trap instrument illustrates this stage of instrument development. Improvements in resolution and mass range and their application to the characterization of biomolecules are described. The interaction of theory with experiment is illustrated through the role of simulations of ion motion in the ion trap. It is emphasized that mature instruments play a

  17. Marine and urban influences on summertime PM2.5 aerosol in the Po basin using mobile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R.; El Haddad, I.; Crippa, M.; Decesari, S.; Slowik, J. G.; Poulain, L.; Gilardoni, S.; Rinaldi, M.; Carbone, S.; Canonaco, F.; Huang, R.-J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-11-01

    We report ambient measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) on a mobile platform in the southeast Po Valley (Italy) in summer 2012. During the PEGASOS southbound campaign measurements of non-refractory aerosol were performed in urban and rural environments as well as near the coast of the Adriatic Sea. Organic source apportionment analysis of the aerosol mass spectrometer data was carried out using positive matrix factorization and multilinear engine (ME-2) receptor modelling. Five major organic aerosol components were identified: hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SVOOA), low volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA), cooking organic aerosol (COA) and a regionally influenced highly oxygenated organic aerosol (HOOA). Essential changes in both aerosol composition and concentration were induced by the ventilation and recirculation of air masses in the East-West direction of the valley (land/sea breeze system) and via the Apennine mountain range (mountain/valley wind system). An urban increment of the non-refractory aerosol mass concentration in Bologna of about 1.6-2.3 μg/m3 compared to the surrounding regions was quantified which can be explained by the sum of local contributions from cooking activities and from hydrocarbon-like aerosol related to traffic emissions.

  18. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  19. Unification of Cas protein families and a simple scenario for the origin and evolution of CRISPR-Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems that are present in most Archaea and many Bacteria function by incorporating fragments of alien genomes into specific genomic loci, transcribing the inserts and using the transcripts as guide RNAs to destroy the genome of the cognate virus or plasmid. This RNA interference-like immune response is mediated by numerous, diverse and rapidly evolving Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins, several of which form the Cascade complex involved in the processing of CRISPR transcripts and cleavage of the target DNA. Comparative analysis of the Cas protein sequences and structures led to the classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems into three Types (I, II and III). Results A detailed comparison of the available sequences and structures of Cas proteins revealed several unnoticed homologous relationships. The Repeat-Associated Mysterious Proteins (RAMPs) containing a distinct form of the RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) domain, which are major components of the CRISPR-Cas systems, were classified into three large groups, Cas5, Cas6 and Cas7. Each of these groups includes many previously uncharacterized proteins now shown to adopt the RAMP structure. Evidence is presented that large subunits contained in most of the CRISPR-Cas systems could be homologous to Cas10 proteins which contain a polymerase-like Palm domain and are predicted to be enzymatically active in Type III CRISPR-Cas systems but inactivated in Type I systems. These findings, the fact that the CRISPR polymerases, RAMPs and Cas2 all contain core RRM domains, and distinct gene arrangements in the three types of CRISPR-Cas systems together provide for a simple scenario for origin and evolution of the CRISPR-Cas machinery. Under this scenario, the CRISPR-Cas system originated in thermophilic Archaea and subsequently spread horizontally among prokaryotes. Conclusions Because of the extreme diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems, in-depth sequence and structure comparison continue to

  20. Characterizing the Hygroscopicity of Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol from Synthetic Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Cappa, C. D.; Sultana, C. M.; Lee, C.; Wang, X.; Helgestad, T.; Moore, K.; Prather, K. A.; Cornwell, G.; Novak, G.; Bertram, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles make up a significant portion of natural aerosols and are therefore important in establishing the baseline for anthropogenic aerosol climate impacts. Scattering of solar radiation by aerosols affects Earth's radiative budget and the degree of scattering is size-dependent. Thus, aerosols scatter more light at elevated relative humidities when they grow larger via water uptake. This growth depends critically on chemical composition. SSA can become enriched in organics during phytoplankton blooms, becoming less salty and therefore less hygroscopic. Subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors at 85% relative humidity (GF(85%)) of SSA particles were quantified during two mesocosm experiments in enclosed marine aerosol reference tanks (MARTs). The two experiments were conducted with filtered seawater collected at separate times from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography Pier in La Jolla, CA. Phytoplankton blooms in each tank were induced via the addition of nutrients and photosynthetically active radiation. The "indoor" MART was illuminated with fluorescent light and the other "outdoor" MART was illuminated with sunlight. The peak chlorophyll-a concentrations were 59 micrograms/L and 341 micrograms /L for the indoor and outdoor MARTs, respectively. GF(85%) values for SSA particles were quantified using a humidified cavity ringdown spectrometer and particle size distributions. Particle composition was monitored with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Relationships between the observed particle GFs and the particle composition markers will be discussed.

  1. Organic Aerosols from SÃO Paulo and its Relationship with Aerosol Absorption and Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Brito, J. F.; Rizzo, L. V.

    2012-12-01

    The megacity of São Paulo with its 19 million people and 7 million cars is a challenge from the point of view of air pollution. High levels of organic aerosols, PM10, black carbon and ozone and the peculiar situation of the large scale use of ethanol fuel makes it a special case. Little is known about the impact of ethanol on air quality and human health and the increase of ethanol as vehicle fuel is rising worldwide An experiment was designed to physico-chemical properties of aerosols in São Paulo, as well as their optical properties. Aerosol size distribution in the size range of 1nm to 10 micrometers is being measured with a Helsinki University SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer), an NAIS (Neutral ion Spectrometer) and a GRIMM OPC (Optical Particle Counter). Optical properties are being measured with a TSI Nephelometer and a Thermo MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). A CIMEL sunphotometer from the AERONET network measure the aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. The ACSM was operated for 3 months continuosly during teh wintertime of 2012. The measured total particle concentration typically varies between 10,000 and 30,000 cm-3 being the lowest late in the night and highest around noon and frequently exceeding 50,000 cm-3. Clear diurnal patterns in aerosol optical properties were observed. Scattering and absorption coefficients typically range between 20 and 100 Mm-1 at 450 nm, and between 10 to 40 Mm-1 at 637 nm, respectively, both of them peaking at 7:00 local time, the morning rush hour. The corresponding single scattering albedo varies between 0.50 and 0.85, indicating a significant contribution of primary absorbing particles to the aerosol population. During the first month a total of seven new particle formation events were observed with growth rates ranging from 9 to 25

  2. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  3. Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, J; Zhang, Q; tilp, A; Shippert, T; Parworth, C; Mei, F

    2013-08-23

    Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10–90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties accurately. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in quantification of aerosol effects and prediction of future climate change. Evaluation and development of aerosol models require data products generated from field observations. Real-time, quantitative data acquired with aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) (Canagaratna et al. 2007) are critical to this need. The AMS determines size-resolved concentrations of non-refractory (NR) species in submicrometer particles (PM1) with fast time resolution suitable for both ground-based and aircraft deployments. The high-resolution AMS (HR-AMS), which is equipped with a high mass resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer, can be used to determine the elemental composition and oxidation degrees of OA (DeCarlo et al. 2006).

  4. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  5. The skylab S191 spectrometer experiment: Analysis of data and their applications to the earth sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmarth, V. R.; Rainey, D. A.; Johnson, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    The data in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum as recorded by identical spectrometers on Skylab and on a helicopter are examined to establish the significance of spectral reflectances from the Earth surface as influenced by water vapor, atmospheric gases, and aerosols. Models of radiation transfer show good agreement of theoretical computations and observed measurements.

  6. Characterization of ambient aerosols at the San Francisco International Airport using BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; McJimpsey, E L; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Tobias, H J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2006-03-16

    The BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is a rapidly fieldable, fully autonomous instrument that can perform correlated measurements of multiple orthogonal properties of individual aerosol particles. The BAMS front end uses optical techniques to nondestructively measure a particle's aerodynamic diameter and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence can be excited at 266nm or 355nm and is detected in two broad wavelength bands. Individual particles with appropriate size and fluorescence properties can then be analyzed more thoroughly in a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Over the course of two deployments to the San Francisco International Airport, more than 6.5 million individual aerosol particles were fully analyzed by the system. Analysis of the resulting data has provided a number of important insights relevant to rapid bioaerosol detection, which are described here.

  7. Meteorological and Aerosol Sensing with small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, J.; Möhler, O.; Haunold, W.; Schrod, J.; Brooks, I.; Norris, S.; Brooks, B.; Hill, M.; Leisner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) facilitate the monitoring of several meteorological and aerosol parameters with high resolution in space and time. They are small, easy to operate, cost efficient and allow for flexible application during field campaigns. We present two experimental payloads for measurement of relative humidity, temperature, aerosol size distribution and the collection of aerosol samples on board the small UAS SIRIUS II. The payload modules are light weight (<1kg) and can be easily switched between two flights. All sensors can be controlled from the ground and the measured data is recorded by the autopilot together with the position data. The first module contains a sensor package for measurement of relative humidity and temperature and the Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Prope (CLASP) for acquisition of aerosol size distributions. CLASP measures aerosol particles with diameters from 0.12μm to 9.25μm in up to 32 channels at a frequency of 10 Hz. The second module also contains a humidity and temperature sensor package and the aerosol sample collection device. The aerosol sampler collects air samples at 2 l/min onto a sample holder. After the flight the ice nuclei on the sample holder are activated in the lab and counted. In August 2012 the complete setup will be used during a measurement campaign at mount "Kleiner Feldberg" close to Frankfurt. Until then we will perform test flights and additional laboratory tests.

  8. Aerosol optical depth retrieval using the MERIS observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Linlu; Rozanov, Vladimir; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Surface reflectance determination and aerosol type selection are the two main challenges for space-borne aerosol remote sensing, especially for those instruments lacking of near-infrared channels, high-temporal observations, multi-angles abilities and/or polarization information. However, space based instruments like the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and the successor, Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) with high calibration accuracy and high spatial resolution provide unique abilities for obtaining valuable aerosol information for a better understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate, which is still one of the largest uncertainties of global climate change evaluation. In this study, a new Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm is presented. Global aerosol type and surface spectral dataset were used for the aerosol type selection and surface reflectance determination. A modified Ross-Li mode is used to describe the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effect. The comparison with operational MODIS C6 product and the validation using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) show promising results.

  9. Observational Study and Parameterization of Aerosol-fog Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J.; Guo, X.; Liu, Y.; Fang, C.; Su, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Studies have shown that human activities such as increased aerosols affect fog occurrence and properties significantly, and accurate numerical fog forecasting depends on, to a large extent, parameterization of fog microphysics and aerosol-fog interactions. Furthermore, fogs can be considered as clouds near the ground, and enjoy an advantage of permitting comprehensive long-term in-situ measurements that clouds do not. Knowledge learned from studying aerosol-fog interactions will provide useful insights into aerosol-cloud interactions. To serve the twofold objectives of understanding and improving parameterizations of aerosol-fog interactions and aerosol-cloud interactions, this study examines the data collected from fogs, with a focus but not limited to the data collected in Beijing, China. Data examined include aerosol particle size distributions measured by a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-100X), fog droplet size distributions measured by a Fog Monitor (FM-120), Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN), liquid water path measured by radiometers and visibility sensors, along with meteorological variables measured by a Tethered Balloon Sounding System (XLS-Ⅱ) and Automatic Weather Station (AWS). The results will be compared with low-level clouds for similarities and differences between fogs and clouds.

  10. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2015-10-20

    ) two well-characterized source of soot particles and (b) a flow reactor for controlled OH and/or O3 oxidation of relevant gas phase species to produce well-characterized SOA particles. After formation, the aerosol particles are subjected to physical and chemical processes that simulate aerosol growth and aging. A suite of instruments in our laboratory is used to characterize the physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles before and after processing. The Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ToF-AMS) together with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) measures particle mass, volume, density, composition (including black carbon content), dynamic shape factor, and fractal dimension. The–ToF-AMS was developed at ARI with Boston College participation. About 120 AMS instruments are now in service (including 5 built for DOE laboratories) performing field and laboratory studies world-wide. Other major instruments include a thermal denuder, two Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMA), a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCN), a Thermal desorption Aerosol GC/MS (TAG) and the new Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). Optical instrumentation required for the studies have been brought to our laboratory as part of ongoing and planned collaborative projects with colleagues from DOE, NOAA and university laboratories. Optical instruments that will be utilized include a Photoacoustic Spectrometer (PAS), a Cavity Ring Down Aerosol Extinction Spectrometer (CRD-AES), a Photo Thermal Interferometer (PTI), a new 7-wavelength Aethalometer and a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Extinction Monitor (CAPS). These instruments are providing aerosol absorption, extinction and scattering coefficients at a range of atmospherically relevant wavelengths. During the past two years our work has continued along the lines of our original proposal. We report on 12 completed and/or continuing projects conducted during the period 08/14 to 0814/2015. These projects are described in

  11. Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosol Vertical Distributions above Svalbard, Norway using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Stalin, S.; Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Burkhart, J. F.; Quinn, P.; Storvold, R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2015 to investigate the processes controlling aerosol concentrations and radiative effects. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) on 9 flights totaling 19 flight hours. Measurements were made of particle number concentration and aerosol light absorption at three wavelengths, similar to those conducted in April 2011 (Bates et al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 2115-2120, 2013). A filter sample was collected on each flight for analyses of trace elements. Additional measurements in the aerosol payload in 2015 included aerosol size distributions obtained using a Printed Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS) and aerosol optical depth obtained using a four wavelength miniature Scanning Aerosol Sun Photometer (miniSASP). The data show most of the column aerosol mass and resulting optical depth in the boundary layer but frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (2000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Transport of these aerosol layers was assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion models. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  12. Substrate generation for endonucleases of CRISPR/cas systems.

    PubMed

    Zoephel, Judith; Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Richter, Hagen; Plagens, André; Randau, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of viruses and their prokaryotic hosts shaped the evolution of bacterial and archaeal life. Prokaryotes developed several strategies to evade viral attacks that include restriction modification, abortive infection and CRISPR/Cas systems. These adaptive immune systems found in many Bacteria and most Archaea consist of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) sequences and a number of CRISPR associated (Cas) genes (Fig. 1) (1-3). Different sets of Cas proteins and repeats define at least three major divergent types of CRISPR/Cas systems (4). The universal proteins Cas1 and Cas2 are proposed to be involved in the uptake of viral DNA that will generate a new spacer element between two repeats at the 5' terminus of an extending CRISPR cluster (5). The entire cluster is transcribed into a precursor-crRNA containing all spacer and repeat sequences and is subsequently processed by an enzyme of the diverse Cas6 family into smaller crRNAs (6-8). These crRNAs consist of the spacer sequence flanked by a 5' terminal (8 nucleotides) and a 3' terminal tag derived from the repeat sequence (9). A repeated infection of the virus can now be blocked as the new crRNA will be directed by a Cas protein complex (Cascade) to the viral DNA and identify it as such via base complementarity(10). Finally, for CRISPR/Cas type 1 systems, the nuclease Cas3 will destroy the detected invader DNA (11,12) . These processes define CRISPR/Cas as an adaptive immune system of prokaryotes and opened a fascinating research field for the study of the involved Cas proteins. The function of many Cas proteins is still elusive and the causes for the apparent diversity of the CRISPR/Cas systems remain to be illuminated. Potential activities of most Cas proteins were predicted via detailed computational analyses. A major fraction of Cas proteins are either shown or proposed to function as endonucleases (4). Here, we present methods to generate crRNAs and precursor-cRNAs for

  13. An Analysis of EPA’s STAR Program and a Decade of Field Changing Research in Atmospheric Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies in the past decade have transformed the way we think about atmospheric aerosols. The advances include, but are not limited to, source apportionment of organics using aerosol mass spectrometer data, the volatility basis set approach, quantifying isoprene oxida...

  14. Astronomical Fourier spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Connes, P; Michel, G

    1975-09-01

    A high resolution near ir Fourier spectrometer with the same general design as previously described laboratory instruments has been built for astronomical observations at a coudé focus. Present spectral range is 0.8-3.5 microm with PbS and Ge detectors and maximum path difference 1 m. The servo system can accommodate various recording modes: stepping or continuous scan, path difference modulation, sky chopping. A real time computer is incorporated into the system, which has been set up at the Hale 500-cm telescope on Mount Palomar. Samples of the results are given. PMID:20154966

  15. Mossbauer spectrometer radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A Mossbauer spectrometer with high efficiencies in both transmission and backscattering techniques is described. The device contains a sodium iodide crystal for detecting radiation caused by the Mossbauer effect, and two photomultipliers to collect the radiation detected by the crystal. When used in the transmission technique, the sample or scatterer is placed between the incident radiation source and the detector. When used in a backscattering technique, the detector is placed between the incident radiation source and the sample of scatterer such that the incident radiation will pass through a hole in the crystal and strike the sample. Diagrams of the instrument are provided.

  16. Automated transportable mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echo, M. W.

    1981-09-01

    The need was identified for a mass spectrometer (MS) which can be conveniently transported among several facilities for rapid verification of the isotopic composition of special nuclear material. This requirement for a light weight, transportable MS for U and Pu mass analysis was met by deleting the gas chromograph (GC) portions of a Hewlett-Packard Model 5992 Quadrupole GCMS and substituting a vacuum lock sample entry system. A programmable power supply and vacuum gauge were added and circuitry modifications were made to enable use of the supplied software.

  17. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  18. The organic aerosols of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Arakawa, E. T.; Suits, F.; Callcott, T. A.; Williams, M. W.; Shrader, S.; Ogino, H.; Willingham, T. O.

    1984-01-01

    The optical properties and chemical composition of thiolin, an organic solid synthesized by high-energy-electron irradiation in a plasma discharge (Sagan et al., 1984) to simulate the high-altitude aerosols of Titan, are investigated experimentally using monochromators, ellipsometers, and spectrometers (on thin films deposited by continuous dc discharge) and sequential and nonsequential pyrolytic gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (of the volatile component), respectively. The results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized. The real and imaginary elements of the complex refractive index in the visible are estimated as 1.65 and 0.004-0.08, respectively, in agreement with observations of Titan, and the IR absorption features include the nitrile band at 4.6 microns. The molecules identified in the volatile part of thiolin include complex species considered important in theoretical models of the origin of life on earth.

  19. Protein engineering of Cas9 for enhanced function

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Benjamin L.; Nadler, Dana C.; Savage, David F.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems act to protect the cell from invading nucleic acids in many bacteria and archaea. The bacterial immune protein Cas9 is a component of one of these CRISPR/Cas systems and has recently been adapted as a tool for genome editing. Cas9 is easily targeted to bind and cleave a DNA sequence via a complimentary RNA; this straightforward programmability has gained Cas9 rapid acceptance in the field of genetic engineering. While this technology has developed quickly, a number of challenges regarding Cas9 specificity, efficiency, fusion protein function, and spatiotemporal control within the cell remain. In this work, we develop a platform for constructing novel proteins to address these open questions. We demonstrate methods to either screen or select active Cas9 mutants and use the screening technique to isolate functional Cas9 variants with a heterologous PDZ domain inserted directly into the protein. As a proof of concept, these methods lay the groundwork for the future construction of diverse Cas9 proteins. Straightforward and accessible techniques for genetic editing are helping to elucidate biology in new and exciting ways; a platform to engineer new functionalities into Cas9 will help forge the next generation of genome modifying tools. PMID:25398355

  20. CRISPR-Cas9-assisted recombineering in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jee-Hwan; van Pijkeren, Jan-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and the CRISPR-associated (Cas) nuclease protect bacteria and archeae from foreign DNA by site-specific cleavage of incoming DNA. Type-II CRISPR-Cas systems, such as the Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR-Cas9 system, can be adapted such that Cas9 can be guided to a user-defined site in the chromosome to introduce double-stranded breaks. Here we have developed and optimized CRISPR-Cas9 function in the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475. We established proof-of-concept showing that CRISPR-Cas9 selection combined with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombineering is a realistic approach to identify at high efficiencies edited cells in a lactic acid bacterium. We show for three independent targets that subtle changes in the bacterial genome can be recovered at efficiencies ranging from 90 to 100%. By combining CRISPR-Cas9 and recombineering, we successfully applied codon saturation mutagenesis in the L. reuteri chromosome. Also, CRISPR-Cas9 selection is critical to identify low-efficiency events such as oligonucleotide-mediated chromosome deletions. This also means that CRISPR-Cas9 selection will allow identification of recombinant cells in bacteria with low recombineering efficiencies, eliminating the need for ssDNA recombineering optimization procedures. We envision that CRISPR-Cas genome editing has the potential to change the landscape of genome editing in lactic acid bacteria, and other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25074379

  1. Costs of CRISPR-Cas-mediated resistance in Streptococcus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Pedro F.; Lafforgue, Guillaume; Gatchitch, Francois; Gardan, Rozenn; Moineau, Sylvain; Gandon, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is a form of adaptive sequence-specific immunity in microbes. This system offers unique opportunities for the study of coevolution between bacteria and their viral pathogens, bacteriophages. A full understanding of the coevolutionary dynamics of CRISPR-Cas requires knowing the magnitude of the cost of resisting infection. Here, using the gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus and its associated virulent phage 2972, a well-established model system harbouring at least two type II functional CRISPR-Cas systems, we obtained different fitness measures based on growth assays in isolation or in pairwise competition. We measured the fitness cost associated with different components of this adaptive immune system: the cost of Cas protein expression, the constitutive cost of increasing immune memory through additional spacers, and the conditional costs of immunity during phage exposure. We found that Cas protein expression is particularly costly, as Cas-deficient mutants achieved higher competitive abilities than the wild-type strain with functional Cas proteins. Increasing immune memory by acquiring up to four phage-derived spacers was not associated with fitness costs. In addition, the activation of the CRISPR-Cas system during phage exposure induces significant but small fitness costs. Together these results suggest that the costs of the CRISPR-Cas system arise mainly due to the maintenance of the defence system. We discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of CRISPR-Cas-mediated immunity. PMID:26224708

  2. Expanding the catalog of cas genes with metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Doak, Thomas G; Ye, Yuzhen

    2014-02-01

    The CRISPR (clusters of regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas adaptive immune system is an important defense system in bacteria, providing targeted defense against invasions of foreign nucleic acids. CRISPR-Cas systems consist of CRISPR loci and cas (CRISPR-associated) genes: sequence segments of invaders are incorporated into host genomes at CRISPR loci to generate specificity, while adjacent cas genes encode proteins that mediate the defense process. We pursued an integrated approach to identifying putative cas genes from genomes and metagenomes, combining similarity searches with genomic neighborhood analysis. Application of our approach to bacterial genomes and human microbiome datasets allowed us to significantly expand the collection of cas genes: the sequence space of the Cas9 family, the key player in the recently engineered RNA-guided platforms for genome editing in eukaryotes, is expanded by at least two-fold with metagenomic datasets. We found genes in cas loci encoding other functions, for example, toxins and antitoxins, confirming the recently discovered potential of coupling between adaptive immunity and the dormancy/suicide systems. We further identified 24 novel Cas families; one novel family contains 20 proteins, all identified from the human microbiome datasets, illustrating the importance of metagenomics projects in expanding the diversity of cas genes. PMID:24319142

  3. Precision Targeted Mutagenesis via Cas9 Paired Nickases in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi; Endo, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of CRISPR- (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) mediated heritable mutagenesis in plants highlight the need for accuracy of the mutagenesis directed by this system. Off-target mutations are an important issue when considering functional gene analysis, as well as the molecular breeding of crop plants with large genome size, i.e. with many duplicated genes, and where the whole-genome sequence is still lacking. In mammals, off-target mutations can be suppressed by using Cas9 paired nickases together with paired guide RNAs (gRNAs). However, the performance of Cas9 paired nickases has not yet been fully assessed in plants. Here, we analyzed on- and off-target mutation frequency in rice calli and regenerated plants using Cas9 nuclease or Cas9 nickase with paired gRNAs. When Cas9 paired nickases were used, off-target mutations were fully suppressed in rice calli and regenerated plants. However, on-target mutation frequency also decreased compared with that induced by the Cas9 paired nucleases system. Since the gRNA sequence determines specific binding of Cas9 protein–gRNA ribonucleoproteins at the targeted sequence, the on-target mutation frequency of Cas9 paired nickases depends on the design of paired gRNAs. Our results suggest that a combination of gRNAs that can induce mutations at high efficiency with Cas9 nuclease should be used together with Cas9 nickase. Furthermore, we confirmed that a combination of gRNAs containing a one nucleotide (1 nt) mismatch toward the target sequence could not induce mutations when expressed with Cas9 nickase. Our results clearly show the effectiveness of Cas9 paired nickases in delivering on-target specific mutations. PMID:26936792

  4. Efficient Mitochondrial Genome Editing by CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Areum; Ham, Sangwoo; Lee, Gum Hwa; Lee, Yun-Il; Kim, SangSeong; Lee, Yun-Song; Shin, Joo-Ho; Lee, Yunjong

    2015-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system has been widely used for nuclear DNA editing to generate mutations or correct specific disease alleles. Despite its flexible application, it has not been determined if CRISPR/Cas9, originally identified as a bacterial defense system against virus, can be targeted to mitochondria for mtDNA editing. Here, we show that regular FLAG-Cas9 can localize to mitochondria to edit mitochondrial DNA with sgRNAs targeting specific loci of the mitochondrial genome. Expression of FLAG-Cas9 together with gRNA targeting Cox1 and Cox3 leads to cleavage of the specific mtDNA loci. In addition, we observed disruption of mitochondrial protein homeostasis following mtDNA truncation or cleavage by CRISPR/Cas9. To overcome nonspecific distribution of FLAG-Cas9, we also created a mitochondria-targeted Cas9 (mitoCas9). This new version of Cas9 localizes only to mitochondria; together with expression of gRNA targeting mtDNA, there is specific cleavage of mtDNA. MitoCas9-induced reduction of mtDNA and its transcription leads to mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and cell growth inhibition. This mitoCas9 could be applied to edit mtDNA together with gRNA expression vectors without affecting genomic DNA. In this brief study, we demonstrate that mtDNA editing is possible using CRISPR/Cas9. Moreover, our development of mitoCas9 with specific localization to the mitochondria should facilitate its application for mitochondrial genome editing. PMID:26448933

  5. Breaking-Cas-interactive design of guide RNAs for CRISPR-Cas experiments for ENSEMBL genomes.

    PubMed

    Oliveros, Juan C; Franch, Mònica; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; San-León, David; Montoliu, Lluis; Cubas, Pilar; Pazos, Florencio

    2016-07-01

    The CRISPR/Cas technology is enabling targeted genome editing in multiple organisms with unprecedented accuracy and specificity by using RNA-guided nucleases. A critical point when planning a CRISPR/Cas experiment is the design of the guide RNA (gRNA), which directs the nuclease and associated machinery to the desired genomic location. This gRNA has to fulfil the requirements of the nuclease and lack homology with other genome sites that could lead to off-target effects. Here we introduce the Breaking-Cas system for the design of gRNAs for CRISPR/Cas experiments, including those based in the Cas9 nuclease as well as others recently introduced. The server has unique features not available in other tools, including the possibility of using all eukaryotic genomes available in ENSEMBL (currently around 700), placing variable PAM sequences at 5' or 3' and setting the guide RNA length and the scores per nucleotides. It can be freely accessed at: http://bioinfogp.cnb.csic.es/tools/breakingcas, and the code is available upon request. PMID:27166368

  6. Investigating Types and Sources of Organic Aerosol in Rocky Mountain National Park Using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurman, M. I.; Lee, T.; Sun, Y.; Schichtel, B. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur Study (RoMANS) focuses on identifying pathways and sources of nitrogen deposition in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). Past work has combined measurements from a range of instrumentation such as annular denuders, PILS-IC, Hi-Vol samplers, and trace gas analyzers. Limited information from early RoMANS campaigns is available regarding organic aerosol. While prior measurements have produced a measure of total organic carbon mass, high time resolution measures of organic aerosol concentration and speciation are lacking. One area of particular interest is characterizing the types, sources, and amounts of organic nitrogen aerosol. Organic nitrogen measurements in RMNP wet deposition reveal a substantial contribution to the total reactive nitrogen deposition budget. In this study an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed in summer 2010 at RMNP to investigate organic aerosol composition and its temporal variability. The species timeline and diurnal species variations are combined with meteorological data to investigate local transport events and chemistry; transport from the Colorado Front Range urban corridor appears to be more significant for inorganic species than for the overall organic aerosol mass. Considerable variation in organic aerosol concentration is observed (0.5 to 20 μg/m3), with high concentration episodes lasting between hours and two days. High resolution AMS data are analyzed for organic aerosol, including organic nitrogen species that might be expected from local biogenic emissions, agricultural activities, and secondary reaction products of combustion emissions. Positive matrix factorization reveals that semi-volatile oxidized OA, low-volatility oxidized OA, and biomass burning OA comprise most organic mass; the diurnal profile of biomass burning OA peaks at four and nine pm and may arise from local camp fires, while constant concentrations of

  7. The Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness Using the MERIS Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, L.; Rozanov, V. V.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Levy, R. C.; Lotz, W.

    2015-12-01

    Retrieval of aerosol properties for satellite instruments without shortwave-IR spectral information, multi-viewing, polarization and/or high-temporal observation ability is a challenging problem for spaceborne aerosol remote sensing. However, space based instruments like the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and the successor, Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) with high calibration accuracy and high spatial resolution provide unique abilities for obtaining valuable aerosol information for a better understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate, which is still one of the largest uncertainties of global climate change evaluation. In this study, a new Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm (XBAER: eXtensible Bremen AErosol Retrieval) is presented. XBAER utilizes the global surface spectral library database for the determination of surface properties while the MODIS collection 6 aerosol type treatment is adapted for the aerosol type selection. In order to take the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effect into account for the MERIS reduce resolution (1km) retrieval, a modified Ross-Li mode is used. The AOT is determined in the algorithm using lookup tables including polarization created using Radiative Transfer Model SCIATRAN3.4, by minimizing the difference between atmospheric corrected surface reflectance with given AOT and the surface reflectance calculated from the spectral library. The global comparison with operational MODIS C6 product, Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) product, Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) aerosol product and the validation using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) show promising results. The current XBAER algorithm is only valid for aerosol remote sensing over land and a similar method will be extended to ocean later.

  8. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  9. Aerosols and environmental pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth’s radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  10. Aerosol properties derived from spectral actinic flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, H.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Cozic, J.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurement of aerosol properties is very important for understanding climate change. Aerosol optical properties influence solar radiation throughout the troposphere. According to the Working Group I report of the intergovernmental panel for climate change [IPCC, 2007], aerosols have a direct radiative forcing of - 0.5±0.4 W/m2 with a medium to low level of scientific understanding. This relatively large uncertainty indicates the need for more frequent and precise measurements of aerosol properties. We will show how actinic flux measurements can be used to derive important optical aerosol parameters such as aerosol optical thickness and depth, surface albedo, angstrom exponent, radiative forcing by clouds and aerosols, aerosol extinction, and others. The instrument used for this study is a combination of two spectroradiometers measuring actinic flux in the ultraviolet and visible radiation range from 280 to 690 nm with a resolution of 1 nm. Actinic flux is measured as the radiation incident on a spherical surface with sensitivity independent of direction. In contrast, irradiance is measured as the radiation incident on a plane surface, which depends on the cosine of the incident angle. Our goal is to assess the capabilities of using spectral actinic flux measurements to derive various aerosol properties. Here we will compare 1) actinic flux measurements to irradiance measurements from the spectral solar flux radiometer (SSFR), 2) derived aerosol size distributions with measurements from a white light optical particle counter (WLOPC) and ultra high sensitivity aerosol size spectrometer (UHSAS), and 3) derived aerosol optical extinction with measurements from a cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectrometer (CRD-AES). These comparisons will utilize data from three recent field campaigns over New England and the Atlantic Ocean (ICARTT 2004), Texas and the Gulf of Mexico during (TexAQS/GoMACCS 2006), and Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (ARCPAC 2008) when the instruments

  11. Spectrometer Observations Near Mawrth Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    minerals with different rock formations and to search for new minerals not resolved by OMEGA.

    CRISM has found that the iron-rich clays (lower left image) correspond with a layer of rock that is dark red in the true color view (upper left) and bright gray in the infrared (upper right). In addition, it has found previously undetected exposures of aluminum-rich clay, in a rock unit that is buff-colored in the true color view, and bluish in the infrared. Both types of rocks formed early in Mars' history, about 3.8 billion years ago. The difference in clay mineralogy reveals differences in the environment either over time or over a distance of kilometers. CRISM will be taking many more images of the Mawrth Vallis region to piece together the geologic history of this fascinating area that was once a wet oasis on Mars.

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, the CRISM team includes expertise from universities, government agencies and small businesses in the United States and abroad.

    CRISM's mission: Find the spectral fingerprints of aqueous and hydrothermal deposits and map the geology, composition and stratigraphy of surface features. The instrument will also watch the seasonal variations in Martian dust and ice aerosols, and water content in surface materials -- leading to new understanding of the climate.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the Califonia Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor and built the spacecraft.

  12. Improved multisphere spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Schwahn, S.O.; Rogers, P.E.; Misko, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    Shonka Research Associated undertook a research program to improve the capabilities and ease of use of the Bonner sphere spectrometer system. Two key elements formed the heart of this research: replacement of the lithium iodide (LiI(Eu)) detector normally used in the spectrometer system with a spherical boron triflouride (BF{sub 3}) proportional counter and exploitation of an optimized set of nested polyethylene spheres, including boron-loaded spherical shells. Use of a spherical BF{sub 3} detector offers many advantages over the LiI(Eu) crystal. The BF{sub 3} detectors are insensitive to gamma radiation. Lack of gamma sensitivity permits acquiring data with simple electronics and allows determination of neutron spectra and dose in lower neutron-to-gamma ratio fields, including background terrestrial radiation fields. The importance of the lack of gamma sensitivity is underscored by the pending changes in neutron quality factors. The nearly perfect spherical symmetry offers advantages for BF{sub 3} over LiI(Eu) detectors as well. A light pipe, which perturbs measurements, is not needed. The bare BF{sub 3} detector response is not affected by the moderation of neutrons as is the case of the organic light pipe used with LiI(Eu). The spherical symmetry permits the use of smaller diameter shells, which add to the number of response functions.

  13. Spectrometers beyond the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, W.

    1996-11-01

    Two new types of miniature Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) presently being built have enabled this technology to be taken out of the laboratory and into the field. Both designs are very rugged, use little power to run, and can be made extremely small and lightweight. They are excellent candidates for airborne use, both in aircraft and satellite applications. One, the Mcro FT, is a mass balanced linear reciprocating scan operating in the 1-2 scan per second speed range. The other, the Turbo FT, uses a rotary scan, enabling it to run at much higher speeds, from 10 to 1000 scans per second. Either type can be built in the visible, near K and thermal IR wavelength ranges, and provide spectral resolution of 1-2 wave-numbers. Results obtained in all these wavelength ranges are presented here. The rotary configuration is more suited to airborne and satellite survey type deployments, due mostly to its rapid scan rate. Either of these sensors will fit into a small, commercially available stabilized pod which can easily be attached to a helicopter or light plane. This results in a very economical flight spectrometer system. 11 figs.

  14. The Athena Raman Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Alian; Haskin, Larry A.; Jolliff, Bradley; Wdowiak, Tom; Agresti, David; Lane, Arthur L.

    2000-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for in situ mineralogy, petrology, and detection of water and carbon. The Athena Raman spectrometer is a microbeam instrument intended for close-up analyses of targets (rock or soils) selected by the Athena Pancam and Mini-TES. It will take 100 Raman spectra along a linear traverse of approximately one centimeter (point-counting procedure) in one to four hours during the Mars' night. From these spectra, the following information about the target will extracted: (1) the identities of major, minor, and trace mineral phases, organic species (e.g., PAH or kerogen-like polymers), reduced inorganic carbon, and water-bearing phases; (2) chemical features (e.g. Mg/Fe ratio) of major minerals; and (3) rock textural features (e.g., mineral clusters, amygdular filling and veins). Part of the Athena payload, the miniaturized Raman spectrometer has been under development in a highly interactive collaboration of a science team at Washington University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and an engineering team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The development has completed the brassboard stage and has produced the design for the engineering model.

  15. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.; Fisk, Zachary

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  16. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  17. Retrieval and Validation of Aerosol Optical Properties over East Asia from TANSO-Cloud and Aerosol Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghee; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Mijin; Choi, Myungje; Go, Sujung; Lim, HyunKwang; Ou, Mi-Lim; Goo, Tae-Young; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol is a significant component on air quality and climate change. In particular, spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol shows large variability over East Asia, thus has large effect in retrieving carbon dioxide from Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS). An aerosol retrieval algorithm was developed from TANSO- Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) onboard the GOSAT. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), size distribution of aerosol, and aerosol type in 0.1 degree grid resolution and surface reflectance was estimated using the clear sky composite method. To test aerosol absorptivity, the reflectance difference method was considered using channels of TANSO-CAI. In this study, the retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) was compared with those of Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) and MODerate resolution Imaging Sensor (MODIS) dataset from September 2011 and August 2014. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and CAI show the reasonably good correlation with correlation coefficient of 0.77 and regression slope of 0.87 for the whole period. Moreover, those between MODIS and CAI for the same period show correlations with correlation coefficient of 0.7 ~ 0.9 and regression slope of 0.7 ~ 1.2, depending on season and comparison regions however, the largest error source in aerosol retrieval has been surface reflectance. Over ocean and some Land, surface reflectance tends to be overestimated, and thereby CAI-AOD tends to be underestimated. Based on the results with CAI algorithm developed, the algorithm is continuously improved for better performance.

  18. Variability of Biomass Burning Aerosols Layers and Near Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilescu, Jeni; Belegante, Livio; Marmureanu, Luminita; Toanca, Flori

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize aerosols from both chemical and optical point of view and to explore the conditions to sense the same particles in elevated layers and at the ground. Three days of continuous measurements using a multi-wavelength depolarization lidar(RALI) and a C-ToF-AMS aerosol mass spectrometer are analyzed. The presence of smoke particles was assessed in low level layers from RALI measurements. Chemical composition of submicronic volatile/semi-volatile aerosols at ground level was monitored by the CTOF AMS Several episodes of biomass burning aerosols have been identified by both techniques due to the presence of specific markers (f60, linear particle depolarization ratio, Ängström exponent).

  19. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  20. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  1. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  2. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  3. ISS Update: Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Trent Martin, Johnson Space Center project manager for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) aboard the International Space Station. Questions...

  4. Advances in therapeutic CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing.

    PubMed

    Savić, Nataša; Schwank, Gerald

    2016-02-01

    Targeted nucleases are widely used as tools for genome editing. Two years ago the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated Cas9 nuclease was used for the first time, and since then has largely revolutionized the field. The tremendous success of the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing tool is powered by the ease design principle of the guide RNA that targets Cas9 to the desired DNA locus, and by the high specificity and efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-generated DNA breaks. Several studies recently used CRISPR/Cas9 to successfully modulate disease-causing alleles in vivo in animal models and ex vivo in somatic and induced pluripotent stem cells, raising hope for therapeutic genome editing in the clinics. In this review, we will summarize and discuss such preclinical CRISPR/Cas9 gene therapy reports. PMID:26470680

  5. Inducible in vivo genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Kevin P; Muley, Ashlesha; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Livshits, Geulah; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; Socci, Nicholas D; Lowe, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing enables the rapid genetic manipulation of any genomic locus without the need for gene targeting by homologous recombination. Here we describe a conditional transgenic approach that allows temporal control of CRISPR/Cas9 activity for inducible genome editing in adult mice. We show that doxycycline-regulated Cas9 induction enables widespread gene disruption in multiple tissues and that limiting the duration of Cas9 expression or using a Cas9D10A (Cas9n) variant, can regulate the frequency and size of target gene modifications, respectively. Further, we show that the inducible CRISPR (iCRISPR) system can be used effectively to create biallelic mutation in multiple target loci and thus, provides a flexible and fast platform to study loss of function phenotypes in vivo. PMID:25690852

  6. Evaporated CaS thin films for AC electroluminescence devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Tanaka, S.; Shanker, V.; Shiiki, M.; Deguchi, H.

    1985-08-01

    The growth behavior of evaporated CaS thin films has been investigated to achieve bright electroluminescence. The crystallinity of CaS films is improved with substrate temperature and for temperatures higher than 300°C, the films orient to the (200) plane. Sulfur coevaporation further helps to form a more perfect film even at lower temperatures. A CaS: Ce,Cl electroluminescent thin film device has been fabricated with a brightness of 650 cd/m 2.

  7. Particle Spectrometers for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amthor, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    FRIB promises to dramatically expand the variety of nuclear systems available for direct experimental study by providing rates of many rare isotopes orders of magnitude higher than those currently available. A new generation of experimental systems, including new particle spectrometers will be critical to our ability to take full advantage of the scientific opportunities offered by FRIB. The High-Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) will allow for experiments with the most neutron-rich and short-lived isotopes produced by in-flight fragmentation at FRIB. The bending capability of the HRS (8 Tm) matches to the rigidity for which rare isotopes are produced at the highest intensity in the FRIB fragment separator. The experimental program will be focused on nuclear structure and astrophysics, and allow for the use of other cutting-edge detection systems for gamma, neutron, and charged-particle detection. Stopped and reaccelerated beam studies will be an important compliment to in-flight techniques at FRIB, providing world-unique, high quality, intense rare isotope beams at low energies up to and beyond the Coulomb barrier--with the completion of ReA12--and serving many of the science goals of the broader facility, from nuclear structure and astrophysics to applications. Two specialized recoil spectrometers are being developed for studies with reaccelerated beams. SECAR, the Separator for Capture Reactions, will be built following ReA3, coupled to a windowless gas jet target, JENSA, and will focus on radiative capture reactions for astrophysics, particularly those needed to improve our understanding of novae and X-ray bursts. A recoil separator following ReA12 is proposed to address a variety of physics cases based on fusion-evaporation, Coulomb excitation, transfer, and deep-inelastic reactions by providing a large angular, momentum and charge state acceptance; a high mass resolving power; and the flexibility to couple to a variety of auxiliary detector systems. Two designs

  8. Foreign DNA capture during CRISPR–Cas adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, James K.; Harrington, Lucas B.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Engelman, Alan N.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea generate adaptive immunity against phages and plasmids by integrating foreign DNA of specific 30–40 base pair (bp) lengths into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci as spacer segments1–6. The universally conserved Cas1–Cas2 integrase complex catalyzes spacer acquisition using a direct nucleophilic integration mechanism similar to retroviral integrases and transposases7–13. How the Cas1–Cas2 complex selects foreign DNA substrates for integration remains unknown. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of the Escherichia coli Cas1–Cas2 complex bound to cognate 33 nucleotide (nt) protospacer DNA substrates. The protein complex creates a curved binding surface spanning the length of the DNA and splays the ends of the protospacer to allow each terminal nucleophilic 3′–OH to enter a channel leading into the Cas1 active sites. Phosphodiester backbone interactions between the protospacer and the proteins explain the sequence-nonspecific substrate selection observed in vivo2–4. Our results uncover the structural basis for foreign DNA capture and the mechanism by which Cas1–Cas2 functions as a molecular ruler to dictate the sequence architecture of CRISPR loci. PMID:26503043

  9. CRISPR-Cas9-guided Genome Engineering in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Min; Colaiácovo, Monica P.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system is successfully being used for efficient and targeted genome editing in various organisms including the nematode C. elegans. Recent studies developed various CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to enhance genome engineering via two major DNA double-strand break repair pathways: non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination. Here we describe a protocol for Cas9-mediated C. elegans genome editing together with single guide RNA (sgRNA) and repair template cloning and injection methods required for delivering Cas9, sgRNAs and repair template DNA into the C. elegans germline. PMID:27366893

  10. Foreign DNA capture during CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, James K; Harrington, Lucas B; Kranzusch, Philip J; Engelman, Alan N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2015-11-26

    Bacteria and archaea generate adaptive immunity against phages and plasmids by integrating foreign DNA of specific 30-40-base-pair lengths into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci as spacer segments. The universally conserved Cas1-Cas2 integrase complex catalyses spacer acquisition using a direct nucleophilic integration mechanism similar to retroviral integrases and transposases. How the Cas1-Cas2 complex selects foreign DNA substrates for integration remains unknown. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of the Escherichia coli Cas1-Cas2 complex bound to cognate 33-nucleotide protospacer DNA substrates. The protein complex creates a curved binding surface spanning the length of the DNA and splays the ends of the protospacer to allow each terminal nucleophilic 3'-OH to enter a channel leading into the Cas1 active sites. Phosphodiester backbone interactions between the protospacer and the proteins explain the sequence-nonspecific substrate selection observed in vivo. Our results uncover the structural basis for foreign DNA capture and the mechanism by which Cas1-Cas2 functions as a molecular ruler to dictate the sequence architecture of CRISPR loci. PMID:26503043

  11. Cas9 as a versatile tool for engineering biology

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Prashant; Esvelt, Kevin M; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    RNA-guided Cas9 nucleases derived from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas systems have dramatically transformed our ability to edit the genomes of diverse organisms. We believe tools and techniques based on Cas9, a single unifying factor capable of colocalizing RNA, DNA and protein, will grant unprecedented control over cellular organization, regulation and behavior. Here we describe the Cas9 targeting methodology, detail current and prospective engineering advances and suggest potential applications ranging from basic science to the clinic. PMID:24076990

  12. Optical Control of CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing

    PubMed Central

    Hemphill, James; Borchardt, Erin K.; Brown, Kalyn; Asokan, Aravind; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has emerged as an important tool in biomedical research for a wide range of applications, with significant potential for genome engineering and gene therapy. In order to achieve conditional control of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, a genetically encoded light-activated Cas9 was engineered through the site-specific installation of a caged lysine amino acid. Several potential lysine residues were identified as viable caging sites that can be modified to optically control Cas9 function, as demonstrated through optical activation and deactivation of both exogenous and endogenous gene function. PMID:25905628

  13. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-12-26

    A charged particle spectrometer is described for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode. 12 figs.

  14. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A charged particle spectrometer for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode.

  15. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, Paul G.; Williams, Timothy; Horton, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote-sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly.

  16. Optical fiber smartphone spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2016-05-15

    An optical fiber-based smartphone spectrometer incorporating an endoscopic fiber bundle is demonstrated. The endoscope allows transmission of the smartphone camera LED light to a sample, removing complications from varying background illumination. The reflected spectra collected from a surface or interface is dispersed onto the camera CMOS using a reflecting diffraction grating. A spectral resolution as low as δλ∼2.0  nm over a bandwidth of Δλ∼250  nm is obtained using a slit width, ωslit=0.7  mm. The instrument has vast potential in a number of industrial applications including agricultural produce analysis. Spectral analysis of apples shows straightforward measurement of the pigments anthocyanins, carotenoid, and chlorophyll, all of which decrease with increasing storage time. PMID:27176971

  17. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, Michael J.; Johnson, Stanley N.; Yu, Yong; Perraud, Veronique; Bruns, Emily; Alexander, M. L.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Dabdub, Donald; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-05-01

    For studying the formation and photochemical/thermal reactions of aerosols relevant to the troposphere, a unique, high-volume, slow-flow, stainless steel aerosol flow system equipped with 5 UV lamps has been constructed and characterized experimentally. The total flow system length 6 is 8.5 m and includes a 1.2 m section used for mixing, a 6.1 m reaction section and a 1.2 m 7 transition cone at the end. The 45.7 cm diameter results in a smaller surface to volume ratio than is found in many other flow systems and thus reduces the potential contribution from wall reactions. The latter are also reduced by frequent cleaning of the flow tube walls which is made feasible by the ease of disassembly. The flow tube is equipped with ultraviolet lamps for photolysis. This flow system allows continuous sampling under stable conditions, thus increasing the amount of sample available for analysis and permitting a wide variety of analytical techniques to be applied simultaneously. The residence time is of the order of an hour, and sampling ports located along the length of the flow tube allow for time-resolved measurements of aerosol and gas-phase products. The system was characterized using both an inert gas (CO2) and particles (atomized NaNO3). Instruments interfaced directly to this flow system include a NOx analyzer, an ozone analyzer, relative humidity and temperature probes, a scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer, an aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer, a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, an integrating nephelometer, and a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer equipped with a long path (64 m) cell. Particles collected with impactors and filters at the various sampling ports can be analyzed subsequently by a variety of techniques. Formation of secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene reactions (NOx photooxidation and ozonolysis) are used to demonstrate the capabilities of this new system.

  18. Prospects of real-time single-particle biological aerosol analysis: A comparison between laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddows, D. C. S.; Telle, H. H.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we discuss the prospects of real-time, in situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy applied for the identification and classification of bio-aerosols (including species of potential bio-hazard) within common urban aerosol mixtures. In particular, we address the issues associated with the picking out of bio-aerosols against common background aerosol particles, comparing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements with data from a mobile single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (ATOFMS). The data from the latter provide statistical data over an extended period of time, highlighting the variation of the background composition. While single-particle bio-aerosols are detectable in principle, potential problems with small (˜ 1 μm size) bio-aerosols have been identified; constituents of the air mass other than background aerosols, e.g. gaseous CO 2 in conjunction with common background aerosols, may prevent unique recognition of the bio-particles. We discuss whether it is likely that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on its own can provide reliable, real-time identification of bio-aerosol in an urban environment, and it is suggested that more than one technique should be or would have to be used. A case for using a combination of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman (and/or) laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is made.

  19. Cryogenic Neutron Spectrometer Development

    SciTech Connect

    Niedermayr, T; Hau, I D; Friedrich, S; Burger, A; Roy, U N; Bell, Z W

    2006-03-08

    Cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors operating at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K have been developed for the last two decades, driven mostly by the need for ultra-high energy resolution (<0.1%) in X-ray astrophysics and dark matter searches [1]. The Advanced Detector Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed different cryogenic detector technologies for applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to nuclear science and non-proliferation. In particular, we have adapted cryogenic detector technologies for ultra-high energy resolution gamma-spectroscopy [2] and, more recently, fast-neutron spectroscopy [3]. Microcalorimeters are essentially ultra-sensitive thermometers that measure the energy of the radiation from the increase in temperature upon absorption. They consist of a sensitive superconducting thermometer operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state, where its resistance changes very rapidly with temperature such that even the minute energies deposited by single radiation quanta are sufficient to be detectable with high precision. The energy resolution of microcalorimeters is fundamentally limited by thermal fluctuations to {Delta}E{sub FWHM} {approx} 2.355 (k{sub B}T{sup 2}C{sub abs}){sup 1/2}, and thus allows an energy below 1 keV for neutron spectrometers for an operating temperature of T {approx} 0.1 K . The {Delta}E{sub FWHM} does not depend on the energy of the incident photon or particle. This expression is equivalent to the familiar (F{var_epsilon}E{sub {gamma}}){sup 1/2} considering that an absorber at temperature T contains a total energy C{sub abs}T, and the associated fluctuation are due to variations in uncorrelated (F=1) phonons ({var_epsilon} = k{sub B}T) dominated by the background energy C{sub abs}T >> E{gamma}. The rationale behind developing a cryogenic neutron spectrometer is the very high energy resolution combined with the high efficiency. Additionally, the response function is simple

  20. Aromatic Structure in Simulates Titan Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Hudson, R. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Moore, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) between 560 and 20 per centimeter (approximately 18 to 500 micrometers) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's ice abundances, as well as those of the aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km [1]. The aerosol has a broad emission feature centered approximately at 140 per centimeter (71 micrometers). As seen in Figure 1, this feature cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs [2]. The far-IR is uniquely qualified for investigating low-energy vibrational motions within the lattice structures of COITIDlex aerosol. The feature observed by CIRS is broad, and does not likely arise from individual molecules, but rather is representative of the skeletal movements of macromolecules. Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, benzene (C6H6) has been detected in the atmosphere at ppm levels as well as ions that may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [3]. We speculate that the feature may be a blended composite that can be identified with low-energy vibrations of two-dimensional lattice structures of large molecules, such as PAHs or nitrogenated aromatics. Such structures do not dominate the composition of analog materials generated from CH4 and N2 irradiation. We are performing studies forming aerosol analog via UV irradiation of aromatic precursors - specifically C6H6 - to understand how the unique chemical architecture of the products will influence the observable aerosol characteristics. The optical and chemical properties of the aromatic analog will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures, with a focus on the as-yet unidentified far-IR absorbance feature. Preliminary results indicate that the photochemically-formed aromatic aerosol has distinct chemical composition, and may incorporate nitrogen either into the ring structure or adjoined chemical groups. These compositional differences are

  1. Retrieval of CO2 Mixing Ratios from CLARS Measurements: Correcting Aerosol Induced Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Roehl, C. M.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer at the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) on the top of Mt Wilson, California, measures greenhouse gas concentrations in the Los Angeles basin using reflected sun light. Observations include those with large viewing zenith angles (up to 83.1), making the measurements very sensitive to aerosol scattering. A previous study by the authors shows the ratioing of CO2 and O2 slant column densities (SCDs) can largely cancel the effect of aerosol scattering, but biases still exist due to the wavelength dependence of aerosol scattering.In this study, biases caused by different types of aerosols are analyzed. Preliminary results indicate that the information from CLARS-FTS spectra is not sufficient to constrain all the free parameters, including the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth, surface albedo, etc. In order to mitigate the influence of aerosol scattering, a few effective aerosol parameters are retrieved simultaneously with absorbing gas abundances. The corrected SCDs show reasonable variabilities from the morning to the afternoon in the presence of aerosols. The column-averaged dry air mole fraction of CO2 (XCO2) products are compared to measurements from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) at Caltech. By retrieving aerosol parameters in the CO2 and O2 absorption bands, biases in XCO2 caused by wavelength dependence of aerosol scattering can be considerably reduced.

  2. Size-Resolved Volatility and Chemical Composition of Aged European Aerosol Measured During FAME-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Mohr, C.; Lee, B.; Engelhart, G. J.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prevot, A. S.; Baltensperger, U.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    We present first results on the volatility and chemical composition of aged organic aerosol measured during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008 (FAME-2008). Finokalia is located in the Southeast of Crete, Greece, and this remote site allows for the measurement of aged European aerosol as it is transported from Central to Southeastern Europe. We measured the volatility of the aerosol at Finokalia as a function of its size by combining several instruments. We used an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of the particles, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to measure the volume distribution of particles, and a thermodenuder system to induce changes in size and composition via moderate heating of the particles. The largest fraction of the non-refractory material in the aerosol sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organic material and a small contribution from nitrate. Most of the organic aerosol was highly oxidized, even after only a few days of transport over continental Europe. These highly oxidized organics had lower volatility than fresh primary or secondary aerosol measured in the laboratory. Significant changes in air-parcel trajectories and wind direction led to changes in the chemical composition of the sampled aerosol and corresponding changes of the volatility. These results allow the quantification of the effect of atmospheric processing on organic aerosol volatility and can be used as constraints for atmospheric Chemical Transport Models that predict the aerosol volatility.

  3. Blowing Snow - A Major Source of Aerosol in the Polar Regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnajs, L.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Giordano, M.; Davis, S. M.; Deshler, T.; Johnson, A.; Goetz, J. D.; Mukherjee, A. D.; Slater, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Sea salt aerosol is the dominant aerosol component in unpolluted Polar Regions, particularly in the sea ice zone. In the lower latitude liquid ocean, wave action and bubble bursting is thought to be the main mechanism for sea salt aerosol production. However there is growing evidence that in the Polar Regions, particularly near sea ice, that the sublimation of wind lofted salty snow may be a dominant source of sea salt aerosol. An extensive set of aerosol sizing and compositional measurements was made at sea ice location near Ross Island, Antarctica during two field measurement campaigns - a summer campaign in 2014 and late winter campaign in 2015. Sizing measurements from both open and closed path aerosol instruments, and compositional measurements from an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer suggest that there is a significant enhancement in both super and sub micron aerosol associated with high wind events and blowing snow in the boundary layer. While the composition of this aerosol indicates that it is primarily of marine origin, the ratios of the major sea salt ions suggest that processing in the snow pack significantly modifies the aerosol. This alternate sea salt aerosol production mechanism could have significant impact on the modeling of tropospheric halogen chemistry and on the interpretation of sea salt-based proxies in the ice core record.

  4. Measurements of aerosol chemical composition in boreal forest summer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ńijälä, M.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Corrigan, A.; Russell, L.; Makkonen, U.; Virkkula, A.; Mäntykenttä, J.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.

    2012-04-01

    Boreal forests are an important biome, covering vast areas of the northern hemisphere and affecting the global climate change via various feedbacks [1]. Despite having relatively few anthropogenic primary aerosol sources, they always contain a non-negligible aerosol population [2]. This study describes aerosol chemical composition measurements using Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (C-ToF AMS, [3]), carried out at a boreal forest area in Hyytiälä, Southern Finland. The site, Helsinki University SMEAR II measurement station [4], is situated at a homogeneous Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) forest stand. In addition to the station's permanent aerosol, gas phase and meteorological instruments, during the HUMPPA (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air) campaign in July 2010, a very comprehensive set of atmospheric chemistry measurement instrumentation was provided by the Max Planck Institute for chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University, University of California and the Finnish Meteorological institute. In this study aerosol chemical composition measurements from the campaign are presented. The dominant aerosol chemical species during the campaign were the organics, although periods with elevated amounts of particulate sulfates were also seen. The overall AMS measured particle mass concentrations varied from near zero to 27 μg/m observed during a forest fire smoke episode. The AMS measured aerosol mass loadings were found to agree well with DMPS derived mass concentrations (r2=0.998). The AMS data was also compared with three other aerosol instruments. The Marga instrument [5] was used to provide a quantitative semi-online measurement of inorganic chemical compounds in particle phase. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis was performed on daily filter samples, enabling the identification and quantification of organic aerosol subspecies. Finally an Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (APCI

  5. Reactive uptake of HOCl to laboratory generated sea salt particles and nascent sea-spray aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, N. R.; Ryder, O. S.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Field observations suggest that the reactive uptake of HOCl on marine aerosol particles is an important source of chlorine radicals, particularly under low NOx conditions. However to date, laboratory measurements disagree on the magnitude of the reactive uptake coefficient for HOCl by a factor of 5 (γ(HOCl) ranges between 0.0004 and 0.0018), and there are no measurements of γ(HOCl) on nascent sea-spray aerosol. Here, we present measurements of the reactive uptake of HOCl to laboratory generated sodium chloride and sea-spray aerosol particles generated in a novel Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART), coupled to an entrained aerosol flow reactor and Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Measurements of γ(HOCl) retrieved here are compared against those in the literature, and the role of organic coatings on nascent sea-spray aerosol is explored.

  6. Aerosol Measurements from Current and Future EUMETSAT Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ruediger; Munro, Rosemary; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Grzegorski, Michael; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy; Retscher, Christian; Marbach, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    EUMETSAT supports the operational monitoring and forecasting of atmospheric composition including various aerosol optical properties through specific products from its geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites. Meteosat imagery is used to characterise aerosols in the atmosphere, including volcanic ash and dust storms at high temporal resolution, while the GOME-2, AVHRR and IASI and instruments on Metop observe aerosol optical properties from the UV/vis to the infra-red spectral region from a polar morning orbit. The role of EUMETSAT in observing aerosol optical properties will expand further towards the 2020 timeframe when EUMETSAT also becomes the operator of the Copernicus Sentinel-3, 4 and 5 missions. This expanding role will be realised through additional atmospheric composition sounding instruments such as the UVN/Sentinel-4 on the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) geostationary platforms and the 3MI, METimage, and Sentinel-5 instruments on the EPS Second Generation (EPS-SG) satellites. The synergistic use of imager, spectrometer and interferometer data will, with the availability of this new generation of instrumentation and with the need for measuring aerosol optical properties at short-time scales, high spatial resolution and over a broad spectra region, play and increasingly important role in the field of aerosol remote sensing. With its new Polar Multi-mission Aerosol optical properties (PMAp) product, providing aerosol and cloud optical depth information, as well as fine mode, dust and volcanic ash characterisation over ocean and in the future also over land, EUMETSAT has recently been implementing the first framework for such synergistic retrievals for the remote sensing of aerosol optical properties from GOME-2, AVHRR and IASI instruments on Metop. We will present an overview of the ongoing and the future developments at EUMETSAT concerning aerosol remote sensing from Metop as well as from the current MSG geostationary platforms and from the future

  7. Tenth anniversary of CAS ONLINE service : What CAS services should be in the new era of chemical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostakos, Charles N.

    Chemical Abstracts Service celebrated 10th anniversary of CAS online information service in 1990. A speech given on the occasion reviewed history of the CAS ONLINE, in relation to its most important benefits for scientists and engineers. The development of STN international, the network through which CAS ONLINE is accessible around the world, was also discussed in the speech. The CAS ONLINE now contains a wide variety of files relating to chemical field including CA file, Registry file. CA previews,. CASREACT, CIN. MARPAT, etc for supplying chemical information worldwide.

  8. THEMIS Observations of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft entered into Martian orbit in October 2001 and after successful aerobraking began mapping in February 2002 (approximately Ls=330 deg.). Images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on-board the Odyssey spacecraft allow the quantitative retrieval of atmospheric dust and water-ice aerosol optical depth. Atmospheric quantities retrieved from THEMIS build upon existing datasets returned by Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). Data from THEMIS complements the concurrent MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data by offering a later local time (approx. 2:00 for TES vs. approx. 4:00 - 5:30 for THEMIS) and much higher spatial resolution.

  9. Lunar orbital mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, W. P.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, manufacture, test and calibration of five lunar orbital mass spectrometers with the four associated ground support equipment test sets are discussed. A mass spectrometer was installed in the Apollo 15 and one in the Apollo 16 Scientific Instrument Module within the Service Module. The Apollo 15 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 38 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit and 50 hours of data were collected during transearth coast. The Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 76 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit. However, the Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was ejected into lunar orbit upon malfunction of spacecraft boom system just prior to transearth insection and no transearth coast data was possible.

  10. HIGHLY TIME-RESOLVED SOURCE APPORTIONMENT TECHNIQUES FOR ORGANIC AEROSOLS USING THE AERODYNE AEROSOL MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project had two major components: (1) the development and application of receptor model techniques to AMS OA data, and (2) the field deployment and field data analysis for several new technique...

  11. Recent Advances in Genome Editing Using CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuduan; Li, Hong; Chen, Ling-Ling; Xie, Kabin

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated nuclease 9) system is a versatile tool for genome engineering that uses a guide RNA (gRNA) to target Cas9 to a specific sequence. This simple RNA-guided genome-editing technology has become a revolutionary tool in biology and has many innovative applications in different fields. In this review, we briefly introduce the Cas9-mediated genome-editing method, summarize the recent advances in CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and discuss their implications for plant research. To date, targeted gene knockout using the Cas9/gRNA system has been established in many plant species, and the targeting efficiency and capacity of Cas9 has been improved by optimizing its expression and that of its gRNA. The CRISPR/Cas9 system can also be used for sequence-specific mutagenesis/integration and transcriptional control of target genes. We also discuss off-target effects and the constraint that the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) puts on CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering. To address these problems, a number of bioinformatic tools are available to help design specific gRNAs, and new Cas9 variants and orthologs with high fidelity and alternative PAM specificities have been engineered. Owing to these recent efforts, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is becoming a revolutionary and flexible tool for genome engineering. Adoption of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology in plant research would enable the investigation of plant biology at an unprecedented depth and create innovative applications in precise crop breeding. PMID:27252719

  12. Cas9 Variants Expand the Target Repertoire in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bell, Ryan T; Fu, Becky X H; Fire, Andrew Z

    2016-02-01

    The proliferation of CRISPR/Cas9-based methods in Caenorhabditis elegans has enabled efficient genome editing and precise genomic tethering of Cas9 fusion proteins. Experimental designs using CRISPR/Cas9 are currently limited by the need for a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) in the target with the sequence NGG. Here we report the characterization of two modified Cas9 proteins in C. elegans that recognize NGA and NGCG PAMs. We found that each variant could stimulate homologous recombination with a donor template at multiple loci and that PAM specificity was comparable to that of wild-type Cas9. To directly compare effectiveness, we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to generate a set of assay strains with a common single-guide RNA (sgRNA) target sequence, but that differ in the juxtaposed PAM (NGG, NGA, or NGCG). In this controlled setting, we determined that the NGA PAM Cas9 variant can be as effective as wild-type Cas9. We similarly edited a genomic target to study the influence of the base following the NGA PAM. Using four strains with four NGAN PAMs differing only at the fourth position and adjacent to the same sgRNA target, we observed that efficient homologous replacement was attainable with any base in the fourth position, with an NGAG PAM being the most effective. In addition to demonstrating the utility of two Cas9 mutants in C. elegans and providing reagents that permit CRISPR/Cas9 experiments with fewer restrictions on potential targets, we established a means to benchmark the efficiency of different Cas9::PAM combinations that avoids variations owing to differences in the sgRNA sequence. PMID:26680661

  13. Cassini/CIRS capabilities for aerosol, cloud, and surface measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelson, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Information that should be revealed by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) about the aerosol, cloud, and surface properties of Titan are addressed. Limb sounding data will be used to determine aerosol abundances, scale heights, and gradients between 80 and 400 km for various latitudes. Stratospheric condensate cloud top altitudes and column abundances will be inferred as functions of latitude. A search for new species will be conducted. Thermal maps between 500 and 550/cm will be used to investigate tropospheric methane clouds and surface topography; time resolution provided by different orbits will be used to distinguish the two.

  14. Rocket-borne Ion Mass Spectrometer for the Mesosphere That is Pumped by Rocket Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Smith, Steven; Robertson, Scott

    The mesospheric region close to the mesopause is populated by electrons, ions and aerosol particles. The number density of aerosol particles may exceed that of the background plasma creating conditions where the free electron density is reduced. Understanding the full charge balance of the region requires the simultaneous detection of electrons, charged aerosol particles and ions. Rocket borne instruments for the measurement of electrons and aerosols are readily available. Mass spectrometers for ions have been flown that were evacuated by cryogenic vacuum pumps with liquid helium or neon. There have not been flights since 1993 because these instruments required expensive deliveries of cryogens and frequent refilling. Advances in (1) aerodynamic modeling, (2) mass spectrometer design, and (3) ion detection technology make possible a new approach to mass spectrometry in the mesosphere in which the spectrometer is pumped by the flow around the rocket. A miniature Rotating Field Mass Analyzer (RFMS) is presented that is suitable for the measurement of ions in from 70 km upward. RFMS has a 2 x 2 x 20 mm3 velocity selection cell and utilizes and advanced ion detector that is capable of single ions operation mode at these altitudes. The instrument is pumped by the aerodynamic effect of the supersonic payload. A prototype version of RFMS is under laboratory testing.

  15. Similarities and differences of aerosol optical properties between southern and northern sides of the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ma, Y. M.; Panday, A.; Cong, Z. Y.; Yang, K.; Zhu, Z. K.; Wang, J. M.; Amatya, P. M.; Zhao, L.

    2014-03-01

    The Himalaya mountains along the southern edge of the Tibetan Plateau act as a natural barrier for the transport of atmospheric aerosols from the polluted regions of South Asia to the main body of the Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we investigate the seasonal and diurnal variations of aerosol optical properties measured at two Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites on the southern side of the Himalaya (Pokhara, 812 m above sea level (a.s.l.) and EVK2-CNR, 5079 m a.s.l. in Nepal) and one on the northern side (Qomolangma (Mt. Everest) station for Atmospheric and Environmental Observation and Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (QOMS_CAS) in Tibet, 4076 m a.s.l. in China). While observations at QOMS_CAS and EVK2-CNR can generally be representative of a remote background atmosphere, Pokhara is a lower-elevation suburban site with much higher aerosol load due to both the influence of local anthropogenic activities and to its proximity to the Indo-Gangetic Plains. The annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) during the investigated period was 0.05 at QOMS_CAS, 0.04 at EVK2-CNR and 0.51 at Pokhara, respectively. Seasonal variations of aerosols are profoundly affected by large-scale atmospheric circulation. Vegetation fires, peaking during April in the Himalayan region and northern India, contribute to a growing fine mode AOD at the three stations. Dust transported to these sites, wind erosion and hydrated/cloud-processed aerosols lead to an increase in coarse mode AOD during the monsoon season at QOMS_CAS and EVK2-CNR. Meanwhile, coarse mode AOD at EVK2-CNR is higher than at QOMS_CAS in August and September, indicating that the transport of coarse mode aerosols from the southern to the northern side may be effectively reduced. The effect of precipitation scavenging is clearly seen at Pokhara, which sees significantly reduced aerosol loads during the monsoon season. Unlike the seasonal variations, diurnal variations are mainly influenced by meso-scale systems and local

  16. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Owen W; Poddar, Snigdha; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing that results in scarless and marker-free integrations of DNA into Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. DNA integration results from cotransforming (1) a single plasmid (pCAS) that coexpresses the Cas9 endonuclease and a uniquely engineered single guide RNA (sgRNA) expression cassette and (2) a linear DNA molecule that is used to repair the chromosomal DNA damage by homology-directed repair. For target specificity, the pCAS plasmid requires only a single cloning modification: replacing the 20-bp guide RNA sequence within the sgRNA cassette. This CRISPR-Cas9 protocol includes methods for (1) cloning the unique target sequence into pCAS, (2) assembly of the double-stranded DNA repair oligonucleotides, and (3) cotransformation of pCAS and linear repair DNA into yeast cells. The protocol is technically facile and requires no special equipment. It can be used in any S. cerevisiae strain, including industrial polyploid isolates. Therefore, this CRISPR-Cas9-based DNA integration protocol is achievable by virtually any yeast genetics and molecular biology laboratory. PMID:27250940

  17. Interacting Parallel Constructions of Knowledge in a CAS Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidron, Ivy; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2010-01-01

    We consider the influence of a CAS context on a learner's process of constructing a justification for the bifurcations in a logistic dynamical process. We describe how instrumentation led to cognitive constructions and how the roles of the learner and the CAS intertwine, especially close to the branching and combining of constructing actions. The…

  18. Semiotic and Discursive Variables in CAS-Based Didactical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslow, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Presents a semiotic analysis of the potential of computer algebra systems (CAS) for enabling mathematical activity on a conceptual level higher than usual. Illustrates examples of theoretical points from a development project in the context of a first year university course in calculus. Discusses how CAS may be used in a didactical analysis and in…

  19. Transformation of OODT CAS to Perform Larger Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris; Freeborn, Dana; Crichton, Daniel; Hughes, John; Ramirez, Paul; Hardman, Sean; Woollard, David; Kelly, Sean

    2008-01-01

    A computer program denoted OODT CAS has been transformed to enable performance of larger tasks that involve greatly increased data volumes and increasingly intensive processing of data on heterogeneous, geographically dispersed computers. Prior to the transformation, OODT CAS (also alternatively denoted, simply, 'CAS') [wherein 'OODT' signifies 'Object-Oriented Data Technology' and 'CAS' signifies 'Catalog and Archive Service'] was a proven software component used to manage scientific data from spaceflight missions. In the transformation, CAS was split into two separate components representing its canonical capabilities: file management and workflow management. In addition, CAS was augmented by addition of a resource-management component. This third component enables CAS to manage heterogeneous computing by use of diverse resources, including high-performance clusters of computers, commodity computing hardware, and grid computing infrastructures. CAS is now more easily maintainable, evolvable, and reusable. These components can be used separately or, taking advantage of synergies, can be used together. Other elements of the transformation included addition of a separate Web presentation layer that supports distribution of data products via Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, and provision for full Resource Description Framework (RDF) exports of metadata.

  20. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  1. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  2. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  3. Teaching Undergraduate Mathematics Using CAS Technology: Issues and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Patrick C.; Weiss, Vida

    2016-01-01

    The use of handheld CAS technology in undergraduate mathematics courses in Australia is paradoxically shrinking under sustained disapproval or disdain from the professional mathematics community. Mathematics education specialists argue with their mathematics colleagues over a range of issues in course development and this use of CAS or even…

  4. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  5. 48 CFR 970.3002-1 - CAS applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....3002-1 CAS applicability. The provisions of 48 CFR part 30 and 48 CFR chapter 99 (FAR Appendix) shall... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CAS applicability. 970.3002-1 Section 970.3002-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  6. From Calculus to Dynamical Systems through DGS and CAS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Jeanett López; Zamudio, Jorge Javier Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Several factors have motivated the use of CAS or DGS in the teaching-learning process, such as: the development of new technologies, the availability of computers, and the widespread use of the Internet, among others. Even more, the trend to include CAS and DGS in the curricula of some undergraduate studies has resulted in the instruction of the…

  7. Optimization of genome editing through CRISPR-Cas9 engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Adikaram, Poorni; Pandey, Mritunjay; Genis, Allison; Simonds, William F

    2016-04-01

    CRISPR (Clustered Regularly-Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9) has rapidly become the most promising genome editing tool with great potential to revolutionize medicine. Through guidance of a 20 nucleotide RNA (gRNA), CRISPR-Cas9 finds and cuts target protospacer DNA precisely 3 base pairs upstream of a PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif). The broken DNA ends are repaired by either NHEJ (Non-Homologous End Joining) resulting in small indels, or by HDR (Homology Directed Repair) for precise gene or nucleotide replacement. Theoretically, CRISPR-Cas9 could be used to modify any genomic sequences, thereby providing a simple, easy, and cost effective means of genome wide gene editing. However, the off-target activity of CRISPR-Cas9 that cuts DNA sites with imperfect matches with gRNA have been of significant concern because clinical applications require 100% accuracy. Additionally, CRISPR-Cas9 has unpredictable efficiency among different DNA target sites and the PAM requirements greatly restrict its genome editing frequency. A large number of efforts have been made to address these impeding issues, but much more is needed to fully realize the medical potential of CRISPR-Cas9. In this article, we summarize the existing problems and current advances of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology and provide perspectives for the ultimate perfection of Cas9-mediated genome editing. PMID:27340770

  8. Simplified CRISPR-Cas genome editing for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Gottardi, Manuela; Oreb, Mislav; Boles, Eckhard

    2016-08-01

    CRISPR-Cas has become a powerful technique for genetic engineering of yeast. Here, we present an improved version by using only one single plasmid expressing Cas9 and one or two guide-RNAs. A high gene deletion efficiency was achieved even with simultaneous recombination cloning of the plasmid and deletion in industrial strains. PMID:27327211

  9. Recent Progress in CRISPR/Cas9 Technology.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yue; Wang, Yan; Chen, Huiqian; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Ju, Xing-Da

    2016-02-20

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, a simple and efficient tool for genome editing, has experienced rapid progress in its technology and applicability in the past two years. Here, we review the recent advances in CRISPR/Cas9 technology and the ways that have been adopted to expand our capacity for precise genome manipulation. First, we introduce the mechanism of CRISPR/Cas9, including its biochemical and structural implications. Second, we highlight the latest improvements in the CRISPR/Cas9 system, especially Cas9 protein modifications for customization. Third, we review its current applications, in which the versatile CRISPR/Cas9 system was employed to edit the genome, epigenome, or RNA of various organisms. Although CRISPR/Cas9 allows convenient genome editing accompanied by many benefits, we should not ignore the significant ethical and biosafety concerns that it raises. Finally, we discuss the prospective applications and challenges of several promising techniques adapted from CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:26924689

  10. VEGAS: VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussa, Srikanth; VEGAS Development Team

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (NSF-ATI) program is funding a new spectrometer backend for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This spectrometer is being built by the CICADA collaboration - collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) at the University of California Berkeley.The backend is named as VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) and will replace the capabilities of the existing spectrometers. This backend supports data processing from focal plane array systems. The spectrometer will be capable of processing up to 1.25 GHz bandwidth from 8 dual polarized beams or a bandwidth up to 10 GHz from a dual polarized beam.The spectrometer will be using 8-bit analog to digital converters (ADC), which gives a better dynamic range than existing GBT spectrometers. There will be 8 tunable digital sub-bands within the 1.25 GHz bandwidth, which will enhance the capability of simultaneous observation of multiple spectral transitions. The maximum spectral dump rate to disk will be about 0.5 msec. The vastly enhanced backend capabilities will support several science projects with the GBT. The projects include mapping temperature and density structure of molecular clouds; searches for organic molecules in the interstellar medium; determination of the fundamental constants of our evolving Universe; red-shifted spectral features from galaxies across cosmic time and survey for pulsars in the extreme gravitational environment of the Galactic Center.

  11. Cascaded interferometric imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Swinyard, Bruce; Ferlet, Marc

    2007-09-01

    We present what we believe to be a novel method for order sorting a Fabry-Perot interferometer using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) in tandem. We demonstrate how the order sorting is achieved using a model instrument response as an example of an instrument working in the 5-25 microm band, although the method is generally applicable at all wavelengths. We show that an instrument of this type can be realized with a large bandwidth, a large field of view, and good transmission efficiency. These attributes make this instrument concept a useful technique in applications where true imaging spectroscopy is required, such as mapping large astronomical sources. We compare the performance of the new instrument to grating and standard FTS instruments in circumstances where the measurement is background and detector noise limited. We use a figure of merit based on the field of view and speed of detection and find that the new system has a speed advantage over a FTS with the same field of view in all circumstances. The instrument will be faster than a grating instrument with the same spectral resolution once the field of view is >13 times larger under high background conditions and >50 times larger with detector performances that match the photon noise from Zodiacal light. PMID:17805378

  12. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected autoionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy.

  13. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-08-08

    A method and apparatus are described for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected auto-ionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy. 8 figs.

  14. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  15. Coordinated Airborne, Spaceborne, and Ground-Based Measurements of Massive, Thick Aerosol Layers During the Dry Season in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hlavka, D. L.; McGill, M. J.; Holben, B. N.; Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J.; Torres, O.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the dry-season airborne campaign of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000), unique coordinated observations were made of massive, thick aerosol layers. These layers were often dominated by aerosols from biomass burning. We report on airborne Sunphotometer measurements of aerosol optical depth (lambda=354-1558 nm), columnar water vapor, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and water vapor density that were obtained aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft. We compare these with ground-based AERONET Sun/sky radiometer results, with ground based lidar data MPL-Net), and with measurements from a downward-pointing lidar aboard the high-flying NASA ER-2 aircraft. Finally, we show comparisons between aerosol optical depths from the Sunphotometer and those retrieved over land and over water using four spaceborne sensors (TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer), MISR (Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer) and ATSR-2 (Along Track Scanning Radiometer)).

  16. Comparison of three methods for measuring light absorption by collected aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ramsey-Bell, D C; Couture, G

    1985-08-01

    Three instruments for measuring absorption of visible light by atmospheric aerosols are compared: the visual comparator; plate diffuser; and photoacoustic spectrometer. Two versions of the photoacoustic spectrometer are tested, one built of acrylic plastic and the other of aluminum. One version of the visual comparator uses Millipore filters for a crucial reflective surface, another a mirror. Several materials collected on Nuclepore filters are used in the comparison. Laboratory generated samples consist of carbon and carbon overlaid with ammonium sulfate. Atmospheric aerosols were collected in Tucson and on an Arizona mountain peak. All methods give reasonably consistent results, even when applied to the lightly absorbing nonurban atmospheric samples. PMID:18223896

  17. Cas9-mediated targeting of viral RNA in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Price, Aryn A.; Sampson, Timothy R.; Ratner, Hannah K.; Grakoui, Arash; Weiss, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats–CRISPR associated (CRISPR-Cas) systems are prokaryotic RNA-directed endonuclease machineries that act as an adaptive immune system against foreign genetic elements. Using small CRISPR RNAs that provide specificity, Cas proteins recognize and degrade nucleic acids. Our previous work demonstrated that the Cas9 endonuclease from Francisella novicida (FnCas9) is capable of targeting endogenous bacterial RNA. Here, we show that FnCas9 can be directed by an engineered RNA-targeting guide RNA to target and inhibit a human +ssRNA virus, hepatitis C virus, within eukaryotic cells. This work reveals a versatile and portable RNA-targeting system that can effectively function in eukaryotic cells and be programmed as an antiviral defense. PMID:25918406

  18. Conditional Control of CRISPR/Cas9 Function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenyuan; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-04-25

    The recently discovered CRISPR/Cas9 endonuclease system, comprised of a guide RNA for the recognition of a DNA target and the Cas9 nuclease protein for binding and processing the target, has been extensively studied and has been widely applied in genome editing, synthetic biology, and transcriptional modulation in cells and animals. Toward more precise genomic modification and further expansion of the CRISPR/Cas9 system as a spatiotemporally controlled gene regulatory system, several approaches of conditional activation of Cas9 function using small molecules and light have recently been developed. These methods have led to improvements in the genome editing specificity of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and enabled its activation with temporal and spatial precision. PMID:26996256

  19. Multiple order common path spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbury, Amy B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dispersive spectrometer. The spectrometer allows detection of multiple orders of light on a single focal plane array by splitting the orders spatially using a dichroic assembly. A conventional dispersion mechanism such as a defraction grating disperses the light spectrally. As a result, multiple wavelength orders can be imaged on a single focal plane array of limited spectral extent, doubling (or more) the number of spectral channels as compared to a conventional spectrometer. In addition, this is achieved in a common path device.

  20. Method for calibrating mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2002-12-24

    A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

  1. Implementing the CAS Standards: The Implementation of the CAS Standards in Student Affairs as a Comprehensive Assessment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Jesse A.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing use of the CAS standards as a comprehensive assessment approach in divisions of student affairs necessitates a more in-depth understanding of how the CAS standards are being implemented in these settings. In response to increasing calls for improvement, accountability and professionalism in student affairs (Bresciani, 2006; Cooper…

  2. Field Studies of Broadband Aerosol Optical Extinction in the Ultraviolet Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. In the case of brown carbon, its wavelength-dependent absorption in the ultraviolet spectral region has been suggested as an important component of aerosol radiative forcing. We describe a new field instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We deployed this instrument during the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment during Fall 2012 to measure biomass burning aerosol, and again during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study in summer 2013 to measure organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. In both field experiments, we determined aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength and can interpret this together with size distribution and composition measurements to characterize the aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing.

  3. Optical extinction of highly porous aerosol following atmospheric freeze drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Gabriela; Haspel, Carynelisa; Moise, Tamar; Rudich, Yinon

    2014-06-01

    Porous glassy particles are a potentially significant but unexplored component of atmospheric aerosol that can form by aerosol processing through the ice phase of high convective clouds. The optical properties of porous glassy aerosols formed from a freeze-dry cycle simulating freezing and sublimation of ice particles were measured using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer (CRD-AS) at 532 nm and 355 nm wavelength. The measured extinction efficiency was significantly reduced for porous organic and mixed organic-ammonium sulfate particles as compared to the extinction efficiency of the homogeneous aerosol of the same composition prior to the freeze-drying process. A number of theoretical approaches for modeling the optical extinction of porous aerosols were explored. These include effective medium approximations, extended effective medium approximations, multilayer concentric sphere models, Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory, and the discrete dipole approximation. Though such approaches are commonly used to describe porous particles in astrophysical and atmospheric contexts, in the current study, these approaches predicted an even lower extinction than the measured one. Rather, the best representation of the measured extinction was obtained with an effective refractive index retrieved from a fit to Mie scattering theory assuming spherical particles with a fixed void content. The single-scattering albedo of the porous glassy aerosols was derived using this effective refractive index and was found to be lower than that of the corresponding homogeneous aerosol, indicating stronger relative absorption at the wavelengths measured. The reduced extinction and increased absorption may be of significance in assessing direct, indirect, and semidirect forcing in regions where porous aerosols are expected to be prevalent.

  4. Complete chemical analysis of aerosol particles in real-time

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mo; Reilly, P.T.A.; Gieray, R.A.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Real-time mass spectrometry of individual aerosol particles using an ion trap mass spectrometer is described. The microparticles are sampled directly from the air by a particle inlet system into the vacuum chamber. An incoming particle is detected as it passes through two CW laser beams and a pulsed laser is triggered to intercept the particle for laser ablation ionization at the center of the ion trap. The produced ions are analyzed by the ion trap mass spectrometer. Ions of interest are selected and dissociated through collision with buffer gas atoms for further fragmentation analysis. Real-time chemical analyses of inorganic, organic, and bacterial aerosol articles have been demonstrated. It has been confirmed that the velocity and the size of the incoming particles highly correlate to each other. The performance of the inlet system, particle detection, and preliminary results are discussed.

  5. Thermoluminescent aerosol analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Long, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for detecting and measuring trace amounts of aerosols when reacted with ozone in a gaseous environment was examined. A sample aerosol was exposed to a fixed ozone concentration for a fixed period of time, and a fluorescer was added to the exposed sample. The sample was heated in a 30 C/minute linear temperature profile to 200 C. The trace peak was measured and recorded as a function of the test aerosol and the recorded thermoluminescence trace peak of the fluorescer is specific to the aerosol being tested.

  6. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  7. Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2013-02-07

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short

  8. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2010-10-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While extensive BB is not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m=1.53(±0.03)+0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m=1.54(±0.01)+0.04i(±0.01) compared to m=1.49(±0.01)+0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  9. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-02-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03) + 0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01) + 0.04i(±0.01) compared to m = 1.49(±0.01) + 0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  10. Formation of HNO 2 on aerosol surfaces during foggy periods in the presence of NO and NO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notholt, J.; Hjorth, J.; Raes, F.

    A commercial Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer (DOAS), measuring trace gases absorbing in the u.v./vis region was used for obtaining information on aerosol parameters (e.g. total surface) based on the observed Mie scattering. This procedure allows simultaneous measurements of trace gas concentrations and aerosol parameters within the same air volume. A series of measurements of HNO 2, NO 2, NO, SO 2 and aerosol parameters was performed at Ispra in northern Italy. The observations show a rapid formation of gaseous HNO 2 during foggy episodes and give direct evidence of an important contribution of reactions on wet aerosols to the transformation of tropospheric NO x into HNO 2.

  11. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote-sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly.anomaly. Both the visible and infrared subsystems scan in "pushbroom" mode: that is, an aircraft carrying the system moves along a ground track, the system is aimed downward, and image data are acquired in acrosstrack linear arrays of pixels. Both subsystems operate at a frame rate of 30 Hz. The infrared and visible-light optics are adjusted so that both subsystems are aimed at the same moving swath, which has across-track angular width of 15. Data from the infrared and visible imaging subsystems are stored in the same file along with aircraft-position data acquired by a Global Positioning System receiver. The combination of the three sets of data is used to construct infrared and hyperspectral maps of scanned areas shown.

  12. Interference activity of a minimal Type I CRISPR–Cas system from Shewanella putrefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Brenzinger, Susanne; Gleditzsch, Daniel; Plagens, André; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai; Randau, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Type I CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)–Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems exist in bacterial and archaeal organisms and provide immunity against foreign DNA. The Cas protein content of the DNA interference complexes (termed Cascade) varies between different CRISPR-Cas subtypes. A minimal variant of the Type I-F system was identified in proteobacterial species including Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. This variant lacks a large subunit (Csy1), Csy2 and Csy3 and contains two unclassified cas genes. The genome of S. putrefaciens CN-32 contains only five Cas proteins (Cas1, Cas3, Cas6f, Cas1821 and Cas1822) and a single CRISPR array with 81 spacers. RNA-Seq analyses revealed the transcription of this array and the maturation of crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs). Interference assays based on plasmid conjugation demonstrated that this CRISPR-Cas system is active in vivo and that activity is dependent on the recognition of the dinucleotide GG PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif) sequence and crRNA abundance. The deletion of cas1821 and cas1822 reduced the cellular crRNA pool. Recombinant Cas1821 was shown to form helical filaments bound to RNA molecules, which suggests its role as the Cascade backbone protein. A Cascade complex was isolated which contained multiple Cas1821 copies, Cas1822, Cas6f and mature crRNAs. PMID:26350210

  13. Indoor aerosol size distributions in a gymnasium.

    PubMed

    Castro, Amaya; Calvo, Ana I; Alves, Célia; Alonso-Blanco, Elisabeth; Coz, Esther; Marques, Liliana; Nunes, Teresa; Fernández-Guisuraga, Jose Manuel; Fraile, Roberto

    2015-08-15

    In this study, an indoor/outdoor monitoring program was carried out in a gymnasium at the University of Leon, Spain. The main goal was a characterization of aerosol size distributions in a university gymnasium under different conditions and sports activities (with and without magnesia alba) and the study of the mass fraction deposited in each of the parts of the respiratory tract. The aerosol particles were measured in 31 discrete channels (size ranges) using a laser spectrometer probe. Aerosol size distributions were studied under different conditions: i) before sports activities, ii) activities without using magnesia alba, iii) activities using magnesia alba, iv) cleaning procedures, and v) outdoors. The aerosol refractive index and density indoors were estimated from the aerosol composition: 1.577-0.003i and 2.055 g cm(-3), respectively. Using the estimated density, the mass concentration was calculated, and the evolution of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 for different activities was assessed. The quality of the air in the gymnasium was strongly influenced by the use of magnesia alba (MgCO3) and the number of gymnasts who were training. Due to the climbing chalk and the constant process of resuspension, average PM10 concentrations of over 440 μg m(-3) were reached. The maximum daily concentrations ranged from 500 to 900 μg m(-3). Particle size determines the place in the respiratory tract where the deposition occurs. For this reason, the inhalable, thoracic, tracheobronchial and respirable fractions were assessed for healthy adults and high risk people, according to international standards. The estimations show that, for healthy adults, up to 300 μg m(-3) can be retained by the trachea and bronchi, and 130 μg m(-3) may reach the alveolar region. The different physical activities and the attendance rates in the sports facility have a significant influence on the concentration and size distributions observed. PMID:25897726

  14. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Overview

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is flying to the station on STS-134. The AMS experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 ...

  15. Micromachined Slits for Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Daniel; Kenny, James; White, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Slits for imaging spectrometers can now be fabricated to a precision much greater than previously attainable. What makes this possible is a micromachining process that involves the use of microlithographic techniques.

  16. Versatile cluster based photoelectron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Knappenberger, K. L. Jr.; Jones, C. E. Jr.; Sobhy, M. A.; Castleman, A. W. Jr.

    2006-12-15

    A recently constructed cluster based photoelectron spectrometer is described. This instrumentation is unique in that it enables the kinetic energy analysis of electrons ejected from both anions and neutral clusters. This capability permits the investigation of discrete electronic levels in all charge states (anionic, neutral, and cationic). A laser vaporization plasma reactor cluster source affixed with a sublimation cell is employed to produce a variety of metal clusters, and the resulting cluster distributions are analyzed with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The corresponding electronic structure is analyzed with a 'magnetic bottle' photoelectron spectrometer. Examples of instrument performance operating in both anion photodetachment and neutral multiphoton ionization (MPI) modes are provided. In the case of neutral MPI, the corresponding product distribution is collected with a Wiley-McLaren [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 26, 1150 (1955)] mass spectrometer mounted perpendicular to the magnetic bottle photoelectron spectrometer.

  17. Fast-neutron spectrometer developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moler, R. B.; Zagotta, W. E.; Baker, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    Li6 sandwich-type neutron spectrometer is equipped with proportional counter for particle identification. System uses current-sensitive preamplifiers to minimize pile-up of gamma-ray and particle pulses.

  18. One Martian Year of Atmospheric Observations by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor has completed one full Martian year of mapping. Infrared spectra returned by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are very well suited for monitoring the thermal structure and the distribution of aerosols and water vapor in the Mars atmosphere. Nadir-viewing spectra allow a global picture of the state of the Mars atmosphere on a daily basis. We report here on the observed annual cycle of the latitudinal dependence of atmospheric temperature, dust aerosols, water-ice clouds, and water vapor.

  19. The GRAVITY spectrometers: optical qualification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, Senol; Straubmeier, Christian; Wiest, Michael; Wank, Imke; Fischer, Sebastian; Horrobin, Matthew; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy; Perraut, Karine; Brandner, Wolfgang; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY1 is a 2nd generation Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) operated in the astronomical K-band. In the Beam Combiner Instrument2 (BCI) four Fiber Couplers3 (FC) will feed the light coming from each telescope into two fibers, a reference channel for the fringe tracking spectrometer4 (FT) and a science channel for the science spectrometer4 (SC). The differential Optical Path Difference (dOPD) between the two channels will be corrected using a novel metrology concept.5 The metrology laser will keep control of the dOPD of the two channels. It is injected into the spectrometers and detected at the telescope level. Piezo-actuated fiber stretchers correct the dOPD accordingly. Fiber-fed Integrated Optics6 (IO) combine coherently the light of all six baselines and feed both spectrometers. Assisted by Infrared Wavefront Sensors7 (IWS) at each Unit Telescope (UT) and correcting the path difference between the channels with an accuracy of up to 5 nm, GRAVITY will push the limits of astrometrical accuracy to the order of 10 μas and provide phase-referenced interferometric imaging with a resolution of 4 mas. The University of Cologne developed, constructed and tested both spectrometers of the camera system. Both units are designed for the near infrared (1.95 - 2.45 μm) and are operated in a cryogenic environment. The Fringe Tracker is optimized for highest transmission with fixed spectral resolution (R = 22) realized by a double-prism.8 The Science spectrometer is more diverse and allows to choose from three different spectral resolutions8 (R = [22, 500, 4000]), where the lowest resolution is achieved with a prism and the higher resolutions are realized with grisms. A Wollaston prism in each spectrometer allows for polarimetric splitting of the light. The goal for the spectrometers is to concentrate at least 90% of the ux in 2 × 2 pixel (36 × 36 μm2) for the Science channel and in 1 pixel (24 × 24 μm) in the Fringe Tracking channel. In Section 1, we present

  20. Resonance-filtered beam spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Taylor, A.D.; Olsen, C.E.; Goldstone, J.A.; Soper, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    A new inelastic neutron scattering spectrometer which operates in the range 1 eV to 15 eV has been developed at the Los Alamos pulsed spallation source WNR. Based on a nuclear resonance filtering the beam, the concept has been tested in direct, inverted and sample geometries. A number of resonance filters have been tested to determine their effectiveness. The spectrometer is described and examples of data are presented.

  1. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Riipinen, I.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-12-01

    A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD) was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008). A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model. Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements. The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 or more orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated monoterpene (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene under low NOx conditions) secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species. This analysis is based on the assumption that there were no significant reactions taking place inside the thermodenuder.

  2. Light absorption by secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene: Effects of oxidants, seed aerosol acidity, and relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chen; Gyawali, Madhu; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2013-10-25

    It is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532, and 870 nm. Significant light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed for the SOA formed from α-pinene + O3 + NO3 system only in the presence of highly acidic sulfate seed aerosols under dry conditions. In contrast, no absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27% or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. Organic nitrates in the SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols were found to be nonabsorbing, while the light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with nitroxy organosulfate groups that are formed in highly acidic sulfate aerosols. Finally and overall, these results suggest that dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems do not form light-absorbing SOA under typical atmospheric conditions.

  3. Light absorption by secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene: Effects of oxidants, seed aerosol acidity, and relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chen; Gyawali, Madhu; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2013-10-01

    is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532, and 870 nm. Significant light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed for the SOA formed from α-pinene + O3 + NO3 system only in the presence of highly acidic sulfate seed aerosols under dry conditions. In contrast, no absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27% or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. Organic nitrates in the SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols were found to be nonabsorbing, while the light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with nitroxy organosulfate groups that are formed in highly acidic sulfate aerosols. Overall, these results suggest that dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems do not form light-absorbing SOA under typical atmospheric conditions.

  4. Pilomatricome: étude de 22 cas

    PubMed Central

    Nasreddine, Fatima Zahra; Hali, Fouzia; Chiheb, Soumiya

    2016-01-01

    Le pilomatricome est une tumeur cutanée fréquente et bénigne du follicule pileux chez l'enfant. C'est une tumeur annexielle souvent méconnue et confondue avec d'autres lésions cutanées. Les localisations habituelles sont la tête et le cou. Le but de ce travail est de rapporter une série de 22 cas comportant des formes inhabituelles colligées au service de dermatologie sur une période allant de Janvier 2006 jusqu'au Mai 2015. L’étude a concerné 16 femmes et 6 hommes. La moyenne d’âge était de 23,3 ans (4-80 ans). La localisation cervico faciale a été observée dans 12 cas, 2 patients avaient des localisations multiples, un garçon de 4ans avait une localisation au niveau fronto-temporal et une fillette de 14 ans avait une localisation au niveau du visage et de l'avant-bras, et un patient de 48 ans avait une localisation sous unguéale. L'aspect clinique était typique dans tous les cas avec des nodules sous cutanés de consistance pierreuse. Tous les patients ont bénéficié d'une exérèse des nodules sous anesthésie locale. L’étude histologique était en faveur d'un épithélioma momifié de Malherbe d'exérèse complète sans signes de malignité. Aucun patient n'a présenté de rechute. L'originalité de notre étude réside dans la présence de localisations exceptionnelles au niveau latéro-vertébral, des membres et sous-unguéale, l’âge de survenue inhabituel à 80 ans et la présence de localisations multiples signalées chez 2 enfants. PMID:27516819

  5. Measuring Aerosol Optical Properties with the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veefkind, J. P.; Torres, O.; Syniuk, A.; Decae, R.; deLeeuw, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is the Dutch-Finnish contribution to the NASA EOS-Aura mission scheduled for launch in January 2004. OM1 is an imaging spectrometer that will measure the back-scattered Solar radiance between 270 an 500 nm. With its relatively high spatial resolution (13x24 sq km at nadir) and daily global coverage. OM1 will make a major contribution to our understanding of atmospheric chemistry and to climate research. OM1 will provide data continuity with the TOMS instruments. One of the pleasant surprises of the TOMS data record was its information on aerosol properties. First, only the absorbing aerosol index, which is sensitive to elevated lay- ers of aerosols such as desert dust and smoke aerosols, was derived. Recently these methods were further improved to yield aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over land and ocean for 19 years of TOMS data (1979-1992,1997-2002), making it one of the longest and most valuable time series for aerosols presently available. Such long time series are essential to quantify the effect of aerosols on the Earth& climate. The OM1 instrument is better suited to measure aerosols than the TOMS instruments because of the smaller footprint, and better spectral coverage. The better capabilities of OMI will enable us to provide an improved aerosol product, but the knowledge will also be used for further analysis of the aerosol record from TOMS. The OM1 aerosol product that is currently being developed for OM1 combines the TOMS experience and the multi-spectral techniques that are used in the visible and near infrared. The challenge for this new product is to provide aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo from the near ultraviolet to the visible (330-500 nm) over land and ocean. In this presentation the methods for deriving the OM1 aerosol product will be presented. Part of these methods developed for OM1 can already be applied to TOMS data and results of such analysis will be shown.

  6. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilde, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-04-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterized by a less dense urbanization. We present here the results obtained in San Pietro Capofiume, which is located in a sparsely inhabited sector of the Po Valley, Italy. The experiment was carried out in summer 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI project ("European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud Climate Aerosol Interaction"). For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art techniques were used in parallel: (1) on-line TSI aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), (2) on-line Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS), (3) soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), (4) on-line high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer-thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (HR-ToFMS-TAG), (5) off-line twelve-hour resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy, and (6) chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) for the analysis of gas-phase precursors of secondary aerosol. Data from each aerosol spectroscopic method were analysed individually following ad-hoc tools (i.e. PMF for AMS, Art-2a for ATOFMS). The results obtained from each techniques are herein presented and compared. This allows us to clearly link the modifications in aerosol chemical composition to transitions in air mass origin and meteorological regimes. Under stagnant conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC

  7. Novel laser breakdown spectrometer for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirov, Sergey B.; Pitt, Robert E.; Dergachev, Alex Y.; Lee, Wonwoo; Martyshkin, Dmitri V.; Mirov, Olga D.; Randolph, Jeremy J.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Brouillette, Christie G.; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Orlovskii, Yurii V.; Alimov, Olimkhon K.; Vorob'ev, Ivan N.

    1999-11-01

    A novel experimental set-up using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for environmental analyses of heavy metals is described in this paper. It is based on state-of-the-art spectroscopic equipment, advanced detectors, and laser atomizers: a 0.75 m spectrometer ARC-750, intensified TE- cooled 256 X 1024 CCD camera, probe with fiber optic guide for signal transportation, and Nd:YAG laser plasma atomizers with two different methods for sample delivery. In the first method the liquid solution containing the atoms to be investigated is drawn into the chamber of the nebulizer. The mixture passes through the nozzle, accompanied by argon gas along with formed aerosol, and enters the plasma plume, which is generated by the laser spark in argon. The second method is based on direct generating of the plasma in the water jet of a continuously circulating sample. LIBS testing of samples containing Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, and Cr ions was compared with results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Initial indications showed good agreement between these two methods. Detection levels of less than 100 ppb were observed for copper and chromium. The described spectroscopic system exhibits high sensitivity, accumulation of luminescence spectrum in real time; and high dynamic range for concentrations detection from 100 ppb to 1000 ppm.

  8. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (<0.1micron) were also collected at site T0 and T1 (Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, State of Mexico) from 5 am to 5 pm (day) and from 5 pm to 5 am (night) during the month of March 2006. Samples were collected on quartz fiber filters with high volume impactor samplers. Continuous absorption spectra of these aerosol samples have been obtained in the laboratory from 280 to 900nm with the use of an integrating sphere coupled to a UV spectrometer (Beckman DU with a Labsphere accessory). The integrating sphere allows the detector to collect and spatially integrate the total radiant flux reflected from the sample and therefore allows for the measurement of absorption on highly reflective or diffusely scattering samples. These continuous spectra have also been used to obtain the

  9. Photochemical aging of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol material.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Moussa, Samar G; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-04-11

    Dark reactions of methylglyoxal with NH4(+) in aqueous aerosols yield light-absorbing and surface-active products that can influence the physical properties of the particles. Little is known about how the product mixture and its optical properties will change due to photolysis as well as oxidative aging by O3 and OH in the atmosphere. Here, we report the results of kinetics and product studies of the photochemical aging of aerosols formed by atomizing aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal and ammonium sulfate. Experiments were performed using aerosol flow tube reactors coupled with an aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometer (Aerosol-CIMS) for monitoring gas- and particle-phase compositions. Particles were also impacted onto quartz windows in order to assess changes in their UV-visible absorption upon oxidation. Photooxidation of the aerosols leads to the formation of small, volatile organic acids including formic acid, acetic acid, and glyoxylic acid. The atmospheric lifetime of these species during the daytime is predicted to be on the order of minutes, with photolysis being an important mechanism of degradation. The lifetime with respect to O3 oxidation was observed to be on the order of hours. O3 oxidation also leads to a net increase in light absorption by the particles due to the formation of additional carbonyl compounds. Our results are consistent with field observations of high brown carbon absorption in the early morning. PMID:23506538

  10. Aerosol Production in a Mixed Deciduous/Coniferous Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, N.; Mielke, L.; Alaghmand, M.; Galloway, M.; Kammrath, A.; Keutsch, F.; Hansen, R.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P.; Carroll, M.; Bertman, S.; Shepson, P.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols are of fundamental concern because of their impacts on air quality, human health and radiative forcing. Recent studies have focused on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production due to oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and more importantly biogenic-VOCs (BVOCs), in particular, isoprene. However, the SOA precursors are not well understood because the mechanisms have shown that isoprene oxidation can contribute to aerosol production through multiple generation oxidation products. For terpenes, it is more likely that primary or secondary oxidation products lead to particle formation. In the present study, we measured the aerosol size distribution, along with O3, HOx, NOx, NOy and BVOCs, in a mixed deciduous forest that is undergoing successional transition to a conifer-dominated species mix. This study was conducted in a rural forest environment in northern Michigan as a part of the summer 2008 PROPHET campaign at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). We examine here the potential BVOC contribution to aerosol formation. A TSI, inc. Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was used to measure aerosol number density in the size range, 15 nm < x < 711 nm and a Proton Transfer Reaction - Linear Ion Trap (PTR-LIT) mass spectrometer for quantifying isoprene and other BVOCs, including methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and total monoterpenes. Preliminary results show periods of new particle production. Here we use a unique set of BVOC, HOx, NOx, NOy, O3 and meteorological data to examine conditions leading to new particle production.

  11. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C.; Lee, E.C.; Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B.; Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Bailey, P. L.; Gille, J. C.; Lee, E. C.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Fishbein, E. F.; Waters, J. W.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605/cm (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 micrometers) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheriodal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculations and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles.

  13. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, Paul G.; Williams, Timothy; Horton, Keith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly. Both the visible and infrared subsystems scan in pushbroom mode: that is, an aircraft carrying the system moves along a ground track, the system is aimed downward, and image data are acquired in across-track linear arrays of pixels. Both subsystems operate at a frame rate of 30 Hz. The infrared and visible-light optics are adjusted so that both subsystems are aimed at the same moving swath, which has across-track angular width of 15 . Data from the infrared and visible imaging subsystems are stored in the same file along with aircraft- position data acquired by a Global Positioning System receiver. The combination of the three sets of data is used to construct infrared and hyperspectral maps of scanned areas (see figure). The visible subsystem is based on a grating spectrograph and a rapid-readout charge-coupled-device camera. Images of the swatch are acquired in 256 spectral bands at wavelengths from 400 to 800 nm. The infrared subsystem, which is sensitive in a single

  14. CRISPR/Cas9 in Genome Editing and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifeng; La Russa, Marie; Qi, Lei S

    2016-06-01

    The Cas9 protein (CRISPR-associated protein 9), derived from type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) bacterial immune systems, is emerging as a powerful tool for engineering the genome in diverse organisms. As an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9 can be easily programmed to target new sites by altering its guide RNA sequence, and its development as a tool has made sequence-specific gene editing several magnitudes easier. The nuclease-deactivated form of Cas9 further provides a versatile RNA-guided DNA-targeting platform for regulating and imaging the genome, as well as for rewriting the epigenetic status, all in a sequence-specific manner. With all of these advances, we have just begun to explore the possible applications of Cas9 in biomedical research and therapeutics. In this review, we describe the current models of Cas9 function and the structural and biochemical studies that support it. We focus on the applications of Cas9 for genome editing, regulation, and imaging, discuss other possible applications and some technical considerations, and highlight the many advantages that CRISPR/Cas9 technology offers. PMID:27145843

  15. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13450.001 PMID:27130520

  16. CRISPR/Cas9 Based Genome Editing of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Pohl, C; Kiel, J A K W; Driessen, A J M; Bovenberg, R A L; Nygård, Y

    2016-07-15

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially relevant cell factory. The developed CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox is highly flexible and allows editing of new targets with minimal cloning efforts. The Cas9 protein and the sgRNA can be either delivered during transformation, as preassembled CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) or expressed from an AMA1 based plasmid within the cell. The direct delivery of the Cas9 protein with in vitro synthesized sgRNA to the cells allows for a transient method for genome engineering that may rapidly be applicable for other filamentous fungi. The expression of Cas9 from an AMA1 based vector was shown to be highly efficient for marker-free gene deletions. PMID:27072635

  17. HPCCP/CAS Workshop Proceedings 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulbach, Catherine; Mata, Ellen (Editor); Schulbach, Catherine (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This publication is a collection of extended abstracts of presentations given at the HPCCP/CAS (High Performance Computing and Communications Program/Computational Aerosciences Project) Workshop held on August 24-26, 1998, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The objective of the Workshop was to bring together the aerospace high performance computing community, consisting of airframe and propulsion companies, independent software vendors, university researchers, and government scientists and engineers. The Workshop was sponsored by the HPCCP Office at NASA Ames Research Center. The Workshop consisted of over 40 presentations, including an overview of NASA's High Performance Computing and Communications Program and the Computational Aerosciences Project; ten sessions of papers representative of the high performance computing research conducted within the Program by the aerospace industry, academia, NASA, and other government laboratories; two panel sessions; and a special presentation by Mr. James Bailey.

  18. Adaptation in CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Richter, Hagen; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Qimron, Udi

    2016-03-17

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute an adaptive immune system in prokaryotes. The system preserves memories of prior infections by integrating short segments of foreign DNA, termed spacers, into the CRISPR array in a process termed adaptation. During the past 3 years, significant progress has been made on the genetic requirements and molecular mechanisms of adaptation. Here we review these recent advances, with a focus on the experimental approaches that have been developed, the insights they generated, and a proposed mechanism for self- versus non-self-discrimination during the process of spacer selection. We further describe the regulation of adaptation and the protein players involved in this fascinating process that allows bacteria and archaea to harbor adaptive immunity. PMID:26949040

  19. Aqueous phase processing of secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Tritscher, T.; Praplan, A. P.; Decarlo, P. F.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Quivet, E.; Marchand, N.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Monod, A.

    2011-07-01

    The aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) by photooxidation in the aqueous phase was experimentally investigated. To simulate multiphase processes, the following experiments were sequentially performed in a smog chamber and in an aqueous phase photoreactor: (1) Gas-phase photooxidation of three different volatile organic compounds (VOC): isoprene, α-pinene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB) in the presence of NOx, leading to the formation of SOA which was subjected to on-line physical and chemical analysis; (2) particle-to-liquid transfer of water soluble species of SOA using filter sampling and aqueous extraction; (3) aqueous-phase photooxidation of the obtained water extracts; and (4) nebulization of the solutions for a repetition of the on-line characterization. SOA concentrations in the chamber measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) were higher than 200 μg m-3, as the experiments were conducted under high initial concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and NOx. The aging of SOA through aqueous phase processing was investigated by measuring the physical and chemical properties of the particles online before and after processing using a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA). It was shown that, after aqueous phase processing, the particles were significantly more hygroscopic, and contained more fragmentation ions at m/z = 44 and less ions at m/z = 43, thus showing a significant impact on SOA aging for the three different precursors. Additionally, the particles were analyzed with a thermal desorption atmospheric pressure ionization aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-API-AMS). Comparing the smog chamber SOA composition and non processed nebulized aqueous extracts with this technique revealed that sampling, extraction and/or nebulization did not significantly impact the chemical composition of SOA formed from isoprene and α-pinene, whereas it

  20. Interpretation of Aerosol Optical and Morphological Properties during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study in Sacramento, June 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkowski, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Sharma, N.; Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.; Gyawali, M. S.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Sacramento Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) utilized two ground sites T0 and T1 along with an aircraft platform to characterize carbonaceous aerosol chemical and physical properties and their evolution. The T0 site was chosen within the Sacramento metropolitan area for measuring primary and secondary aerosols generated in the city. The T1 site was chosen East of Sacramento on the Sierra foothill to study the evolution and processing of the Sacramento aerosol plume and to assess the characteristics of the background air. To reach T1, the Sacramento aerosols traveled often over the Blodgett Forest resulting in significant aging due coagulation, condensation, and photochemical processes. The ground sites were chosen for this unique and reoccurring transport pattern of the aerosols. The campaign took place in June 2010. Six Integrated Photoacoustic/Nephelometer Spectrometers (IPNSs) were installed at the sites to simultaneously record aerosol light scattering and absorption data. The optical properties of the aerosols were measured at 355nm (ultraviolet), 375nm (ultraviolet), 405nm (blue), 532nm (green), and 781nm (red). In conjugation with the IPNSs, aerosol filters for electron microscopy analysis were collected at each site; these were examined using a field emission scanning electron microscope to study the aerosol morphology. The origins of the air masses did vary daily, but a few general trends emerged. The processing of the IPNS data with a wavelet denoising technique greatly enhanced the signal to noise ratio of the measurements enabling a better understanding of the aerosol optical properties for various airmasses with different characteristics. Typically signals at both sites were lower than expected, however the processed signals from T0 clearly showed a daily rise and dilution of the Sacramento plume. Using the processed signals from both sites the transportation of the Sacramento plume was detectable. The IPNS data were

  1. Characterization and evolution of Salmonella CRISPR-Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Shariat, Nikki; Timme, Ruth E; Pettengill, James B; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Dudley, Edward G

    2015-02-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated genes) systems provide adaptive immunity from invasive genetic elements and encompass three essential features: (i) cas genes, (ii) a CRISPR array composed of spacers and direct repeats and (iii) an AT-rich leader sequence upstream of the array. We performed in-depth sequence analysis of the CRISPR-Cas systems in >600 Salmonella, representing four clinically prevalent serovars. Each CRISPR-Cas feature is extremely conserved in the Salmonella, and the CRISPR1 locus is more highly conserved than CRISPR2. Array composition is serovar-specific, although no convincing evidence of recent spacer acquisition against exogenous nucleic acids exists. Only 12% of spacers match phage and plasmid sequences and self-targeting spacers are associated with direct repeat variants. High nucleotide identity (>99.9%) exists across the cas operon among isolates of a single serovar and in some cases this conservation extends across divergent serovars. These observations reflect historical CRISPR-Cas immune activity, showing that this locus has ceased undergoing adaptive events. Intriguingly, the high level of conservation across divergent serovars shows that the genetic integrity of these inactive loci is maintained over time, contrasting with the canonical view that inactive CRISPR loci degenerate over time. This thorough characterization of Salmonella CRISPR-Cas systems presents new insights into Salmonella CRISPR evolution, particularly with respect to cas gene conservation, leader sequences, organization of direct repeats and protospacer matches. Collectively, our data suggest that Salmonella CRISPR-Cas systems are no longer immunogenic; rather, their impressive conservation indicates they may have an alternative function in Salmonella. PMID:25479838

  2. CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing in Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The prokaryotic CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9, an RNA-guided endonuclease, has been shown to mediate efficient genome editing in a wide variety of organisms. In the present study, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted to Leishmania donovani, a protozoan parasite that causes fatal human visceral leishmaniasis. We introduced the Cas9 nuclease into L. donovani and generated guide RNA (gRNA) expression vectors by using the L. donovani rRNA promoter and the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme. It is demonstrated within that L. donovani mainly used homology-directed repair (HDR) and microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) to repair the Cas9 nuclease-created double-strand DNA break (DSB). The nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway appears to be absent in L. donovani. With this CRISPR-Cas9 system, it was possible to generate knockouts without selection by insertion of an oligonucleotide donor with stop codons and 25-nucleotide homology arms into the Cas9 cleavage site. Likewise, we disrupted and precisely tagged endogenous genes by inserting a bleomycin drug selection marker and GFP gene into the Cas9 cleavage site. With the use of Hammerhead and HDV ribozymes, a double-gRNA expression vector that further improved gene-targeting efficiency was developed, and it was used to make precise deletion of the 3-kb miltefosine transporter gene (LdMT). In addition, this study identified a novel single point mutation caused by CRISPR-Cas9 in LdMT (M381T) that led to miltefosine resistance, a concern for the only available oral antileishmanial drug. Together, these results demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas9 system represents an effective genome engineering tool for L. donovani. PMID:26199327

  3. Comparison of LIDAR and Cavity Ring-Down Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Study of Inferred Aerosol Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, W. L.; Massoli, P.; McCarty, B. J.; Machol, J. L.; Tucker, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    A LIDAR and a Cavity Ring-Down Aerosol Extinction Spectrometer (CRD) instrument simultaneously measured aerosol extinction at 355-nm wavelength from aboard the Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown during the Texas Air Quality Study II campaign. The CRD measured air sampled from the top of the common mast used by several in situ aerosol optical and chemical instruments. The LIDAR's scan sequence included near-horizontal stares (2° elevation angle) with pointing corrected for ship's roll. Aerosol extinction was retrieved using a variant of the slope method. The LIDAR therefore sampled air over a short vertical extent with midpoint higher above the surface than the CRD intake and at a horizontal distance of as much as a few kilometers. The CRD measured aerosol extinction at dry and at high (near-ambient) relative humidity (RH) levels, which were used to scale the measurements to ambient RH for the comparisons. Data from the two instruments for well-mixed conditions (supported by turbulence and atmospheric stability data) are compared to evaluate the degree of agreement between the two methods and reasons for differences. For instances of larger differences, the aerosol gradient below approximately 100 m altitude is inferred and examined in context of low-level meteorological parameters and LIDAR measurements at higher angles.

  4. Inter-Comparison of ILAS-II Version 1.4 Aerosol Extinction Coefficient at 780 nm with SAGE II, SAGE III, and POAM III Aerosol Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saitoh, Naoko; Hayashida, S.; Sugita, T.; Nakajima, H.; Yokota, T.; Hayashi, M.; Shiraishi, K.; Kanzawa, H.; Ejiri, M. K.; Irie, H.; Tanaka, T.; Terao, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Sasano, Y.; Bevilacqua, R.; Randall, C.; Thomason, L.; Taha, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) II on board the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) II observed stratospheric aerosol in visible/near-infrared/infrared spectra over high latitudes in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Observations were taken intermittently from January to March, and continuously from April through October, 2003. We assessed the data quality of ILAS-II version 1.4 aerosol extinction coefficients at 780 nm from comparisons with the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, SAGE III, and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III aerosol data. At heights below 20 km in the Northern Hemisphere, aerosol extinction coefficients from ILAS-II agreed with those from SAGE II and SAGE III within 10%, and with those from POAM III within 15%. From 20 to 26 km, ILAS-II aerosol extinction coefficients were smaller than extinction coefficients from the other sensors; differences between ILAS-II and SAGE II ranged from 10% at 20 km to 34% at 26 km. ILAS-II aerosol extinction coefficients from 20 to 25 km in February over the Southern Hemisphere had a negative bias (12-66%) relative to SAGE II aerosol data. The bias increased with increasing altitude. Comparisons between ILAS-II and POAM III aerosol extinction coefficients from January to May in the Southern Hemisphere (defined as the non-Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) season ) yielded qualitatively similar results. From June to October (defined as the PSC season ), aerosol extinction coefficients from ILAS-II were smaller than those from POAM III above 17 km, as in the case of the non-PSC season; however, ILAS-II and POAM III aerosol data were within 15% of each other from 12 to 17 km.

  5. HOUSTON AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive field study of ambient aerosols was conducted in Houston between September 14 and October 14, 1978. Measurements at 12 sites were made using (1) two relocatable monitoring systems instrumented for aerosol and gaseous pollutants, (2) a network of high volume samplers ...

  6. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately measure column aerosol amount and ... being used to improve Air Quality Models and for regional health studies. To assess the human-health impact of chronic aerosol exposure, ...

  7. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  8. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  9. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  10. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  12. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  14. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  15. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  16. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  17. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  18. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  19. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  20. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  1. 41 CFR 102-33.435 - What CAS cost and utilization data must we report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What CAS cost and... Services (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.435 What CAS cost and utilization data must we report? You must report the costs and flying hours for each CAS aircraft you hire. You must also report...

  2. 41 CFR 102-33.440 - Who must report CAS cost and utilization data?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Who must report CAS cost... (cas) Cost and Utilization Data § 102-33.440 Who must report CAS cost and utilization data? Executive agencies, except the Armed Forces and U.S. intelligence agencies, must report CAS cost and utilization...

  3. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false If we hire CAS, what are... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are... agreements; (b) Accounting for the cost of your aircraft and services hired as CAS; (c) Accounting for use...

  4. Aerosol identification using a hybrid active/passive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Francis M.; Moon, Raphael P.; Davidson, Charles E.

    2005-08-01

    Recent experimental work has shown that passive systems such as hyperspectral FTIR and frequency-tunable IR cameras have application in detection of biological aerosols. This provided the motivation for a new detection technique, which we call Aerosol Ranging Spectroscopy (ARS), whereby a scattering LIDAR is used to augment passive spectrometer data to determine the location and optical depth of the aerosol plume. When the two systems are co-aligned or boresighted, the hybrid data product provides valuable enhancements for signal exploitation of the passive spectral data. This paper presents the motivation and theoretical basis for the ARS technique. A prototype implementation of an ARS system will also be described, along with preliminary results from recent outdoor field experiments.

  5. Aerosols and Clouds: In Cahoots to Change Climate

    ScienceCinema

    Berg, Larry

    2014-06-02

    Key knowledge gaps persist despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. The Two-Column Aerosol Project, or TCAP, was designed to provide a detailed set of observations to tackle this area of unknowns. Led by PNNL atmospheric scientist Larry Berg, ARM's Climate Research Facility was deployed in Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the 12-month duration of TCAP, which came to a close in June 2013. "We are developing new tools to look at particle chemistry, like our mass spectrometer used in TCAP that can tell us the individual chemical composition of an aerosol," said Berg. "Then, we'll run our models and compare it with the data that we have to make sure we're getting correct answers and make sure our climate models are reflecting the best information."

  6. Aerosols and Clouds: In Cahoots to Change Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry

    2014-03-29

    Key knowledge gaps persist despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. The Two-Column Aerosol Project, or TCAP, was designed to provide a detailed set of observations to tackle this area of unknowns. Led by PNNL atmospheric scientist Larry Berg, ARM's Climate Research Facility was deployed in Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the 12-month duration of TCAP, which came to a close in June 2013. "We are developing new tools to look at particle chemistry, like our mass spectrometer used in TCAP that can tell us the individual chemical composition of an aerosol," said Berg. "Then, we'll run our models and compare it with the data that we have to make sure we're getting correct answers and make sure our climate models are reflecting the best information."

  7. Determination of the Physical Dimensions of μ Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, K.; Kang, W.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the physical properties of the nearby astrometric binary μ Cas based on a spectroscopic analysis and evolutionary calculations. The chemical composition of the μ Cas system has been determined based on high resolution spectroscopy from BOES. Combining our spectroscopic analysis with observations from Hipparcos and CHARA, we determine the evolutionary status of μ Cas. With well-constrained stellar parameters, the internal structure and frequency modes have also been calculated. The ultimate goal of this study is to describe the physical processes inside stars through a comprehensive modeling.

  8. Grossesse intra murale à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    de Tové, Kofi-Mensa Savi; Salifou, Kabibou; Imorou, Rachidi Sidi; Biaou, Olivier; Boco, Vicentia

    2015-01-01

    La grossesse intra-murale est la variété la plus rare de grossesse extra-utérine. Il s'agit de la localisation de l’œuf dans l’épaisseur du myomètre. En cas de retard diagnostic, l’évolution peut être catastrophique avec rupture utérine et hémorragie cataclysmique. L’échographie permet dans certains cas un diagnostic pré opératoire. Les auteurs rapportent un cas survenu chez une patiente aux antécédents de curetage. PMID:26448812

  9. Introducing the TI-Nspire CAS Learning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbourne, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Engage your students! In this hands-on workshop, we will demonstrate how TI's newest graphing technology can be integrated into the physics classroom. Come experience both the TI-NspireT CAS Handheld and the TI- NspireT CAS Computer Software. The new TI-Nspire learning technology has been developed to allow students to explore physics and to better understand concepts through the manipulation of complex formulas,graphing, spreadsheets, data analysis, and simulations. During the workshop you will receive an overview of the technology, sample activities, along with the opportunity to experience how TI-Nspire CAS can be effectively integrated into the physics classroom. Limited to 20 participants.

  10. Biological aerosol detection with combined passive-active infrared measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifarraguerri, Agustin I.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Ben-David, Avishai

    2004-12-01

    A data collection experiment was performed in November of 2003 to measure aerosol signatures using multiple sensors, all operating in the long-wave infrared. The purpose of this data collection experiment was to determine whether combining passive hyperspectral and LIDAR measurements can substantially improve biological aerosol detection performance. Controlled releases of dry aerosols, including road dust, egg albumin and two strains of Bacillus Subtilis var. Niger (BG) spores were performed using the ECBC/ARTEMIS open-path aerosol test chamber located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD. The chamber provides a ~ 20' path without optical windows. Ground truth devices included 3 aerodynamic particle sizers, an optical particle size spectrometer, 6 nephelometers and a high-volume particle sampler. Two sensors were used to make measurements during the test: the AIRIS long-wave infrared imaging spectrometer and the FAL CO2 LIDAR. The AIRIS and FAL data sets were analyzed for detection performance relative to the ground truth. In this paper we present experimental results from the individual sensors as well as results from passive-active sensor fusion. The sensor performance is presented in the form of receiver operating characteristic curves.

  11. A new approach for retrieving the UV-vis optical properties of ambient aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluvshtein, Nir; Flores, J. Michel; Segev, Lior; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important part in the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. To quantify the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions, researchers must obtain a detailed understanding of the spectrally dependent intensive and extensive optical properties of different aerosol types. Our new approach retrieves the optical coefficients and the single-scattering albedo of the total aerosol population over 300 to 650 nm wavelength, using extinction measurements from a broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer at 315 to 345 nm and 390 to 420 nm, extinction and absorption measurements at 404 nm from a photoacoustic cell coupled to a cavity ring-down spectrometer, and scattering measurements from a three-wavelength integrating nephelometer. By combining these measurements with aerosol size distribution data, we retrieved the time- and wavelength-dependent effective complex refractive index of the aerosols. Retrieval simulations and laboratory measurements of brown carbon proxies showed low absolute errors and good agreement with expected and reported values. Finally, we implemented this new broadband method to achieve continuous spectral- and time-dependent monitoring of ambient aerosol population, including, for the first time, extinction measurements using cavity-enhanced spectrometry in the 315 to 345 nm UV range, in which significant light absorption may occur.

  12. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  13. Oxodicarboxylic acids in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römpp, Andreas; Winterhalter, Richard; Moortgat, Geert K.

    Fine mode aerosol was collected on quartz fiber filters at several sites across Europe. These samples were analyzed for carboxylic acids by liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid (quadrupole and time-of-flight) mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS-TOF). A series of oxodicarboxylic acids (C 7-C 11) was detected. Oxodicarboxylic acids are linear dicarboxylic acids with an additional carbonyl group. Previous measurements of these acids are scarce and their sources are largely unknown. Several structural isomers (different positions of the carbonyl group within the molecule) could be identified and differentiated by the combination of laboratory experiments and high mass accuracy measurements. The homologs with 9-11 carbon atoms were identified for the first time in atmospheric aerosol particles. The concentrations of oxodicarboxylic acids in ambient aerosol samples frequently exceeded those of the corresponding unsubstituted dicarboxylic acids. Oxodicarboxylic acids have been shown to be products of the reaction of dicarboxylic acids with OH radicals in chamber experiments and a reaction mechanism is proposed. Good correlation of oxodicarboxylic acid and hydroxyl radical concentrations was found at two measurement sites (Finland and Crete) of different geographic location and meteorological conditions. The ratios of individual isomers from the field samples are comparable to those of the laboratory experiments. The results of this study imply that the reaction of OH radicals and dicarboxylic acids is an important pathway for the production of oxodicarboxylic acids in the atmosphere. Oxodicarboxylic acids seem to be important intermediates in atmospheric oxidation processes of organic compounds.

  14. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  15. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, M.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols of a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Hi-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While extensive BB is not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). EBRI during the smoldering phase of the fires was m=1.54(±0.01)+0.04i(±0.01) compared to m=1.49(±0.01)+0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  16. Secondary Organic Aerosol from biogenic VOCs over West Africa during AMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capes, G.; Murphy, J. G.; Reeves, C. E.; McQuaid, J. B.; Hamilton, J. F.; Hopkins, J. R.; Crosier, J.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of organic aerosols above subtropical West Africa during the wet season using data from the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) aircraft. Measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) at low altitudes over these subtropical forests were made during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) field experiment during July and August 2006 mainly above Benin, Nigeria and Niger. Data from an Aerodyne Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer show a median organic aerosol loading of 1.08 μg m-3 over tropical West Africa, which represents the first regionally averaged assessment of organic aerosol mass (OM) in this region during the wet season. This is in good agreement with predictions based on aerosol yields from isoprene and monoterpenes during chamber studies and model predictions based on partitioning schemes, contrasting markedly with the large under representations of OM in similar models when compared with data from mid latitudes.

  17. Particle size distribution of the stratospheric aerosol from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Malinina, Elizaveta; Rozanov, Vladimir; Hommel, Rene; Burrows, John

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are of a great scientific interest because of their crucial role in the Earth's radiative budget as well as their contribution to chemical processes resulting in ozone depletion. While the permanent aerosol background in the stratosphere is determined by the tropical injection of SO2, COS and sulphate particles from the troposphere, major perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer result form an uplift of SO2 after strong volcanic eruptions. Satellite measurements in the visible spectral range represent one of the most important sources of information about the vertical distribution of the stratospheric aerosol on the global scale. This study employs measurements of the scattered solar light performed in the limb viewing geometry from the space borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which operated onboard the ENVISAT satellite, from August 2002 to April 2012. A retrieval approach to obtain parameters of the stratospheric aerosol particle size distribution will be reported along with the sensitivity studies and first results.

  18. Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macenka, Steven A.; Chrisp, Michael P.

    1988-01-01

    The development of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has been completed at JPL. This paper outlines the functional requirements of the spectrometer optics subsystem, and describes the spectrometer optical design. The optical subsystem performance is shown in terms of spectral modulation transfer functions, radial energy distributions, and system transmission at selected wavelengths for the four spectrometers. An outline of the spectrometer alignment is included.

  19. Imaging spectrometers for remote sensing from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisp, M. P.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Macenka, S. A.; Page, N. A.

    1986-01-01

    Three imaging spectrometers and two camera systems for remote sensing are described. Two of the imaging spectrometers are versions of the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) for Mars Observer and the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission. The other spectrometer is the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) which is currently under construction. The optical imaging systems are the wide angle and narrow angle cameras for the CRAF mission.

  20. A Novel MOEMS NIR Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhihai, Zhang; Xiangxia, Mo; Yuanjun, Guo; Wei, Wang

    In order to detect luminous intensity of light signal in NIR (Near-infrared) wavelength range, a novel MOEMS(Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems) NIR spectrometer is proposed in the paper. It uses DMD (Digital Micro-mirror Device) to band filter the input spectrum. The merits of DMD are small size, low price and high scan speed. Especially, when DMD acts as a Hadamard Transform encoding mask, the SNR (signal-to-noise-ratio) can be improved by multiplexing the light intensities. The structure and the theory of this spectrometer are analyzed. The Hadamard-S matrix and mask of 63-order and 127-order are designed. The output spectrum of the new spectrometer coincides with experimental result of Shimadzu spectrometer. The resolution of the new spectrometer is 19 nm over the spectral range between 900∼1700 nm while single scan time is only 2.4S. The SNR is 44.67:1. The size of optical path is 70mm × 130 mm, and it has a weight less than 1Kg. It can meet the requirement of real time measurement and portable application.

  1. Resolution-enhanced Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Aubrun, J. N.; Rosenberg, W. J.; Roche, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    A familiar mapping spectrometer implementation utilizes two dimensional detector arrays with spectral dispersion along one direction and spatial along the other. Spectral images are formed by spatially scanning across the scene (i.e., push-broom scanning). For imaging grating and prism spectrometers, the slit is perpendicular to the spatial scan direction. For spectrometers utilizing linearly variable focal-plane-mounted filters the spatial scan direction is perpendicular to the direction of spectral variation. These spectrometers share the common limitation that the number of spectral resolution elements is given by the number of pixels along the spectral (or dispersive) direction. Resolution enhancement by first passing the light input to the spectrometer through a scanned etalon or Michelson is discussed. Thus, while a detector element is scanned through a spatial resolution element of the scene, it is also temporally sampled. The analysis for all the pixels in the dispersive direction is addressed. Several specific examples are discussed. The alternate use of a Michelson for the same enhancement purpose is also discussed. Suitable for weight constrained deep space missions, hardware systems were developed including actuators, sensor, and electronics such that low-resolution etalons with performance required for implementation would weigh less than one pound.

  2. Retrieval of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties from SCIAMACHY limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerner, S.; Kühl, S.; Pukite, J.; Penning de Vries, M. J.; Hoermann, C.; von Savigny, C.; Deutschmann, T.; Wagner, T.

    2012-12-01

    Since the start of the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement program in 1975 satellites have been improving our understanding of the global distribution of trace gases, clouds and aerosols. Observations in occultation and limb geometry provide profile information on stratospheric aerosol, which have an important influence on the global radiation budget (e.g., after strong volcanic eruptions) and the stratospheric ozone chemistry (e.g., the chlorine activation inside the polar vortex). The Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) on ENVISAT performed measurements in limb geometry for almost ten years between 2002 and 2012. Its vertical resolution of about 3.3 km at the tangent point and the broad spectral range (UV/VIS/NIR) allow to retrieve profile information of stratospheric trace gases (e.g., O3, NO2, BrO or OClO) and stratospheric aerosol properties. Pioneering studies (e.g., Savigny et al., 2005) showed that in particular from color indices (including the near IR spectral range) signatures of stratospheric aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can be retrieved. In our study we investigate the sensitivity of SCIAMACHY's broad spectral range to aerosol particle properties by comparing measured spectra with simulated results from the 3D full spherical Monte Carlo Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Model McArtim. In particular, we focus on the absorption properties in the UV spectral range, the extinction coefficient and the Angström exponent. The final aim of our study is to use SCIAMACHY limb measurements for the profile retrieval of optical parameters (e.g., absorption and phase function) from which microphysical properties (e.g., mean aerosol particle diameter) of the stratospheric aerosol particles can be deduced.

  3. Broadband measurements of aerosol extinction in the ultraviolet spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Flores, J. M.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Rudich, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross-sections and complex refractive indices. We describe a new laboratory instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We determined aerosol extinction cross-sections and directly observed Mie scattering resonances for aerosols that are purely scattering (polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate), slightly absorbing (Suwannee River fulvic acid), and strongly absorbing (nigrosin dye). We describe an approach for retrieving refractive indices as a function of wavelength from the measured extinction cross-sections over the 360-420 nm wavelength region. The retrieved refractive indices for PSL and ammonium sulfate agree within uncertainty with literature values for this spectral region. The refractive index determined for nigrosin is 1.78 (±0.03) + 0.19 (±0.08) i at 360 nm and 1.53 (±0.03) + 0.21 (±0.05) i at 420 nm. The refractive index determined for Suwannee River fulvic acid is 1.71 (±0.02) + 0.07 (±0.06) i at 360 nm and 1.66 (±0.02) + 0.06 (±0.04) i at 420 nm. These laboratory results support the potential for a field instrument capable of determining ambient aerosol optical extinction, average aerosol extinction cross-section, and complex refractive index as a function of wavelength.

  4. Broadband measurements of aerosol extinction in the ultraviolet spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Flores, J. M.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Rudich, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. We describe a new laboratory instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We determined aerosol extinction cross sections and directly observed Mie scattering resonances for aerosols that are purely scattering (polystyrene latex spheres and ammonium sulfate), slightly absorbing (Suwannee River fulvic acid), and strongly absorbing (nigrosin dye). We describe an approach for retrieving refractive indices as a function of wavelength from the measured extinction cross sections over the 360-420 nm wavelength region. The retrieved refractive indices for PSL and ammonium sulfate agree within uncertainty with the literature values for this spectral region. The refractive index determined for nigrosin is 1.78 (± 0.03) + 0.19 (± 0.08)i at 360 nm and 1.63 (± 0.03) + 0.21 (± 0.05)i at 420 nm. The refractive index determined for Suwannee River fulvic acid is 1.71 (± 0.02) + 0.07 (± 0.06)i at 360 nm and 1.66 (± 0.02) + 0.06 (± 0.04)i at 420 nm. These laboratory results support the potential for a field instrument capable of determining ambient aerosol optical extinction, average aerosol extinction cross section, and complex refractive index as a function of wavelength.

  5. Mid-infrared extinction by sulfate aerosols from the Mt. Pinatubo eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Yue, G. K.; Gunson, M. R.; Zander, R.; Abrams, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction in the 750-3400/cm spectral region have been derived from 0.01/cm resolution stratospheric solar occultation spectra recorded by the ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) Fourier transform spectrometer about 9 1/2 months after the Mt Pinatubo volcanic eruption. Strong, broad aerosol features have been identified near 900, 1060, 1190, 1720, and 2900/cm below a tangent height of approximately 30 km. Aerosol extinction measurements derived from approximately 0.05/cm wide microwindows nearly free of telluric line absorption in the ATMOS spectra are compared with transmission calculations derived from aerosol size distribution profiles retrieved from correlative SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) II visible and near i.r. extinction measurements, seasonal and zonally averaged H2SO4 aerosol weight percentage profiles, and published sulfuric acid optical constants derived from room temperature laboratory measurements. The calculated shapes and positions of the aerosol features are generally consistent with the observations, thereby confirming that the aerosols are predominantly concentrated H2SO4-H2O droplets, but there are significant differences between the measured and calculated wavelength dependences of the aerosol extinction. We attribute these differences as primarily the result of errors in the calculated low temperature H2SO4-H2O optical constants. Errors in both the published room temperature optical constants and the limitations of the Lorentz-Lorenz relation are likely to be important.

  6. Fast Airborne Size Distribution Measurements of an Aerosol Processes and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A. D.; Zhou, J.; Brekhovskikh, V.; McNaughton, C. S.; Howell, S.

    2009-12-01

    During MILAGRO/INTEX experiment the Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research (HIGEAR) deployed a wide range of aerosol instrumentation aboard NSF C-130 and NASA DC-8. These were designed to provide rapid information on aerosol composition, state of mixing (internal or external), spectral optical properties (scattering and absorption), the humidity dependence of light scattering - f(RH), and the role of condensed species in changing the absorption properties of black carbon (BC) and inferred properties of organic carbon (OC). We also flew the Fast Mobility Particle Spectrometer (FMPS, TSI Inc.) to measure aerosol size distributions in a range 5.6 - 560 nm. For all our flights around Mexico City, an aerosol number concentration usually was well above the nominal FMPS sensitivity (from ~100 particles/cc @ Dp = 5.6 nm to 1 part/cc @ 560nm), providing us with reliable size distributions even at 1 sec resolution. FMPS measurements revealed small scale structure of an aerosol and allowed us to examine size distributions varying over space and time associated with mixing processes previously unresolved. These 1-Hz measurements during aircraft profiles captured variations in size distributions within shallow layers. Other dynamic processes observed included orography induced aerosol layers and evolution of the nanoparticles formed by nucleation. We put FMPS high resolution size distribution data in a context of aerosol evolution and aging, using a range of established (for MIRAGE/INTEX) chemical, aerosol and transport aging parameters.

  7. The Structural Biology of CRISPR-Cas Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas genomic loci encode RNA-mediated adaptive immune systems that bear some functional similarities with eukaryotic RNA interference. Acquired and heritable immunity against bacteriophage and plasmids begins with integration of ~30 base pair foreign DNA sequences into the host genome. CRISPR-derived transcripts assemble with CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to target complementary nucleic acids for degradation. Here we review recent advances in the structural biology of these targeting complexes, with a focus on structural studies of the multisubunit Type I CRISPR RNA-guided surveillance and the Cas9 DNA endonuclease found in Type II CRISPR-Cas systems. These complexes have distinct structures that are each capable of site-specific double-stranded DNA binding and local helix unwinding. PMID:25723899

  8. CAS Standards and Guidelines for Student Services/Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NACADA Journal, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The Council for the Advancement of Standards for Student Services/Development Programs (CAS) developed and adopted standards and interpretive guidelines for specific functional areas of student services/development programs within postsecondary educational institutions. These guidelines are presented. (MLW)

  9. CRISPR-Cas9-Guided Genome Engineering in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Min; Colaiácovo, Monica P

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system is successfully being used for efficient and targeted genome editing in various organisms, including the nematode C. elegans. Recent studies have developed various CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to enhance genome engineering via two major DNA double-strand break repair pathways: non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination. Here we describe a protocol for Cas9-mediated C. elegans genome editing together with single guide RNA (sgRNA) and repair template cloning, as well as injection methods required for delivering Cas9, sgRNAs, and repair template DNA into the C. elegans germline. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27366893

  10. Methods for Optimizing CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing Specificity.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Josh; Myer, Vic E; Hsu, Patrick D

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the development of delivery, repair, and specificity strategies for the CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering toolbox are helping researchers understand gene function with unprecedented precision and sensitivity. CRISPR-Cas9 also holds enormous therapeutic potential for the treatment of genetic disorders by directly correcting disease-causing mutations. Although the Cas9 protein has been shown to bind and cleave DNA at off-target sites, the field of Cas9 specificity is rapidly progressing, with marked improvements in guide RNA selection, protein and guide engineering, novel enzymes, and off-target detection methods. We review important challenges and breakthroughs in the field as a comprehensive practical guide to interested users of genome editing technologies, highlighting key tools and strategies for optimizing specificity. The genome editing community should now strive to standardize such methods for measuring and reporting off-target activity, while keeping in mind that the goal for specificity should be continued improvement and vigilance. PMID:27494557

  11. Engineering the Caenorhabditis elegans genome with CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Selma; Boxem, Mike

    2014-08-01

    The development in early 2013 of CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering promises to dramatically advance our ability to alter the genomes of model systems at will. A single, easily produced targeting RNA guides the Cas9 endonuclease to a specific DNA sequence where it creates a double strand break. Imprecise repair of the break can yield mutations, while homologous recombination with a repair template can be used to effect specific changes to the genome. The tremendous potential of this system led several groups to independently adapt it for use in Caenorhabditiselegans, where it was successfully used to generate mutations and to create tailored genome changes through homologous recombination. Here, we review the different approaches taken to adapt CRISPR/Cas9 for C. elegans, and provide practical guidelines for CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering. PMID:24685391

  12. CRISPR-Cas systems: Prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-04-24

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control. PMID:24766887

  13. CRISPR-Cas systems: prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing, and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control. PMID:24766887

  14. An updated evolutionary classification of CRISPR-Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Alkhnbashi, Omer S; Costa, Fabrizio; Shah, Shiraz A; Saunders, Sita J; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Brouns, Stan J J; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Haft, Daniel H; Horvath, Philippe; Moineau, Sylvain; Mojica, Francisco J M; Terns, Rebecca M; Terns, Michael P; White, Malcolm F; Yakunin, Alexander F; Garrett, Roger A; van der Oost, John; Backofen, Rolf; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of CRISPR-cas loci, which encode adaptive immune systems in archaea and bacteria, involves rapid changes, in particular numerous rearrangements of the locus architecture and horizontal transfer of complete loci or individual modules. These dynamics complicate straightforward phylogenetic classification, but here we present an approach combining the analysis of signature protein families and features of the architecture of cas loci that unambiguously partitions most CRISPR-cas loci into distinct classes, types and subtypes. The new classification retains the overall structure of the previous version but is expanded to now encompass two classes, five types and 16 subtypes. The relative stability of the classification suggests that the most prevalent variants of CRISPR-Cas systems are already known. However, the existence of rare, currently unclassifiable variants implies that additional types and subtypes remain to be characterized. PMID:26411297

  15. Mobile spectrometer measures radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogineni, S.; Moore, R. K.; Onstott, R. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Bushnell, D.

    1984-01-01

    The present article is concerned with a helicopter-borne spectrometer (Heloscat), which has been developed to permit high-quality scattering measurements from a mobile platform at remote sites. The term 'spectrometer' referes to a class of scatterometers. The term 'scatterometer' is employed to denote a specialized radar for measuring scattering coefficients as a function of angle. A spectrometer, on the other hand, is a scatterometer which can measure backscatter at several frequencies. The Heloscat system is discussed, taking into account two antennas, RF hardware, and an externally mounted pendulum for angle encoding. A dual-antenna configuration is used for cross-polarized measurements, while a single-antenna system is used for like-polarized measurements. Attention is also given to oscillator characteristics, efficient data handling, and aspects of calibration.

  16. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  17. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  18. Thermal Infrared Profiling Spectrometer (TIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzl, Franz; Miosga, G.; Lehmann, F.; Richter, R.; Tank, V.

    1989-12-01

    An airborne/spaceborne sensor concept developed for scientific observations in remote sensing of the earth surface is presented. The spectrometer design is based on a fast scanning Fourier spectrometer using a rotating retroreflector. The spectrometer covers the 3-13-micron band with a spectral resolution of 5/cm. The measured signal is an interferogramm, while derived quantities are spectral emissivity, spectral radiance, and surface temperature. The optical system consists of an aperture-filling plane tilting mirror to provide off-nadir observation and calibration modes. The collecting mirror focal length and the detector area yield an instantaneous field of view of 1.2 mrad, noise equivalent temperature resolution of 0.004 K, and a noise equivalent change in emissivity of 0.0006. The simulation results of signal-to-noise performance of the TIPS are presented and discussed.

  19. Multichannel Spectrometer of Time Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindinova, E. V.; Babenko, A. G.; Vakhtel, V. M.; Evseev, N. A.; Rabotkin, V. A.; Kharitonova, D. D.

    2015-06-01

    For research and control of characteristics of radiation fluxes, radioactive sources in particular, for example, in paper [1], a spectrometer and methods of data measurement and processing based on the multichannel counter of time intervals of accident events appearance (impulses of particle detector) MC-2A (SPC "ASPECT") were created. The spectrometer has four independent channels of registration of time intervals of impulses appearance and correspondent amplitude and spectrometric channels for control along the energy spectra of the operation stationarity of paths of each of the channels from the detector to the amplifier. The registration of alpha-radiation is carried out by the semiconductor detectors with energy resolution of 16-30 keV. Using a spectrometer there have been taken measurements of oscillations of alpha-radiation 239-Pu flux intensity with a subsequent autocorrelative statistical analysis of the time series of readings.

  20. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act