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Sample records for aerosol surface areas

  1. The post-pinatubo evolution of stratospheric aerosol surface area density as inferred from SAGE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Thomason, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June of 1991, the aerosol mass loading of the stratosphere increased from -1 Mt to approximately 30 Mt. This change in aerosol loading was responsible for numerous radiative and chemical changes observed within the stratosphere. As a result, the ability to quantify aerosol properties on a global basis during this period is important. Aerosol surface area density is a critical parameter in governing the rates of heterogeneous reactions, such as ClONO2 plus H2O yields HNO3 plus HOCl, which influence the stratospheric abundance of ozone. Following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, measurements by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE 2) indicated that the stratospheric aerosol surface area density increased by as much as a factor of 100. Using SAGE 2 multi-wavelength aerosol extinction data, aerosol surface area density as well as mass are derived for the period following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo through the present.

  2. In Situ Aerosol Profile Measurements and Comparisons with SAGE 3 Aerosol Extinction and Surface Area Profiles at 68 deg North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Under funding from this proposal three in situ profile measurements of stratospheric sulfate aerosol and ozone were completed from balloon-borne platforms. The measured quantities are aerosol size resolved number concentration and ozone. The one derived product is aerosol size distribution, from which aerosol moments, such as surface area, volume, and extinction can be calculated for comparison with SAGE III measurements and SAGE III derived products, such as surface area. The analysis of these profiles and comparison with SAGE III extinction measurements and SAGE III derived surface areas are provided in Yongxiao (2005), which comprised the research thesis component of Mr. Jian Yongxiao's M.S. degree in Atmospheric Science at the University of Wyoming. In addition analysis continues on using principal component analysis (PCA) to derive aerosol surface area from the 9 wavelength extinction measurements available from SAGE III. Ths paper will present PCA components to calculate surface area from SAGE III measurements and compare these derived surface areas with those available directly from in situ size distribution measurements, as well as surface areas which would be derived from PCA and Thomason's algorithm applied to the four wavelength SAGE II extinction measurements.

  3. Investigation of Aerosol Surface Area Estimation from Number and Mass Concentration Measurements: Particle Density Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Evans, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    For nanoparticles with nonspherical morphologies, e.g., open agglomerates or fibrous particles, it is expected that the actual density of agglomerates may be significantly different from the bulk material density. It is further expected that using the material density may upset the relationship between surface area and mass when a method for estimating aerosol surface area from number and mass concentrations (referred to as “Maynard’s estimation method”) is used. Therefore, it is necessary to quantitatively investigate how much the Maynard’s estimation method depends on particle morphology and density. In this study, aerosol surface area estimated from number and mass concentration measurements was evaluated and compared with values from two reference methods: a method proposed by Lall and Friedlander for agglomerates and a mobility based method for compact nonspherical particles using well-defined polydisperse aerosols with known particle densities. Polydisperse silver aerosol particles were generated by an aerosol generation facility. Generated aerosols had a range of morphologies, count median diameters (CMD) between 25 and 50 nm, and geometric standard deviations (GSD) between 1.5 and 1.8. The surface area estimates from number and mass concentration measurements correlated well with the two reference values when gravimetric mass was used. The aerosol surface area estimates from the Maynard’s estimation method were comparable to the reference method for all particle morphologies within the surface area ratios of 3.31 and 0.19 for assumed GSDs 1.5 and 1.8, respectively, when the bulk material density of silver was used. The difference between the Maynard’s estimation method and surface area measured by the reference method for fractal-like agglomerates decreased from 79% to 23% when the measured effective particle density was used, while the difference for nearly spherical particles decreased from 30% to 24%. The results indicate that the use of

  4. USE OF CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF INTEGRAL AEROSOL PARAMETERS TO ESTIMATE PARTICLE SURFACE AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken because of interest in using particle surface area as an indicator for studies of the health effects of particulate matter. First, we wished to determine the integral parameter of the size distribution measured by the electrical aerosol detector. Secon...

  5. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined ‘geometric surface area’ of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60–350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility–mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility–mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility–mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3–10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3. PMID:26692585

  6. A preliminary analysis of the surface chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles in a typical urban area of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengzheng; Li, Hong; Liu, Hongyan; Ni, Runxiang; Li, Jinjuan; Deng, Liqun; Lu, Defeng; Cheng, Xueli; Duan, Pengli; Li, Wenjun

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle samples were collected using an Ambient Eight Stage (Non-Viable) Cascade Impactor Sampler in a typical urban area of Beijing from 27th Sep. to 5th Oct., 2009. The surface chemistry of these aerosol particles was analyzed using Static Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (Static TOF-SIMS). The factors influencing surface compositions were evaluated in conjunction with the air pollution levels, meteorological factors, and air mass transport for the sampling period. The results show that a variety of organic ion groups and inorganic ions/ion groups were accumulated on the surfaces of aerosol particles in urban areas of Beijing; and hydrophobic organic compounds with short- or middle-chain alkyl as well as hydrophilic secondary inorganic compounds were observed. All these compounds have the potential to affect the atmospheric behavior of urban aerosol particles. PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7 had similar elements on their surfaces, but some molecules and ionic groups demonstrated differences in Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry spectra. This suggests that the quantities of elements varied between PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7. In particular, more intense research efforts into fluoride pollution are required, because the fluorides on aerosol surfaces have the potential to harm human health. The levels of air pollution had the most significant influence on the surface compositions of aerosol particles in our study. Hence, heavier air pollution was associated with more complex surface compositions on aerosol particles. In addition, wind, rainfall, and air masses from the south also greatly influenced the surface compositions of these urban aerosol particles.

  7. A preliminary analysis of the surface chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles in a typical urban area of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengzheng; Li, Hong; Liu, Hongyan; Ni, Runxiang; Li, Jinjuan; Deng, Liqun; Lu, Defeng; Cheng, Xueli; Duan, Pengli; Li, Wenjun

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle samples were collected using an Ambient Eight Stage (Non-Viable) Cascade Impactor Sampler in a typical urban area of Beijing from 27th Sep. to 5th Oct., 2009. The surface chemistry of these aerosol particles was analyzed using Static Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (Static TOF-SIMS). The factors influencing surface compositions were evaluated in conjunction with the air pollution levels, meteorological factors, and air mass transport for the sampling period. The results show that a variety of organic ion groups and inorganic ions/ion groups were accumulated on the surfaces of aerosol particles in urban areas of Beijing; and hydrophobic organic compounds with short- or middle-chain alkyl as well as hydrophilic secondary inorganic compounds were observed. All these compounds have the potential to affect the atmospheric behavior of urban aerosol particles. PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7 had similar elements on their surfaces, but some molecules and ionic groups demonstrated differences in Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry spectra. This suggests that the quantities of elements varied between PM1.1-2.1 and PM3.3-4.7. In particular, more intense research efforts into fluoride pollution are required, because the fluorides on aerosol surfaces have the potential to harm human health. The levels of air pollution had the most significant influence on the surface compositions of aerosol particles in our study. Hence, heavier air pollution was associated with more complex surface compositions on aerosol particles. In addition, wind, rainfall, and air masses from the south also greatly influenced the surface compositions of these urban aerosol particles. PMID:27593274

  8. A Multi-Year Aerosol Characterization for the Greater Tehran Area Using Satellite, Surface, and Modeling Data

    PubMed Central

    Crosbie, Ewan; Sorooshian, Armin; Monfared, Negar Abolhassani; Shingler, Taylor; Esmaili, Omid

    2014-01-01

    This study reports a multi-year (2000–2009) aerosol characterization for metropolitan Tehran and surrounding areas using multiple datasets (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART), and surface and upper air data from local stations). Monthly trends in aerosol characteristics are examined in the context of the local meteorology, regional and local emission sources, and air mass back-trajectory data. Dust strongly affects the region during the late spring and summer months (May–August) when aerosol optical depth (AOD) is at its peak and precipitation accumulation is at a minimum. In addition, the peak AOD that occurs in July is further enhanced by a substantial number of seasonal wildfires in upwind regions. Conversely, AOD is at a minimum during winter; however, reduced mixing heights and a stagnant lower atmosphere trap local aerosol emissions near the surface and lead to significant reductions in visibility within Tehran. The unique meteorology and topographic setting makes wintertime visibility and surface aerosol concentrations particularly sensitive to local anthropogenic sources and is evident in the noteworthy improvement in visibility observed on weekends. Scavenging of aerosol due to precipitation is evident during the winter when aconsistent increase in surface visibility and concurrent decrease in AOD is observed in the days after rain compared with the days immediately before rain. PMID:25083295

  9. Determinants of aerosol lung-deposited surface area variation in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Reche, Cristina; Viana, Mar; Brines, Mariola; Pérez, Noemí; Beddows, David; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafine particles are characterized by a high surface area per mass. Particle surface has been reported to play a significant role in determining the toxicological activity of ultrafine particles. In light of this potential role, the time variation of lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentrations in the alveolar region was studied at the urban background environment of Barcelona (Spain), aiming to asses which processes and sources govern this parameter. Simultaneous data on Black Carbon (BC), total particle number (N) and particle number size distribution were correlated with LDSA. Average LDSA concentrations in Barcelona were 37 ± 26 μm(2)cm(-3), levels which seem to be characteristic for urban environments under traffic influence across Europe. Results confirm the comparability between LDSA data provided by the online monitor and those calculated based on particle size distributions (by SMPS), and reveal that LDSA concentrations are mainly influenced by particles in the size range 50-200 nm. A set of representative daily cycles for LDSA concentrations was obtained by means of a k-means cluster technique. The contribution of traffic emissions to daily patterns was evidenced in all the clusters, but was quantitatively different. Traffic events under stable atmospheric conditions increased mean hourly background LDSA concentrations up to 6 times, attaining levels higher than 200 μm(2)cm(-3). However, under warm and relatively clean atmospheric conditions, the traffic rush hour contribution to the daily LDSA mean appeared to be lower and the contribution of new urban particle formation events (by photochemically induced nucleation) was detected. These nucleation events were calculated to increase average background LDSA concentrations by 15-35% (maximum LDSA levels=45-50 μm(2)cm(-3)). Thereby, it may be concluded that in the urban background of Barcelona road traffic is the main source increasing the aerosol surface area which can deposit on critical

  10. Simulating gas and aerosol concentrations in the Paris area using different land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Morille, Yoann; Haeffelin, Martial

    2010-05-01

    Regional air quality forecasting depends on the performance of weather forecast models used to drive chemistry-transport models. The widely used Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model provides a few land surface schemes (LSMs) to compute heat and moisture fluxes over land surface. The LSMs differ in complexity and approaches used. We performed WRF simulations for 15 and 5 km resolution nested domains over the North of France and Paris, respectively, for summer 2008. We used the four LSMs provided with WRF: 6-layer Rapid Update Cycle (RUC), 5-layer thermal diffusion, 2-layer Pleim-Xiu scheme (together with the Pleim-Xiu surface layer and the ACM boundary layer models), and 4-layer Noah scheme. The SIRTA atmospheric observatory located in Paris area provides in situ data of measurements for a number of meteorological parameters, as well as vertical profiles measured by a lidar. The simulation results were compared to the SIRTA measurement data. In order to quantify possible impacts of the LSMs to simulated gas and aerosol concentrations in the Paris region, we use a chemistry-transport model CHIMERE forced by the corresponding WRF meteorological fields. Implications for the regional air quality forecasting will be discussed.

  11. Joint remote sensing of aerosol optical properties and surface reflectance by sun-photometer and satellite in the urban area of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jietai; Zhang, Junhua

    2003-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth in the urban area of Beijing has been measured by multi-wavelength sun-photometer during a one-year period from Apr. 1999 to Mar. 2000. Using the aerosol optical depth as the atmospheric correction parameter, the reflectance of the urban surface and the mean aerosol type have been retrieved by the apparent reflectance of the visible channel of the Visible and Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer (VISSR) onboard the Japanese Geostationary Meteorology Satellite.

  12. Use of the electrical aerosol detector as an indicator of the surface area of fine particles deposited in the lung.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William E; Stanek, John; Han, Hee-Siew Ryan; Johnson, Tim; Sakurai, Hiromu; Pui, David Y H; Turner, Jay; Chen, Da-Ren; Duthie, Scott

    2007-02-01

    Because of recent concerns about the health effects of ultrafine particles and the indication that particle toxicity is related to surface area, we have been examining techniques for measuring parameters related to the surface area of fine particles, especially in the 0.003- to 0.5-microm size range. In an earlier study, we suggested that the charge attached to particles, as measured by a prototype of the Electrical Aerosol Detector (EAD, TSI Inc., Model 3070), was related to the 1.16 power of the mobility diameter. An inspection of the pattern of particle deposition in the lung as a function of particle size suggested that the EAD measurement might be a useful indicator of the surface area of particles deposited in the lung. In this study, we calculate the particle surface area (micrometer squared) deposited in the lung per cubic centimeter of air inhaled as a function of particle size using atmospheric particle size distributions measured in Minneapolis, MN, and East St. Louis, IL. The correlations of powers of the mobility diameter, Dx, were highest for X = 1.1-1.6 for the deposited surface area and for X = 1.25 with the EAD signal. This overlap suggested a correspondence between the EAD signal and the deposited surface area. The correlation coefficients of the EAD signal and particle surface area deposited in the alveolar and tracheobronchial regions of the lung for three breathing patterns are in the range of Pearson's r = 0.91-0.95 (coefficient of determination, R2 = 0.82-0.90). These statistical relationships suggest that the EAD could serve as a useful indicator of particle surface area deposited in the lung in exposure and epidemiologic studies of the human health effects of atmospheric particles and as a measure of the potential surface area dose for the characterization of occupational environments.

  13. On the Accuracy of Stratospheric Aerosol Extinction and Surface Area Derived from in situ and Remote Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh

    Measurements from University of Wyoming balloon-borne optical particle counters (OPCs) provide one of the longest stratospheric aerosol records in the world. In this study, University of Wyoming OPC measurements are compared with Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE II) satellite measurements to uncover the reason for differences between SAGE II and OPC measurements during non-volcanic (background) periods. The surface area density (SAD) estimation from various stratospheric aerosol measurements is important, because of surface reactions which affect abundances of oxides of nitrogen and ozone, and thereby the chemistry of the stratosphere. It is therefore important to get an accurate estimation of surface area density, as many climate models use aerosol climatologies provided by satellites. OPC and SAGE II measurements are compared for volcanic (1991-1996) and non-volcanic or background (1997-2004) periods. The extinction comparisons show that OPC extinctions calculated at SAGE II wavelengths are about a factor of 2 lower than SAGE II during the non-volcanic period. Under volcanic conditions the differences decrease; however, OPC extinction is still less than SAGE II extinction. This led to an investigation of the three most important systematic errors associated with the OPC measurements anisokineticity, evaporation of particles in the OPC inlet, and counting efficiency. The effect of anisokineticity is found to be negligible. For calculating the evaporation of particles in the OPC inlet, a heat transfer model is developed to calculate the mean air temperature inside the inlet, which is then coupled with a microphysical model to predict the evaporation of stratospheric aerosol particles. This evaporation increases OPC extinctions by 10-15% for both volcanic and non-volcanic cases; however, counting efficiency is the major source of error, which increases the extinction by 30-50% for the volcanic case, and 80-150% for the non-volcanic cases. These corrections

  14. Adaption of the MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm using airborne spectral surface reflectance measurements over urban areas: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäkel, E.; Mey, B.; Levy, R.; Gu, X.; Yu, T.; Li, Z.; Althausen, D.; Heese, B.; Wendisch, M.

    2015-12-01

    MODIS (MOderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) are biased over urban areas, primarily because the reflectance characteristics of urban surfaces are different than that assumed by the retrieval algorithm. Specifically, the operational "dark-target" retrieval is tuned towards vegetated (dark) surfaces and assumes a spectral relationship to estimate the surface reflectance in blue and red wavelengths. From airborne measurements of surface reflectance over the city of Zhongshan, China, were collected that could replace the assumptions within the MODIS retrieval algorithm. The subsequent impact was tested upon two versions of the operational algorithm, Collections 5 and 6 (C5 and C6). AOD retrieval results of the operational and modified algorithms were compared for a specific case study over Zhongshan to show minor differences between them all. However, the Zhongshan-based spectral surface relationship was applied to a much larger urban sample, specifically to the MODIS data taken over Beijing between 2010 and 2014. These results were compared directly to ground-based AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) measurements of AOD. A significant reduction of the differences between the AOD retrieved by the modified algorithms and AERONET was found, whereby the mean difference decreased from 0.27±0.14 for the operational C5 and 0.19±0.12 for the operational C6 to 0.10±0.15 and -0.02±0.17 by using the modified C5 and C6 retrievals. Since the modified algorithms assume a higher contribution by the surface to the total measured reflectance from MODIS, consequently the overestimation of AOD by the operational methods is reduced. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the MODIS AOD retrieval with respect to different surface types was investigated. Radiative transfer simulations were performed to model reflectances at top of atmosphere for predefined aerosol properties. The reflectance data were used as input for the retrieval methods. It

  15. Improving aerosol retrieval over urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picón, A. J.; Wu, Y.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosol retrieval over urban areas is complicated since surface models in the operational algorithms are based on vegetation models such as the case of MODIS. To improve satellite retrieval of aerosols in urban areas, we use simultaneous AERONET radiometer and MODIS measurements in combination to refine surface albedo models. Refined surface models have been implemented for NYC and Mexico City demonstrating significant improvement in AOD in terms of accuracy and spatial resolution. Based on these direct retrievals of the surface reflection for the MODIS Land Aerosol Bands, we were able to show that current parameterizations of the surface as a function of the Modified Vegetation Index are not in good agreement either quantitatively or qualitatively. Further comparisons in other urban areas (eg. Beijing) show that for cases with surface reflectance ratios sufficiently high at the AERONET site, similar over biases can be observed. On the other hand, other cities such as Kanpur, Buenos Aires and Rome do not show any significant bias which can be traced to the fact that these sites are located in regions with less urban surface correlations. Further comparisons in these urban centers are also made with other satellites aerosol retrievals such as POLDER, MISR and OMI.

  16. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS.
    Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  17. Influence of seed aerosol surface area and oxidation rate on vapor wall deposition and SOA mass yields: a case study with α-pinene ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, Theodora; McVay, Renee C.; Zhang, Xuan; Boyd, Christopher M.; Seinfeld, John H.; Ng, Nga L.

    2016-07-01

    Laboratory chambers, invaluable in atmospheric chemistry and aerosol formation studies, are subject to particle and vapor wall deposition, processes that need to be accounted for in order to accurately determine secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields. Although particle wall deposition is reasonably well understood and usually accounted for, vapor wall deposition is less so. The effects of vapor wall deposition on SOA mass yields in chamber experiments can be constrained experimentally by increasing the seed aerosol surface area to promote the preferential condensation of SOA-forming vapors onto seed aerosol. Here, we study the influence of seed aerosol surface area and oxidation rate on SOA formation in α-pinene ozonolysis. The observations are analyzed using a coupled vapor-particle dynamics model to interpret the roles of gas-particle partitioning (quasi-equilibrium vs. kinetically limited SOA growth) and α-pinene oxidation rate in influencing vapor wall deposition. We find that the SOA growth rate and mass yields are independent of seed surface area within the range of seed surface area concentrations used in this study. This behavior arises when the condensation of SOA-forming vapors is dominated by quasi-equilibrium growth. Faster α-pinene oxidation rates and higher SOA mass yields are observed at increasing O3 concentrations for the same initial α-pinene concentration. When the α-pinene oxidation rate increases relative to vapor wall deposition, rapidly produced SOA-forming oxidation products condense more readily onto seed aerosol particles, resulting in higher SOA mass yields. Our results indicate that the extent to which vapor wall deposition affects SOA mass yields depends on the particular volatility organic compound system and can be mitigated through the use of excess oxidant concentrations.

  18. Aerosols of Mongolian arid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golobokova, L.; Marinayte, I.; Zhamsueva, G.

    2012-04-01

    Sampling was performed in July-August 2005-2010 at Station Sain Shand (44°54'N, 110°07'E) in the Gobi desert (1000 m a.s.l.), West Mongolia. Aerosol samples were collected with a high volume sampler PM 10 (Andersen Instruments Inc., USA) onto Whatman-41 filters. The substance was extracted from the filters by de-ionized water. The solution was screened through an acetate-cellulose filter with 0.2 micron pore size. Ions of ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium, as well as sulphate ions, nitrate ions, hydrocarbonate, chloride ions were determined in the filtrate by means of an atomic adsorption spectrometer Carl Zeiss Jena (Germany), a high performance liquid chromatographer «Milichrome A-02» (Russia), and an ionic chromatographer ICS-3000 (Dionex, USA). The PAH fraction was separated from aerosol samples using hexane extraction at room temperature under UV environment. The extract was concentrated to 0.1-0.2 ml and analysed by a mass-spectrometer "Agilent, GC 6890, MSD 5973 Network". Analysis of concentrations of aerosols components, their correlation ratios, and meteorological modeling show that the main factor affecting chemical composition of aerosols is a flow of contaminants transferred by air masses to the sampling area mainly from the south and south-east, as well as wind conditions of the area, dust storms in particular. Sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium are major ions in aerosol particles at Station Sain Shand. Dust-borne aerosol is known to be a sorbent for both mineral and organic admixtures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) being among superecotoxicants play an important role among resistant organic substances. PAH concentrations were determined in the samples collected in 2010. All aerosol samples contained dominant PAHs with 5-6 benzene rings ( (benze(k)fluoranthen, benze(b)flouranthen, benze(a)pyren, benze(?)pyren, perylene, benze(g,h,i)perylene, and indene(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene). Their total quantity varied between 42 and 90

  19. On the accuracy of stratospheric aerosol extinction derived from in situ size distribution measurements and surface area density derived from remote SAGE II and HALOE extinction measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Deshler, Terry

    2015-08-26

    In situ stratospheric aerosol measurements, from University of Wyoming optical particle counters (OPCs), are compared with Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE) II (versions 6.2 and 7.0) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite measurements to investigate differences between SAGE II/HALOE-measured extinction and derived surface area and OPC-derived extinction and surface area. Coincident OPC and SAGE II measurements are compared for a volcanic (1991-1996) and nonvolcanic (1997 2005) period. OPC calculated extinctions agree with SAGE II measurements, within instrumental uncertainty, during the volcanic period, but have been a factor of 2 low during the nonvolcanic period. Three systematic errors associated with themore » OPC measurements, anisokineticity, inlet particle evaporation, and counting efficiency, were investigated. An overestimation of the OPC counting efficiency is found to be the major source of systematic error. With this correction OPC calculated extinction increases by 15 30% (30 50%) for the volcanic (nonvolcanic) measurements. These changes significantly improve the comparison with SAGE II and HALOE extinctions in the nonvolcanic cases but slightly degrade the agreement in the volcanic period. These corrections have impacts on OPC-derived surface area density, exacerbating the poor agreement between OPC and SAGE II (version 6.2) surface areas. This disparity is reconciled with SAGE II version 7.0 surface areas. For both the volcanic and nonvolcanic cases these changes in OPC counting efficiency and in the operational SAGE II surface area algorithm leave the derived surface areas from both platforms in significantly better agreement and within the 40% precision of the OPC moment calculations.« less

  20. On the accuracy of stratospheric aerosol extinction derived from in situ size distribution measurements and surface area density derived from remote SAGE II and HALOE extinction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Deshler, Terry

    2015-08-26

    In situ stratospheric aerosol measurements, from University of Wyoming optical particle counters (OPCs), are compared with Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment (SAGE) II (versions 6.2 and 7.0) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) satellite measurements to investigate differences between SAGE II/HALOE-measured extinction and derived surface area and OPC-derived extinction and surface area. Coincident OPC and SAGE II measurements are compared for a volcanic (1991-1996) and nonvolcanic (1997 2005) period. OPC calculated extinctions agree with SAGE II measurements, within instrumental uncertainty, during the volcanic period, but have been a factor of 2 low during the nonvolcanic period. Three systematic errors associated with the OPC measurements, anisokineticity, inlet particle evaporation, and counting efficiency, were investigated. An overestimation of the OPC counting efficiency is found to be the major source of systematic error. With this correction OPC calculated extinction increases by 15 30% (30 50%) for the volcanic (nonvolcanic) measurements. These changes significantly improve the comparison with SAGE II and HALOE extinctions in the nonvolcanic cases but slightly degrade the agreement in the volcanic period. These corrections have impacts on OPC-derived surface area density, exacerbating the poor agreement between OPC and SAGE II (version 6.2) surface areas. This disparity is reconciled with SAGE II version 7.0 surface areas. For both the volcanic and nonvolcanic cases these changes in OPC counting efficiency and in the operational SAGE II surface area algorithm leave the derived surface areas from both platforms in significantly better agreement and within the 40% precision of the OPC moment calculations.

  1. Modal Bin Hybrid Model: A Surface Area Consistent, Triple Moment Sectional Method for Use in Process-oriented Modeling of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, Mizuo; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-09-10

    A triple moment sectional method, Modal Bin Hybrid Model (MBHM), has been developed. In addition to number and mass (volume), surface area is predicted (and preserved), which is important for gas-to-particle mass transfer and light extinction cross section. The performance of MBHM was evaluated against double moment sectional (DMS) methods with various size resolutions up to BIN256 (BINx: x is number of sections over three orders of magnitude in size, ΔlogD = 3/x) for simulating evolution of particles under simultaneously occurring nucleation, condensation and coagulation processes. Because MBHM gives a physically consistent form of the intra-sectional distributions, errors and biases of MBHM at BIN4-8 resolution were almost equivalent to those of DMS at BIN16-32 resolution for various important variables such as the moments Mk (k: 0, 2, 3), dMk/dt, and the number and volume of particles larger than a certain diameter. Another important feature of MBHM is that only a single bin is adequate to simulate full aerosol dynamics for particles whose size distribution can be approximated by a single lognormal mode. This flexibility is useful for process-oriented (multi category and/or mixing state) modeling: primary aerosols whose size parameters would not differ substantially in time and space can be expressed by a single or a small number of modes, whereas secondary aerosols whose size changes drastically from one to several hundred nanometers can be expressed by a number of modes. Added dimensions can be applied to MBHM to represent mixing state or photo-chemical age for aerosol mixing state studies.

  2. Surface-active organics in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    McNeill, V Faye; Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N

    2014-01-01

    Surface-active organic material is a key component of atmospheric aerosols. The presence of surfactants can influence aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, cloud formation, and ice nucleation. We review the current state of the science on the sources, properties, and impacts of surfactants in atmospheric aerosols. PMID:23408277

  3. 1984-1995 Evolution of Stratospheric Aerosol Size, Surface Area, and Volume Derived by Combining SAGE II and CLAES Extinction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Bauman, Jill J.

    2000-01-01

    This SAGE II Science Team task focuses on the development of a multi-wavelength, multi- sensor Look-Up-Table (LUT) algorithm for retrieving information about stratospheric aerosols from global satellite-based observations of particulate extinction. The LUT algorithm combines the 4-wavelength SAGE II extinction measurements (0.385 <= lambda <= 1.02 microns) with the 7.96 micron and 12.82 micron extinction measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) instrument, thus increasing the information content available from either sensor alone. The algorithm uses the SAGE II/CLAES composite spectra in month-latitude-altitude bins to retrieve values and uncertainties of particle effective radius R(sub eff), surface area S, volume V and size distribution width sigma(sub g).

  4. Volcanic Signatures in Estimates of Stratospheric Aerosol Size, Distribution Width, Surface Area, and Volume Deduced from Global Satellite-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, J. J.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    Volcanic signatures in the stratospheric aerosol layer are revealed by two independent techniques which retrieve aerosol information from global satellite-based observations of particulate extinction. Both techniques combine the 4-wavelength Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II extinction measurements (0.385 <= lambda <= 1.02 microns) with the 7.96 micron and 12.82 micron extinction measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) instrument. The algorithms use the SAGE II/CLAES composite extinction spectra in month-latitude-altitude bins to retrieve values and uncertainties of particle effective radius R(sub eff), surface area S, volume V and size distribution width sigma(sub R). The first technique is a multi-wavelength Look-Up-Table (LUT) algorithm which retrieves values and uncertainties of R(sub eff) by comparing ratios of extinctions from SAGE II and CLAES (e.g., E(sub lambda)/E(sub 1.02) to pre-computed extinction ratios which are based on a range of unimodal lognormal size distributions. The pre-computed ratios are presented as a function of R(sub eff) for a given sigma(sub g); thus the comparisons establish the range of R(sub eff) consistent with the measured spectra for that sigma(sub g). The fact that no solutions are found for certain sigma(sub g) values provides information on the acceptable range of sigma(sub g), which is found to evolve in response to volcanic injections and removal periods. Analogous comparisons using absolute extinction spectra and error bars establish the range of S and V. The second technique is a Parameter Search Technique (PST) which estimates R(sub eff) and sigma(sub g) within a month-latitude-altitude bin by minimizing the chi-squared values obtained by comparing the SAGE II/CLAES extinction spectra and error bars with spectra calculated by varying the lognormal fitting parameters: R(sub eff), sigma(sub g), and the total number of particles N(sub 0). For both techniques, possible biases in

  5. Gas-phase removal of biofilms from various surfaces using carbon dioxide aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minju; Hong, Seongkyeol; Kang, Min-Yeong; Lee, Jin-Won; Jang, Jaesung

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the removal of Escherichia coli XL1-blue biofilms using periodic jets of carbon dioxide aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO(2)) with nitrogen gas. The aerosols were generated by the adiabatic expansion of high-pressure CO(2) gas through a nozzle and used to remove air-dried biofilms. The areas of the biofilms were measured from scanning electron micrographs before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured with various air-drying times of the biofilms before the treatment, surface materials, and durations of CO(2) aerosols in each 8-s aerosol-nitrogen cleaning cycle. Nearly 100% of the fresh biofilms were removed from the various surfaces very reliably within 90 s. This technique can be useful for removing unsaturated biofilms on solid surfaces and has potential applications for cleaning bio-contaminated surfaces.

  6. New Photosensitized Processes at Aerosol and Ocean Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, S.; Aregahegn, K. Z.; Ciuraru, R.; Bernard, F.; Tinel, L.; Fine, L.; George, C.

    2014-12-01

    From a few years now, there is a growing body of evidence that photoinduced processes could be of great importance for the tropospheric chemistry. Here, we would like to present two additional outcomes of this new area of research, firstly the photosensitized direct VOC uptake by aerosols and, secondly, the photoinduced chemical formation of unsaturated VOC from marine microlayer proxy. It was recently shown that the chemistry of glyoxal toward ammonium ions into droplets and wet aerosols leads to the formation of light-absorbing compounds. Among them, we found that imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC) acts as a photosensitizer and is able to initiate the growth of organic aerosols via the uptake of VOC, such as limonene. Given its potential importance, the mechanism of this photoinduced uptake was investigated thanks to aerosol flow tube experiments and UPLC-ESI-HRMS analysis. Results reveal hydrogen abstraction on the VOC molecule by the triplet state of IC leading to the VOC oxidation without any traditional oxidant. As well as aerosol, the sea-surface microlayer, known to be enriched in light-absorbing organics, is largely impacted by photochemical processes. Recent studies have pointed out for example the role of photosentitized processes in the loss of NO2 and ozone at water surfaces containing photoactive compounds such as chlorophyll. In order to go further, we worked from sea-surface microlayer proxy containing humic acids as photoactive material and organic acids as surfactants. Beside oxidation processes, we monitored by high resolution PTR-MS the release in the gas phase of unsaturated compounds, including C5 dienes (isoprene ?). A strong correlation between the measured surface tension and the C5 diene concentration in the gas phase was evidenced, clearly pointing toward an interfacial process. This contribution will highlight the similarities between both systems and will attempt to present a general chemical scheme for photosensitized chemistry at

  7. Resolution and Content Improvements to MISR Aerosol and Land Surface Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garay, M. J.; Bull, M. A.; Diner, D. J.; Hansen, E. G.; Kalashnikova, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Since early 2000, the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite has been providing operational Level 2 (swath-based) aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle property retrievals at 17.6 km spatial resolution and atmospherically corrected land surface products at 1.1 km resolution. The performance of the aerosol product has been validated against ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations, model comparisons, and climatological assessments. This product has played a major role in studies of the impacts of aerosols on climate and air quality. The surface product has found a variety of uses, particularly at regional scales for assessing vegetation and land surface change. A major development effort has led to the release of an update to the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol and land surface retrieval products, which has been in production since December 2007. The new release is designated Version 23. The resolution of the aerosol product has been increased to 4.4 km, allowing more detailed characterization of aerosol spatial variability, especially near local sources and in urban areas. The product content has been simplified and updated to include more robust measures of retrieval uncertainty and other fields to benefit users. The land surface product has also been updated to incorporate the Version 23 aerosol product as input and to improve spatial coverage, particularly over mountainous terrain and snow/ice-covered surfaces. We will describe the major upgrades incorporated in Version 23 and present validation of the aerosol product against both the standard AERONET historical database, as well as high spatial density AERONET-DRAGON deployments. Comparisons will also be shown relative to the Version 22 aerosol and land surface products. Applications enabled by these product updates will be discussed.

  8. High surface area calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. N.; Andersson, M. P.; Dalby, K. N.; Müter, D.; Okhrimenko, D. V.; Fordsmand, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2013-05-01

    Calcite (CaCO3) is important in many fields—in nature, because it is a component of aquifers, oil reservoirs and prospective CO2 storage sites, and in industry, where it is used in products as diverse as paper, toothpaste, paint, plastic and aspirin. It is difficult to obtain high purity calcite with a high surface area but such material is necessary for industrial applications and for fundamental calcite research. Commercial powder is nearly always contaminated with growth inhibitors such as sugars, citrate or pectin and most laboratory synthesis methods deliver large precipitates, often containing vaterite or aragonite. To address this problem, we (i) adapted the method of carbonating a Ca(OH)2 slurry with CO2 gas to develop the first simple, cheap, safe and reproducible procedure using common laboratory equipment, to obtain calcite that reproducibly had a surface area of 14-17 m2/g and (ii) conducted a thorough characterization of the product. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed nanometer scale, rhombohedral crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) confirmed highly crystalline, pure calcite that more closely resembles the dimensions of the biogenic calcite produced by algae in coccoliths than other methods for synthesizing calcite. We suggest that this calcite is useful when purity and high surface area are important.

  9. Applications of Sunphotometry to Aerosol Extinction and Surface Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, S.

    2002-09-30

    Support cost-sharing of a newly developed sunphotometer in field deployment for aerosol studies. This is a cost-sharing research to deploy a newly developed sun-sky-surface photometer for studying aerosol extinction and surface anisotropy at the ARM SGP, TWP, and NSA-AAO CART sites and in many field campaigns. Atmospheric aerosols affect the radiative energy balance of the Earth, both directly by perturbing the incoming/outgoing radiation fields and indirectly by influencing the properties/processes of clouds and reactive greenhouse gases. The surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) also plays a crucial role in the radiative energy balance, since the BRDF is required to determine (i) the spectral and spectrally-averaged surface albedo, and (ii) the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) angular distribution of radiance field. Therefore, the CART sites provide an excellent, albeit unique, opportunity to collect long-term climatic data in characterizing aerosol properties and various types of surface anisotropy.

  10. Applications of Sunphotometry to Aerosol Extinction and Surface Anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, S. C.; Holben, B. N.; Privette, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    Support cost-sharing of a newly developed sunphotometer in field deployment for aerosol studies. This is a cost-sharing research to deploy a newly developed sun-sky-surface photometer for studying aerosol extinction and surface anisotropy at the ARM SGP, TWP, and NSA-AAO CART sites and in many field campaigns. Atmospheric aerosols affect the radiative energy balance of the Earth, both directly by perturbing the incoming/outgoing radiation fields and indirectly by influencing the properties/processes of clouds and reactive greenhouse gases. The surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) also plays a crucial role in the radiative energy balance, since the BRDF is required to determine (1) the spectral and spectrally-averaged surface albedo, and (2) the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) angular distribution of radiance field. Therefore, the CART sites provide an excellent, albeit unique, opportunity to collect long-term climatic data in characterizing aerosol properties and various types of surface anisotropy.

  11. Relationships between optical extinction, backscatter and aerosol surface and volume in the stratosphere following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, C.A.; Jonsson, H.H.; Wilson, J.C. ); Dye, J.E.; Baumgardner, D.; Borrmann, S.; Pitts, M.C.; Osborn, M.T.; DeCoursey, R.J.; Woods, D.C.

    1993-11-19

    The eruption of the Mt. Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines in June 1991 has resulted in increases in the surface and mass concentrations of aerosol particles in the lower stratosphere. Airborne measurements made at midlatitudes between 15 and 21 km from August 1991 to March 1992 show that, prior to December 1991, the Pinatubo aerosol cloud varied widely in microphysical properties such as size distribution, number, surface and volume concentration and was also spatially variable. Aerosol surface area concentration was found to be highly correlated to extinction at visible and near-infrared wavelengths throughout the measurement period. Similarly, backscatter at common lidar wavelengths was a good predictor of aerosol volume concentrations. These results support the use of satellite extinction measurements to estimate aerosol surface and of lidar measurements to estimate aerosol volume or mass if temporal changes in the relationships between the variables are considered. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A surface reflectance scheme for retrieving aerosol optical depth over urban surfaces in MODIS Dark Target retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pawan; Levy, Robert C.; Mattoo, Shana; Remer, Lorraine A.; Munchak, Leigh A.

    2016-07-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, aboard the two Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites Terra and Aqua, provide aerosol information with nearly daily global coverage at moderate spatial resolution (10 and 3 km). Almost 15 years of aerosol data records are now available from MODIS that can be used for various climate and air-quality applications. However, the application of MODIS aerosol products for air-quality concerns is limited by a reduction in retrieval accuracy over urban surfaces. This is largely because the urban surface reflectance behaves differently than that assumed for natural surfaces. In this study, we address the inaccuracies produced by the MODIS Dark Target (MDT) algorithm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals over urban areas and suggest improvements by modifying the surface reflectance scheme in the algorithm. By integrating MODIS Land Surface Reflectance and Land Cover Type information into the aerosol surface parameterization scheme for urban areas, much of the issues associated with the standard algorithm have been mitigated for our test region, the continental United States (CONUS). The new surface scheme takes into account the change in underlying surface type and is only applied for MODIS pixels with urban percentage (UP) larger than 20 %. Over the urban areas where the new scheme has been applied (UP > 20 %), the number of AOD retrievals falling within expected error (EE %) has increased by 20 %, and the strong positive bias against ground-based sun photometry has been eliminated. However, we note that the new retrieval introduces a small negative bias for AOD values less than 0.1 due to the ultra-sensitivity of the AOD retrieval to the surface parameterization under low atmospheric aerosol loadings. Global application of the new urban surface parameterization appears promising, but further research and analysis are required before global implementation.

  13. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  14. Characterization of aerosol composition and sources in the greater Atlanta area by aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Weber, R. J. J.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    An important and uncertain aspect of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is that it is often associated with anthropogenic pollution tracers. Prior studies in Atlanta suggested that 70-80% of the carbon in water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is modern, yet it is well-correlated with the anthropogenic CO. In this study, we deployed a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at multiple sites in different seasons (May 2012-February 2013) to characterize the sources and chemical composition of aerosols in the greater Atlanta area. This area in the SE US is ideal to investigate anthropogenic-biogenic interactions due to high natural and anthropogenic emissions. These extensive field studies are part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology study (SCAPE). The HR-ToF-AMS is deployed at four sites (~ 3 weeks each) in rotation: Jefferson Street (urban), Yorkville (rural), roadside site (near Highway 75/85), and Georgia Tech site (campus), with the urban and rural sites being part of the SEARCH network. We obtained seven HR-ToF-AMS datasets in total. During the entire measurement period, the ACSM is stationary at the GIT site and samples continuously. We perform positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis on the HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data to deconvolve the OA into different components. While the diurnal cycle of the total OA is flat as what have been previously observed, the OA factors resolved by PMF analysis show distinctively different diurnal trends. We find that the "more-oxidized oxygenated OA" (MO-OOA) constitutes a major fraction of OA at all sites. In summer, OA is dominated by SOA, e.g., isoprene-OA and OOA with different degrees of oxidation. In contrary, biomass burning OA is more prominent in winter data. By comparing HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data during the same sampling periods, we find that the aerosol time series are highly correlated, indicating the

  15. Variability of Ambient Aerosol in the Mexico City Metropolian Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J. T.; Herndon, S.; Mortimer, P.; Kolb, C. E.; Rogers, T.; Knighton, B.; Dunlea, E.; Marr, L.; de Foy, B.; Molina, M.; Molina, L.; Salcedo, D.; Dzepina, K.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    The spatial and temporal variations of the ambient aerosol in the Mexico City Metropolitan area was characterized during the springs of 2002 and 2003 using a mobile laboratory equipped with gas and particulate measurement instrumentation. The laboratory was operated at various fixed sites locations in and at the edge of the metropolitan area (Xalostoc, Merced, Cenica, Pedregal, and Santa Ana). Size-resolved aerosol mass and chemical composition was measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer and selected trace gas species (low mass organic compounds, NO, NO2, NOy, O3, SO2, CH2O, NH3, CO2) were measured using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer and various optical systems. The aerosol was predominantly organic in composition with lesser amounts of ammonium nitrate, sulfate, and chloride. The organic component was composed of mixed primary and secondary organic compounds. The mass loading and chemical composition of the aerosol was influenced by local and regional air pollution sources and the meteorology in Mexico City. Most urban sites were influenced by a strong diurnal particulate mass trend indicative of primary organic emissions from traffic during early morning and subsequently oxidized/processed organics and ammonium nitrate particles starting in the mid-morning (~9 AM) and continuing throughout the day. Morning traffic-related primary organic emissions were strongest at La Merced (center of Mexico City, located near a busy food market), more subdued at other fixed sites further from the city center, and varied depending upon the day of week and holiday schedules. Particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were observed within Mexico City fixed sites and were correlated with traffic organic PM emissions. Oxidized organic and ammonium nitrate events occurred during mid-morning at all city sites and were well correlated with gas phase photochemical activity. The daily ammonium nitrate aerosol event occurred later at sites near the city limits

  16. Aerosol interactions between the surface and the atmosphere: Urban fluxes, forest canopy vertical exchange, and wintertime urban patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivicke, Rasa

    Atmospheric aerosols play a major role in regional atmospheric chemistry and air quality, while on a global scale, aerosol processes continue to represent the largest source of uncertainty related to climate change. An important aspect of understanding the role of aerosols in these areas is to document the vertical exchange of aerosols with the surface in both urban and rural landscapes since the vertical exchange represents important sources and sinks of aerosols on regional and global scales. In this dissertation, investigation of aerosol dynamics is described for three separate field studies. First, urban eddy covariance flux measurements were made from a building rooftop in Mexico City using a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) to determine the fluxes of aerosol species to/from the urban landscape. Second, conditional sampling of fine particles in updrafts and downdrafts was performed above a pine forest in Colorado using a thermal desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometer (TD-CIMS) to investigate the relative strengths of sources and sinks for speciated aerosol in a forest environment. Third, the aerosol and gas phase pollutant patterns, measured in Boise, ID during wintertime inversion conditions, were analyzed with respect to the daily evolution of the planetary boundary layer depth and surface meteorological conditions. This dissertation describes the methods used for each of the three studies and summarizes the analysis of the results.

  17. Cassini/CIRS capabilities for aerosol, cloud, and surface measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelson, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Information that should be revealed by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) about the aerosol, cloud, and surface properties of Titan are addressed. Limb sounding data will be used to determine aerosol abundances, scale heights, and gradients between 80 and 400 km for various latitudes. Stratospheric condensate cloud top altitudes and column abundances will be inferred as functions of latitude. A search for new species will be conducted. Thermal maps between 500 and 550/cm will be used to investigate tropospheric methane clouds and surface topography; time resolution provided by different orbits will be used to distinguish the two.

  18. Using Satellite Aerosol Retrievals to Monitor Surface Particulate Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Holben, Brent N.; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS and MISR aerosol products were designed nearly two decades ago for the purpose of climate applications. Since launch of Terra in 1999, these two sensors have provided global, quantitative information about column-integrated aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and relative aerosol type parameters (such as Angstrom exponent). Although primarily designed for climate, the air quality (AQ) community quickly recognized that passive satellite products could be used for particulate air quality monitoring and forecasting. However, AOD and particulate matter (PM) concentrations have different units, and represent aerosol conditions in different layers of the atmosphere. Also, due to low visible contrast over brighter surface conditions, satellite-derived aerosol retrievals tend to have larger uncertainty in urban or populated regions. Nonetheless, the AQ community has made significant progress in relating column-integrated AOD at ambient relative humidity (RH) to surface PM concentrations at dried RH. Knowledge of aerosol optical and microphysical properties, ambient meteorological conditions, and especially vertical profile, are critical for physically relating AOD and PM. To make urban-scale maps of PM, we also must account for spatial variability. Since surface PM may vary on a finer spatial scale than the resolution of standard MODIS (10 km) and MISR (17km) products, we test higher-resolution versions of MODIS (3km) and MISR (1km research mode) retrievals. The recent (July 2011) DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the mid-Atlantic offers a comprehensive network of sun photometers (DRAGON) and other data that we use for validating the higher resolution satellite data. In the future, we expect that the wealth of aircraft and ground-based measurements, collected during DISCOVER-AQ, will help us quantitatively link remote sensed and ground-based measurements in the urban region.

  19. On surface temperature, greenhouse gases, and aerosols: models and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.F.B.; Davis, R.A.; Ingram, W.J.; Senior, C.A.

    1995-10-01

    The effect of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and sulphate aerosols on near-surface temperature is investigated using a version of the Hadley Centre atmospheric model coupled to a mixed layer ocean. The scattering of sunlight by sulphate aerosols is represented by appropriately enhancing the surface albedo. On doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, the global mean temperature increases by 5.2 K. An integration with a 39% increase in CO{sub 2}, giving the estimated change in radiative heating due to increases in greenhouse gases since 1900, produced an equilibrium warming of 2.3 K, which, even allowing for oceanic inertia, is significantly higher than the observed warming over the same period. Furthermore, the simulation suggests a substantial warming everywhere, whereas the observations indicate isolated regions of cooling, including parts of the northern midlatitude continents. The addition of an estimate of the effect of scattering by current industrial aerosols (uncertain by a factor of at least 3) leads to improved agreement with the observed pattern of changes over the northern continents and reduces the global mean warming by about 30%. Doubling the aerosol forcing produces patterns that are still compatible with the observations, but further increase leads to unrealistically extensive cooling in the midlatitudes. The diurnal range of surface temperature decreases over most of the northern extratropics on increasing CO{sub 2}, in agreement with recent observations. The addition of the current industrial aerosol had little detectable effect on the diurnal range in the model because the direct effect of reduced solar heating at the surface is approximately balanced by the indirect effects of cooling. Thus, the ratio of the reduction in diurnal range to the mean warming is increased, in closer agreement with observations. Results from further sensitivity experiments with larger increases in aerosol and CO{sub 2} are presented.

  20. Synergy of Satellite-Surface Observations for Studying the Properties of Absorbing Aerosols in Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2010-01-01

    Through interaction with clouds and alteration of the Earth's radiation budget, atmospheric aerosols significantly influence our weather and climate. Monsoon rainfalls, for example, sustain the livelihood of more than half of the world's population. Thus, understanding the mechanism that drives the water cycle and freshwater distribution is high-lighted as one of the major near-term goals in NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Strategy. Every cloud droplet/ice-crystal that serves as an essential element in portraying water cycle and distributing freshwater contains atmospheric aerosols at its core. In addition, the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol properties is complex due to their dynamic nature. In fact, the predictability of the tropical climate system is much reduced during the boreal spring, which is associated with the peak season of biomass burning activities and regional/long-range transport of dust aerosols. Therefore, to accurately assess the impact of absorbing aerosols on regional-to-global climate requires not only modeling efforts but also continuous observations from satellites, aircraft, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites the Earth Observing System - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, we have gradually developed and refined the SMART (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) and COMMIT (Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile observatories, a suite of surface remote sensing and in-situ instruments that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement the satellite observations. In this talk, we will present SMART-COMMIT which has played key roles, serving as network or supersite

  1. Accuracy of near-surface aerosol extinction determined from columnar aerosol optical depth measurements in Reno, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela; Arnott, W. Patrick; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present work is a detailed analysis of aerosol columnar optical depth as a tool to determine near-surface aerosol extinction in Reno, Nevada, USA, during the summer of 2012. Ground and columnar aerosol optical properties were obtained by use of in situ Photoacoustic and Integrated Nephelometer and Cimel CE-318 Sun photometer instruments, respectively. Both techniques showed that seasonal weather changes and fire plumes had enormous influence on local aerosol optics. The apparent optical height followed the shape but not magnitude of the development of the convective boundary layer when fire conditions were not present. Back trajectory analysis demonstrated that a local flow known as the Washoe Zephyr circulation often induced aerosol transport from Northern California over the Sierra Nevada Mountains that increased the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm during afternoons when compared with mornings. Aerosol fine mode fraction indicated that afternoon aerosols in June and July and fire plumes in August were dominated by submicron particles, suggesting upwind urban plume biogenically enhanced evolution toward substantial secondary aerosol formation. This fine particle optical depth was inferred to be beyond the surface, thereby complicating use of remote sensing measurements for near-ground aerosol extinction measurements. It is likely that coarse mode depletes fine mode aerosol near the surface by coagulation and condensation of precursor gases.

  2. Mass size distributions of elemental aerosols in industrial area

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Mona; Mohamed, Amer; Ahmed, Abdel-Rahman; Nazmy, Hyam

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor aerosol particles were characterized in industrial area of Samalut city (El-minia/Egypt) using low pressure Berner cascade impactor as an aerosol sampler. The impactor operates at 1.7 m3/h flow rate. Seven elements were investigated including Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu, Mn and Pb using atomic absorption technique. The mean mass concentrations of the elements ranged from 0.42 ng/m3 (for Ba) to 89.62 ng/m3 (for Fe). The mass size distributions of the investigated elements were bi-modal log normal distribution corresponding to the accumulation and coarse modes. The enrichment factors of elements indicate that Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu and Mn are mainly emitted into the atmosphere from soil sources while Pb is mostly due to anthropogenic sources. PMID:26644919

  3. Radiative Properties of Smoke and Aerosol Over Land Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    This talk discusses smoke and aerosol's radiative properties with particular attention to distinguishing the measurement over clear sky from clouds over land, sea, snow, etc. surfaces, using MODIS Airborne Simulator data from (Brazil, arctic sea ice and tundra and southern Africa, west Africa, and other ecosystems. This talk also discusses the surface bidirectional reflectance using Cloud Absorption Radiometer, BRDF measurements of Saudi Arabian desert, Persian Gulf, cerrado and rain forests in Brazil, sea ice, tundra, Atlantic Ocean, Great Dismal Swamp, Kuwait oil fire smoke. Recent upgrades to instrument (new TOMS UVA channels at 340 and 380 planned use in Africa (SAFARI 2000) and possibly for MEIDEX will also be discussed. This talk also plans to discuss the spectral variation of surface reflectance over land and the sensitivity of off-nadir view angles to correlation between visible near-infrared reflectance for use in remote sensing of aerosol over land.

  4. Multi-Decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and their Effects on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007) during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations) ground-based measurements) and intensive field experiments have become available. We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends and their relationship to the changes of aerosol and precursor emissions and assess the role aerosols play in the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening") at different regions of the world) including the major anthropogenic source regions (North America) Europe) Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions) dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variabilities) downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area) and remote regions that are considered to representing "backgroundH conditions.

  5. Can satellite-derived aerosol optical depth quantify the surface aerosol radiative forcing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Ceamanos, Xavier; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Carrer, Dominique; Xue, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the climate of the Earth through aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Nowadays, aerosol particles are detected, quantified and monitored by remote sensing techniques using low Earth orbit (LEO) and geostationary (GEO) satellites. In the present article, the use of satellite-derived AOD (aerosol optical depth) products is investigated in order to quantify on a daily basis the ARF at the surface level (SARF). By daily basis we mean that an average SARF value is computed every day based upon the available AOD satellite measurements for each station. In the first part of the study, the performance of four state-of-art different AOD products (MODIS-DT, MODIS-DB, MISR, and SEVIRI) is assessed through comparison against ground-based AOD measurements from 24 AERONET stations located in Europe and Africa during a 6-month period. While all AOD products are found to be comparable in terms of measured value (RMSE of 0.1 for low and average AOD values), a higher number of AOD estimates is made available by GEO satellites due to their enhanced frequency of scan. Experiments show a general lower agreement of AOD estimates over the African sites (RMSE of 0.2), which show the highest aerosol concentrations along with the occurrence of dust aerosols, coarse particles, and bright surfaces. In the second part of this study, the lessons learned about the confidence in aerosol burden derived from satellites are used to estimate SARF under clear sky conditions. While the use of AOD products issued from GEO observations like SEVIRI brings improvement in the SARF estimates with regard to LEO-based AOD products, the resulting absolute bias (13 W/m2 in average when AERONET AOD is used as reference) is judged to be still high in comparison with the average values of SARF found in this study (from - 25 W/m2 to - 43 W/m2) and also in the literature (from - 10 W/m2 to - 47 W/m2).

  6. A modified MODIS dark-target aerosol retrieval over urban areas: Evaluation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Gupta, P.; Mattoo, S.

    2015-12-01

    With amplified urbanization and industrialization during the last few decades, now more than half of the world's population lives in urban areas. With surface particle matter (PM) concentration five or ten times higher than World Health Organization guidelines in some cities, it is very critical to accurately monitor PM air quality for global cities on a daily basis. The new version (C6) of MODIS Dark Target Land Aerosol Algorithm (MDT) provides near-daily aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals at 10km2 and 3km2 spatial resolutions, which can be used to estimate surface PM. However, initial validation efforts showed that MDT overestimates AOD over urban areas, primarily because the bright and complex urban surface does not meet MDT assumptions. We combined the MODIS Land Classification Product (MCD12Q1) with MODIS land surface spectral reflectance product (MOD09A1) to develop new surface characterization scheme to be used within the MDT algorithm framework. We applied the new surface characterization to the MDT algorithm, and compared the retrieved AOD with AOD observed from the ground-based AERONET's DRAGON network operated during four DISCOVER-AQ field campaigns. AOD retrievals both in 10km and 3km spatial resolution show significant improvement over urban areas over the U.S. The bias in AOD reduced to -0.01 from 0.07, percentage of retrievals within uncertainty window increased to 85% from 62%. We will also present air quality assessment and implication of air quality monitoring in cities using revised MODIS aerosol retrievals.

  7. Extraction of Aerosol-Deposited Yersinia pestis from Indoor Surfaces To Determine Bacterial Environmental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Ryan A.; Yeager, John J.; Leroux, Brian; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Dabisch, Paul

    2016-01-01

    utilized large liquid droplet deposition to provide persistence data. As a result, methods were developed to deposit aerosols containing bacteria onto indoor surfaces, reproducibly enumerate bacteria harvested from coupons, and determine surface decay utilizing Y. pestis. The results of this study provide foundational methods required to evaluate surface decay of bacteria and potentially other biological agents, such as viruses, in aerosol particles as a function of surface type and environment. Integrating the data from both aerosol and liquid deposition surface decay studies will provide medical and public health personnel with a more complete understanding of agent persistence on surfaces in contaminated areas for assessment of health risks and to inform decontamination decisions. PMID:26944839

  8. Evaluation of the Aerosol Type Effect on the Surface Reflectance Retrieval Using Chris/proba Images Over Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirelli, C.; Manzo, C.; Curci, G.; Bassani, C.

    2015-04-01

    Surface reflectance has a central role in the analysis of land surface for a broad variety of agricultural, geological and urban studies. An accurate atmospheric correction, obtained by an appropriate selection of aerosol type and loading, is the first requirement for a reliable surface reflectance estimation. The aerosol type is defined by its micro-physical properties, while the aerosol loading is described by optical thickness at 550 nm. The aim of this work is to evaluate the radiative impact of the aerosol model on the surface reflectance obtained from CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) hyperspectral data over land by using the specifically developed algorithm CHRIS@CRI (CHRIS Atmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) based on the 6SV radiative transfer model. Five different aerosol models have been used: one provided by the AERONET inversion products (used as reference), three standard aerosol models in 6SV, and one obtained from the output of the GEOS-Chem global chemistry-transport model (CTM). As test case the urban site of Bruxelles and the suburban area of Rome Tor Vergata have been considered. The results obtained encourages the use of CTM in operational retrieval and provides an evaluation of the role of the aerosol model in the atmospheric correction process, considering the different microphysical properties impact.

  9. New aerosol particles formation in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, Angel; Andrade, Maria de Fatima; Ynoue, Rita

    2016-04-01

    The Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), in the southeast region of Brazil, is considered a megalopolis comprised of Sao Paulo city and more 38 municipalities. The air pollutant emissions in the SPMA are related to the burning of the fuels: etanol, gasohol (gasoline with 25% ethanol) and diesel. According to CETESB (2013), the road vehicles contributed up to about 97, 87, and 80% of CO, VOCs and NOx emissions in 2012, respectively, being most of NOx associated to diesel combustion and most of CO and VOCs from gasohol and ethanol combustion. Studies conducted on ambient air pollution in the SPMA have shown that black carbon (BC) explains 21% of mass concentration of PM2.5 compared with 40% of organic carbon (OC), 20% of sulfates, and 12% of soil dust (Andrade et al., 2012). Most of the observed ambient PM2.5 mass concentration usually originates from precursors gases such as sulphur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and VOCs as well as through the physico-chemical processes such as the oxidation of low volatile hydrocarbons transferring to the condensed phase (McMurry et al., 2004). The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model (WRF-Chem; Grell et al. 2005), configured with three nested grid cells: 75, 15, and 3 km, is used as photochemical modeling to describe the physico-chemical processes leading to evolution of particles number and mass size distribution from a vehicular emission model developed by the IAG-USP laboratory of Atmospheric Processes and based on statistical information of vehicular activity. The spatial and temporal distributions of emissions in the finest grid cell are based on road density products compiled by the OpenStreetMap project and measurements performed inside tunnels in the SPMA, respectively. WRF-Chem simulation with coupled primary aerosol (dust and sea-salt) and biogenic emission modules and aerosol radiative effects turned on is conducted as the baseline simulation (Case_0) to evaluate the model

  10. Putative cryomagma interaction with aerosols deposit at Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Patrice; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Raulin, Francois; Coscia, David; Ramirez, Sandra I.; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Poch, Olivier; Cabane, Michel; Brassé, Coralie

    The largest moon of Saturn, Titan, is known for its dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The organic aerosols which are produced in Titan’s atmosphere are of great astrobiological interest, particularly because of their potential evolution when they reach the surface and may interact with putative ammonia-water cryomagma [1]. In this context we have followed the evolution of alkaline pH hydrolysis (25wt% ammonia-water) of Titan aerosol analogues, that have been qualified as representative of Titan’s aerosols [2]. Indeed the first results obtained by the ACP experiment onboard Huygens probe revealed that the main products obtained after thermolysis of Titan’s collected aerosols, were ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Then performing a direct comparison of the volatiles produced after a thermal treatment done in conditions similar to the ones used by the ACP experiment, we may estimate that the tholins we used are relevant to chemical analogues of Titan’s aerosols, and to note free of oxygen. Taking into account recent studies proposing that the subsurface ocean may contain a lower fraction of ammonia (about 5wt% or less [3]), and assuming the presence of specific gas species [4, 5], in particular CO2 and H2S, trapped in likely internal ocean, we determine a new probable composition of the cryomagma which could potentially interact with deposited Titan’s aerosols. We then carried out different hydrolyses, taking into account this composition, and we established the influence of the hydrolysis temperature on the organic molecules production. References: [1] Mitri et al., 2008. Resurfacing of Titan by ammonia-water cryomagma. Icarus. 196, 216-224. [2] Coll et al. 2013, Can laboratory tholins mimic the chemistry producing Titan's aerosols? A review in light of ACP experimental results, Planetary and Space Science 77, 91-103. [3] Tobie et al. 2012. Titan’s Bulk Composition Constrained by Cassini-Huygens: implication for internal outgassing. The

  11. Fusion of SeaWiFS and TOMS satellite data with surface observations and topographic data during extreme aerosol events.

    PubMed

    Falke, S R; Husar, R B; Schichtel, B A

    2001-11-01

    Spaceborne sensors allow near-continuous aerosol monitoring throughout the world. This paper illustrates the fusion of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and TOMS satellite data with surface observations and topographic data during four extreme aerosol events: (1) the April 1998 Asian dust storm that impacted the west coast of North America, (2) the May 1998 Central American forest fire smoke that impacted eastern North America, (3) the intense fall 1999 northern California fires, and (4) the massive February 2000 Sahara dust storm. During these dust and smoke events, the aerosol was visualized on true color SeaWiFS images as a distinct yellowish dye, the result of the aerosol increasing the reflectance of darker surfaces (ocean and land) and decreasing the reflectance of clouds. TOMS imagery also indicated increased aerosol absorption in the affected areas, while surface monitors measured major reductions in visual range. Fusing these data aids in the determination of the aerosol's spatial, temporal, and optical properties and provides supporting evidence for characterizing what is being visualized as dust or smoke. A 3-dimensional perspective of the events is obtained when incorporating topographic data and provides insight into the vertical properties of the aerosol plumes.

  12. An example in surface area.

    PubMed

    Goffman, C

    1969-05-01

    For length and area, a central fact is that the value of the length of a curve or the area of a surface, as given by the Lebesgue theory, is at least as great as that given by the classical formula, whenever the latter has meaning. This is now found not to be valid in higher dimensions. We give an example of a continuous mapping of the unit cube into itself for which the value given by the formula exceeds the three-dimensional Lebesgue area of the corresponding suface.

  13. Surface biofunctionalization and production of miniaturized sensor structures using aerosol printing technologies.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Ingo; Groth, Esther; Wirth, Ingo; Schumacher, Julian; Maiwald, Marcus; Zoellmer, Volker; Busse, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    The work described in this paper demonstrates that very small protein and DNA structures can be applied to various substrates without denaturation using aerosol printing technology. This technology allows high-resolution deposition of various nanoscaled metal and biological suspensions. Before printing, metal and biological suspensions were formulated and then nebulized to form an aerosol which is aerodynamically focused on the printing module of the system in order to achieve precise structuring of the nanoscale material on a substrate. In this way, it is possible to focus the aerosol stream at a distance of about 5 mm from the printhead to the surface. This technology is useful for printing fluorescence-marked proteins and printing enzymes without affecting their biological activity. Furthermore, higher molecular weight DNA can be printed without shearing. The advantages, such as printing on complex, non-planar 3D structured surfaces, and disadvantages of the aerosol printing technology are also discussed and are compared with other printing technologies. In addition, miniaturized sensor structures with line thicknesses in the range of a few micrometers are fabricated by applying a silver sensor structure to glass. After sintering using an integrated laser or in an oven process, electrical conductivity is achieved within the sensor structure. Finally, we printed BSA in small micrometre-sized areas within the sensor structure using the same deposition system. The aerosol printing technology combined with material development offers great advantages for future-oriented applications involving biological surface functionalization on small areas. This is important for innovative biomedical micro-device development and for production solutions which bridge the disciplines of biology and electronics. PMID:20811121

  14. Aerosol model development for environmental monitoring in the coastal atmosphere surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, Gennady A.; Matvienko, Gennady G.

    2007-06-01

    Extinction of radiation in the marine boundary layer is dominated by scattering and absorption due to atmospheric aerosol. It is known, that the extinction of optical radiation visible and near IR spectra in the marine surface layer is determined mainly by scattering and absorption atmospheric aerosol. It influences on a dependence of spectral transmission and extinction both natural, and artificial light that is of interest for a wide range of problems, in particular for radiating problems at studying laws of climate formation, and for lines of the applications connected to the forecast of a signal power in coastal conditions at an estimation of EO systems characteristics. This is important to optical retrievals from satellite, remote sensing at environmental monitoring, backscatter of light to space (including climate forcing), cloud properties etc. In unpolluted regions the greatest effects on near shore scattering extinction will be a result of sea-salt from breaking waves and variations in relative humidity. The role of breaking waves appears to be modulated by wind, tide, swell, wave spectra and coastal conditions. These influences will be superimposed upon aerosol generated by open ocean sea-salt aerosol that varies with wind speed. The focus of our study is the extinction and optical effects due to aerosol in a specific coastal region. This involves linking coastal physical properties to oceanic and meteorological parameters in order to develop predictive algorithms that describe 3-D aerosol structure and variability. The aerosol microphysical model of the marine and coastal atmosphere surface layer is considered. The model distinctive feature is parameterization of amplitude and width of the modes as functions of fetch and wind speed. In the paper the dN/dr behavior depending at change meteorological parameters, heights above sea level, fetch, wind speed and RH is show. On the basis of the developed model with usage of Mie theory for spheres the

  15. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer, CAR, and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 μm) and angular range (180°) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  16. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  17. Dust, Pollution, and Biomass Burning Aerosols in Asian Pacific: A Column Surface/Satellite Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many recent field experiments are designed to study the compelling variability in spatial and temporal scale of both pollution-derived and naturally occurring aerosols, which often exist in high concentrations over eastern/southeastern Asia and along the rim of the western Pacific. For example, the phase-I of ACE-Asia was conducted from March-May 2001 in the vicinity of the Gobi desert, East Coast of China, Yellow Sea, Korea, and Japan, along the pathway of Kosa (severe events that blanket East Asia with yellow desert dust, peaked in the Spring season). Asian dust typically originates in desert areas far from polluted urban regions. During transport, dust layers can interact with anthropogenic sulfate and soot aerosols from heavily polluted urban areas. Springtime is also the peak season for biomass burning in southeastern Asia. Added to the complex effects of clouds and natural marine aerosols, dust particles reaching the marine environment can have drastically different properties than those from the source. Thus, understanding the unique temporal and spatial variations of Asian aerosols is of special importance in regional-to-global climate issues such as radiative forcing, the hydrological cycle, and primary biological productivity in the mid-Pacific Ocean. During ACE-Asia we have measured continuously aerosol physical/optical/radiative properties, column precipitable water amount, and surface reflectivity over homogeneous areas from surface. The inclusion of flux measurements permits the determination of aerosol radiative flux in addition to measurements of loading and optical depth. At the time of the Terra/MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor), TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and other satellite overpasses, these ground-based observations can provide valuable data to compare with satellite retrievals over land. A column satellite-surface perspective of Asian aerosols will be presented

  18. Multi-decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and their Effect on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diel, Thomas; Streets, David; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Tan, Qian; Bian, Huisheng; Wang. Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model GOCART along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007 during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. Particularly: (1) We compare the model calculated clear sky downward radiation at the surface with surface network data from Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and CMA (2) We compare the model and surface data with satellite derived downward radiation products from ISCCP and SRB (3) We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends in major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions during the three decades, dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variability, downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area, and remote regions that are considered to representing "background" conditions.

  19. Multi-Decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and Their Effect on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Tan, Qian; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Bian, Huisheng; Wang, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007, during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations and ground-based remote sensing and in-situ measurements have become available. We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol optical depth and concentration trends and their relationship to the changes of emissions" and assess the role aerosols play in the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening") at different regions of the world, including the major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions, dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variabilities, downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area, and remote regions that are considered to representing "background" conditions.

  20. Bias Correction of high resolution MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth in urban areas using the Dragon AERONET Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakar, N. K.; Atia, A.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S. A.; Lary, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is widely used parameter used to quantify aerosol abundance. Satellite retrievals of aerosols over land is fundamentally more complex than aerosol retrieval over oceans. Due to wide coverage and the extensive validation the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), on board the Terra and Aqua satellites is the workhorse instrument used to retrieve AOD from space. However, satellite algorithms of AOD are extremely complex and depends strongly on sun/view geometry, spectral surface albedo, aerosol model assumptions and surface heterogeneity. This issue becomes even more severe when considering the new MODIS 3 km aerosol retrieval products within version 6. To assess satellite retrievals of these high resolution 3 km products, we use the summer 2011 Dragon AERONET data to assess accuracy as well as major retrieval bias that can occur in MODIS measurements. In this study, we explore in detail the factors that can drive these biases statistically. As discussed above, our considers multiple conditions such as surface reflectivity at various wavelengths, solar and sensor zenith angles, the solar and sensor azimuth, scattering angles as well as meteorological factors and aerosol type (angstrom coefficient) etc which are used inputs are used to train neural network in regression mode to compensate for biases against the Dragon AERONET AOD values. In particular, we confirm the results of previous studies where the land cover (urban fraction) appears to be a strong factor in AOD bias and develop a NN estimator which includes land cover directly. The algorithm will be tested not only in the Baltimore/Washington area but assessed in the general North East US where urban biases in the NYC area have been previously identified.

  1. Multi-Decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and their Effect on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Streets, David; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Tan, Qian; Bian, Huisheng; Wang, Weiguo

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model, GOCART, along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007 during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. Particularly: (1) We compare the model calculated clear sky downward radiation at the surface with surface network data from BSRN and CMA (2) We compare the model and surface data with satellite derived downward radiation products from ISCCP and SRS (3) We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends in major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions during the three decades, dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variability, downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area, and remote regions that are considered to representing "background" conditions. The comparisons and methods from this study can be applied to multiple model analysis in the AeroCom framework.

  2. A new method for estimating aerosol mass flux in the urban surface layer using LAS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Renmin; Luo, Tao; Sun, Jianning; Liu, Hao; Fu, Yunfei; Wang, Zhien

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol greatly influences human health and the natural environment, as well as the weather and climate system. Therefore, atmospheric aerosol has attracted significant attention from society. Despite consistent research efforts, there are still uncertainties in understanding its effects due to poor knowledge about aerosol vertical transport caused by the limited measurement capabilities of aerosol mass vertical transport flux. In this paper, a new method for measuring atmospheric aerosol vertical transport flux is developed based on the similarity theory of surface layer, the theory of light propagation in a turbulent atmosphere, and the observations and studies of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index (AERI). The results show that aerosol mass flux can be linked to the real and imaginary parts of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index structure parameter (AERISP) and the ratio of aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI. The real and imaginary parts of the AERISP can be measured based on the light-propagation theory. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI can be measured based on the measurements of aerosol mass concentration and visibility. The observational results show that aerosol vertical transport flux varies diurnally and is related to the aerosol spatial distribution. The maximum aerosol flux during the experimental period in Hefei City was 0.017 mg m-2 s-1, and the mean value was 0.004 mg m-2 s-1. The new method offers an effective way to study aerosol vertical transport in complex environments.

  3. Retrieval of Aerosol Microphysical Properties Using Surface MultiFilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Data: Modeling and Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2005-05-06

    Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs) are widely deployed over the world. These radiometers measure the total, direct, and diffuse components of shortwave, narrowband irradiance at 6 wavelengths. For 5 of these wavelengths, aerosol optical depths and single scattering albedos can be retrieved. We describe here a simple retrieval technique that can significantly extend the capability of the MFRSR to study atmospheric aerosols and can provide a means for simultaneous retrieval of the aerosol size distribution (for an assumed shape) and the imaginary refractive index. This technique is based on measurements of the direct irradiances at two wavelengths (0.415 μm and 0.870 μm) and the diffuse irradiance at 0.415 μm. Our technique requires assumptions regarding the shape of the aerosol size distribution, and the real part of the refractive index, as well as an estimate of the surface albedo at 0.415 μm. Given plausible values of these quantities, sensitivity tests show that successful retrievals of aerosol characteristics can be achieved. The technique has been applied to derive time series of aerosol microphysical properties from MFRSR measurements taken during a single day, April 27, 2003, of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field campaign. Additionally, MFRSR-derived aerosol properties are in good agreement with AERONET retrievals made also in Mexico City.

  4. Radiative Forcing at the Surface by Clouds, Aerosols, and Water Vapor Over Tropical Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, E.; Minnett, P.; Szczodrak, G.; Caniaux, G.; Voss, K.; Bourras, D.

    2007-12-01

    Data from recent campaigns conducted in the tropical Atlantic and Indian Oceans provide thorough testbeds for determining the contribution of clouds, aerosols, and water vapor to surface radiative forcing, with particular focus on areas of extreme SST gradients. Oceanographic cruises conducted during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis included sampling monsoon onset in the Gulf of Guinea, which was characterized nearshore by rain and haze, the latter being a combination of water vapor and continental and pollution aerosols. Offshore and nearer to the equatorial cold tongue, the ITCZ was the dominant northern hemisphere cloud feature, while drier, cooler air masses existed south of the equator. The R/V Ronald H. Brown, operating a north-south transect along 23 W, encountered both atmospheric tropical wave conditions as well as dry Saharan Air Layers. In the Indian Ocean, the N/O Le Suroit occupied a point station near a positive SST anomaly to observe the onset of convection associated with the MJO and strong diurnal warming signatures. Combining radiative and turbulent flux data with measured and modeled profiles of the marine and atmospheric boundary layer, the evolution and interaction of the total air-sea column is observed. Particular emphasis is placed on the radiative forcing of clouds, aerosols, and water vapor on the sea surface skin temperature, towards the improvement of current diurnal warming models, which simplify atmospheric radiative effects into a general cloud parameter.

  5. Concentrations and composition of aerosols and particulate matter in surface waters along the transatlantic section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Novigatsky, A. N.; Redzhepova, Z. U.; Dara, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Along the transatlantic section from Ushuaia to Gdańsk (March 26-May 7, 2015; cruise 47 of R/V Akademik Ioffe), data were obtained on the concentrations of aerosols in the near-water layer of the atmosphere and of particulate matter in surface waters, as well as of organic compounds within the considered matter (Corg, chlorophyll a, lipids, and hydrocarbons). The concentrations of aerosols amounted to 1237-111 739 particles/L for the fraction of 0.3-1 μm and to 0.02-34.4 μg/m2/day for the matter collected by means of the network procedure. The distribution of aerosols is affected by circumcontinental zoning and by the fluxes from arid areas of African deserts. The maximum concentration of the treated compounds were found in the river-sea frontal area (the runoff of the Colorado River, Argentina), as well as when nearing the coasts, especially in the English Channel.

  6. Distinct impact of different types of aerosols on surface solar radiation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhou, Lijing; Wang, Yang; Liu, Xiaohong

    2016-06-01

    Observations of surface direct solar radiation (DSR) and visibility, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5), together with the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) taken from Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, were investigated to gain insight into the impact of aerosol pollution on surface solar radiation in China. The surface DSR decreased during 2004-2014 compared with 1993~2003 over eastern China, but no clear reduction was observed in remote regions with cleaner air. Significant correlations of visibility, PM2.5, and regionally averaged AOT with the surface DSR over eastern China indicate that aerosol pollution greatly affects the energy available at the surface. The net loss of surface solar radiation also reduces the surface ground temperature over eastern China. However, the slope of the linear variation of the radiation with respect to atmospheric visibility is distinctly different at different stations, implying that the main aerosol type varies regionally. The largest slope value occurs at Zhengzhou and indicates that the aerosol absorption in central China is the highest, and lower slope values suggest relatively weakly absorbing types of aerosols at other locations. The spatial distribution of the linear slopes agrees well with the geographical distribution of the absorbing aerosols derived from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations and Ozone Monitoring Instrument over China. The regional correlation between a larger slope value and higher absorbance properties of aerosols indicates that the net effects of aerosols on the surface solar energy and corresponding climatic effects are dependent on both aerosol amount and optical properties.

  7. Aerosol effects on global land surface energy fluxes during 2003-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoqing; Chen, Min; Zhuang, Qianlai

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols affect downward solar radiation, impacting the terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics and energy budget. Here we apply a coupled modeling framework of a terrestrial ecosystem model and an atmospheric radiative transfer model to evaluate aerosol direct radiative effects on the surface heat fluxes of global terrestrial ecosystems during 2003-2010. We find that aerosol loadings decrease the mean latent heat flux by 2.4 Wm-2 (or evapotranspiration by 28 mm) and sensible heat flux by 16 Wm-2. As a result, global mean soil moisture and water evaporative fraction have increased by 0.5% and 4%, respectively. Spatially, aerosol effects are significant in tropical forests and temperate broadleaf evergreen forests. This study is among the first quantifications of aerosols' effects on the heat fluxes of the global terrestrial ecosystems. The study further suggests that both direct and indirect aerosol radiative effects through aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered to quantify the energy budget of the global terrestrial ecosystems.

  8. Aerosol radiative effects on the meteorology and distribution of pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during MCMA-2006/MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guohui; Bei, Naifang; Molina, Luisa

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols scatter or absorb incoming solar radiation, perturb the temperature structure of the atmosphere, and impact meteorological fields and further the distribution of gas phase species and aerosols. In the present study, the aerosol radiative effects on the meteorology and photochemistry in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) are investigated using the WRF-CHEM model during the period from March 24th to 29th associated with the MILAGRO-2006 campaign. Aerosols decrease incoming solar radiation by up to 20% and reduce the surface temperature by up to 0.5 °C due to scattering and absorbing the incoming solar radiation in Mexico City. The absorption of black carbon aerosols can also enhance slightly the temperature in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Generally, the change of the PBL height in the city is less than 200 m during daytime due to the aerosol-induced perturbation of temperature profile. Wind fields are also adjusted with the variation of temperatures, but all the aerosol-induced meteorological changes cannot significantly influence the distribution of pollutants in the city. In addition, when convective events occur in the city, the aerosol radiative effects reduce the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the convective precipitation is generally decreased. Further studies still need to be performed to evaluate the aerosol indirect effect on precipitation in Mexico City.

  9. Are atmospheric aerosols able to modify the surface winds? A sensitivity study of the biomass burning aerosols impact on the spatially-distributed wind over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baró, Rocío; Lorente-Plazas, Raquel; Jerez, Sonia; Montávez, Juan Pedro; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect the Earth's climate through their radiative effects, being one of the most uncertain areas in climate modelling. Aerosols are widely known to affect radiation, temperature, stability, clouds and precipitation through their radiative effects, which depend mainly on the aerosol optical properties. These can be divided into direct and semi-direct effect, produced by the scattering and absorption of radiation; and indirect effect, which influences the aerosols-cloud interactions. In this sense, wind fields affect aerosols levels by several different processes, finally resulting in a wind-dependent emission over land or ocean. Moreover they can disperse the particles leading to a cleaner atmosphere. But, how do aerosol particles affect the wind? Scientific literature about their effects on wind is scarce. In this sense, the objective of this work is to assess the effects of biomass burning aerosols on spatially-distributed winds over Europe. The methodology carried out consists of three WRF-Chem simulations for Europe during the Russian fires (25 July to 15 August 2010) differing in the inclusion (or not) of aerosol direct and direct+indirect radiative feedbacks. These simulations have been carried out under the umbrella of the EuMetChem COST ES1004 Action. A Euro-CORDEX compliant domain at 0.22° and 23 km resolution has been used. The first simulation does not take into account any aerosol feedbacks (NFB), the second simulation differs from the base case by the inclusion of direct effect (DFB); while the third includes the direct+indirect radiative feedbacks (TFB). Results depict that the presence of aerosol reduces the wind module over Russian. Aerosol radiative effects imply a decrease of the shortwave downwelling radiation at the bottom of the atmosphere (with maximum values of 50 W m-2 over Russia). As a consequence there is a reduction on the temperature at 2 m up to 1 K. The decrease of the temperature reduces the convective processes

  10. Intensification of North American Megadroughts through Surface and Dust Aerosol Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Seager, Richard; Miller, Ron L.; Mason, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Tree-ring-based reconstructions of the Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) indicate that, during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), the central plains of North America experienced recurrent periods of drought spanning decades or longer. These megadroughts had exceptional persistence compared to more recent events, but the causes remain uncertain. The authors conducted a suite of general circulation model experiments to test the impact of sea surface temperature (SST) and land surface forcing on the MCA megadroughts over the central plains. The land surface forcing is represented as a set of dune mobilization boundary conditions, derived from available geomorphological evidence and modeled as increased bare soil area and a dust aerosol source (32deg-44degN, 105deg-95degW). In the experiments, cold tropical Pacific SST forcing suppresses precipitation over the central plains but cannot reproduce the overall drying or persistence seen in the PDSI reconstruction. Droughts in the scenario with dust aerosols, however, are amplified and have significantly longer persistence than in other model experiments, more closely matching the reconstructed PDSI. This additional drying occurs because the dust increases the shortwave planetary albedo, reducing energy inputs to the surface and boundary layer. The energy deficit increases atmospheric stability, inhibiting convection and reducing cloud cover and precipitation over the central plains. Results from this study provide the first model-based evidence that dust aerosol forcing and land surface changes could have contributed to the intensity and persistence of the central plains megadroughts, although uncertainties remain in the formulation of the boundary conditions and the future importance of these feedbacks.

  11. Observation of low single scattering albedo of aerosols in the downwind of the East Asian desert and urban areas during the inflow of dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Pradeep; Takamura, Tamio; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed data observed at Fukue-jima (32.752°N, 128.682°E), the downwind of the East Asian desert and urban areas, during the spring season (March-April) of 2008-2011 aiming to understand the light-absorption capacity of Asian dust aerosols, which is a topic of controversy. We observed the decreasing tendency of single-scattering albedo (SSA) with the decrease of Ångström exponent and the increase of the ratio of dust aerosol optical thickness to total aerosol optical thickness, suggesting the important role of coarse-mode dust aerosols on observed low SSAs. The observational data further indicated that the low SSAs during strong dust events were less likely due to the effect of only strong light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, such as black carbon (BC), indicating the association of aerosol size distribution on modulating SSA. Such observational results are justified by numerical calculations showing that aerosol size distribution can be the key factor on modulating SSA even without any change in relative amount of light-absorbing aerosol as well as total aerosol optical thickness. Therefore, the observed low SSAs in the downwind regions during dust events could be partially due to the dominance of coarse-mode aerosols over fine-mode aerosols, which are usual in dust events, along with the effect of mixed light-absorbing aerosols. The study further suggests that such effect of aerosol size distribution on SSA can be one of the important reasons for the low SSAs of dust aerosols in the source region as reported by some studies, if coarse-mode aerosols dominate fine-mode aerosols.

  12. Study on distribution of aerosol optical depth in Chongqing urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiqi; Liu, Can; Gao, Yanghua

    2015-12-01

    This paper selected 6S (second simulation of the satellite signal in the solar spectrum) model with dark pixel method to inversion aerosol optical depth by MODIS data, and got the spatial distribution and the temporal distribution of Chongqing urban area. By comparing with the sun photometer and API data, the result showed that the inversion method can be used in aerosol optical thickness monitoring in Chongqing urban area.

  13. Aerosol measurements at the Southern Great Plains Site: Design and surface installation

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer, R.; Knuth, R.H.; Guggenheim, S.F.; Albert, B.

    1996-04-01

    To impropve the predictive capabilities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program radiation models, measurements of awserosol size distributions, condensation particle concentrations, aerosol scattering coefficients at a number of wavelenghts, and the aerosol absorption coefficients are needed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Alos, continuous measurements of ozone concnetrations are needed for model validation. The environmental Measuremenr Laboratory (EMK) has the responsibility to establish the surface aerosol measurements program at the SGP site. EML has designed a special sampling manifold.

  14. Externally pressurized porous cylinder for multiple surface aerosol generation and method of generation

    DOEpatents

    Apel, Charles T.; Layman, Lawrence R.; Gallimore, David L.

    1988-01-01

    A nebulizer for generating aerosol having small droplet sizes and high efficiency at low sample introduction rates. The nebulizer has a cylindrical gas permeable active surface. A sleeve is disposed around the cylinder and gas is provided from the sleeve to the interior of the cylinder formed by the active surface. In operation, a liquid is provided to the inside of the gas permeable surface. The gas contacts the wetted surface and forms small bubbles which burst to form an aerosol. Those bubbles which are large are carried by momentum to another part of the cylinder where they are renebulized. This process continues until the entire sample is nebulized into aerosol sized droplets.

  15. Modelled and observed changes in aerosols and surface solar radiation over Europe between 1960 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnock, S. T.; Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Mann, G. W.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Forster, P. M.; Haywood, J.; Johnson, C. E.; Dalvi, M.; Bellouin, N.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.

    2015-08-01

    Substantial changes in anthropogenic aerosols and precursor gas emissions have occurred over recent decades due to the implementation of air pollution control legislation and economic growth. The response of atmospheric aerosols to these changes and the impact on climate are poorly constrained, particularly in studies using detailed aerosol chemistry-climate models. Here we compare the HadGEM3-UKCA (Hadley Centre Global Environment Model-United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols) coupled chemistry-climate model for the period 1960-2009 against extensive ground-based observations of sulfate aerosol mass (1978-2009), total suspended particle matter (SPM, 1978-1998), PM10 (1997-2009), aerosol optical depth (AOD, 2000-2009), aerosol size distributions (2008-2009) and surface solar radiation (SSR, 1960-2009) over Europe. The model underestimates observed sulfate aerosol mass (normalised mean bias factor (NMBF) = -0.4), SPM (NMBF = -0.9), PM10 (NMBF = -0.2), aerosol number concentrations (N30 NMBF = -0.85; N50 NMBF = -0.65; and N100 NMBF = -0.96) and AOD (NMBF = -0.01) but slightly overpredicts SSR (NMBF = 0.02). Trends in aerosol over the observational period are well simulated by the model, with observed (simulated) changes in sulfate of -68 % (-78 %), SPM of -42 % (-20 %), PM10 of -9 % (-8 %) and AOD of -11 % (-14 %). Discrepancies in the magnitude of simulated aerosol mass do not affect the ability of the model to reproduce the observed SSR trends. The positive change in observed European SSR (5 %) during 1990-2009 ("brightening") is better reproduced by the model when aerosol radiative effects (ARE) are included (3 %), compared to simulations where ARE are excluded (0.2 %). The simulated top-of-the-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing over Europe under all-sky conditions increased by > 3.0 W m-2 during the period 1970-2009 in response to changes in anthropogenic emissions and aerosol concentrations.

  16. Surface dimming by the 2013 Rim Fire simulated by a sectional aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Saide, Pablo E.; Da Silva, Arlindo; Ziemba, Luke D.; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Perring, Anne E.; Froyd, Karl D.; Wagner, N. L.; Mills, Michael J.; Reid, Jeffrey S.

    2016-06-01

    The Rim Fire of 2013, the third largest area burned by fire recorded in California history, is simulated by a climate model coupled with a size-resolved aerosol model. Modeled aerosol mass, number, and particle size distribution are within variability of data obtained from multiple-airborne in situ measurements. Simulations suggest that Rim Fire smoke may block 4-6% of sunlight energy reaching the surface, with a dimming efficiency around 120-150 W m-2 per unit aerosol optical depth in the midvisible at 13:00-15:00 local time. Underestimation of simulated smoke single scattering albedo at midvisible by 0.04 suggests that the model overestimates either the particle size or the absorption due to black carbon. This study shows that exceptional events like the 2013 Rim Fire can be simulated by a climate model with 1° resolution with overall good skill, although that resolution is still not sufficient to resolve the smoke peak near the source region.

  17. Improved aerosol retrieval algorithm using Landsat images and its application for PM10 monitoring over urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nana; Wong, Man Sing; Zhao, Wenji; Yan, Xing; Xiao, Fei

    2015-02-01

    Aerosol retrieval using MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been well researched over the past decade. However, the application is limited to global- and regional-scale studies, which may not be applicable for urban areas due to its low spatial resolution. To overcome the limitation, this paper proposed an improved aerosol retrieval algorithm for Landsat images (ImAero-Landsat) at spatial resolution of 30 m. This ImAero-Landsat algorithm has been improved in the following two aspects: (i) it does not require a comprehensive look up table and thus it is more efficient in AOT retrieval; and (ii) it can be operated in both bright and dark surfaces. The derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT) images were validated with AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) measurements as well as MODIS MOD04 AOT products. Small root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.11 and 0.14 and mean absolute difference (MAD) of 0.07 and 0.11 between ImAero-Landsat AOT, with MODIS MOD04 and AERONET products were observed. By correlating with ground based PM10 concentrations, the ImAero-Landsat method outperforms (r2 = 0.32) than MOD04 AOT products (r2 = 0.23). In addition, the accuracy of estimating PM10 can be improved to r2 = 0.55 when the derived AOT was integrated with meteorological parameters. The accuracy is similar to the results derived from AERONET AOT (r2 = 0.62). This study offers a simple and accurate method to investigate aerosol optical thickness at detailed city-scale. Environmental authorities may use the derived methods for deriving aerosol distribution maps and pinpointing the sources of pollutants in urban areas.

  18. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing using Satellite and Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Christopher, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    Over the industrial period, aerosols have increased due to human activities and their effects on climate are the largest source of uncertainty in the current IPCC estimates of global climate forcing due to human activities. Inhomogeneous distribution of aerosols in space and time poses a challenge in their characterization and requires global measurements to assess their effects and reduce the associated uncertainties. In this paper we use global measurements from both satellite and ground based observations for one year time period to estimate the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and discuss the associated uncertainties. For this, aerosol properties (optical depth) derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), a federation of ground-based remote sensing instruments, are used in this paper in conjunction with measurements of the TOA shortwave flux from CERES instrument (onboard Terra satellite). High spectral and spatial resolution observations from Imager (MODIS) will be used to identify clear sky conditions within CERES foot print and GOCART results will also be used for separating aerosol types. Global aerosol forcing and corresponding radiative forcing efficiencies will be presented as a function of major aerosol types [including anthropogenic (sulfate, soot, black carbon) and natural (dust) aerosols], region and season. This study should serve as a useful constraint for both numerical modeling simulations and satellite based estimates of SWARF.

  19. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Using Satellite and Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Christopher, S. A.

    2008-05-01

    Over the industrial period, aerosols have increased due to human activities and their effects on climate are the largest source of uncertainty in the current IPCC estimates of global climate forcing due to human activities. Inhomogeneous distribution of aerosols in space and time poses a challenge in characterizing their properties and requires global measurements to assess their effects and reduce the associated uncertainties. In this paper we use global measurements from both satellite and ground based observations for one year time period to estimate the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and discuss the associated uncertainties. For this, aerosol properties (optical depth) derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), a federation of ground-based remote sensing instruments, are used in this paper in conjunction with measurements of the TOA shortwave flux from CERES instrument (onboard Terra satellite). High spectral and spatial resolution observations from Imager (MODIS) is used to identify clear sky conditions within CERES foot print and GOCART results will also be used for separating aerosol types. Global aerosol forcing and corresponding radiative forcing efficiencies will be presented as a function of major aerosol types [including anthropogenic (sulfate, soot, black carbon) and natural (dust) aerosols], region and season. This study should serve as a useful constraint for both numerical modeling simulations and satellite based estimates of SWARF.

  20. Simultaneous Cartography of Aerosol Opacity and Surface Albedo of Titan by the Massive Inversion of the Cassini/VIMS Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Sotin, C.; Rannou, P.; Cornet, T.; Hirtzig, M.; Appéré, T.; Solomonidou, A.; Le Mouelic, S.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping Titan's surface albedo is a necessary step to give reliable constraints on its composition. However, surface albedo maps of Titan, especially over large regions, are still very rare, the surface windows being strongly affected by atmospheric effects (absorption, scattering). A full radiative transfer model is an essential tool to remove these effects, but too time-consuming to treat systematically the ~40000 hyperspectral images VIMS acquired since the beginning of the mission. We developed a massive inversion of VIMS data based on lookup tables computed from a state-of-the-art radiative transfer model (Hirtzig et al. 2013), updated with new aerosol properties coming from our analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation acquired recently by VIMS. Once the physical properties of gases, aerosols and surface are fixed, the lookup tables are built for the remaining free parameters: the incidence, emergence and azimuth angles, given by navigation; and two products (the aerosol opacity and the surface albedo at all wavelengths). The lookup table grid was carefully selected after thorough testing. The data inversion on these pre-computed spectra (opportunely interpolated) is more than 1000 times faster than recalling the full radiative transfer at each minimization step. We present here the results from selected flybys. We invert mosaics composed by couples of flybys observing the same area at two different times. The composite albedo maps do not show significant discontinuities in any of the surface windows, suggesting a robust correction of the effects of the geometry (and thus the aerosols) on the observations. Maps of aerosol and albedo uncertainties are also provided, with the absolute error on the albedo being approximately between 1 and 3% (depending on the surface window considered). We are thus able to provide for the first time ever reliable surface albedo maps at pixel scale for the whole VIMS spectral range.

  1. Competing Atmospheric and Surface-Driven Impacts of Absorbing Aerosols on the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persad, G.; Paynter, D.; Ming, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols, by attenuating shortwave radiation within the atmosphere and reemitting it as longwave radiation, redistribute energy both vertically within the surface-atmosphere column and horizontally between polluted and unpolluted regions. East Asia has the largest concentrations of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols globally, and these, along with the region's scattering aerosols, have both reduced the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface regionally ("solar dimming") and increased shortwave absorption within the atmosphere, particularly during the peak months of the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). We here analyze how atmospheric absorption and surface solar dimming compete in driving the response of EASM circulation to anthropogenic absorbing aerosols, which dominates, and why—issues of particular importance for predicting how the EASM will respond to projected changes in absorbing and scattering aerosol emissions in the future. We probe these questions in a state-of-the-art general circulation model (GCM) using a combination of realistic and idealized aerosol perturbations that allow us to analyze the relative influence of absorbing aerosols' atmospheric and surface-driven impacts on EASM circulation. In combination, our results make clear that, although absorption-driven dimming has a less detrimental effect on EASM circulation than purely scattering-driven dimming, aerosol absorption is still a net impairment to EASM strength when both its atmospheric and surface effects are considered. Because atmospheric heating is not efficiently conveyed to the surface, the surface dimming and associated cooling from even a pure absorber is sufficient to counteract its atmospheric heating, resulting in a net reduction in EASM strength. These findings elevate the current understanding of the impacts of aerosol absorption on the EASM, improving our ability to diagnose EASM responses to current and future regional changes in aerosol emissions.

  2. Infrared Aerosol Radiative Forcing at the Surface and the Top of the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2003-01-01

    We study the clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing at infrared wavelengths using data from the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) cruise of the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown. Limited number of data points is analyzed mostly from ship and collocated satellite values. An optical model is derived from chemical measurements, lidar profiles, and visible extinction measurements which is used to and estimate the infrared aerosol optical thickness and the single scattering albedo. The IR model results are compared to detailed Fourier Transform Interferometer based infrared aerosol forcing estimates, pyrgeometer based infrared downward fluxes, and against the direct solar forcing observations. This combined approach attests for the self-consistency of the optical model and allows to derive quantities such as the infrared forcing at the top of the atmosphere or the infrared optical thickness. The mean infrared aerosol optical thickness at 10 microns is 0.08 and the single scattering albedo is 0.55. The modeled infrared aerosol forcing reaches 10 W/sq m during the cruise, which is a significant contribution to the total direct aerosol forcing. The surface infrared aerosol radiative forcing is between 10 to 25% of the shortwave aerosol forcing. The infrared aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere can go up to 19% of the solar aerosol forcing. We show good agreement between satellite (CERES instrument) retrievals and model results at the top of the atmosphere. Over the Sea of Japan, the average infrared radiative forcing is 4.6 W/sq m in the window region at the surface and it is 1.5 W/sq m at top of the atmosphere. The top of the atmosphere IR forcing efficiency is a strong function of aerosol temperature while the surface IR forcing efficiency varies between 37 and 55 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit). and changes between 10 to 18 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit).

  3. Surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Quinn J.

    1991-08-01

    Absolute reflectance-based radiometric calibrations of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) are improved with the inclusion of a method to invert optical-depth measurements to obtain aerosol-particle size distributions, and a non-Lambertian surface reflectance model. The inverted size distributions can predict radiances varying from the previously assumed jungian distributions by as much as 5 percent, though the reduction in the estimated error is less than one percent. Comparison with measured diffuse-to-global ratios show that neither distribution consistently predicts the ratio accurately, and this is shown to be a large contributor to calibration uncertainties. An empirical model for the surface reflectance of White Sands, using a two-degree polynomial fit as a function of scattering angle, was employed. The model reduced estimated errors in radiance predictions by up to one percent. Satellite calibrations dating from October, 1984 were reprocessed using the improved methods and linear estimations of satellite counts per unit radiance versus time since launch were determined which showed a decrease over time for the first four bands.

  4. The impact of changing surface ocean conditions on the dissolution of aerosol iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishwick, Matthew P.; Sedwick, Peter N.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Worsfold, Paul J.; Buck, Kristen N.; Church, Thomas M.; Ussher, Simon J.

    2014-11-01

    The proportion of aerosol iron (Fe) that dissolves in seawater varies greatly and is dependent on aerosol composition and the physicochemical conditions of seawater, which may change depending on location or be altered by global environmental change. Aerosol and surface seawater samples were collected in the Sargasso Sea and used to investigate the impact of these changing conditions on aerosol Fe dissolution in seawater. Our data show that seawater temperature, pH, and oxygen concentration, within the range of current and projected future values, had no significant effect on the dissolution of aerosol Fe. However, the source and composition of aerosols had the most significant effect on the aerosol Fe solubility, with the most anthropogenically influenced samples having the highest fractional solubility (up to 3.2%). The impact of ocean warming and acidification on aerosol Fe dissolution is therefore unlikely to be as important as changes in land usage and fossil fuel combustion. Our experimental results also reveal important changes in the size distribution of soluble aerosol Fe in solution, depending on the chemical conditions of seawater. Under typical conditions, the majority (77-100%) of Fe released from aerosols into ambient seawater existed in the colloidal (0.02-0.4 µm) size fraction. However, in the presence of a sufficient concentration of strong Fe-binding organic ligands (10 nM) most of the aerosol-derived colloidal Fe was converted to soluble Fe (<0.02 µm). This finding highlights the potential importance of organic ligands in retaining aerosol Fe in a biologically available form in the surface ocean.

  5. Towards Improved MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over the US East Coast Region: Re-examining the Aerosol Model and Surface Assumptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Holben, B. N.

    2002-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra and recently the Aqua platform, produces a set of aerosol products over both ocean and land regions. Previous validation efforts have shown that from a global perspective, aerosol optical depth (AOD) is successfully retrieved from MODIS. Even over coastal regions, the over- land and over-ocean retrievals are consistent with each other, and well matched with ground-based sunphotometer measurements (such as AERONET). However, the East Coast of the United States is one region where there is consistently a discrepancy between land and ocean retrievals. Over the ocean, MODIS AODs are consistent with coastal sunphotometer measurements, but over land, AODs are consistently over- estimated. In this study we use field data from the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites experiment (CLAMS), (held during summer 2001) to determine the aerosol properties at a number of sites. Using the 6-S radiative transfer package, we compute simulated satellite radiances and compare them with observed MODIS radiances. We believe that the AOD over-estimation is not likely due to an incorrect choice of the urban/industrial aerosol models. Using 6-S to do an atmospheric correction for a very low AOD case, we show rather, that the discrepancies are likely a result of incorrect assumptions about the surface reflectance properties. Understanding and improving MODIS retrievals over the East Coast will not only improve the global quality of MODIS, but also would enable the use of MODIS as a tool for monitoring regional aerosol events.

  6. Multi-Decadal Variations of Atmospheric Aerosols and Their Effects on Surface Radiation Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Streets, David; Bian, Huisheng; Wang, Weiguo

    2010-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007, during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends and their relationship to the changes of aerosol and precursor emissions and assess the role aerosols play in the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening") at different regions of the world.

  7. Chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosol in urban areas with different anthropic impact.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattori, I.; Bellandi, S.; Innocenti, M.; Largiuni, O.; Lucarelli, F.; Mannini, A.; Udisti, R.

    2003-04-01

    Several sampling campaigns, in the last four years, were carried out in the Florence (Italy) city and surrounding areas in order to identify main aerosol contributions and their changes in time and in different meteorological conditions. The sampling sites were located in the city centre (60 m a.s.l.), in a suburban site (150 m a.s.l.) at the altitude of the usual thermal inversion level and in a hilly and woody site (750 m a.s.l.), as a reference for low anthropic inputs. To discriminate between primary sources, mainly related to the coarse fraction, and secondary contributions, dominant in the finest particles, the sampling was performed by a stacked filter unit holding two sequential polycarbonate membrane filters at different porosity (coarse fraction: 8 and 5 um; fine fraction: 1 and 0.45 um - depending on the campaigns). Each membrane filter was analysed for ionic components (by IC), soluble (at pH=2) fraction of selected heavy metals (by GFAAS) and their total content (by PIXE). For the different sites and different dimensional classes, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied in order to group components coming from common aerosol sources or transport processes. The typical anthropic components (sulphate, nitrate, carboxylic acid, heavy metals such as Pb, V, Cu) dominate the finest fraction collected in the city centre and their contribution decreases as distance and altitude increase. In the highest site, relatively far from direct vehicular emissions, natural contributions (sea spray, crustal and vegetation inputs) were enlightened by the PCA, in both size fractions. A comparison between total heavy metal content (measured by PIXE) and soluble (pH=2) fraction (by GFAAS) allowed evaluating the metal percentage more toxic for the environment. In the finest particles Pb, in spite of the Pb-gasoline reduction, constitutes the main component of the "soluble" metal fraction. Indeed, the Pb is mainly in soluble form (GFAAS/PIXE = 0.8). The effect of wind

  8. 2014 iAREA campaign on aerosol in Spitsbergen - Part 1: Study of physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisok, J.; Markowicz, K. M.; Ritter, C.; Makuch, P.; Petelski, T.; Chilinski, M.; Kaminski, J. W.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Rozwadowska, A.; Jefimow, M.; Markuszewski, P.; Neuber, R.; Pakszys, P.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Struzewska, J.; Zielinski, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties during iAREA2014 campaign that took place on Svalbard between 15th of Mar and 4th of May 2014. With respect to field area, the experiment consisted of two sites: Ny-Ålesund (78°55‧N, 11°56‧E) and Longyearbyen (78°13‧N, 15°33‧E) with further integration of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station in Hornsund (77°00‧N, 15°33‧E). The subject of this study is to investigate the in-situ, passive and active remote sensing observations as well as numerical simulations to describe the temporal variability of aerosol single-scattering properties during spring season on Spitsbergen. The retrieval of the data indicates several event days with enhanced single-scattering properties due to the existence of sulphate and additional sea-salt load in the atmosphere which is possibly caused by relatively high wind speed. Optical results were confirmed by numerical simulations made by the GEM-AQ model and by chemical observations that indicated up to 45% contribution of the sea-salt to a PM10 total aerosol mass concentration. An agreement between the in-situ optical and microphysical properties was found, namely: the positive correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient measured by the nephelometer and effective radius obtained from laser aerosol spectrometer as well as negative correlation between aerosol scattering coefficient and the Ångstrom exponent indicated that slightly larger particles dominated during special events. The in-situ surface observations do not show any significant enhancement of the absorption coefficient as well as the black carbon concentration which might occur during spring. All of extensive single-scattering properties indicate a diurnal cycle in Longyearbyen, where 21:00-5:00 data stays at the background level, however increasing during the day by the factor of 3-4. It is considered to be highly connected with local emissions originating

  9. The impact of atmospheric aerosols on trace metal chemistry in open ocean surface seawater. 2. Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Maring, H.B.; Duce, R.A. )

    1989-01-15

    Atmospheric deposition contributes copper to the surface ocean. The biogeochemical importance and fate of this copper is poorly understood for open ocean regions. Atmospheric aerosols collected at Enewetak Atoll, in the tropical North Pacific, were exposed to seawater and artificial rainwater in laboratory experiments. Aerosol copper during the high-dust season at Enewetak Atoll is made up of aluminosilicate, oceanic, and possibly soil organic matter components. During the low-dust season, marine aerosols collected at Enewetak is soluble in seawater. Dissolved organic matter and possibly cations in seawater increase the dissolution of aerosol copper. The net atmospheric flux of soluble copper to the tropical North Pacific surface waters as does upwelling to eastern North Pacific surface waters. Atmospheric copper deposition, which appears to be primarily of natural origin, may be the most important input of copper to the surface waters of the central gyre of the North Pacific.

  10. Surface tension depression by low-solubility organic material in aqueous aerosol mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, Allison; Mitroo, Dhruv; McNeill, V. Faye

    2012-07-01

    Surface-active material, including long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), comprises a significant fraction of organic aerosol mass. Surface-active species are thought to form a film at the gas-aerosol interface, with implications for aerosol heterogeneous chemistry and cloud formation. However, LCFA phase behavior and surface-bulk partitioning has not been characterized under most conditions typical of tropospheric aerosol water (i.e. acidic, high ionic content), making it challenging to predict surface film formation in aerosols. In this study, we present measurements of the surface tension of aqueous solutions containing the slightly soluble LCFAs oleic and stearic acid. The effect of varying pH, organic concentration, and inorganic salt content was tested for each system. We observe surface tension depression compared to water of up to ˜30 and 45% for aqueous solutions containing stearic or oleic acid at pH 0-8 and high inorganic salt concentrations (NaCl and (NH4)2SO4). This suggests that surface film formation is favorable for these species in atmospheric aerosols.

  11. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration based on aerosol type classification and near-surface AOD over Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwanchul; Noh, Youngmin; Lee, Kwon H.

    2016-04-01

    Surface-level PM distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of aerosol type classification and near-surface AOD over Jeju, Korea. For this purpose, data from various instruments such as satellites, sunphotometer, and Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL) was used during March 2008 and October 2009. Initial analyses of comparison with sunphotometer AOD and PM concentration showed some relatively poor relationship over Jeju, Korea. Since the AERONET L2 data has significant number of observations with high AOT values paired to low surface-level PM values, which were believed to be the effect of long-rage transport aerosols like as Asian dust and biomass burning. Stronger correlations (exceeding R = 0.8) were obtained by screening long-rage transport aerosols and calculating near-surface AOT considering aerosol profiles data from MPL and HYSPLIT air mass trajectory. The relationship found between corrected satellite observed AOD and surface-level PM concentration over Jeju is very similar. An approach to reduce the discrepancy between satellite observed AOD and PM concentration is demonstrated by tuning thresholds used to detect aerosol type from sunphotometer inversion data. Finally, the satellite observed AOD-surface PM concentration correlation is significantly improved. Our study clearly demonstrates that satellite observed AOD is a good surrogate for monitoring PM air quality over Korea.

  12. Modelled and observed changes in aerosols and surface solar radiation over Europe between 1960 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnock, S. T.; Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Mann, G. W.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Forster, P. M.; Haywood, J.; Johnson, C. E.; Dalvi, M.; Bellouin, N.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.

    2015-05-01

    Substantial changes in anthropogenic aerosols and precursor gas emissions have occurred over recent decades due to the implementation of air pollution control legislation and economic growth. The response of atmospheric aerosols to these changes and the impact on climate are poorly constrained, particularly in studies using detailed aerosol chemistry climate models. Here we compare the HadGEM3-UKCA coupled chemistry-climate model for the period 1960 to 2009 against extensive ground based observations of sulfate aerosol mass (1978-2009), total suspended particle matter (SPM, 1978-1998), PM10 (1997-2009), aerosol optical depth (AOD, 2000-2009) and surface solar radiation (SSR, 1960-2009) over Europe. The model underestimates observed sulfate aerosol mass (normalised mean bias factor (NMBF) = -0.4), SPM (NMBF = -0.9), PM10 (NMBF = -0.2) and aerosol optical depth (AOD, NMBF = -0.01) but slightly overpredicts SSR (NMBF = 0.02). Trends in aerosol over the observational period are well simulated by the model, with observed (simulated) changes in sulfate of -68% (-78%), SPM of -42% (-20%), PM10 of -9% (-8%) and AOD of -11% (-14%). Discrepancies in the magnitude of simulated aerosol mass do not affect the ability of the model to reproduce the observed SSR trends. The positive change in observed European SSR (5%) during 1990-2009 ("brightening") is better reproduced by the model when aerosol radiative effects (ARE) are included (3%), compared to simulations where ARE are excluded (0.2%). The simulated top-of-the-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing over Europe under all-sky conditions increased by 3 W m-2 during the period 1970-2009 in response to changes in anthropogenic emissions and aerosol concentrations.

  13. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  14. Aerosol Simulation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during MCMA2003 using CMAQ/Models3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bei, N.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; de Foy, B.; Molina, L.

    2007-12-01

    CMAQ/Models3 has been employed to simulate the aerosol distribution and variation during the period from 13 to 16 April 2003 over the Mexico City Metropolitan Area as part of MCMA-2003 campaign. The meteorological fields are simulated using MM5, with three one-way nested grids with horizontal resolutions of 36, 12 and 3 km and 23 sigma levels in the vertical. MM5 3DVAR system has also been incorporated into the meteorological simulations. Chemical initial and boundary conditions are interpolated from the MOZART output. The SAPRC emission inventory is developed based on the official emission inventory for MCMA in 2004. The simulated mass concentrations of different aerosol compositions, such as elemental carbon (EC), primary organic aerosol (POA), secondary organic aerosol (SOA), nitrate, ammonium, and sulfate have been compared to the measurements taken at the National Center for Environmental Research and Training (Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental, CENICA) super-site. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) are used as observations of POA and SOA, respectively in this study. The preliminary model results show that the temporal evolutions of EC and POA are reasonable compared with measurements. The peak time of EC and POA are basically reproduced, thus validating the emission inventory and its processing through CMAQ/Models3. But the magnitude of EC and POA are underestimated over the entire episode. The modeled nitrate and ammonium concentrations are overestimated on most of the days. There is 1-2 hour difference between the simulated peak time of nitrate and ammonium aerosols compared to observations at CENICA. The simulated mass concentrations of SOA and sulfate are significantly underestimated. The reasons of the discrepancy between simulations and measurements are due to the uncertainties existing in the emission inventory, meteorological fields, and as well as aerosol formation mechanism in the case

  15. Combination of spaceborne sensor(s) and 3-D aerosol models to assess global daily near-surface air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol Particulate Matter (PM), measured by ground-based monitoring stations, is used as a standard by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) to evaluate daily air quality. PM monitoring is particularly important for human health protection because the exposure to suspended particles can contribute, among others, to lung and respiratory diseases and even premature death. However, most of the PM monitoring stations are located close to cities, leaving large areas without any operational data. Satellite remote sensing is well suited for a global coverage of the aerosol load and can provide an independent and supplemental data source to in situ monitoring. Nevertheless, PM at the ground cannot easily be determined from satellite AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) without additional information on the optical/microphysical properties and vertical distribution of the aerosols. The objective of this study is to explore the efficacy and accuracy of combining a 3-D aerosol transport model and satellite remote sensing as a cost-effective approach for estimating ground-level PM on a global and daily basis. The estimation of the near-surface PM will use the vertical distribution (and, if possible, the physicochemical properties) of the aerosols inferred from a transport model and the measured total load of particles in the atmospheric column retrieved by satellite sensor(s). The first step is to select a chemical transport model (CTM) that provides “good” simulated aerosol vertical profiles. A few global (e.g., WRF-Chem-GOCART) or regional (e.g., MM5-CMAQ, PM-CAMx) CTM will be compared during selected airborne campaigns like ARCTAS-CARB (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites- California Air Resources Board). The next step will be to devise an algorithm that combines the satellite and model data to infer PM mass estimates at the ground, after evaluating different spaceborne instruments and possible multi-sensor combinations.

  16. Comprehensive tool for calculation of radiative fluxes: illustration of shortwave aerosol radiative effect sensitivities to the details in aerosol and underlying surface characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derimian, Yevgeny; Dubovik, Oleg; Huang, Xin; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Litvinov, Pavel; Kostinski, Alex B.; Dubuisson, Philippe; Ducos, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    The evaluation of aerosol radiative effect on broadband hemispherical solar flux is often performed using simplified spectral and directional scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosol and underlying surface reflectance. In this study we present a rigorous yet fast computational tool that accurately accounts for detailed variability of both spectral and angular scattering properties of aerosol and surface reflectance in calculation of direct aerosol radiative effect. The tool is developed as part of the GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) project. We use the tool to evaluate instantaneous and daily average radiative efficiencies (radiative effect per unit aerosol optical thickness) of several key atmospheric aerosol models over different surface types. We then examine the differences due to neglect of surface reflectance anisotropy, nonsphericity of aerosol particle shape and accounting only for aerosol angular scattering asymmetry instead of using full phase function. For example, it is shown that neglecting aerosol particle nonsphericity causes mainly overestimation of the aerosol cooling effect and that magnitude of this overestimate changes significantly as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA) if the asymmetry parameter is used instead of detailed phase function. It was also found that the nonspherical-spherical differences in the calculated aerosol radiative effect are not modified significantly if detailed BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) is used instead of Lambertian approximation of surface reflectance. Additionally, calculations show that usage of only angular scattering asymmetry, even for the case of spherical aerosols, modifies the dependence of instantaneous aerosol radiative effect on SZA. This effect can be canceled for daily average values, but only if sun reaches the zenith; otherwise a systematic bias remains. Since the daily average radiative effect is obtained by integration over a range

  17. Use of Remotely Sensed Aerosol Optical Depth in Particulate Matter Forecasting for Urban Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, S. L.; Crist, K.

    2011-12-01

    Cincinnati, a large metropolitan area in southwestern Ohio, has been listed as a non-attainment area based on the EPA 1997 PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5μm) standard with a number of unhealthy days reported annually for sensitive groups. AirNow provides air quality index for the city, but its accuracy largely depends on the air quality forecast models used and ground-based monitoring network measurements. These networks are inherently limited by their sparse distribution; nonetheless, they form an integral part of many decision-making structure and epidemiological studies. Remote sensing instruments such as MODIS provide daily aerosol optical depth (AOD) products with almost global spatial coverage, which are available on a near-real-time (NRT) basis. This work aims to show that the NRT AOD product obtained from MODIS can improve the air quality forecast in the Cincinnati area. To achieve this, an evaluation of the correlation of AOD retrievals with ground-based PM2.5 observations is carried out. Further to which, the MODIS AOD data is included as a variable in a statistical model to bolster current PM2.5 forecasting capabilities. Other key input parameters to the multiple linear regression model includes surface and vertical weather patterns, mixing height, local wind patterns, relative humidity and temperature.

  18. Aeration remediation of a polluted waterway increases near-surface coarse and culturable microbial aerosols.

    PubMed

    Dueker, M Elias; O'Mullan, Gregory D

    2014-04-15

    Aeration remediation is currently used in polluted urban waterways to increase oxygen levels in the water column. Recent studies have provided increasing evidence that the bursting of bubbles at water surfaces introduced by aeration, or other surface disturbances, can transfer viable bacteria to the air. In heavily sewage-polluted waterways these water-originated bacterial aerosols may pose as a health risk to recreators in small boats or residents inhabiting the shoreline. Nonetheless, few studies have explored aerosols above active aeration remediation projects in waterways or investigated how bacterial aerosols change with vertical distance from aeration activities. This study, conducted at the Newtown Creek superfund site in Brooklyn, NY, USA, measured coarse aerosol particles and culturable bacteria in near-surface air above waters undergoing aeration remediation. Regardless of aeration operation culturable bacterial fallout was greater near-surface (0.6m above water) than previously-reported measurements made at 2.5m. Molecular analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences from isolated bacteria demonstrates that water and air shared a large number of bacterial genera and that the genera present in the near-surface aerosols (0.6m) contained water-associated Vibrio and Caulobacter, which were not present at 2.5m, despite the smaller sequence library size from the near-surface. Also, the near-surface microbial assemblage had significantly greater association with sequences detected previously in aquatic environments compared to the 2.5m library. We found compelling evidence that aeration activity contributed to this vertical gradient in bacterial aerosol concentrations and identity. Similar to results from 2.5m, concentrations of near-surface respirable coarse aerosols (<10 um) increased significantly when aeration was occurring. Culturable bacterial aerosol fallout was also greater near-surface when the aerator was on compared to simultaneous measurements made at 2

  19. Aerosol-cloud-land surface interactions within tropical sea breeze convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the influence of aerosols, surface roughness length, soil moisture, and synergistic interactions among these factors on tropical convective rainfall focused along a sea breeze front are explored within idealized cloud-resolving modeling simulations using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The idealized RAMS domain setup is representative of the coastal Cameroon rainforest in equatorial Africa. In order to assess the potential sensitivity of sea breeze convection to increasing anthropogenic activity and deforestation occurring in such regions, 27 total simulations are performed in which combinations of enhanced aerosol concentrations, reduced surface roughness length, and reduced soil moisture are included. Both enhanced aerosols and reduced soil moisture are found to individually reduce the precipitation due to reductions in downwelling shortwave radiation and surface latent heat fluxes, respectively, while perturbations to the roughness length do not have a large impact on the precipitation. The largest soil moisture perturbations dominate the precipitation changes due to reduced low-level moisture available to the convection, but if the soil moisture perturbation is more moderate, synergistic interactions between soil moisture and aerosols enhance the sea breeze precipitation. This is found to result from evening convection that forms ahead of the sea breeze only when both effects are present. Interactions between the resulting gust fronts and the sea breeze front locally enhance convergence and therefore the rainfall. The results of this study underscore the importance of considering the aerosol-cloud-land surface system responses to perturbations in aerosol loading and land surface characteristics.

  20. Atmospheric aerosols local-regional discrimination for a semi-urban area in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooda, R. K.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Vestenius, M.; Gilardoni, S.; Sharma, V. P.; Vignati, E.; Kulmala, M.; Lihavainen, H.

    2016-02-01

    In the European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions (EUCAARI), measurements were carried out with a sequential filter-based aerosol sampler and on-line instruments for aerosol composition and behaviour at Gual Pahari, close to New Delhi. In fine mode (PM2.5), the secondary organic carbon (SOC) to total organic carbon ratio was 46%. This indicated that condensation of SOC on fine size particles could occur rapidly which may be related to the growth of aerosols and the potential to the size of cloud condensation nuclei in the region. Source region discrimination was improved significantly through coupling conditional probability functions with receptor modelling, and validation through volume size distribution. The air masses from industrial and dense populated regions show a mix of local as well as regional emissions to fine mode aerosols. The back-trajectory analysis captured the long-range transport of sea-salt aerosols enriched with mineral dust. The surface wind directions identified the influence of local emission activities.

  1. The surface area of soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Lee, J.-F.; Boyd, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    The previously reported surface area for soil organic matter (SOM) of 560-800 m2/g as determined by the ethylene glycol (EG) retention method was reexamined by the standard BET method based on nitrogen adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. Test samples consisted of two high organic content soils, a freeze-dried soil humic acid, and an oven-dried soil humic acid. The measured BET areas for these samples were less than 1 m2/g, except for the freeze-dried humic acid. The results suggest that surface adsorption of nonionic organic compounds by SOM is practically insignificant in comparison to uptake by partition. The discrepancy between the surface areas of SOM obtained by BET and EG methods was explained in terms of the 'free surface area' and the 'apparent surface area' associated with these measurements.The previously reported surface area for soil organic matter (SOM) of 560-800 m2/g as determined by the ethylene glycol (EG) retention method was reexamined by the standard BET method based on nitrogen adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. Test samples consisted of two high organic content soils, a freeze-dried soil humic acid, and an oven-dried soil humic acid. The measured BET areas for these samples were less than 1 m2/g, except for the freeze-dried humic acid. The results suggest that surface adsorption of nonionic organic compounds by SOM is practically insignificant in comparison to uptake by partition. The discrepancy between the surface areas of SOM obtained by BET and EG methods was explained in terms of the 'free surface area' and the 'apparent surface area' associated with these measurements.

  2. Development and Testing of the New Surface LER Climatology for OMI UV Aerosol Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pawan; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren; Ahn, Changwoo

    2014-01-01

    Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard Aura satellite retrieved aerosols properties using UV part of solar spectrum. The OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) is a global inversion scheme which retrieves aerosol properties both over ocean and land. The current version of the algorithm makes use of TOMS derived Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) climatology. A new monthly climatology of surface LER at 354 and 388 nm have been developed. This will replace TOMS LER (380 nm and 354nm) climatology in OMI near UV aerosol retrieval algorithm. The main objectives of this study is to produce high resolution (quarter degree) surface LER sets as compared to existing one degree TOMS surface LERs, to product instrument and wavelength consistent surface climatology. Nine years of OMI observations have been used to derive monthly climatology of surface LER. MODIS derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been used to make aerosol corrections on OMI wavelengths. MODIS derived BRDF adjusted reflectance product has been also used to capture seasonal changes in the surface characteristics. Finally spatial and temporal averaging techniques have been used to fill the gaps around the globes, especially in the regions with consistent cloud cover such as Amazon. After implementation of new surface data in the research version of algorithm, comparisons of AOD and single scattering albedo (SSA) have been performed over global AERONET sites for year 2007. Preliminary results shows improvements in AOD retrievals globally but more significance improvement were observed over desert and bright locations. We will present methodology of deriving surface data sets and will discuss the observed changes in retrieved aerosol properties with respect to reference AERONET measurements.

  3. The Effect of Non-Lambertian Surface Reflectance on Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ricchiazzi, P.; O'Hirok, W.; Gautier, C.

    2005-03-18

    Surface reflectance is an important factor in determining the strength of aerosol radiative forcing. Previous studies of radiative forcing assumed that the reflected surface radiance is isotropic and does not depend on incident illumination angle. This Lambertian reflection model is not a very good descriptor of reflectance from real land and ocean surfaces. In this study we present computational results for the seasonal average of short and long wave aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. The effect of the Lambertian assumption is found through comparison with calculations using a more detailed bi-direction reflectance distribution function (BRDF).

  4. Large differences in tropical aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere and Earth's surface

    PubMed

    Satheesh; Ramanathan

    2000-05-01

    The effect of radiative forcing by anthropogenic aerosols is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate predictions. Direct observations of the forcing are therefore needed, particularly for the poorly understood tropical aerosols. Here we present an observational method for quantifying aerosol forcing to within +/-5 per cent. We use calibrated satellite radiation measurements and five independent surface radiometers to quantify the aerosol forcing simultaneously at the Earth's surface and the top of the atmosphere over the tropical northern Indian Ocean. In winter, this region is covered by anthropogenic aerosols of sulphate, nitrate, organics, soot and fly ash from the south Asian continent. Accordingly, mean clear-sky solar radiative heating for the winters of 1998 and 1999 decreased at the ocean surface by 12 to 30 Wm(-2), but only by 4 to 10 Wm(-2) at the top of the atmosphere. This threefold difference (due largely to solar absorption by soot) and the large magnitude of the observed surface forcing both imply that tropical aerosols might slow down the hydrological cycle.

  5. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 μm were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular

  6. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  7. Characterization of aerosol episodes in the greater Mediterranean Sea area from satellite observations (2000-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, A.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Torres, O.

    2016-03-01

    An algorithm able to identify and characterize episodes of different aerosol types above sea surfaces of the greater Mediterranean basin (GMB), including the Black Sea and the Atlantic Ocean off the coasts of Iberia and northwest Africa, is presented in this study. Based on this algorithm, five types of intense (strong and extreme) aerosol episodes in the GMB are identified and characterized using daily aerosol optical properties from satellite measurements, namely MODIS-Terra, Earth Probe (EP)-TOMS and OMI-Aura. These aerosol episodes are: (i) biomass-burning/urban-industrial (BU), (ii) desert dust (DD), (iii) dust/sea-salt (DSS), (iv) mixed (MX) and (v) undetermined (UN). The identification and characterization is made with our algorithm using a variety of aerosol properties, namely aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), fine fraction (FF), effective radius (reff) and Aerosol Index (AI). During the study period (2000-2007), the most frequent aerosol episodes are DD, observed primarily in the western and central Mediterranean Sea, and off the northern African coasts, 7 times/year for strong episodes and 4 times/year for extreme ones, on average. The DD episodes yield 40% of all types of strong aerosol episodes in the study region, while they account for 71.5% of all extreme episodes. The frequency of occurrence of strong episodes exhibits specific geographical patterns, for example the BU are mostly observed along the coasts of southern Europe and off the Atlantic coasts of Portugal, the MX episodes off the Spanish Mediterranean coast and over the Adriatic and northern Aegean Sea, while the DSS ones over the western and central Mediterranean Sea. On the other hand, the extreme episodes for all but DD aerosol display more patchy spatial patterns. The strong episodes exhibit AOD at 550 nm as high as 1.6 in the southernmost parts of central and eastern Mediterranean Sea, which rise up to 5 for the extreme, mainly DD and DSS, episodes. Although more

  8. Dust transport over the eastern Mediterranean derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Aerosol Robotic Network, and surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Kubilay, N.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Vardavas, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-02-01

    Multiyear surface PM10 measurements performed on Crete Island, Greece, have been used in conjunction with satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) and ground-based remote sensing measurements (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)) to enhance our understanding of the evolution of mineral dust events over the eastern Mediterranean. An analysis of southerly air masses at altitudes of 1000 and 3000 m over a 5 year period (2000-2005), showed that dust can potentially arrive over Crete, either simultaneously in the lower free troposphere and inside the boundary layer (vertical extended transport (VET)) or initially into the free troposphere with the heavier particles gradually being scavenged inside the boundary layer (free troposphere transport (FTT)). Both pathways present significant seasonal variations but on an annual basis contribute almost equally to the dust transport in the area. During VET the aerosol index (AI) derived from TOMS was significantly correlated with surface PM10, and in general AI was found to be adequate for the characterization of dust loadings over the eastern Mediterranean on a climatological basis. A significant covariance between PM10 and AOT was observed during VET as well, indicating that AOT levels from AERONET may be estimated by PM10 levels at the surface. Surface measurements are thus crucial for the validation of remote sensing measurements and hence are a powerful tool for the investigation of the impact of aerosols on climate.

  9. Surface area coefficients for airship envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W S

    1922-01-01

    In naval architecture, it is customary to determine the wetted surface of a ship by means of some formula which involves the principal dimensions of the design and suitable constants. These formulas of naval architecture may be extended and applied to the calculation of the surface area of airship envelopes by the use of new values of the constants determined for this purpose. Surface area coefficients were calculated from the actual dimensions, surfaces, and volumes of 52 streamline bodies, which form a series covering the entire range of shapes used in the present aeronautical practice.

  10. Externally pressurized porous cylinder for multiple surface aerosol generation and method of generation

    DOEpatents

    Apel, C.T.; Layman, L.R.; Gallimore, D.L.

    1988-05-10

    A nebulizer is described for generating aerosol having small droplet sizes and high efficiency at low sample introduction rates. The nebulizer has a cylindrical gas permeable active surface. A sleeve is disposed around the cylinder and gas is provided from the sleeve to the interior of the cylinder formed by the active surface. In operation, a liquid is provided to the inside of the gas permeable surface. The gas contacts the wetted surface and forms small bubbles which burst to form an aerosol. Those bubbles which are large are carried by momentum to another part of the cylinder where they are renebulized. This process continues until the entire sample is nebulized into aerosol sized droplets. 2 figs.

  11. Aerosol and its Radiative Impact on Surface Solar Radiation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.

    2007-05-01

    As a fast developing country covering a large territory, China is experiencing rapid environmental changes. High concentrations of aerosols with diverse properties are emitted in the region, providing a unique opportunity for understanding the impact of environmental changes on climate. Until very recently, few observational studies were conducted in this important source regions. The East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) attempts to characterize the physical, optical and chemical properties of the aerosols and their effects on climate over China. Some preliminary results will be presented using continuous high-quality measurements of aerosol, cloud and radiative quantities made at the EAST-AIRE baseline stations in northern and southern China. Both regions are often covered by a thick layer of haze (with a yearly mean aerosol optical depth 0.7-0.8) due primarily to anthropogenic emissions of moderately strong absorbing aerosols, leading exceptionally large aerosol radiative effect at the surface in broadband, PAR and ultraviolet radiation. The boundary atmosphere is thus heated dramatically during the daytime, which may affect atmospheric stability and cloud formation.

  12. Aerosol acidity characterization of large metropolitan areas: Pilot and planning for Philadelphia

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, J.M.; Koutrakis, P.; Burton, R.; Wilson, W.E.; Purdue, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    The report described the EPA's multi-year program to investigate the specific issues surrounding human exposures to aerosol activity. Philadelphia, a large metropolitan area in the heart of the northeastern seaboard afflicted with photochemical regional smog during the summertime, was chosen as the first city in the program. A pilot study of ambient concentrations was conducted in July 1991. An annular denuder system (ADS) sampler was operated for two weeks near downtown Philadelphia, with a second unit operated in central, suburban New Jersey, the same location of measurements in past years. The Philadelphia site was found to have higher concentrations of most major aerosol species, ammonia and acidic particles than in New Jersey, showing that aerosol neutralization within the urban center will not necessarily totally eliminate acidic particle exposures.

  13. Chemical characteristics of organic aerosols in Algiers city area: influence of a fat manufacture plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Meklati, Brahim Youcef; Cecinato, Angelo

    Total concentrations and homologue distributions of organic fraction constituents have been determined in particulate matter emitted from different units of a fat manufacturer (i.e. oils refining and conditioning plants, and production and conditioning units of a soap industry) located in Algiers area, as well as in atmospheric aerosols. In particular n-alkanes, n-alkanoic and n-alkenoic acids, n-alkan-2-ones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were investigated. Organic aerosol contents varied broadly among the plant units, depending upon nature of the manufactured products. The percent composition of all classes of compounds investigated in ambient atmosphere was similar to those observed indoor at industrial plant units. Organic acids, n-alkanoic as well as n-alkenoic, appeared by far the most abundant organic constituents of aerosols, both indoor and outdoor, ranging from 7.7 to 19.8 and from 12.7 to 17.1 μg m -3, respectively. The huge occurrence of acids and n-alkanes in ambient aerosols was consistent with their high levels present in oil and fat materials. Among minor components of aerosols, n-alkan-2-ones and PAH, seemed to be related to thermally induced ageing and direct combustion of raw organic material used for oil and soap production.

  14. Aerosol optical properties in pristine and biomass burning areas in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Rizzo, L.; Lucca, S.; Paixao, M.; Sena, E. T.; Cirino, G.; Arana, A.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol physical and chemical properties were measured in two sites in Amazonia. The clean site is at Central Amazonia, close to Manaus. A second sampling site is located in Porto Velho, Rondonia, an area strongly affected by biomass burning emissions. Long term measurements, from February 2008 are being carried out in these two sites. In the pristine central Amazonia, measurements were taken at the Cuieiras forest site, tower TT34, 55 Km North of Manaus under dry conditions (RH<40%). A MAAP 5012 absorption photometer in series with a nephelometer (TSI 3563) was used to measure aerosol absorption and scattering, respectively. Aerosol size distributions were measure using a TSI SMPS system. Aerosol composition, and several trace gases that helps to characterize aerosol sources were also measured. In Rondonia, a sampling station was installed close to the city of Porto Velho. Similar instrumentation as in Manaus was used in Rondonia. In the pristine Amazonian atmosphere, aerosol scattering coefficients ranged between 1 and 200 Mm-1 at 450 nm, while absorption ranged between 1 and 20 Mm-1 at 637 nm. A strong seasonal behavior was observed, with greater aerosol loadings during the dry season (Jul-Nov) as compared to the wet season (Dec-Jun). During the wet season in Manaus, aerosol scattering (450 nm) and absorption (637 nm) coefficients averaged, respectively, 14±22 and 0.9±0.8 Mm-1. Both optical coefficients were greatly increased during the dry season, averaging 58±35 Mm-1 and 4.1±3.8 Mm-1, correspondingly. Angstrom exponents for scattering were lower during the wet season (1.6±0.4) in comparison to the dry season (1.9±0.2), which is consistent with the shift from biomass burning aerosols. Single scattering albedo, calculated at 637 nm, did not show a significant seasonal variation, averaging 0.86 ± 0.06 and 0.86 ± 0.04, respectively for wet and dry season. In Rondonia, even in the wet season it was possible to observe a strong impact from anthropogenic

  15. Different responses of Sea Surface Temperature in the North Pacific to greenhouse gas and aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liyi; Liu, Qinyu

    2015-12-01

    The responses of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) to greenhouse gas (GHG) and anthropogenic aerosol in the North Pacific are compared based on the historical single and all-forcing simulations with Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 3 (GFDL CM3). During 1860-2005, the effect of GHG forcing on the North Pacific SST is opposite to that of the aerosol forcing. Specifically, the aerosol cooling effect exceeds the GHG warming effect in the Kuroshio Extension (KE) region during 1950-2004 in the CM3 single forcing. The mid-latitude response of ocean circulation to the GHG (aerosol) forcing is to enhance (weaken) the Subtropical Gyre. Then the SST warming (cooling) lies on the zonal band of 40°N because of the increased (reduced) KE warm advection effect in the GHG (aerosol) forcing simulations, and the cooling effect to SST will surpass the warming effect in the KE region in the historical all-forcing simulations. Besides, the positive feedback between cold SST and cloud can also strengthen the aerosol cooling effect in the KE region during boreal summer, when the mixed layer depth is shallow. In the GHG (aerosol) forcing simulations, corresponding to warming (cooling) SST in the KE region, the weakened (enhanced) Aleutian Low appears in the Northeast Pacific. Consequently, the SST responses to all-forcing in the historical simulations are similar to the responses to aerosol forcing in sign and spatial pattern, hence the aerosol effect is quite important to the SST cooling in the mid-latitude North Pacific during the past 55 years.

  16. Surface ozone-aerosol behaviour and atmospheric boundary layer structure in Saharan dusty scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adame, Jose; Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Sorrribas, Mar; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Toledo, Daniel; Yela, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    A research campaign was performed for the AMISOC (Atmospheric Minor Species relevant to the Ozone Chemistry) project at El Arenosillo observatory (southwest Spain) in May-June 2012. The campaign focused on the impact of Saharan dust intrusions at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and ozone-aerosol interactions. In-situ and remote-sensing techniques for gases and aerosols were used moreover to modelling analyses. Meteorology features, ABL structures and evolution, aerosol profiling distributions and aerosol-ozone interactions on the surface were analysed. Two four-day periods were selected according to non-dusty (clean conditions) and dusty (Saharan dust) situations. In both scenarios, sea-land breezes developed in the lower atmosphere, but differences were found in the upper levels. Results show that surface temperatures were greater than 3°C and humidity values were lower during dusty conditions than non-dusty conditions. Thermal structures on the surface layer (estimated using an instrument on a 100 m tower) show differences, mainly during nocturnal periods with less intense inversions under dusty conditions. The mixing layer during dusty days was 400-800 m thick, less than observed on non-dusty days. Dust also disturbed the typical daily ABL evolution. Stable conditions were observed during the early evening during intrusions. Aerosol extinction on dusty days was 2-3 times higher, and the dust was confined between 1500 and 5500 m. Back trajectory analyses confirmed that the dust had an African origin. On the surface, the particle concentration was approximately 3.5 times higher during dusty events, but the local ozone did not exhibit any change. The arrival of Saharan dust in the upper levels impacted the meteorological surface, inhibited the daily evolution of the ABL and caused an increase in aerosol loading on the surface and at higher altitudes; however, no dust influence was observed on surface ozone.

  17. Aerosol Plume during a Polluted Event Occuring Over Paris Area and its Potential Photochemical Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamiarisoa, H.; Chazette, P.; Sanak, J.; Hauglustaine, D.

    2002-12-01

    As in many big cities, there are several pollution events in Paris area. A thorough understanding of the processes leading on the formation of pollutants and their transport during pollution episodes is necessary. One of the pertinent factors, which contributions on atmospheric chemistry and radiative effect are not yet well known, is the aerosol. ESQUIF (Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l?air en Ile de France) is the first program dedicated to study such issues over the Paris area. It was carried out from summer 1998 to winter 2000 (Menut et al., 2000). To characterize all the properties of the urban aerosol, many campaigns were coordinated using both ground and airborne measurements (Chazette et al., 2000). We are focusing on the 31st of July 2000 where a well-defined polluted plume has been observed. Aerosol number concentrations in different size classes were measured and show that urban aerosol in Paris area is mainly submicronic. The absorbent part of the aerosol, mainly associated to the black carbon component, has been observed to be associated to particles with diameter less than 0.1 æm. The single scattering albedo has been assessed to be close to 0.85 leading to a significant influence on the photochemical chemistry. Indeed, a significant decrease of the daily maximum ozone concentration has been calculated using the INCA model and will be presented. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Programme National de Chimie Atmosphérique, INSU supported this work. REFERENCES Chazette P., H. Randriamiarisoa, J. Sanak, C. Flamant, J. Pelon, M. Sicard, H. Cachier, F. Aulagnier, R. Sarda-Esteve, L. Gomes, S. Alfaro and A. Gaudichet (2001). ESQUIF 2000 : Aerosol survey over the Ile-de-France area, J. Aerosol Sci ., 32/suppl. 1, S439-S440. Menut, L., R. Vautard, C. Flamant, A. Abonnel, M. Beekmann, P. Chazette, P.H. Flamant, D. Gombert, D. Guédalia, D. Kley, M.P. Lefebvre, B. Lossec, D. Martin, G. Mégie, P. Perros, M. Sicard and G. Toupance (2000). Measurements and modelling

  18. Development of an Aerosol Surface Inoculation Method for Bacillus Spores ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Don; Ryan, Shawn P.; Snyder, Emily Gibb

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed to deposit Bacillus subtilis spores via aerosolization onto various surface materials for biological agent decontamination and detection studies. This new method uses an apparatus coupled with a metered dose inhaler to reproducibly deposit spores onto various surfaces. A metered dose inhaler was loaded with Bacillus subtilis spores, a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis. Five different material surfaces (aluminum, galvanized steel, wood, carpet, and painted wallboard paper) were tested using this spore deposition method. This aerosolization method deposited spores at a concentration of more than 107 CFU per coupon (18-mm diameter) with less than a 50% coefficient of variation, showing that the aerosolization method developed in this study can deposit reproducible numbers of spores onto various surface coupons. Scanning electron microscopy was used to probe the spore deposition patterns on test coupons. The deposition patterns observed following aerosol impaction were compared to those of liquid inoculation. A physical difference in the spore deposition patterns was observed to result from the two different methods. The spore deposition method developed in this study will help prepare spore coupons via aerosolization fast and reproducibly for bench top decontamination and detection studies. PMID:21193670

  19. Measurements of the HO2 uptake coefficient onto aqueous salt and organic aerosols and interpretation using the kinetic multi-layer model of aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (KM-SUB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S. J.; Berkemeier, T.; George, I. J.; Whalley, L. K.; Moon, D. R.; Ammann, M.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Poeschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.; Heard, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    HO2 is closely coupled with OH which is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict OH and HO2 concentrations. However, many studies have reported a large discrepancy between HO2 radical concentrations measured during field campaigns and predicted by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms (1,2). However, there have been very few laboratory studies (3,4) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for deliquesced ammonium nitrate and sodium chloride aerosols and copper doped sucrose aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. By either placing the HO2 injector in set positions and varying the aerosol concentration or by moving it along the flow tube at given aerosol concentrations, uptake coefficients could be measured. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a SMPS. Larger uptake coefficients were measured at shorter times and lower HO2 concentrations for aqueous salt aerosols. The time dependence was able to be modelled by the KM-SUB model (5) as the HO2 concentration decreases along the flow tube and the HO2 uptake mechanism is known to be a second order reaction. Measurements have shown that at higher HO2 concentrations there was also more H2O2 exiting the injector which could convert back to HO2 if trace amounts of metals are present within the aerosol via Fenton reactions. Preliminary results have shown that the inclusion of a Fenton-like reaction within the KM-SUB model has the potential to explain the apparent HO2 concentration dependence. Finally, the KM-SUB model has been used to demonstrate that the increase in uptake coefficient observed when increasing the relative humidity for copper doped sucrose aerosols could be explained by an

  20. Impacts of Aerosol Direct Effects on the South Asian Climate: Assessment of Radiative Feedback Processes Using Model Simulations and Satellite/Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Gautam, Ritesh; Lau, William K. M.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Sun, Wen-Yih; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Hsu, Christina; Lin, Neng-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Current assessment of aerosol radiative effect is hindered by our incomplete knowledge of aerosol optical properties, especially absorption, and our current inability to quantify physical and microphysical processes. In this research, we investigate direct aerosol radiative effect over heavy aerosol loading areas (e.g., Indo-Gangetic Plains, South/East Asia) and its feedbacks on the South Asian climate during the pre-monsoon season (March-June) using the Purdue Regional Climate Model (PRCM) with prescribed aerosol data derived by the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-5). Our modeling domain covers South and East Asia (60-140E and 0-50N) with spatial resolutions of 45 km in horizontal and 28 layers in vertical. The model is integrated from 15 February to 30 June 2008 continuously without nudging (i.e., only forced by initial/boundary conditions). Two numerical experiments are conducted with and without the aerosol-radiation effects. Both simulations are successful in reproducing the synoptic patterns on seasonal-to-interannual time scales and capturing a pre-monsoon feature of the northward rainfall propagation over Indian region in early June which shown in Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observation. Preliminary result suggests aerosol-radiation interactions mainly alter surface-atmosphere energetics and further result in an adjustment of the vertical temperature distribution in lower atmosphere (below 700 hPa). The modifications of temperature and associated rainfall and circulation feedbacks on the regional climate will be discussed in the presentation.

  1. Surface tensions, viscosities, and diffusion constants in mixed component single aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdek, Bryan; Marshall, Frances; Song, Young-Chul; Haddrell, Allen; Reid, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Surface tension and viscosity are important aerosol properties but are challenging to measure on individual particles owing to their small size and mass. Aerosol viscosity impacts semivolatile partitioning from the aerosol phase, molecular diffusion in the bulk of the particle, and reaction kinetics. Aerosol surface tension impacts how particles activate to serve as cloud condensation nuclei. Knowledge of these properties and how they change under different conditions hinders accurate modelling of aerosol physical state and atmospheric impacts. We present measurements made using holographic optical tweezers to directly determine the viscosity and surface tension of optically trapped droplets containing ~1-4 picolitres of material (corresponding to radii of ~5-10 micrometres). Two droplets are captured in the experimental setup, equilibrated to a relative humidity, and coalesced through manipulation of the relative trap positions. The moment of coalescence is captured using camera imaging as well as from elastically backscattered light connected to an oscilloscope. For lower viscosity droplets, the relaxation in droplet shape to a sphere follows the form of a damped oscillator and gives the surface tension and viscosity. For high viscosity droplets, the relaxation results in a slow merging of the two droplets to form a sphere and the timescale of that process permits determination of viscosity. We show that droplet viscosity and surface tension can be quantitatively determined to within <10% of the expected value for low viscosity droplets and to better than 1 order of magnitude for high viscosity droplets. Examples illustrating how properties such as surface tension can change in response to environmental conditions will be discussed. Finally, a study of the relationship between viscosity, diffusion constants, vapour pressures, and reactive uptake coefficients for a mixed component aerosol undergoing oxidation and volatilisation will be discussed.

  2. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Liger-Belair, G.; Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Kattner, G.; Harir, M.; Kanawati, B.; Lucio, M.; Tziotis, D.; Hertkorn, N.; Gebefügi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported laterally with

  3. Long-term comparative study of columnar and surface mass concentration aerosol properties in a background environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennouna, Y. S.; Cachorro, V. E.; Mateos, D.; Burgos, M. A.; Toledano, C.; Torres, B.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between columnar and surface aerosol properties is not a straightforward problem. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (AE), and ground-level Particulate Matter (PMX, x = 10 or 2.5 μm) data have been studied from a climatological point of view. Despite the different meanings of AOD and PMx both are key and complementary quantities that quantify aerosol load in the atmosphere and many studies intend to find specific relationships between them. Related parameters such as AE and PM ratio (PR = PM2.5/PM10), giving information about the predominant particle size, are included in this study on the relationships between columnar and surface aerosol parameters. This study is based on long measurement records (2003-2014) obtained at two nearby background sites from the AERONET and EMEP networks in the north-central area of Spain. The climatological annual cycle of PMx shows two maxima along the year (one in late-winter/early-spring and another in summer), but this cycle is not followed by the AOD which shows only a summer maximum and a nearly bell shape. However, the annual means of both data sets show strong correlation (R = 0.89) and similar decreasing trends of 40% (PM10) and 38% (AOD) for the 12-year record. PM10 and AOD daily data are moderately correlated (R = 0.58), whereas correlation increases for monthly (R = 0.74) and yearly (R = 0.89) means. Scatter plots of AE vs. AOD and PR vs. PM10 have been used to characterize aerosols over the region. The PR vs. AE scatterplot of daily data shows no correlation due to the prevalence of intermediate-sized particles. As day-to-day correlation is low (especially for high turbidity events), a binned analysis was also carried out to establish consistent relationships between columnar and surface quantities, which is considered to be an appropriate approach for environmental and climate studies. In this way the link between surface concentrations and columnar remote sensing data is shown to

  4. Intensification of aerosol pollution associated with its feedback with surface solar radiation and winds in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Guo, Jianping; Wang, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Beijing has been experiencing serious air pollution in recent years, resulting in serious impacts on the local environment and climate and on human health. In addition to individual pollution sources and weather systems, feedback between aerosols and downwelling solar radiation (DSR) and between aerosols and winds also contribute to heavy aerosol pollution. By using atmospheric visibility (VIS) to represent the relative amount of aerosol pollution during a 5 week observation around the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) period (22 October to 25 November 2014) over a site in south Beijing, China, we show clear positive relationships between DSR and VIS and between winds and VIS. The sensitivities of daily DSR and surface winds to VIS are approximately 15.42 W/m2/km and 0.068 m/s/km, respectively. The strengthening contributions to atmospheric visibility by surface DSR-VIS interactions and between surface wind-aerosol interactions are estimated at approximately 15% and 12%, respectively, in south Beijing around the APEC period.

  5. Influence of relative humidity on aerosol composition: Impacts on light extinction and visibility impairment at two sites in coastal area of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. J.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, D.; Sheng, L. F.

    2015-02-01

    Investigation on the aerosol characteristics, surface visibility (Vis) and meteorology at BGS (Baguanshan, Qingdao) and LNA (Lin'an, Zhejiang) shows that the ambient aerosol chemical composition and light extinction are relative humidity (RH) dependent. At higher RH, both the strengthened hygroscopic growth and the more efficient oxidization (of the precursor gases and formation of the secondary sulfate and nitrate) contribute to the increase of the mass fraction of the hygroscopic species, which consequently results in the increase of the aerosol mass extinction efficiency (MEE) and Vis reduction at the two Chinese coastal sites. MEE and chemical composition of the aerosol vary significantly under different regional transport ways; the airmasses from the ocean directions are associated with higher RH, higher sulfate mass fraction and greater MEE at BGS, while MEEs are smaller and associated with lower RH and lower sulfate fraction for the airmasses from the continent directions. Vis shows better correlation with PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentrations when RH effect on aerosol hygroscopic growth is considered. At BGS, the sulfate mass fraction in PM2.5 and PM10 (in average 32.4% and 27.4%) can explain about 60.7% and 74.3% of the variance of the aerosol MEE, respectively; sulfate and nitrate contribute to about 61% of the light extinction. RH plays a key role in aerosol extinction and visibility variation over this coastal area of China. Formation of the secondary aerosol (especially sulfate and nitrate) as well as hygroscopic growth under favorable (more stable and humid) meteorological conditions should be paid adequate attention in regulation of air quality and Vis improvement over eastern China in addition to the routine emission control measurements.

  6. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  7. Influence of absorbing aerosols on the inference of solar surface radiation budget and cloud absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing

    1998-01-01

    This study addresses the impact of absorbing aerosols on the retrieval of the solar surface radiation budget (SSRB) and on the inference of cloud absorption using multiple global datasets. The data pertain to the radiation budgets at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), at the surface, and to precipitation and tropical biomass burning. Satellite-based SSRB data were derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program using different inversion algorithms. A manifestation of the aerosol effect emerges from a zonal comparison between satellite-based and surface-observed SSRB, which shows good agreement in most regions except over the tropical continents active in biomass burning. Another indication arises from the variation of the ratio of cloud radiative forcing at the TOA and at the surface, which was used in many recent studies addressing the cloud absorption problem. The author`s studies showed that the ratio is around unity under most circumstances except when there is heavy urban/industrial pollution or fires. These exceptions register discrepancy between observed and modeled SSRB. The discrepancy is found to increase with decreasing cloudiness, implying that it has more to do with the treatment of aerosols than clouds, although minor influences by other factors may also exist. The largest discrepancy is observed in the month of minimal cloud cover and maximal aerosol loading. The corresponding maximum monthly mean aerosol optical thickness is estimated to be around 1.0 by a parameterization developed in this study. After the effects of aerosols on SSRB are accounted for using biomass burning and precipitation data, disagreements no longer exist between the theory and observation with regard to the transfer of solar radiation. It should be pointed out that the tropical data employed in this study are limited to a small number of continental sites. 75 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. An initial assessment of the impact of Australian aerosols on surface ultraviolet radiation and implications for human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee, C. Y.; Mills, F. P.

    2010-08-01

    Aerosols can have significant influence on surface radiation, and the intense surface ultraviolet radiation Australia experiences contributes to Australia's high incidence rates for related human diseases. Aerosol properties, such as total column aerosol optical depth, have been measured over several years for varying lengths of time at sites across Australia using sunphotometers. Statistical analysis of the average daily aerosol optical depth over sites near Alice Springs, Canberra, Darwin, and Perth provides one measure of the annual atmospheric loading of aerosols over these sites. The sunphotometers used at these sites do not make measurements in the UV-B spectral region and have only one channel in the UV-A spectral region, the regions of most interest for assessing human health impact. Consequently, model calculations using standard aerosol types have been used to make an initial estimate of the impact of the aerosols found over these four sites on surface ultraviolet radiation. The aerosol loading is at times sufficient to significantly reduce the surface ultraviolet radiation, but few such days occur each year. The annual average effect of aerosols on surface ultraviolet radiation, thus, appears to be small compared to lifestyle factors, such as clothing and use of sunscreen.

  9. Examining the relationship among atmospheric aerosols and light scattering and extinction in the Grand Canyon area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, William C.; Molenar, John V.; Eldred, Robert A.; Sisler, James F.

    1996-08-01

    During the winter and summer months of 1990 a special study called Project MOHAVE (measurement of haze and visual effects) was carried out with the principle objective of attributing aerosol species to extinction and scattering and the aerosol species to sources and/or source regions. The study area included much of southern California and Nevada, Arizona, and Utah; however, the intensive monitoring sites and primary focus of the study was on the Colorado Plateau of northern Arizona, southern Nevada, and Utah. This paper reports on the apportionment of various aerosol species to measured fine and coarse mass concentrations and these species to scattering and extinction. The study is unique in that a number of "ambient" integrating nephelometers were operated to measure the ambient scattering coefficient, while transmissometers were used to measure atmospheric extinction. Comparison of measured scattering, extinction, and aerosol species concentration, both statistically and theoretically, allows for an estimate of scattering and absorption efficiencies. Analysis suggests that using elemental carbon, derived from thermal optical techniques, to estimate absorption may significantly underestimate absorption. Using elemental carbon, absorption is estimated to be 5% of extinction, while direct measurements of absorption suggest that it is about 30% of measured extinction. Furthermore, because light absorption by soil is usually not accounted for, soil extinction is underestimated by about 30%.

  10. Effect of Aerosols on Surface Radiation and Air Quality in the Central American Region Estimated Using Satellite UV Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Torres, O.; Krotkov, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    Solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface is reduced by both aerosol scattering and aerosol absorption. Over many parts of the world the latter effect can be as large or larger than the former effect, and small changes in the aerosol single scattering albedo can either cancel the former effect or enhance it. In addition, absorbing aerosols embedded in clouds can greatly reduce the amount of radiation reaching the surface by multiple scattering. Though the potential climatic effects of absorbing aerosols have received considerable attention lately, their effect on surface UV, photosynthesis, and photochemistry can be equally important for our environment and may affect human health and agricultural productivity. Absorption of all aerosols commonly found in the Earth's atmosphere becomes larger in the UV and blue wavelengths and has a relatively strong wavelength dependence. This is particularly true of mineral dust and organic aerosols. However, these effects have been very difficult to estimate on a global basis since the satellite instruments that operate in the visible are primarily sensitive to aerosol scattering. A notable exception is the UV Aerosol Index (AI), first produced using NASA's Nimbus-7 TOMS data. AI provides a direct measure of the effect of aerosol absorption on the backscattered UV radiation in both clear and cloudy conditions, as well as over snow/ice. Although many types of aerosols produce a distinct color cast in the visible images, and aerosols absorption over clouds and snow/ice could, in principle be detected from their color, so far this technique has worked well only in the UV. In this talk we will discuss what we have learned from the long-term record of AI produced from TOMS and Aura/OMI about the possible role of aerosols on surface radiation and air quality in the Central American region.

  11. Aerosol transport and dispersion measurements in the near surface boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiscox, April Lynn

    The studies presented in this dissertation present new techniques for measuring aerosols in the atmosphere, and the application of these techniques to three different aerosol sources. A methodology for measuring dispersion parameters based on lidar images, which can be used as an efficient way to remotely monitor time variations of plume dispersion parameters, is presented. Lidar images of a smoke plume cross-section over a forest canopy during nighttime conditions are analyzed to estimate vertical dispersion parameters and vertical meander of the plume centerline in the near field. Dispersion parameters 60 meters downwind are found to have a median value of 2.31 meters. Measurements of these parameters have not previously been made outside the restraints of a wind tunnel experiment. A second technique to measure in-plume concentrations based on single wavelength lidar images is also presented. A field study of aerial spray movement and dispersion was used to determine in-plume spray concentrations of very fine droplets applied during calm, stable atmospheric conditions. Supporting meteorology and air turbulence measurements were made simultaneously with 3-D sonic anemometers. The amount of spray material remaining in the air decreased rapidly for 1--2 minutes, and thereafter remained nearly constant and drifted as a definable plume with the slight air currents. Finally, these two techniques are applied to measure near-field spatial dynamics, spread and concentrations of dust plumes emitted during tilling and harvesting of an irrigated cotton field. Combined lidar images are used to form three-dimensional plumes. Plume dynamics and suspended aerosol concentrations are found. Dust plume dynamics varied with atmospheric stability. In particular, plume maximum height was significantly lower during stable conditions. Plume tracking indicated little change in plume cross-sectional area with height under unstable conditions and plume movement depended on wind speed and

  12. Secondary organic aerosol formation initiated from reactions between ozone and surface-sorbed squalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyi; Waring, Michael S.

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has shown that ozone reactions on surface-sorbed D-limonene can promote gas phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation indoors. In this work, we conducted 13 steady state chamber experiments to measure the SOA formation entirely initiated by ozone reactions with squalene sorbed to glass, at chamber ozone of 57-500 ppb for two relative humidity (RH) conditions of 21% and 51%, in the absence of seed particles. Squalene is a nonvolatile compound that is a component of human skin oil and prevalent on indoor surfaces and in settled dust due to desquamation. The size distributions, mass and number secondary emission rates (SER), aerosol mass fractions (AMF), and aerosol number fractions (ANF) of formed SOA were quantified. The surface AMF and ANF are defined as the change in SOA mass or number formed, respectively, per ozone mass consumed by ozone-squalene reactions. All experiments but one exhibited nucleation and mass formation. Mass formation was relatively small in magnitude and increased with ozone, most notably for the RH = 51% experiments. The surface AMF was a function of the chamber aerosol concentration, and a multi-product model was fit using the 'volatility basis set' framework. Number formation was relatively strong at low ozone and low RH conditions. Though we cannot extrapolate our results because experiments were conducted at high air exchange rates, we speculate that this process may enhance particle number more than mass concentrations indoors.

  13. Osmosis and Surface Area to Volume Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, D. R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help students understand the concepts of osmosis and surface area to volume ratio (SA:VOL). The task for students is to compare water uptake in different sizes of potato cubes and relate differences to their SA:VOL ratios. (JN)

  14. Volumes and surface areas of pendular rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.

    1958-01-01

    A packing of spheres is taken as a suitable model of porous media. The packing may be regular and the sphere size may be uniform, but in general, both should be random. Approximations are developed to give the volumes and surface areas of pendular rings that exist at points of sphere contact. From these, the total free volume and interfacial specific surface area are derived as expressive of the textural character of the packing. It was found that the log-log plot of volumes and surface areas of pendular rings vary linearly with the angle made by the line joining the sphere centers and the line from the center of the largest sphere to the closest edge of the pendular ring. The relationship, moreover, was found not to be very sensitive to variation in the size ratio of the spheres in contact. It also was found that the addition of pendular ring material to various sphere packings results in an unexpected decrease in the surface area of the boundaries that confine the resulting pore space. ?? 1958 The American Institute of Physics.

  15. Arctic Sea Salt Aerosol from Blowing Snow and Sea Ice Surfaces - a Missing Natural Source in Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Norris, S. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Nishimura, K.; Jones, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particles in the polar regions consist mostly of sea salt aerosol (SSA). SSA plays an important role in regional climate change through influencing the surface energy balance either directly or indirectly via cloud formation. SSA irradiated by sunlight also releases very reactive halogen radicals, which control concentrations of ozone, a pollutant and greenhouse gas. However, models under-predict SSA concentrations in the Arctic during winter pointing to a missing source. It has been recently suggested that salty blowing snow above sea ice, which is evaporating, to be that source as it may produce more SSA than equivalent areas of open ocean. Participation in the 'Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE 2015)' on board the research vessel `Lance' allowed to test this hypothesis in the Arctic sea ice zone during winter. Measurements were carried out from the ship frozen into the pack ice North of 80º N during February to March 2015. Observations at ground level (0.1-2 m) and from the ship's crows nest (30 m) included number concentrations and size spectra of SSA (diameter range 0.3-10 μm) as well as snow particles (diameter range 50-500 μm). During and after blowing snow events significant SSA production was observed. In the aerosol and snow phase sulfate is fractionated with respect to sea water, which confirms sea ice surfaces and salty snow, and not the open ocean, to be the dominant source of airborne SSA. Aerosol shows depletion in bromide with respect to sea water, especially after sunrise, indicating photochemically driven release of bromine. We discuss the SSA source strength from blowing snow in light of environmental conditions (wind speed, atmospheric turbulence, temperature and snow salinity) and recommend improved model parameterisations to estimate regional aerosol production. N-ICE 2015 results are then compared to a similar study carried out previously in the Weddell Sea during the Antarctic winter.

  16. Simulating aerosols over Arabian Peninsula with CHIMERE: Sensitivity to soil, surface parameters and anthropogenic emission inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum, S. Naseema; Gherboudj, Imen; Chaouch, Naira; Couvidat, Florian; Menut, Laurent; Ghedira, Hosni

    2016-03-01

    A three dimensional chemistry transport model, CHIMERE, was used to simulate the aerosol optical depths (AOD) over the Arabian Peninsula desert with an offline coupling of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The simulations were undertaken with: (i) different horizontal and vertical configurations, (ii) new datasets derived for soil/surface properties, and (iii) EDGAR-HTAP anthropogenic emissions inventories. The model performance evaluations were assessed: (i) qualitatively using MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) deep blue (DB) AOD data for the two local dust events of August 6th and 23rd (2013), and (ii) quantitatively using AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) AOD observations, CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) aerosol extinction profiles, and AOD simulations from various forecast models. The model results were observed to be highly sensitive to erodibility and aerodynamic surface roughness length. The use of new datasets on soil erodibility, derived from the MODIS reflectance, and aerodynamic surface roughness length (z0), derived from the ERA-Interim datasets, significantly improved the simulation results. Simulations with the global EDGAR-HTAP anthropogenic emission inventories brought the simulated AOD values closer to the observations. Performance testing of the adapted model for the Arabian Peninsula domain with improved datasets showed good agreement between AERONET AOD measurements and CHIMERE simulations, where the correlation coefficient (R) is 0.6. Higher values of the correlation coefficients and slopes were observed for the dusty periods compared to the non-dusty periods.

  17. Potential chemical evolution of aerosols on Titan's surface: some new results on Titan's tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P.; Poch, O.; Ramirez, S. I.; Buch, A.; Brassé, C.; Raulin, F.

    2011-10-01

    Titan's environment hosts a complex organic chemistry that can be investigated from Earth-based laboratory experiments. One of the key astrobiological questions of Titan's environment is the fate of the organic aerosols produced in the atmosphere, after they are deposited on the surface. In the present study, we report the geological structures these aerosols may encounter in the light of the last observations of the Cassini-Huygens mission. We chose to quantify the production of some astrobiologically interesting molecules in putative ammonia-water bodies likely to be present at the surface or subsurface of Titan, as crater melt pools or cryolavas. After aerosol analogues (tholins) synthesis and surface hydrolysis simulation, some resulting products were identified and quantified. Tholins were found to be very reactive toward an oxygen source. Urea was identified as the main product of Titan's tholins hydrolysis in ammonia-water solutions, with a production yield in mass, ranging from 6 to 12% at 279 K after 10 weeks. Several amino acids - alanine, glycine and aspartic acid - and perhaps the uracil nucleobase were also produced with yields from 0.001 to 0.4%. The determination of production yields carried out by the present study is a major step into the characterization of potential aerosols evolution on Titan.

  18. Condensed-Phase Photochemical Processes in Titan's Aerosols and Surface: The Role of Longer Wavelength Photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Jacovi, Ronen; Lignell, Antti; Couturier, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    We will discuss photochemical properties of Titan's organic molecules in the condensed phase as solid aerosols or surface material, from small linear polyyenes (polyacetylenes and polycyanoacetylenes) such as C2H2, C4N2, HC5N, etc. In particular we will focus on photochemistry caused by longer wavelength UV-VIS photons (greater than 250 nm) photons that make it through Titan's atmosphere to the haze region (approximately 100 km) and on to the surface of Titan.

  19. Atmospheric aerosol impacts on sea surface temperatures and medium range forecast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyola, M. I.; Joseph, E.; Lu, C. H.; Nalli, N. R.

    2014-12-01

    This work proposes a series of experiments to analyze the impact of dust aerosols on numerical weather prediction (NWP) and the global data assimilation system. We strive to accomplish this by the application of the NOAA Environmental Modeling System/Global Forecasting System (NEMS/GFS) aerosol component (NGAC), which corresponds to the first global interactive atmosphere-aerosol forecast system ever implemented at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and which has been operational since September 2012. Specifically, our approach will include the implementation of an improved satellite sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval methodology, that allows for better representation of the atmospheric state under dust-laden conditions. Specifically, the new algorithm will be included within the NGAC aerosol product to improve the accuracy of the SST analysis and examine the impact on NWP, particularly in tropical cyclone genesis regions in the eastern Atlantic. The results of these corrections are validated against observed measurements from the eastern Atlantic Ocean, which is dominated by Saharan dust throughout most of the year and that is also a genesis region for Atlantic tropical cyclones. These observations are obtained from the NOAA Aerosols and Ocean Science Expeditions (AEROSE) and PIRATA Northeast Extension (PNE) buoys network. We believe that the improved physical SST methodology has the potential to allow for improved representation of the geophysical state under dust-laden conditions

  20. 2014 iAREA campaign on aerosol in Spitsbergen - Part 2: Optical properties from Raman-lidar and in-situ observations at Ny-Ålesund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, C.; Neuber, R.; Schulz, Alexander; Markowicz, K. M.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Lisok, J.; Makuch, P.; Pakszys, P.; Markuszewski, P.; Rozwadowska, A.; Petelski, T.; Zielinski, T.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Gausa, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work multi wavelength Raman lidar data from Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen have been analysed for the spring 2014 Arctic haze season, as part of the iAREA campaign. Typical values and probability distributions for aerosol backscatter, extinction and depolarisation, the lidar ratio and the color ratio for 4 different altitude intervals within the troposphere are given. These quantities and their dependencies are analysed and the frequency of altitude-dependent observed aerosol events are given. A comparison with ground-based size distribution and chemical composition is performed. Hence the aim of this paper is to provide typical and statistically meaningful properties of Arctic aerosol, which may be used in climate models or to constrain the radiative forcing. We have found that the 2014 season was only moderately polluted with Arctic haze and that sea salt and sulphate were the most dominant aerosol species. Moreover the drying of an aerosol layer after cloud disintegration has been observed. Hardly any clear temporal evolution over the 4 week data set on Arctic haze is obvious with the exception of the extinction coefficient and the lidar ratio, which significantly decreased below 2 km altitude by end April. In altitudes between 2 and 5 km the haze season lasted longer and the aerosol properties were generally more homogeneous than closer to the surface. Above 5 km only few particles were found. The variability of the lidar ratio is discussed. It was found that knowledge of the aerosol's size and shape does not determine the lidar ratio. Contrary to shape and lidar ratio, there is a clear correlation between size and backscatter: larger particles show a higher backscatter coefficient.

  1. 2014 iAREA campaign on aerosol in Spitsbergen - Part 2: Optical properties from Raman-lidar and in-situ observations at Ny-Ålesund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, C.; Neuber, R.; Schulz, Alexander; Markowicz, K. M.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Lisok, J.; Makuch, P.; Pakszys, P.; Markuszewski, P.; Rozwadowska, A.; Petelski, T.; Zielinski, T.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Gausa, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work multi wavelength Raman lidar data from Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen have been analysed for the spring 2014 Arctic haze season, as part of the iAREA campaign. Typical values and probability distributions for aerosol backscatter, extinction and depolarisation, the lidar ratio and the color ratio for 4 different altitude intervals within the troposphere are given. These quantities and their dependencies are analysed and the frequency of altitude-dependent observed aerosol events are given. A comparison with ground-based size distribution and chemical composition is performed. Hence the aim of this paper is to provide typical and statistically meaningful properties of Arctic aerosol, which may be used in climate models or to constrain the radiative forcing. We have found that the 2014 season was only moderately polluted with Arctic haze and that sea salt and sulphate were the most dominant aerosol species. Moreover the drying of an aerosol layer after cloud disintegration has been observed. Hardly any clear temporal evolution over the 4 week data set on Arctic haze is obvious with the exception of the extinction coefficient and the lidar ratio, which significantly decreased below 2 km altitude by end April. In altitudes between 2 and 5 km the haze season lasted longer and the aerosol properties were generally more homogeneous than closer to the surface. Above 5 km only few particles were found. The variability of the lidar ratio is discussed. It was found that knowledge of the aerosol's size and shape does not determine the lidar ratio. Contrary to shape and lidar ratio, there is a clear correlation between size and backscatter: larger particles show a higher backscatter coefficient.

  2. Chemical composition of individual aerosol particles from working areas in a nickel refinery.

    PubMed

    Höflich, B L; Wentzel, M; Ortner, H M; Weinbruch, S; Skogstad, A; Hetland, S; Thomassen, Y; Chaschin, V P; Nieboer, E

    2000-06-01

    Individual aerosol particles (n = 1170) collected at work stations in a nickel refinery were analyzed by wavelength-dispersive electron-probe microanalysis. By placing arbitrary restrictions on the contents of sulfur and silicon, the particles could be divided into four main groups. Scanning electron images indicated that most of the particles examined were relatively small (< or = 2 microm, equivalent projected area diameter), and that their morphology suggested formation from a melt. There was an absence of well-defined phases and simple stoichiometries, indicating that exposures to pure substances such as nickel subsulfide or specific oxides appeared not to occur. Although the elemental composition of particles varied greatly, a rough association was evident with the known elemental content of the refinery intermediates. The implications of the findings for aerosol speciation measurements, toxicological studies and interpretation of adverse health effects are explored. PMID:11256701

  3. Deriving aerosol properties from measurements of the Atmosphere-Surface Radiation Automatic Instrument (ASRAI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Li, Donghui; Li, Zhengqiang; Zheng, Xiaobing; Li, Xin; Xie, Yisong; Liu, Enchao

    2015-10-01

    The Atmosphere-surface Radiation Automatic Instrument (ASRAI) is a newly developed hyper-spectral apparatus by Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (AIOFM, CAS), measuring total spectral irradiance, diffuse spectral irradiance of atmosphere and reflected radiance of the land surface for the purpose of in-situ calibration. The instrument applies VIS-SWIR spectrum (0.4~1.0 μm) with an averaged spectral resolution of 0.004 μm. The goal of this paper is to describe a method of deriving both aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol modes from irradiance measurements under free cloudy conditions. The total columnar amounts of water vapor and oxygen are first inferred from solar transmitted irradiance at strong absorption wavelength. The AOD together with total columnar amounts of ozone and nitrogen dioxide are determined by a nonlinear least distance fitting method. Moreover, it is able to infer aerosol modes from the spectral dependency of AOD because different aerosol modes have their inherent spectral extinction characteristics. With assumption that the real aerosol is an idea of "external mixing" of four basic components, dust-like, water-soluble, oceanic and soot, the percentage of volume concentration of each component can be retrieved. A spectrum matching technology based on Euclidean-distance method is adopted to find the most approximate combination of components. The volume concentration ratios of four basic components are in accordance with our prior knowledge of regional aerosol climatology. Another advantage is that the retrievals would facilitate the TOA simulation when applying 6S model for satellite calibration.

  4. GRASP Algorithm: retrieval of the aerosol properties over land surface from satellite observations (solicited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Litvinov, Pavel; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Ducos, Fabrice; Aspetsberger, Michael; Planer, Wolfgang; Federspiel, Christian; Fuertes, David

    The GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) algorithm has been developed for enhanced characterization of the properties of both aerosol and land surface from diverse remote sensing observations. The concept of the algorithm is described in details by Dubovik et al. (2011). The algorithm is based on highly advanced statistically optimized fitting implemented as Multi-Term Least Square minimization (Dubovik, 2004) and deduces nearly 50 unknowns for each observed site. The algorithm derives a set of aerosol parameters similar to that derived by AERONET including detailed particle size distribution, the spectral dependence on the complex index of refraction and the fraction of non-spherical particles. The algorithm uses detailed aerosol and surface models and fully accounts for all multiple interactions of scattered solar light with aerosol, gases and the underlying surface. All calculations are done on-line without using traditional look-up tables. In addition, the algorithm can use the new multi-pixel concept - a simultaneous fitting of a large group of pixels with additional constraints limiting the time variability of surface properties and spatial variability of aerosol properties. This principle provides a possibility to improve retrieval for multiple observations even if the observations are not exactly co-incident or co-located. Significant efforts have been spent for optimization and speedup of the GRASP computer routine and retrievals from satellite observations. For example, the routine has been adapted for running at GPGPUs accelerators. Originally GRASP has been developed for POLDER/PARASOL multi-viewing imager and later adapted to a number of other satellite sensors such as MERIS at polar-orbiting platform and COCI/GOMS geostationary observations. The results of numerical tests and results of applications to real data will be presented. REFERENCES: Dubovik, et al.,“Statistically optimized inversion algorithm for enhanced

  5. More Realistic Face Model Surface Improves Relevance of Pediatric In-Vitro Aerosol Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amirav, Israel; Halamish, Asaf; Gorenberg, Miguel; Omar, Hamza; Newhouse, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Various hard face models are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of aerosol face masks. Softer more realistic “face” surface materials, like skin, deform upon mask application and should provide more relevant in-vitro tests. Studies that simultaneously take into consideration many of the factors characteristic of the in vivo face are lacking. These include airways, various application forces, comparison of various devices, comparison with a hard-surface model and use of a more representative model face based on large numbers of actual faces. Aim To compare mask to “face” seal and aerosol delivery of two pediatric masks using a soft vs. a hard, appropriately representative, pediatric face model under various applied forces. Methods Two identical face models and upper airways replicas were constructed, the only difference being the suppleness and compressibility of the surface layer of the “face.” Integrity of the seal and aerosol delivery of two different masks [AeroChamber (AC) and SootherMask (SM)] were compared using a breath simulator, filter collection and realistic applied forces. Results The soft “face” significantly increased the delivery efficiency and the sealing characteristics of both masks. Aerosol delivery with the soft “face” was significantly greater for the SM compared to the AC (p< 0.01). No statistically significant difference between the two masks was observed with the hard “face.” Conclusions The material and pliability of the model “face” surface has a significant influence on both the seal and delivery efficiency of face masks. This finding should be taken into account during in-vitro aerosol studies. PMID:26090661

  6. Aerosols in coastal and inland areas in the equatorial African belt.

    PubMed

    Ssenyonga, Taddeo; Muyimbwa, Dennis; Okullo, Willy; Chen, Yi-Chun; Frette, Øvyind; Hamre, Børge; Steigen, Andreas; Dahlback, Arne; Stamnes, Jakob J

    2014-05-10

    Aerosols affect the climate directly through absorption and reflection of sunlight back to space and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. This paper is based on more than three decades of satellite data (1979-1994 and 1996-2012) from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and ozone monitoring instrument (OMI), which have provided measurements of backscattered radiances in the wavelength range from 331 to 380 nm. These data have been used to determine the aerosol climatology and to investigate the influence of the aerosol index (AI) on the ultraviolet index (UVI) in coastal land areas in Serrekunda (13.28°N, 16.34°W), The Gambia, and Dar-es-Salaam (6.8°S, 39.26°E), Tanzania, as well as in inland areas in Kampala (0.19°N, 32.34°E), Uganda. Heavy aerosol loadings were found to occur in the dry seasons at all three locations. To reduce the influence of clouds, we disregarded TOMS and OMI data for days during which the UV reflectivity was larger than 9% and investigated the correlation of the AI with the UVI for the remaining days at the three locations. We found a high correlation coefficient of 0.82 for Serrekunda, but poor correlation for Kampala and Dar-es-Salaam. The average AI for Serrekunda was found to be about three times higher than that for Kampala or Dar-es-Salaam, and a positive trend was found for the AI in Kampala and Dar-es-Salaam, whereas a negative trend was found for the AI in Serrekunda.

  7. Enviro-HIRLAM in Studies of Urban and Aerosol Impacts on Metropolitan Areas: Science-Education Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahura, Alexander; Nuterman, Roman; Mazeikis, Adomas; Gonzalez-Aparicio, Iratxe; Ivanov, Sergey; Palamarchuk, Julia

    2014-05-01

    into account urban (anthropogenic heat flux, roughness, buildings and their characteristics), chemical species/ aerosol (feedback mechanisms) effects with further analysis of temporal and spatial variability of diurnal cycle for meteorological variables of key importance. Main items of listed above YSSS small-scale research projects include the following: • Introduction with background discussions (with brainstorming to outline research and technical tasks planned including main goal, specific objectives, etc.) in groups; • Analysis of meteorological situations (selecting specific cases/ dates using surface maps, diagrams of vertical sounding, and surface meteorological measurements); • Learning practical technical steps (in order to make necessary changes in the model and implementing urban and aerosol effects, compiling executables, making test runs); • Performing model runs/simulations at different options (dates, control vs. modified urban and aerosol runs, forecast lengths, spatial and temporal resolutions, etc.); • Visualization/ plotting of results obtained (in a form of graphs, tables, animations); • Evaluation of possible impact on urban areas (estimating differences between the control and modified runs through temporal and spatial variability of simulated meteorological (air temperature, wind speed, relative humidity, sensible and latent heat fluxes, etc.) and chemical pollutants (concentration and deposition) fields/ patterns; • Team's oral presentation of the project about results and findings and following guidelines (including aim and specific objectives, methodology and approaches, results and discussions with examples, conclusions, acknowledgements, references). Outline and detailed description of the developed approach, key items of the research projects and their schedules, preparatory steps including team of students' familiarization with general information on planned exercises and literature list (composed of required, recommended

  8. Enviro-HIRLAM in Studies of Urban and Aerosol Impacts on Metropolitan Areas: Science-Education Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahura, Alexander; Nuterman, Roman; Mazeikis, Adomas; Gonzalez-Aparicio, Iratxe; Ivanov, Sergey; Palamarchuk, Julia

    2014-05-01

    into account urban (anthropogenic heat flux, roughness, buildings and their characteristics), chemical species/ aerosol (feedback mechanisms) effects with further analysis of temporal and spatial variability of diurnal cycle for meteorological variables of key importance. Main items of listed above YSSS small-scale research projects include the following: • Introduction with background discussions (with brainstorming to outline research and technical tasks planned including main goal, specific objectives, etc.) in groups; • Analysis of meteorological situations (selecting specific cases/ dates using surface maps, diagrams of vertical sounding, and surface meteorological measurements); • Learning practical technical steps (in order to make necessary changes in the model and implementing urban and aerosol effects, compiling executables, making test runs); • Performing model runs/simulations at different options (dates, control vs. modified urban and aerosol runs, forecast lengths, spatial and temporal resolutions, etc.); • Visualization/ plotting of results obtained (in a form of graphs, tables, animations); • Evaluation of possible impact on urban areas (estimating differences between the control and modified runs through temporal and spatial variability of simulated meteorological (air temperature, wind speed, relative humidity, sensible and latent heat fluxes, etc.) and chemical pollutants (concentration and deposition) fields/ patterns; • Team's oral presentation of the project about results and findings and following guidelines (including aim and specific objectives, methodology and approaches, results and discussions with examples, conclusions, acknowledgements, references). Outline and detailed description of the developed approach, key items of the research projects and their schedules, preparatory steps including team of students' familiarization with general information on planned exercises and literature list (composed of required, recommended

  9. High Surface Area Tunnels in Hexagonal WO₃.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wanmei; Yeung, Michael T; Lech, Andrew T; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chain; Li, Tianqi; Duan, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Jun; Kaner, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    High surface area in h-WO3 has been verified from the intracrystalline tunnels. This bottom-up approach differs from conventional templating-type methods. The 3.67 Å diameter tunnels are characterized by low-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherms with nonlocal density functional theory fitting, transmission electron microscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. These open and rigid tunnels absorb H(+) and Li(+), but not Na(+) in aqueous electrolytes without inducing a phase transformation, accessing both internal and external active sites. Moreover, these tunnel structures demonstrate high specific pseudocapacitance and good stability in an H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. Thus, the high surface area created from 3.67 Å diameter tunnels in h-WO3 shows potential applications in electrochemical energy storage, selective ion transfer, and selective gas adsorption.

  10. MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth retrieval over land considering surface BRDF effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yerong; de Graaf, Martin; Menenti, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere play an important role in the climate system and human health. Retrieval from satellite data, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), one of most important indices of aerosol optical properties, has been extensively investigated. Benefiting from the high resolution at spatial and temporal and the maturity of the aerosol retrieval algorithm, MOderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Dark Target AOD product has been extensively applied in other scientific research such as climate change and air pollution. The latest product - MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target AOD (C6_DT) has been released. However, the accuracy of C6_DT AOD (global mean ±0.03) over land is still too low for the constraint on radiative forcing in the climate system, where the uncertainty should be reduced to ±0.02. The major uncertainty mainly lies on the underestimation/overestimation of the surface contribution to the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA) radiance since a lambertian surface is assumed in the C6_DT land algorithm. In the real world, it requires considering the heterogeneity of the surface reflection in the radiative transfer process. Based on this, we developed a new algorithm to retrieve AOD by considering surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effects. The surface BRDF is much more complicated than isotropic reflection, described as 4 elements: directional-directional, directional-hemispherical, hemispherical-directional and hemispherical-hemispherical reflectance, and coupled into radiative transfer equation to generate an accurate top of atmosphere reflectance. The limited MODIS measurements (three channels available) allow us to retrieve only three parameters, which including AOD, the surface directional-directional reflectance and fine aerosol ratio η. The other three elements of the surface reflectance are expected to be constrained by ancillary data and assumptions or "a priori" information since there are more unknowns than MODIS

  11. Model for a surface film of fatty acids on rain water and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Winfried

    Organic compounds with polar groups can form films on the water surface which lower the surface tension and may hinder the transport of water vapor and trace gases through the interface. A model is presented which describes in detail surface films formed by fatty acids. The model has been applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids on rain water and atmospheric aerosol particles. In most cases only a diluted film has been calculated which does not affect their physical and chemical properties. The exception was a clean region in the western USA, where the fatty acid concentrations are sufficiently high to form a dense film on atmospheric aerosol particles. An algorithm for the identification of the sources of fatty acids was developed. It showed leaf abrasion or biomass burning as a major source of fatty acids in the western USA.

  12. Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the

  13. Relating Aerosol Profile and Column Measurements to Surface Concentrations: What Have We Learned from Discover-AQ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    One research goal of the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission was to determine sufficient column profile measurements to relate column integrated quantities such as Aerosol Optical Depth to surface concentrations. I will review the relationship between AOD and PM2.5 at the surface. DISCOVER-AQ in Baltimore, the San Joaquin Valley, Houston and Denver revealed quite different conditions for determining this relationship. In each case, the surface reflectivity made determination of aerosol optical depth challenging, but upward looking columns of aerosol optical depth from sunphotometers provided confirmation of the AOD results from space. In Baltimore, AOD fields reflected PM2.5 concentrations well. In California, however, the low boundary layer heights and dominance of nitrate and organic aerosols made the AOD fields less predictive of PM2.5. In California and Colorado, hydration of the aerosol varied dramatically with aerosol type (especially smoke and dust) and revealed that without an understanding of the degree of aerosol hydration with aerosol composition, the relationship between AOD and PM2.5 will continue to be a challenge. Model predictions in the Baltimore-Washington study are relatively disappointing in helping define the needed physics between the optical and microphysical properties. An overview of the measurements from DISCOVER-AQ which will help define the needed information in a more general case in the future will be given.

  14. Aerosol anomalies in Nimbus-7 coastal zone color scanner data obtained in Japan area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, Hajime; Sugimori, Yasuhiro; Toratani, Mitsuhiro; Smith, Raymond C.; Yasuda, Yoshizumi

    1989-01-01

    About 400 CZCS (coastal zone color scanner) scenes covering the Japan area in November 1978-May 1982 were processed to study the applicability of the Gordon-Clark atmospheric correction scheme which produces water-leaving radiances Lw at 443 nm, 520 nm, and 550 nm as well as phytoplankton pigment maps. Typical spring-fall aerosol radiance in the images was found to be 0.8-1.5 micro-W/sq cm-nm-sr, which is about 50 percent more than reported for the US eastern coastal images. The correction for about half the data resulted in negative Lw (443) values, implying overestimation of the aerosol effect for this channel. Several possible reasons for this are considered, including deviation of the aerosol optical thickness tau(a) at 443 nm from that estimated by Angstrom's exponential law, which the algorithm assumes. The analysis shows that, assuming the use of the Gordon-Clark algorithm, and for a pigment concentration of about 1 microgram/l, -40 percent to +100 percent error in satellite estimates is common. Although this does not fully explain the negative Lw (443) in the satellite data, it seems to contribute to the problem significantly, together with other error sources, including one in the sensor calibration.

  15. Marine aerosol as a possible source for endotoxins in coastal areas.

    PubMed

    Lang-Yona, Naama; Lehahn, Yoav; Herut, Barak; Burshtein, Noa; Rudich, Yinon

    2014-11-15

    Marine aerosols, that are very common in the highly populated coastal cities and communities, may contain biological constituents. Some of this biological fraction of marine aerosols, such as cyanobacteria and plankton debris, may influence human health by inflammation and allergic reactions when inhaled. In this study we identify and compare sources for endotoxins sampled on filters in an on-shore and more-inland site. Filter analysis included endotoxin content, total bacteria, gram-negative bacteria and cyanobacteria genome concentrations as well as ion content in order to identify possible sources for the endotoxins. Satellite images of chlorophyll-a levels and back trajectory analysis were used to further study the cyanobacteria blooms in the sea, close to the trajectory of the sampled air. The highest endotoxin concentrations found in the shoreline site were during winter (3.23±0.17 EU/m(3)), together with the highest cyanobacteria genome (1065.5 genome/m(3)). The elevated endotoxin concentrations were significantly correlated with cyanobacterial levels scaled to the presence of marine aerosol (r=0.90), as well as to chlorophyll-a (r=0.96). Filters sampled further inland showed lower and non-significant correlation between endotoxin and cyanobacteria (r=0.70, P value=0.19), suggesting decrease in marine-originated endotoxin, with possible contributions from other sources of gram-negative non-cyanobacteria. We conclude that marine cyanobacteria may be a dominant contributor to elevated endotoxin levels in coastal areas.

  16. Aerosol characteristics and surface radiative forcing components during a dust outbreak in Gwangju, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ogunjobi, K O; Kim, Y J

    2008-02-01

    Atmospheric surface aerosol radiative forcing (SARF) DeltaF, forcing efficiency DeltaF(e) and fractional forcing efficiency DeltaFF(e) evaluated from cloud-screened narrowband spectral and thermal-offset-corrected radiometric observations during the Asia dust outbreak episodes in Gwangju, Republic of Korea are reported in this study. Columnar aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth (AOD), tau (alambda), Angstrom exponent alpha, mass concentration of fine and coarse mode particles) were also reported for the station between January 2000 and May 2001 consisting of 211cloud-free days. Results indicate that majority of the AOD were within the range 0.25-0.45 while some high aerosol events in which AODs > or = 0.6 were observed during the severe dust episodes. For example, AOD increases from annual average value of 0.34 +/- 0.13 at 501 nm to values >0.60 during the major dust events of March 27-30 and April 7-9, 2000, respectively. The alpha (501-870 nm) which is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size had values ranging from 0.01 to 1.77. The diurnal forcing efficiency DeltaDF(e) at Gwangju was estimated to be -81.10 +/- 5.14 W m (-2)/tau (501 nm) and -47.09 +/- 2.20 W m (-2)/tau (501 nm) for the total solar broadband and visible band pass, respectively while the fractional diurnal forcing efficiency DeltaFDF(e) were -15.8 +/- 0.64%/tau (501 nm) and -22.87 +/- 1.13%/tau (501 nm) for the same band passes. Analyses of the 5-day air-mass back trajectories were further developed for Gwangju in order to classify the air-mass and types of aerosol reaching the site during the Asia dust episodes.

  17. AERONET data investigation of the aerosol mixtures over Iasi area, One-year time scale overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazacu, Mihai Marius; Timofte, Adrian; Unga, Florin; Albina, Bogdan; Gurlui, Silviu

    2015-03-01

    In order to analyze the troposphere dynamics under particular conditions in North-East region of Romania, various types of aerosols chemical compositions have been studied using complementary techniques. Thus, the seasonal trends of aerosols and its external influences have been studied using aerosol optical properties retrieved from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Complementary studies were taken into account by using several meteorological factors, computational models and meteorological data. Moreover, this paper presents optical properties analysis of different types of aerosols and the seasonal variability of them in one year of measurements. The major categories of aerosol types are evidenced, such as urban/industrial aerosol, biomass burning and mineral dust.

  18. Contrasting characteristics of the surface energy balance between the urban and rural areas of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Gao, Zhiqiu; Miao, Shiguang; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Ting; Liu, Maofeng; Li, Dan

    2015-04-01

    A direct comparison of urban and rural surface energy balances, as well as a variety of other variables including incoming shortwave/longwave radiation and aerosol optical depth, is conducted for the Beijing metropolitan area. The results indicate that, overall, the urban area receives a smaller amount of incoming shortwave radiation but a larger amount of incoming longwave radiation. However, comparisons in the aerosol optical depth and cloud fraction at the two locations suggest that neither aerosol optical depth nor cloud fraction alone can explain the difference in the incoming shortwave radiation. The urban-rural differences in the incoming longwave radiation are unlikely to be caused by the presence of more abundant greenhouse gases over the urban area, as suggested by some previous studies, given that water vapor is the most dominant greenhouse gas and precipitable water is found to be less in urban areas. The higher incoming longwave radiation observed over the urban area is mostly likely due to the higher temperatures of the ambient air. The urban area is also found to always produce higher sensible heat fluxes and lower latent heat fluxes in the growing season. Furthermore, the urban area is associated with a larger amount of available energy (the sum of sensible and latent heat fluxes) than the rural area, except in May and October when evapotranspiration in the rural area significantly exceeds that in the urban area. This study provides observational evidence of urban-rural contrasts in relevant energy-balance components that plausibly arise from urban-rural differences in atmospheric and land-surface conditions.

  19. Modeling South America regional smoke plume: aerosol optical depth variability and shortwave surface forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosário, N. E.; Longo, K. M.; Freitas, S. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Fonseca, R. M.

    2012-07-01

    Intra-seasonal variability of smoke aerosol optical depth (AOD) and downwelling solar irradiance at the surface during the 2002 biomass burning season in South America was modeled using the Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT-BRAMS). Measurements of AOD from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and solar irradiance at the surface from the Solar Radiation Network (SolRad-NET) were used to evaluate model results. In general, the major features associated with AOD evolution over the southern part of the Amazon Basin and cerrado ecosystem are captured by the model. The main discrepancies were found for high aerosol loading events. In the northeastern portion of the Amazon Basin the model systematically underestimated AOD. This is likely due to the cloudy nature of the region, preventing accurate detection of the fire spots used in the emission model. Moreover, measured AOD were very often close to background conditions and emissions other than smoke were not considered in the simulation. Therefore, under the background scenario, one would expect the model to underestimate AOD. The issue of high aerosol loading events in the southern part of the Amazon and cerrado is also discussed in the context of emission shortcomings. The Cuiabá cerrado site was the only one where the highest quality AERONET data were unavailable. Thus, lower quality data were used. Root-mean-square-error (RMSE) between the model and observations decreased from 0.48 to 0.17 when extreme AOD events (AOD550 nm ≥ 1.0) and Cuiabá were excluded from analysis. Downward surface solar irradiance comparisons also followed similar trends when extremes AOD were excluded. This highlights the need to improve the modelling of the regional smoke plume in order to enhance the accuracy of the radiative energy budget. Aerosol optical model based on the mean intensive properties of smoke from the southern part of the

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of liquid solutions: a comparative study on the forms of liquid surface and liquid aerosol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyan; Guo, Lianbo; Li, Jiaming; Yi, Rongxing; Hao, Zhongqi; Shen, Meng; Zhou, Ran; Li, Kuohu; Li, Xiangyou; Lu, Yongfeng; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-09-10

    Liquid surface and liquid aerosol as the traditional liquid forms for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP), respectively, have been used to analyze chromium (Cr) and cadmium (Cd) elements using LIBS in a liquid solution. The spectral differences, the effects of laser energy and laser frequency, the accumulated number of laser pulses, gate delay time, and the quantitative analyses for a liquid surface and a liquid aerosol were compared. The results showed that the liquid surface demonstrated a lower plasma threshold, higher optical emission intensity, and higher single-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the intensities of the liquid aerosol are better than those of the liquid surface. Furthermore, the results of the quantitative analyses of Cr I 357.86 nm and Cd I 361.05 nm of the liquid surface are close to those of the liquid aerosol. The limit of detections of Cr and Cd of the liquid surface were 2.764 and 86.869  μg/mL, which were close to those of liquid aerosol, 2.847  μg/mL of Cr and 97.635  μg/mL of Cd. For both the liquid surface and liquid aerosol, the coefficient of determination R2 of the calibration curve for Cr and Cd were above 0.99, and the average RSDs of Cr and Cd of the liquid surface were 0.027 and 0.054, which were similar to the 0.020 of Cr and 0.042 of Cd of the liquid aerosol. These results suggest that both the liquid surface and aerosol have similar detection abilities for water quality monitoring. PMID:27661382

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of liquid solutions: a comparative study on the forms of liquid surface and liquid aerosol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyan; Guo, Lianbo; Li, Jiaming; Yi, Rongxing; Hao, Zhongqi; Shen, Meng; Zhou, Ran; Li, Kuohu; Li, Xiangyou; Lu, Yongfeng; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-09-10

    Liquid surface and liquid aerosol as the traditional liquid forms for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP), respectively, have been used to analyze chromium (Cr) and cadmium (Cd) elements using LIBS in a liquid solution. The spectral differences, the effects of laser energy and laser frequency, the accumulated number of laser pulses, gate delay time, and the quantitative analyses for a liquid surface and a liquid aerosol were compared. The results showed that the liquid surface demonstrated a lower plasma threshold, higher optical emission intensity, and higher single-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the intensities of the liquid aerosol are better than those of the liquid surface. Furthermore, the results of the quantitative analyses of Cr I 357.86 nm and Cd I 361.05 nm of the liquid surface are close to those of the liquid aerosol. The limit of detections of Cr and Cd of the liquid surface were 2.764 and 86.869  μg/mL, which were close to those of liquid aerosol, 2.847  μg/mL of Cr and 97.635  μg/mL of Cd. For both the liquid surface and liquid aerosol, the coefficient of determination R2 of the calibration curve for Cr and Cd were above 0.99, and the average RSDs of Cr and Cd of the liquid surface were 0.027 and 0.054, which were similar to the 0.020 of Cr and 0.042 of Cd of the liquid aerosol. These results suggest that both the liquid surface and aerosol have similar detection abilities for water quality monitoring.

  2. Effect of the aerosol type uncertainty on the surface reflectance retrieval using CHRIS/PROBA hyperspectral images over land.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirelli, C.; Manzo, C.; Curci, G.; Bassani, C.

    2014-12-01

    The surface reflectance is crucial for the quantitative analysis of land surface properties in geological, agricultural and urban studies. The first requirement for a reliable surface reflectance estimation is an accurate atmospheric correction obtained by an appropriate selection of aerosol loading and type. The aerosol optical thickness at 550nm is widely used to describe the aerosol loading. Recent works have highlighted the relevant role of the aerosol types on the atmospheric correction process defined by their micro-physical properties. The aim of this work is to evaluate the radiative impact of the aerosol type on the surface reflectance obtained from CHRIS (Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) hyperspectral data over land. CHRIS on PROBA satellite is an high resolution multi-angular imaging spectrometer, operating in the visible near-infrared spectral domain (400 to 1000 nm). As test case the urban site of Brussels has been selected. The physically-based algorithm CHRIS@CRI (CHRIS Atmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) has been developed specifically for CHRIS data by using the vector version of 6S (6SV) radiative transfer model. The atmospheric data needed for the atmospheric correction were obtained from CIMEL CE-318 of the Brussels AERONET station. CHRIS images were selected if simultaneous AERONET data were available. Other specific requirements for imagery acquisition were high aerosol loading and high solar irradiation. The aerosol radiative impact has been investigated comparing the reflectance obtained by applying the CHRIS@CRI algorithm with different aerosol types: the three aerosol standard of 6SV and two characterized by specific microphysical properties provided by the AERONET station and calculated with FlexAOD code (a post-processing tool of the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem), respectively. The results show a clear dependence of the atmospheric correction results on the aerosol absorption properties.

  3. The effect of aerosols and sea surface temperature on China's climate over the late twentieth century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Focusing on China in the second half of the twentieth century, we examine the relative role of aerosols and prescribed, observation based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) for the evolution of surface solar radiation (SSR), surface air temperature (SAT), and precipitation in ensembles of transient (1870 - 2005) sensitivity experiments with the global climate model ECHAM5-HAM. Observations and simulations with transient SSTs and aerosol emissions agree reasonably well in eastern China in terms of SSR dimming (-6 +/- 2 W/m2/decade, 1960 - 2000), statistically non-significant JJA SAT trend (1950 - 2000), and drying in JJA from 1950 to 1990 (-2.5% to -3.5% per decade, essentially via reduction of convective precipitation). Other major observed features are not reproduce by the model, e.g. precipitation increase in the 1990s in the Yangtze valley, the strong warming in winter in northern parts of China and Mongolia, or SSR dimming in western China. For the model results, SO2 emissions are more relevant than emissions of black and organic carbon. Aerosol effects are less pronounced at higher model resolution. Transient SSTs are found to be crucial for decadal scale SAT variability over land, especially the strong warming in the 1990s, and, via SST forced reduction of cloud cover, for the ceasing of SSR dimming around the year 2000. Unforced cloud variability leads to relevant scatter (up to +/- 2 W/m2/decade) of modeled SSR trends at individual observation sites.

  4. Final report. [Impact of tropospheric aerosols on the past surface radiation income: Calibration with ARM site data

    SciTech Connect

    Kukla, George

    2001-03-15

    This work involved a comparison of surface solar radiation observations from the SOCMET-DATA BASE from 1960-1990 and results from a General Circulation Model to test and evaluate the effects of tropospheric aerosols on clouds.

  5. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Ng, N. L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P. S.; Herndon, S. C.; Brooks, B.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Fleming, Z.; Visser, S.; Prevot, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the spatial distribution of PM1 in the greater London area during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012 by applying two High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). While the concentration of organic aerosol (OA) is comparable between the rural and urban sites, the OA sources are distinctly different. Due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area, the concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site. In contrast, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. This is likely caused by a steep concentration gradient of OOA when air masses are advected from polluted mainland Europe. Taking advantage of low biogenic emissions in winter, the sources of OOA, which are highly uncertain, are investigated. Combing Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis and radiocarbon analysis, the majority of OOA is estimated to arise from aged biomass burning. We deploy a suite of instruments to investigate the organic volatility at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250°C in a thermal-denuder (TD), the mass fraction remaining of organics is 16%, which indicates the presence of non-volatile organics. By comparing the OA associated with refractory black carbon (measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) and total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS), we proposed that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have undergone similar chemical processing as refractory black carbon in the atmosphere. Finally, we will discuss the relationship between the volatility and the degree of oxidation of organics.

  6. High surface area, high permeability carbon monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    The goal of this work is to prepare carbon monoliths having precisely tailored pore size distribution. Prior studies have demonstrated that poly(acrylonitrile) can be processed into a precursor having tailored macropore structure. Since the macropores were preserved during pyrolysis, this synthetic process provided a route to porous carbon having macropores with size =0.1 to 10{mu}m. No micropores of size <2 nm could be detected in the carbon, however, by nitrogen adsorption. In the present work, the authors have processed a different polymer, poly(vinylidene chloride) into a macroporous precursor, Pyrolysis produced carbon monoliths having macropores derived from the polymer precursor as well as extensive microporosity produced during the pyrolysis of the polymer. One of these carbons had BET surface area of 1,050 m{sup 2}/g and about 1.2 cc/g total pore volume, with about 1/3 of the total pore volume in micropores and the remainder in 1{mu}m macropores. No mesopores in the intermediate size range could be detected by nitrogen adsorption. Carbon materials having high surface area as well as micron size pores have potential applications as electrodes for double layer supercapacitors containing liquid electrolyte, or as efficient media for performing chemical separations.

  7. Heterogeneous reactions of surface-adsorbed catechol with nitrogen dioxide: substrate effects for tropospheric aerosol surrogates.

    PubMed

    Woodill, Laurie A; Hinrichs, Ryan Z

    2010-09-28

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric aerosols thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed catechol with nitrogen dioxide. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO(2) with NaCl-adsorbed catechol produced 4-nitrocatechol, 1,2-benzoquinone, and the ring-cleaved product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4% at relative humidity (RH) < 2%, respectively. The reaction was first-order with respect to both catechol and NO(2). The reactive uptake coefficient for NO(2) + NaCl-adsorbed catechol increased from 3 x 10(-6) at <2% RH to 7 x 10(-6) at 30% RH. These reactions were more than two orders of magnitude more reactive than NaCl without adsorbed catechol. The 4-nitrocatechol product yield was enhanced on NaF, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced considerably more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. This substrate effect is discussed in terms of each substrate's ability to polarize the phenol group and hinder hydrogen atom abstraction from intermediate o-semiquinone radicals. These dark heterogeneous reactions may alter the UV-visible absorbing properties of tropospheric aerosols and may also contribute as a dark source of NO(2)(-)/HONO. These results contrast prior observations which found pure catechol thin films unreactive with NO(2), highlighting the need to specifically consider substrate and matrix effects in laboratory systems.

  8. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Fleming, Z. L.; Visser, S.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Ng, N. L.

    2015-08-01

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 μm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the sources of OA are distinctly different. The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC, measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for < 10 % of the total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS) at 250 °C, the two measurements are well-correlated, suggesting that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have undergone similar chemical processing as rBC in the atmosphere

  9. Lung deposited surface area size distributions of particulate matter in different urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuuluvainen, Heino; Rönkkö, Topi; Järvinen, Anssi; Saari, Sampo; Karjalainen, Panu; Lähde, Tero; Pirjola, Liisa; Niemi, Jarkko V.; Hillamo, Risto; Keskinen, Jorma

    2016-07-01

    Lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration is considered as a relevant metric for the negative health effects of aerosol particles. We report for the first time the size distributions of the LDSA measured in urban air. The measurements were carried out in the metropolitan area of Helsinki, including mobile laboratory and stationary measurements in different outdoor environments, such as traffic sites, a park area, the city center and residential areas. The main instrument in this study was an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI), which was calibrated in the field to measure the LDSA concentration. The calibration factor was determined to be 60 μm2/(cm3 pA). In the experiments, the LDSA size distributions were found to form two modes at the traffic sites and in the city center. Both of these traffic related particle modes, the nucleation mode and the soot mode, had a clear contribution to the total LDSA concentration. The average total concentrations varied from 12 to 94 μm2/cm3, measured in the park area and at the traffic site next to a major road, respectively. The LDSA concentration was found to correlate with the mass of fine particles (PM2.5), but the relation of these two metrics varied between different environments, emphasizing the influence of traffic on the LDSA. The results of this study provide valuable information on the total concentrations and size distributions of the LDSA for epidemiological studies. The size distributions are especially important in estimating the contribution of outdoor concentrations on the concentrations inside buildings and vehicles through size-dependent penetration factors.

  10. Changes in droplet surface tension affect the observed hygroscopicity of photochemically aged biomass burning aerosol.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Michael R; Short, Daniel Z; Hosseini, Seyedehsan; Lichtenberg, William; Asa-Awuku, Akua A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the hygroscopic and surface tension properties as a function of photochemical aging of the aerosol emissions from biomass burning. Experiments were conducted in a chamber setting at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and off-line filter sample analysis were conducted. The water-soluble organic carbon content and surface tension of the extracted filter samples were measured. Surface tension information was then examined with Köhler theory analysis to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning smoke from two chaparral fuels is shown to depress the surface tension of water by 30% or more at organic matter concentrations relevant at droplet activation. Accounting for surface tension depression can lower the calculated κ by a factor of 2. This work provides evidence for surface tension depression in an important aerosol system and may provide closure for differing sub- and supersaturated κ measurements. PMID:23957441

  11. Aerosol and Surface Parameter Retrievals for a Multi-Angle, Multiband Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This software retrieves the surface and atmosphere parameters of multi-angle, multiband spectra. The synthetic spectra are generated by applying the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model, and a single-scattering dominated atmosphere model to surface reflectance data from Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The aerosol physical model uses a single scattering approximation using Rayleigh scattering molecules, and Henyey-Greenstein aerosols. The surface and atmosphere parameters of the models are retrieved using the Lavenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The software can retrieve the surface and atmosphere parameters with two different scales. The surface parameters are retrieved pixel-by-pixel while the atmosphere parameters are retrieved for a group of pixels where the same atmosphere model parameters are applied. This two-scale approach allows one to select the natural scale of the atmosphere properties relative to surface properties. The software also takes advantage of an intelligent initial condition given by the solution of the neighbor pixels.

  12. Changes in droplet surface tension affect the observed hygroscopicity of photochemically aged biomass burning aerosol.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Michael R; Short, Daniel Z; Hosseini, Seyedehsan; Lichtenberg, William; Asa-Awuku, Akua A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the hygroscopic and surface tension properties as a function of photochemical aging of the aerosol emissions from biomass burning. Experiments were conducted in a chamber setting at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and off-line filter sample analysis were conducted. The water-soluble organic carbon content and surface tension of the extracted filter samples were measured. Surface tension information was then examined with Köhler theory analysis to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning smoke from two chaparral fuels is shown to depress the surface tension of water by 30% or more at organic matter concentrations relevant at droplet activation. Accounting for surface tension depression can lower the calculated κ by a factor of 2. This work provides evidence for surface tension depression in an important aerosol system and may provide closure for differing sub- and supersaturated κ measurements.

  13. Titan's Aerosols Interacting with Its Surface: The Potential Role of Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Patrice; Ramirez, S. I.; Buch, A.; Brassé, C.; Raulin, F.

    2009-09-01

    We performed a laboratory study on the chemical transformation of Titan's aerosols when placed under putative surface conditions of the satellite. Titan's surface was one of the targets of the Cassini-Huygens mission and of several of the Cassini orbiter instruments. The first images revealed an interesting solid surface with features that suggest aeolian, tectonic, fluvial processes and even an impact structure. Since then, more detailed descriptions of dunes, channels, lakes, impact craters and cryovolcanic structures have been documented. The existence of an internal liquid water ocean, containing a few percent ammonia has been proposed. It has also been proposed that ammonia-water mixtures can erupt from the putative subsurface ocean leading to cryovolcanism. The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper obtained SAR images that revealed a highly complex geology occurring at Titan's surface, among which cryovolcanic features play a central role. The composition of the cryomagma is mainly proposed to be a mixture of water ice and ammonia, although ammonia has not been directly detected on Titan. In order to understand the role that ammonia may have on the chemical transformation of the atmospheric aerosols once they reach the surface, we designed the following laboratory protocol: analogues of Titan's aerosols were synthesized from a N2:CH4 mixture irradiated under a continuous flow regime, inside which a cold plasma was established. The synthesized particles were then partitioned in several samples that were placed in aqueous ammonia solutions at different temperatures for 3 weeks. After a derivatization process performed to the refractory phase, the products were analyzed. We found derived residues related to glycine and alanine as well as urea, that may have important astrobiological implications to Titan's environment. Therefore, this kind of studies helps to better understand the geological processes of Titan's surface and its relationship with the active organic

  14. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Liger-Belair, G.; Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Kattner, G.; Harir, M.; Kanawati, B.; Lucio, M.; Tziotis, D.; Hertkorn, N.; Gebefügi, I.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by adsorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of primary marine aerosols, i.e., the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere was studied, and we present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using high resolution analytical tools (Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance = FT-ICR MS and NMR). We could experimentally confirm the chemo-selective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of concentrated compounds were CHO and CHOS type of molecules, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content and typical surfactants. A non-targeted mass spectrometric analysis of the samples showed that many of these molecules correspond to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxyl-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of production of sea spray leaves a specific biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding lower atmosphere that can be transported laterally in the context of global cycling.

  15. Application of aerosol optical properties to estimate aerosol type from ground-based remote sensing observation at urban area of northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Huizheng; Zhao, Hujia; Wu, Yunfei; Xia, Xiangao; Zhu, Jun; Dubovik, Oleg; Estelles, Victor; Ma, Yanjun; Wang, Yangfeng; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yaqiang; Zhang, Xiaoye; Shi, Guangyu

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties were derived from ground-based sunphotometer observations between 2009-2013 at three urban sites of Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun in northeastern China. The annual means for extinction aerosol optical depths (EAOD) at 500 nm were 0.57±0.38, 0.52±0.35, and 0.41±0.31 at Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun, respectively. The corresponding annual means for the extinction Angstrom exponents (EAE) computed for the wavelengths of 440 and 870 nm were 0.86±0.32, 0.86±0.34 and 0.91±0.35, respectively, indicating that urban area of Northeast China were affected by both coarse and fine particles. Hygroscopic growth in summer and incursions of dust aerosols in spring were evidently revealed from the analysis of the relationship between EAE and δEAE (the EAE difference, δEAE=EAE(440,670)-EAE(670,870)). The annual mean absorption aerosol optical depths (AAOD440 nm) values at Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun were 0.15±0.11, 0.10±0.07, 0.08±0.04, respectively. The annual mean absorption Angstrom exponents (AAE440-870 nm) values were 0.86±0.24, 1.19±0.39, 1.33±0.36 at Shenyang, Anshan, Fushun, respectively. When the AAEs were close to unity at Anshan, the absorption aerosol particles evidently consisted of black carbon from coal combustion and motor vehicles. Larger AAEs at Fushun were indicative of absorbing aerosols mainly from biomass burning and mineral dust. The AAE at Shenyang was<1 which may be consistent with black carbon particles with absorbing or non-absorbing coatings. Analysis of the relationship between the AAEs and extinction Angstrom exponents showed that the aerosol populations at these three sites could be classified as "mixed-small particles" including anthropogenic particles and secondary organic aerosol with highly variable sphericity fractions.

  16. Accuracy of fuzzy burned area mapping as a function of the aerosol parameterization of atmospheric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Ramin; Stroppiana, Daniela; Bresciani, Mariano; Giardino, Claudia; Boschetti, Mirco; Brivio, Pietro A.

    2013-10-01

    Mediterranean forests are every year affected by wildfires which have a significant effect on the ecosystem. Mapping burned areas is an important field of application for optical remote sensing techniques and several methodologies have been developed in order to improve mapping accuracy. We developed an automated procedure based on spectral indices and fuzzy theory for mapping burned areas from atmospherically corrected Landsat TM images. The algorithm proved to provide consistent accuracy over Mediterranean areas. We further tested algorithm's performance to assess the influence of the atmospheric correction on the accuracy of burned areas. In particular, we ran the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) code with different Atmospheric Optical Thickness (AOT) levels and two aerosol models (continental and maritime) on one TM image acquired over Portugal (12/08/2003). Burned area maps derived from atmospherically corrected images and from the non corrected image (Top Of Atmosphere, TOA) have been analyzed. In the output burned areas maps the omission error varies in the range 4.6-6.5% and the commission error fluctuates between 11.9 and 22.2%; the highest omission (commission) errors occur with the continental (maritime) model. The accuracy of burned area maps derived from non corrected image is very low, with omission error greater than 90%. These results show that, although atmospheric correction is needed for the application of the algorithm, the AOT value does not significantly affect the performance.

  17. Dust, Pollution, and Biomass Burning Aerosols in Asian Pacific: A Column Satellite-Surface Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2004-01-01

    Airborne dusts from northern China contribute a significant part of the air quality problem and, to some extent, regional climatic impact in Asia during spring-time. However, with the economical growth in China, increases in the emission of air pollutants generated from industrial and vehicular sources will not only impact the radiation balance, but adverse health effects to humans all year round. In addition, both of these dust and air pollution clouds can transport swiftly across the Pacific reaching North America within a few days, possessing an even larger scale effect. The Asian dust and air pollution aerosols can be detected by its colored appearance on current Earth observing satellites (e.g., MODIS, SeaWiFS, TOMS, etc.) and its evolution monitored by satellites and surface network. Biomass burning has been a regular practice for land clearing and land conversion in many countries, especially those in Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia. However, the unique climatology of Southeast Asia is very different than that of Africa and South America, such that large-scale biomass burning causes smoke to interact extensively with clouds during the peak-burning season of March to April. Significant global sources of greenhouse gases (e.g., CO2, CH4), chemically active gases (e.g., NO, CO, HC, CH3Br), and atmospheric aerosols are produced by biomass burning processes. These gases influence the Earth-atmosphere system, impacting both global climate and tropospheric chemistry. Some aerosols can serve as cloud condensation nuclei, which play an important role in determining cloud lifetime and precipitation, hence, altering the earth's radiation and water budget. Biomass burning also affects the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen and carbon compounds from the soil to the atmosphere; the hydrological cycle (i.e., run off and evaporation); land surface reflectivity and emissivity; as well as ecosystem biodiversity and stability. Two new initiatives, EAST-AIRE (East

  18. Surface and Column Aerosol Impacts of the United States' Natural Gas Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burney, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper quantifies the air pollution and climate impacts of the natural gas transition over the past decade in the United States. We integrate satellite and ground measurements with chemical transport modeling to understand the impact of of the large-scale shift from coal to natural gas on the quantity and chemical composition of column aerosol and surface particulate matter. We leverage the natural experiment of individual units that changed technologies (a sharp discontinuity) as well as state-level changes from old plants being taken offline and new ones being brought online (a soft discontinuity) and connect technology changes to emissions changes to detected aerosol / particulate matter changes. We use this methodology to estimate the size of the 'sulfate' mask due to coal consumption in the United States and understand more fully the climate implications of energy technology changes.

  19. Adsorption of HO(x) on aerosol surfaces - Implications for the atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Leu, M.-T.; Nair, H. A.; Yung, Y. L.

    1993-01-01

    The potential impact of heterogeneous chemistry on the abundance and distribution of HO(x) in the Martian atmosphere is investigated using observational data on dust and ice aerosol distributions combined with an updated photochemical model. Critical parameters include the altitude distributions of aerosols and the surface loss coefficients of HO2 on dust and ice in the lower atmosphere and of H on ice above 40 km. Results of calculations indicate that adsorption of HO2 on dust, or ice near 30 km, can deplete OH abundances in the lower atmosphere by 10 percent or more and that the adsorption of H on ice at 50 km can result in even larger OH depletions (this effect is localized to altitudes greater than 40 km, where CO oxidation is relatively unimportant).

  20. 30 CFR 817.95 - Stabilization of surface areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stabilization of surface areas. 817.95 Section 817.95 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... ACTIVITIES § 817.95 Stabilization of surface areas. (a) All exposed surface areas shall be protected...

  1. A Global Model Simulation of Aerosol Effects of Surface Radiation Budget- Toward Understanding of the "Dimming to Brightening" Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Bian, Huisheng; Yu, Hongbin

    2008-01-01

    We present a global model study on the role aerosols play in the change of solar radiation at Earth's surface that transitioned from a decreasing (dimming) trend to an increasing (brightening) trend. Our primary objective is to understand the relationship between the long-term trends of aerosol emission, atmospheric burden, and surface solar radiation. More specifically, we use the recently compiled comprehensive global emission datasets of aerosols and precursors from fuel combustion, biomass burning, volcanic eruptions and other sources from 1980 to 2006 to simulate long-term variations of aerosol distributions and optical properties, and then calculate the multi-decadal changes of short-wave radiative fluxes at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere by coupling the GOCART model simulated aerosols with the Goddard radiative transfer model. The model results are compared with long-term observational records from ground-based networks and satellite data. We will address the following critical questions: To what extent can the observed surface solar radiation trends, known as the transition from dimming to brightening, be explained by the changes of anthropogenic and natural aerosol loading on global and regional scales? What are the relative contributions of local emission and long-range transport to the surface radiation budget and how do these contributions change with time?

  2. Multi-year Satellite and Surface Observations of AOD in support of Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John

    2012-11-01

    We use combined multi-year measurements from the surface and space for assessing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol properties within a large (~400x400 km) region centered on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, along the East Coast of the United States. The ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements at Martha’s Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) site and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensors on board the Terra and Aqua satellites provide horizontal and temporal variations of aerosol optical depth, while the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) offers the altitudes of aerosol-layers. The combined ground-based and satellite measurements indicated several interesting features among which were the large differences in the aerosol properties observed in July and February. We applied the climatology of aerosol properties for designing the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The TCAP field campaign involves 12-month deployment (started July 1, 2012) of the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod and complimentary aerosol observations from two research aircraft: the DOE Gulfstream-1 (G-1) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) B200 King Air. Using results from the coordinated G-1 and B200 flights during the recent (July, 2012) Intensive Observation Period, we demonstrated that the G-1 in situ measurements and B200 active remote sensing can provide complementary information on the temporal and spatial changes of the aerosol properties off the coast of North America.

  3. Metals and Rare Earth Elements in polar aerosol as specific markers of natural and anthropogenic aerosol sources areas and atmospheric transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardi, Fabio; Becagli, Silvia; Caiazzo, Laura; Cappelletti, David; Grotti, Marco; Malandrino, Mery; Salzano, Roberto; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Metals and Rare Earth Elements (REEs) in the aerosol have conservative properties from the formation to the deposition and can be useful to identify and quantify their natural and anthropic sources and to study the atmospheric transport processes. In spite of their importance relatively little is known about metals and especially REEs in the Artic atmosphere due to their low concentration in such environment. The present work reports the first attempt to determine and interpret the behaviour of metals and REEs in polar aerosol at high temporal resolution. Daily PM10 samples of arctic atmospheric particulate were collected on Teflon filters, during six spring-summer campaigns, since 2010, in the laboratory of Gruvebadet in Ny Ålesund (78°56' N, 11°56' E, Svalbard Islands, Norway). Chemical analyses were carried out through Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer provided with a desolvation nebulizer inlet system, allowing to reduce isobaric interferences and thus to quantify trace and ultra-trace metals in very low concentration in the Arctic aerosol samples. The results are useful in order to study sources areas, transport processes and depositional effects of natural and anthropic atmospheric particulate reaching the Arctic from southern industrialized areas; moreover, the observed seasonal trends give information about the different impact of natural and anthropic emissions driven by phenomena such as the Arctic Haze and the melting of the snow. In particular Rare Earth Elements (often in the ppt range) can be considered as soil's fingerprints of the particulate source areas and their determination, together with air-mass backtrajectory analysis, allow to identify dust source areas for the arctic mineral aerosol.

  4. Effect of spectrally varying albedo of vegetation surfaces on shortwave radiation fluxes and direct aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-06-01

    This study develops an algorithm for the representation of large spectral variations of albedo over vegetation surfaces based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels centered at 0.47, 0.55, 0.67, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.11 μm. The MODIS 7-channel observations miss several major features of vegetation albedo including the vegetation red edge near 0.7 μm and vegetation absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 μm. We characterize these features by investigating aerosol forcing in different spectral ranges. We show that the correction at 0.7 μm is the most sensitive and important due to the presence of the red edge and strong solar radiation; the other two corrections are less sensitive due to the weaker solar radiation and strong atmospheric water absorption. Four traditional approaches for estimating the reflectance spectrum and the MODIS enhanced vegetation albedo (MEVA) are tested against various vegetation types: dry grass, green grass, conifer, and deciduous from the John Hopkins University (JHU) spectral library; aspens from the US Geological Survey (USGS) digital spectral library; and Amazon vegetation types. Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA improves the accuracy of the outgoing flux at the top of the atmosphere by over 60 W m-2 and aerosol forcing by over 10 W m-2. Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol forcing at equator at equinox by 3.7 W m-2 (about 70% of the aerosol forcing calculated with high spectral resolution surface reflectance). These improvements indicate that MEVA can contribute to vegetation covered regional climate studies, and help to improve understanding of climate processes and climate change.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Variations of EC and OC Aerosol Combustion Sources in a Polluted Metropolitan Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Fahrni, S.; Santos, G.; Bush, S. E.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of carbonaceous aerosols are a major component of fine air particulate matter (PM2.5) in polluted metropolitan areas and in the global atmosphere. Elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC) aerosols influence Earth's energy balance by means of direct and indirect pathways and EC has been suggested as a better indicator of public health impacts from combustion-related sources than PM mass. Quantifying the contribution of fossil fuel and biomass combustion to the EC and OC emissions and their temporal and spatial variations is critical for developing efficient legislative air pollution control measures and successful climate mitigation strategies. In this study, we used radiocarbon (14C) to separate and quantify fossil and biomass contributions to a time series of EC and OC collected at 3 locations in Salt Lake City (SLC). Aerosol samples were collected on quartz fiber filters and a modified OC/EC analyzer was used with the Swiss_4S protocol to isolate and trap the EC fraction. Together with the total carbon (TC) content of the samples, the EC was analyzed for its 14C content with accelerator mass spectrometry. The 14C of OC was derived as a mass balance difference between TC and EC. EC had an annual average fraction modern of 0.13±0.06 and did not vary significantly across seasons. OC had an annual average FM of 0.49±0.13, with the winter mean (0.43±0.11) lower than the summer mean (0.64±0.13) at the 5% significance level. While the 3 stations were chosen to represent a variety of environmental conditions within SLC, no major differences in this source partitioning were observed between stations. During winter, the major sources of air pollutants in SLC are motor vehicles and wood stove combustion and determining their relative contributions has been the subject of debate. Our results indicated that fossil fuels were the dominant source of carbonaceous aerosols during winter, contributing 87% or more of the total EC mass and 40-75% of the OC

  6. Damage areas on selected LDEF aluminum surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Atkinson, Dale R.; Allbrooks, Martha K.; Watts, Alan J.; Hennessy, Corey J.; Wagner, John D.

    1993-01-01

    With the U.S. about to embark on a new space age, the effects of the space environment on a spacecraft during its mission lifetime become more relevant. Included among these potential effects are degradation and erosion due to micrometeoroid and debris impacts, atomic oxygen and ultraviolet light exposure as well as material alteration from thermal cycling, and electron and proton exposure. This paper focuses on the effects caused by micrometeoroid and debris impacts on several LDEF aluminum plates from four different bay locations: C-12, C-10, C-01, and E-09. Each plate was coated with either a white, black, or gray thermal paint. Since the plates were located at different orientations on the satellite, their responses to the hypervelocity impacts varied. Crater morphologies range from a series of craters, spall zones, domes, spaces, and rings to simple craters with little or no spall zones. In addition, each of these crater morphologies is associated with varying damage areas, which appear to be related to their respective bay locations and thus exposure angles. More than 5% of the exposed surface area examined was damaged by impact cratering and its coincident effects (i.e., spallation, delamination and blow-off). Thus, results from this analysis may be significant for mission and spacecraft planners and designers.

  7. Parameterization of clear-sky surface irradiance and its implications for estimation of aerosol direct radiative effect and aerosol optical depth

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiangao

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols impact clear-sky surface irradiance () through the effects of scattering and absorption. Linear or nonlinear relationships between aerosol optical depth (τa) and have been established to describe the aerosol direct radiative effect on (ADRE). However, considerable uncertainties remain associated with ADRE due to the incorrect estimation of (τa in the absence of aerosols). Based on data from the Aerosol Robotic Network, the effects of τa, water vapor content (w) and the cosine of the solar zenith angle (μ) on are thoroughly considered, leading to an effective parameterization of as a nonlinear function of these three quantities. The parameterization is proven able to estimate with a mean bias error of 0.32 W m−2, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that derived using earlier linear or nonlinear functions. Applications of this new parameterization to estimate τa from , or vice versa, show that the root-mean-square errors were 0.08 and 10.0 Wm−2, respectively. Therefore, this study establishes a straightforward method to derive from τa or estimate τa from measurements if water vapor measurements are available. PMID:26395310

  8. Parameterization of clear-sky surface irradiance and its implications for estimation of aerosol direct radiative effect and aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiangao

    2015-09-01

    Aerosols impact clear-sky surface irradiance () through the effects of scattering and absorption. Linear or nonlinear relationships between aerosol optical depth (τa) and have been established to describe the aerosol direct radiative effect on (ADRE). However, considerable uncertainties remain associated with ADRE due to the incorrect estimation of (τa in the absence of aerosols). Based on data from the Aerosol Robotic Network, the effects of τa, water vapor content (w) and the cosine of the solar zenith angle (μ) on are thoroughly considered, leading to an effective parameterization of as a nonlinear function of these three quantities. The parameterization is proven able to estimate with a mean bias error of 0.32 W m-2, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that derived using earlier linear or nonlinear functions. Applications of this new parameterization to estimate τa from , or vice versa, show that the root-mean-square errors were 0.08 and 10.0 Wm-2, respectively. Therefore, this study establishes a straightforward method to derive from τa or estimate τa from measurements if water vapor measurements are available.

  9. Quantification of surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy: the concept of effective amorphous surface area.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jeffrey; Burnett, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the use of dispersive surface energy in quantifying surface amorphous content, and the concept of effective amorphous surface area is introduced. An equation is introduced employing the linear combination of surface area normalized square root dispersive surface energy terms. This equation is effective in generating calibration curves when crystalline and amorphous references are used. Inverse gas chromatography is used to generate dispersive surface energy values. Two systems are investigated, and in both cases surface energy data collected for physical mixture samples comprised of amorphous and crystalline references fits the predicted response with good accuracy. Surface amorphous content of processed lactose samples is quantified using the calibration curve, and interpreted within the context of effective amorphous surface area. Data for bulk amorphous content is also utilized to generate a thorough picture of how disorder is distributed throughout the particle. An approach to quantifying surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy is presented. Quantification is achieved by equating results to an effective amorphous surface area based on reference crystalline, and amorphous materials. PMID:21725707

  10. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric solid-air interfaces, such as aerosol and ground level surfaces, thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed-catechol with nitrogen dioxide and, in separate preliminary experiments, ozone. Graphite, kaolinite, and sodium halide (NaF, NaCl, NaBr) powders served as carbonaceous, mineral and sea salt aerosol surrogates, respectively. Broad OH stretching bands for adsorbed catechol shifted to lower wavenumber with peak frequencies following the trend NaBr > NaCl > NaF ≈ kaolinite, consistent with the increasing basicity of the halide anions and basic Brønsted sites on kaolinite. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with NaCl-adsorbed catechol at relative humidity (RH) <2% promoted nitration forming 4-nitrocatechol and oxidation forming 1,2-benzoquinone and the ring cleavage product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4%, respectively. 4-Nitrocatechol was the dominant product for catechol adsorbed on NaF and kaolinite, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced less 4-nitrocatechol and more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. For all three sodium halides, the reactions of NO2 with adsorbed catechol were orders of magnitude faster than between NO2 and each NaX substrate. 4-Nitrocatechol rates and product yields were consistent with the relative ability of each substrate to enhance the deprotonated nature of adsorbed-catechol. Increasing the relative humidity caused the rate of each product channel to decrease and also altered the product branching ratios. Most notably, 1,2-benzoquinone formation decreased significantly even at 13% RH. The dramatic

  11. In situ observations of aerosol and chlorine monoxide after the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo - Effect of reactions on sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Brock, C. A.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Baumgardner, D.; Dye, J. E.; Poole, L. R.; Woods, D. C.; Decoursey, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Highly resolved aerosol size distributions measured from high-altitude aircraft can be used to describe the effect of the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo on the stratospheric aerosol. In some air masses, aerosol mass mixing ratios increased by factors exceeding 100 and aerosol surface area concentrations increased by factors of 30 or more. Increases in aerosol surface area concentration were accompanied by increases in chlorine monoxide at mid-latitudes when confounding factors were controlled. This observation supports the assertion that reactions occurring on the aerosol can increase the fraction of stratospheric chlorine that occurs in ozone-destroying forms.

  12. Prebiotic chemistry on Titan ? The nature of Titan's aerosols and their potential evolution at the satellite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P. J.; Poch, O.; Ramirez, S. I.; Buch, A.; Brassé, C.; Raulin, F.

    2010-12-01

    How may Titan's aerosols interact with Titan's surface after settling down in the atmosphere ? Could they play the role of bio-precursors ? A laboratory study based on the chemical transformation that Titan’s aerosol analogues suffer when placed under putative surface conditions of the satellite was performed. In order to understand the role that aqueous ammonia may play on the chemical transformation of atmospheric aerosols once they reach the surface, we synthesized laboratory analogues of Titan’s aerosols from a N2:CH4 (98:2) mixture irradiated at low temperatures under a continuous flow regime by a cold plasma discharge of 180 W. The analogues were recovered, partitioned in several 10.0 mg samples and placed inside different ammonia concentrations during 10 weeks at temperatures as low as those reported for Titan’s surface. After a derivatization process performed to the aerosols’ refractory phase with MTBSTFA in DMF, the products were identified and quantified using a GC-MS system. We found derived residues related to amino acids as well as urea. Our results have important astrobiological implications to Titan’s environment particularly if the existence of the suggested subsurface water-ammonia mixture and its deposition on the satellite’s surface is validated. This paper will also deal with more general discussions : we will especially emphasize what we learn about Titan’s aerosol nature from Space Exploration (especially ACP experiment onboard Huygens probe) and more globally on aerosol fate in Titan’s environment, and what we learn about Titan’s aerosol nature from laboratory studies (characterization of aerosol analogues, aka tholins) Illustration of the chemical evolution of Titan’s tholins in NH4OH neutralizing solution : depending of the group nature (-R) of some tholins components the name of the resulting amino-acid obtained after NH4OH hydrolysis is listed at the bottom of the figure.

  13. Effects of aerosols and surface shadowing on bidirectional reflectance measurements of deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, David E.; Davis, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Desert surfaces are probably one of the most stable of the Earth's natural targets for remote sensing. The bidirectional reflectance properties of the Saudi Arabian desert was investigated during the Summer Monsoon Experiment (Summer Monex). A comparison of high-altitude with near-surface measurements of the White Sands desert showed significant differences. These discrepancies have been attributed to forward scattering of the dust-laden atmosphere prevalent during Summer Monex. This paper is concerned in general with modeling the effects of atmospheric aerosols and surface shadowing on the remote sensing of bidirectional reflectance factors of desert targets, and in particular with comparing the results of these models with flight results. Although it is possible to approximate the latter, it is felt that a surface reflectance model with a smaller specular component would have permitted using a more realistic set of atmospheric conditions in the simulations.

  14. Role of volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols in the recent global surface warming slowdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Doug M.; Booth, Ben B. B.; Dunstone, Nick J.; Eade, Rosie; Hermanson, Leon; Jones, Gareth S.; Scaife, Adam A.; Sheen, Katy L.; Thompson, Vikki

    2016-10-01

    The rate of global mean surface temperature (GMST) warming has slowed this century despite the increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Climate model experiments show that this slowdown was largely driven by a negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), with a smaller external contribution from solar variability, and volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols. The prevailing view is that this negative PDO occurred through internal variability. However, here we show that coupled models from the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project robustly simulate a negative PDO in response to anthropogenic aerosols implying a potentially important role for external human influences. The recovery from the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 also contributed to the slowdown in GMST trends. Our results suggest that a slowdown in GMST trends could have been predicted in advance, and that future reduction of anthropogenic aerosol emissions, particularly from China, would promote a positive PDO and increased GMST trends over the coming years. Furthermore, the overestimation of the magnitude of recent warming by models is substantially reduced by using detection and attribution analysis to rescale their response to external factors, especially cooling following volcanic eruptions. Improved understanding of external influences on climate is therefore crucial to constrain near-term climate predictions.

  15. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration. PMID:26421659

  16. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration.

  17. Effective pulmonary delivery of an aerosolized plasmid DNA vaccine via surface acoustic wave nebulization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary-delivered gene therapy promises to mitigate vaccine safety issues and reduce the need for needles and skilled personnel to use them. While plasmid DNA (pDNA) offers a rapid route to vaccine production without side effects or reliance on cold chain storage, its delivery to the lung has proved challenging. Conventional methods, including jet and ultrasonic nebulizers, fail to deliver large biomolecules like pDNA intact due to the shear and cavitational stresses present during nebulization. Methods In vitro structural analysis followed by in vivo protein expression studies served in assessing the integrity of the pDNA subjected to surface acoustic wave (SAW) nebulisation. In vivo immunization trials were then carried out in rats using SAW nebulized pDNA (influenza A, human hemagglutinin H1N1) condensate delivered via intratracheal instillation. Finally, in vivo pulmonary vaccinations using pDNA for influenza was nebulized and delivered via a respirator to sheep. Results The SAW nebulizer was effective at generating pDNA aerosols with sizes optimal for deep lung delivery. Successful gene expression was observed in mouse lung epithelial cells, when SAW-nebulized pDNA was delivered to male Swiss mice via intratracheal instillation. Effective systemic and mucosal antibody responses were found in rats via post-nebulized, condensed fluid instillation. Significantly, we demonstrated the suitability of the SAW nebulizer to administer unprotected pDNA encoding an influenza A virus surface glycoprotein to respirated sheep via aerosolized inhalation. Conclusion Given the difficulty of inducing functional antibody responses for DNA vaccination in large animals, we report here the first instance of successful aerosolized inhalation delivery of a pDNA vaccine in a large animal model relevant to human lung development, structure, physiology, and disease, using a novel, low-power (<1 W) surface acoustic wave (SAW) hand-held nebulizer to produce droplets of p

  18. Climatological classification of five sectors in the Iberian Peninsula using columnar (AOD, α) and surface (PM10, PM2.5) aerosol data supported by air mass apportioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, Victoria; Mateos, David; Toledano, Carlos; Burgos, Maria A.; Bennouna, Yasmine; Torres, Benjamín; Fuertes, David; González, Ramiro; Guirado, Carmen; Román, Roberto; Velasco-Merino, Cristian; Marcos, Alberto; Calle, Abel; de Frutos, Angel M.

    2015-04-01

    The study of atmospheric aerosol over the Iberian Peninsula (IP) under a climatologic perspective is an interesting and meaningful aim due to the wide variety of conditions (geographical position, air masses, topography, among others) which cause a complex role of the distribution of aerosol properties. In the deeply investigation on the annual cycle and time evolution of the particulate matter lower than 10 µm (PM10, surface) and aerosol optical depth (AOD, columnar) in a large number of sites covering the period 2000-2013, five sectors can be distinguished in the IP. Both set of data belong to EMEP and AERONET networks respectively, as representative of aerosol air quality and climate studies, are complementary elements for a global aerosol research. The prevalence of fine-coarse particles is also analyzed over each sector. Seasonal bimodality of the PM10 annual cycle with a strong North-South gradient is observed in most sites, but this is only reported in the AOD climatology for the southern IP. The northern coast is clearly governed by the Atlantic Ocean influence, while the northeastern area is modulated by the Mediterranean Sea. The southern area, very close to the African continent, presents a large influence of desert dust intrusions. However, the southern Atlantic and Mediterranean coast present discrepancies and two sectors have been defined in this area. Finally, the center of the Peninsula is a mix of conditions, with north-south and east-west gradients of different magnitude. Overall, there is a relationship between PM10 and AOD with a proportional factor varying from 20 to 90, depending on the sector. The particular characteristic of PM10-AOD annual cycle of each geographical sector can be understood by the different climatology of the air mass origins observed at 500 and 1500 m (a.s.l.) and its apportioning to PM10 and AOD, respectively.

  19. Trend of surface solar radiation over Asia simulated by aerosol transport-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, T.; Ohmura, A.

    2009-12-01

    Long-term records of surface radiation measurements indicate a decrease in the solar radiation between the 1950s and 1980s (“global dimming”), then its recovery afterward (“global brightening”) at many locations all over the globe [Wild, 2009]. On the other hand, the global brightening is delayed over the Asian region [Ohmura, 2009]. It is suggested that these trends of the global dimming and brightening are strongly related with a change in aerosol loading in the atmosphere which affect the climate change through the direct, semi-direct, and indirect effects. In this study, causes of the trend of the surface solar radiation over Asia during last several decades are analyzed with an aerosol transport-climate model, SPRINTARS. SPRINTARS is coupled with MIROC which is a general circulation model (GCM) developed by Center for Climate System Research (CCSR)/University of Tokyo, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), and Frontier Research Center for Global Change (FRCGC) [Takemura et al., 2000, 2002, 2005, 2009]. The horizontal and vertical resolutions are T106 (approximately 1.1° by 1.1°) and 56 layers, respectively. SPRINTARS includes the transport, radiation, cloud, and precipitation processes of all main tropospheric aerosols (black and organic carbons, sulfate, soil dust, and sea salt). The model treats not only the aerosol mass mixing ratios but also the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations as prognostic variables, and the nucleation processes of cloud droplets and ice crystals depend on the number concentrations of each aerosol species. Changes in the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations affect the cloud radiation and precipitation processes in the model. Historical emissions, that is consumption of fossil fuel and biofuel, biomass burning, aircraft emissions, and volcanic eruptions are prescribed from database provided by the Aerosol Model Intercomparison Project (AeroCom) and the latest IPCC inventories

  20. Body surface area formulae: an alarming ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Redlarski, Grzegorz; Palkowski, Aleksander; Krawczuk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Body surface area (BSA) plays a key role in several medical fields, including cancer chemotherapy, transplantology, burn treatment and toxicology. BSA is often a major factor in the determination of the course of treatment and drug dosage. A series of formulae to simplify the process have been developed. Because easy-to-identify, yet general, body coefficient results of those formulae vary considerably, the question arises as to whether the choice of a particular formula is valid and safe for patients. Here we show that discrepancies between most of the known BSA formulae can reach 0.5 m(2) for the standard adult physique. Although many previous studies have demonstrated that certain BSA formulae provide an almost exact fit with the patients examined, all of these studies have been performed on a limited and isolated group of people. Our analysis presents a broader perspective, considering 25 BSA formulae. The analysis revealed that the choice of a particular formula is a difficult task. Differences among calculations made by the formulae are so great that, in certain cases, they may considerably affect patients' mortality, especially for people with an abnormal physique or for children. PMID:27323883

  1. Body surface area formulae: an alarming ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Redlarski, Grzegorz; Palkowski, Aleksander; Krawczuk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Body surface area (BSA) plays a key role in several medical fields, including cancer chemotherapy, transplantology, burn treatment and toxicology. BSA is often a major factor in the determination of the course of treatment and drug dosage. A series of formulae to simplify the process have been developed. Because easy-to-identify, yet general, body coefficient results of those formulae vary considerably, the question arises as to whether the choice of a particular formula is valid and safe for patients. Here we show that discrepancies between most of the known BSA formulae can reach 0.5 m2 for the standard adult physique. Although many previous studies have demonstrated that certain BSA formulae provide an almost exact fit with the patients examined, all of these studies have been performed on a limited and isolated group of people. Our analysis presents a broader perspective, considering 25 BSA formulae. The analysis revealed that the choice of a particular formula is a difficult task. Differences among calculations made by the formulae are so great that, in certain cases, they may considerably affect patients’ mortality, especially for people with an abnormal physique or for children. PMID:27323883

  2. Aerosol optical retrieval and surface reflectance from airborne remote sensing data over land.

    PubMed

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm (τ(550)) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ(550) with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ(550) and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ(550) retrieved by Module A (r(2) = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r(2) ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness. PMID:22163558

  3. Effects of sulfate aerosol on the central Pennsylvania surface shortwave radiation budget. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Guimond, P.W.

    1994-12-01

    Surface radiation measurements are taken simultaneously with measurements of meteorological variables including temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and visibility to evaluate the impact of sulfate haze on the surface radiation budget. A relationship is sought between flux losses due only to aerosol and relative humidity, visibility or both, with the goal of facilitating parameterization of sulfate hazes by climate modelers. At the same time, a rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) is compared with a more costly sun photometer to determine the feasibility of substituting the former for the latter in future research. It is found that depletion of surface radiation due to aerosol is typically ten to twenty percent of initial insolation, and that the losses can be correlated with zenith angle, relative humidity and optical depth. In the case of flux loss as a function of optical depth, the two are related in a nearly linear fashion. It is also discovered that the RSR has a predictable error owing to a wider field of view than the sun photometer, and can be used as a replacement for the former by correcting for the error.

  4. Aerosol Optical Retrieval and Surface Reflectance from Airborne Remote Sensing Data over Land

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Cristiana; Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pignatti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of atmospheric optical properties and surface reflectance can be performed by applying radiative transfer theory in the Atmosphere-Earth coupled system, for the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral remote sensing data. This paper describes a new physically-based algorithm to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness at 550nm (τ550) and the surface reflectance (ρ) from airborne acquired data in the atmospheric window of the Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) range. The algorithm is realized in two modules. Module A retrieves τ550 with a minimization algorithm, then Module B retrieves the surface reflectance ρ for each pixel of the image. The method was tested on five remote sensing images acquired by an airborne sensor under different geometric conditions to evaluate the reliability of the method. The results, τ550 and ρ, retrieved from each image were validated with field data contemporaneously acquired by a sun-sky radiometer and a spectroradiometer, respectively. Good correlation index, r, and low root mean square deviations, RMSD, were obtained for the τ550 retrieved by Module A (r2 = 0.75, RMSD = 0.08) and the ρ retrieved by Module B (r2 ≤ 0.9, RMSD ≤ 0.003). Overall, the results are encouraging, indicating that the method is reliable for optical atmospheric studies and the atmospheric correction of airborne hyperspectral images. The method does not require additional at-ground measurements about at-ground reflectance of the reference pixel and aerosol optical thickness. PMID:22163558

  5. Subtask 2.7 -- Mercury capture on solid surfaces and aerosols. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Determining the fly ash properties responsible for the capture of mercury in coal-fired power generation systems is key to understanding and controlling mercury emissions in these systems. Several capture mechanisms and interactions may be possible, such as condensation, chemical adsorption, physical adsorption, chemical bonding, and amalgamation. The chemical nature of the exposed surfaces and the amount of surface area are likely to affect the amount of mercury capture, so both of these parameters must be explored. Since much of the fly ash surface area is concentrated on submicron particles, the interaction of mercury with submicron particles needs to be evaluated. Another possible explanation of mercury capture on fly ash is the formation of amalgams with other metal species that may be present in the fly ash; if this is true, amalgamation may be a viable control technology. The project objectives are to relate mercury capture by fly ash to chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, determine mercury associations with submicron aerosols, evaluate mercury capture on metal sorbents, and relate experimental results to predictions based on state-of-the-art models. Results to date on these activities are described.

  6. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; et al

    2016-02-02

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 µm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the contribution from different sources is distinctly different between the two sites.more » The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC; measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for < 10 % of the total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS) at 250 °C, the two measurements are well-correlated, suggesting that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have

  7. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Fleming, Z. L.; Visser, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Ng, N. L.

    2016-02-01

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 µm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the contribution from different sources is distinctly different between the two sites. The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC; measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for < 10 % of the total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS) at 250 °C, the two measurements are well-correlated, suggesting that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have undergone similar chemical

  8. Spatial and Temporal Monitoring of Aerosol over Selected Urban Areas in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokr, Mohammed; El-Tahan, Mohammed; Ibrahim, Alaa

    2015-04-01

    We utilize remote sensing data of atmospheric aerosols from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites to explore spatio-temporal patterns over selected urban sites in Egypt during 2000-2015. High resolution (10 x 10 km^2) Level 2, collection 5, quality-controlled product was used. The selected sites are characterized by different human and industrial activities as well as landscape and meteorological attributes. These have impacts on the dominant types and intensity of aerosols. Aerosol robotic network (AERONET) data were used to validate the calculations from MODIS. The suitability of the MODIS product in terms of spatial and temporal coverage as well as accuracy and robustness has been established. Seasonal patterns of aerosol concentration are identified and compared between the sites. Spatial gradient of aerosol is assessed in the vicinity of major aerosol-emission sites (e.g. Cairo) to determine the range of influence of the generated pollution. Peak aerosol concentrations are explained in terms of meteorological events and land cover. The limited trends found in the temporal records of the aerosol measurements will be confirmed using calibrated long-term ground observations. The study has been conducted under the PEER 2-239 research project titled "The Impact of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Atmospheric Aerosols to Climate in Egypt". Project website is CleanAirEgypt.org

  9. Measurement of tropospheric aerosol in São Paulo area using a new upgraded Raman LIDAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Patrícia F.; da Silva Lopes, Fábio Juliano; Bourayou, Riad

    2012-11-01

    Elastic backscatter LIDAR systems have been used to determine aerosol profile concentration in several areas such as weather, pollution and air quality monitoring. In order to determine the aerosol extinction and backscattering profiles, the Klett inversion method is largely used, but this method suffers from lack of information since there are two unknown variables to be determined using only one measured LIDAR signal, and assumption of the LIDAR ratio (the relation between the extinction and backscattering coefficients) is needed. When a Raman LIDAR system is used, the inelastic backscattering signal is affected by aerosol extinction but not by aerosol backscatter, which allows this LIDAR to uniquely determine extinction and backscattering coefficients without any assumptions or any collocated instruments. The MSP-LIDAR system, set-up in a highly dense suburban area in the city of São Paulo, has been upgraded to a Raman LIDAR, and in its actual 6-channel configuration allows it to monitor elastic backscatter at 355 and 532 nm together with nitrogen and water vapor Raman backscatters at 387nm and 608 nm and 408nm and 660 nm, respectively. Thus, the measurements of aerosol backscattering, extinction coefficients and water vapor mixing ratio in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) are becoming available. The system will provide the important meteorological parameters such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and will be used for the study of aerosol variations in lower troposphere over the city of São Paulo, air quality monitoring and for estimation of humidity impact on the aerosol optical properties, without any a priori assumption. This study will present the first results obtained with this upgraded LIDAR system, demonstrating the high quality of obtained aerosol and water vapor data. For that purpose, we compared the data obtained with the new MSP-Raman LIDAR with a mobile Raman LIDAR collocated at the Center for Lasers and Applications, Nuclear and Energy Research

  10. Seasonal differences in aerosol water may reconcile AOT and surface mass measurements in the Southeast U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. K. V.; Ghate, V. P.; Carlton, A. M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Summertime aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the Southeast U.S. is high and sharply enhanced (2-3 times) compared to wintertime AOT. This seasonal pattern is unique to the Southeast U.S. and is of particular interest because temperatures there have not warmed over the past 100 years, contrasting with trends in other U.S. regions. Some investigators hypothesize the Southeast temperature trend is due to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from interactions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and anthropogenic emissions that create a cooling haze. However, aerosol measurements made at the surface do not exhibit strong seasonal differences in mass or organic fraction to support this hypothesis. In this work, we attempt to reconcile the spatial and temporal distribution of AOT over the U.S. with surface mass measurements by examining trends in particle-phase liquid water, an aerosol constituent that effectively scatters radiation and is removed from aerosols in mass measurements at routine surface monitoring sites. We employ the thermodynamic model ISORROPIA (v2.1) to estimate surface and aloft aerosol water mass concentrations at locations of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites using measured speciated ion mass concentrations and NCEP North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) meteorological data. Results demonstrate strong seasonal differences in aerosol water in the eastern compared to the western part of the U.S., consistent with geographic patterns in AOT. The highest mean regional seasonal difference from 2000 to 2007 is 5.5 μg m-3 and occurs the Southeast, while the lowest is 0.44 μg m-3 and occurs in the dry Mountain West. Our findings suggest 1) similarity between spatial trends in aerosol water in the U.S. and previously published AOT data from the MODIS-TERRA instrument and 2) similar interannual trends in mean aerosol water and previously published interannual AOT trends from MISR, MODIS-TERRA, MODIS

  11. Asian industrial lead inputs to the North Pacific evidenced by lead concentrations and isotopic compositions in surface waters and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gallon, Céline; Ranville, Mara A; Conaway, Christopher H; Landing, William M; Buck, Clifton S; Morton, Peter L; Flegal, A Russell

    2011-12-01

    Recent trends of atmospheric lead deposition to the North Pacific were investigated with analyses of lead in aerosols and surface waters collected on the fourth Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Contaminant Baseline Survey from May to June, 2002. Lead concentrations of the aerosols varied by 2 orders of magnitude (0.1-26.4 pmol/m(3)) due in part to variations in dust deposition during the cruise. The ranges in lead aerosol enrichment factors relative to iron (1-119) and aluminum (3-168) were similar, evidencing the transport of Asian industrial lead aerosols across the North Pacific. The oceanic deposition of some of those aerosols was substantiated by the gradient of lead concentrations of North Pacific waters, which varied 3-fold (32.7-103.5 pmol/kg), were highest along with the Asian margin of the basin, and decreased eastward. The hypothesized predominance of Asian industrial lead inputs to the North Pacific was further corroborated by the lead isotopic composition of ocean surface waters ((206)Pb/(207)Pb = 1.157-1.169; (208)Pb/(206)Pb = 2.093-2.118), which fell within the range of isotopic ratios reported in Asian aerosols that are primarily attributed to Chinese industrial lead emissions.

  12. Recovery efficiency and limit of detection of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from environmental surface samples.

    PubMed

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A; Beard, Jeremy K; Hein, Misty J; Larsen, Lloyd D; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H D Alan; Deye, Gregory J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm(2)). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm(2)) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm(2)) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm(2)) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans.

  13. Characteristics of black carbon aerosol from a surface oil burn during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Bahreini, R.; de Gouw, J. A.; Gao, R. S.; Holloway, J. S.; Lack, D. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Peischl, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol mass mixing ratio and microphysical properties were measured from the NOAA P-3 aircraft during active surface oil burning subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in April 2010. Approximately 4% of the combusted material was released into the atmosphere as BC. The total amount of BC introduced to the atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico via surface burning of oil during the 9-week spill is estimated to be (1.35 ± 0.72) × 106 kg. The median mass diameter of BC particles observed in the burning plume was much larger than that of the non-plume Gulf background air and previously sampled from a variety of sources. The plume BC particles were internally mixed with very little non-refractory material, a feature typical of fresh emissions from fairly efficient fossil-fuel burning sources and atypical of BC in biomass burning plumes. BC dominated the total accumulation-mode aerosol in both mass and number. The BC mass-specific extinction cross-section was 10.2 ± 4.1 and 7.1 ± 2.8 m2/g at 405 and 532 nm respectively. These results help constrain the properties of BC emissions associated with DWH and other large spills.

  14. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  15. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus.

  16. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  17. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-05-03

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus.

  18. Evaluating the Assumptions of Surface Reflectance and Aerosol Type Selection Within the MODIS Aerosol Retrieval Over Land: The Problem of Dust Type Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielonen, T.; Levy, R. C.; Aaltonen, V.; Komppula, M.; de Leeuw, G.; Huttunen, J.; Lihavainen, H.; Kolmonen, P.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Arola, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (AE) values derived with the MODIS retrieval algorithm over land (Collection 5) are compared with ground based sun photometer measurements at eleven sites spanning the globe. Although, in general, total AOD compares well at these sites (R2 values generally over 0.8), there are cases (from 2 to 67% of the measurements depending on the site) where MODIS clearly retrieves the wrong spectral dependence, and hence, an unrealistic AE value. Some of these poor AE retrievals are due to the aerosol signal being too small (total AOD<0.3) but in other cases the AOD should have been high enough to derive accurate AE. However, in these cases, MODIS indicates AE values close to 0.6 and zero fine model weighting (FMW), i.e. dust model provides the best fitting to the MODIS observed reflectance. Yet, according to evidence from the collocated sun photometer measurements and back-trajectory analyses, there should be no dust present. This indicates that the assumptions about aerosol model and surface properties made by the MODIS algorithm may have been incorrect. Here we focus on problems related to parameterization of the land-surface optical properties in the algorithm, in particular the relationship between the surface reflectance at 660 and 2130 nm.

  19. Surface atmospheric extremes (Launch and transportation areas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The effects of extreme values of surface and low altitude atmospheric parameters on space vehicle design, tests, and operations are discussed. Atmospheric extremes from the surface to 150 meters for geographic locations of interest to NASA are given. Thermal parameters (temperature and solar radiation), humidity, pressure, and atmospheric electricity (lighting and static) are presented. Weather charts and tables are included.

  20. A Characterization of Arctic Aerosols as Derived from Airborne Observations and their Influence on the Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herber, A.; Stone, R.; Liu, P. S.; Li, S.; Sharma, S.; Neuber, R.; Birnbaumn, G.; Vitale, V.

    2011-12-01

    Arctic climate is influenced by aerosols that affect the radiation balance at the surface and within the atmosphere. Impacts depend on the composition and concentration of aerosols that determine opacity, which is quantified by the measure of aerosol optical depth (AOD). During winter and spring, aerosols are transported into the Arctic from lower latitude industrial regions. Trans-Arctic flight missions PAMARCMiP (Polar Airborne Measurements and Arctic Regional Climate Model Simulation Project) of the German POLAR 5 during spring 2009 and spring 2011 provided opportunities to collect a comprehensive data set from which properties of the aerosol were derived, including AOD. Measurements were made from near the surface to over 4 km in altitude during flights between Svalbard, Norway and Pt. Barrow, Alaska. These, along with measurements of particle size and concentration, and black carbon content (BC) provide a three-dimensional characterization of the aerosols encountered along track. The horizontal and vertical distribution of Arctic haze, in particular, was evaluated. During April 2009, the Arctic atmosphere was variably turbid with total column AOD (at 500 nm) ranging from ~ 0.12 to > 0.35, where clean background values are typically < 0.06 (Stone et al., 2010). The haze was concentrated within and just above the surface-based temperature inversion layer. Few, distinct elevated aerosol layers were observed, also with an aerosol airborne Lidar. The presence of these haze layers in the Arctic atmosphere during spring reduced the diurnally averaged net shortwave irradiance, which can cause cooling of the surface, depending on its Albedo (reflectivity). An overview of both campaigns will be given with results presented in the context of historical observations and current thinking about the impact aerosols have on the Arctic climate. Stone, R.S., A. Herber, V. Vitale, M. Mazzola, A. Lupi, R. Schnell, E.G. Dutton, P. Liu, S.M. Li, K. Dethloff, A. Lampert, C. Ritter

  1. Influence of the micro-physical properties of the aerosol on the atmospheric correction of OLI data acquired over desert area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of surface reflectance obtained by different atmospheric correction algorithms of the Landsat 8 OLI data considering or not the micro-physical properties of the aerosol when images are acquired in desert area located in South-West of Nile delta. The atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was shown to be sensitive to the aerosol micro-physical properties, as reported in Bassani et al., 2012. In particular, the role of the aerosol micro-physical properties on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of remote sensing data was investigated [Bassani et al., 2015; Tirelli et al., 2015]. In this work, the OLI surface reflectance was retrieved by the developed OLI@CRI (OLI ATmospherically Corrected Reflectance Imagery) physically-based atmospheric correction which considers the aerosol micro-physical properties available from the two AERONET stations [Holben et al., 1998] close to the study area (El_Farafra and Cairo_EMA_2). The OLI@CRI algorithm is based on 6SV radiative transfer model, last generation of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code [Kotchenova et al., 2007; Vermote et al., 1997], specifically developed for Landsat 8 OLI data. The OLI reflectance obtained by the OLI@CRI was compared with reflectance obtained by other atmospheric correction algorithms which do not consider micro-physical properties of aerosol (DOS) or take on aerosol standard models (FLAASH, implemented in ENVI software). The accuracy of the surface reflectance retrieved by different algorithms were calculated by comparing the spatially resampled OLI images with the MODIS surface reflectance products. Finally, specific image processing was applied to the OLI reflectance images in order to compare remote sensing products obtained for same scene. The results highlight the influence of the physical characterization of aerosol on the OLI data improving the retrieved atmospherically corrected

  2. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth and Surface Reflectance over Land within Short Temporal Interval Using MSG Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Xue, Y.; Li, Y. J.; Yang, L. K.; Hou, T. T.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosols cause a major uncertainty in the research of climatology and global change, whereas satellite aerosol remote sensing over land still remains a big challenge. Due to their short time repeat cycle, geostationary satellites are capable of monitoring the temporal features of aerosols, while its limited number of visible bands is an obstacle. On the other hand, a main uncertainty in aerosol retrieval is the difficulty to separate the relatively weaker contribution of the atmosphere to the signal received by the satellite from the contribution of the Earth's surface. In this paper, an analytical retrieval strategy is presented to solve the both problems above. For the lack of surface reflectance, we use the Ross-Li BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) model and assume that the surface reflective property changes mainly due to the change of illumination geometry in a short time interval while the kernals of Ross-Li model remain the same. For the limited visible band, we take advantage of the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) consistence within short distances, thus to reduce the number of unknown parameters. A parameterization of the atmospheric radiative transfer model is used which is proved to be proper to retrieve aerosol and surface parameters by sensitivity analysis. Taking the three kernels of kernel-driven BRDF model and AOD as unknown parameters and based on prior knowledge of aerosol types, a series of nonlinear equations can be established then. Both AOD and surface reflectance can be obtained by using a numerical method to solve these equations. By applying this method, called LABITS-MSG (Land Aerosol and Bidirectional reflectance Inversion by Time Series technique for MSG), to data from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) observations on board Meteosat Second Generation (MSG), we obtain regional maps of AOD and surface reflectance in July 11, 2010 within a temporal interval of as short as 1 hour, and a spatial

  3. Field Observation of Heterogeneous Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols on Asian Mineral Dust Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the heterogeneous formation mechanism of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on dust surfaces by characterizing molecular compositions and size distributions of dicarboxylic acids, keto-carboxylic acids, a-dicarbonyls and inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols (9-stages) in the urban atmosphere of Xi'an, China during dust storm periods and comparing with those in non-dust storm periods. In the presence of a dust storm, all the above mentioned SOA species in Xi'an are predominantly enriched on coarse particles (>2.1 µm). Oxalic acid well correlated with NO3- (r2=0.72, p<0.01) rather than SO42-. This phenomenon differs greatly from the observed particles during a non-dust storm period, which is characterized by an enrichment of the SOA on fine particles (<2.1 µm) with a strong correlation between C2 and SO42-. We propose a three-step formation pathway to explain these observations as follows. First, nitric acid and nitrogen oxides react with dust to form a liquid film on the surface via water vapor-absorption of calcium nitrate. Second, gaseous Gly and mGly partition into the aqueous-phase. Finally, the aqueous-phase Gly and mGly oxidize into glyoxylic acid (wC2), followed by a further oxidation into C2. To the best of our knowledge, we found for the first time the enrichments of glyoxal (Gly) and methylglyoxal (mGly) on dust surfaces. Our data indicate a more critical role of nitrate than sulfate in the heterogeneous formation process of SOA on dust surfaces. Mass ratio of C2 to wC2 was found to be higher in coarse particles than in fine particles during the dust storm events, which is due to low acidity condition of large particles that is favorable for conversion of wC2 to C2.

  4. An aerosol optical depth climatology for NOAA's national surface radiation budget network (SURFRAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, John A.; Hodges, Gary B.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Cornwall, Christopher R.

    2008-06-01

    A series of algorithms developed to process spectral solar measurements for aerosol optical depth (AOD) for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) national surface radiation budget network (SURFRAD) is summarized, and decadal results are presented. AOD is a measure of the extinction of the Sun's beam due to aerosols. Daily files of AOD for five spectral measurements in the visible and near-infrared have been produced for 1997-2006. Comparisons of SURFRAD daily AOD averages to NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network product at two of the stations were generally good. An AOD climatology for each SURFRAD station is presented as an annual time series of composite monthly means that represents a typical intra-annual AOD variation. Results are similar to previous U.S. climatologies in that the highest AOD magnitude and greatest variability occur in summer, the lowest AOD levels are in winter, and geographically, the highest-magnitude AOD is in the eastern United States. Springtime Asian dust intrusions show up as a secondary maximum at the western stations. A time series of nationwide annual means shows that 500-nm AOD has decreased over the United States by about 0.02 AOD units over the 10-year period. However, this decline is not statistically significant nor geographically consistent within the country. The eastern U.S. stations and westernmost station at Desert Rock, Nevada, show decreasing AOD, whereas the other two western stations show an increase that is attributed to an upsurge in wildfire activity in the last half of the decade.

  5. 30 CFR 56.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 56.17001... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Illumination § 56.17001 Illumination of surface working areas. Illumination sufficient to provide safe...

  6. 30 CFR 57.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 57.17001... Illumination § 57.17001 Illumination of surface working areas. Illumination sufficient to provide safe working conditions shall be provided in and on all surface structures, paths, walkways, stairways, switch...

  7. 30 CFR 56.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 56.17001... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Illumination § 56.17001 Illumination of surface working areas. Illumination sufficient to provide safe...

  8. 30 CFR 56.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 56.17001... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Illumination § 56.17001 Illumination of surface working areas. Illumination sufficient to provide safe...

  9. 30 CFR 57.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 57.17001... Illumination § 57.17001 Illumination of surface working areas. Illumination sufficient to provide safe working conditions shall be provided in and on all surface structures, paths, walkways, stairways, switch...

  10. 30 CFR 57.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 57.17001... Illumination § 57.17001 Illumination of surface working areas. Illumination sufficient to provide safe working conditions shall be provided in and on all surface structures, paths, walkways, stairways, switch...

  11. 30 CFR 56.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 56.17001... NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Illumination § 56.17001 Illumination of surface working areas. Illumination sufficient to provide safe...

  12. 30 CFR 57.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 57.17001... Illumination § 57.17001 Illumination of surface working areas. Illumination sufficient to provide safe working conditions shall be provided in and on all surface structures, paths, walkways, stairways, switch...

  13. Selectivity Across the Interface: A Test of Surface Activity in the Composition of Organic-Enriched Aerosols from Bubble Bursting.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Richard E; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-05-01

    Although theories have been developed that describe surface activity of organic molecules at the air-water interface, few studies have tested how surface activity impacts the selective transfer of molecules from solution phase into the aerosol phase during bubble bursting. The selective transfer of a series of organic compounds that differ in their solubility and surface activity from solution into the aerosol phase is quantified experimentally for the first time. Aerosol was produced from solutions containing salts and a series of linear carboxlyates (LCs) and dicarboxylates (LDCs) using a bubble bursting process. Surface activity of these molecules dominated the transport across the interface, with enrichment factors of the more surface-active C4-C8 LCs (55 ± 8) being greater than those of C4-C8 LDCs (5 ± 1). Trends in the estimated surface concentrations of LCs at the liquid-air interface agreed well with their relative concentrations in the aerosol phase. In addition, enrichment of LCs was followed by enrichment of calcium with respect to other inorganic cations and depletion of chloride and sulfate. PMID:27093579

  14. The regime of aerosol asymmetry parameter over Europe, the Mediterranean and the Middle East based on MODIS satellite data: evaluation against surface AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras-Carraca, M. B.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Gkikas, A.; Papadimas, C. D.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric particulates are a significant forcing agent for the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. The particulates' interaction with radiation, which defines their climate effect, is strongly dependent on their optical properties. In the present work, we study one of the most important optical properties of aerosols, the asymmetry parameter (gaer), over sea surfaces of the region comprising North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Europe, and the Mediterranean Basin. These areas are of great interest, because of the variety of aerosol types they host, both anthropogenic and natural. Using satellite data from the collection 051 of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Terra and Aqua), we investigate the spatiotemporal characteristics of the asymmetry parameter. We generally find significant spatial variability, with larger values over regions dominated by larger size particles, e.g., outside the Atlantic coasts of northwestern Africa, where desert-dust outflow takes place. The gaer values tend to decrease with increasing wavelength, especially over areas dominated by small particulates. The intra-annual variability is found to be small in desert-dust areas, with maximum values during summer, while in all other areas larger values are reported during the cold season and smaller during the warm. Significant intra-annual and inter-annual variability is observed around the Black Sea. However, the inter-annual trends of gaer are found to be generally small. Although satellite data have the advantage of broad geographical coverage, they have to be validated against reliable surface measurements. Therefore, we compare satellite-measured values with gaer values measured at 69 stations of the global surface AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), located within our region of interest. This way, we provide some insight on the quality and reliability of MODIS data. We report generally better agreement at the wavelength of 860 nm (correlation

  15. Effect of Aerosol and Ocean Representation on Simulated Climate Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It is still debated to what extent anthropogenic aerosols shaped 20th century surface temperatures, especially sea surface temperatures (SSTs), through alteration of surface solar radiation (SSR). SSTs, in turn, are crucial in the context of atmospheric circulation and ocean heat uptake. Uncertainty considering anthropogenic aerosol forcing thus translates into uncertainty regarding ocean heat uptake and, ultimately, climate responses towards anthropogenic influences. We use the global climate model ECHAM to analyse the 20th century climate response towards either anthropogenic aerosols or well-mixed greenhouse gases or both with different representations of ocean and aerosols: atmosphere-only with prescribed SSTs and interactive aerosols; mixed-layer ocean and interactive or prescribed aerosols; fully coupled with prescribed aerosols. For interactive aerosols we use the Hamburg Aerosol Module (HAM). Our results suggest that up to 15% of global ocean surfaces undergo an SSR reduction of at least -4W/m² in the year 2000, due to anthropogenic aerosols. The area affected depends on how aerosols are represented and whether clear sky or all sky SSR is considered. In MLO equilibria with interactive aerosols, anthropogenic aerosols clearly shape surface temperature response patterns. This is to a lesser degree the case for the transient fully coupled case. Additivity of global mean temperature responses towards single forcings - an assumption often made in the literature - is not fulfilled for the MLO experiments, but for the fully coupled experiments. While some of these differences can be attributed to the differing ocean representation, it is implied that differing aerosol representation may play an even more relevant role. Thus, our results corroborate not only the relevance of anthropogenic aerosols for surface temperature responses, but also highlight the relevance of choice of aerosol representation.

  16. Spectral dependence on the correction factor of erythemal UV for cloud, aerosol, total ozone, and surface properties: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Jung, Yeonjin; Lee, Yun Gon

    2016-07-01

    Radiative transfer model simulations were used to investigate the erythemal ultraviolet (EUV) correction factors by separating the UV-A and UV-B spectral ranges. The correction factor was defined as the ratio of EUV caused by changing the amounts and characteristics of the extinction and scattering materials. The EUV correction factors (CFEUV) for UV-A [CFEUV(A)] and UV-B [CFEUV(B)] were affected by changes in the total ozone, optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and the solar zenith angle. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) were also estimated as a function of solar zenith angle, the optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and total ozone. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) ranged from -5.0% to 25.0% for aerosols, and from -9.5% to 2.0% for clouds in all simulations for different solar zenith angles and optical depths of aerosol and cloud. The rate of decline of CFEUV per unit optical depth between UV-A and UV-B differed by up to 20% for the same aerosol and cloud conditions. For total ozone, the variation in CFEUV(A) was negligible compared with that in CFEUV(B) because of the effective spectral range of the ozone absorption band. In addition, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs due to changes in surface conditions (i.e., surface albedo and surface altitude) was also estimated by using the model in this study. For changes in surface albedo, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs was 2.9%-4.1% per 0.1 albedo change, depending on the amount of aerosols or clouds. For changes in surface altitude, the sensitivity of CFEUV(B) was twice that of CFEUV(A), because the Rayleigh optical depth increased significantly at shorter wavelengths.

  17. Source quantification of size and season resolved aerosols in a semi-urban area of Indo-Gangetic plain, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooda, R. K.; Hyvärinen, A.; Gilardoni, S.; Sharma, V.; Vestenius, M.; Kerminen, V.; Vignati, E.; Kulmala, M. T.; Lihavainen, H.

    2012-12-01

    PMF. For fine aerosols five factors were identified and quantified as biomass combustion (53%), road traffic (tail-pipe emissions and road dust) (7%), mineral dust (7%), secondary aerosols (12%) and external coal combustion (21%). CPF analysis for fine shows that combustion sources and secondary aerosols mainly from Delhi region and other distant urban/rural environments, while re-suspended mineral dust from desert areas. PMF results for coarse aerosols identified four factors and quantified as external coal combustion (7%), fossils fuel combustion (biomass and oil) (22%), dust (re-suspended and natural) (49%), construction activities (22%). Distinct seasonal variation for combustion sources have been seen for Gual Pahari. The peaks for dust aerosols even in monsoon have also been observed and these could be a long-range transport. CPF analysis for coarse shows that combustion sources mainly from Delhi region and other distant urban/rural environments, re-suspended mineral dust from desert areas of Thar and Saharan in west/south-west transported over Gual Pahari while, construction activities mainly from Delhi. This could be due to heavy construction activities during Commonwealth Games (2010) preparations in Delhi.

  18. The impact of marine surface organic enrichment on the measured hygroscopicity parameter of laboratory generated sea-spray aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, S.; Novak, G.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean serves as a major source for atmospheric aerosol particles, yet the chemicophysical properties of sea spray aerosol to date are not well characterized. Understanding the transfer of organic compounds, present in the sea surface microlayer (SSML), to sea-spray particles and their resulting impact on cloud formation is important for predicting aerosol impact on climate in remote marine environments. Here, we present a series of laboratory experiments designed to probe the fractionation of select organic molecules during wave breaking. We use a representative set of organic mimics (e.g. sterols, sugars, lipids, proteins, fatty acids) to test a recent physically based model of organic enrichment in sea-spray aerosol [Burrows et al., 2014] that is based on Langmuir absorption equilibria. Experiments were conducted in the UCSD Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART) permitting accurate representation of wave breaking processes in the laboratory. We report kappa values for the resulting sea-spray aerosols and compare them to a predictions made using Kappa-Köhler Theory driven by a linear combination of the pure component kappa values. Hygroscopicity determinations made using the model systems are discussed within the context of measurements of CCN activity made using natural, coastal water.

  19. Heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol surfaces: A possible source of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröske, R.; Kleffmann, J.; Wiesen, P.

    2003-05-01

    The heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on different secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was investigated with the focus on a possible formation of nitrous acid (HONO). In one set of experiments different organic aerosols were produced in the reactions of O3 with alpha-pinene, limonene or catechol and OH radicals with toluene or limonene, respectively. The aerosols were sampled on filters and exposed to humidified NO2 mixtures under atmospheric conditions. The estimated upper limits for the uptake coefficients of NO2 and the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 -> HONO are in the range of 10-6 and 10-7, respectively. The integrated HONO formation for 1 h reaction time was <1013 cm-2 geometrical surface and <1017 g-1 particle mass. In a second set of experiments the conversion of NO2 into HONO in the presence of organic particles was carried out in an aerosol flow tube under atmospheric conditions. In this case the aerosols were produced in the reaction of O3 with beta-pinene, limonene or catechol, respectively. The upper limits for the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 -> HONO were in the range of 7 x 10-7 - 9 x 10-6. The results from the present study show that heterogeneous formation of nitrous acid on secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is unimportant for the atmosphere.

  20. Heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol surfaces: A possible source of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bröske, R.; Kleffmann, J.; Wiesen, P.

    2003-02-01

    The heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on different secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was investigated with the focus on a possible formation of nitrous acid (HONO). In one set of experiments different organic aerosols were produced in the reactions of O3 with α-pinene, limonene or catechol and OH radicals with toluene or limonene, respectively. The aerosols were sampled on filters and exposed to humidified NO2 mixtures under atmospheric conditions. The estimated upper limits for the uptake coefficients of NO2 and the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 →HONO are in the range of 10-6 and 10-7, respectively. The integrated HONO formation for 1 h reaction time was <1013 cm-2 geometrical surface and <1017 g-1 particle mass. In a second set of experiments the conversion of NO2 into HONO in the presence of organic particles was carried out in an aerosol flow tube under atmospheric conditions. In this case the aerosols were produced in the reaction of O3 with β-pinene, limonene or catechol, respectively. The upper limits for the reactive uptake coefficients NO2 → HONO were in the range of 7×10-7 -9×10-6. The results from the present study show that heterogeneous formation of nitrous acid on secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is unimportant for the atmosphere.

  1. Local and distant source contributions to secondary organic aerosol in the Beijing urban area in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; An, Junling; Qu, Yu; Chen, Yong; Li, Ying; Tang, Yujia; Wang, Feng; Xiang, Weiling

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of local and distant source contributions to particulate matter is a key issue to improving air quality in large urban areas, but few studies have focused on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source contributions in a large area, especially in China. In this study, we extended the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMX) version 5.4, replacing the two-product approach by the volatility basis-set (VBS) approach, with updated SOA yields based on smog chamber studies. The modules related to the computationally efficient particulate source apportionment technology (PSAT) used in CAMX v5.4 were extended based on the volatility basis set (VBS) approach. The updated version of the CAMX model was then used to calculate the local and distant source contributions to SOA in Beijing for the first time. The results indicated that the VBS approach substantially improved hourly, daily, and monthly SOA simulations, compared with the two-product approach and the observations. In August 2007, the local source contributions to anthropogenic and biogenic SOA in Beijing were 23.8% and 16.6%, respectively; distant sources dominated for both anthropogenic and biogenic SOA in Beijing: Northern Hebei, Middle Hebei, Northeast China, Inner Mongolia, Shandong, and Tianjin (including Xianghe) contributed 5.1%-18.2% to anthropogenic SOA in Beijing; whereas, Inner Mongolia, Northern Hebei, and Northeast China contributed 12.2%, 18.6%, and 10.1%, respectively, to biogenic SOA in Beijing. Additionally, other areas outside China respectively contributed 5.3% and 10.8% to anthropogenic and biogenic SOA in Beijing: this could be related to strong summer monsoon.

  2. Nonlinear effects of anthropogenic aerosol and urban land surface forcing on spring climate in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiechun; Xu, Haiming; Zhang, Leying

    2016-05-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols and urban land cover change induce opposite thermal effects on the atmosphere near surface as well as in the troposphere. One can think of these anthropogenic effects as composed of two parts: the individual effect due to an individual anthropogenic forcing and the nonlinear effects resulting from the coexistence of two forcing factors. In this study, we explored the role of such nonlinear effects in affecting East Asian climate, as well as individual forcing effects, using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 coupled with the Community Land Model version 4. Atmospheric responses were simulated by including anthropogenic aerosol emission only, urban cover only, or the combination of the two, over eastern China. Results showed that nonlinear responses were different from any effects by an individual forcing or the linear combination of individual responses. The nonlinear interaction could generate cold horizontal temperature advection to cool the troposphere, which induced anomalous subsidence along the Yangtze River Valley (YRV). This anomalous vertical motion, together with a weakened low-level southwesterly, favored below-normal (above-normal) rainfall over the YRV (southern China), shifting the spring rain belt southward. The resultant diabatic cooling, in turn, amplified the anomalous descent and further decreased tropospheric temperature over the YRV, forming a positive feedback loop to maintain the nonlinear effects. Consequently, the nonlinear effects acted to reduce the climate anomalies from a simple linear combination of two individual effects and played an important role in regional responses to one anthropogenic forcing when the other is prescribed.

  3. Effects of acid aerosol exposure on the surface properties of airway mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.M.; Schuerch, S.; Roth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    It was hypothesized that the mucous layer lining the tracheas of rats and guinea pigs contains surfactant material capable of lowering the air/mucus surface tension, {gamma}, and that exposure to an irritant aerosol would raise the {gamma}. The {gamma} of the surface film was measured directly by a spreading droplet technique and indirectly by displacement of polymethyl methacrylate particles into the aqueous layer. The morphology of the mucous film was examined by electron microscopy after nonaqueous fixation. {gamma} was 33.3 {plus_minus} 0.70 (SE) mN/m and 32.3 {plus_minus} 0.68 (SE) mN/m for the normal rat and guinea pig trachea, respectively. Exposure for 4 h to aerosols of sulfuric acid (94.1 {plus_minus} 18.68 (SD) and 43.3 {plus_minus} 4.57 (SD) mg/m{sup 3}) caused a several-fold increase in thickness of the mucous layer with exudation of protein-like material. The osmiophilic surfactant film at the air/mucus interface became irregularly thickened and multilayered. Despite these morphological changes {gamma} remained low, 33.2 {plus_minus} 0.43 (SE) mN/m and 32.6 {plus_minus} 0.60 (SE) mN/m for rats and guinea pigs, respectively, and displacement of particles into the subphase was not compromised. The results indicate that rodent tracheas are able to maintain a low surface tension in the presence of injury. 24 refs., 9 figs.

  4. An observational approach for determining aerosol surface radiative forcing: Results from the first field phase of INDOEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, William C.

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents one of the few quantitative estimates of surface aerosol forcing made directly from surface irradiance observations. The method described within yields estimates of the forcing accurate to 20%. The study was conducted from February to March 1998 at the Kaashidhoo Climate Observatory (KCO) during the First Field Phase of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX-FFP). For the 400-700 nm region studied here, the forcing is -7.6±1.5 W m-2. The data are obtained from two photodiode radiometers measuring global and diffuse irradiance in five channels in the visible and ultraviolet. The instruments were chosen, calibrated, and deployed specifically for a precise measurement of aerosol forcing. The angular, spectral, and absolute response characteristics of the instruments are determined in the laboratory and used to calibrate the data, as described here. The accuracy in the calibrated data is 2.4% for the global irradiance and 1.8% for the diffuse irradiance. Direct aerosol forcing is obtained from the measured aerosol forcing efficiency, which is determined by two methods: hybrid and differential. The hybrid method uses a radiative transfer model to subtract out the contribution from the aerosol-free atmosphere. The differential method assumes that changes in 400-700 nm solar flux are forced by changes in aerosol optical depth. By using flux changes, the differential method is not sensitive to the small calibration uncertainties, and is independent of model assumptions about the single-scatter properties of the aerosol. For this soot-laden marine region south of India, a 0.1 change in aerosol optical depth produces a -4.0±0.8 W m-2; change in the 400-700 nm surface flux; 55% of this forcing is observed in the 400-540 nm region. The global and diffuse data agree to within 5 W m-2 of results calculated by a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. The model assumes an aerosol consistent with the spectral optical depth, lidar vertical profiles, and surface

  5. Backfill hydrologic characteristics in a Tennessee area surface coal mine

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, C.G.

    1996-12-31

    The hydrological characteristics of backfill in a Tennessee area surface coal mine provide useful information concerning the aqueous environment in a recovering water table within a reclaimed surface mine. Chemical analysis of water samples provide a measure of reclamation activities.

  6. Carbon content of atmospheric aerosols in a residential area during the wood combustion season in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krecl, Patricia; Ström, Johan; Johansson, Christer

    Carbonaceous aerosol particles were observed in a residential area with wood combustion during wintertime in Northern Sweden. Filter samples were analyzed for elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) content by using a thermo-optical transmittance method. The light-absorbing carbon (LAC) content was determined by employing a commercial Aethalometer and a custom-built particle soot absorption photometer. Filter samples were used to convert the optical signals to LAC mass concentrations. Additional total PM 10 mass concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured. The mean and standard deviation mass concentrations were 4.4±3.6 μg m -3 for OC, and 1.4±1.2 μg m -3 for EC. On average, EC accounted for 10.7% of the total PM 10 and the contribution of OC to the total PM 10 was 35.4%. Aethalometer and custom-built PSAP measurements were highly correlated ( R2=0.92). The hourly mean value of LAC mass concentration was 1.76 μg m -3 (median 0.88 μg m -3) for the winter 2005-2006. This study shows that the custom-built PSAP is a reliable alternative for the commercial Aethalometer with the advantage of being a low-cost instrument.

  7. SERF: a program for accessible surface area calculations.

    PubMed

    Flower, D R

    1997-08-01

    The program SERF has been designed to facilitate the greater use of accessible surface area calculations in the analysis of protein structure, including analysis of surface area changes on binding and complexation. For comparative purposes, the program implements a number of alternative methods for calculating surface areas, including those that approximate residues by single spheres. Algorithmic details, comparative performance, and the software implementation of SERF are discussed.

  8. Surface atmospheric extremes (launch and transportation areas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria are provided on atmospheric extremes from the surface to 150 meters for geographical locations of interest to NASA. Thermal parameters (temperature and solar radiation), humidity, precipitation, pressure, and atmospheric electricity (lightning and static) are presented. Available data are also provided for the entire continental United States for use in future space programs.

  9. Isotopic mass independent signature of black crusts: a proxy for atmospheric aerosols formation in the Paris area (France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genot, Isabelle; Martin, Erwan; Yang, David Au; De Rafelis, Marc; Cartigny, Pierre; Wing, Boswell; Le Gendre, Erwann; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-04-01

    In view of the negative forcing of the sulfate aerosols on climate, a more accurate understanding of the formation of these particles is crucial. Indeed, despite the knowledge of their effects, uncertainties remain regarding the formation of sulfate aerosols, particularly the oxidation processes of S-bearing gases. Since the discovery of oxygen and sulfur mass independent fractionation (O- and S-MIF) processes on Earth, the sulfate isotopic composition became essential to investigate the atmospheric composition evolution and its consequences on the climate and the biosphere. Large amount of S-bearing compounds (SO2 mainly) is released into the atmosphere by anthropogenic and natural sources. Their oxidation in the atmosphere generates sulfate aerosols, H2SO4, which precipitate on the earth surface mainly as acid rain. One consequence of this precipitation is the formation of black crust on buildings made of carbonate stones. Indeed the chemical alteration of CaCO3 by H2SO4 leads to gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) concretions on building walls. Associated to other particles, gypsum forms black-crusts. Therefore, black crusts acts as 'sulfate aerosol traps', meaning that their isotopic composition reveals the composition and thus the source and formation processes of sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere in a specific region. In this study we collected 37 black crusts on a 300km NW-SE profile centered on Paris (France). In our samples, sulfate represent 40wt.% and other particles 60wt.% of the black crusts. After sulfate extraction from each samples we measured their O- and S-isotopes composition. Variations of about 10‰ in δ18O and δ34S are observed and both O-MIF (Δ17O from 0 to 1.4‰) and S-MIF (Δ33S from 0 to -0.3‰) compositions have been measured. In regards to these compositions we can discuss the source and formation (oxidation pathways) of the sulfate aerosols in troposphere above the Paris region that covers urban, rural and coastal environments. Furthermore

  10. Introducing the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-SAM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Timmreck, C.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-04-01

    We are presenting a new global aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2 to study the aerosol dynamics in the UTLS under background and volcanic conditions. The microphysical core modul SAM2 treats the formation, the evolution and the transport of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The aerosol size distribution and the weight percentage of the sulphuric acid solution is calculated dependent on the concentrations of H2SO4 and H2O, their vapor pressures, the atmospheric temperature and pressure. The fixed sectional method is used to resolve an aerosol distribution between 1 nm and 2.6 micron in particle radius. Homogeneous nucleation, condensation and evaporation, coagulation, water-vapor growth, sedimentation and sulphur chemistry are included. The module is applied in the middle-atmosphere MAECHAM5 model, resolving the atmosphere up to 0.01 hPa (~80 km) in 39 layers. It is shown here that MAECHAM5-SAM2 well represents in-situ measured size distributions of stratospheric background aerosol in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. Distinct differences can be seen when derived integrated aerosol parameters (surface area, effective radius) are compared with aerosol climatologies based on the SAGE II satellite instrument (derived by the University of Oxford and the NASA AMES laboratory). The bias between the model and the SAGE II data increases as the moment of the aerosol size distribution decreases. Thus the modeled effective radius show the strongest bias, followed by the aerosol surface area density. Correspondingly less biased are the higher moments volume area density and the mass density of the global stratospheric aerosol coverage. This finding supports the key finding No. 2 of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (2006), where it was shown that during periods of very low aerosol load in the stratosphere, the consistency between in-situ and satellite measurements, which exist in a volcanically perturbed stratosphere, breaks down and significant

  11. Improvement in Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System/Surface and Atmosphere Radiation Budget Dust Aerosol Properties, Effects on Surface Validation of Clouds and Radiative Swath

    SciTech Connect

    Rutan, D.; Rose, F.; Charlock, T.P.

    2005-03-18

    Within the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) science team (Wielicki et al. 1996), the Surface and Atmospheric Radiation Budget (SARB) group is tasked with calculating vertical profiles of heating rates, globally, and continuously, beneath CERES footprint observations of Top of Atmosphere (TOA) fluxes. This is accomplished using a fast radiative transfer code originally developed by Qiang Fu and Kuo-Nan Liou (Fu and Liou 1993) and subsequently highly modified by the SARB team. Details on the code and its inputs can be found in Kato et al. (2005) and Rose and Charlock (2002). Among the many required inputs is characterization of the vertical column profile of aerosols beneath each footprint. To do this SARB combines aerosol optical depth information from the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument along with aerosol constituents specified by the Model for Atmosphere and Chemical Transport (MATCH) of Collins et al. (2001), and aerosol properties (e.g. single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter) from Tegen and Lacis (1996) and OPAC (Hess et al. 1998). The publicly available files that include these flux profiles, called the Clouds and Radiative Swath (CRS) data product, available from the Langley Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/). As various versions of the code are completed, publishable results are named ''Editions.'' After CRS Edition 2A was finalized it was found that dust aerosols were too absorptive. Dust aerosols have subsequently been modified using a new set of properties developed by Andy Lacis and results have been released in CRS Edition 2B. This paper discusses the effects of changing desert dust aerosol properties, which can be significant for the radiation budget in mid ocean, a few thousand kilometers from the source regions. Resulting changes are validated via comparison of surface observed fluxes from the Saudi Solar Village surface site (Myers et al. 1999), and the E13 site

  12. Calculation of cell volumes and surface areas in MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    MCNP is a general Monte Carlo neutron-photon particle transport code which treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces, and some special fourth-degree surfaces. It is necessary to calculate cell volumes and surface areas so that cell masses, fluxes, and other important information can be determined. The volume/area calculation in MCNP computes cell volumes and surface areas for cells and surfaces rotationally symmetric about any arbitrary axis. 5 figures, 1 table.

  13. Black-carbon-surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    Soot particles are the most strongly light-absorbing particles commonly found in the atmosphere. They are major contributors to the radiative budget of the Earth and to the toxicity of atmospheric pollution. Atmospheric aging of soot may change its health- and climate-relevant properties by oxidizing the primary black carbon (BC) or organic particulate matter (OM) which, together with ash, comprise soot. This atmospheric aging, which entails the condensation of secondary particulate matter as well as the oxidation of the primary OM and BC emissions, is currently poorly understood. In this study, atmospheric aging of wood-stove soot aerosols was simulated in a continuous-flow reactor. The composition of fresh and aged soot particles was measured in real time by a dual-vaporizer aerosol-particle mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS provided information on the OM, BC, and surface composition of the soot. The OM appeared to be generated largely by cellulose and/or hemicellulose pyrolysis, and was only present in large amounts when new wood was added to the stove. BC signals otherwise dominated the mass spectrum. These signals consisted of ions related to refractory BC (rBC, C+1-5), oxygenated surface groups (CO+1-2), potassium (K+) and water (H+2O and related fragments). The C+4 : C+3 ratio, but not the C+1 : C+3 ratio, was consistent with the BC-structure trends of Corbin et al. (2015c). The CO+1-2 signals likely originated from BC surface groups: upon aging, both CO+ and CO+2 increased relative to C+1-3 while CO+2 simultaneously increased relative to CO+. Factor analysis (PMF) of SP-AMS and AMS data, using a new error model to account for peak-integration uncertainties, indicated that the surface composition of the BC was approximately constant across all stages of combustion for both fresh and aged samples. These results represent the first time-resolved measurements of in-situ BC-surface aging and suggest that the surface of beech-wood BC may be modelled as a

  14. The effects of synoptical weather pattern and complex terrain on the formation of aerosol events in the Greater Taipei area.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ming-Tung; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Wang, Chu-Fang; Chang, E-E; Lee, Chung-Te

    2008-07-25

    The aerosol in the Taipei basin is difficult to transport outward under specific weather patterns owing to complex terrain blocking. In this study, seven weather patterns are identified from synoptic weather maps for aerosol events, which occurred from March 2002 to February 2005. Among the identified weather patterns, High Pressure Peripheral Circulation (HPPC), Warm area Ahead of a cold Front (WAF), TYPhoon (TYP), Pacific High Pressure system stretching westerly (PHP), Weak High Pressure system (WHP), and Weak Southern Wind (WSW) are related to terrain blocking. The remaining pattern is High Pressure system Pushing (HPP). The classification of the pollution origin of the air masses shows that 15% of event days were contributed by long-range transport (LRT), 20% by local pollution (LP), and 65% by LRT/LP mix. Terrain blocking causes aerosol accumulation from high atmospheric stability and weak winds occurring under HPPC, TYP, and PHP weather patterns when the Taipei basin is situated on the lee side of the Snow Mountains Chain (SMC). Terrain blocking also occurs when the Taipei basin is situated on the upwind of SMC and Mt. Da-Twen under WAF and WSW patterns. To study the variation of aerosol properties under the mixed influence of terrain and pollution origin, we conducted a field observation simultaneously at the urban, suburban, and background sites in the Greater Taipei area from April 14 to 23, 2004. Terrain blocking plays an important role in aerosol accumulation in the stagnant environment when the Taipei basin is on the lee side of SMC. On the other hand, the PM(2.5) sulfate level is stable with a fraction of 30% in PM(2.5) during the observation period at the urban (25%-33%) and background (25%-41%) sites. It indicates that background PM(2.5) sulfate is high on the West Pacific in winter.

  15. Evaluation of filter media for particle number, surface area and mass penetrations.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zuo, Zhili; Japuntich, Daniel A; Pui, David Y H

    2012-07-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) developed a standard for respirator certification under 42 CFR Part 84, using a TSI 8130 automated filter tester with photometers. A recent study showed that photometric detection methods may not be sensitive for measuring engineered nanoparticles. Present NIOSH standards for penetration measurement are mass-based; however, the threshold limit value/permissible exposure limit for an engineered nanoparticle worker exposure is not yet clear. There is lack of standardized filter test development for engineered nanoparticles, and development of a simple nanoparticle filter test is indicated. To better understand the filter performance against engineered nanoparticles and correlations among different tests, initial penetration levels of one fiberglass and two electret filter media were measured using a series of polydisperse and monodisperse aerosol test methods at two different laboratories (University of Minnesota Particle Technology Laboratory and 3M Company). Monodisperse aerosol penetrations were measured by a TSI 8160 using NaCl particles from 20 to 300 nm. Particle penetration curves and overall penetrations were measured by scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), condensation particle counter (CPC), nanoparticle surface area monitor (NSAM), and TSI 8130 at two face velocities and three layer thicknesses. Results showed that reproducible, comparable filtration data were achieved between two laboratories, with proper control of test conditions and calibration procedures. For particle penetration curves, the experimental results of monodisperse testing agreed well with polydisperse SMPS measurements. The most penetrating particle sizes (MPPSs) of electret and fiberglass filter media were ~50 and 160 nm, respectively. For overall penetrations, the CPC and NSAM results of polydisperse aerosols were close to the penetration at the corresponding median particle sizes. For each filter type, power

  16. Confining capillary waves to control aerosol droplet size from surface acoustic wave nebulisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarzadeh, Elijah; Reboud, Julien; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    Aerosols play a significant role in targeted delivery of medication through inhalation of drugs in a droplet form to the lungs. Delivery and targeting efficiencies are mainly linked to the droplet size, leading to a high demand for devices that can produce aerosols with controlled sizes in the range of 1 to 5 μm. Here we focus on enabling the control of the droplet size of a liquid sample nebulised using surface acoustic wave (SAW) generated by interdigitated transducers on a piezoelectric substrate (lithium niobate). The formation of droplets was monitored through a high-speed camera (600,000 fps) and the sizes measured using laser diffraction (Spraytec, Malvern Ltd). Results show a wide droplet size distribution (between 0.8 and 400 μm), while visual observation (at fast frame rates) revealed that the large droplets (>100 μm) are ejected due to large capillary waves (80 to 300 μm) formed at the free surface of liquid due to leakage of acoustic radiation of the SAWs, as discussed in previous literature (Qi et al. Phys Fluids, 2008). To negate this effect, we show that a modulated structure, specifically with feature sizes, typically 200 μm, prevents formation of large capillary waves by reducing the degrees of freedom of the system, enabling us to obtain a mean droplet size within the optimum range for drug delivery (<10 μm). This work was supported by an EPSRC grant (EP/K027611/1) and an ERC Advanced Investigator Award (340117-Biophononics).

  17. The regime of aerosol asymmetry parameter over Europe, Mediterranean and Middle East based on MODIS satellite data: evaluation against surface AERONET measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras-Carraca, M. B.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Gkikas, A.; Papadimas, C. D.

    2014-09-01

    Atmospheric particulates are a significant forcing agent for the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. The particulates' interaction with radiation, which defines their climate effect, is strongly dependent on their optical properties. In the present work, we study one of the most important optical properties of aerosols, the asymmetry parameter (gaer), in the region comprised of North Africa, the Arabian peninsula, Europe, and the Mediterranean basin. These areas are of great interest, because of the variety of aerosol types they host, both anthropogenic and natural. Using satellite data from the collection 051 of MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Terra and Aqua), we investigate the spatio-temporal characteristics of the asymmetry parameter. We generally find significant spatial variability, with larger values over regions dominated by larger size particles, e.g. outside the Atlantic coasts of north-western Africa, where desert-dust outflow is taking place. The gaer values tend to decrease with increasing wavelength, especially over areas dominated by small particulates. The intra-annual variability is found to be small in desert-dust areas, with maximum values during summer, while in all other areas larger values are reported during the cold season and smaller during the warm. Significant intra-annual and inter-annual variability is observed around the Black Sea. However, the inter-annual trends of gaer are found to be generally small. Although satellite data have the advantage of broad geographical coverage, they have to be validated against reliable surface measurements. Therefore, we compare satellite-based values with gaer values measured at 69 stations of the global surface network AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), located within our region of interest. This way, we provide some insight on the quality and reliability of MODIS data. We report generally better agreement at the wavelength of 870 nm (correlation coefficient

  18. Superhydrophobic photocatalytic surfaces through direct incorporation of titania nanoparticles into a polymer matrix by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Crick, Colin R; Bear, Joseph C; Kafizas, Andreas; Parkin, Ivan P

    2012-07-10

    A new class of superhydrophobic photocatalytic surfaces that are self-cleaning through light-induced photodegradation and the Lotus effect are presented. The films are formed in a single-step aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) process. The films are durable and show no degradation on continuous exposure to UV-C radiation. PMID:22706974

  19. Cloud residues and interstitial aerosols from non-precipitating clouds over an industrial and urban area in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Li, Peiren; Sun, Guode; Zhou, Shengzhen; Yuan, Qi; Wang, Wenxing

    2011-05-01

    Most studies of aerosol-cloud interactions have been conducted in remote locations; few have investigated the characterization of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) over highly polluted urban and industrial areas. The present work, based on samples collected at Mt. Tai, a site in northern China affected by nearby urban and industrial air pollutant emissions, illuminates CCN properties in a polluted atmosphere. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to obtain the size, composition, and mixing state of individual cloud residues and interstitial aerosols. Most of the cloud residues displayed distinct rims which were found to consist of soluble organic matter (OM). Nearly all (91.7%) cloud residues were attributed to sulfate-related salts (the remainder was mostly coarse crustal dust particles with nitrate coatings). Half the salt particles were internally mixed with two or more refractory particles (e.g., soot, fly ash, crustal dust, CaSO 4, and OM). A comparison between cloud residues and interstitial particles shows that the former contained more salts and were of larger particle size than the latter. In addition, a somewhat high number scavenging ratio of 0.54 was observed during cloud formation. Therefore, the mixtures of salts with OMs account for most of the cloud-nucleating ability of the entire aerosol population in the polluted air of northern China. We advocate that both size and composition - the two influential, controlling factors for aerosol activation - should be built into all regional climate models of China.

  20. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition and source apportionment of the organic fraction in the metropolitan area of Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, M.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Slowik, J. G.; Mohr, C.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Poulain, L.; Freutel, F.; Sciare, J.; Cozic, J.; Di Marco, C. F.; Elsasser, M.; Nicolas, J. B.; Marchand, N.; Abidi, E.; Wiedensohler, A.; Drewnick, F.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.; Nemitz, E.; Zimmermann, R.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a post-industrial megacity on local and regional air quality was assessed via a month-long field measurement campaign in the Paris metropolitan area during winter 2010. Here we present source apportionment results from three aerosol mass spectrometers and two aethalometers deployed at three measurement stations within the Paris region. Submicron aerosol composition is dominated by the organic fraction (30-36%) and nitrate (28-29%), with lower contributions from sulfate (14-16%), ammonium (12-14%) and black carbon (7-13%). Organic source apportionment was performed using positive matrix factorization, resulting in a set of organic factors corresponding both to primary emission sources and secondary production. The dominant primary sources are traffic (11-15% of organic mass), biomass burning (13-15%) and cooking (up to 35% during meal hours). Secondary organic aerosol contributes more than 50% to the total organic mass and includes a highly oxidized factor from indeterminate and/or diverse sources and a less oxidized factor related to wood burning emissions. Black carbon was apportioned to traffic and wood burning sources using a model based on wavelength-dependent light absorption of these two combustion sources. The time series of organic and black carbon factors from related sources were strongly correlated. The similarities in aerosol composition, total mass and temporal variation between the three sites suggest that particulate pollution in Paris is dominated by regional factors, and that the emissions from Paris itself have a relatively low impact on its surroundings.

  1. A method for the direct measurement of surface tension of collected atmospherically relevant aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hritz, Andrew D.; Raymond, Timothy M.; Dutcher, Dabrina D.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimates of particle surface tension are required for models concerning atmospheric aerosol nucleation and activation. However, it is difficult to collect the volumes of atmospheric aerosol required by typical instruments that measure surface tension, such as goniometers or Wilhelmy plates. In this work, a method that measures, ex situ, the surface tension of collected liquid nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy is presented. A film of particles is collected via impaction and is probed using nanoneedle tips with the atomic force microscope. This micro-Wilhelmy method allows for direct measurements of the surface tension of small amounts of sample. This method was verified using liquids, whose surface tensions were known. Particles of ozone oxidized α-pinene, a well-characterized system, were then produced, collected, and analyzed using this method to demonstrate its applicability for liquid aerosol samples. It was determined that oxidized α-pinene particles formed in dry conditions have a surface tension similar to that of pure α-pinene, and oxidized α-pinene particles formed in more humid conditions have a surface tension that is significantly higher.

  2. Why Do We Need the Derivative for the Surface Area?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hristova, Yulia; Zeytuncu, Yunus E.

    2016-01-01

    Surface area and volume computations are the most common applications of integration in calculus books. When computing the surface area of a solid of revolution, students are usually told to use the frustum method instead of the disc method; however, a rigorous explanation is rarely provided. In this note, we provide one by using geometric…

  3. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiencies at Surface from the shortwave Irradiance Measurements in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum S, N.; Ben Romdhane, H.; Ghedira, H.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to affect the radiation balance of the Earth-Atmospheric system directly by scattering and absorbing the solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly by affecting the lifetime and albedo of the clouds. Continuous and simultaneous measurements of short wave global irradiance in combination with synchronous spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements (from 340 nm to 1640 nm in 8 channels), for a period of 1 year from June 2012 to May 2013, were used for the determination of the surface direct aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies under cloud free conditions in Abu Dhabi (24.42°N, 54.61o E, 7m MSL), a coastal location in United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the Arabian Peninsula. The Rotating Shadow band Pyranometer (RSP, LI-COR) was used for the irradiance measurements (in the spectral region 400-1100 nm), whereas the AOD measurements were carried out using CIMEL Sunphotometer (CE 318-2, under AERONET program). The differential method, which is neither sensitive to calibration uncertainties nor model assumptions, has been employed for estimating forcing efficiencies from the changes in the measured fluxes. The forcing efficiency, which quantifies the net change in irradiance per unit change in AOD, is an appropriate parameter for the characterization of the aerosol radiative effects even if the microphysical and optical properties of the aerosols are not completely understood. The corresponding forcing values were estimated from the forcing efficiencies. The estimated radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies exhibited strong monthly variations. The forcing efficiencies (absolute magnitudes) were highest during March, and showed continuous decrease thereafter to reach the lowest value during September. In contrast, the forcing followed a slightly different pattern of variability, with the highest solar dimming during April ( -60 W m-2) and the minimum during February ( -20 W m-2). The results indicate that the aerosol

  4. Detection of Remarkably Low Isotopic Ratio of Iron in Anthropogenic Aerosols and Evaluation of its Contribution to the Surface Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurisu, M.; Iizuka, T.; Sakata, K.; Uematsu, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It has been reported that phytoplankton growth in the High Nutrient-Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions is limited by dissolved iron (DFe) concentration (e.g., Martin and Fitzwater, 1988). Aerosol is known as one of the dominant sources of DFe to the ocean and classified into two origins such as anthropogenic and natural. A series of recent studies showed that Fe in anthropogenic aerosols is more soluble than that in natural aerosols (Takahashi et al., 2013) and has lower isotopic ratio (Mead et al., 2013). However, the difference between Fe isotopic ratio (δ56Fe: [(56Fe/54Fe)sample/(56Fe/54Fe)IRMM-14]-1) of two origins reported in Mead et al. (2013) is not so large compared with the standard deviation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine Fe species and δ56Fe in anthropogenic aerosols more accurately and to evaluate its contribution to the ocean surface. Iron species were determined by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis, while δ56Fe in size-fractionated aerosols were measured by MC-ICP-MS (NEPTUNE Plus) after chemical separation using anion exchange resin. Dominant Fe species in the samples were, ferrihydrite, hematite, and biotite. It was also revealed that coarse particles contained a larger amount of biotite and that fine particles contained a larger amount of hematite, which suggested that anthropogenic aerosols were emitted during combustion processes. In addition, results of Fe isotopic ratio analysis suggested that δ56Fe of coarse particles were around +0.25‰, whereas that of fine particles were -0.5 ˜ -2‰, which was lower than the δ56Fe in anthropogenic aerosol by Mead et al. (2013). The size-fractionated sampling made it possible to determine the δ56Fe in anthropogenic aerosol. Soluble component in fine particles extracted by simulated rain water also showed much lower δ56Fe (δ56Fe = -3.9±0.12‰), suggesting that anthropogenic Fe has much lower isotopic ratio. The remarkably low δ56Fe may be caused by the

  5. π-Hydrogen Bonding of Aromatics on the Surface of Aerosols: Insights from Ab Initio and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ya-Juan; Huang, Teng; Wang, Chao; Liu, Yi-Rong; Jiang, Shuai; Miao, Shou-Kui; Chen, Jiao; Huang, Wei

    2016-07-14

    Molecular level insight into the interaction between volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aerosols is crucial for improvement of atmospheric chemistry models. In this paper, the interaction between adsorbed toluene, one of the most significant VOCs in the urban atmosphere, and the aqueous surface of aerosols was studied by means of combined molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio quantum chemistry calculations. It is revealed that toluene can be stably adsorbed on the surface of aqueous droplets via hydroxyl-π hydrogen bonding between the H atoms of the water molecules and the C atoms in the aromatic ring. Further, significant modifications on the electrostatic potential map and frontier molecular orbital are induced by the solvation effect of surface water molecules, which would affect the reactivity and pathway of the atmospheric photooxidation of toluene. This study demonstrates that the surface interactions should be taken into consideration in the atmospheric chemical models on oxidation of aromatics.

  6. π-Hydrogen Bonding of Aromatics on the Surface of Aerosols: Insights from Ab Initio and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ya-Juan; Huang, Teng; Wang, Chao; Liu, Yi-Rong; Jiang, Shuai; Miao, Shou-Kui; Chen, Jiao; Huang, Wei

    2016-07-14

    Molecular level insight into the interaction between volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aerosols is crucial for improvement of atmospheric chemistry models. In this paper, the interaction between adsorbed toluene, one of the most significant VOCs in the urban atmosphere, and the aqueous surface of aerosols was studied by means of combined molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio quantum chemistry calculations. It is revealed that toluene can be stably adsorbed on the surface of aqueous droplets via hydroxyl-π hydrogen bonding between the H atoms of the water molecules and the C atoms in the aromatic ring. Further, significant modifications on the electrostatic potential map and frontier molecular orbital are induced by the solvation effect of surface water molecules, which would affect the reactivity and pathway of the atmospheric photooxidation of toluene. This study demonstrates that the surface interactions should be taken into consideration in the atmospheric chemical models on oxidation of aromatics. PMID:27280740

  7. Dynamics of the flame surface area in turbulent nonpremixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmann, W.; Chen, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic equation for the total surface area of level surfaces is developed based on a theorem of geometric measure theory and its relation to other versions of the equation is established. The mixture fraction, a quantity which is relevant to non-premixed combustion, is used to define the level surfaces. The level surface corresponding to its stoichiometric value is defined as the flame surface. It is shown that the evolution of the surface properties is determined by the rate-of-strain generated by the motion of the fluid, coupled with molecular diffusion and source terms of the scalar variable defining the level surface. DNS results obtained for a low-Reynolds number turbulent non-premixed flame are used to evaluate the effects of strain rate and scalar dynamics on the surface area of level surfaces.

  8. Black carbon surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Soot particles are the most strongly light-absorbing particles commonly found in the atmosphere. They are major contributors to the radiative budget of the Earth and to the toxicity of atmospheric pollution. Atmospheric aging of soot may change its health- and climate-relevant properties by oxidizing the primary black carbon (BC) or organic particulate matter (OM) which, together with ash, comprise soot. This atmospheric aging, which entails the condensation of secondary particulate matter as well as the oxidation of the primary OM and BC emissions, is currently poorly understood. In this study, atmospheric aging of wood-stove soot aerosols was simulated in a continuous-flow reactor. The composition of fresh and aged soot particles was measured in real time by a dual-vaporizer aerosol-particle mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The dual-vaporizer SP-AMS provided information on the OM and BC components of the soot as well as on refractory components internally mixed with BC. By switching the SP-AMS laser vaporizer off and using only the AMS thermal vaporizer (at 600 °C), information on the OM component only was obtained. In both modes, OM appeared to be generated largely by cellulose and/or hemicellulose pyrolysis and was only present in large amounts when new wood was added to the stove. In SP-AMS mode, BC signals otherwise dominated the mass spectrum. These signals consisted of ions related to refractory BC (rBC, C1-5+), oxygenated carbonaceous ions (CO1-2+), potassium (K+), and water (H2O+ and related fragments). The C4+ : C3+ ratio, but not the C1+ : C3+ ratio, was consistent with the BC-structure trends of Corbin et al. (2015c). The CO1-2+ signals likely originated from BC surface groups: upon aging, both CO+ and CO2+ increased relative to C1-3+ while CO2+ simultaneously increased relative to CO+. Factor analysis (positive matrix factorization) of SP-AMS and AMS data, using a modified error model to address peak-integration uncertainties, indicated that the surface

  9. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness and Normalized Water-Leaving Radiances From the SeaWiFS and MODIS Sensors Over the Chesapeake Bay Area (Case 2 Water)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Z.; Kwiatkowska, E. J.; Franz, B. A.; McClain, C. R.

    2007-12-01

    Presently, a suite of 12 aerosol models are used for atmospheric correction purposes to retrieve normalized water-leaving radiances in the visible bands of the SeaWiFS and MODIS sensors. These aerosol models are based on Shettle and Fenn's models (1979) of tropospheric and oceanic aerosols. Over most of the open oceans of the world (case 1 water), the atmospheric correction algorithm has been shown to work reasonably well. However, over case 2 waters, (for example Chesapeake Bay) the algorithm often yields negative water- leaving radiances, particularly, in the blue bands of the two sensors. In addition, over the coastal areas, the retrieved aerosol optical thickness (AOT) in the 865/869 bands are often higher than the in situ AERONET retrievals. Our analysis of the AERONET data show that Shettle and Fenn's aerosol models are not representative of the aerosols generally found over the coastal region of the Eastern United States. We show that use of wrong aerosol models often results in negative water-leaving radiances. Also, the backscattering of the solar irradiance in the near IR bands by phytoplankton and non-algal suspended particles results in overestimation of AOT. Based on the AERONET data, we have developed a set of new aerosol models for the atmospheric correction over Chesapeake Bay. Results from the new aerosol models, including comparison of satellite-derived AOT and the AERONET in the visible and near IR bands, will be presented.

  10. Investigation of sources of atmospheric aerosol at a hot spot area in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Begum, Bilkis A; Biswas, Swapan K; Kim, Eugene; Hopke, Philip K; Khaliquzzaman, Mohammed

    2005-02-01

    Samples of fine and coarse fractions of airborne particulate matter were collected at the Farm Gate area in Dhaka from July 2001 to March 2002. Dhaka is a hot spot area with very high pollutant concentrations because of the proximity of major roadways. The samples were collected using a "Gent" stacked filter unit in two fractions of 0- to 2.2-microm and 2.2- to 10-microm sizes. The samples were analyzed for elemental concentrations by particle-induced X-ray excitation (PIXE) and for black carbon by reflectivity methods, respectively. The data were analyzed by positive matrix factorization (PMF) to identify the possible sources of atmospheric aerosols in this area. Six sources were found for both the coarse and fine PM fractions. The data sets were also analyzed by an expanded model to explore additional sources. Seven and six factors were obtained for coarse and fine PM fractions, respectively, in these analyses. The identified sources are motor vehicle, soil dust, emissions from construction activities, sea salt, biomass burning/brick kiln, resuspended/fugitive Pb, and two-stroke engines. From the expanded modeling, approximately 50% of the total PM2.2 mass can be attributed to motor vehicles, including two-stroke engine vehicle in this hot spot in Dhaka, whereas the PMF modeling indicates that 45% of the total PM2.2 mass is from motor vehicles. The PMF2 and expanded models could resolve approximately 4% and 3% of the total PM2.2 mass as resuspended/fugitive Pb, respectively. Although, Pb has been eliminated from gasoline in Bangladesh since July 1999, there still may be substantial amounts of accumulated lead in the dust near roadways as well as fugitive Pb emissions from battery reclaimation and other industries. Soil dust is the largest component of the coarse particle fraction (PM2.2-10) accounting for approximately 71% of the total PM2.2-10 mass in the expanded model, whereas from the PMF modeling, the dust (undifferentiated) contribution is approximately 49%.

  11. Retrieval of aerosol properties over land surfaces: capabilities of multiple-viewing-angle intensity and polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, Otto P.; Landgraf, Jochen

    2007-06-01

    We investigate the capabilities of different instrument concepts for the retrieval of aerosol properties over land. It was found that, if the surface reflection properties are unknown, only multiple-viewing-angle measurements of both intensity and polarization are able to provide the relevant aerosol parameters with sufficient accuracy for climate research. Furthermore, retrieval errors are only little affected when the number of viewing angles is increased at the cost of the number of spectral sampling points and vice versa. This indicates that there is a certain amount of freedom for the instrument design of dedicated aerosol instruments. The final choice on the trade-off between the spectral sampling and the number of viewing angles should be made taking other factors into account, such as instrument complexity and the ability to obtain global coverage.

  12. 30 CFR 816.95 - Stabilization of surface areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stabilization of surface areas. 816.95 Section 816.95 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE...

  13. Surface ozone concentration and its behaviour with aerosols in the northwestern Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Kuniyal, Jagdish Chandra; Chand, Kesar; Guleria, Raj Paul; Dhyani, Pitamber Prasad; Chauhan, Chetan

    2013-06-01

    Surface ozone (O3), black carbon (BC) concentration and their relationship were established with PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentration at Mohal (31.9°N, 77.12°E, 1154 m amsl), a semi-urban site, in the Kullu valley of the northwestern part of the Indian Himalaya during January to December, 2010. O3 showed highest diurnal variation (84 ppb) during daytime and lowest (10 ppb) during late evening as well as early morning hours. The maximum concentration of O3 during summer was influenced by meteorological parameters, high insolation and backward airmass trajectories with transported pollutants. Rate of increase of O3 was observed as high as 2.92 ppb h-1 in October, followed by 2.73 ppb h-1 in March and 2.71 ppb h-1 in May. However, it was low 1.89 ppb h-1 in February. Monthly average concentration of O3 showed distinct seasonal variations with maximum in summer (55.9 ± 9.3 ppb in May) and minimum in winter (30.0 ± 6.2 ppb in January). Most of the O3 episodes were observed in summer during fair weather conditions like high solar flux (480-500 W m-2), relatively high temperature (22-24 °C) and negligible rainfall. By applying backward trajectory Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, the origin of the airmasses contributing to the background O3 concentration was investigated. O3 showed negative correlation with BC (r = -0.42). BC contributed 10-20% and 14-42% to the total aerosol mass concentration of PM10 and PM2.5 respectively which showed positive correlation (r = 0.65) with PM10 as well as PM2.5 aerosol mass concentration.

  14. Rain-aerosol coupling in urban area: Scavenging ratio measurement and identification of some transfer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Colin, J.-L.

    Coupling between rain and associated aerosol has been studied for 1 year in Paris. Sampling techniques were chosen so as to describe the interacting phases as precisely as possible: exclusion of dry deposition, separation of successive rain events by an automatic sequential collector and aerosol collection over 6-h periods only. Study of interphase correlations for 82 events reveals three groups of species with distinctly different behaviour: insolubles—Al, Si, Fe; solubles—SO 42-, K, Ca, Zn, Mg; and the extreme case of Na and Cl. Interphase relationships decrease in this order. Variations of the scavenging ratio are in good agreement with the theoretical curve for collection efficiency. Noteworthy is the rise of the experimental curve for sub-μm particles. An interpretation based on the origin and hygroscopy of the species is attempted. Apart from their predictive ability in geochemical assessment, scavenging ratios appear useful for investigating the mechanisms of transfer between aerosols and precipitation.

  15. Bulk, surface, and gas-phase limited water transport in aerosol.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Haddrell, Allen E; Miles, Rachael E H; Bull, Craig R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-11-15

    The influence of solute species on mass transfer to and from aqueous aerosol droplets is investigated using an electrodynamic balance coupled with light scattering techniques. In particular, we explore the limitations imposed on water evaporation by slow bulk phase diffusion and by the formation of surface organic films. Measurements of evaporation from ionic salt solutions, specifically sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate, are compared with predictions from an analytical model framework, highlighting the uncertainties associated with quantifying gas diffusional transport. The influence of low solubility organic acids on mass transfer is reported and compared to both model predictions and previous work. The limiting value of the evaporation coefficient that can be resolved by this approach, when uncertainties in key thermophysical quantities are accounted for, is estimated. The limitation of slow bulk phase diffusion on the evaporation rate is investigated for gel and glass states formed during the evaporation of magnesium sulfate and sucrose droplets, respectively. Finally, the effect of surfactants on evaporation has been probed, with soluble surfactants (such as sodium dodecyl sulfate) leading to little or no retardation of evaporation through slowing of surface layer kinetics. PMID:23095147

  16. Comparison of Satellite Observations of Aerosol Optical Depth to Surface Monitor Fine Particle Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Mary M.; AlSaadi, Jassim A.; Neil, Doreen O.; Pierce, Robert B.; Pippin, Margartet R.; Roell, Marilee M.; Kittaka, Chieko; Szykman, James J.

    2004-01-01

    Under NASA's Earth Science Applications Program, the Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications (IDEA) project examined the relationship between satellite observations and surface monitors of air pollutants to facilitate a more capable and integrated observing network. This report provides a comparison of satellite aerosol optical depth to surface monitor fine particle concentration observations for the month of September 2003 at more than 300 individual locations in the continental US. During September 2003, IDEA provided prototype, near real-time data-fusion products to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) directed toward improving the accuracy of EPA s next-day Air Quality Index (AQI) forecasts. Researchers from NASA Langley Research Center and EPA used data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument combined with EPA ground network data to create a NASA-data-enhanced Forecast Tool. Air quality forecasters used this tool to prepare their forecasts of particle pollution, or particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), for the next-day AQI. The archived data provide a rich resource for further studies and analysis. The IDEA project uses data sets and models developed for tropospheric chemistry research to assist federal, state, and local agencies in making decisions concerning air quality management to protect public health.

  17. [Pollution Characteristics and Sources of Carbonaceous Aerosol in PM2.5 During Winter in Guanzhong Area].

    PubMed

    Tian, Peng-shan; Cao, Jun-ji; Han, Yong-ming; Zhang, Ning-ning; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Sui-xin

    2016-02-15

    To study the characteristics and sources of carbonaceous aerosol in PM2.5 during winter in Guanzhong area, PM2.5 samples were collected from December 2012 to February 2013 in Xi'an, Baoji, Weinan and Qinling, and then organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were analyzed following the thermal/optical reflection protocol. The average concentrations of OC in the four sites were 47.8, 45.8, 31.2 and 37.0 microg x m(-3), respectively, while EC concentrations were 8.5, 6.7, 7.6 and 5.7 microg x m(-3), respectively. Total carbonaceous aerosol (TCA) accounted for 36.4%, 46.2%, 36.9% and 33.4% of PM2.5, respectively. OC was strongly correlated with EC in Xi'an (R2 = 0.93) and Qinling (R2 = 0.91), while weakly correlated in Baoji (R2 = 0.58) and Weinan (R2 = 0.62), which indicated that OC and EC had more similar sources or higher mixing degree in the former two sites. All OC/EC ratios exceeded 2.0, which indicated the formation of secondary organic carbon (SOC). In Xi'an, Baoji, Weinan and Qinling, SOC accounted for 21.6%, 40.3%, 23.2% and 27.8% of OC, respectively. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to analyze the sources of carbonaceous aerosol and four sources were obtained. Coal burning was the major source, contributing 45.3%-47.9% in Guanzhong area. Gasoline vehicle and biomass burning were the minor sources, contributing 26.1%-33.1% and 14.3%-20.1% respectively. In addition, diesel vehicle also had some contribution to carbonaceous aerosol.

  18. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique. PMID:19350912

  19. MOISTURE AND SURFACE AREA MEASUREMENTS OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Scogin, J.; Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.

    2009-09-28

    To ensure safe storage, plutonium-bearing oxides are stabilized at 950 C for at least two hours in an oxidizing atmosphere. Stabilization conditions are expected to decompose organic impurities, convert metals to oxides, and result in moisture content below 0.5 wt%. During stabilization, the specific surface area is reduced, which minimizes readsorption of water onto the oxide surface. Plutonium oxides stabilized according to these criteria were sampled and analyzed to determine moisture content and surface area. In addition, samples were leached in water to identify water-soluble chloride impurity content. Results of these analyses for seven samples showed that the stabilization process produced low moisture materials (< 0.2 wt %) with low surface area ({le} 1 m{sup 2}/g). For relatively pure materials, the amount of water per unit surface area corresponded to 1.5 to 3.5 molecular layers of water. For materials with chloride content > 360 ppm, the calculated amount of water per unit surface area increased with chloride content, indicating hydration of hygroscopic salts present in the impure PuO{sub 2}-containing materials. The low moisture, low surface area materials in this study did not generate detectable hydrogen during storage of four or more years.

  20. Relationship Between Aerosol Number Size Distribution and Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient in an Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Matthew; Matthews, James; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Small ions are created in the atmosphere by ground based radioactive decay and solar and cosmic radiation ionising the air. The ionosphere is maintained at a high potential relative to the Earth due to global thunderstorm activity, a current from the ionosphere transfers charge back to the ground through the weakly ionised atmosphere. A potential gradient (PG) exists between the ionosphere and the ground that can be measured in fair weather using devices such as an electric field mill. PG is inversely-proportional to the conductivity of the air and therefore to the number of ions of a given electrical mobility; a reduction of air ions will cause an increase of PG. Aerosols in the atmosphere act as a sink of air ions with an attachment rate dependent on aerosol size distribution and ion mobility. These relationships have been used to infer high particulate, and hence pollution, levels in historic datasets of atmospheric PG. A measurement campaign was undertaken in Manchester, UK for three weeks in July and August where atmospheric PG was measured with an electric field mill (JCI131, JCI Chilworth) on a second floor balcony, aerosol size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI3936), aerosol concentration measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC, Grimm 5.403) and local meteorological measurements taken on a rooftop measurement site ~200 m away. Field mill and CPC data were taken at 1 s intervals and SMPS data in 2.5 minute cycles. Data were excluded for one hour either side of rainfall as rainclouds and droplets can carry significant charge which would affect PG. A quantity relating to the attachment of ions to aerosol (Ion Sink) was derived from the effective attachment coefficient of the aerosols. Further measurements with the field mill and CPC were taken at the same location in November 2015 when bonfire events would be expected to increase aerosol concentrations. During the summer measurements, particle number count (PNC

  1. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  2. EGG Volume and Surface Area Calculationsbased on Machine Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Zheng, Wengang; Zhao, Chunjiang; Shen, Changjun; Sun, Gang

    Egg volume(V) and surface area(S) are two important geometrical calculations for the poultry industry and in biological studies, as they can be used in research on population and ecological morphology, and to predict chick weight, egg hatchability, shell quality characteristics, and egg interior parameters. With machine vision technology, the objective of the research herein was to develop a much more fast and available method to predict them. Besides, the researcher gave the definition of Volume in Pixels (Vp) and Surface area in Pixels (Sp) for the first time. Finally, new linear models were established. The R value for volume model is 0.88 and surface area is 0.86. The prediction ability of the models are: for volume, the correctness reaches 52% with ± 1cm3 statistical errors, 89% with ± 2cm3, for surface, the correctness reaches 49% with ±1cm2 statistical errors , 87% with ±2 cm2.

  3. Case study of extreme aerosol pollution events in the Paris area by synergy between optical measurements from multiple platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totems, Julien; Chazette, Patrick; Royer, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Major pollution events encountered in the Paris area are mainly due to anticyclonic conditions where air masses are blocked and recycled (horizontal wind speed less than 1 m.s-1) or advected from northestern Europe. Such events with aerosol optical thickness larger than 0.4 at 355 nm have been documented by in situ sensors (AirParif network), ground-based sunphotometers (Aeronet network) and fixed and mobile ground-based Rayleigh-Mie lidars. The first studied event occurred during the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) summer experiment, on July 1st, 2009. Another favorable period for major pollution events is the spring season and we have highlighted two of them using the opportunity given by lidar experimental tests at LSCE in march 2011. Ground-based observations have been complemented by spaceborne measurements from MODIS and CALIPSO/CALIOP that give information on the spatial extent of the pollution plume in 3 dimensions. From this instrumental synergy we determine the aerosol optical properties (extinction coefficients in the atmospheric column, optical thickness, lidar ratio, ...). The probable aerosol sources have also been investigated using back-trajectories analyses computed by the HYSPLIT model (http://ready.arl.noaa.gov/HYSPLIT.php) ; they lie in the French Lorraine, Benelux, and German Saarland and Ruhr industrialized regions.

  4. Analysis of particulate emissions from tropical biomass burning using a global aerosol model and long-term surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddington, Carly L.; Spracklen, Dominick V.; Artaxo, Paulo; Ridley, David A.; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Arana, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    We use the GLOMAP global aerosol model evaluated against observations of surface particulate matter (PM2.5) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) to better understand the impacts of biomass burning on tropical aerosol over the period 2003 to 2011. Previous studies report a large underestimation of AOD over regions impacted by tropical biomass burning, scaling particulate emissions from fire by up to a factor of 6 to enable the models to simulate observed AOD. To explore the uncertainty in emissions we use three satellite-derived fire emission datasets (GFED3, GFAS1 and FINN1). In these datasets the tropics account for 66-84 % of global particulate emissions from fire. With all emission datasets GLOMAP underestimates dry season PM2.5 concentrations in regions of high fire activity in South America and underestimates AOD over South America, Africa and Southeast Asia. When we assume an upper estimate of aerosol hygroscopicity, underestimation of AOD over tropical regions impacted by biomass burning is reduced relative to previous studies. Where coincident observations of surface PM2.5 and AOD are available we find a greater model underestimation of AOD than PM2.5, even when we assume an upper estimate of aerosol hygroscopicity. Increasing particulate emissions to improve simulation of AOD can therefore lead to overestimation of surface PM2.5 concentrations. We find that scaling FINN1 emissions by a factor of 1.5 prevents underestimation of AOD and surface PM2.5 in most tropical locations except Africa. GFAS1 requires emission scaling factor of 3.4 in most locations with the exception of equatorial Asia where a scaling factor of 1.5 is adequate. Scaling GFED3 emissions by a factor of 1.5 is sufficient in active deforestation regions of South America and equatorial Asia, but a larger scaling factor is required elsewhere. The model with GFED3 emissions poorly simulates observed seasonal variability in surface PM2.5 and AOD in regions where small fires dominate, providing

  5. Characterization of Cooking-Related Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Blanc, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    The temperatures at which food is cooked are usually high enough to drive oils and other organic compounds out of materials which are being prepared for consumption. As these compounds move away from the hot cooking surface and into the atmosphere, they can participate in chemical reactions or condense to form particles. Given the high concentration of cooking in urban areas, cooking-related aerosols likely contribute to the overall amount of particulate matter on a local scale. Reported here are results for the mid-infrared optical characterization of aerosols formed during the cooking of several meat and vegetable samples in an inert atmosphere. The samples were heated in a novel aerosol generator that is designed to collect particles formed immediately above the cooking surface and inject them into a laminar aerosol flow cell. Preliminary results for the chemical processing of cooking-related aerosols in synthetic air will also be presented.

  6. Determination of Reactive Surface Area of Melt Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bourcier,W.L.; Roberts, S.; Smith, D.K.; Hulsey, S.; Newton,L.; Sawvel, A.; Bruton, C.; Papelis, C.; Um, W.; Russell, C. E.; Chapman,J.

    2000-10-01

    A comprehensive investigation of natural and manmade silicate glasses, and nuclear melt glass was undertaken in order to derive an estimate of glass reactive surface area. Reactive surface area is needed to model release rates of radionuclides from nuclear melt glass in the subsurface. Because of the limited availability of nuclear melt glasses, natural volcanic glass samples were collected which had similar textures and compositions as those of melt glass. A flow-through reactor was used to measure the reactive surface area of the analog glasses in the presence of simplified NTS site ground waters. A measure of the physical surface area of these glasses was obtained using the BET gas-adsorption method. The studies on analog glasses were supplemented by measurement of the surface areas of pieces of actual melt glass using the BET method. The variability of the results reflect the sample preparation and measurement techniques used, as well as textural heterogeneity inherent to these samples. Based on measurements of analog and actual samples, it is recommended that the hydraulic source term calculations employ a range of 0.001 to 0.01 m{sup 2}/g for the reactive surface area of nuclear melt glass.

  7. Unique developmental trajectories of cortical thickness and surface area.

    PubMed

    Wierenga, Lara M; Langen, Marieke; Oranje, Bob; Durston, Sarah

    2014-02-15

    There is evidence that the timing of developmental changes in cortical volume and thickness varies across the brain, although the processes behind these differences are not well understood. In contrast to volume and thickness, the regional developmental trajectories of cortical surface area have not yet been described. The present study used a combined cross-sectional and longitudinal design with 201 MRI-scans (acquired at 1.5-T) from 135 typically developing children and adolescents. Scans were processed using FreeSurfer software and the Desikan-Killiany atlas. Developmental trajectories were estimated using mixed model regression analysis. Within most regions, cortical thickness showed linear decreases with age, whereas both cortical volume and surface area showed curvilinear trajectories. On average, maximum surface area occurred later in development than maximum volume. Global gender differences were more pronounced in cortical volume and surface area than in average thickness. Our findings suggest that developmental trajectories of surface area and thickness differ across the brain, both in their pattern and their timing, and that they also differ from the developmental trajectory of global cortical volume. Taken together, these findings indicate that the development of surface area and thickness is driven by different processes, at least in part. PMID:24246495

  8. 30 CFR 56.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 56.17001 Section 56.17001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Illumination § 56.17001 Illumination of...

  9. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3− aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; Ault, A.; Bondy, A.; Takahama, S.; Modini, R. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Knote, C.; et al

    2015-09-25

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3−) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3more » and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. In addition, calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3− is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3− and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas–aerosol phase partitioning.« less

  10. Developing a model system for studying the ozone processing of atmospheric aerosols by following changes in surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Labrada, Erick

    Atmospheric aerosols have a significant organic composition as determined by field measurement studies. This organic material is released to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources, such as wind bursting of the ocean surface, car exhausts, and meat cooking, among others. An inverted micelle model has been proposed in order to explain the high concentration of organic compounds in aerosol particles. The model describes an organic film coating the air-liquid interface of an aqueous aerosol core. Chemical processing of this organic film by atmospheric oxidants (such as OH radicals, O3, and NO3) through heterogeneous and multiphase reactions can activate the aerosol to participate in atmospheric chemistry. After reaction, the particle has an increased role in the absorption and scattering of incoming solar radiation and cloud formation. Another consequence of this oxidation is the decrease of the atmospheric budget of gas-phase trace species, as well as the formation of volatile products. Several studies have proposed that the ozonolysis of organic films in aerosols takes place mainly at the surface. Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop a suitable model system for following the reaction through quantitative changes of a property inherent to the surface. Several attempts were made to examine the ozonolysis of organic monolayers at either solid or liquid surfaces. The studied monolayers contained unsaturated organic compounds as the only component or as part of a binary mixture with saturated compounds. The study of the ozone processing of monolayers deposited on solid substrates revealed information about changes in the hydrophobic character of the surface that occurred because of the reaction. On the other hand, the processing of a monolayer spread on a pendant drop allowed a real-time monitoring of surface pressure changes. This permitted a kinetic study of the reaction that yielded parameters related exclusively to processes

  11. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature. PMID:25272147

  12. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature.

  13. Quantifying object and material surface areas in residences

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Ming, Katherine Y.; Singer, Brett C.

    2005-01-05

    The dynamic behavior of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor environments depends, in part, on sorptive interactions between VOCs in the gas phase and material surfaces. Since information on the types and quantities of interior material surfaces is not generally available, this pilot-scale study was conducted in occupied residences to develop and demonstrate a method for quantifying surface areas of objects and materials in rooms. Access to 33 rooms in nine residences consisting of bathrooms, bedroom/offices and common areas was solicited from among research group members living in the East San Francisco Bay Area. A systematic approach was implemented for measuring rooms and objects from 300 cm{sup 2} and larger. The ventilated air volumes of the rooms were estimated and surface area-to-volume ratios were calculated for objects and materials, each segregated into 20 or more categories. Total surface area-to-volume ratios also were determined for each room. The bathrooms had the highest total surface area-to-volume ratios. Bedrooms generally had higher ratios than common areas consisting of kitchens, living/dining rooms and transitional rooms. Total surface area-to-volume ratios for the 12 bedrooms ranged between 2.3 and 4.7 m{sup 2} m{sup -3}. The importance of individual objects and materials with respect to sorption will depend upon the sorption coefficients for the various VOC/materials combinations. When combined, the highly permeable material categories, which may contribute to significant interactions, had a median ratio of about 0.5 m{sup 2} m{sup -3} for all three types of rooms.

  14. Specific surface area as a maturity index of lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammage, R. B.; Holmes, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Mature surface fines have an equilibrium specific surface area of about 0.6 sq m/g the equivalent mean particle size being about 3 microns. The adsorption behavior of inert gases (reversible isotherms) indicates that the particles are also nonporous in the size range of pores from 10 to 3000 A. Apparently, in mature soils there is a balance in the forces which cause fining, attrition, pore filling, and growth of lunar dust grains. Immature, lightly irradiated soils usually have coarser grains which reduce in size as aging proceeds. The specific surface area, determined by nitrogen or krypton sorption at 77 K, is a valuable index of soil maturity.

  15. Water Soluble Organic Nitrogen in atmospheric aerosol samples from urban, sub-urban and pristine areas of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelon, R.; Giuliante, A.; Aguiar, G.; Ghneim, T.; Perez, T.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) were determined in atmospheric total suspended particles (TSP) collected between September of 2005 and May of 2006, in an urban continental (Caracas, 10° 29' 09'' N, 66° 53' 48'' W), an urban coastal (Catia la mar, 10° 35' 47'' N, 67° 01' 45'' W), a sub-urban coastal (Osma, 10° 32' N, 67° 28' W), a suburban continental (Altos de Pipe, 10° 23' 41'' N, 63° 59' 10'' W), a pristine coastal (Isla de Aves, 15° 40' N, 63° 36' W) and a pristine continental (La Gran Sabana National Park, 5° 41' 30'' N, 61° 34' 20'' W) areas of Venezuela. TSP samples were collected using a Hi-Vol airborne particle sampler. TSP were impacted on a fiberglass filter pretreated under 400° C for 4 hours to minimize organic nitrogen contamination. Ultra sound water extractions of the sample filters were performed and their NH4+, NO2- and NO3- concentrations were determined by ion exchange liquid chromatography. The water extracts were UV digested and the nitrogen inorganic ions were analyzed after the UV exposure. WSON concentrations were calculated by the difference between the inorganic nitrogen concentrations before and after UV digestion. Ninety five percent of the aerosol samples collected in the suburban and pristine areas showed a WSON concentration range from 0.03 to 0.6 μg/m3 whereas in urban areas the range was 0.21 to 1.09 μg/m3. These concentration values are on the same order of magnitude than the previously found in other tropical and subtropical areas. The contribution of aerosol WSON to the total soluble nitrogen in the coastal urban, sub-urban and pristine areas ranged from 23 to 67%, while in Caracas was smaller (38±8%, n=5). Therefore, aerosol WSON provides an important source of nitrogen to these pristine and suburban ecosystems, which could potentially have implications on the nutrient cycling. There was a statistically significant linear correlation between the aerosol WSON and the water soluble inorganic

  16. Measurements of BET Surface Area on Silica Nanosprings

    SciTech Connect

    Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.

    2008-09-01

    Nitrogen adsorption desorption isotherm for Silica nanosprings (GoNano2) samples deposited on substrate. The isotherm was obtained at 77 K using liquid N2 bath. The area of the substrate is 16 cm2. The amount of the sample is 0.44 mg/cm2. Amount of silica nanosprings= 7.04 mg. There is no indication of substantial micro or mesoporosity in the sample based on the nature of the isotherm. Eleven point BET surface area was measured. Nine points plotted. Goodness if fit R= 0.9992. BET surface area for silica nanosprings= 262 cm2/g

  17. Carbonaceous Aerosols in Fine Particulate Matter of Santiago Metropolitan Area, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Toro Araya, Richard; Flocchini, Robert; Morales Segura, Rául G. E.; Leiva Guzmán, Manuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in South American cities are limited, and most existing data are of short term and limited to only a few locations. For 6 years (2002–2007), concentrations of fine particulate matter and organic and elemental carbon were measured continuously in the capital of Chile. The contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to the primary and secondary fractions was estimated at three different sampling sites and in the warm and cool seasons. The results demonstrate that there are significant differences in the levels in both the cold (March to August) and warm (September to February) seasons at all sites studied. The percent contribution of total carbonaceous aerosol fine particulate matter was greater in the cool season (53 ± 41%) than in the warm season (44 ± 18%). On average, the secondary organic carbon in the city corresponded to 29% of the total organic carbon. In cold periods, this proportion may reach an average of 38%. A comparison of the results with the air quality standards for fine particulate matter indicates that the total carbonaceous fraction alone exceeds the World Health Organization standard (10 µg/m3) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency standard (15 µg/m3) for fine particulate matter. PMID:24587753

  18. Molecular marker study of extractable organic matter in aerosols from urban areas of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Sheng, Guoying; Chen, Xiaojing; Fu, Jiamo; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Yuping

    The solvent-extractable compounds (lipids) of aerosol samples, which were collected from a western suburb of Beijing, in the city of Guiyang and on the outskirts of Guangzhou, P.R. China, using a standard high volume air sampler, were investigated to determine the distributions of homologous compounds and biomarkers. These preliminary results show that all samples contain aliphatic hydrocarbons including n-alkanes, steranes and triterpanes, derived from both biogenic sources (vascular plant wax input) and fossil fuel contamination (coal, crude oil, etc.). Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, which are considered to be combustion products from fossil fuels such as petroleum and, especially in this case, coal burning, are also widely distributed in all samples. Oxygenated compounds (e.g. alkanoic acids, alkanones and alkanols) are present as major fractions and are derived from mainly natural sources. Furthermore, some compositional differences are observed for the organic compounds in samples from different heights above ground. This is interpreted to be due to dilution at higher levels of locally generated aerosol with upper air aerosol transported over longer distances.

  19. Minimal adhesion surface area in tangentially loaded digital contacts.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Alexander V; Hayward, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    The stick-to-slip transition of a fingertip in contact with a planar surface does not occur instantaneously. As the tangential load increases, portions of the skin adhere while others slip, giving rise to an evolution of the contact state, termed partial slip. We develop a quasi-static model that predicts that if the coefficient of kinetic friction is larger than the coefficient of static friction, then the stuck surface area diminishes as the tangential load increases until reaching a 'minimal adhesion surface area' where it vanishes abruptly. This phenomenon was observed in recently measured finger-slip image data (André et al., 2011) that were processed by an optic flow detection algorithm. We examined the results of 10 trials. Four of them exhibited the minimal adhesion surface area phenomenon, four of them did not, and two were inconclusive.

  20. Minimal adhesion surface area in tangentially loaded digital contacts.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Alexander V; Hayward, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    The stick-to-slip transition of a fingertip in contact with a planar surface does not occur instantaneously. As the tangential load increases, portions of the skin adhere while others slip, giving rise to an evolution of the contact state, termed partial slip. We develop a quasi-static model that predicts that if the coefficient of kinetic friction is larger than the coefficient of static friction, then the stuck surface area diminishes as the tangential load increases until reaching a 'minimal adhesion surface area' where it vanishes abruptly. This phenomenon was observed in recently measured finger-slip image data (André et al., 2011) that were processed by an optic flow detection algorithm. We examined the results of 10 trials. Four of them exhibited the minimal adhesion surface area phenomenon, four of them did not, and two were inconclusive. PMID:21774936

  1. Measurements of regional-scale aerosol impacts on cloud microphysics over the East China Sea: Possible influences of warm sea surface temperature over the Kuroshio ocean current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Takegawa, N.; Moteki, N.; Kondo, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Kita, K.; Matsui, H.; Oshima, N.; Kajino, M.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2012-09-01

    Cloud microphysical properties and aerosol concentrations were measured aboard an aircraft over the East China Sea and Yellow Sea in April 2009 during the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) experiment. We sampled stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds over the ocean in 9 cases during 7 flights 500-900 km off the east coast of Mainland China. In this study we report aerosol impacts on cloud microphysical properties by focusing on regional characteristics of two key parameters, namely updraft velocity and aerosol size distribution. First, we show that the cloud droplet number concentration (highest 5%, Nc_max) correlates well with the accumulation-mode aerosol number concentration (Na) below the clouds. We then show that Nc_maxcorrelates partly with near-surface stratification evaluated as the difference between the sea surface temperature (SST) and 950-hPa temperature (SST - T950). Cold air advection from China to the East China Sea was found to bring not only a large number of aerosols but also a dry and cold air mass that destabilized the atmospheric boundary layer, especially over the warm Kuroshio ocean current. Over this high-SST region, greater updraft velocities and hence greater Nc_maxlikely resulted. We hypothesize that the low-level static stability determined by SST and regional-scale airflow modulates both the cloud microphysics (aerosol impact on clouds) and macro-structure of clouds (cloud base and top altitudes, hence cloud liquid water path). Second, we show that not only higher aerosol loading in terms of total aerosol number concentration (NCN, D > 10 nm) but also larger aerosol mode diameters likely contributed to high Ncduring A-FORCE. The mean Nc of 650 ± 240 cm-3was more than a factor of 2 larger than the global average for clouds influenced by continental sources. A crude estimate of the aerosol-induced cloud albedo radiative forcing is also given.

  2. Impact of long-range transport of aerosols on the PM2.5 composition at a major metropolitan area in the northern Kyushu area of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyasu, Naoki; Yamamoto, Shigekazu; Sato, Kei; Takami, Akinori; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hara, Keiichiro; Kawamoto, Kazuaki; Okuda, Tomoaki; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2014-11-01

    In view of the recent rapid economic growth and accompanying energy consumption in the East Asian region, particularly in China, there is much concern about the effects of emitted particulate pollutants on human health. We have thus investigated the impact of long-range transport of aerosols on urban air quality in the upwind areas of Japan by comparing the PM2.5 composition collected for multiple years in Fukuoka, a representative metropolis in the Kyushu area, and in Fukue Island, located 190 km southwest of Fukuoka. Daily averaged PM2.5 concentrations in Fukuoka and Fukue were almost identical. PM2.5 concentrations at these sites were dominated by sulfate and particulate organics, and their fluctuation patterns were similar except for organics in the warm season. In contrast, those of nitrate and elemental carbon differed substantially between the sites. In addition, the ratios of Pb/Zn and Cd/Pb in Fukuoka were close to the reported values in Beijing. Non-sea-salt sulfate concentration in Fukuoka measured in this study and reported in the past measurements apparently coincided with the decadal SO2 emission change in China reported in a recent emission inventory. Therefore, we conclude that even in a city as large as Fukuoka, the PM2.5 concentration in the northern part of the Kyushu area is primarily dominated by the inflow of long-range transported aerosols throughout the year, except in the summer, rather than local air pollution emitted at each site.

  3. GRMPY surface ground motion measurements in Area 16

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, R.G.

    1995-09-01

    The GRMPY surface ground motion data collection system was fielded on two shallowly buried high explosive tests in Area 16 at the Nevada Tests Site. Excellent data were collected on both tests and on two very small high explosive calibration tests conducted prior to the main tests. The data superficially resemble surface ground motion data for nuclear weapons tests, but there are differences. The most obvious is the rate of decline in peak vertical velocity with horizontal distance. Less obvious is the ratio of the surface ground zero peak vertical acceleration to the surface ground zero peak vertical velocity. The ramifications of these features as tools for on-site verification are explored.

  4. Poster 13: Large-scale simultaneous mapping of Titan's aerosol opacity and surface albedo by a new massive inversion method of Cassini/VIMS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Sotin, Christophe; Rannou, Pascal; Bezard, Bruno; Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; Appere, Thomas; Cornet, Thomas; Le Mouelic, Stephane%F. Aa(Aim Cea Saclay; Lesia Observatoire de Paris), Ab(Aim Cea Saclay; Universite Paris 7), Ac(Jpl; Lpg Nantes), Ad(Gsma Reims), Ae(Lesia Observatoire De Paris), Af(Jpl), Ag(Lesia Observatoire De Paris), Ah(Aim Cea Saclay), Ai(Esac/Esa), Aj(Lpg Nantes)

    2016-06-01

    way for global maps of mineralogical composition (and related temporal variations). Results of simultaneous maps of aerosol opacity and surface albedo for the various surface windows are shown for some selected flybys observing the same area with different geometries, to highlight the robustness of the method to correct seamlessly the atmospheric effects.

  5. Trends in surface solar radiation in Spain since the 1980s: the role of the changes in the radiative effects of aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Mateos, David; Wild, Martin; Calbó, Josep; Antón, Manuel; Enriquez-Alonso, Aaron; Sanchez-Romero, Alex

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of decadal variations in surface solar radiation, although the analyses of long-term time series in some areas with major gaps in observations, such as in Spain, are still pending. In the first part of this work, a previously published surface solar radiation dataset in Spain is described (for more details, see Sanchez-Lorenzo et al., 2013) based on the longest series with ground-based records of global and diffuse solar radiation, most of them starting in the early 1980s and ending in 2012. Particular emphasis is placed upon the homogenization of this dataset in order to ensure the reliability of the trends. The linear trend in the mean annual series of global solar radiation shows a significant increase since 1981 of 4.0 Wm-2 (or 2.4 %) per decade. These results are in line with the increase of global solar radiation (i.e. brightening period) reported at many worldwide observation sites (Wild, 2009). In addition, the annual mean diffuse solar radiation series shows a significant decrease during the last three decades, but it is disturbed by strong increases in 1983 and 1991-1992, which might reflect the effects of the El Chichón and Pinatubo volcanic eruptions as a result of enhanced scattering of the aerosols emitted during these large volcanic eruptions. As clouds and aerosols are the main sources of uncertainty in the determination of the energy balance of the Earth, there is a growing interest in the evaluation of their radiative effects and their impact on the decadal variability of the surface solar radiation. Hence, in the second part of this work, the changes of the combined radiative effects of clouds and aerosols in Spain since the 1980s are investigated (for more details, see Mateos et al., 2013). In particular, the global solar radiation data above mentioned and radiative transfer simulations fed with reanalysis data of ozone, water vapour and surface albedo, are used to evaluate the cloud and aerosol

  6. Simultaneous observation of seasonal variations of beryllium-7 and typical POPs in near-surface atmospheric aerosols in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jing; Yang, Yong-Liang; Zhang, Gan; Shi, Jing-Lei; Zhu, Xiao-Hua; Li, Yong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-07-01

    Near-surface atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at the sampling frequency of 2-3 d per week for one year from August 2006 to August 2007 at a low latitude station in Tianhe District, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province of southern China. The samples were analyzed for cosmogenic nuclide 7Be and persistent organic pollutants, i.e. organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The annual average 7Be concentration was 2.59 mBq m -3, with the maximum occurred in May (8.45 mBq m -3) and minimum in late August and early September (0.07 mBq m -3). Winter and spring were the seasons in which the 7Be concentrations were high while summer and autumn were the lower 7Be seasons. Spring peaks in 7Be in the near-surface atmospheric aerosols may have associated with the "spring leak maximum" episode. The annual average ∑OCPs concentration was 345.6 pg m -3, ∑ 33PCBs 317.6 pg m -3, and ∑ 31PBDEs 609.0 pg m -3. The variation trends in the time-series of 7Be, OCPs, PCBs, and PBDEs in near-surface atmospheric aerosol showed both common features and differences. Significant correlations ( R2 = 0.957 and 0.811. respectively, p = 0.01) were observed between the monthly average 7Be concentrations and those of ∑PCBs and ∑PBDEs in summer, autumn, and early winter. The difference between the seasonal variation features of OCPs and PCBs (and PBDEs) could be attributed to the different source functions and physical-chemical properties which could control the behaviors of these compounds in air-aerosol partitions as well as atmospheric transport.

  7. Role of anthropogenic aerosols in the20th century surface solar radiation, temperature, and meridional heat transport in the Max Planck Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It is still debated, to what degree anthropogenic aerosols were affected surface temperatures - especially over sea surfaces - through alteration of surface solar radiation (SSR). Previous work using mixed-layer ocean equilibria corroborated the relevance of anthropogenic aerosols for surface temperature response patterns obtained. Here we complement these studies by fully coupled simulations with the Max Planck Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) in its CMIP5 version. Experiments comprise preindustrial control and historical as in CMIP5, as well as transient experiments 1850 - 2000 with either anthropogenic aerosols or well-mixed greenhouse gases (WMGHG) kept at 1850 levels. With this suite of experiments, we analyse the impact of anthropogenic aerosols and WMGHG on the global energy balance and provide estimates of atmospheric and oceanic meridional heat transport changes in our modeling setup. We find that Global mean surface temperature responses to single forcings are additive. Furthermore, spatial surface temperature response patterns in the WMGHG only experiment are more strongly correlated with the historical experiment than the aerosol only case. We compare transient and equilibrium responses and discuss potential implications of not allowing for cloud-aerosol interactions in the transient modeling set-up.

  8. Global Aerosol Distributions Derived From the CALIPSO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittaka, C.; Winker, D.; Omar, A.; Liu, Z.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C.

    2008-12-01

    Since June 2006, CALIPSO continues to provide routine and systematic measurements of lidar backscatter at two wavelengths, 532 and 1064 nm. As an active sensor, the quality of the measurement is nearly insensitive to surface properties allowing quantitative measurements in regions that are problematic to passive sensors. In particular, aerosol and cloud observations in the polar regions and desert areas are possible with the CALIPSO lidar through the different seasons of a year. The CALIPSO level 2 products, which include aerosol and cloud vertical profiles along tracks, reveal, for the first time, the multi-layer structure of aerosols and clouds on a global scale. This allows not only a depiction of aerosols in relation to clouds, but also the investigation of the interaction between aerosols and clouds. In this study, we present global distributions of aerosol in terms of season, layer height, aerosol species, and in relation to clouds using two years of CALIPSO observations. The CALIPSO aerosol extinction data sets under clear sky are evaluated against the AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the MODIS AOD collection 5 data sets. The agreement and discrepancies from these comparisons are characterized regionally and investigated using other CALIPSO observable and retrieved parameters. Furthermore, aerosols above clouds and in the vicinity of clouds are examined on a global scale. The implications for aerosol radiative forcing are discussed, highlighting the new and interesting aerosol features obtained from CALIPSO observations.

  9. PIXE and XRF analysis of atmospheric aerosols from a site in the West area of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, R. V.; López-Monroy, J.; Miranda, J.; Espinosa, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to geographical factors, most of the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City features, on average, similar heights above the sea level, climate, wind speed and direction, with very uniform pollution degrees in most of the frequently studied sites. A site with different characteristics, Cuajimalpa de Morelos, was studied. It is located to the West of the urban area at 2760 m above sea level, in contrast to other sites (2240 m). Here, the wind is mostly directed towards the center of the city. Then, the site should not be affected by pollutants from the Northern/Northeastern industrial zones, so lower aerosol concentrations are expected. In this work, the elemental composition of coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) fractions of atmospheric aerosol samples collected in Cuajimalpa is studied. The sampling period covered the cold-dry season in 2004-2005 (December 1st, 2004 to March 31, 2005), exposing polycarbonate filters with a Stacked Filter Unit of the Gent design along 24 h, every two days. The samples were analyzed with Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), to obtain elemental concentrations. The EPA code UNMIX was used to determine the number of possible influencing polluting sources, which were then identified through back-trajectory simulations with the HYSPLIT modeling software. Four sources (mostly related to soil) were found in the coarse fraction, while the fine fraction presented three main sources (fuel oil, industry and biomass burning).

  10. Organic aerosols in the Miami area, USA: temporal variability of atmospheric particles and wet/dry deposition.

    PubMed

    Lang, Qingyong; Zhang, Qian; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2002-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter and both wet and dry deposition was collected over a period of nine months at one location in the metropolitan area of Miami, Florida. Molecular distributions and concentrations of n-alkanes, fatty acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and hopanes were determined using weekly composite samples over this time period in order to determine temporal variability, and their possible dependence on climatic parameters such as temperature, rainfall and wind direction and frequency. Based on molecular distributions of the compounds studied, potential emission sources for the atmospheric particles were assessed and suggested to be mainly derived from automobile exhaust and natural sources. Although wet and dry deposition processes were observed to remove about equal amounts of organic aerosols from the Miami atmosphere, dry deposition was dominant in the removal of anthropogenically derived compounds such as PAHs and hopanes. Only very limited seasonal trends were observed, while wind direction and frequency was found to be the most important meteorological parameter controlling the temporal variability of the organic aerosols. This is the first detailed report of this nature for the Miami area.

  11. Comparison of black carbon (BC) aerosols in two urban areas - concentrations and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Tohno, S.

    In this study, the BC aerosol measured at two very different urban sites is compared in terms of concentration, seasonal variation, and size distribution. During a 14 month study, one impactor sample was performed each month on a day with typical meteorological conditions. One (Vienna) or three (Uji) filter samples were obtained during the sampling time of the impactors. BC concentration in both the filter and impactor samples was analyzed with an optical technique (integrating sphere technique), where a calibration curve obtained from commercial carbon black is used to convert the optical signal to BC mass. Gravimetric mass concentration was measured at both sites. The gravimetric mass size distribution was measured only in Vienna. At both sites, the yearly average of the BC concentration on the sampling days was around 5 μg m -3. In Vienna, some seasonal trend with high concentrations during the cold season was observed, while in Uji, no pronounced seasonal trend was found. The BC size distribution in Uji was distinctly bimodal in the submicron size range. Log-normal distributions were fitted through the impactor data. The average BC mass median diameters (MMD) of the two submicron modes were 0.15 and 0.39 μm. Each mode contained about the same amount of BC mass. In Vienna only one submicron BC mode (average MMD 0.3 μm) was found because of the low size resolution of the impactor. An analysis of humidity effects on the MMDs of BC (both sites) and gravimetric mass (Vienna only) indicates that the Vienna aerosol is partly mixed internally with respect to BC, while the Uji aerosol seems to be externally mixed.

  12. PIXE Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Samples in an Urban Area in Upstate NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadareski, Benjamin; Ali, Salina; Yoskowitz, Josh; Vineyard, Michael; Labrake, Scott

    2014-09-01

    Extremely fine particles (PM2.5) are found to penetrate deep into the lungs and hence, are found to have harmful health effects on humans. Atmospheric aerosol samples collected in Schenectady, NY were analyzed for evidence for air pollution; specifically lead pollution over the past 12 months. Air samples were collected on 7 μm Kapton foils using a nine-stage cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic size. A 2.2 MeV proton beam impacts the target samples. X-ray intensity versus energy spectra was produced using an Amptek silicon drift detector. Proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) techniques were used to analyze the energy spectra and we determined a range of 16 elements present in the aerosol samples including, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, and Pb. The elemental composition and concentrations of these elements were determined using GUPIX. Many of the elements suggest airborne soils, however we see trace amounts of lead concentrations only at the minimal level of detection around 1 ng / m3. Preliminary results suggest that lead pollution is not significant however; we believe that the trace amounts of lead detected are due to fuel emissions from small aircraft due to the sampling site near an airport. Extremely fine particles (PM2.5) are found to penetrate deep into the lungs and hence, are found to have harmful health effects on humans. Atmospheric aerosol samples collected in Schenectady, NY were analyzed for evidence for air pollution; specifically lead pollution over the past 12 months. Air samples were collected on 7 μm Kapton foils using a nine-stage cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic size. A 2.2 MeV proton beam impacts the target samples. X-ray intensity versus energy spectra was produced using an Amptek silicon drift detector. Proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) techniques were used to analyze the energy spectra and we determined a range of 16 elements present in

  13. Characterizing the formation of organic layers on the surface of inorganic/aqueous aerosols by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buajarern, Jariya; Mitchem, Laura; Reid, Jonathan P

    2007-11-22

    We demonstrate that nonlinear Raman spectroscopy coupled with aerosol optical tweezers can be used to probe the evolving phase partitioning in mixed organic/inorganic/aqueous aerosol droplets that adopt a core-shell structure in which the aqueous phase is coated in an organic layer. Specifically, we demonstrate that the characteristic fingerprint of wavelengths at which stimulated Raman scattering is observed can be used to assess the phase behavior of multiphase decane/aqueous sodium chloride droplets. Decane is observed to form a layer on the surface of the core aqueous droplet, and from the spectroscopic signature the aqueous core size can be determined with nanometer accuracy and the thickness of the decane layer with an accuracy of +/-8 nm. Further, the presence of the organic layer is observed to reduce the rate at which water evaporates from the core of the droplet with an increasing rate of evaporation observed with diminishing layer thickness.

  14. Characterizing the formation of organic layers on the surface of inorganic/aqueous aerosols by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buajarern, Jariya; Mitchem, Laura; Reid, Jonathan P

    2007-11-22

    We demonstrate that nonlinear Raman spectroscopy coupled with aerosol optical tweezers can be used to probe the evolving phase partitioning in mixed organic/inorganic/aqueous aerosol droplets that adopt a core-shell structure in which the aqueous phase is coated in an organic layer. Specifically, we demonstrate that the characteristic fingerprint of wavelengths at which stimulated Raman scattering is observed can be used to assess the phase behavior of multiphase decane/aqueous sodium chloride droplets. Decane is observed to form a layer on the surface of the core aqueous droplet, and from the spectroscopic signature the aqueous core size can be determined with nanometer accuracy and the thickness of the decane layer with an accuracy of +/-8 nm. Further, the presence of the organic layer is observed to reduce the rate at which water evaporates from the core of the droplet with an increasing rate of evaporation observed with diminishing layer thickness. PMID:17958403

  15. Modulated exponential films generated by surface acoustic waves and their role in liquid wicking and aerosolization at a pinned drop.

    PubMed

    Taller, Daniel; Go, David B; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2013-05-01

    The exponentially decaying acoustic pressure of scattered surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at the contact line of a liquid film pinned to filter paper is shown to sustain a high curvature conic tip with micron-sized modulations whose dimension grows exponentially from the tip. The large negative capillary pressure in the film, necessary for offsetting the large positive acoustic pressure at the contact line, also creates significant negative hydrodynamic pressure and robust wicking action through the paper. An asymptotic analysis of this intricate pressure matching between the quasistatic conic film and bulk drop shows that the necessary SAW power to pump liquid from the filter paper and aerosolize, expressed in terms of the acoustic pressure scaled by the drop capillary pressure, grows exponentially with respect to twice the acoustic decay constant multiplied by the drop length, with a universal preexponential coefficient. Global rapid aerosolization occurs at a SAW power twice as high, beyond which the wicking rate saturates. PMID:23767617

  16. Sources, seasonality, and trends of Southeast US aerosol: an integrated analysis of surface, aircraft, and satellite observations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, P. S.; Jacob, D. J.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Zhu, L.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; Hair, J. W.; Fenn, M. A.; Butler, C. F.; Wagner, N. L.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Teng, A. P.; Millet, D. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.

    2015-07-01

    We use an ensemble of surface (EPA CSN, IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET), aircraft (SEAC4RS), and satellite (MODIS, MISR) observations over the Southeast US during the summer-fall of 2013 to better understand aerosol sources in the region and the relationship between surface particulate matter (PM) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM) with 25 km × 25 km resolution over North America is used as a common platform to interpret measurements of different aerosol variables made at different times and locations. Sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) are the main contributors to surface PM2.5 (mass concentration of PM finer than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) and AOD over the Southeast US. GEOS-Chem simulation of sulfate requires a missing oxidant, taken here to be stabilized Criegee intermediates, but which could alternatively reflect an unaccounted for heterogeneous process. Biogenic isoprene and monoterpenes account for 60 % of OA, anthropogenic sources for 30 %, and open fires for 10 %. 60 % of total aerosol mass is in the mixed layer below 1.5 km, 20 % in the cloud convective layer at 1.5-3 km, and 20 % in the free troposphere above 3 km. This vertical profile is well captured by GEOS-Chem, arguing against a high-altitude source of OA. The extent of sulfate neutralization (f = [NH4+]/(2[SO42-] + [NO3-])) is only 0.5-0.7 mol mol-1 in the observations, despite an excess of ammonia present, which could reflect suppression of ammonia uptake by organic aerosol. This would explain the long-term decline of ammonium aerosol in the Southeast US, paralleling that of sulfate. The vertical profile of aerosol extinction over the Southeast US follows closely that of aerosol mass. GEOS-Chem reproduces observed total column aerosol mass over the Southeast US within 6 %, column aerosol extinction within 16 %, and space-based AOD within 21 %. The large AOD decline observed from summer to winter is driven by sharp declines in both sulfate and OA from

  17. Evolution of the surface area of a snow layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hanot, L.; Domine, F.

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric trace gases can partition between the atmosphere and the snow surface. Because snow has a large surface-to-volume ratio, an important interaction potential between ice and atmospheric trace gases exists. Quantifying this partitioning requires the knowledge of the surface area (SA) of snow. Eleven samples were taken from a 50 cm thick snow fall at Col de Porte, near Grenoble (French Alps) between January 20 and February 4, 1998. Fresh snow and 3, 8, and 15-day-old snow were sampled at three different depths. Surface hoar, formed after the fall, was also sampled. Air and surface snow temperature, snow density, and snow fall rate were measured. Snow temperature always remained below freezing. Snow SA was measured using methane adsorption at 77.15 K. Values ranged from 2.25 m{sup 2}/g for fresh snow to 0.25 m{sup 2}/g for surface hoar and surface snow after 15 days. These values are much too high to be explained by the macroscopic aspect of snow crystals, and microstructures such as small rime droplets must have been present. Large decrease in SA with time were observed. The first meter of snowpack had a total surface area of about 50,000 m{sup 2} per m{sup 2} of ground. Reduction in SA will lead to the emission of adsorbed species by the snowpack, with possible considerable increase in atmospheric concentrations.

  18. Surface-Sensitive and Bulk Studies on the Complexation and Photosensitized Degradation of Catechol by Iron(III) as a Model for Multicomponent Aerosol Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-abadleh, H. A.; Tofan-Lazar, J.; Situm, A.; Ruffolo, J.; Slikboer, S.

    2013-12-01

    Surface water plays a crucial role in facilitating or inhibiting surface reactions in atmospheric aerosols. Little is known about the role of surface water in the complexation of organic molecules to transition metals in multicomponent aerosol systems. We will show results from real time diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments for the in situ complexation of catechol to Fe(III) and its photosensitized degradation under dry and humid conditions. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for humic-like substances (HULIS) in aerosols and aged polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It has also been detected in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with benzene. Given the importance of the iron content in aerosols and its biogeochemistry, our studies were conducted using FeCl3. For comparison, these surface-sensitive studies were complemented with bulk aqueous ATR-FTIR, UV-vis, and HPLC measurements for structural, quantitative and qualitative information about complexes in the bulk, and potential degradation products. The implications of our studies on understanding interfacial and condensed phase chemistry relevant to multicomponent aerosols, water thin islands on buildings, and ocean surfaces containing transition metals will be discussed.

  19. The impact of natural aerosols on Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoj, V.; Wang, H.; Yoon, J.; Rasch, P.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols emitted from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources impact the earth's radiation and water budget. Most of the studies in the recent past have been focusing on anthropogenic aerosols and their impact. However, natural aerosols like sea-salt and dust form the bulk of the aerosol mass loading in the atmosphere. For example, oceans cover about 70% of the earth's surface area and are a major source of sea-salt aerosols in the atmosphere. Sea-salt emission is the single largest contributor to natural aerosols and accounts for nearly half of the global aerosol optical depth. Dust emission, the counterpart over land, also contributes substantially to natural atmospheric aerosols. In addition to their direct effect on solar radiation, these aerosols also actively participate in cloud formation by acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei and have indirect effects on clouds. Both sea-salt and dust particles are primarily formed by the action of winds that largely determine seasonal/annual variations in their source strength and atmospheric loading. Over the Indian Ocean region, especially the Arabian Sea is characterized by high winds during the monsoon that generate a large amount of sea-salt aerosols. Also these high winds mobilize large amount of dust aerosols in the northern Arabian Sea depending on wind direction. These natural aerosols together with anthropogenic emissions impact Indian monsoon precipitation. We use satellite observation of precipitation and column aerosol loading along with a global climate model (Community Atmosphere Model version 5, CAM5) to show that the variability of natural aerosols (i.e., sea-salt and dust) play an important role in modulating the Indian monsoon precipitation and the response of the monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosols. The effect of dust and sea-salt on precipitation is found to be opposite to each other. Our study suggests that the observed spatial and temporal trends in precipitation

  20. Gas/aerosol-ash interaction in volcanic plumes: New insights from surface analyses of fine ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Lambert, Mathieu; Dufrêne, Yves; Gerin, Patrick; Óskarsson, Niels

    2007-07-01

    The reactions occurring between gases/aerosols and silicate ash particles in volcanic eruption plumes remain poorly understood, despite the fact that they are at the origin of a range of volcanic, environmental, atmospheric and health effects. In this study, we apply X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a surface-sensitive technique, to determine the chemical composition of the near-surface region (2-10 nm) of nine ash samples collected from eight volcanoes. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to image the nanometer-scale surface structure of individual ash particles isolated from three samples. We demonstrate that rapid acid dissolution of ash occurs within eruption plumes. This process is favoured by the presence of fluoride and is believed to supply the cations involved in the deposition of sulphate and halide salts onto ash. AFM imaging also has permitted the detection of extremely thin (< 10 nm) coatings on the surface of ash. This material is probably composed of soluble sulphate and halide salts mixed with sparingly soluble fluoride compounds. The surface approach developed here offers promising aspects for better appraising the role of gas/aerosol-ash interaction in dictating the ability of ash to act as sinks for various volcanic and atmospheric chemical species as well as sources for others.

  1. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Quigley, Gerard P.

    1996-01-01

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  2. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOEpatents

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  3. Surface Measurements of dust/local aerosol properties over Northern China during 2008 China-US joined dust field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Huang, J.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the detailed characteristics and underlying mechanisms of aerosol physical and optical parameters over China Loess Plateau and its potential impacts on the regional/global climate. In order to characterize the emission, transport, and removal of atmospheric pollutants emitted from East Asia, the 2008 China-US joined field campaign are conducted from late April to May 2008 focused specifically on the Asian direct measurements of dust and pollution transport, following the plume from the Northern China which from the Taklamakan desert and Gobi desert to the Eastern Pacific and into North America. Such measurements are crucial to understanding how the dust and the pollution plume (including black carbon) are modified as their age. Three sites involved this campaign, including one permanent site (Semi-Arid Climate & Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL)) (located in Yuzhong, 35.95N/104.1E), one SACOL's Mobile Facility (SMF) (deployed in Jintai, 37.57N/104.23E) and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements(ARM) Ancillary Facility (AAF mobile laboratories, SMART-COMMIT) (deployed in Zhangye, 39.08N/100.27E). Results indicate that the dust plumes are transported from the surface to a long distance from their sources have a significant influence on the air quality in the study area. The meteorological analysis indicates that these polluted layers are not from local sources during dust plume and this large-scale transport of dust and pollutants remains a major uncertainty in quantifying the global effect of emissions from Northern China.

  4. Organic aerosols in a Brazilian agro-industrial area: Speciation and impact of biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, R. C.; Alves, C. A.; Allen, A. G.; Cardoso, A. A.; Campos, M. L. A. M.

    2016-03-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive organic characterization of atmospheric aerosols from an agro-industrial region (São Paulo State, Brazil) highly impacted by biomass burning. The organic speciation was performed using different solvents of increasing polarity, enabling the identification and quantification of 172 different organic species by GC-MS. The mass of organic compounds reached 123 μg m- 3 in an aerosol sample collected during the sugar cane harvest period compared with 0.82 μg m- 3 in the non-harvest period. The samples most impacted by biomass burning were those with the highest percentages of non-polar compounds (n-alkanes; up to 96%). However, in absolute terms, the total mass of polar compounds in such samples was greater than for samples less impacted by this activity. Retene (a marker for biomass combustion) was the most abundant of the 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons quantified, corresponding to 14%-84%. This work shows that biomass burning was responsible for a benzo(a)pyrene equivalent index value that exceeded the recommendation of the World Health Organization. Principal component analysis indicated that agricultural biomass burning and emissions from crop processing facilities explained 42% of the variance of the data, while 37% was explained by urban emissions, 10% by vehicle emissions, and 10% by biogenic sources. This study provides insights into the emissions of a suite of organic compounds that could participate in anthropic alteration of regional cloud formation and precipitation patterns.

  5. Investigation of the aerosol structure over an urban area using a polarization lidar.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Nikolay; Tatarov, Boyan; Kaprielov, Boiko; Kolev, Ivan

    2004-10-01

    The paper presents a lidar study of the aerosol structure in the planetary boundary layer in the case of radiation fog and haze. A conceptual model of the dynamics of the depolarization coefficient profile during the mixing layer development, taking into account the presence of a multilayered inversions and radiation fogs, is proposed. Various techniques are employed in the processing of the lidar signal in order to determine the mixing layer height as well as more details of the aerosol structure in the low atmosphere, namely, finding the maximum of the signal returned from the lowest temperature inversion, the crossing point of the S function's first derivative with the x axis, and profiles of the depolarization ratio. After the complete destruction of the stable stratification, a low constant value of the depolarization ratio within the newly formed mixing layer is being observed. The study of stable boundary layer disintegration and convective boundary layer formation in the presence of fogs and/or clouds is of both scientific and practical significance in what concerns the protection of the environment and the aviation meteorology.

  6. Application of mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements for the investigation of megacity air pollution emissions: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meleux, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-01-01

    For the investigation of megacity emission development and the impact outside the source region, mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements were carried out in the Paris metropolitan area between 1 July and 31 July 2009 (summer conditions) and 15 January and 15 February 2010 (winter conditions) in the framework of the European Union FP7 MEGAPOLI project. Two mobile laboratories, MoLa and MOSQUITA, were deployed, and here an overview of these measurements and an investigation of the applicability of such measurements for the analysis of megacity emissions are presented. Both laboratories measured physical and chemical properties of fine and ultrafine aerosol particles as well as gas phase constituents of relevance for urban pollution scenarios. The applied measurement strategies include cross-section measurements for the investigation of plume structure and quasi-Lagrangian measurements axially along the flow of the city's pollution plume to study plume aging processes. Results of intercomparison measurements between the two mobile laboratories represent the adopted data quality assurance procedures. Most of the compared measurement devices show sufficient agreement for combined data analysis. For the removal of data contaminated by local pollution emissions a video tape analysis method was applied. Analysis tools like positive matrix factorization and peak integration by key analysis applied to high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer data are used for in-depth data analysis of the organic particulate matter. Several examples, including a combination of MoLa and MOSQUITA measurements on a cross section through the Paris emission plume, are provided to demonstrate how such mobile measurements can be used to investigate the emissions of a megacity. A critical discussion of advantages and limitations of mobile measurements for the investigation of megacity emissions completes this work.

  7. Diversity of bacteria producing pigmented colonies in aerosol, snow and soil samples from remote glacial areas (Antarctica, Alps and Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Toril, E.; Amils, R.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Komárek, J.; Elster, J.

    2008-04-01

    Four different communities and one culture of pigmented microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation in mineral medium of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area) and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia), from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville) and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas). Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. The phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed the identification of sequences belonging to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria), Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified) and the maritime Antarctic soil the poorest (only one). Snow samples from Col du midi (Alps) and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones). These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clone). The only microorganism identified in the maritime Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp.) was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. The two snow samples from the Alps only shared one common microorganism. Most of the identified microorganisms have been detected previously in cold environments (Dietzia kujamenisi, Pseudonocardia Antarctica, Hydrogenophaga palleronii and Brebundimonas sp.), marine sediments (Aquiflexus balticus, Pseudomonas pseudoalkaligenes, Pseudomonas sp. and one uncultured Alphaproteobacteria), and soils and rocks (Pseudonocardia sp., Agrobactrium sp., Limnobacter sp. and two uncultured Alphaproteobacetria clones). Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those

  8. Application of mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements for the investigation of megacity air pollution emissions: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meleux, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-08-01

    For the investigation of megacity emission development and impact outside the source region mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements were carried out in the Paris metropolitan area between 1 July and 31 July 2009 (summer conditions) and 15 January and 15 February 2010 (winter conditions) in the framework of the European Union FP7 MEGAPOLI project. Two mobile laboratories, MoLa and MOSQUITA, were deployed, and here an overview of these measurements and an investigation of the applicability of such measurements for the analysis of megacity emissions are presented. Both laboratories measured physical and chemical properties of fine and ultrafine aerosol particles as well as gas phase constituents of relevance for urban pollution scenarios. The applied measurement strategies include cross section measurements for the investigation of plume structure and quasi-Lagrangian measurements radially away from the city center to study plume aging processes. Results of intercomparison measurements between the two mobile laboratories represent the adopted data quality assurance procedures. Most of the compared measurement devices show sufficient agreement for combined data analysis. For the removal of data contaminated by local pollution emissions a video tape analysis method was applied. Analysis tools like positive matrix factorization and peak integration by key analysis applied to high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer data are used for in-depth data analysis of the organic particulate matter. Several examples, including a combination of MoLa and MOSQUITA measurements on a cross section through the Paris emission plume are provided to demonstrate how such mobile measurements can be used to investigate the emissions of a megacity. A critical discussion of advantages and limitations of mobile measurements for the investigation of megacity emissions completes this work.

  9. Determining Surface Roughness in Urban Areas Using Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An automated procedure has been developed to derive relevant factors, which can increase the ability to produce objective, repeatable methods for determining aerodynamic surface roughness. Aerodynamic surface roughness is used for many applications, like atmospheric dispersive models and wind-damage models. For this technique, existing lidar data was used that was originally collected for terrain analysis, and demonstrated that surface roughness values can be automatically derived, and then subsequently utilized in disaster-management and homeland security models. The developed lidar-processing algorithm effectively distinguishes buildings from trees and characterizes their size, density, orientation, and spacing (see figure); all of these variables are parameters that are required to calculate the estimated surface roughness for a specified area. By using this algorithm, aerodynamic surface roughness values in urban areas can then be extracted automatically. The user can also adjust the algorithm for local conditions and lidar characteristics, like summer/winter vegetation and dense/sparse lidar point spacing. Additionally, the user can also survey variations in surface roughness that occurs due to wind direction; for example, during a hurricane, when wind direction can change dramatically, this variable can be extremely significant. In its current state, the algorithm calculates an estimated surface roughness for a square kilometer area; techniques using the lidar data to calculate the surface roughness for a point, whereby only roughness elements that are upstream from the point of interest are used and the wind direction is a vital concern, are being investigated. This technological advancement will improve the reliability and accuracy of models that use and incorporate surface roughness.

  10. Improvement of GOCI Yonsei Aerosol retrieval algorithm and validation during DRAGON campaign: Surface reflectance issue according to land, clear water and turbid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jhoon; Choi, Myungje; Lee, Jaehwa

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol optical properties (AOPs) over East Asia are retrieved hourly from the first Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI). GOCI Yonsei aerosol retrieval (YAER) algorithm was developed and improved continuously. Final products of GOCI YAER are aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent (AE) and aerosol type in high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous aerosol retrieval algorithm over ocean adopts surface reflectance using cox and munk technique as fixed wind speed or the minimum reflectivity technique for continuous characteristics between ocean and land. This study adopt cox and munk technique using real time ECMWF wind speed data over clear water and the minimum reflectivity technique over turbid water. For detecting turbid water, TOA reflectance of 412, 660, and 865nm was used. Over the turbid water, TOA reflectance at 660nm increases more than 412 and 865nm. It also shows more sensitivity over turbid water than dust aerosol. We evaluated the accuracy of GOCI aerosol products using ground-based AERONET Level 2.0 products from total 38 East Asia sites and satellite-based MODIS-Aqua aerosol C6 products. The period of assessment is 3 months from March to May, 2012. Comparison results show that a correlation coefficient between the AODs at 550 nm of AERONET and GOCI is 0.884. Comparison results over ocean between GOCI and MODIS DT algorithm shows good agreement as R = 0.915.

  11. Clay mineralogy in different geomorphic surfaces in sugarcane areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, L.; Marques, J., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    The crystallization of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction is the result of pedogenetic processes controlled by the relief. These minerals have influence on the physical and chemical attributes of soil and exhibit spatial dependence. The pattern of spatial distribution is influenced by forms of relief as the geomorphic surfaces. In this sense, the studies aimed at understanding the relationship between relief and the distribution pattern of the clay fraction attributes contribute to the delineation of specific areas of management in the field. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction and its relationship with the physical and chemical attributes in different geomorphic surfaces. Soil samples were collected in a transect each 25 m (100 samples) and in the sides of the same (200 samples) as well as an area of 500 ha (1 sample each six hectare). Geomorphic surfaces (GS) in the transect were mapped in detail to support mapping the entire area. The soil samples were taken to the laboratory for chemical, physical, and mineralogical analysis, and the pattern of spatial distribution of soil attributes was obtained by statistics and geostatistics. The GS I is considered the oldest surface of the study area, with depositional character, and a slope ranging from 0 to 4%. GS II and III are considered to be eroded, and the surface II plan a gentle slope that extends from the edge of the surface until the beginning of I and III. The crystallographic characteristics of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite showed spatial dependence and the distribution pattern corresponding to the limits present of the GS in the field. Surfaces I and II showed the best environments to the degree of crystallinity of hematite and the surface III to the greatest degree of crystallinity of goethite agreeing to the pedoenvironment

  12. An evaluation of the impact of aerosol particles on weather forecasts from a biomass burning aerosol event over the Midwestern United States: observational-based analysis of surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianglong; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Christensen, Matthew; Benedetti, Angela

    2016-05-01

    A major continental-scale biomass burning smoke event from 28-30 June 2015, spanning central Canada through the eastern seaboard of the United States, resulted in unforecasted drops in daytime high surface temperatures on the order of 2-5 °C in the upper Midwest. This event, with strong smoke gradients and largely cloud-free conditions, provides a natural laboratory to study how aerosol radiative effects may influence numerical weather prediction (NWP) forecast outcomes. Here, we describe the nature of this smoke event and evaluate the differences in observed near-surface air temperatures between Bismarck (clear) and Grand Forks (overcast smoke), to evaluate to what degree solar radiation forcing from a smoke plume introduces daytime surface cooling, and how this affects model bias in forecasts and analyses. For this event, mid-visible (550 nm) smoke aerosol optical thickness (AOT, τ) reached values above 5. A direct surface cooling efficiency of -1.5 °C per unit AOT (at 550 nm, τ550) was found. A further analysis of European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) near-surface air temperature forecasts for up to 54 h as a function of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Dark Target AOT data across more than 400 surface stations, also indicated the presence of the daytime aerosol direct cooling effect, but suggested a smaller aerosol direct surface cooling efficiency with magnitude on the order of -0.25 to -1.0 °C per unit τ550. In addition, using observations from the surface stations, uncertainties in near-surface air temperatures from ECMWF, NCEP, and UKMO model runs are estimated. This study further suggests that significant daily changes in τ550 above 1, at which the smoke-aerosol-induced direct surface cooling effect could be comparable in magnitude with model uncertainties, are rare events on a global scale. Thus, incorporating

  13. Characterization of Speciated Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Over California

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Easter, Richard C.; Hand, Jenny; Avise, J.

    2013-03-16

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem) with added capability of diagnosing the spatial and seasonal distribution of radiative forcings for individual aerosol species over California is used to characterize the radiative forcing of speciated aerosols in California. Model simulations for the year of 2005 are evaluated with various observations including meteorological data from California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), aerosol mass concentrations from US EPA Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE), and aerosol optical depth from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and satellites. The model well captures the observed seasonal meteorological conditions over California. Overall, the simulation is able to reproduce the observed spatial and seasonal distribution of mass concentration of total PM2.5 and the relative contribution from individual aerosol species, except the model significantly underestimates the surface concentrations of organic matter (OM) and elemental carbon (EC), potentially due to uncertainty in the anthropogenic emissions of OM and EC and the outdated secondary organic aerosol mechanism used in the model. A sensitivity simulation with anthropogenic EC emission doubled significantly reduces the model low bias of EC. The simulation reveals high anthropogenic aerosol loading over the Central Valley and the Los Angeles metropolitan regions and high natural aerosol (dust) loading over southeastern California. The seasonality of aerosol surface concentration is mainly determined by vertical turbulent mixing, ventilation, and photochemical activity, with distinct characteristics for individual aerosol species and between urban and rural areas. The simulations show that anthropogenic aerosols dominate the aerosol optical depth (AOD). The ratio of AOD to AAOD (aerosol absorption optical depth) shows distinct seasonality with a winter maximum and a summer minimum

  14. The impacts of a plume-rise scheme on earth system modeling: climatological effects of biomass aerosols on the surface temperature and energy budget of South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Menezes Neto, Otacilio L.; Coutinho, Mariane M.; Marengo, José A.; Capistrano, Vinícius B.

    2016-05-01

    Seasonal forest fires in the Amazon are the largest source of pollutants in South America. The impacts of aerosols due to biomass burning on the temperature and energy balance in South America are investigated using climate simulations from 1979 to 2005 using HadGEM2-ES, which includes the hot plume-rise scheme (HPR) developed by Freitas et al. (Estudos Avançados 19:167-185, 2005, Atmos Chem Phys 7:3385-3398, 2007, Atmos Chem Phys 10:585-594, 2010). The HPR scheme is used to estimate the vertical heights of biomass-burning aerosols based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the underlying model. Three experiments are performed. The first experiment includes the HPR scheme, the second experiment turns off the HPR scheme and the effects of biomass aerosols (BIOMASS OFF), and the final experiment assumes that all biomass aerosols are released at the surface (HPR OFF). Relative to the BIOMASS OFF experiment, the temperature decreased in the HPR experiment as the net shortwave radiation at the surface decreased in a region with a large amount of biomass aerosols. When comparing the HPR and HPR OFF experiments, the release of biomass aerosols higher on the atmosphere impacts on temperature and the energy budget because the aerosols were transported by strong winds in the upper atmospheric levels.

  15. 77 FR 50165 - Escape and Evacuation Plans for Surface Coal Mines, Surface Facilities and Surface Work Areas of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration Escape and Evacuation Plans for Surface Coal Mines, Surface Facilities and Surface Work Areas of Underground Coal Mines AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration,...

  16. Megacity emission plume characteristics in summer and winter investigated by mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Zhang, Q. J.; Freutel, F.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-12-01

    emission plume. For in-depth analysis of transformation processes occurring in the advected plume, simultaneous measurements at a suburban measurement site and a stationary site outside the metropolitan area using the mobile laboratory have proven to be most useful. Organic aerosol oxidation was observed in summer, while in winter transformation processes seemed to occur at a slower rate.

  17. Megacity emission plume characteristics in summer and winter investigated by mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Zhang, Q. J.; Freutel, F.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-05-01

    site outside the metropolitan area using the mobile laboratory have proven to be most useful. Organic aerosol oxidation was observed in summer, while in winter transformation processes seemed to occur at a slower rate.

  18. Propagation of atmospheric aerosol and the area of representativeness of its measurements in the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vana, Marko; Tamm, Eduard

    Area of representativeness (AR) of atmospheric aerosol measurements and horizontal dimensions of a cloud of particles are estimated by time series of aerosol particle size number spectrum measured simultaneously at two locations. The distances between sampling points are varied, 7, 30, 50, 100 or 375 km. The spectrum in form of 12 fraction concentrations is measured every 10 or 15 min during five 2-4 week measurement campaigns in Estonia. During one measurement campaign one measurement point was in Estonia (Tahkuse) and the other in Finland (Hyytiälä). Two electrical aerosol spectrometers (EAS) designed at University of Tartu, having diameter range 10 nm-10 μm, were used. At Hyytiälä, the particle size spectrum ( d=3-500 nm ) was measured by two Hauke type differential mobility analysers (DMA). The transport of the submicron fraction ( d=60 nm -1 μm ) of atmospheric aerosol is investigated during the time intervals when an air mass moves from the one measurement point towards the other or crosswise to this direction. Sample cross-correlation functions (SCCF) are calculated between prewhitened time series. The time lag corresponding to the mode of these functions are found to be 3-5 h for upwind-downwind case and zero for crosswind case. This time lag should indicate the mean time of pollution transport for upwind-downwind case. A certain minimal distance between sampling points should exist, when statistically significant correlation between the time series cannot be found. Considering this circumstance, the half-width of the AR is estimated. It is found to be more than 100 km but less than 375 km when the sampling points are located on the same line with the wind direction; and more than 50 km but less than 100 km when the sampling points are located on a straight line crosswise to the wind direction. The pollutant concentrations in the limits of AR are estimated by regression analysis. To support these results, the dispersion calculations by HYSPLIT (Hybrid

  19. Vertical motion of near-surface aerosols close to breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienert, Barry; Porter, John; Sharma, Shiv

    2005-10-01

    We have used two-dimensional correlation on two-dimensional extinction cross-sections measured by a scanning lidar to determine the velocity structure of the salt-spray aerosols. The lidar scans were collected over a reef at Bellows Beach, on the Northeast side of Oahu, Hawaii. The resulting velocity streamlines suggest that lifting of sea-spray aerosols as high as 200 m occurs in the vicinity of opposing horizontal roll vortices. The velocities vary rapidly over distances of less than 500 m and show a complex pattern which is inadequately represented by conventional anemometer measurements.

  20. 30 CFR 57.17001 - Illumination of surface working areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illumination of surface working areas. 57.17001 Section 57.17001 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Illumination § 57.17001 Illumination of...

  1. [Characteristics of surface runoff pollution of Shanghai urban area].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-feng; Li, Tian; Li, He

    2007-07-01

    Sampling and monitoring of surface runoff in Shanghai urban area were carried out during rainy seasons from 2003 to 2005, and pollutographs of COD, BOD5, SS, NH4+ -N, TP and TN of 56 rainfall events from 19 sampling sites were analyzed. Discharge processes of runoff pollutants during rain events and relationships of the processes with rainfall characters were discussed, and event mean concentrations (EMCs) were calculated. Probability distribution of EMCs and correlation between EMCs and rain characters were analyzed. Medium event mean concentrations of pollutants in surface runoff of Shanghai urban area are: COD 205, BOD5 68, SS 185, NH4+ -N 3.14,TP 0.40, TN 7.23 (mg/L), which are much higher than those in Paris urban area. The ratio of BOD5 to COD is 0.37, which is very high for surface runoff compared with that of large cities of developed countries. Results show that impervious surface pollution is serious in Shanghai urban area and some measures must be taken to improve urban water environment quality except stormwater separation. PMID:17891947

  2. Estimating 3-dimensional colony surface area of field corals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colony surface area is a critical descriptor for biological and physical attributes of reef-building (scleractinian, stony) corals. The three-dimensional (3D) size and structure of corals are directly related to many ecosystem values and functions. Most methods to estimate colony...

  3. Effect of milling temperatures on surface area, surface energy and cohesion of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Shah, Umang V; Wang, Zihua; Olusanmi, Dolapo; Narang, Ajit S; Hussain, Munir A; Tobyn, Michael J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2015-11-10

    Particle bulk and surface properties are influenced by the powder processing routes. This study demonstrates the effect of milling temperatures on the particle surface properties, particularly surface energy and surface area, and ultimately on powder cohesion. An active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of industrial relevance (brivanib alaninate, BA) was used to demonstrate the effect of two different, but most commonly used milling temperatures (cryogenic vs. ambient). The surface energy of powders milled at both cryogenic and room temperatures increased with increasing milling cycles. The increase in surface energy could be related to the generation of surface amorphous regions. Cohesion for both cryogenic and room temperature milled powders was measured and found to increase with increasing milling cycles. For cryogenic milling, BA had a surface area ∼ 5× higher than the one obtained at room temperature. This was due to the brittle nature of this compound at cryogenic temperature. By decoupling average contributions of surface area and surface energy on cohesion by salinization post-milling, the average contribution of surface energy on cohesion for powders milled at room temperature was 83% and 55% at cryogenic temperature.

  4. Measurement of resuspended aerosol in the Chernobyl area. I. Discussion of instrumentation and estimation of measurement uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Garger, E K; Kashpur, V; Belov, G; Demchuk, V; Tschiersch, J; Wagenpfeil, F; Paretzke, H G; Besnus, F; Holländer, W; Martinez-Serrano, J; Vintersved, I

    1997-09-01

    Results of measurements of the resuspended radioactive aerosols in the Chernobyl area are presented which were obtained soon after the Chernobyl reactor accident and in a European project in 1992-1993. The measurements were carried out with the intention of obtaining a data base for dose assessment of resuspended radioactive particles. Potential significant dose contributions may result from inhalation and secondary contamination due to resuspended radionuclides. In this first article of a series of three papers, the instrumentation and the measurement uncertainties are discussed. An effort was made to sample quantitatively giant aerosol particles (particles larger than 10 microns aerodynamic diameter) as well. The comparison of the samplers shows, in general, an agreement of concentration measurements of 137Cs and 7Be within a factor of two. One sampler was identified with larger discrepancies and needs additional investigation of its sampling characteristics; for another device, the recalibration of the analysing system is recommended. Ordinary integrating samplers have a loss of about 30% in 137Cs activity compared to an isokinetic sampler collecting giant particles as well. The mean ratio of 137Cs activity concentration between an instrument sampling only particles larger than 10 microns and an ordinary integrating sampler is 0.39 +/- 0.15 during anthropogenic-enhanced resuspension. These findings demonstrate the significant contribution of giant particles to resuspended airborne radioactivity. The results of this study concerning integral measurements during wind-driven resuspension proved to be in good agreement with previously published data on resuspension.

  5. Composition and source apportionment of surfactants in atmospheric aerosols of urban and semi-urban areas in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wahid, Nurul Bahiyah Abd; Latif, Mohd Talib; Suratman, Suhaimi

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the composition and source apportionment of surfactant in atmospheric aerosols around urban and semi-urban areas in Malaysia based on ionic compositions. Colorimetric analysis was undertaken to determine the concentrations of anionic surfactants as Methylene Blue Active Substances (MBAS) and cationic surfactants as Disulphine Blue Active Substances (DBAS) using a UV spectrophotometer. Ionic compositions were determined using ion chromatography for cations (Na(+), NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+)) and anions (F(-), Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-)). Principle component analysis (PCA) combined with multiple linear regression (MLR) were used to identify the source apportionment of MBAS and DBAS. Results indicated that the concentrations of surfactants at both sampling sites were dominated by MBAS rather than DBAS especially in fine mode aerosols during the southwest monsoon. Three main sources of surfactants were identified from PCA-MLR analysis for MBAS in fine mode samples particularly in Kuala Lumpur, dominated by motor vehicles, followed by soil/road dust and sea spray. Besides, for MBAS in coarse mode, biomass burning/sea spray were the dominant source followed by motor vehicles/road dust and building material. PMID:23336924

  6. Interface Surface Area Tracking for the Conservative Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firehammer, Stephanie; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    One key question in liquid-gas flows is how to model the interface between phases in a way that is mass, momentum, and energy conserving. The accurate conservative level set (ACLS) method of Desjardins et al. provides a tool for tracking a liquid-gas interface with minimal mass conservation issues; however, it does not explicitly compute the interface surface area and thus nothing can be said a priori about the balance between kinetic energy and surface energy. This work examines an equation for the transport of interface surface area density, which can be written in terms of the gradient of the volume fraction. Furthermore this presentation will outline a numerical method for jointly transporting a conservative level set and surface area density. Finally, we will explore oppportunities for energy conservation via the accurate exchange of energy between the flow field and the interface through surface tension, with test cases to show the results of our extended ACLS method. Funding from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Sources, seasonality, and trends of southeast US aerosol: an integrated analysis of surface, aircraft, and satellite observations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, P. S.; Jacob, D. J.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Zhu, L.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; Hair, J. W.; Fenn, M. A.; Butler, C. F.; Wagner, N. L.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Teng, A. P.; Millet, D. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.

    2015-09-01

    We use an ensemble of surface (EPA CSN, IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET), aircraft (SEAC4RS), and satellite (MODIS, MISR) observations over the southeast US during the summer-fall of 2013 to better understand aerosol sources in the region and the relationship between surface particulate matter (PM) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM) with 25 × 25 km2 resolution over North America is used as a common platform to interpret measurements of different aerosol variables made at different times and locations. Sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) are the main contributors to surface PM2.5 (mass concentration of PM finer than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) and AOD over the southeast US. OA is simulated successfully with a simple parameterization, assuming irreversible uptake of low-volatility products of hydrocarbon oxidation. Biogenic isoprene and monoterpenes account for 60 % of OA, anthropogenic sources for 30 %, and open fires for 10 %. 60 % of total aerosol mass is in the mixed layer below 1.5 km, 25 % in the cloud convective layer at 1.5-3 km, and 15 % in the free troposphere above 3 km. This vertical profile is well captured by GEOS-Chem, arguing against a high-altitude source of OA. The extent of sulfate neutralization (f = [NH4+]/(2[SO42-] + [NO3-]) is only 0.5-0.7 mol mol-1 in the observations, despite an excess of ammonia present, which could reflect suppression of ammonia uptake by OA. This would explain the long-term decline of ammonium aerosol in the southeast US, paralleling that of sulfate. The vertical profile of aerosol extinction over the southeast US follows closely that of aerosol mass. GEOS-Chem reproduces observed total column aerosol mass over the southeast US within 6 %, column aerosol extinction within 16 %, and space-based AOD within 8-28 % (consistently biased low). The large AOD decline observed from summer to winter is driven by sharp declines in both sulfate and OA from August to October. These declines

  8. Surface-Area-Based Attribute Filtering in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiwanuka, Fred N.; Ouzounis, Georgios K.; Wilkinson, Michael H. F.

    In this paper we describe a rotation-invariant attribute filter based on estimating the sphericity or roundness of objects by efficiently computing surface area and volume of connected components. The method is based on an efficient algorithm to compute all iso-surfaces of all nodes in a Max-Tree. With similar properties to moment-based attributes like sparseness, non-compactness, and elongation, our sphericity attribute can supplement these in finding blood-vessels in time-of-flight MR angiograms. We compare the method to a discrete surface area method based on adjacency, which has been used for urinary stone detection. Though the latter is faster, it is less accurate, and lacks rotation invariance.

  9. Aerosols concentration in the Candiota area applying different gravimetric methods of sampling and numeric modelling.

    PubMed

    Braga, C F; Alves, R C M; Teixeira, E C; Pire, M

    2002-12-01

    The main purpose of the present work is to study the concentration of atmospheric particles in the Candiota region, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, where the Presidente Médici coal power plant is located. Aerosol samples were collected at the studied locations between December 2000 and December 2001 during 24 h periods at 15 day intervals using HV PM10 and dichotomous samplers. Then, the values obtained with the ISCST (Industrial Source Complex Term) model, with the HV PM10 sampler at all studied stations, and with the dichotomous sampler at the 8 de Agosto station were compared with each other. The results show that the values for the model had been underestimated in relation to the HV PM10 data for the studied stations, but agreed with the values obtained with the dichotomous sampler.

  10. Organic components of aerosols in a forested area of central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio, Casimiro; Alves, Célia; Duarte, Armando

    Total suspended particulate matter was collected in a Abies boressi forest in central Greece during the period of 20 July-12 August 1997. Filters were extracted with solvents and the soluble content was separated into functional group fractions for analyses by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A total of 1050 different compounds could be identified in the various extracts. The lipid material consisted primarily of n-alkanes, n-alkan-2-ones, n-alkanols and n-fatty acids, with a higher concentration of molecular weights >C 20, derived from vascular plant waxes. Biomarkers for vegetation sources such as phytosterols and triterpenic compounds were also detected. Microbial components (aerosol extracts. Photochemical products deriving from volatile organic compounds emitted by vegetation or from anthropogenic precursors were also detected. These secondary organics include alkane derivatives, di- and carboxylic acids, nitroaromatics and many terpene photo-oxidation products.

  11. Chemical characterization of polar organic markers in aerosols in a local area around Bologna, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Bacco, Dimitri; Rossi, Mauro

    2013-08-01

    The composition and seasonal variations of water-soluble organic compounds, including 18 dicarboxylic acids and 7 sugars, were determined in the atmospheric aerosol in the surroundings of Bologna, Northern Italy, during intensive summer and winter campaigns. In both seasons the most abundant compound is levoglucosan, as the major by-product from biomass burning. The abundances of dicarboxylic acids exhibit a seasonal pattern with higher winter concentrations (mean total concentrations are 60 ng m-3 and 23 ng m-3, in winter and summer, respectively). The distribution profiles and the diagnostic ratios of these markers allowed to estimate the contribution of primary emission sources (power plants, vehicular circulation, biomass burning) associated with secondary constituents from both biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. The distinct seasonal pattern of abundances suggests, overall, the dominant role of secondary formation of particulate organics in summer, and the highest strength of primary emissions in winter.

  12. Effects of Aerosols over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Aerosols that contain black carbon both absorb and reflect incoming sunlight. Even as these atmospheric particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface, they increase the amount of solar energy absorbed in the atmosphere, thus making it possible to both cool the surface and warm the atmosphere. The images above show satellite measurements of the region studied during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)a vast region spanning the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (west to east), and from the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, across the Indian subcontinent to the southern Indian Ocean (north to south). The Aerosol images show aerosol pollution (brownish pixels) in the lower atmosphere over the INDOEX study area, as measured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra. These were composited from March 14-21, 2001. The Albedo images show the total solar energy reflected back to space, as measured by Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) aboard Terra. White pixels show high values, greens are intermediate values, and blues are low. Note how the aerosols, particularly over the ocean, increase the amount of energy reflected back to space. The Atmospheric Warming images show the absorption of the black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere. Where the aerosols are most dense, the absorption is highest. Red pixels indicate the highest levels of absorption, blues are low. The Surface Cooling images show that the aerosol particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface. Dark pixels show where the aerosols exert their cooling influence on the surface (or a high magnitude of negative radiative forcing). The bright pixels show where there is much less aerosol pollution and the incoming sunlight is relatively unaffected.

  13. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach.more » The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).« less

  14. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach. The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).

  15. Definition of Method of Measurement of Supporting and Control Surface Areas, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Definitions of methods of measurements of supporting and control surface areas are presented. Methods for measuring the supporting surface, i.e., the wing area, and the control surfaces, i.e., the horizontal tail area, the vertical tail area, and the trailing control surface areas are defined. Illustrations of each of the areas are included.

  16. Direct observations of shortwave aerosol radiative forcing at surface and its diurnal variation during the Asian dry season at southwest Indian peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Manoj Kumar; Rajeev, K.

    2016-08-01

    The Arabian Sea witnesses consistent occurrence of a large-scale aerosol plume transported by the northerlies from the Asian region during the dry season (December-April). This paper presents direct observations of the diurnal variation (and dependence on solar zenith angle, SZA) of instantaneous aerosol direct radiative forcing efficiency (IADRFE) and aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) at surface during the period from December to March of 2010-2013 at Thiruvananthapuram (8.5°N, 77°E), an Indian peninsular station adjoining the Arabian Sea coast, which resides well within this aerosol plume. Magnitude of the IADRFE increases with SZA from -75 ± 20 W m-2 τ 500 -1 at SZA of ~80° to attain a peak value of -170 ± 30 W m-2 τ 500 -1 at SZA ~60° in March (~3 h before and after the local noon). Absolute magnitudes and SZA dependence of the observed seasonal mean IADRFE are in agreement (within 16 % of the absolute magnitudes) with those estimated using radiation transfer computations employing an aerosol model with visible band single-scattering albedo of ~0.90 ± 0.03. Observed values of the diurnal mean aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (ADRFE) averaged during the season (December-March) vary between -71 and -76.5 W m-2 τ 500 -1 , which is in agreement with the model estimate of -71 W m-2 τ 500 -1 . The present observations show that the seasonal mean ADRF at surface (-25 to -28 W m-2) is about 10 % of the diurnal mean downwelling shortwave flux reaching the surface (in the absence of aerosols) during dry season at this location, indicating the major role of aerosols in regulating surface energetics.

  17. Observations of Clouds, Aerosols and Surface Energy Fluxes over the Northern and Southern Atlantic Ocean with the Oceanet-Atmosphere Platform Onboard RV Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, A.; Brückner, M.; Deneke, H.; Engelmann, R.; Hanschmann, T.; Kalisch, J.; Kanitz, T.; Merkel, M.; Pospichal, B.; van Pinxteren, M.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2007, the regular Atlantic Ocean transfer cruises of the research icebreaker Polarstern are used to continuously observe the state of the atmosphere and the corresponding surface energy fluxes over the Northern and Southern Atlantic Ocean in the framework of the German research initiative OCEANET. At present, the OCEANET-atmosphere equipment consists of the multiwavelength polarized Raman lidar Polly-XT for aerosol profiling and for aerosol-cloud-interaction studies, the passive microwave radiometer HATPRO for determining water-vapor and temperature profiles as well as cloud liquid-water path, pyranometer and pyrgeometer for surface radiation budget measurements, occasional measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes, sky imager for cloud characterization as well as sun photometer for vertically integrated aerosol measurements. Further instruments from partner institutes have contributed at individual expeditions like the University of Leipzig multispectral solar transmissivity measurements or the cloud radar from NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory. The presentation discusses latitudinal variations of atmospheric thermodynamic and aerosols profiles as well as water vapour and cloud liquid water path. Cloud and aerosol direct radiative effects have been calculated and have been associated to different cloud and aerosol types. Furthermore, characteristics of trade wind cumuli in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere have been investigated. On several cruises the atmospheric measurements are accompanied by physical and chemical characterizations of sea surface film and surface near aerosols, which enables to identify maritime aerosol formation processes. Satellite data from Meteosat Second Generation MSG are used to obtain cloud properties and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes along the ship tracks in order to close the energy budget over the atmospheric column.

  18. Organic carbon in the sea surface microlayer and in submicron aerosol particles - measurements from the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, Manuela; Wadinga Fomba, Kanneh; Müller, Konrad; Barthel, Stefan; von Tümpling, Wolf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    The export of organic compounds from the oceans can establish a considerable carbon flux in the Earth system. The detailed transport processes and especially the impact of environmental drivers in the organic carbon transfer are not yet fully understood. Here we present a broad study of measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations and enrichment in the sea surface microlayer (SML) as well as equivalent measurements in marine aerosol particles. For the first time, enrichment factors of organic carbon in marine ambient aerosol are reported that based on concerted measurements of seawater and aerosol particles. The measurements were conducted at different field campaigns in the Atlantic Ocean: at the Cape Verde islands, during two Atlantic transects with the RV Polarstern, and during a campaign at the Raune Fjord in Bergen, Norway. In oceanic water, concentration of DOC were in average 161 μmol/L in bulk water and 225 μmol/L in the SML. Average POC concentrations were 13 μmol/L in bulk water and 17 μmol/L in the SML. Instead of a constant enrichment of DOC or POC there are rather two pattern: high enrichment in samples with low concentrations and low enrichment when concentration were high. In seawater (bulk water and SML) small, mostly insignificant effects, concerning concentration and enrichment of DOC and POC were found regarding the impact of wind stress and chl-a concentrations. Differences between SML and bulk water concentrations are more pronounced at times of high chl-a, but all in all these effects are not strong. The thickness of the SML is affected by biological activity but probably caused by a more surface-active part of the DOC/POC pool and this is not reflected in the sum parameters. In the ambient marine aerosol particles water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and water-insoluble organic carbon (WISOC) concentrations were in average about 0.2 μg m-3, respectively. Higher concentration differences of

  19. Coliform aerosols generated from the surface of dewatered sewage applied to a forest clearcut.

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, R L; Littke, W

    1978-01-01

    Concentrations of airborne coliform bacteria as high as 1.5 X 10(4) m-3 were observed 8 cm above anaerobically digested sewage sludge applied to a forest clearcut. Dry conditions and high wind speeds tended to favor aerosol generation. PMID:367270

  20. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases.

  1. Sustained distribution of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in epithelial lining fluids on alveolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Keita; Togami, Kohei; Yamamoto, Eri; Wang, Shujun; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Itagaki, Shirou; Chono, Sumio

    2016-10-01

    The distribution characteristics of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in alveolar epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were examined in rats, and the ensuing mechanisms were investigated in the in vitro uptake and protein adsorption experiments. Nonmodified or PEGylated liposomes (particle size 100 nm) were aerosolized into rat lungs. PEGylated liposomes were distributed more sustainably in ELFs than nonmodified liposomes. Furthermore, the uptake of PEGylated liposomes by alveolar macrophages (AMs) was less than that of nonmodified liposomes. In further in vitro uptake experiments, nonmodified and PEGylated liposomes were opsonized with rat ELF components and then added to NR8383 cells as cultured rat AMs. The uptake of opsonized PEGylated liposomes by NR8383 cells was lower than that of opsonized nonmodified liposomes. Moreover, the protein absorption levels in opsonized PEGylated liposomes were lower than those in opsonized nonmodified liposomes. These findings suggest that sustained distributions of aerosolized PEGylated liposomes in ELFs reflect evasion of liposomal opsonization with surfactant proteins and consequent reductions in uptake by AMs. These data indicate the potential of PEGylated liposomes as aerosol-based drug delivery system that target ELF for the treatment of respiratory diseases. PMID:27334278

  2. Preliminary results of the aerosol optical depth retrieval in Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. Q.; Kanniah, K. D.; Lau, A. M. S.

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric aerosols over the urban area is important as tremendous amounts of pollutants are released by industrial activities and heavy traffic flow. Air quality monitoring by satellite observation provides better spatial coverage, however, detailed aerosol properties retrieval remains a challenge. This is due to the limitation of aerosol retrieval algorithm on high reflectance (bright surface) areas. The aim of this study is to retrieve aerosol optical depth over urban areas of Iskandar Malaysia; the main southern development zone in Johor state, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 500 m resolution data. One of the important steps is the aerosol optical depth retrieval is to characterise different types of aerosols in the study area. This information will be used to construct a Look Up Table containing the simulated aerosol reflectance and corresponding aerosol optical depth. Thus, in this study we have characterised different aerosol types in the study area using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data. These data were processed using cluster analysis and the preliminary results show that the area is consisting of coastal urban (65%), polluted urban (27.5%), dust particles (6%) and heavy pollution (1.5%) aerosols.

  3. The Studies on Aerosol Transport, Its Deposition, and Its Impact on Climate - the Study on the Surface Material Circulation can Connect from the Past to the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasunari, Teppei

    2012-01-01

    Recently the issue on glacier retreats comes up and many factors should be relevant to the issue. The absorbing aerosols such as dust and black carbon (BC) are considered to be one of the factors. After they deposited onto the snow surface, it will reduce snow albedo (called snow darkening effect) and probably contribute to further melting of glacier. The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) has developed at NASAlGSFC. However, the original snowpack model used in the land surface model in the GEOS-5 did not consider the snow darkening effect. Here we developed the new snow albedo scheme which can consider the snow darkening effect. In addition, another scheme on calculating mass concentrations on the absorbing aerosols in snowpack was also developed, in which the direct aerosol depositions from the chemical transport model in the GEOS-5 were used. The scheme has been validated with the observed data obtained at backyard of the Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, by Dr. Teruo Aoki (Meteorological Research Institute) et al. including me. The observed data was obtained when I was Ph.D. candidate. The original GEOS-5 during 2007-2009 over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau region showed more reductions of snow than that of the new GEOS-5 because the original one used lower albedo settings. On snow cover fraction, the new GEOS-5 simulated more realistic snow-covered area comparing to the MODIS snow cover fraction. The reductions on snow albedo, snow cover fraction, and snow water equivalent were seen with statistically significance if we consider the snow darkening effect comparing to the results without the snow darkening effect. In the real world, debris-cover, inside refreezing process, surface flow of lacier, etc. affect glacier mass balance and the simu.latedresults immediately do not affect whole glacier retreating. However, our results indicate that some surface melting over non debris-covered parts of the glacier would be

  4. Aerosol Indirect Effects on the Cold Pool Characteristics of Convective Storms and Their Subsequent Feedbacks to Convective Development and Surface Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    Enhanced aerosol concentrations are often associated with a decrease in the surface precipitation through their suppression of the warm rain process. Such changes to the surface precipitation may, however, have an impact on the associated cold pool characteristics, thereby affecting subsequent convective development and the resultant surface precipitation. This dynamic response of the cold pool to enhanced aerosol concentrations may therefore at times offset the aerosol indirect effects on precipitation through its organization of the convection. The relationship between aerosol indirect effects on precipitation characteristics and the associated dynamic forcing of the cold pool has been investigated through the use of several cloud-resolving simulations of convective storms over Florida. Toward the end of NASA's CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign conducted over Florida during July 2002, high concentrations of Saharan dust, which can serve as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, were observed over the peninsula of Florida. Cloud-resolving model simulations have been conducted using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to investigate the impacts of varying aerosol concentrations on the characteristics of the convection developing over the Peninsula. The model was initialized with vertical profiles of both clean and high aerosol concentrations observed during the field campaign. Results from the simulations show that while enhanced aerosol concentrations do tend to result in a decrease in the surface precipitation throughout much of the lifecycle of the storms, there are however times when the precipitation produced by the high aerosol case is greater than that of the clean case. It is during these times that the gust fronts of the storms in the clean case have outrun their associated updrafts, resulting in a weakening of the storm system and a concomitant decrease in surface precipitation. In the high aerosol case the updrafts remain co-located with their

  5. Surface measurements of aerosol properties over northwest China during ARM China 2008 deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Huang, Jiangping; Zhang, Rudong; Chen, Bin; Bi, Jianrong

    2010-04-01

    To improve understanding and capture the direct evidence of the impact of dust aerosol on climate, the 2008 China-U.S. joint field campaigns are conducted. Three sites are involved this campaign, including one permanent site (Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL)) (located in Yuzhong, 35.95°N, 104.1°E), one SACOL's Mobile Facility (SMF) (deployed in Jintai, 37.57°N, 104.23°E), and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Ancillary Facility (AAF mobile laboratories, SMART-COMMIT) (deployed in Zhangye, 39.08°N, 100.27°E). This paper presents the results of direct measurement analysis of the dust plume transport case. During the dust plume period, the OMI AI data and air mass back trajectory model (HYSPLIT) clearly illustrated that the air mass originated from the Taklamakan desert and Inner Mongolia Gobi desert. The daily averaged concentrations of PM10 were about 0.2 ± 0.03 mg/m3 at SACOL and Zhangye, but during the dust plume the mass concentration of dust aerosol were 0.98 mg/m3 at Zhangye and 0.52 mg/m3 at SACOL. The black carbon (BC) value reached its high peak during the dust plume. However, the concentration of BC was not only fluctuated with the dust plume, but also affected by the local air pollutants. When the dust plume occurred, the multiwavelength aerosol optical depth can be raised to ˜2, ˜1.5 times as high as that during the non dust plume period, and the number (mass) distribution during the dust plume showed the aerosol types considered correspond to urban/industrial aerosols, coarse mode particles. The meteorological analysis indicated that these polluted layers are not only transported from their sources, but also include the local sources.

  6. Excess surface area in bioelectrochemical systems causes ion transport limitations

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: 1) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200 mM increased current linearly up to a total of +273% vs. 0 mM NaCl under advective conditions, 2) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200 mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and 3) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steady-state current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential at the electrode surface. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant. PMID:25421463

  7. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions. PMID:24601011

  8. A fast pairwise evaluation of molecular surface area.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, Vladislav; Purisima, Enrico O

    2002-05-01

    A fast and general analytical approach was developed for the calculation of the approximate van der Waals and solvent-accessible surface areas. The method is based on three basic ideas: the use of the Lorentz transformation formula, a rigid-geometry approximation, and a single fitting parameter that can be refitted on the fly during a simulation. The Lorentz transformation equation is used for the summation of the areas of an atom buried by its neighboring contacting atoms, and implies that a sum of the buried pairwise areas cannot be larger than the surface area of the isolated spherical atom itself. In a rigid-geometry approximation we numerically calculate and keep constant the surface of each atom buried by the atoms involved in 1-2 and 1-3 interactions. Only the contributions from the nonbonded atoms (1-4 and higher interactions) are considered in terms of the pairwise approximation. The accuracy and speed of the method is competitive with other pairwise algorithms. A major strength of the method is the ease of parametrization. PMID:11948592

  9. Tropical cyclone rainfall area controlled by relative sea surface temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanluan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Tropical cyclone rainfall rates have been projected to increase in a warmer climate. The area coverage of tropical cyclones influences their impact on human lives, yet little is known about how tropical cyclone rainfall area will change in the future. Here, using satellite data and global atmospheric model simulations, we show that tropical cyclone rainfall area is controlled primarily by its environmental sea surface temperature (SST) relative to the tropical mean SST (that is, the relative SST), while rainfall rate increases with increasing absolute SST. Our result is consistent with previous numerical simulations that indicated tight relationships between tropical cyclone size and mid-tropospheric relative humidity. Global statistics of tropical cyclone rainfall area are not expected to change markedly under a warmer climate provided that SST change is relatively uniform, implying that increases in total rainfall will be confined to similar size domains with higher rainfall rates. PMID:25761457

  10. Aerosols and environmental pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth’s radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  11. Aerosols and environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth's radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  12. Origin of surface and columnar Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) aerosols using source- and region-tagged emissions transport in a general circulation model - article no. D24211

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, S.; Venkataraman, C.; Boucher, O.

    2008-12-15

    We study the relative influence of aerosols emitted from different sectors and geographical regions on aerosol loading in south Asia. Sectors contributing aerosol emissions include biofuel and fossil fuel combustion, open biomass burning, and natural sources. Geographical regions include India, southeast Asia, east Asia, Africa-west Asia, and the rest of the world. Simulations of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), from January to March 1999, are made in the general circulation model of Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD-ZT GCM) with emissions tagged by sector and geographical region. Anthropogenic emissions dominate (54-88%) the predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) over all the receptor regions. Among the anthropogenic sectors, fossil fuel combustion has the largest overall influence on aerosol loading, primarily sulfate, with emissions from India (50-80%) and rest of the world significantly influencing surface concentrations and AOD. Biofuel combustion has a significant influence on both the surface and columnar black carbon (BC) in particular over the Indian subcontinent and Bay of Bengal with emissions largely from the Indian region (60-80%). Open biomass burning emissions influence organic matter (OM) significantly, and arise largely from Africa-west Asia. The emissions from Africa-west Asia affect the carbonaceous aerosols AOD in all receptor regions, with their largest influence (AOD-BC: 60%; and AOD-OM: 70%) over the Arabian Sea. Among Indian regions, the Indo-Gangetic Plain is the largest contributor to anthropogenic surface mass concentrations and AOD over the Bay of Bengal and India. Dust aerosols are contributed mainly through the long-range transport from Africa-west Asia over the receptor regions. Overall, the model estimates significant intercontinental incursion of aerosol, for example, BC, OM, and dust from Africa-west Asia and sulfate from distant regions (rest of the world) into the INDOEX domain.

  13. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique of estimating aerosol radiative forcing from high resolution spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Roshan

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. We look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurement is made and along with an Radtiative transfer (RT) model, radiative forcing is estimated. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and a 3nm resolution during around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.01 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux due to change in individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves matching different combinations of aerosol species in OPAC model and RT model as long as the combination which gives the minimum root mean squared deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model, aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. Also an alternate method to estimate the spectral SSA is discussed. Here, the RT model, the observed spectral flux and spectral AOD is used. Spectral AOD is input to RT model and SSA is varied till the minimum root mean squared difference between observed and simulated spectral flux from RT model is obtained. The methods discussed are limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive

  14. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique for estimating aerosol radiative forcing from spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. In this study we look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurements along with an RT model is used to estimate radiative forcing. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and 3nm resolution for around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.1 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. All the measurements were made in the campus of Indian Institute of Science which is in the heart of Bangalore city. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux to change in the mass concentration of individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds -OPAC classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the region of influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves an iterative process where the mixture of aerosol species are changed in OPAC model and RT model is run as long as the mixture which mimics the measured spectral flux within 2-3% deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. The new method is limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive an optically equivalent aerosol mixture reduces when diffuse component of flux increases. Our analysis also showed that direct component of spectral flux is

  15. Enhanced Deep Blue Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm: The Second Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A. M.; Hansell, R.; Seftor, C. S.; Huang, J.; Tsay, S.-C.

    2013-01-01

    The aerosol products retrieved using the MODIS collection 5.1 Deep Blue algorithm have provided useful information about aerosol properties over bright-reflecting land surfaces, such as desert, semi-arid, and urban regions. However, many components of the C5.1 retrieval algorithm needed to be improved; for example, the use of a static surface database to estimate surface reflectances. This is particularly important over regions of mixed vegetated and non- vegetated surfaces, which may undergo strong seasonal changes in land cover. In order to address this issue, we develop a hybrid approach, which takes advantage of the combination of pre-calculated surface reflectance database and normalized difference vegetation index in determining the surface reflectance for aerosol retrievals. As a result, the spatial coverage of aerosol data generated by the enhanced Deep Blue algorithm has been extended from the arid and semi-arid regions to the entire land areas.

  16. Surface observations of aerosols and vertical ozone profiling: Influence from the Indo Gangetic Plain, biomass burning and LRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naja, M. K.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Singh, N.; Phani, D. V.; Dumka, U. C.; Kumar, R.; Ojha, N.; Bhardhwaj, P.; Lal, S.

    2013-12-01

    South Asia is the home to one of the most populated and polluted region (The Indo-Gangetic Plain, IGP) of the world and variety of anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources are exiting in the same region. Despite of the poor understanding of the physical, chemical, and dynamical processes in the lower atmosphere over this region, there are very limited ground based observations in South Asia. In view of this, an observational facility was setup at ARIES, Nainital (29.4N, 79.5E; 1950 m) in the central Himalayas and at two sites in the IGP region for the surface based trace gases and aerosols observations as well as balloon-borne ozone observations. Further, First Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF1), DOE, was setup at ARIES during a GVAX campaign (June 2011-March 2012) and extensive observations of vertical profiling was also carried out using balloons, doppler Lidar, microwave radiometer, wind profiler and ceilometers. Observations of trace gases and aerosols show a clear enhancement during pre-monsoon and a secondary peak during post-monsoon period. The average scattering Angstrom exponent suggests dominance of relatively larger size particles and single scattering albedo indicates more scattering or less absorbing aerosols in this region. Events of the long-range transport are seen, when concentrations of bigger particle are observed to be higher. Apart from LRT, events of downward transport of ozone rich but drier air-masses are also observed. Extensive in-situ observations of ozone, CO, BC, aerosol absorption, scattering and number-concentration, along with back-air trajectories and MODIS fire-counts have been used to demonstrate evidences of the influence of biomass burning over this region. Aerosol organic enrichment and subsequent evolution to predominantly accumulation mode have been observed. This enrichment and its simultaneous size-growth caused it to get brighter during the biomass burning season. A very clear enhancement (20

  17. High Surface Area Inorganic Membrane for Water Removal

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose objective is to demonstrate the fabrication and performance advantages of minichannel planar membrane modules made of porous metallic supports of surface area packing density one order of magnitude higher than the conventional membrane tube. The new, transformational, ceramic/metallic, hybrid membrane technology will be used for water/ethanol separations and reduce energy consumption by >20% over distillation and adsorption.

  18. Excess Surface Area in Bioelectrochemical Systems Causes ion Transport Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: (i) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200mM increased current linearly up to a total of þ273% vs. 0mM NaCl under advective conditions; (ii) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and (iii) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steadystate current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant.

  19. Facile synthesis of high surface area molybdenum nitride and carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Aaron; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Brosha, Eric L.; Atanassov, Plamen; Ward, Tim L.

    2015-08-15

    The synthesis of high surface area γ-Mo{sub 2}N and α-Mo{sub 2}C is reported (116 and 120 m{sup 2}/g) without the temperature programmed reduction of MoO{sub 3}. γ-Mo{sub 2}N was prepared in an NH{sub 3}-free synthesis using forming gas (7 at% H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}-balance) as the reactive atmosphere. Three precursors were studied ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}·4H{sub 2}O, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2} Mg(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}, and MgMoO{sub 4}) along with the sacrificial support method (SSM) as a means of reducing the particle size of Mo{sub 2}N and Mo{sub 2}C. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to identify reaction intermediates, the temperature at which various intermediates form, and the average domain size of the Mo{sub 2}N products. Materials were synthesized in bulk and further characterized by XRD, HRTEM, XPS, and BET. - Highlights: • Facile synthesis of γ-Mo2N and α-Mo2C with surface area exceeding 100 m{sup 2}/g. • Sacrificial support method was used to achieve these high surface areas. • Materials can serve as catalysts or supports in (electro)chemical processes.

  20. Trends in arsenic levels in PM10 and PM 2.5 aerosol fractions in an industrialized area.

    PubMed

    García-Aleix, J R; Delgado-Saborit, J M; Verdú-Martín, G; Amigó-Descarrega, J M; Esteve-Cano, V

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic element that affects human health and is widely distributed in the environment. In the area of study, the main Spanish and second largest European industrial ceramic cluster, the main source of arsenic aerosol is related to the impurities in some boracic minerals used in the ceramic process. Epidemiological studies on cancer occurrence in Spain points out the study region as one with the greater risk of cancer. Concentrations of particulate matter and arsenic content in PM10 and PM2.5 were measured and characterized by ICP-MS in the area of study during the years 2005-2010. Concentrations of PM10 and its arsenic content range from 27 to 46 μg/m(3) and from 0.7 to 6 ng/m(3) in the industrial area, respectively, and from 25 to 40 μg/m(3) and from 0.7 to 2.8 ng/m(3) in the urban area, respectively. Concentrations of PM2.5 and its arsenic content range from 12 to 14 μg/m(3) and from 0.5 to 1.4 ng/m(3) in the urban background area, respectively. Most of the arsenic content is present in the fine fraction, with ratios of PM2.5/PM10 in the range of 0.65-0.87. PM10, PM2.5, and its arsenic content show a sharp decrease in recent years associated with the economic downturn, which severely hit the production of ceramic materials in the area under study. The sharp production decrease due to the economic crisis combined with several technological improvements in recent years such as substitution of boron, which contains As impurities as raw material, have reduced the concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, and As in air to an extent that currently meets the existing European regulations.

  1. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth from surface solar radiation measurements using machine learning algorithms, non-linear regression and a radiative transfer-based look-up table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttunen, Jani; Kokkola, Harri; Mielonen, Tero; Esa Juhani Mononen, Mika; Lipponen, Antti; Reunanen, Juha; Vilhelm Lindfors, Anders; Mikkonen, Santtu; Erkki Juhani Lehtinen, Kari; Kouremeti, Natalia; Bais, Alkiviadis; Niska, Harri; Arola, Antti

    2016-07-01

    In order to have a good estimate of the current forcing by anthropogenic aerosols, knowledge on past aerosol levels is needed. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a good measure for aerosol loading. However, dedicated measurements of AOD are only available from the 1990s onward. One option to lengthen the AOD time series beyond the 1990s is to retrieve AOD from surface solar radiation (SSR) measurements taken with pyranometers. In this work, we have evaluated several inversion methods designed for this task. We compared a look-up table method based on radiative transfer modelling, a non-linear regression method and four machine learning methods (Gaussian process, neural network, random forest and support vector machine) with AOD observations carried out with a sun photometer at an Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site in Thessaloniki, Greece. Our results show that most of the machine learning methods produce AOD estimates comparable to the look-up table and non-linear regression methods. All of the applied methods produced AOD values that corresponded well to the AERONET observations with the lowest correlation coefficient value being 0.87 for the random forest method. While many of the methods tended to slightly overestimate low AODs and underestimate high AODs, neural network and support vector machine showed overall better correspondence for the whole AOD range. The differences in producing both ends of the AOD range seem to be caused by differences in the aerosol composition. High AODs were in most cases those with high water vapour content which might affect the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) through uptake of water into aerosols. Our study indicates that machine learning methods benefit from the fact that they do not constrain the aerosol SSA in the retrieval, whereas the LUT method assumes a constant value for it. This would also mean that machine learning methods could have potential in reproducing AOD from SSR even though SSA would have changed during

  2. Composition of microbial communities in aerosol, snow and ice samples from remote glaciated areas (Antarctica, Alps, Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elster, J.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Řeháková, K.

    2007-06-01

    Taxonomical and ecological analyses were performed on micro-autotrophs (cyanobacteria and algae together with remnants of diatom valves), micro-fungi (hyphae and spores), bacteria (rod, cocci and red clusters), yeast, and plant pollen extracted from various samples: Alps snow (Mt. Blank area), Andean snow (Illimani, Bolivia), Antarctic aerosol filters (Dumont d'Urville, Terre Adélie), and Antarctic inland ice (Terre Adélie). Three methods for ice and snow sample's pre-concentration were tested (filtration, centrifugation and lyophilisation). Afterwards, cultivation methods for terrestrial, freshwater and marine microorganisms (micro-autotrophs and micro-fungi) were used in combination with liquid and solid media. The main goal of the study was to find out if micro-autotrophs are commonly transported by air masses, and later stored in snow and icecaps around the world. The most striking result of this study was the absence of culturable micro-autotrophs in all studied samples. However, an unusual culturable pigmented prokaryote was found in both alpine snow and aerosol samples. Analyses of many samples and proper statistical analyses (PCA, RDA- Monte Carlo permutation tests) showed that studied treatments highly significantly differ in both microbial community and biotic remnants composition F=9.33, p=0.001. In addition, GLM showed that studied treatments highly significantly differ in numbers of categories of microorganisms and remnants of biological material F=11.45, p=0.00005. The Antarctic aerosol samples were characterised by having red clusters of bacteria, the unusual prokaryote and yeasts. The high mountain snow from the Alps and Andes contained much more culturable heterotrophs. The unusual prokaryote was very abundant, as were coccoid bacteria, red clusters of bacteria, as well as yeasts. The Antarctic ice samples were quite different. These samples had higher numbers of rod bacteria and fungal hyphae. The microbial communities and biological remnants of

  3. The influence of metallurgy on the formation of welding aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Anthony T

    2002-10-01

    Recent research has indicated that insoluble ultrafine aerosols (ie., particles whose physical diameters are less than 100 nm) may cause adverse health effects due to their small size, and that toxicological response may be more appropriately represented by particle number or particle surface area. Unfortunately, current exposure criteria and the associated air-sampling techniques are primarily mass-based. Welding processes are high-temperature operations that generate substantial number concentrations of ultrafine aerosols. Welding aerosols are formed primarily through the nucleation of metal vapors followed by competing growth mechanisms such as coagulation and condensation. Experimental results and mathematical tools are presented to illustrate how welding metallurgy influences the chemical aspects and dynamic processes that initiate and evolve the resultant aerosol. This research suggests that a fundamental understanding of metallurgy and aerosol physics can be exploited to suppress the formation of undesirable chemical species as well as the amount of aerosol generated during a welding process.

  4. Competing effects of viscosity and surface-tension depression on the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Shiraiwa, M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.; Schilling, K.; Berkemeier, T.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of oligomers in biomass burning aerosol, as well as secondary organic aerosol derived from other sources, influences particle viscosity and can introduce kinetic limitations to water uptake. This, in turn, impacts aerosol optical properties and the efficiency with which these particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). To explore the influence of organic-component viscosity on aerosol hygroscopicity, the water-uptake behavior of aerosol systems comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and mixtures of PEG and ammonium sulfate (AS) was measured under sub- and supersaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions. Experiments were conducted with systems containing PEG with average molecular weights ranging from 200 to 10,000 g/mol, corresponding to a range in viscosity of 0.004 - 4.5 Pa s under dry conditions. While evidence suggests that viscous aerosol components can suppress water uptake at RH < 90%, under supersaturated conditions (with respect to RH), an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular weight was observed. We attribute this to an increase in the efficiency with which PEG serves as a surfactant with increasing molecular weight. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures and, in fact, a modest increase in CCN activity is observed for the PEG 10,000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 4% reduction in critical activation diameter. Experimental results are compared with calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients model and the potential influence of kinetic limitations to observed water uptake is further explored with the Kinetic Multi-Layer Model of Gas-Particle Interactions. Results suggest the competing effects of organic-component viscosity and surface-tension depression may lead to RH-dependent differences in hygroscopicity for oligomers and other surface-active compounds present in atmospheric

  5. Seasonal and spatial variation of organic tracers for biomass burning in PM1 aerosols from highly insolated urban areas.

    PubMed

    van Drooge, B L; Fontal, M; Bravo, N; Fernández, P; Fernández, M A; Muñoz-Arnanz, J; Jiménez, B; Grimalt, J O

    2014-10-01

    PM1 aerosol characterization on organic tracers for biomass burning (levoglucosan and its isomers and dehydroabietic acid) was conducted within the AERTRANS project. PM1 filters (N = 90) were sampled from 2010 to 2012 in busy streets in the urban centre of Madrid and Barcelona (Spain) at ground-level and at roof sites. In both urban areas, biomass burning was not expected to be an important local emission source, but regional emissions from wildfires, residential heating or biomass removal may influence the air quality in the cities. Although both areas are under influence of high solar radiation, Madrid is situated in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula, while Barcelona is located at the Mediterranean Coast and under influence of marine atmospheres. Two extraction methods were applied, i.e. Soxhlet and ASE, which showed equivalent results after GC-MS analyses. The ambient air concentrations of the organic tracers for biomass burning increased by an order of magnitude at both sites during winter compared to summer. An exception was observed during a PM event in summer 2012, when the atmosphere in Barcelona was directly affected by regional wildfire smoke and levels were four times higher as those observed in winter. Overall, there was little variation between the street and roof sites in both cities, suggesting that regional biomass burning sources influence the urban areas after atmospheric transport. Despite the different atmospheric characteristics in terms of air relative humidity, Madrid and Barcelona exhibit very similar composition and concentrations of biomass burning organic tracers. Nevertheless, levoglucosan and its isomers seem to be more suitable for source apportionment purposes than dehydroabietic acid. In both urban areas, biomass burning contributions to PM were generally low (2 %) in summer, except on the day when wildfire smoke arrive to the urban area. In the colder periods the contribution increase to around 30 %, indicating that regional

  6. Seasonal and spatial variation of organic tracers for biomass burning in PM1 aerosols from highly insolated urban areas.

    PubMed

    van Drooge, B L; Fontal, M; Bravo, N; Fernández, P; Fernández, M A; Muñoz-Arnanz, J; Jiménez, B; Grimalt, J O

    2014-10-01

    PM1 aerosol characterization on organic tracers for biomass burning (levoglucosan and its isomers and dehydroabietic acid) was conducted within the AERTRANS project. PM1 filters (N = 90) were sampled from 2010 to 2012 in busy streets in the urban centre of Madrid and Barcelona (Spain) at ground-level and at roof sites. In both urban areas, biomass burning was not expected to be an important local emission source, but regional emissions from wildfires, residential heating or biomass removal may influence the air quality in the cities. Although both areas are under influence of high solar radiation, Madrid is situated in the centre of the Iberian Peninsula, while Barcelona is located at the Mediterranean Coast and under influence of marine atmospheres. Two extraction methods were applied, i.e. Soxhlet and ASE, which showed equivalent results after GC-MS analyses. The ambient air concentrations of the organic tracers for biomass burning increased by an order of magnitude at both sites during winter compared to summer. An exception was observed during a PM event in summer 2012, when the atmosphere in Barcelona was directly affected by regional wildfire smoke and levels were four times higher as those observed in winter. Overall, there was little variation between the street and roof sites in both cities, suggesting that regional biomass burning sources influence the urban areas after atmospheric transport. Despite the different atmospheric characteristics in terms of air relative humidity, Madrid and Barcelona exhibit very similar composition and concentrations of biomass burning organic tracers. Nevertheless, levoglucosan and its isomers seem to be more suitable for source apportionment purposes than dehydroabietic acid. In both urban areas, biomass burning contributions to PM were generally low (2 %) in summer, except on the day when wildfire smoke arrive to the urban area. In the colder periods the contribution increase to around 30 %, indicating that regional

  7. Analysis of Characteristics of Dust Aerosols in Northwest China based on Satellite Remote-sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Liu, D.; Zhao, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Based on the CloudSat data, effects of dust aerosol on cloud parameters under the circumstance of the monthly average, dusty days and dust-free days were analyzed during April, 2010. By using L2 aerosol profiles satellite data of CALIOP/CALIOPSO the aerosol extinction coefficients were analyzed over northwest China. As an important case, space distribution and transmission route of dust aerosol were investigated during the dust events occurred from April 16th to 18th in 2013 over northwest China, based on L1 data of CALIOP/CALIOPSO, a combination of multiple satellite data and models. The results show that (1) dust aerosols could cause the reduction in effective radius of particle, cloud liquid water content and cloud optical thickness, and the increase of the number concentration of liquid cloud particles as well, (2) The aerosol extinction coefficients were decreased with the increase of height. The value of the aerosol extinction coefficients in desert area was greater than that in the area of Gansu Province due to urbanization. Distribution of the aerosol extinction coefficients in spring was nearly the same as the annual average. (3) Using aerosol products of the vertical characteristics from CALIOP/CALIOPSO, aerosol was classified during dust events, and with NAPPS Global aerosol model, daily distribution of the dust aerosol concentration was given, showing the transport and diffusion of dust aerosol. With HYSPLIT trajectory model dust transportation path of the sand dust source areas was simulated and identified. During the outbreak of dust event dust aerosol was mainly distributed over the surface about 3km, with depolarization ratio at 0.4 and color ratio at 1.2. During the dust events were close to weak and stop, dust aerosol was mainly distributed over the surface under 2 km, with depolarization ratio from 0.2 to 0.3, and color ratio about 1.

  8. Enhanced Surface Warming and Accelerated Snow Melt in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau Induced by Absorbing Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2010-01-01

    Numerical experiments with the NASA finite-volume general circulation model show that heating of the atmosphere by dust and black carbon can lead to widespread enhanced warming over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) and accelerated snow melt in the western TP and Himalayas. During the boreal spring, a thick aerosol layer, composed mainly of dust transported from adjacent deserts and black carbon from local emissions, builds up over the Indo-Gangetic Plain, against the foothills of the Himalaya and the TP. The aerosol layer, which extends from the surface to high elevation (approx.5 km), heats the mid-troposphere by absorbing solar radiation. The heating produces an atmospheric dynamical feedback the so-called elevated-heat-pump (EHP) effect, which increases moisture, cloudiness, and deep convection over northern India, as well as enhancing the rate of snow melt in the Himalayas and TP. The accelerated melting of snow is mostly confined to the western TP, first slowly in early April and then rapidly from early to mid-May. The snow cover remains reduced from mid-May through early June. The accelerated snow melt is accompanied by similar phases of enhanced warming of the atmosphere-land system of the TP, with the atmospheric warming leading the surface warming by several days. Surface energy balance analysis shows that the short-wave and long-wave surface radiative fluxes strongly offset each other, and are largely regulated by the changes in cloudiness and moisture over the TP. The slow melting phase in April is initiated by an effective transfer of sensible heat from a warmer atmosphere to land. The rapid melting phase in May is due to an evaporation-snow-land feedback coupled to an increase in atmospheric moisture over the TP induced by the EHP effect.

  9. High surface area aerogels for energy storage and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Ryan Patrick

    ADAI are demonstrated in a third-generation prototypical thermoelectric generator for automotive waste heat recovery. The second chapter then details two different aerogel-based materials for electrochemical energy storage. It begins with lithium titanate aerogel, which takes advantage of the high surface area of the aerogel morphology to display a batt-cap behavior. This should allow the lithium titanate aerogel to perform at higher rates than would normally be expected for the bulk oxide material. Additionally, the flexibility of the sol-gel process is demonstrated through the incorporation of electrically conductive high-surface area exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets in the oxide. The last section describes the characterization of a LiMn2O 4 spinel coated carbon nanofoam in a non-aqueous electrolyte. The short diffusion path, high surface area and intimately wired architecture of the nanofoam allows the oxide to retain its capacity at significantly higher rates when compared with literature values for the bulk oxide. Additionally, the nanometric length scale improves cycle life, and the high surface area dramatically increases the insertion capacity by providing a higher concentration of surface defects. Taken together, it is clear that aerogels are an extremely attractive class of material for applications pertaining to energy and efficiency, and further research in this area will provide valuable solutions for pressing societal needs. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  10. A Case Study of Urbanization Impact on Summer Precipitation in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area. Urban Heat Island Versus Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Shi; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Xiuqun

    2015-10-23

    Convection-resolving ensemble simulations using the WRF-Chem model coupled with a single-layer Urban Canopy Model (UCM) are conducted to investigate the individual and combined impacts of land use and anthropogenic pollutant emissions from urbanization on a heavy rainfall event in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area (GBMA) in China. The simulation with the urbanization effect included generally captures the spatial pattern and temporal variation of the rainfall event. An improvement of precipitation is found in the experiment including aerosol effect on both clouds and radiation. The expanded urban land cover and increased aerosols have an opposite effect on precipitation processes, with the latter playing a more dominant role, leading to suppressed convection and rainfall over the upstream (northwest) area, and enhanced convection and more precipitation in the downstream (southeast) region of the GBMA. In addition, the influence of aerosol indirect effect is found to overwhelm that of direct effect on precipitation in this rainfall event. Increased aerosols induce more cloud droplets with smaller size, which favors evaporative cooling and reduce updrafts and suppress convection over the upstream (northwest) region in the early stage of the rainfall event. As the rainfall system propagates southeastward, more latent heat is released due to the freezing of larger number of smaller cloud drops that are lofted above the freezing level, which is responsible for the increased updraft strength and convective invigoration over the downstream (southeast) area.

  11. A case study of urbanization impact on summer precipitation in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area: Urban heat island versus aerosol effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shi; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Ruby; Yang, Xiu-Qun

    2015-10-01

    Convection-resolving ensemble simulations using the WRF-Chem model coupled with a single-layer Urban Canopy Model are conducted to investigate the individual and combined impacts of land use and anthropogenic pollutant emissions from urbanization on a heavy rainfall event in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area (GBMA) in China. The simulation with the urbanization effect included generally captures the spatial pattern and temporal variation of the rainfall event. An improvement of precipitation is found in the experiment including aerosol effect on both clouds and radiation. The expanded urban land cover and increased aerosols have an opposite effect on precipitation processes, with the latter playing a more dominant role, leading to suppressed convection and rainfall over the upstream (northwest) area, and enhanced convection and more precipitation in the downstream (southeast) region of the GBMA. In addition, the influence of aerosol indirect effect is found to overwhelm that of direct effect on precipitation in this rainfall event. Increased aerosols lead to more cloud droplets with smaller size, which favor evaporative cooling and reduce updrafts and suppress convection over the upstream (northwest) region in the early stage of the rainfall event. As the rainfall system propagates southeastward, more latent heat is released due to the freezing of larger number of smaller cloud drops that are lofted above the freezing level, which is responsible for the increased updraft strength and convective invigoration over the downstream (southeast) area.

  12. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    m, PM10=1.1 μg m-3; estimated coefficient of light scattering by particulate matter, σep, at 570 nm=12 Mm-1). (b) High aerosol concentration (PM2.5=43.9 μg m-3; PM10=83.4 μg m-3; estimated σep at 570 nm=245 Mm-1) (reproduced by permission of National Park Service, 2002). Although comprising only a small fraction of the mass of Earth's atmosphere, aerosol particles are highly important constituents of the atmosphere. Special interest has focused on aerosols in the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere, extending from the land or ocean surface typically to ˜8 km at high latitudes, ˜12 km in mid-latitudes, and ˜16 km at low latitudes. That interest arises in large part because of the importance of aerosol particles in geophysical processes, human health impairment through inhalation, environmental effects through deposition, visibility degradation, and influences on atmospheric radiation and climate.Anthropogenic aerosols are thought to exert a substantial influence on Earth's climate, and the need to quantify this influence has sparked much of the current interest in and research on tropospheric aerosols. The principal mechanisms by which aerosols influence the Earth radiation budget are scattering and absorbing solar radiation (the so-called "direct effects") and modifying clouds and precipitation, thereby affecting both radiation and hydrology (the so-called "indirect effects"). Light scattering by aerosols increases the brightness of the planet, producing a cooling influence. Light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon exert a warming influence. Aerosols increase the reflectivity of clouds, another cooling influence. These radiative influences are quantified as forcings, where a forcing is a perturbation to the energy balance of the atmosphere-Earth system, expressed in units of watts per square meter, W m-2. A warming influence is denoted a positive forcing, and a cooling influence, negative. The radiative direct and indirect forcings by

  13. Note: A combined aerodynamic lens/ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiment for the on-stream investigation of aerosol surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mysak, Erin R.; Starr, David E.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2010-01-15

    We discuss a new approach for the measurement of the surfaces of free aerosol particles with diameters from 50 to 1000 nm. Particles in this size range have significant influence on the heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere and affect human health. Interfacing an aerodynamic lens to an ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer permits measurement of the surface chemical composition of unsupported aerosol particles in real time. We discuss the basic considerations for the design of such an instrument, its current limitations and potentials for improvement. Results from a proof-of-principle experiment on silicon oxide particles with average diameters of 270 nm are shown.

  14. Impact of Spatial Resolution on Surface PM2.5 Monitoring using Satellite-derived Aerosol Optical Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondragunta, S.

    2012-12-01

    Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument was launched on October 28, 2011. The VIIRS instrument provides Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) at two different spatial resolutions: a pixel level (~750 m at nadir) product called the Intermediate Product (IP) and an aggregated (~6 km at nadir) product called the Environmental Data Record (EDR). The air quality and public health community has been using the 10-km Aqua and Terra MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOT products as a proxy to monitor surface PM2.5 (particulate mass for particles smaller than 2.5 μm in median diameter). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) monitors surface PM2.5 because high concentrations have adverse human health impacts. The monitoring stations are not dense, especially in the rural regions, requiring the EPA and scientific community to use satellite-derived AOT as a proxy to derive surface PM2.5. VIIRS AOT will provide continuity to the use of MODIS AOT and its two different spatial resolutions provide an opportunity to test the impact of spatial resolution on the AOT-PM2.5 relationship. A preliminary comparison of VIIRS best quality aerosol products with in situ L1.5 AERONET data using nearest neighbor matchup criteria for one month (May 2012) shows that the IP and EDR AOT bias is 0.204 and 0.153 respectively, and the precision of IP and EDR AOT is 0.319 and 0.235 respectively. A comparison to Aqua MODIS for the same time period also shows that VIIRS AOT is biased high over land but the magnitudes of bias and precision are lower. Given that this evaluation places the VIIRS aerosol products at the beta maturity level (product is minimally validated, may contain significant errors, and not appropriate for quantitative applications) and algorithm refinements are forthcoming, this study compares the collocated satellite-derived AOT and surface PM2.5 relationship for summer 2012 using

  15. Evaluation of MODIS surface reflectance products for wheat leaf area index (LAI) retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yonghong; Yang, Dawen; Huang, Jingfeng; Chen, Daoyi

    The accuracy of leaf area index (LAI) retrieval depends critically on the quality of the input reflectance. MODIS Collection 4 (C4) and Collection 5 (C5) land surface reflectance data are used for wheat LAI retrieval. Results are compared with in situ measurements. The uncertainty in the reflectance data of the two collections (C4 and C5) from both Terra and Aqua sensors is analyzed and its influence on LAI retrieval is discussed. The discrepancies of blue and near infrared reflectances between Terra and Aqua in the C5 data are less than the discrepancies between the sensors in the C4 data. For both Terra and Aqua, the C5 data have much lower blue reflectance than do the C4 data. This can be attributed to improvements in the atmospheric correction algorithm for the C5 data including cloud mask definition and aerosol retrieval. Using both empirical vegetation indices and inversion methods, the LAI is derived from the C4 and C5 surface reflectances. For daily C4 data, only Aqua Normalized difference water indices (NDWI) have significant correlations with the LAI (at a 99% confidence level); in contrast, for the daily C5 data, all the vegetation indices have significant correlations with the LAI. A three-layer neural network is used to invert a one-dimensional (1-D) radiative transfer model for LAI estimation. For the daily C4 data, the correlation between the modeled and measured LAIs is poor and the root mean square error (RMSE) is larger than 1.1; in comparison, the RMSE for the daily C5 data is 0.7. For both C4 and C5 collections, the LAI tends to be overestimated when the sensor is operated with a large view zenith angle in the backscattering direction. The error is either due to the mismatch between the measured reflectance and the modeled reflectance from the simple 1-D radiative transfer model in this direction or due to the assumption of a Lambertian surface in the MODIS atmospheric correction. Additionally, for both methods the results from the 8-day

  16. Relationship Between Surface Reflectance in the Visible and Mid-IR used in MODIS Aerosol Algorithm-Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Gobron, Nadine; Pinty, Bernard; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Verstraete, Michel M.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies in polar orbit on the Terra platform, are used to derive the aerosol optical thickness and properties over land and ocean. The relationships between visible reflectance (at blue, rho(sub blue), and red, rho(sub red)) and mid-infrared (at 2.1 microns, rho(sub 2.1)) are used in the MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm to derive global distribution of aerosols over the land. These relations have been established from a series of measurements indicating that rho(sub blue) is approximately 0.5 rho(sub red) is approximately 0.25 rho(sub 2.1). Here we use a model to describe the transfer of radiation through a vegetation canopy composed of randomly oriented leaves to assess the theoretical foundations for these relationships. Calculations for a wide range of leaf area indices and vegetation fractions show that rho(sub blue) is consistently about 1/4 of rho(sub 2.1) as used by MODIS for the whole range of analyzed cases, except for very dark soils, such as those found in burn scars. For its part, the ratio rho(sub red)/rho(sub 2.1) varies from less than the empirically derived value of 1/2 for dense and dark vegetation, to more than 1/2 for bright mixture of soil and vegetation. This is in agreement with measurements over uniform dense vegetation, but not with measurements over mixed dark scenes. In the later case the discrepancy is probably mitigated by shadows due to uneven canopy and terrain on a large scale. It is concluded that the value of this ratio should ideally be made dependent on the land cover type in the operational processing of MODIS data, especially over dense forests.

  17. Fabrication of large area nanostructures with surface modified silica spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kwang-Sun

    2014-03-01

    Surface modification of silica spheres with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) has been performed at ambient condition. However, the FTIR spectra and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show no evidence of the surface modification. The reaction temperatures were varied from 60 to 80 °C with various reaction periods. Small absorption shoulder of the CO stretching vibration was at 1700 cm-1, and slightly increased with the increase of the reaction time at 60 °C. The clear absorption peak appeared at 1698 cm-1 for the spheres reacted for 80 min at 70 °C and shifted toward 1720 cm-1 with the increase the reaction time. Strong absorption peak showed at 1698 cm-1 and shifted toward 1725 cm-1 with the increase of the reaction time at 80 °C. The spheres were dispersed to methanol and added photoinitiator (Irgacure-184). The solution was poured to a patterned glass substrate and exposed to the 254 nm UV-light during a self-assembly process. A large area and crack-free silica sphere film was formed. To increase the mechanical stability, a cellulose acetate solution was spin-coated to the film. The film was lift-off from the glass substrate to analyze the surface nanostructures. The surface nanostructures were maintained, and the film is stable enough to use as a mold to duplicate the nanopattern and flexible.

  18. Surface area-dependent second harmonic generation from silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hoang Minh; Luong, Thanh Tuyen; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle

    2016-08-17

    The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of metallic nanoparticles strongly depend on their size and shape. Metallic gold nanorods have already been widely investigated, but other noble metals could also be used for nanorod fabrication towards applications in photonics. Here we report on the synthesis and NLO characterization of silver nanorods (AgNRs) with controllable localized surface plasmon resonance. We have implemented an original, one-step and seedless synthesis method, based on a spontaneous particle growth technique in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent. Colloidal solutions of AgNRs with various aspect ratios (5.0; 6.3; 7.5; 8.2 and 9.7) have been obtained and characterized using Harmonic light scattering (HLS) at 1064 nm, in order to investigate their quadratic NLO properties. From HLS experiments, we demonstrate that hyperpolarizability (β) values of AgNRs display a strong dependence on their surface area.

  19. Surface Areas and Morphology of Thin Ice Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.; Timonen, Raimo S.

    1996-01-01

    Thin ice films formed by deposition from the vapor phase in a fast flow-tube reactor have been used to simulate polar stratospheric cloud surfaces in order to obtain laboratory data on uptake and heterogeneous reaction rates. Surface areas are determined from BET (Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller) analysis of gas adsorption isotherms. The results for ices prepared at 196 K or 77 K are consistent with previous data on thicker ice films. Environmental scanning electron microscopy is used to obtain particle sizes and shapes, and to investigate the morphology of the ices on borosilicate or silicon windows. In addition, the uptake of HCI on ice films prepared at 196 K is investigated. The results suggest that the layer model we have previously developed for analysis of uptake and heterogeneous reaction rates on ice films is valid. Detailed information will be presented at the conference.

  20. Surface area-dependent second harmonic generation from silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hoang Minh; Luong, Thanh Tuyen; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle

    2016-08-17

    The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of metallic nanoparticles strongly depend on their size and shape. Metallic gold nanorods have already been widely investigated, but other noble metals could also be used for nanorod fabrication towards applications in photonics. Here we report on the synthesis and NLO characterization of silver nanorods (AgNRs) with controllable localized surface plasmon resonance. We have implemented an original, one-step and seedless synthesis method, based on a spontaneous particle growth technique in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent. Colloidal solutions of AgNRs with various aspect ratios (5.0; 6.3; 7.5; 8.2 and 9.7) have been obtained and characterized using Harmonic light scattering (HLS) at 1064 nm, in order to investigate their quadratic NLO properties. From HLS experiments, we demonstrate that hyperpolarizability (β) values of AgNRs display a strong dependence on their surface area. PMID:27498825

  1. High surface area graphene-supported metal chalcogenide assembly

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kuntz, Joshua; Orme, Christine A.

    2016-04-19

    A composition comprising at least one graphene-supported assembly, which comprises a three-dimensional network of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds, and at least one metal chalcogenide compound disposed on said graphene sheets, wherein the chalcogen of said metal chalcogenide compound is selected from S, Se and Te. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the graphene-supported assembly, including graphene-supported MoS.sub.2. Monoliths with high surface area and conductivity can be achieved. Lower operating temperatures in some applications can be achieved. Pore size and volume can be tuned.

  2. Hydroetching of high surface area ceramics using moist supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen; Zemanian, Thomas S.

    2004-11-02

    Aerogels having a high density of hydroxyl groups and a more uniform pore size with fewer bottlenecks are described. The aerogel is exposed to a mixture of a supercritical fluid and water, whereupon the aerogel forms a high density of hydroxyl groups. The process also relaxes the aerogel into a more open uniform internal structure, in a process referred to as hydroetching. The hydroetching process removes bottlenecks from the aerogels, and forms the hydrogels into more standard pore sizes while preserving their high surface area.

  3. Metal-organic framework materials with ultrahigh surface areas

    DOEpatents

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Wilmer, Christopher E.; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Snurr, Randall Q.; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Borah, Bhaskarjyoti

    2015-12-22

    A metal organic framework (MOF) material including a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area greater than 7,010 m.sup.2/g. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bond. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including three types of cuboctahedron cages fused to provide continuous channels. Also a method of making a metal organic framework (MOF) material including saponifying hexaester precursors having alkyne bonds to form a plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bonds and performing a solvothermal reaction with the plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers and one or more metal containing compounds to form the MOF material.

  4. Specific surface area determinations on intact drillcores and evaluation of extrapolation methods for rock matrix surfaces.

    PubMed

    André, M; Malmström, M E; Neretnieks, I

    2009-11-01

    Permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel in crystalline bedrock is investigated in several countries. For this storage scenario, the host rock is the third and final barrier for radionuclide migration. Sorption reactions in the crystalline rock matrix have strong retardative effects on the transport of radionuclides. To assess the barrier properties of the host rock it is important to have sorption data representative of the undisturbed host rock conditions. Sorption data is in the majority of reported cases determined using crushed rock. Crushing has been shown to increase a rock samples sorption capacity by creating additional surfaces. There are several problems with such an extrapolation. In studies where this problem is addressed, simple models relating the specific surface area to the particle size are used to extrapolate experimental data to a value representative of the host rock conditions. In this article, we report and compare surface area data of five size fractions of crushed granite and of 100 mm long drillcores as determined by the Brunauer Emmet Teller (BET)-method using N(2)-gas. Special sample holders that could hold large specimen were developed for the BET measurements. Surface area data on rock samples as large as the drillcore has not previously been published. An analysis of this data show that the extrapolated value for intact rock obtained from measurements on crushed material was larger than the determined specific surface area of the drillcores, in some cases with more than 1000%. Our results show that the use of data from crushed material and current models to extrapolate specific surface areas for host rock conditions can lead to over estimation interpretations of sorption ability. The shortcomings of the extrapolation model are discussed and possible explanations for the deviation from experimental data are proposed.

  5. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    The work mainly focuses on the study of thermal infrared (IR) properties of atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the estimation of the aerosol-induced direct longwave (LW) radiative forcing in the spectral region 5-20 mum at the Earth's surface (BOA; bottom of the atmosphere) and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in cloud-free atmospheric conditions. These objectives were accomplished by conducting case studies on clear sky, smoky, and dusty conditions that took place in the Great Basin of the USA in 2013. Both the solar and thermal IR measurements and a state-of-the-science radiative transfer model, the LBLDIS, a combination of the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model and the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) solver were employed for the study. The LW aerosol forcing is often not included in climate models because the aerosol effect on the LW is often assumed to be negligible. We lack knowledge of aerosol characteristics in the LW region, and aerosol properties exhibit high variability. We have found that the LW TOA radiative forcing due to fine mode aerosols, mainly associated with small biomass burning smoke particles, is + 0.4 W/m2 which seems to be small, but it is similar to the LW radiative forcing due to increase in CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere since the preindustrial era of 1750 (+ 1.6 W/m 2). The LW radiative forcing due to coarse mode aerosols, associated with large airborne mineral dust particles, was found to be as much as + 5.02 W/m2 at the surface and + 1.71 W/m2 at the TOA. All of these significant positive values of the aerosol radiative forcing both at the BOA and TOA indicate that the aerosols have a heating effect in the LW range, which contributes to counterbalancing the cooling effect associated with the aerosol radiative forcing in the shortwave (SW) spectral region. In the meantime, we have found that LW radiative forcing by aerosols is highly sensitive to particle size and complex refractive indices of

  6. Angular and Seasonal Variation of Spectral Surface Reflectance Ratios: Implications for the Remote Sensing of Aerosol over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Wald, A. E.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1999-01-01

    We obtain valuable information on the angular and seasonal variability of surface reflectance using a hand-held spectrometer from a light aircraft. The data is used to test a procedure that allows us to estimate visible surface reflectance from the longer wavelength 2.1 micrometer channel (mid-IR). Estimating or avoiding surface reflectance in the visible is a vital first step in most algorithms that retrieve aerosol optical thickness over land targets. The data indicate that specular reflection found when viewing targets from the forward direction can severely corrupt the relationships between the visible and 2.1 micrometer reflectance that were derived from nadir data. There is a month by month variation in the ratios between the visible and the mid-IR, weakly correlated to the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). If specular reflection is not avoided, the errors resulting from estimating surface reflectance from the mid-IR exceed the acceptable limit of DELTA-rho approximately 0.01 in roughly 40% of the cases, using the current algorithm. This is reduced to 25% of the cases if specular reflection is avoided. An alternative method that uses path radiance rather than explicitly estimating visible surface reflectance results in similar errors. The two methods have different strengths and weaknesses that require further study.

  7. Evaluating the Impact of Aerosols on Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Saulo; Silva, Arlindo; Benedetti, Angela; Grell, Georg; Members, Wgne; Zarzur, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    The Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (WMO, http://www.wmo.int/pages/about/sec/rescrosscut/resdept_wgne.html) has organized an exercise to evaluate the impact of aerosols on NWP. This exercise will involve regional and global models currently used for weather forecast by the operational centers worldwide and aims at addressing the following questions: a) How important are aerosols for predicting the physical system (NWP, seasonal, climate) as distinct from predicting the aerosols themselves? b) How important is atmospheric model quality for air quality forecasting? c) What are the current capabilities of NWP models to simulate aerosol impacts on weather prediction? Toward this goal we have selected 3 strong or persistent events of aerosol pollution worldwide that could be fairly represented in current NWP models and that allowed for an evaluation of the aerosol impact on weather prediction. The selected events includes a strong dust storm that blew off the coast of Libya and over the Mediterranean, an extremely severe episode of air pollution in Beijing and surrounding areas, and an extreme case of biomass burning smoke in Brazil. The experimental design calls for simulations with and without explicitly accounting for aerosol feedbacks in the cloud and radiation parameterizations. In this presentation we will summarize the results of this study focusing on the evaluation of model performance in terms of its ability to faithfully simulate aerosol optical depth, and the assessment of the aerosol impact on the predictions of near surface wind, temperature, humidity, rainfall and the surface energy budget.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Organosulfates in Organic Aerosols from Shanghai and Los Angeles Urban Areas by Nanospray-Desorption Electrospray Ionization High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Shikang; Lu, Xiaohui; Levac, Nicole; Bateman, Adam P.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Bones, David L.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Yang, Xin

    2014-09-16

    Aerosol samples collected in the urban areas of Shanghai and Los Angeles were analyzed by nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS) with high mass resolution (m/Δm=100,000). Solvent mixtures of acetonitrile/water and acetonitrile/toluene were used to extract and ionize polar and non-polar compounds, respectively. A diverse mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons, organosulfates, organonitrates, and organics with reduced nitrogen were detected in the Los Angeles sample. Majority of the organics in the Shanghai sample were detected as organosulfates. The dominant organosulfates in the two samples have distinctly different molecular characteristics. Specifically, organosulfates in the Los Angeles sample were dominated by isoprene- or monoterpene-derived products, while organosulfates of yet unknown origin in the Shanghai sample had distinctive characteristics of long aliphatic carbon chains and low degree of oxidation and unsaturation. The use of acetonitrile/toluene solvent facilitated identification of this type of organosulfates, suggesting they could be missed in previous studies relying on sample extraction using common polar solvents. The high molecular weight and low degree of unsaturation and oxidization of the organosulfates detected in the Shanghai sample suggest that they may act as surfactants, and plausibly affect the surface tension and hygroscopicity of the atmospheric particulate matter. We propose that direct esterification of carbonyl or hydroxyl compounds by sulfates or sulfuric acid in liquid phase could be the formation pathway of these special organosulfates. Finally, long-chain alkanes from vehicle emissions might be their precursors.

  9. Comparison of measured and calculated scattering from surface aerosols with an average, a size-dependent, and a time-dependent refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yong; Montague, Derek C.; Deshler, Terry

    2011-01-01

    Midcontinental surface aerosols have been measured at a small, minimally polluted city in summer and winter and on a nearby remote mountain in summer. Aerosol scattering, absorption, size distribution, and composition were measured using a three-wavelength nephelometer, an aethalometer, a passive cavity aerosol spectrometer, a scanning mobility particle sizer, an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer, and conventional filter systems. Size-dependent, time-dependent, and averaged refractive indices are estimated from the aerosol composition measurements and then used to calculate time-dependent aerosol scattering. The calculated scattering values show differences that are generally less than 5% on average for all three refractive indices, suggesting that the average refractive index is adequate for scattering estimations from time- or size-dependent aerosol measurements. The calculated scattering (backscattering) at 550 nm ranges from 2% less to 23% greater (11-22% smaller) than that measured. These differences decrease at 450 nm and increase at 700 nm and significantly exceed these values if optical size distribution measurements are not corrected for an appropriate index of refraction. Optimal agreement between calculated and measured scattering is achieved on 4 of the 6 days investigated in detail, if the real refractive index of the aerosol organic species ranges from 1.45 ± 0.02 at 450 nm to 1.62 ± 0.05 at 700 nm. Single-scatter albedos are also calculated and found to be in good agreement with those derived from the experimental observations, ranging from 0.79 to 0.87 in the city and constant, near 0.95, on the mountain top.

  10. Urban areas impact on surface water quality during rainfall events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C. S. S.; Soares, D.; Ferreira, A. J. D.; Costa, M. L.; Steenhuis, T. S.; Coelho, C. O. A.; Walsh, R. P. D.

    2012-04-01

    Increasing population and welfare puts water management under stress, especially in what concerns water quality. Surface water properties are strongly linked with hydrological processes and are affected by stream flow variability. Changes in some chemical substances concentrations can be ascribed to different water sources. Runoff generated in urban areas is considered the main responsible for water quality degradation inside catchments. This poster presents the methodology and first results of a study that is being developed to assess the impact of urbanization on surface water quality, during rainfall events. It focuses on the Ribeira dos Covões catchment (620 ha) located in central Portugal. Due to its proximity to the Coimbra city in central region, the urban areas sprawled during the last decades. In 2008, urban areas represented 32% of the area. Recently a highway was constructed crossing the catchment and a technological industrial park is being build-up in the headwaters. Several water samples were collected at four different locations: the catchment outlet and in three sub-catchments with distinct urbanization patterns - Espírito Santo that represents a highly urbanized area (45%) located over sandstone, Porto do Bordalo with 30% of urbanized area located over limestone, and IParque, mainly forest and just downstream the disturbed technological industrial park construction area. The samples were collected at different times during rainfall events to monitor the variability along the hydrograph. Six monitoring campaigns were performed: two in April 2011, at the end of the winter period, and the others between October and November 2011, after the dry summer. The number of samples collected per monitoring campaign is variable according with rainfall pattern. Parameters such as pH, conductivity, turbidity and total suspended sediments were immediately analyzed. The samples were then preserved, after filtered (0.45µm), and later analyzed for dissolved

  11. Improved retrieval of direct and diffuse downwelling surface shortwave flux in cloudless atmosphere using dynamic estimates of aerosol content and type: application to the LSA-SAF project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, X.; Carrer, D.; Roujean, J.-L.

    2014-03-01

    Downwelling surface shortwave flux (DSSF) is a key parameter to address many climate, meteorological, and solar energy issues. Under clear sky conditions, DSSF is particularly sensitive to the variability both in time and space of the aerosol load and chemical composition. Hitherto, this dependence has not been properly addressed by the Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF), which operationally disseminates instantaneous DSSF products over the continents since 2005 considering unchanging aerosol conditions. In the present study, an efficient method is proposed for DSSF retrieval that will overcome the limitations of the current LSA-SAF product. This method referred to as SIRAMix (Surface Incident Radiation estimation using Aerosol Mixtures) is based on an accurate physical parameterization that is coupled with a radiative transfer-based look up table of aerosol properties. SIRAMix considers an aerosol layer constituted of several major aerosol species that are conveniently mixed to match real aerosol conditions. This feature of SIRAMix allows it to provide not only accurate estimates of global DSSF but also the direct and diffuse DSSF components, which are crucial radiative terms in many climatological applications. The implementation of SIRAMix is tested in the present article using atmospheric inputs from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). DSSF estimates provided by SIRAMix are compared against instantaneous DSSF measurements taken at several ground stations belonging to several radiation measurement networks. Results show an average root mean square error (RMSE) of 23.6 W m-2, 59.1 W m-2, and 44.9 W m-2 for global, direct, and diffuse DSSF, respectively. These scores decrease the average RMSE obtained for the current LSA-SAF product by 18.6%, which only provides global DSSF for the time being, and, to a lesser extent, for the state of the art in matter of DSSF retrieval (RMSE decrease of 10.9%, 6.5%, and

  12. Columnar and surface aerosol load over the Iberian Peninsula establishing annual cycles, trends, and relationships in five geographical sectors.

    PubMed

    Mateos, D; Cachorro, V E; Toledano, C; Burgos, M A; Bennouna, Y; Torres, B; Fuertes, D; González, R; Guirado, C; Calle, A; de Frutos, A M

    2015-06-15

    The study of atmospheric aerosol load over the Iberian Peninsula (IP) under a climatological perspective is accomplished by means of PM10 and AOD440 nm measurements from EMEP and AERONET networks, respectively, in the period 2000-2013. The PM10 annual cycles in five Iberian sectors show a main maximum in summer and a secondary maximum in spring, which is only observed in the southern area for the AOD climatology. The characteristics of PM10-AOD annual cycles of each geographical sector are explained by the different climatology of the air mass origins and their apportioning. The two magnitudes are correlated with a factor ranging between 20 and 90 depending on the sector. The temporal evolution of the aerosol load has shown a notable decrease in the IP since the 1980s. Statistically significant trends are obtained in the Northeastern sector with a reduction of 26% (period 1985-2000) for the total suspended particles, which continues for the PM10 data with a value of 35% per decade (2001-2013), and also in the whole column, 61% per decade in the AOD440 nm (2004-2013).

  13. Columnar and surface aerosol load over the Iberian Peninsula establishing annual cycles, trends, and relationships in five geographical sectors.

    PubMed

    Mateos, D; Cachorro, V E; Toledano, C; Burgos, M A; Bennouna, Y; Torres, B; Fuertes, D; González, R; Guirado, C; Calle, A; de Frutos, A M

    2015-06-15

    The study of atmospheric aerosol load over the Iberian Peninsula (IP) under a climatological perspective is accomplished by means of PM10 and AOD440 nm measurements from EMEP and AERONET networks, respectively, in the period 2000-2013. The PM10 annual cycles in five Iberian sectors show a main maximum in summer and a secondary maximum in spring, which is only observed in the southern area for the AOD climatology. The characteristics of PM10-AOD annual cycles of each geographical sector are explained by the different climatology of the air mass origins and their apportioning. The two magnitudes are correlated with a factor ranging between 20 and 90 depending on the sector. The temporal evolution of the aerosol load has shown a notable decrease in the IP since the 1980s. Statistically significant trends are obtained in the Northeastern sector with a reduction of 26% (period 1985-2000) for the total suspended particles, which continues for the PM10 data with a value of 35% per decade (2001-2013), and also in the whole column, 61% per decade in the AOD440 nm (2004-2013). PMID:25770951

  14. High surface area, low weight composite nickel fiber electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bradley A.; Ferro, Richard E.; Swain, Greg M.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    1993-01-01

    The energy density and power density of light weight aerospace batteries utilizing the nickel oxide electrode are often limited by the microstructures of both the collector and the resulting active deposit in/on the collector. Heretofore, these two microstructures were intimately linked to one another by the materials used to prepare the collector grid as well as the methods and conditions used to deposit the active material. Significant weight and performance advantages were demonstrated by Britton and Reid at NASA-LeRC using FIBREX nickel mats of ca. 28-32 microns diameter. Work in our laboratory investigated the potential performance advantages offered by nickel fiber composite electrodes containing a mixture of fibers as small as 2 microns diameter (Available from Memtec America Corporation). These electrode collectors possess in excess of an order of magnitude more surface area per gram of collector than FIBREX nickel. The increase in surface area of the collector roughly translates into an order of magnitude thinner layer of active material. Performance data and advantages of these thin layer structures are presented. Attributes and limitations of their electrode microstructure to independently control void volume, pore structure of the Ni(OH)2 deposition, and resulting electrical properties are discussed.

  15. Nanosilver on nanostructured silica: Antibacterial activity and Ag surface area.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Teleki, Alexandra; Camenzind, Adrian; Krumeich, Frank; Meyer, Andreas; Panke, Sven; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2011-06-01

    Nanosilver is one of the first nanomaterials to be closely monitored by regulatory agencies worldwide motivating research to better understand the relationship between Ag characteristics and antibacterial activity. Nanosilver immobilized on nanostructured silica facilitates such investigations as the SiO2 support hinders the growth of nanosilver during its synthesis and, most importantly, its flocculation in bacterial suspensions. Here, such composite Ag/silica nanoparticles were made by flame spray pyrolysis of appropriate solutions of Ag-acetate or Ag-nitrate and hexamethyldisiloxane or tetraethylorthosilicate in ethanol, propanol, diethylene glucolmonobutyl ether, acetonitrile or ethylhexanoic acid. The effect of solution composition on nanosilver characteristics and antibacterial activity against the Gram negative Escherichia coli was investigated by monitoring their recombinantly synthesized green fluorescent protein. Suspensions with identical Ag mass concentration exhibited drastically different antibacterial activity pointing out that the nanosilver surface area concentration rather than its mass or molar or number concentration determine best its antibacterial activity. Nanosilver made from Ag-acetate showed a unimodal size distribution, while that made from inexpensive Ag-nitrate exhibited a bimodal one. Regardless of precursor composition or nanosilver size distribution, the antibacterial activity of nanosilver was correlated best with its surface area concentration in solution. PMID:23730198

  16. Nanosilver on nanostructured silica: Antibacterial activity and Ag surface area.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Teleki, Alexandra; Camenzind, Adrian; Krumeich, Frank; Meyer, Andreas; Panke, Sven; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2011-06-01

    Nanosilver is one of the first nanomaterials to be closely monitored by regulatory agencies worldwide motivating research to better understand the relationship between Ag characteristics and antibacterial activity. Nanosilver immobilized on nanostructured silica facilitates such investigations as the SiO2 support hinders the growth of nanosilver during its synthesis and, most importantly, its flocculation in bacterial suspensions. Here, such composite Ag/silica nanoparticles were made by flame spray pyrolysis of appropriate solutions of Ag-acetate or Ag-nitrate and hexamethyldisiloxane or tetraethylorthosilicate in ethanol, propanol, diethylene glucolmonobutyl ether, acetonitrile or ethylhexanoic acid. The effect of solution composition on nanosilver characteristics and antibacterial activity against the Gram negative Escherichia coli was investigated by monitoring their recombinantly synthesized green fluorescent protein. Suspensions with identical Ag mass concentration exhibited drastically different antibacterial activity pointing out that the nanosilver surface area concentration rather than its mass or molar or number concentration determine best its antibacterial activity. Nanosilver made from Ag-acetate showed a unimodal size distribution, while that made from inexpensive Ag-nitrate exhibited a bimodal one. Regardless of precursor composition or nanosilver size distribution, the antibacterial activity of nanosilver was correlated best with its surface area concentration in solution.

  17. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Backscatter and Earth Surface Targets By Use of An Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Over Western North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Airborne lidar systems are used to determine wind velocity and to measure aerosol or cloud backscatter variability. Atmospheric aerosols, being affected by local and regional sources, show tremendous variability. Continuous wave (cw) lidar can obtain detailed aerosol loading with unprecedented high resolution (3 sec) and sensitivity (1 mg/cubic meter) as was done during the 1995 NASA Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission over western North America and the Pacific Ocean. Backscatter variability was measured at a 9.1 micron wavelength cw focused CO2 Doppler lidar for approximately 52 flight hours, covering an equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 30,000 km in the troposphere. Some quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents at altitudes that ranged from approximately 0.1 to 12 km. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. Mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was approximately 6 x 10(exp -11)/ms/r, consistent with previous lidar datasets. While these atmospheric measurements were made, the lidar also retrieved a distinct backscatter signal from the Earth's surface from the unfocused part of the focused cw lidar beam during aircraft rolls. Atmospheric backscatter can be highly variable both spatially and temporally, whereas, Earth-surface backscatter is relatively much less variant and can be quite predictable. Therefore, routine atmospheric backscatter measurements by an airborne lidar also give Earth surface backscatter which can allow for investigating the Earth terrain. In the case where the Earth's surface backscatter is coming from a well-known and fairly uniform region, then it can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities during flight. These Earth surface measurements over varying Californian terrain during the mission were compared with laboratory backscatter measurements using the same lidar of various

  18. Surface States and Effective Surface Area on Photoluminescent P-Type Porous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisz, S. Z.; Porras, A. Ramirez; Resto, O.; Goldstein, Y.; Many, A.; Savir, E.

    1997-01-01

    The present study is motivated by the possibility of utilizing porous silicon for spectral sensors. Pulse measurements on the porous-Si/electrolyte system are employed to determine the surface effective area and the surface-state density at various stages of the anodization process used to produce the porous material. Such measurements were combined with studies of the photoluminescence spectra. These spectra were found to shift progressively to the blue as a function of anodization time. The luminescence intensity increases initially with anodization time, reaches a maximum and then decreases with further anodization. The surface state density, on the other hand, increases with anodization time from an initial value of about 2 x 10(exp 12)/sq cm surface to about 1013 sq cm for the anodized surface. This value is attained already after -2 min anodization and upon further anodization remains fairly constant. In parallel, the effective surface area increases by a factor of 10-30. This behavior is markedly different from the one observed previously for n-type porous Si.

  19. 30 CFR 72.620 - Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 72.620 Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines. Holes shall be... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines. 72.620 Section 72.620 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...

  20. 30 CFR 72.620 - Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 72.620 Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines. Holes shall be... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines. 72.620 Section 72.620 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND...

  1. 30 CFR 72.620 - Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines. 72.620 Section 72.620 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... § 72.620 Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines. Holes shall...

  2. 30 CFR 72.620 - Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines. 72.620 Section 72.620 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... § 72.620 Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines. Holes shall...

  3. Ocular surface area as an informative index of visual ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Sotoyama, M; Villanueva, M B; Jonai, H; Saito, S

    1995-01-01

    A large ocular surface area (OSA) is thought to be one of the causes of eye irritation and eye fatigue. Because ocular surface is very sensitive to various irritants such as dust, heat, dryness, air flow, etc., a large OSA increases the possibility of eye surface exposure to such irritants. Thus, OSA is one of the most important indices of visual ergonomics. This paper aims at making OSA an exact and practical index by first describing an accurate method of measuring it, and then clarifying the relationship between OSA, the width of the palpebral fissure, and vertical gaze direction, all of which are thought to be strongly correlated with each other. We derived the following equations: 1) y = 0.039x1 + 3.36, r = 0.99, 2) y = 3.05x2 - 0.39, r = 0.97, 3) x1 = 72.7x2 - 91.4, r = 0.97, where x1 = vertical gaze direction (degrees), x2 = width or the palpebral fissure (cm), y = OSA (cm2). Finally, this paper also introduces the practical applications of OSA measurement, and notes the differences between OSA when VDT work (word processing using a keyboard and drawing a picture using a mouse) is performed and when traditional office work without a VDT (reading, drawing, and writing) is performed.

  4. [PM2.5 pollution and aerosol optical properties in fog and haze days during autumn and winter in Beijing area].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiu-Juan; Pu, Wei-Wei; Meng, Wei; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Dong, Fan; He, Di

    2013-02-01

    A study on the PM2.5 pollution and aerosol optical properties in haze-fog days was carried out from Sep. 1st to Dec. 7th, 2011 in Beijing area by using PM2.5 concentration, aerosol scattering coefficient (sigma sca) and absorption coefficient (sigma abs) measured under urban and rural environment. The effect of weather condition on the PM25 pollution and aerosol optical properties was discussed as well. The results showed that the PM2.5 concentration, sigma sca and sigma abs, were evidently higher in haze-fog days than those in non-haze-fog days. The average PM2.5 concentrations in haze-fog days with values of 97.6 microg m-3 and 64.4 microg.m-3 were as 3.3 and 4.8 times as those in non-haze-fog days at urban and rural stations, respectively. The higher PM2.5 concentration in urban area resulted in the more frequent fog and haze phenomena than that in rural area. The PM25 concentration, sigma sca, and sigma abs were significantly higher in urban area than that in rural area in mist days, while relatively close in mist-haze days. This difference suggested that the effect of regional transport of pollution was relatively evident in mist-haze days but weak in mist day. In fog days the sigma sca showed no evident difference between urban and rural area, and was the highest in all types of fog and haze weather. The scattering property of aerosol was the strongest in fog days. The different weather conditions resulted in various characteristics of spatial distribution of PM2.5 concentration, sigma sca and sigma abs, as well as the strength of PM2,5 pollution and aerosol extinction. The pollutants transported by the strong southwest wind above the boundary layer and subsided in the boundary layer companying with the local accumulation of pollutants due to the weak diffusion resulted in the most serious haze-fog episode with the strongest PM2.5 pollution and aerosol extinction.

  5. Effect of surface coating with magnesium stearate via mechanical dry powder coating approach on the aerosol performance of micronized drug powders from dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Qu, Li; Gengenbach, Thomas; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of particle surface coating with magnesium stearate on the aerosolization of dry powder inhaler formulations. Micronized salbutamol sulphate as a model drug was dry coated with magnesium stearate using a mechanofusion technique. The coating quality was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Powder bulk and flow properties were assessed by bulk densities and shear cell measurements. The aerosol performance was studied by laser diffraction and supported by a twin-stage impinger. High degrees of coating coverage were achieved after mechanofusion, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Concomitant significant increases occurred in powder bulk densities and in aerosol performance after coating. The apparent optimum performance corresponded with using 2% w/w magnesium stearate. In contrast, traditional blending resulted in no significant changes in either bulk or aerosolization behaviour compared to the untreated sample. It is believed that conventional low-shear blending provides insufficient energy levels to expose host micronized particle surfaces from agglomerates and to distribute guest coating material effectively for coating. A simple ultra-high-shear mechanical dry powder coating step was shown as highly effective in producing ultra-thin coatings on micronized powders and to substantially improve the powder aerosolization efficiency.

  6. Investigation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies over Cyprus area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Andreas; Akçit, Nuhcan

    2016-08-01

    The temperature of the sea surface has been identified as an important parameter of the natural environment, governing processes that occur in the upper ocean. This paper focuses on the analysis of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies at the greater area of Cyprus. For that, SST data derived from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on board both Aqua and Terra sun synchronous satellites were used. A four year period was chosen as a first approach to address and describe this phenomenon. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has been used as an integrated platform of analysis and presentation in addition of the support of MATLAB®. The methodology consists of five steps: (i) Collection of MODIS SST imagery, (ii) Development of the digital geo-database; (iii) Model and run the methodology in GIS as a script; (iv) Calculation of SST anomalies; and (v) Visualization of the results. The SST anomaly values have presented a symmetric distribution over the study area with an increase trend through the years of analysis. The calculated monthly and annual average SST anomalies (ASST) make more obvious this trend, with negative and positive SST changes to be distributed over the study area. In terms of seasons, the same increase trend presented during spring, summer, autumn and winter with 2013 to be the year with maximum ASST observed values. Innovative aspects comprise of straightforward integration and modeling of available tools, providing a versatile platform of analysis and semi-automation of the operation. In addition, the fine resolution maps that extracted from the analysis with a wide spatial coverage, allows the detail representation of SST and ASST respectively in the region.

  7. Stratospheric aerosol forcing for climate modeling: 1850-1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfeuille, Florian; Luo, Beiping; Thomason, Larry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present here a stratospheric aerosol dataset produced using the available aerosol optical depth observations from the pre-satellite period. The scarce atmospheric observations are supplemented by additional information from an aerosol microphysical model, initialized by ice-core derived sulfur emissions. The model is used to derive extinctions at all altitudes, latitudes and times when sulfur injections are known for specific volcanic eruptions. The simulated extinction coefficients are then scaled to match the observed optical depths. In order to produce the complete optical properties at all wavelengths (and the aerosol surface area and volume densities) needed by climate models, we assume a lognormal size distribution of the aerosols. Correlations between the extinctions in the visible and the effective radius and distribution width parameters are taken from the better constrained SAGE II period. The aerosol number densities are then fitted to match the derived extinctions in the 1850-1978 period. From these aerosol size distributions, we then calculate extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors at all wavelengths using the Mie theory. The aerosol surface area densities and volume densities are also provided.

  8. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A.; Cass, G.R.

    1992-05-01

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  9. Nanoscale welding aerosol sensing based on whispering gallery modes in a cylindrical silica resonator

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aram; Mills, Thomas; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental technique where one uses a standard silica fiber as a cylindrical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator to sense airborne nanoscale aerosols produced by electric arc welding. We find that the accumulation of aerosols on the resonator surface induces a measurable red-shift in resonance frequency, and establish an empirical relation that links the magnitude of resonance shift with the amount of aerosol deposition. The WGM quality factors, by contrast, do not decrease significantly, even for samples with a large percentage of surface area covered by aerosols. Our experimental results are discussed and compared with existing literature on WGM-based nanoparticle sensing. PMID:25837078

  10. Nanoscale welding aerosol sensing based on whispering gallery modes in a cylindrical silica resonator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aram; Mills, Thomas; Xu, Yong

    2015-03-23

    We report an experimental technique where one uses a standard silica fiber as a cylindrical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator to sense airborne nanoscale aerosols produced by electric arc welding. We find that the accumulation of aerosols on the resonator surface induces a measurable red-shift in resonance frequency, and establish an empirical relation that links the magnitude of resonance shift with the amount of aerosol deposition. The WGM quality factors, by contrast, do not decrease significantly, even for samples with a large percentage of surface area covered by aerosols. Our experimental results are discussed and compared with existing literature on WGM-based nanoparticle sensing. PMID:25837078

  11. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3- aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Hannah M.; Draper, Danielle C.; Ayres, Benjamin R.; Ault, Andrew P.; Bondy, Amy L.; Takahama, S.; Modini, Robert; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Knote, Christoph; Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Bingbing; Fry, Juliane L.

    2015-09-25

    The inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 1 June to 15 July 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA), an ion chromatograph coupled with a wet rotating denuder and a steam-jet aerosol collector for monitoring of ambient inorganic gas and aerosol species, revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3 ) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of coarse mode mineral or sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 um) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of mineral dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. Calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral dust surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas/aerosol phase partitioning.

  12. Lidar Ratios for Dust Aerosols Derived From Retrievals of CALIPSO Visible Extinction Profiles Constrained by Optical Depths from MODIS-Aqua and CALIPSO/CloudSat Ocean Surface Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Stuart A.; Josset, Damien B.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    CALIPSO's (Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) analysis algorithms generally require the use of tabulated values of the lidar ratio in order to retrieve aerosol extinction and optical depth from measured profiles of attenuated backscatter. However, for any given time or location, the lidar ratio for a given aerosol type can differ from the tabulated value. To gain some insight as to the extent of the variability, we here calculate the lidar ratio for dust aerosols using aerosol optical depth constraints from two sources. Daytime measurements are constrained using Level 2, Collection 5, 550-nm aerosol optical depth measurements made over the ocean by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) on board the Aqua satellite, which flies in formation with CALIPSO. We also retrieve lidar ratios from night-time profiles constrained by aerosol column optical depths obtained by analysis of CALIPSO and CloudSat backscatter signals from the ocean surface.

  13. Surface Plasmon Resonance in Novel Nanocomposite Gold/Lead Zirconate Titanate Films Prepared by Aerosol Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Hyuk; Akedo, Jun; Nakada, Masafumi

    2006-09-01

    We prepared gold/lead zirconate titanate (PZT) nanocomposite thick films by the aerosol deposition method (ADM) for the first time and report their enhanced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties. ADM has been attracting much attention for its ability to deposit complex composite films at a high deposition rate and a low process temperature. Composite metal-dielectric powders are prepared from submicron particles of PZT and nano particles of gold (10-40 nm) with concentrations below 1 wt %. Nanocomposite gold/PZT 3-μm-thick film acquired enhanced SPR at approximately 640 nm as a result of annealing. The SPR position in nanocomposite films deposited by ADM can be precisely controlled by adjusting the dielectric constant of the host matrix by annealing. Moreover, nanogold particles were spatially very well distributed in the PZT matrix and showed no growth in spite of annealing at 600 °C.

  14. Aerosol scattering optical properties by nephelometer measurements at the El Arenosillo site (SW coastal area of Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Juan F.; Cachorro, Victoria E.; de Frutos, Ángel

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol light scattering coefficients, the hemispheric σsp and the back-scattering coefficient σbsc, have been measured using a 3-wavelengths integrating nephelometer over two years (January 2006 to May 2008) at the monitoring station ESAT-El Arenosillo. This station is located in the coastal area of the province of Huelva, in the southwest of the Iberian, Peninsula. The Ångström exponent α, has been also derived from the spectral dependence of σsp. All these parameters have been carefully analyzed to investigate their general characteristics and features, and diurnal variability. A general statistic gives mean values and std of σsp = 48.5 ±38.1 Mm-1 with a large range of variation showing moderate values of this rural and coastal site with marine prevalence but with significant influence of local sources of pollution. The daily cycle of σsp and α presents different behaviour depending on the season and is modulated by sea-land breeze regime.

  15. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of black carbon (BC) in PM 10 aerosols from residential area of suburban Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Masao; Kumata, Hidetoshi; Koike, Yasuyo; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Uchida, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Kitao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    The AMS technique was applied to analyse black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), and previously reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 aerosols from a residential area, suburban Tokyo, to determine natural abundance of radiocarbon ( 14C), an ideal tracer to distinguish fossil fuel ( 14C-free) from modern biomass combustion sources of pyrolytic products. The 14C concentrations in BC, isolated using the CTO-375 method, were 42% and 30% pMC (in terms of percent Modern Carbon: pMC) in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C concentrations in BC were also compared with those of compound-class specific 14C content of PAHs previously reported for the same samples: they were 45% and 33% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C signals of BC were identical to those of high molecular weight (MW ⩾ 226, 5-6 rings) PAHs. The resemblance between 14C signals of BC and PAHs can be referred as a 'certificate' for the validity of the BC isolation method employed in this study. Also, it suggests that 14C-BC approach can be a surrogate for PAHs specific 14C analyses to monitor seasonal source variation of combustion-derived pyrolytic products. On the other hand, 14C contents of total organic carbon in 2004 were 61% and 42% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. This is likely attributed to higher contribution of plant activity in summer.

  16. The influence of wildfires on aerosol size distributions in rural areas.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Blanco, E; Calvo, A I; Fraile, R; Castro, A

    2012-01-01

    The number of particles and their size distributions were measured in a rural area, during the summer, using a PCASP-X. The aim was to study the influence of wildfires on particle size distributions. The comparative studies carried out reveal an average increase of around ten times in the number of particles in the fine mode, especially in sizes between 0.10 and 0.14 μm, where the increase is of nearly 20 times. An analysis carried out at three different points in time--before, during, and after the passing of the smoke plume from the wildfires--shows that the mean geometric diameter of the fine mode in the measurements affected by the fire is smaller than the one obtained in the measurements carried out immediately before and after (0.14 μm) and presents average values of 0.11 μm.

  17. The Influence of Wildfires on Aerosol Size Distributions in Rural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Blanco, E.; Calvo, A. I.; Fraile, R.; Castro, A.

    2012-01-01

    The number of particles and their size distributions were measured in a rural area, during the summer, using a PCASP-X. The aim was to study the influence of wildfires on particle size distributions. The comparative studies carried out reveal an average increase of around ten times in the number of particles in the fine mode, especially in sizes between 0.10 and 0.14 μm, where the increase is of nearly 20 times. An analysis carried out at three different points in time—before, during, and after the passing of the smoke plume from the wildfires—shows that the mean geometric diameter of the fine mode in the measurements affected by the fire is smaller than the one obtained in the measurements carried out immediately before and after (0.14 μm) and presents average values of 0.11 μm. PMID:22629191

  18. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  19. Estimating the surface area of birds: using the homing pigeon (Columba livia) as a model.

    PubMed

    Perez, Cristina R; Moye, John K; Pritsos, Chris A

    2014-05-08

    Estimation of the surface area of the avian body is valuable for thermoregulation and metabolism studies as well as for assessing exposure to oil and other surface-active organic pollutants from a spill. The use of frozen carcasses for surface area estimations prevents the ability to modify the posture of the bird. The surface area of six live homing pigeons in the fully extended flight position was estimated using a noninvasive method. An equation was derived to estimate the total surface area of a pigeon based on its body weight. A pigeon's surface area in the fully extended flight position is approximately 4 times larger than the surface area of a pigeon in the perching position. The surface area of a bird is dependent on its physical position, and, therefore, the fully extended flight position exhibits the maximum area of a bird and should be considered the true surface area of a bird.

  20. Fully automated algorithm for wound surface area assessment.

    PubMed

    Deana, Alessandro Melo; de Jesus, Sérgio Henrique Costa; Sampaio, Brunna Pileggi Azevedo; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares; Silva, Daniela Fátima Teixeira; França, Cristiane Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, clinicians, dentists, nurses, researchers, and other health professionals need to monitor the wound healing progress and to quantify the rate of wound closure. The aim of this study is to demonstrate, step by step, a fully automated numerical method to estimate the size of the wound and the percentage damaged relative to the body surface area (BSA) in images, without the requirement for human intervention. We included the formula for BSA in rats in the algorithm. The methodology was validated in experimental wounds and human ulcers and was compared with the analysis of an experienced pathologist, with good agreement. Therefore, this algorithm is suitable for experimental wounds and burns and human ulcers, as they have a high contrast with adjacent normal skin.

  1. High surface area ThO/sub 2/ catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

    1983-06-21

    A ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a high surface area of about 80 to 125m/sup 2//g is synthesized. The compound is synthesized by simultaneously mixing an aqueous solution of ThNO/sub 3/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/.4H/sub 2/O with an aqueous solution of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/.H/sub 2/O, to produce a solution and solid ThOCO/sub 3/. The solid ThOCO/sub 3/ is separated from the solution, and then calcined at a temperature of about 225 to 300/sup 0/C for about 40 to 55 hours to produce ThO/sub 2/. The ThO/sub 2/ catalyst produced includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount equal to about 5 to 10 at. %.

  2. Sodium hydroxide catalyzed monodispersed high