Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol tests conducted

  1. Aerosol tests conducted at Aberdeen Proving Grounds MD.

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Servantes, Brandon Lee; Hankins, Matthew Granholm

    2012-06-01

    Test data are reported that demonstrate the deposition from a spray dispersion system (Illinois Tool Works inductively charging rotary atomization nozzle) for application of decontamination solution to various surfaces in the passenger cabin of a Boeing 737 aircraft. The decontamination solution (EnviroTru) was tagged with a known concentration of fluorescein permitting determination of both airborne decontaminant concentration and surface deposited decontaminant solution so that the effective deposition rates and surface coverage could be determined and correlated with the amount of material sprayed. Six aerosol dispersion tests were conducted. In each test, aluminum foil deposition coupons were set out throughout the passenger area and the aerosol was dispersed. The aerosol concentration was measured with filter samplers as well as with optical techniques Average aerosol deposition ranged from 3 to 15 grams of decontamination solution per square meter. Some disagreement was observed between various instruments utilizing different measurement principles. These results demonstrate a potentially effective method to disperse decontaminant to interior surfaces of a passenger aircraft.

  2. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  3. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  4. Paint spray tests for respirators: aerosol characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ackley, M W

    1980-05-01

    Liquid paint is sprayed from an atomizing nozzle to form an aerosol for testing paint spray respirators. The generated aerosol conditions are dependent upon liguid properties, spray-nozzle flow conditions and droplet evaporation. A technique was developed for controlling the aerosol concentrations reliably. Particle-size distributions of lacquer and enamel have been measured. The lacquer distribution was found to be multi-modal. Aerosol concentration dradients arise when the nozzle is not properly positioned. Filter loading resistance is significantly affected by these concentration variations. With regard to selection of standard aerosol test be improved by modifying the current NIOSH criteria to include a description of the particle-size distribution, a more precise definition of the paint and paint thinner chemical compositions, and a narrower concentration range. PMID:6932174

  5. Bone-Conduction ABR Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone-Wesson, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the accuracy of bone-conduction auditory brainstem response (BC-ABR) tests to determine the presence and severity of conductive hearing impairment. It provides warnings about technical pitfalls and recommends incorporating BC-ABR protocols for routine clinical use. It concludes that the method allows estimating cochlear…

  6. Efficiency tests of samplers for microbiological aerosols, a review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, E.; Faengmark, I.

    1984-01-01

    To obtain comparable results from studies using a variety of samplers of microbiological aerosols with different collection performances for various particle sizes, methods reported in the literature were surveyed, evaluated, and tabulated for testing the efficiency of the samplers. It is concluded that these samplers were not thoroughly tested, using reliable methods. Tests were conducted in static air chambers and in various outdoor and work environments. Results are not reliable as it is difficult to achieve stable and reproducible conditions in these test systems. Testing in a wind tunnel is recommended.

  7. PHEBUS on-line aerosol monitor development test program

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, M.H.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1992-03-01

    EG&G Idaho, Inc. developed an on-line aerosol monitor (OLAM) for the French PHEBUS Fission Product Project. Part of the development was to manufacture and test an OLAM prototype. This report presents the results of the testing which determined the mechanical integrity of the monitor at operating temperature and pressure and performed a preliminary test of the optical system. A series of twenty different tests was conducted during the prototype testing sequence. Since no leaks were detected, the OLAM demonstrated that it could provide a pressure boundary at required test conditions. The optical and electrical system also proved its integrity by exceeding the design requirement of less than 105 optical signal drift during an actual two-hour test sequence.

  8. PHEBUS on-line aerosol monitor development test program

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, M.H.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1992-03-01

    EG G Idaho, Inc. developed an on-line aerosol monitor (OLAM) for the French PHEBUS Fission Product Project. Part of the development was to manufacture and test an OLAM prototype. This report presents the results of the testing which determined the mechanical integrity of the monitor at operating temperature and pressure and performed a preliminary test of the optical system. A series of twenty different tests was conducted during the prototype testing sequence. Since no leaks were detected, the OLAM demonstrated that it could provide a pressure boundary at required test conditions. The optical and electrical system also proved its integrity by exceeding the design requirement of less than 105 optical signal drift during an actual two-hour test sequence.

  9. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  10. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    rectangular slots. For the combination of both test stands, the round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the much larger flow rates and equipment that would be required. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

  11. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  12. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

  13. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01

    rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

  14. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol test program :FY 2005-06 testing and aerosol data summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer institut fur toxikologie und experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Loiseau, O. (Institut de radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer institut fur toxikologie und experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Billone, M. C. (Argonne National Laboratory, USA); Lucero, Daniel A.; Burtseva, T.; Brucher, W (Gesellschaft fur anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

    2006-10-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This document focuses on an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, primarily during FY 2005 and about the first two-thirds of FY 2006. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of May 2006. We provide details on the significant findings on aerosol results and observations from the recently completed Phase 2 surrogate material tests using cerium oxide ceramic pellets in test rodlets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants. Results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR (the ratio of respirable particles from real spent fuel/respirables from surrogate spent fuel, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber); and, measurements of enhanced volatile fission product species sorption onto respirable particles. We discuss progress and results for the first three, recently performed Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide, DUO{sub 2}, test rodlets. We will also review the status of preparations and the final Phase 4 tests in this program, using short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. These data plus testing results and design are tailored to support and guide, follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence

  15. Aerosol can puncture device operational test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1994-05-03

    Puncturing of aerosol cans is performed in the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 (WRAP 1) process as a requirement of the waste disposal acceptance criteria for both transuranic (TRU) waste and low-level waste (LLW). These cans have contained such things as paints, lubricating oils, paint removers, insecticides, and cleaning supplies which were used in radioactive facilities. Due to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Fire Protection concerns of the baseline system`s fire/explosion proof characteristics, a study was undertaken to compare the baseline system`s design to commercially available puncturing devices. While the study found no areas which might indicate a risk of fire or explosion, WHC Fire Protection determined that the puncturing system must have a demonstrated record of safe operation. This could be obtained either by testing the baseline design by an independent laboratory, or by substituting a commercially available device. As a result of these efforts, the commercially available Aerosolv can puncturing device was chosen to replace the baseline design. Two concerns were raised with the system. Premature blinding of the coalescing/carbon filter, due to its proximity to the puncture and draining operation; and overpressurization of the collection bottle due to its small volume and by blinding of the filter assembly. As a result of these concerns, testing was deemed necessary. The objective of this report is to outline test procedures for the Aerosolv.

  16. Predictions of the electrical conductivity and charging of the aerosols in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Levin, Z.; Whitten, R. C.; Keesee, R. G.; Summers, A. L.; Toon, O. B.; Dubach, J.

    1987-01-01

    Computational results are given for Titan atmosphere aerosol electrical conductivity and charge at altitudes up to 400 km, together with a consideration of ionization from such sources as galactic cosmic rays and electron precipitation from the Saturnian magnetosphere. Predicted conductivity shows the existence of substantial electron concentrations up to the Titan surface. At altitudes of more than 100 km, and aerosol concentrations greater than 10/cu cm, electron/positive ion-recombination is found to be controlled by the recombination of the aerosols' surfaces rather than by the gas-kinetic recombination rate.

  17. Results and code predictions for ABCOVE (aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation) aerosol code validation: Test AB6 with two aerosol species. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, R K; McCormack, J C; Muhlestein, L D

    1984-12-01

    A program for aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation (ABCOVE) has been developed in accordance with the LMFBR Safety Program Plan. The ABCOVE program is a cooperative effort between the USDOE, the USNRC, and their contractor organizations currently involved in aerosol code development, testing or application. The second large-scale test in the ABCOVE program, AB6, was performed in the 850-m/sup 3/ CSTF vessel with a two-species test aerosol. The test conditions simulated the release of a fission product aerosol, NaI, in the presence of a sodium spray fire. Five organizations made pretest predictions of aerosol behavior using seven computer codes. Three of the codes (QUICKM, MAEROS and CONTAIN) were discrete, multiple species codes, while four (HAA-3, HAA-4, HAARM-3 and SOFIA) were log-normal codes which assume uniform coagglomeration of different aerosol species. Detailed test results are presented and compared with the code predictions for seven key aerosol behavior parameters.

  18. Unique DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles for studying aerosol transport

    DOE PAGES

    Harding, Ruth N.; Hara, Christine A.; Hall, Sara B.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Jones, A. Daniel; Day, James A.; Tur-Rojas, Vincent R.; Jorgensen, Trond; Herchert, Edwin; et al

    2016-03-22

    Data are presented for the first use of novel DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles that have been developed to track the fate of airborne contaminants in populated environments. Until DNATrax (DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol eXperiments) particles were developed, there was no way to rapidly validate air transport models with realistic particles in the respirable range of 1–10 μm in diameter. The DNATrax particles, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and tested with the assistance of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, are the first safe and effective materials for aerosol transport studies that are identified by DNA molecules. The usemore » of unique synthetic DNA barcodes overcomes the challenges of discerning the test material from pre-existing environmental or background contaminants (either naturally occurring or previously released). The DNATrax particle properties are demonstrated to have appropriate size range (approximately 1–4.5 μm in diameter) to accurately simulate bacterial spore transport. As a result, we describe details of the first field test of the DNATrax aerosol test particles in a large indoor facility.« less

  19. Blue Origin Conducts Pad Escape Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Blue Origin conducted a successful pad escape test Oct. 19 at the company's West Texas launch site, firing its pusher escape motor and launching a full-scale suborbital crew capsule from a simulate...

  20. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno; Young, F. I.; Koch, Wolfgang; Brochard, Didier; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Lange, Florentin

    2004-05-01

    A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  1. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  2. Conductive surge testing of circuits and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, P.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques are given for conductive surge testing of powered electronic equipment. The correct definitions of common and normal mode are presented. Testing requires not only spike-surge generators with a suitable range of open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current waveshapes, but also appropriate means, termed couplers, for connecting test surges to the equipment under test. Key among coupler design considerations is minimization of fail positives resulting from reduction in delivered surge energy due to the coupler. Back-filters and the lines on which they are necessary, are considered as well as ground-fault and ground potential rise. A method for monitoring delivered and resulting surge waves is mentioned.

  3. The design of an aerosol test tunnel for occupational hygiene investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, D. B.; Heighington, K.

    An aerosol test tunnel which provides large working sections is described and its performance evaluated. Air movement within the tunnel is achieved with a powerful D.C. motor and centrifugal fan. Test dusts are dispersed and injected into the tunnel by means of an aerosol generator. A unique divertor valve allows aerosol laden air to be either cleaned by a commercial pulse jet filtration unit or recycled around the tunnel to obtain a high aerosol concentration. The tunnel instrumentation is managed by a microcomputer which automatically controls the airspeed and aerosol concentration.

  4. 14 CFR 33.57 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General conduct of block tests. 33.57... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.57 General conduct of block tests. (a) The applicant may, in conducting the block tests, use separate engines of...

  5. 14 CFR 33.57 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General conduct of block tests. 33.57... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.57 General conduct of block tests. (a) The applicant may, in conducting the block tests, use separate engines of...

  6. 14 CFR 33.57 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General conduct of block tests. 33.57... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.57 General conduct of block tests. (a) The applicant may, in conducting the block tests, use separate engines of...

  7. 14 CFR 33.57 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General conduct of block tests. 33.57... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.57 General conduct of block tests. (a) The applicant may, in conducting the block tests, use separate engines of...

  8. 49 CFR 40.211 - Who conducts DOT alcohol tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? 40.211 Section 40... DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Testing Personnel § 40.211 Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? (a) Screening test technicians (STTs) and breath alcohol technicians (BATs) meeting their...

  9. 49 CFR 40.211 - Who conducts DOT alcohol tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? 40.211 Section 40... DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Testing Personnel § 40.211 Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? (a) Screening test technicians (STTs) and breath alcohol technicians (BATs) meeting their...

  10. 49 CFR 40.211 - Who conducts DOT alcohol tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? 40.211 Section 40... DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Testing Personnel § 40.211 Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? (a) Screening test technicians (STTs) and breath alcohol technicians (BATs) meeting their...

  11. 49 CFR 40.211 - Who conducts DOT alcohol tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? 40.211 Section 40... DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Testing Personnel § 40.211 Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? (a) Screening test technicians (STTs) and breath alcohol technicians (BATs) meeting their...

  12. 49 CFR 40.211 - Who conducts DOT alcohol tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? 40.211 Section 40... DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Testing Personnel § 40.211 Who conducts DOT alcohol tests? (a) Screening test technicians (STTs) and breath alcohol technicians (BATs) meeting their...

  13. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  14. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions. PMID

  15. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, R.; Hogancamp, Kristina U.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rogers, Donna M.; Norton, Olin P.; Nagel, Brian A.; Alderman, Steven L.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30×30×29cm3 nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5to12standardm3/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150°C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7standardm3/min, high mass concentrations (˜25mg/m3) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  16. Developments of aerosol retrieval algorithm for Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) and the retrieval accuracy test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Ahn, C.; Bhartia, P. K.; Torres, O.

    2013-12-01

    A scanning UV-Visible spectrometer, the GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) onboard the GEO-KOMPSAT2B (Geostationary Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite) is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018. The GEMS employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol optical properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). By taking the advantage, the OMI UV aerosol algorithm has provided information on the absorbing aerosol (Torres et al., 2007; Ahn et al., 2008). This study presents a UV-VIS algorithm to retrieve AOD and SSA from GEMS. The algorithm is based on the general inversion method, which uses pre-calculated look-up table with assumed aerosol properties and measurement condition. To obtain the retrieval accuracy, the error of the look-up table method occurred by the interpolation of pre-calculated radiances is estimated by using the reference dataset, and the uncertainties about aerosol type and height are evaluated. Also, the GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with measured normalized radiance from OMI, a provisional data set for GEMS measurement, and the results are compared with the values from AERONET measurements over Asia. Additionally, the method for simultaneous retrieve of the AOD and aerosol height is discussed.

  17. 14 CFR 33.99 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General conduct of block tests. 33.99... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.99 General conduct of block tests. (a) Each applicant may, in making a block test, use separate engines of identical design...

  18. 14 CFR 33.99 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General conduct of block tests. 33.99... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.99 General conduct of block tests. (a) Each applicant may, in making a block test, use separate engines of identical design...

  19. 30 CFR 74.12 - Conduct of tests; demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conduct of tests; demonstrations. 74.12 Section... AND HEALTH COAL MINE DUST SAMPLING DEVICES General Requirements for All Devices § 74.12 Conduct of... conduct such public demonstrations and tests of the approved device as MSHA or NIOSH deem appropriate,...

  20. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test Conducted on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Monica I.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1999-01-01

    Colloids are tiny (submicron) particles suspended in fluid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test (BCAT) is part of an extensive series of experiments planned to investigate the fundamental properties of colloids so that scientists can make colloids more useful for technological applications. Some of the colloids studied in BCAT are made of two different sized particles (binary colloidal alloys) that are very tiny, uniform plastic spheres. Under the proper conditions, these colloids can arrange themselves in a pattern to form crystals. These crystals may form the basis of new classes of light switches, displays, and optical devices. Windows made of liquid crystals are already in the marketplace. These windows change their appearance from transparent to opaque when a weak electric current is applied. In the future, if the colloidal crystals can be made to control the passage of light through them, such products could be made much more cheaply. These experiments require the microgravity environment of space because good quality crystals are difficult to produce on Earth because of sedimentation and convection in the fluid. The BCAT experiment hardware included two separate modules for two different experiments. The "Slow Growth" hardware consisted of a 35-mm camera with a 250- exposure photo film cartridge. The camera was aimed toward the sample module, which contained 10 separate colloid samples. A rack of small lights provided backlighting for the photographs. The BCAT hardware was launched on the shuttle and was operated aboard the Russian space station Mir by American astronauts John Blaha and David Wolf (launched September 1996 and returned January 1997; reflown September 1997 and returned January 1998). To begin the experiment, one of these astronauts would mix the samples to disperse the colloidal particles and break up any crystals that might have already formed. Once the samples were mixed and

  1. 14 CFR 33.57 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 33.57 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.57 General conduct of block tests. (a) The applicant may, in conducting the block tests, use separate engines of...

  2. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Brucher, Wenzel; Koch, Wolfgang; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Loiseau, Olivier; Mo, Tin; Billone, Michael C.; Autrusson, Bruno A.; Young, F. I.; Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana; Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver; Thompson, Nancy Slater; Hibbs, Russell S.; Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin; Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung

    2005-07-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of

  3. Results and code predictions for ABCOVE aerosol code validation - Test AB5

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, R K; McCormack, J D; Postma, A K

    1983-11-01

    A program for aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation (ABCOVE) has been developed in accordance with the LMFBR Safety Program Plan. The ABCOVE program is a cooperative effort between the USDOE, the USNRC, and their contractor organizations currently involved in aerosol code development, testing or application. The first large-scale test in the ABCOVE program, AB5, was performed in the 850-m{sup 3} CSTF vessel using a sodium spray as the aerosol source. Seven organizations made pretest predictions of aerosol behavior using seven different computer codes (HAA-3, HAA-4, HAARM-3, QUICK, MSPEC, MAEROS and CONTAIN). Three of the codes were used by more than one user so that the effect of user input could be assessed, as well as the codes themselves. Detailed test results are presented and compared with the code predictions for eight key parameters.

  4. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Modera, Mark

    2012-05-01

    This report presents a process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  5. In Vitro Surfactant and Perfluorocarbon Aerosol Deposition in a Neonatal Physical Model of the Upper Conducting Airways

    PubMed Central

    Goikoetxea, Estibalitz; Murgia, Xabier; Serna-Grande, Pablo; Valls-i-Soler, Adolf; Rey-Santano, Carmen; Rivas, Alejandro; Antón, Raúl; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Lopez-Arraiza, Alberto; Larrabe-Barrena, Juan Luis; Gomez-Solaetxe, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aerosol delivery holds potential to release surfactant or perfluorocarbon (PFC) to the lungs of neonates with respiratory distress syndrome with minimal airway manipulation. Nevertheless, lung deposition in neonates tends to be very low due to extremely low lung volumes, narrow airways and high respiratory rates. In the present study, the feasibility of enhancing lung deposition by intracorporeal delivery of aerosols was investigated using a physical model of neonatal conducting airways. Methods The main characteristics of the surfactant and PFC aerosols produced by a nebulization system, including the distal air pressure and air flow rate, liquid flow rate and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), were measured at different driving pressures (4–7 bar). Then, a three-dimensional model of the upper conducting airways of a neonate was manufactured by rapid prototyping and a deposition study was conducted. Results The nebulization system produced relatively large amounts of aerosol ranging between 0.3±0.0 ml/min for surfactant at a driving pressure of 4 bar, and 2.0±0.1 ml/min for distilled water (H2Od) at 6 bar, with MMADs between 2.61±0.1 µm for PFD at 7 bar and 10.18±0.4 µm for FC-75 at 6 bar. The deposition study showed that for surfactant and H2Od aerosols, the highest percentage of the aerosolized mass (∼65%) was collected beyond the third generation of branching in the airway model. The use of this delivery system in combination with continuous positive airway pressure set at 5 cmH2O only increased total airway pressure by 1.59 cmH2O at the highest driving pressure (7 bar). Conclusion This aerosol generating system has the potential to deliver relatively large amounts of surfactant and PFC beyond the third generation of branching in a neonatal airway model with minimal alteration of pre-set respiratory support. PMID:25211475

  6. 14 CFR 91.1019 - Conducting tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator may conduct an inspection or test, other than an en route inspection, to determine whether a... Administrator to make any test or inspection, other than an en route inspection, to determine...

  7. 30 CFR 18.9 - Conduct of investigations and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conduct of investigations and tests. 18.9 Section 18.9 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES General Provisions § 18.9 Conduct of investigations...

  8. 14 CFR 33.99 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General conduct of block tests. 33.99 Section 33.99 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.99 General conduct of...

  9. 30 CFR 27.9 - Date for conducting tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Date for conducting tests. 27.9 Section 27.9 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS General Provisions § 27.9 Date for conducting...

  10. 30 CFR 27.9 - Date for conducting tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Date for conducting tests. 27.9 Section 27.9 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS General Provisions § 27.9 Date for conducting...

  11. 30 CFR 27.9 - Date for conducting tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Date for conducting tests. 27.9 Section 27.9 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS General Provisions § 27.9 Date for conducting...

  12. 14 CFR 33.99 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General conduct of block tests. 33.99 Section 33.99 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.99 General conduct of...

  13. Reentry Body Stability Tests Conducted in Langley Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Reentry Body Stability Tests Conducted in Langley Spin Tunnel. Reentry body stability tests were conducted in an initial configuration, with a small drogue chute, with an extendable flare, and in an alternate configuration with a covered flare. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030957. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  14. Development and testing of an aerosol-stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, P.Q.; Meyers, M.P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Cotton, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of this new project is to develop an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary layer clouds. Our approach is to create, test, and implement a bulk-microphysics/aerosol model using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites and large-eddy simulation (LES) explicit bin-resolving aerosol/microphysics models. The primary objectives of this work are twofold. First, we need the prediction of number concentrations of activated aerosol which are transferred to the droplet spectrum, so that the aerosol population directly affects the cloud formation and microphysics. Second, we plan to couple the aerosol model to the gas and aqueous-chemistry module that will drive the aerosol formation and growth. We begin by exploring the feasibility of performing cloud-resolving simulations of Arctic stratus clouds over the North Slope CART site. These simulations using Colorado State University`s regional atmospheric modeling system (RAMS) will be useful in designing the structure of the cloud-resolving model and in interpreting data acquired at the North Slope site.

  15. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.; Modera, M.

    2012-05-01

    Space conditioning energy use can be significantly reduced by addressing uncontrolled infiltration and exfiltration through the envelope of a building. A process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology is presented. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  16. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio testing:phase 1 summary and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Manuel Gilbert; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Lange, F. , Germany); Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Dickey, Roy R.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire , France); Young, F. I.; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und reaktorsicherheit , Germany)

    2005-10-01

    This multinational test program is quantifying the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device (HEDD) impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. The experimental work, performed in four consecutive test phases, has been in progress for several years. The overall program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation for nuclear security related evaluations. The spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC), and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the preliminary, Phase 1 work performed in 2001 and 2002 at Sandia National Laboratories and the Fraunhofer Institute, Germany, and documents the experimental results obtained, observations, and preliminary interpretations. Phase 1 testing included: performance quantifications of the HEDD devices; characterization of the HEDD or conical shaped charge (CSC) jet properties with multiple tests; refinement of the aerosol particle collection apparatus being used; and, CSC jet-aerosol tests using leaded glass plates and glass pellets, serving as representative brittle materials. Phase 1 testing was quite important for the design and performance of the following Phase 2 test program and test apparatus.

  17. 14 CFR 33.99 - General conduct of block tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 33.99 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.99 General conduct of block tests. (a) Each applicant may, in making a block test, use separate engines of identical design...

  18. High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-11-07

    We report the results of the first high power tests of single-cell traveling-wave and standing-wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the gradient potential of normal-conducting rf-powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode converters and short test structures and is powered by SLAC's XL-4 klystron. This setup was created for economical testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested in the SLAC Klystron Test Lab.

  19. "Worst-case" aerosol testing parameters: III. Initial penetration of charged and neutralized lead fume and silica dust aerosols through clean, unloaded respirator filters.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Stevens, G A

    1989-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tests and certifies respirator filter media according to Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 11 (30 CFR 11). Subpart K of those regulations specifies that a silica dust test, silica mist test, and/or lead fume test will be used to test and certify dust and mist; and dust, fume, and mist particulate air-purifying respirator filter media. NIOSH studies have shown that an aerosol particle of a certain size can be identified as the most penetrating particle ("worst case") size. Commercial filter media of various types have been studied and the filter's performance against a worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol evaluated. This investigation was done to complement those previous studies by determining how one manufacturer's particulate filters performed against the existing certification aerosol challenges as compared with the worst-case size DOP and NaCl aerosols. Only initial penetration values were determined, and no loading effects were considered. Both neutralized (Boltzman charge distribution) and unneutralized aerosols were used in order to assess the contribution of charging. The results show the dramatic effect of particle size on filter efficiency, and they show that the present methods are not as sensitive as the worst-case aerosol method. PMID:2543198

  20. Worst-case aerosol testing parameters: III. Initial penetration of charged and neutralized lead fume and silica dust aerosols through clean, unloaded respirator filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.S.; Stevens, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tests and certifies respirator filter media according to Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 11 (30 CFR 11). Subpart K of those regulations specifies that a silica dust test, silica mist test, and/or lead fume test will be used to test and certify dust and mist; and dust, fume, and mist particulate air-purifying respirator filter media. NIOSH studies have shown that an aerosol particle of a certain size can be identified as the most penetrating particle (''worst case'') size. Commercial filter media of various types have been studied and the filter's performance against a worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol evaluated. This investigation was done to complement those previous studies by determining how one manufacturer's particulate filters performed against the existing certification aerosol challenges as compared with the worst-case size DOP and NaCl aerosols. Only initial penetration values were determined, and no loading effects were considered. Both neutralized (Boltzman charge distribution) and unneutralized aerosols were used in order to assess the contribution of charging. The results show the dramatic effect of particle size on filter efficiency, and they show that the present methods are not as sensitive as the worst-case aerosol method.

  1. High-sensitivity microchip electrophoresis determination of inorganic anions and oxalate in atmospheric aerosols with adjustable selectivity and conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Noblitt, Scott D; Schwandner, Florian M; Hering, Susanne V; Collett, Jeffrey L; Henry, Charles S

    2009-02-27

    A sensitive and selective separation of common anionic constituents of atmospheric aerosols, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and oxalate, is presented using microchip electrophoresis. The optimized separation is achieved in under 1 min and at low background electrolyte ionic strength (2.9 mM) by combining a metal-binding electrolyte anion (17 mM picolinic acid), a sulfate-binding electrolyte cation (19 mM HEPBS), a zwitterionic surfactant with affinity towards weakly solvated anions (19 mM N-tetradecyl,N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propansulfonate), and operation in counter-electroosmotic flow (EOF) mode. The separation is performed at pH 4.7, permitting pH manipulation of oxalate's mobility. The majority of low-concentration organic acids are not observed at these conditions, allowing for rapid subsequent injections without the presence of interfering peaks. Because the mobilities of sulfate, nitrate, and oxalate are independently controlled, other minor constituents of aerosols can be analyzed, including nitrite, fluoride, and formate if desired using similar separation conditions. Contact conductivity detection is utilized, and the limit of detection for oxalate (S/N=3) is 180 nM without stacking. Sensitivity can be increased with field-amplified sample stacking by injecting from dilute electrolyte with a detection limit of 19 nM achieved. The high-sensitivity, counter-EOF operation, and short analysis time make this separation well-suited to continuous online monitoring of aerosol composition.

  2. 30 CFR 33.7 - Date for conducting tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Date for conducting tests. 33.7 Section 33.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES...

  3. 30 CFR 33.7 - Date for conducting tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Date for conducting tests. 33.7 Section 33.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES...

  4. 30 CFR 33.7 - Date for conducting tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Date for conducting tests. 33.7 Section 33.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES...

  5. 30 CFR 33.7 - Date for conducting tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Date for conducting tests. 33.7 Section 33.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES...

  6. 30 CFR 35.7 - Date for conducting tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Date for conducting tests. 35.7 Section 35.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FIRE-RESISTANT HYDRAULIC FLUIDS General Provisions § 35.7 Date for...

  7. 30 CFR 33.7 - Date for conducting tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Date for conducting tests. 33.7 Section 33.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES...

  8. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... candidate samplers in which the aerosol flow path (the flow path through which sample air passes upstream...

  9. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... candidate samplers in which the aerosol flow path (the flow path through which sample air passes upstream...

  10. Respirator Testing Using Virus Aerosol: Comparison between Viability Penetration and Physical Penetration.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhili; Kuehn, Thomas H; Pui, David Y H

    2015-07-01

    Viability, fluorescence (particle volume), photometric, viral RNA, and particle number penetration of MS2 bacteriophage through filter media used in three different models of respirators were compared to better understand the correlation between viability and physical penetration. Although viability and viral RNA penetration were better represented by particle volume penetration than particle number penetration, they were several-fold lower than photometric penetration, which was partially due to the difference in virus survival between upstream and downstream aerosol samples. Results suggest that the current NIOSH photometer-based test method can be used as a quick means to roughly differentiate respirators with different performance against virus aerosols.

  11. Respirator Testing Using Virus Aerosol: Comparison between Viability Penetration and Physical Penetration.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhili; Kuehn, Thomas H; Pui, David Y H

    2015-07-01

    Viability, fluorescence (particle volume), photometric, viral RNA, and particle number penetration of MS2 bacteriophage through filter media used in three different models of respirators were compared to better understand the correlation between viability and physical penetration. Although viability and viral RNA penetration were better represented by particle volume penetration than particle number penetration, they were several-fold lower than photometric penetration, which was partially due to the difference in virus survival between upstream and downstream aerosol samples. Results suggest that the current NIOSH photometer-based test method can be used as a quick means to roughly differentiate respirators with different performance against virus aerosols. PMID:25846360

  12. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier; Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A.; Koch, Wolfgang; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Brucher, Wenzel; Steyskal, Michele D.

    2008-03-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively

  13. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : technical review and analysis supplement.

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2009-07-01

    This project seeks to provide vital data required to assess the consequences of a terrorist attack on a spent fuel transportation cask. One such attack scenario involves the use of conical shaped charges (CSC), which are capable of damaging a spent fuel transportation cask. In the event of such an attack, the amount of radioactivity that may be released as respirable aerosols is not known with great certainty. Research to date has focused on measuring the aerosol release from single short surrogate fuel rodlets subjected to attack by a small CSC device in various aerosol chamber designs. The last series of three experiments tested surrogate fuel rodlets made with depleted uranium oxide ceramic pellets in a specially designed double chamber aerosol containment apparatus. This robust testing apparatus was designed to prevent any radioactive release and allow high level radioactive waste disposal of the entire apparatus following testing of actual spent fuel rodlets as proposed. DOE and Sandia reviews of the project to date identified a number of issues. The purpose of this supplemental report is to address and document the DOE review comments and to resolve the issues identified in the Sandia technical review.

  14. Analysis of Slug Tests in Formations of High Hydraulic Conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Garnett, E.J.; Healey, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for the analysis of slug tests performed in partially penetrating wells in formations of high hydraulic conductivity. This approach is a simple, spreadsheet-based implementation of existing models that can be used for analysis of tests from confined or unconfined aquifers. Field examples of tests exhibiting oscillatory and nonoscillatory behavior are used to illustrate the procedure and to compare results with estimates obtained using alternative approaches. The procedure is considerably simpler than recently proposed methods for this hydrogeologic setting. Although the simplifications required by the approach can introduce error into hydraulic-conductivity estimates, this additional error becomes negligible when appropriate measures are taken in the field. These measures are summarized in a set of practical field guidelines for slug tests in highly permeable aquifers.

  15. Aerosol behavior during SIC control rod failure in QUENCH-13 test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Terttaliisa; Csordás, Anna Pintér; Nagy, Imre; Stuckert, Juri

    2010-02-01

    In a nuclear reactor severe accident, radioactive fission products as well as structural materials are released from the core by evaporation, and the released gases form particles by nucleation and condensation. In addition, aerosol particles may be generated by droplet formation and fragmentation of the core. In pressurized water reactors (PWR), a commonly used control rod material is silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) covered with stainless steel cladding. The control rod elements, Cd, In and Ag, have relatively low melting temperatures, and especially Cd has also a very low boiling point. Control rods are likely to fail early on in the accident due to melting of the stainless steel cladding which can be accelerated by eutectic interaction between stainless steel and the surrounding Zircaloy guide tube. The release of the control rod materials would follow the cladding failure thus affecting aerosol source term as well as fuel rod degradation. The QUENCH experimental program at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe investigates phenomena associated with reflood of a degrading core under postulated severe accident conditions. QUENCH-13 test was the first in this program to include a silver-indium-cadmium control rod of prototypic PWR design. To characterize the extent of aerosol release during the control rod failure, aerosol particle size distribution and concentration measurements in the off-gas pipe of the QUENCH facility were carried out. For the first time, it was possible to determine on-line the aerosol concentration and size distribution released from the core. These results are of prime importance for model development for the proper calculation of the source term resulting from control rod failure. The on-line measurement showed that the main aerosol release started at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1570 K at hottest bundle elevation. A very large burst of aerosols was detected 660 s later at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1650 K, followed by a relatively

  16. 14 CFR 91.1019 - Conducting tests and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... available to the Administrator at the program manager's principal base of operations, or at a place approved... Operations Program Management § 91.1019 Conducting tests and inspections. (a) At any time or place, the... program manager under this subpart is complying with title 49 of the United States Code,...

  17. Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Zirker; Lance Lauerhass; James Dowalo

    2007-02-01

    During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.

  18. Development of an aerosol dispersion test to detect early changes in lung function

    SciTech Connect

    McCawley, M.; Lippmann, M.

    1988-07-01

    The dispersion of a 0.5 micron aerosol bolus during tidal breathing differs significantly (p less than 0.0001) between a group of smokers (with approximately 20 pack-years average exposure) and a comparable group of nonsmokers. Their mean differences in standard respiratory function indexes from spirometry (forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC (FEF25-75)) were smaller and not statistically significant. The test is simple to perform and may be done as quickly as spirometry but without using a forced exhalation. Comparison of the coefficients of variation for the dispersion test and FEV1 indicate that the aerosol dispersion test may be useful in epidemiologic investigations either by reducing the required population size or increasing the level of confidence.

  19. Testing Conducted for Lithium-Ion Cell and Battery Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Miller, Thomas B.; Manzo, Michelle A.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been conducting in-house testing in support of NASA's Lithium-Ion Cell Verification Test Program, which is evaluating the performance of lithium-ion cells and batteries for NASA mission operations. The test program is supported by NASA's Office of Aerospace Technology under the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Program, which serves to bridge the gap between the development of technology advances and the realization of these advances into mission applications. During fiscal year 2003, much of the in-house testing effort focused on the evaluation of a flight battery originally intended for use on the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. Results of this testing will be compared with the results for similar batteries being tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and the Naval Research Laboratory. Ultimately, this work will be used to validate lithium-ion battery technology for future space missions. The Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander battery was characterized at several different voltages and temperatures before life-cycle testing was begun. During characterization, the battery displayed excellent capacity and efficiency characteristics across a range of temperatures and charge/discharge conditions. Currently, the battery is undergoing lifecycle testing at 0 C and 40-percent depth of discharge under low-Earth-orbit (LEO) conditions.

  20. Vortex Wake Turbulence: Flight Tests Conducted During 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A flight test program designed to obtain data on the characteristics of wing-tip vortices generated by large jet aircraft was initiated on 12 February 1970. The objective was to update the interim air traffic separation standards issued on 21 January 1970 restricting the airspace behind the B-747 and C-5A aircraft 60 deg either side and 2,000 feet below to a distance of 10 miles. The program involved flight tests at three different locations, which were conducted simultaneously. (1) At the Edwards Air Force Base test range, a NASA CV-990 and F-104 probed the vortices of a C-5A. This supplemented previous flight tests in U-3A and F-104 behind a B-52 and C-5A. (2) At Seattle, the Boeing Company probed the vortices of a B-747 and a B-707-300 with a B-737 and F-86. In addition, approach, landing, takeoff, and crossing runway tests were conducted with a B-737 trailing a B-747. Immediately following the Edwards tests, the NASA CV-990 proceeded to Seattle and engaged in probing flights behind the same B-747 and B-707-300. (3) At Idaho Falls, Idaho, FAA personnel, utilizing the Atomic Energy Commission and Environmental Science Services Administration facilities and a 200 ft, instrumented tower, conducted 114 flights past the tower. The aircraft were positioned to permit their vortices to descend into the air flow sensors and smoke generated from various levels on the tower. This permitted obtaining measurements and photography of the vortex core diameters, tangential velocities and related characteristics. Immediately following this test phase, analysis of the interrelated data was completed by the project managers representing NASA, Boeing and FAA and a Compilation of Work Papers was issued on 30 April 1970. These data were the basis of a revised General Notice issued on 26 February 1970 which, in essence, modified the restricted airspace to five miles behind heavy jets in the 300,000 lb. gross takeoff weight category.

  1. Aerosols released during large-scale integral MCCI tests in the ACE Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.; Spencer, B.W.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) program, seven large-scale experiments on molten core concrete interactions (MCCIs) have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the objectives of these experiments is to collect and characterize all the aerosols released from the MCCIs. Aerosols released from experiments using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/common sand, serpentine, and limestone/limestone) and a range of metal oxidation for both BWR and PWR reactor core material have been collected and characterized. Release fractions were determined for UO{sup 2}, Zr, the fission-products: BaO, SrO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, Te, Ru, and control materials: Ag, In, and B{sub 4}C. Release fractions of UO{sub 2} and the fission products other than Te were small in all tests. However, release of control materials was significant.

  2. Aerosols released during large-scale integral MCCI tests in the ACE Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.; Spencer, B.W. ); Sehgal, B.R. )

    1992-01-01

    As part of the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) program, seven large-scale experiments on molten core concrete interactions (MCCIs) have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the objectives of these experiments is to collect and characterize all the aerosols released from the MCCIs. Aerosols released from experiments using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/common sand, serpentine, and limestone/limestone) and a range of metal oxidation for both BWR and PWR reactor core material have been collected and characterized. Release fractions were determined for UO{sup 2}, Zr, the fission-products: BaO, SrO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, Te, Ru, and control materials: Ag, In, and B{sub 4}C. Release fractions of UO{sub 2} and the fission products other than Te were small in all tests. However, release of control materials was significant.

  3. The Messy Aerosol Submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): Description and a Box Model Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl)chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealized marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HClCl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse particles. MADE3 and PartMC- MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes about 2 micrometers) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distribution, and also in terms of aerosol composition. Considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems suitable for application within a global model.

  4. Testing and Optimization of Electrically Conductive Spacecraft Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, R. J.; Wertz, G. E.; Edwards, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report discussing the work done for the Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program. It discusses test chamber design, coating research, and test results on electrically thermal control coatings. These thermal control coatings are being developed to have several orders of magnitude higher electrical conductivity than most available thermal control coatings. Most current coatings tend to have a range in surface resistivity from 1,011 to 1,013 ohms/sq. Historically, spacecraft have had thermal control surfaces composed of dielectric materials of either polymers (paints and metalized films) or glasses (ceramic paints and optical solar reflectors). Very seldom has the thermal control surface of a spacecraft been a metal where the surface would be intrinsically electrically conductive. The poor thermal optical properties of most metals have, in most cases, stopped them from being used as a thermal control surface. Metals low infrared emittance (generally considered poor for thermal control surfaces) and/or solar absorptance, have resulted in the use of various dielectric coatings or films being applied over the substrate materials in order to obtain the required optical properties.

  5. Maintaining Stability During a Conducted-Ripple EMC Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorperian, Vatche

    2007-01-01

    An improved technique, and electronic circuitry to implement the technique, have been developed for a military-standard electromagnetic-compatibility (EMC) test in which one analyzes susceptibility to low-frequency ripple conducted into the equipment under test via a DC power line. In the traditional technique for performing the particular test, the ripple is coupled onto the DC power line via a transformer. Depending upon some design details of the equipment under test, the inductance of the transformer can contribute a degree of instability that results in an oscillation of amplitude large enough to destroy the equipment. It is usually possible to suppress the oscillation by connecting a damping resistor to the primary terminals of the ripple-injection transformer. However, it is important to emphasize the usually in the preceding sentence: sometimes, the resistive damping becomes insufficient to suppress destructive oscillation. In addition, undesirably, the resistor contributes to power dissipation and power demand, and thereby also necessitates the use of a larger ripple voltage amplifier. Yet another disadvantage of the transformer-coupling technique is that the transformer introduces low-frequency distortion of the injected ripple voltage. The improved technique makes it possible to inject ripple with very low distortion at low frequency, without inducing oscillation. In this technique, a transformer is not used: Instead, power is fed to the equipment under test via series power field-effect transistors (FETs) controlled by a summing operational amplifier. One of the inputs to the amplifier controls the DC component of the power-line voltage; the other input, generated by an external oscillator, controls the ripple component. The circuitry for implementing this technique includes panel displays, an internal power supply for the operational amplifier and panel displays, and amplitude controls for the DC and ripple powerline voltage components.

  6. Benchmark Testing of the Largest Titanium Aluminide Sheet Subelement Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Krause, David L.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate wrought titanium aluminide (gamma TiAl) as a viable candidate material for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) exhaust nozzle, an international team led by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field successfully fabricated and tested the largest gamma TiAl sheet structure ever manufactured. The gamma TiAl sheet structure, a 56-percent subscale divergent flap subelement, was fabricated for benchmark testing in three-point bending. Overall, the subelement was 84-cm (33-in.) long by 13-cm (5-in.) wide by 8-cm (3-in.) deep. Incorporated into the subelement were features that might be used in the fabrication of a full-scale divergent flap. These features include the use of: (1) gamma TiAl shear clips to join together sections of corrugations, (2) multiple gamma TiAl face sheets, (3) double hot-formed gamma TiAl corrugations, and (4) brazed joints. The structural integrity of the gamma TiAl sheet subelement was evaluated by conducting a room-temperature three-point static bend test.

  7. Concrete nondestructive tests conducted in 225-B building

    SciTech Connect

    Vollert, F.R.

    1996-09-19

    In 1982, Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL), Portland Cement Association conducted additional sonic concrete nondestructive testing (NDT) in the Service Gallery on the south process (hot) cell walls and adjacent floor slab, including the locations where significant concrete degradation had been found by the 1981 sonic NDT. In the ceiling slabs, the anchor areas For the monorail hangers, and some visible cracks were sonic NDT inspected. CTL concluded that the hot cell walls have no significant reduction of structural capacity due to concrete degradation. Epoxy injection repairs were recommended by CTL for the damaged anchor areas and through depth cracks in the reinforced concrete ceiling slabs. When completed, the epoxy repairs should be inspected and confirmed with follow on sonic NDT. Lateral bracing for the Monorail system is also recommended to relieve the lateral loads on the hangers.

  8. Fabrication and test of a variable conductance heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    A variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP) with feedback control was fabricated with a reservoir-condenser volume ratio of 10 and an axially grooved action section. Tests of the heat transport capability were greater than or equal to the analytical predictions for the no gas case. When gas was added, the pipe performance degraded by 18% at zero tilt as was expected. The placement of the reservoir heater and the test fixture cooling fins are believed to have caused a superheated vapor condition in the reservoir. Erroneously high reservoir temperature indications resulted from this condition. The observed temperature gradients in the reservoir lend support to this theory. The net result was higher than predicted reservoir temperatures. Also, significant increases in minimum heat load resulted for controller set point temperatures higher than 0 C. At 30 C, control within the tolerance band was maintained, but high reservoir heater power was required. Analyses showed that control is not possible for reasonably low reservoir heater power. This is supported by the observation of a significant reservoir heat leak through the condenser.

  9. "Worst case" aerosol testing parameters: II. Efficiency dependence of commercial respirator filters on humidity pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Stevens, G A

    1989-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that relative humidity has a degrading effect on the performance of commercially available particulate air-purifying respirator filters. That degradation results from a reduction of charge within the filter. This study was done to evaluate the time-dependent effects of relative humidity pretreatment and the reduction of charge on filter penetration against a most penetrating, "worst case" aerosol challenge. Filters of the dust and mist; dust, fume, and mist; paint, lacquer, and enamel mist; and high efficiency types were tested after being pretreated in an environment of 38 degrees C and 85% relative humidity for periods up to 42 days. After various intervals of pretreatment (1, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days), the filters were tested against neutralized worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols for percent penetration. The results showed a drop in filter efficiency of approximately 2%-6% depending on preconditioning time, except for the high efficiency filters tested which showed no detectable change. PMID:2729102

  10. Worst case aerosol testing parameters: II. Efficiency dependence of commercial respirator filters on humidity pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.S.; Stevens, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that relative humidity has a degrading effect on the performance of commercially available particulate air-purifying respirator filters. That degradation results from a reduction of charge within the filter. This study was done to evaluate the time-dependent effects of relative humidity pretreatment and the reduction of charge on filter penetration against a most penetrating, ''worst case'' aerosol challenge. Filters of the dust and mist; dust, fume, and mist; paint, lacquer, and enamel mist; and high efficiency types were tested after being pretreated in an environment of 38 degrees C and 85% relative humidity for periods up to 42 days. After various intervals of pretreatment (1, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days), the filters were tested against neutralized worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols for percent penetration. The results showed a drop in filter efficiency of approximately 2%-6% depending on preconditioning time, except for the high efficiency filters tested which showed no detectable change.

  11. Modeling aerosol activation in a tropical, orographic, island setting: Sensitivity tests and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, R. D.; Storelvmo, T.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The aerosol, updraft and cloud droplet observations from the 2011 Dominica Experiment (DOMEX) field campaign provide an interesting opportunity to investigate the process of cloud droplet activation in a tropical, orographic, convective setting. This study involves adiabatic parcel model simulations with a state-of-the-art parameterization of droplet activation, which we run with aerosol size distributions and updraft velocities based on DOMEX data. We compare the cloud droplet concentrations predicted by the parameterization with the observations from DOMEX, and run various sensitivity tests to changes in model inputs on the order of their uncertainty, in order to gain insights into what factors are most important in determining the aerosol activation fraction in this setting. Our control simulations overestimated the observed droplet concentrations, especially for the days with strong trade winds, but in most cases these discrepancies could be eliminated by realistic changes in our assumptions. The remaining error could be the result of entrainment of sub-saturated air, precipitation, or advection of pre-existing clouds from upwind. We found strong sensitivities to the mean updraft velocity and to the size distribution and composition of particles in the Aitken mode, the smallest mode including particles below 100 nm. The Aitken mode accounted for 42% to 68% of the simulated droplet concentration in our control simulations, and simulations excluding the Aitken mode underestimated the observed droplet concentrations under realistic assumptions. Droplets from the Aitken mode dominated the changes in the simulated droplet concentrations in our sensitivity tests. The precision of our simulations, and our ability to constrain the role of the Aitken mode, were limited by our lack of knowledge of the composition and size distribution of Aitken mode particles, highlighting the importance of measuring these variables in field campaigns in similar settings.

  12. 30 CFR 250.1151 - How often must I conduct well production tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How often must I conduct well production tests... Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1151 How often must I conduct well production tests? (a) You must conduct well production tests as shown in the following table: You must conduct: And you must submit...

  13. 30 CFR 250.1151 - How often must I conduct well production tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How often must I conduct well production tests... Gas Production Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1151 How often must I conduct well production tests? (a) You must conduct well production tests as shown in the following table: You must conduct:...

  14. 30 CFR 250.1151 - How often must I conduct well production tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How often must I conduct well production tests... Gas Production Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1151 How often must I conduct well production tests? (a) You must conduct well production tests as shown in the following table: You must conduct:...

  15. 30 CFR 250.1151 - How often must I conduct well production tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How often must I conduct well production tests... Gas Production Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1151 How often must I conduct well production tests? (a) You must conduct well production tests as shown in the following table: You must conduct:...

  16. Estimation on the self recovery behavior of low-conductivity layer in landfill final cover by laboratory conductivity tests.

    PubMed

    Kwon, O; Park, J

    2006-11-01

    This study examined the application of a Self Recovering Sustainable Layer (SRSL) as a landfill final cover. Low-conductivity layers in landfill covers are known to have problems associated with cracking as a result of the differential settlement or climatic changes. A SRSL is defined as a layer with chemical properties that reduces the increased hydraulic conductivity resulting from cracking by forming low-conductivity precipitates of chemicals contained in the layer. In this study, the formation of precipitates was confirmed using a batch test, spectroscopic analysis and mineralogical speciation tests. The possibility of secondary contamination due to the chemicals used for recovery was evaluated using a leaching test. A laboratory conductivity test was performed on a single layer composed of each chemical as well as on a 2-layer system. The recovery performance of the SRSL was estimated by developing artificial cracks in the specimens and observing the change in hydraulic conductivity as a function of time. In the laboratory conductivity test, the hydraulic conductivity of a 2-layer system as well as those of the individual layers that comprise the 2-layer system was estimated. In addition sodium ash was found to enhance the reduction in conductivity. A significant increase in conductivity was observed after the cracks developed but this was reduced with time, which indicated that the SRSL has a proper recovering performance. In conclusion, a SRSL can be used as a landfill final cover that could maintain low-conductivity even after the serious damages due to settlement.

  17. Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Large Refractory Ceramic Test Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Loveland, Erick R; Prigmore, Andre L

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed to utilize the High Intensity Infrared lamp located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the measurement of thermal conductivity of bulk refractory materials at elevated temperatures. The applicability of standardized test methods to determine the thermal conductivity of refractory materials at elevated temperatures is limited to small sample sizes (laser flash) or older test methods (hot wire, guarded hot plate), which have their own inherent problems. A new method, based on the principle of the laser flash method, but capable of evaluating test specimens on the order of 200 x 250 x 50 mm has been developed. Tests have been performed to validate the method and preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  18. 40 CFR 63.2993 - What test methods must I use in conducting performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in conducting performance tests? (a) Use EPA Method 1 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for selecting the sampling port location and the number of sampling ports. (b) Use EPA Method 2 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for measuring the volumetric flow rate. (c) Use EPA Method 316 or 318 (40 CFR part 63, appendix A)...

  19. 40 CFR 63.2993 - What test methods must I use in conducting performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in conducting performance tests? (a) Use EPA Method 1 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for selecting the sampling port location and the number of sampling ports. (b) Use EPA Method 2 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for measuring the volumetric flow rate. (c) Use EPA Method 316 or 318 (40 CFR part 63, appendix A)...

  20. 40 CFR 63.2993 - What test methods must I use in conducting performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in conducting performance tests? (a) Use EPA Method 1 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for selecting the sampling port location and the number of sampling ports. (b) Use EPA Method 2 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for measuring the volumetric flow rate. (c) Use EPA Method 316 or 318 (40 CFR part 63, appendix A)...

  1. A Proposed Framework for Conducting Data-Based Test Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaney, Kathleen L.; Maraun, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The authors argue that the current state of applied data-based test analytic practice is unstructured and unmethodical due in large part to the fact that there is no clearly specified, widely accepted test analytic framework for judging the performances of particular tests in particular contexts. Drawing from the extant test theory literature,…

  2. Laboratory Testing and Calibration of the Nuclei-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    This grant was awarded to complete testing and calibration of a new instrument, the nuclei-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), following its use in the WB-57F Aerosol Measurement (WAM) campaign in early 1998. The N-MASS measures the size distribution of particles in the 4-60 nm diameter range with 1-Hz response at typical free tropospheric conditions. Specific tasks to have been completed under the auspices of this award were: 1) to experimentally determine the instrumental sampling efficiency; 2) to determine the effects of varying temperatures and flows on N-MASS performance; and 3) to calibrate the N-MASS at typical flight conditions as operated in WAM. The work outlined above has been completed, and a journal manuscript based on this work and that describes the performance of the N-MASS is in preparation. Following a brief description of the principles of operation of the instrument, the major findings of this study are described.

  3. Construction, Modeling and Testing of a Low-Flow, Large-Diameter Aerosol Flow System for the Study of the Formation and Reactions of Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezell, M. J.; Johnson, S. N.; Yu, Y.; Pokkunuri, P.; Perraud, V.; Bruns, E.; Alexander, M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Dabdub, D.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A unique, high-volume, low-flow, stainless steel aerosol flow system for the study of the formation and reactions of aerosols relevant to the troposphere has been constructed, modeled and experimentally tested. The total flow tube length is 7.3 m which includes a 1.2 m section used for mixing. The flow tube is equipped with ultraviolet lamps for photolysis. The diameter of 0.45 m results in a smaller surface to volume ratio than is found in many other flow systems and reduces the contribution of wall reactions. The latter is also reduced by frequent cleaning of the flow tube walls which is feasible due to the ease of disassembly of the flow tube. Flow systems present a major advantage over chamber studies in that continuous sampling under stable conditions over long periods of time is possible, increasing the amount of sample available for analysis and permitting a wide variety of analytical techniques to be applied simultaneously. In this system, the large volume (1000 L) and low flow speed (2 cm/minute) result in a residence time of nearly an hour; and equally spaced sampling ports allow for time-resolved measurements of aerosol and gas-phase products. The central features of this system have been modeled using computational fluid dynamics software and experimentally probed using inert gases and aerosols. Instrumentation attached directly to this flow system includes a NOx analyzer, an ozone analyzer, relative humidity and temperature probes, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) spectrometer, an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) spectrometer, GC-MS, integrating nephelometer, and FTIR. Particles are collected using impactors and filters, and analyzed by a variety of techniques including FTIR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS), GC-MS, HPLC-UV and HPLC-MS. In addition, for selected studies, an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), a single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) and

  4. The MESSy aerosol submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): description and a box model test

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, V.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation; version: MADE3v2.0b), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse mode particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl) / chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealised marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HCl / Cl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, the aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse mode particles. MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes ≲ 2 μm) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distributions (sizes ≳ 2 μm), and also in terms of aerosol composition. Finally, considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems

  5. Benchmark Tests for Stirling Convertor Heater Head Life Assessment Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Halford, Gary R.; Bowman, Randy R.

    2004-01-01

    A new in-house test capability has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, where a critical component of the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) is undergoing extensive testing to aid the development of analytical life prediction methodology and to experimentally aid in verification of the flight-design component's life. The new facility includes two test rigs that are performing creep testing of the SRG heater head pressure vessel test articles at design temperature and with wall stresses ranging from operating level to seven times that (see the following photograph).

  6. 30 CFR 250.1152 - How do I conduct well tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I conduct well tests? 250.1152 Section... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1152 How do I conduct well tests? (a) When you conduct well tests...

  7. 30 CFR 250.1152 - How do I conduct well tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1152 How do I conduct well tests? (a) When you conduct well tests you must: (1... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I conduct well tests? 250.1152...

  8. 30 CFR 250.1152 - How do I conduct well tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I conduct well tests? 250.1152 Section... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1152 How do I conduct well tests? (a) When you conduct well tests...

  9. 30 CFR 250.1152 - How do I conduct well tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Gas Production Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1152 How do I conduct well tests? (a) When you conduct well tests you must: (1) Recover fluid from the well completion equivalent to the amount... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I conduct well tests? 250.1152...

  10. 30 CFR 250.1152 - How do I conduct well tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I conduct well tests? 250.1152 Section... OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1152 How do I conduct well tests? (a) When you conduct well tests...

  11. 30 CFR 250.1151 - How often must I conduct well production tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How often must I conduct well production tests... SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Well Tests and Surveys § 250.1151 How often must I conduct well production tests? (a) You must conduct well production tests as shown in the following table:...

  12. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols from infrared measurements: simulations, testing, and applications.

    PubMed

    Zasetsky, Alexander Yu; Khalizov, Alexei F; Sloan, James J

    2004-10-10

    An inversion method for the characterization of atmospheric condensed phases from infrared (IR) spectra is described. The method is tested with both synthetic IR spectra and the spectra of particles that flow in a cryogenic flow tube. The method is applied to the IR spectra recorded by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy instrument carried by the Space Shuttle during three missions in 1992, 1993, and 1994. The volume density and particle size distribution for sulfate aerosol are obtained as a function of altitude. The density and size distribution of ice particles in several cirrus clouds are also retrieved. The probable radius of the ice particles in the high-altitude (10-15-km) cirrus clouds is found to be approximately 6-7 microm.

  13. Test of the Rosetta Pedotransfer Function for saturated hydraulic conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models are tools that can be used to explore, for example, effects of cultural practices on soil erosion and irrigation on crop yield. However, often these models require many soil related input data of which the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) is one of the most important ones. The...

  14. Initial Mechanical Testing of Superalloy Lattice Block Structures Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The first mechanical tests of superalloy lattice block structures produced promising results for this exciting new lightweight material system. The testing was performed in-house at NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Benchmark Test Facility, where small subelement-sized compression and beam specimens were loaded to observe elastic and plastic behavior, component strength levels, and fatigue resistance for hundreds of thousands of load cycles. Current lattice block construction produces a flat panel composed of thin ligaments arranged in a three-dimensional triangulated trusslike structure. Investment casting of lattice block panels has been developed and greatly expands opportunities for using this unique architecture in today's high-performance structures. In addition, advances made in NASA's Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program have extended the lattice block concept to superalloy materials. After a series of casting iterations, the nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 (IN 718, Inco Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV) was successfully cast into lattice block panels; this combination offers light weight combined with high strength, high stiffness, and elevated-temperature durability. For tests to evaluate casting quality and configuration merit, small structural compression and bend test specimens were machined from the 5- by 12- by 0.5-in. panels. Linear elastic finite element analyses were completed for several specimen layouts to predict material stresses and deflections under proposed test conditions. The structural specimens were then subjected to room-temperature static and cyclic loads in Glenn's Life Prediction Branch's material test machine. Surprisingly, the test results exceeded analytical predictions: plastic strains greater than 5 percent were obtained, and fatigue lives did not depreciate relative to the base material. These assets were due to the formation of plastic hinges and the redundancies inherent in lattice block construction

  15. Engineers conduct key water test for A-3 stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Water cascades from the A-2 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center as engineers challenge the limits of the high-pressure water system as part of the preparation process for the A-3 Test Stand under construction. Jeff Henderson, test director for Stennis' A Complex, led a series of tests Nov. 16-20, flowing water simultaneously on the A-1 and A-2 stands, followed by the A-1 and B-1 stands, to determine if the high-pressure industrial water facility pumps and the existing pipe system can support the needs of the A-3 stand. The stand is being built to test rocket engines that will carry astronauts beyond low-Earth orbit and will need about 300,000 gallons of water per minute when operating, but the Stennis system never had been tested to that level. The recent tests were successful in showing the water facility pumps can operate at that capacity - reaching 318,000 gallons per minute in one instance. However, officials continue to analyze data to determine if the system can provide the necessary pressure at that capacity and if the delivery system piping is adequate. 'We just think if there's a problem, it's better to identify and address it now rather than when A-3 is finished and it has to be dealt with,' Henderson said.

  16. 40 CFR 63.2162 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... according to the procedures in § 63.2161, you must conduct an EPA Test Method 25A of 40 CFR part 60... Yeast Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2162 When must I conduct subsequent...

  17. 40 CFR 63.2162 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... according to the procedures in § 63.2161, you must conduct an EPA Test Method 25A of 40 CFR part 60... Yeast Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2162 When must I conduct subsequent...

  18. 40 CFR 63.2162 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... according to the procedures in § 63.2161, you must conduct an EPA Test Method 25A of 40 CFR part 60... Yeast Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2162 When must I conduct subsequent...

  19. 40 CFR 63.2991 - When must I conduct performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 5 years. You must conduct a performance test every 5 years as part of renewing your 40 CFR part 70... conduct a performance test for each drying and curing oven subject to this subpart according to...

  20. Results of the "carbon conference" international aerosol carbon round robin test stage I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Heidrun; Laskus, Lothar; Jürgen Abraham, Hans; Baltensperger, Urs; Lavanchy, Vincent; Bizjak, Mirko; Burba, Peter; Cachier, Helene; Crow, Dale; Chow, Judith; Gnauk, Thomas; Even, Arja; ten Brink, H. M.; Giesen, Klaus-Peter; Hitzenberger, Regina; Hueglin, Christoph; Maenhaut, Willy; Pio, Casimiro; Carvalho, Abel; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Toom-Sauntry, Desiree; Puxbaum, Hans

    An international round robin test on the analysis of carbonaceous aerosols on quartz fiber filters sampled at an urban site was organized by the Vienna University of Technology. Seventeen laboratories participated using nine different thermal and optical methods. For the analysis of total carbon (TC), a good agreement of the values obtained by all laboratories was found (7 and 9% r.s.d.) with only two outliers in the complete data set. In contrast the results of the determination of elemental carbon (EC) in two not pre-extracted samples were highly variable ranging over more than one order of magnitude and the relative standard deviations (r.s.d.) of the means were 36.6 and 45.5%. The laboratories that obtained similar results by using methods which reduce the charring artifact were put together to a new data set in order to approach a "real EC" value. The new data set consisting of the results of 10 laboratories using seven different methods showed 16 and 24% lower averages and r.s.d. of 14 and 24% for the two not pre-extracted samples. Taking the current filters as "equivalents" for urban aerosol samples we conclude that the following methods can be used for the analysis of EC in carbonaceous aerosols: thermal methods with an optical feature to correct for charring during pyrolysis, two-step thermal procedures reducing charring during pyrolysis, the VDI 2465/1 method (removal of OC by solvent extraction and thermodesorption in nitrogen) and the VDI 2465/2 method (combustion of OC and EC at different temperatures) with an additional pre-extraction with a dimethyl formamide (DMF)/toluene mixture. Only thermal methods without any correction for charring during pyrolysis and the VDI 2465/2 method were outside the range of twice the standard deviation of the new data set. For a filter sample pre-extracted with the DMF/toluene mixture the average and r.s.d. from all laboratories (20.7 μgC; 24.4% r.s.d.) was very similar as for the laboratory set reduced to 10

  1. 10 CFR 26.101 - Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol. 26.101 Section... Testing § 26.101 Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol. (a) The confirmatory test must begin as soon... that meets the requirements of § 26.91(b) and (c) was used for the initial alcohol test, the same...

  2. 40 CFR 63.2991 - When must I conduct performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 5 years. You must conduct a performance test every 5 years as part of renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating permit. (c) To change your OMM plan. You must conduct a performance test according to the... and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.2991 When must I conduct performance tests? You must...

  3. Experimental Test of the Spin Mixing Interface Conductivity Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Mathias; Althammer, Matthias; Schreier, Michael; Lotze, Johannes; Pernpeintner, Matthias; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Kamra, Akashdeep; Xiao, Jiang; Chen, Yan-Ting; Jiao, HuJun; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-10-01

    We perform a quantitative, comparative study of the spin pumping, spin Seebeck, and spin Hall magnetoresistance effects, all detected via the inverse spin Hall effect in a series of over 20yttriumirongarnet/Pt samples. Our experimental results fully support present, exclusively spin current-based, theoretical models using a single set of plausible parameters for spin mixing conductance, spin Hall angle, and spin diffusion length. Our findings establish the purely spintronic nature of the aforementioned effects and provide a quantitative description, in particular, of the spin Seebeck effect.

  4. SEP BIMOD variable conductance heat pipes acceptance and characterization tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A series of six heat pipes, similar in design to those flown on the Comunications Technology Satellite Hermes, for use in a prototype Solar Electric Propulsion BIMOD thrust module are evaluated. The results of acceptance and characterization tests performed on the heat pipe subassemble are reported. The performance of all the heat pipes met, or exceeded, design specifications.

  5. Phenols and hydroxy-PAHs (arylphenols) as tracers for coal smoke particulate matter: source tests and ambient aerosol assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd R.T. Simoneit; Xinhui Bi; Daniel R. Oros; Patricia M. Medeiros; Guoying Sheng; Jiamo Fu

    2007-11-01

    Source tests were conducted to analyze and characterize diagnostic key tracers for emissions from burning of coals with various ranks. Coal samples included lignite from Germany, semibituminous coal from Arizona, USA, bituminous coal from Wales, UK and sample from briquettes of semibituminous coal, bituminous coal and anthracite from China. Ambient aerosol particulate matter was also collected in three areas of China and a background area in Corvallis, OR (U.S.) to confirm the presence of tracers specific for coal smoke. The results showed a series of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds, including PAHs and hydroxy-PAHs as the major tracers, as well as a significant unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of compounds. The tracers that were found characteristic of coal combustion processes included hydroxy-PAHs and PAHs. Atmospheric ambient samples from Beijing and Taiyuan, cities where coal is burned in northern China, revealed that the hydroxy-PAH tracers were present during the wintertime, but not in cities where coal is not commonly used (e.g., Guangzhou, South China). Thus, the mass of hydroxy-PAHs can be apportioned to coal smoke and the source strength modeled by summing the proportional contents of EC (elemental carbon), PAHs, UCM and alkanes with the hydroxy-PAHs. 36 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Simulation test of aerosol generation from vessels in the pre-treatment system of fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Fujine, Sachio; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kihara, Takehiro

    1997-08-01

    Aerosol concentration and droplet size are measured in off-gas of vessel under various conditions by changing off-gas flow rate, stirring air flow rate, salts concentration and temperature of nitrate solution. Aerosols are also measured under evaporation and air-lift operation. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  7. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath... Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a) The collector shall perform the initial breath test as soon as practical after the donor indicates that he...

  8. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath... Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a) The collector shall perform the initial breath test as soon as practical after the donor indicates that he...

  9. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath... Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a) The collector shall perform the initial breath test as soon as practical after the donor indicates that he...

  10. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath... Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a) The collector shall perform the initial breath test as soon as practical after the donor indicates that he...

  11. Integrated Stirling Convertor and Hall Thruster Test Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2002-01-01

    An important aspect of implementing Stirling Radioisotope Generators on future NASA missions is the integration of the generator and controller with potential spacecraft loads. Some recent studies have indicated that the combination of Stirling Radioisotope Generators and electric propulsion devices offer significant trip time and payload fraction benefits for deep space missions. A test was devised to begin to understand the interactions between Stirling generators and electric thrusters. An electrically heated RG- 350 (350-W output) Stirling convertor, designed and built by Stirling Technology Company of Kennewick, Washington, under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research agreement, was coupled to a 300-W SPT-50 Hall-effect thruster built for NASA by the Moscow Aviation Institute (RIAME). The RG-350 and the SPT-50 shown, were installed in adjacent vacuum chamber ports at NASA Glenn Research Center's Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Vacuum Facility 8. The Stirling electrical controller interfaced directly with the Hall thruster power-processing unit, both of which were located outside of the vacuum chamber. The power-processing unit accepted the 48 Vdc output from the Stirling controller and distributed the power to all the loads of the SPT-50, including the magnets, keeper, heater, and discharge. On February 28, 2001, the Glenn test team successfully operated the Hall-effect thruster with the Stirling convertor. This is the world's first known test of a dynamic power source with electric propulsion. The RG-350 successfully managed the transition from the purely resistive load bank within the Stirling controller to the highly capacitive power-processing unit load. At the time of the demonstration, the Stirling convertor was operating at a hot temperature of 530 C and a cold temperature of -6 C. The linear alternator was producing approximately 250 W at 109 Vac, while the power-processing unit was drawing 175 W at 48 Vdc. The majority of power was delivered to the

  12. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  13. Optical properties of urban aerosols in the region Bratislava-Vienna I. Methods and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, M.; Horvath, H.; Jovanović, O.; Gangl, M.

    Aerosol optical data obtained by means of ground-based methods are applied to determine microphysical properties of aerosols in the atmosphere of Vienna-city. The measured aerosol extinction coefficient σA serves as a source of information on the ambient aerosols. A large database of extinction efficiency factors for a set of irregularly shaped as well as the spherical particles of various sizes is pre-calculated and employed in the inversion procedure. The assumed particle models differ in chemical composition and are representative for most typical aerosol systems in the urban atmospheres. All database records are taken into a regularization scheme to solve the inverse problem for aerosol size distribution using measured extinction data. In addition, subsidiary data on spectral sky radiance are successfully incorporated into the mathematical model to retrieve the information on aerosol effective refractive index in the visible. As for Vienna, the aerosol extinction is a decreasing function of wavelength in visible spectrum—it indicates the predominance of sub-micrometer-sized particles in the atmosphere. The surface distribution function s( r)=d S/d r of aerosol particles customarily peaks at radii r≈0.2-0.3 μm, while the volume distribution function v( r)=d V/d r˜ rs( r) has a mode at radii about 0.3-0.4 μm. Analysing size distributions d V/d log( r) for irregularly shaped particles it is shown that the daily profile of this function is smoothly evolving and almost typically accounts for a first mode at radii between 0.8 and 0.9 μm.

  14. A comparative assessment of cigarette smoke aerosols using an in vitro air-liquid interface cytotoxicity test.

    PubMed

    Thorne, David; Dalrymple, Annette; Dillon, Deborah; Duke, Martin; Meredith, Clive

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the evaluation of a modified air-liquid interface BALB/c 3T3 cytotoxicity method for the assessment of smoke aerosols in vitro. The functionality and applicability of this modified protocol was assessed by comparing the cytotoxicity profiles from eight different cigarettes. Three reference cigarettes, 1R5F, 3R4F and CORESTA Monitor 7 were used to put the data into perspective and five bespoke experimental products were manufactured, ensuring a balanced and controlled study. Manufactured cigarettes were matched for key variables such as nicotine delivery, puff number, pressure drop, ventilation, carbon monoxide, nicotine free dry particulate matter and blend, but significantly modified for vapor phase delivery, via the addition of two different types and quantities of adsorptive carbon. Specifically manufacturing products ensures comparisons can be made in a consistent manner and allows the research to ask targeted questions, without confounding product variables. The results demonstrate vapor-phase associated cytotoxic effects and clear differences between the products tested and their cytotoxic profiles. This study has further characterized the in vitro vapor phase biological response relationship and confirmed that the biological response is directly proportional to the amount of available vapor phase toxicants in cigarette smoke, when using a Vitrocell® VC 10 exposure system. This study further supports and strengthens the use of aerosol based exposure options for the appropriate analysis of cigarette smoke induced responses in vitro and may be especially beneficial when comparing aerosols generated from alternative tobacco aerosol products.

  15. Selectivity Across the Interface: A Test of Surface Activity in the Composition of Organic-Enriched Aerosols from Bubble Bursting.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Richard E; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-05-01

    Although theories have been developed that describe surface activity of organic molecules at the air-water interface, few studies have tested how surface activity impacts the selective transfer of molecules from solution phase into the aerosol phase during bubble bursting. The selective transfer of a series of organic compounds that differ in their solubility and surface activity from solution into the aerosol phase is quantified experimentally for the first time. Aerosol was produced from solutions containing salts and a series of linear carboxlyates (LCs) and dicarboxylates (LDCs) using a bubble bursting process. Surface activity of these molecules dominated the transport across the interface, with enrichment factors of the more surface-active C4-C8 LCs (55 ± 8) being greater than those of C4-C8 LDCs (5 ± 1). Trends in the estimated surface concentrations of LCs at the liquid-air interface agreed well with their relative concentrations in the aerosol phase. In addition, enrichment of LCs was followed by enrichment of calcium with respect to other inorganic cations and depletion of chloride and sulfate. PMID:27093579

  16. Stimulation of interferons and endorphins/enkephalins by electro-aerosol inhalation? An experimental approach for testing an expanded hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, A. P.

    1984-03-01

    The biological effects of endorphins/enkephalins and of interferons closely resemble those attributed to air ions and electro-aerosols. Air ions/electro-aerosols have been reported to affect brain functions and feelings of “well-being”; to have sedative and analgesic effects; to be therapeutically effective in certain viral (e.g., upper respiratory) infections; and to have tumor-attenuating effects. It is, therefore, conceivable that endorphins/enkephalins and interferons might be the mediators of these air ion/electro-aerosol effects. An experimental approach for testing this hypothesis is described. It calls for mice to be challenged with a suitable agent and to be exposed under appropriate conditions to a negatively charged aerosol of physiological saline 6 hours/day for up to 3 weeks; for the serial sacrifice of subgroups of these mice; for collecting blood and brains of the sacrificed animals; for the bioassay of the sera for interferon; and for radioimmunoassays of brains for endorphins/enkephalins. Special considerations, necessitated by the nature of the experiment, are discussed.

  17. A comparative assessment of cigarette smoke aerosols using an in vitro air–liquid interface cytotoxicity test

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, David; Dalrymple, Annette; Dillon, Deborah; Duke, Martin; Meredith, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study describes the evaluation of a modified air-liquid interface BALB/c 3T3 cytotoxicity method for the assessment of smoke aerosols in vitro. The functionality and applicability of this modified protocol was assessed by comparing the cytotoxicity profiles from eight different cigarettes. Three reference cigarettes, 1R5F, 3R4F and CORESTA Monitor 7 were used to put the data into perspective and five bespoke experimental products were manufactured, ensuring a balanced and controlled study. Manufactured cigarettes were matched for key variables such as nicotine delivery, puff number, pressure drop, ventilation, carbon monoxide, nicotine free dry particulate matter and blend, but significantly modified for vapor phase delivery, via the addition of two different types and quantities of adsorptive carbon. Specifically manufacturing products ensures comparisons can be made in a consistent manner and allows the research to ask targeted questions, without confounding product variables. The results demonstrate vapor-phase associated cytotoxic effects and clear differences between the products tested and their cytotoxic profiles. This study has further characterized the in vitro vapor phase biological response relationship and confirmed that the biological response is directly proportional to the amount of available vapor phase toxicants in cigarette smoke, when using a Vitrocell® VC 10 exposure system. This study further supports and strengthens the use of aerosol based exposure options for the appropriate analysis of cigarette smoke induced responses in vitro and may be especially beneficial when comparing aerosols generated from alternative tobacco aerosol products. PMID:26339773

  18. A comparative assessment of cigarette smoke aerosols using an in vitro air-liquid interface cytotoxicity test.

    PubMed

    Thorne, David; Dalrymple, Annette; Dillon, Deborah; Duke, Martin; Meredith, Clive

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the evaluation of a modified air-liquid interface BALB/c 3T3 cytotoxicity method for the assessment of smoke aerosols in vitro. The functionality and applicability of this modified protocol was assessed by comparing the cytotoxicity profiles from eight different cigarettes. Three reference cigarettes, 1R5F, 3R4F and CORESTA Monitor 7 were used to put the data into perspective and five bespoke experimental products were manufactured, ensuring a balanced and controlled study. Manufactured cigarettes were matched for key variables such as nicotine delivery, puff number, pressure drop, ventilation, carbon monoxide, nicotine free dry particulate matter and blend, but significantly modified for vapor phase delivery, via the addition of two different types and quantities of adsorptive carbon. Specifically manufacturing products ensures comparisons can be made in a consistent manner and allows the research to ask targeted questions, without confounding product variables. The results demonstrate vapor-phase associated cytotoxic effects and clear differences between the products tested and their cytotoxic profiles. This study has further characterized the in vitro vapor phase biological response relationship and confirmed that the biological response is directly proportional to the amount of available vapor phase toxicants in cigarette smoke, when using a Vitrocell® VC 10 exposure system. This study further supports and strengthens the use of aerosol based exposure options for the appropriate analysis of cigarette smoke induced responses in vitro and may be especially beneficial when comparing aerosols generated from alternative tobacco aerosol products. PMID:26339773

  19. 10 CFR 26.95 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. 26.95 Section 26.95 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.95 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a breath specimen. (a)...

  20. 14 CFR 61.37 - Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 61.37 Section 61.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....37 Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) An applicant for a knowledge test...

  1. 14 CFR 61.37 - Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 61.37 Section 61.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....37 Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) An applicant for a knowledge test...

  2. 14 CFR 61.37 - Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 61.37 Section 61.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....37 Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) An applicant for a knowledge test...

  3. 14 CFR 61.37 - Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 61.37 Section 61.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....37 Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) An applicant for a knowledge test...

  4. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  5. 40 CFR 63.5845 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5845 When must I conduct...

  6. 40 CFR 63.5845 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORIES National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5845 When must I conduct subsequent...

  7. 40 CFR 63.5845 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5845 When must I conduct...

  8. 40 CFR 63.5845 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CATEGORIES National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5845 When must I conduct subsequent...

  9. 40 CFR 63.5845 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5845 When must I conduct...

  10. Development and Testing of the New Surface LER Climatology for OMI UV Aerosol Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pawan; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren; Ahn, Changwoo

    2014-01-01

    Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard Aura satellite retrieved aerosols properties using UV part of solar spectrum. The OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) is a global inversion scheme which retrieves aerosol properties both over ocean and land. The current version of the algorithm makes use of TOMS derived Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) climatology. A new monthly climatology of surface LER at 354 and 388 nm have been developed. This will replace TOMS LER (380 nm and 354nm) climatology in OMI near UV aerosol retrieval algorithm. The main objectives of this study is to produce high resolution (quarter degree) surface LER sets as compared to existing one degree TOMS surface LERs, to product instrument and wavelength consistent surface climatology. Nine years of OMI observations have been used to derive monthly climatology of surface LER. MODIS derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been used to make aerosol corrections on OMI wavelengths. MODIS derived BRDF adjusted reflectance product has been also used to capture seasonal changes in the surface characteristics. Finally spatial and temporal averaging techniques have been used to fill the gaps around the globes, especially in the regions with consistent cloud cover such as Amazon. After implementation of new surface data in the research version of algorithm, comparisons of AOD and single scattering albedo (SSA) have been performed over global AERONET sites for year 2007. Preliminary results shows improvements in AOD retrievals globally but more significance improvement were observed over desert and bright locations. We will present methodology of deriving surface data sets and will discuss the observed changes in retrieved aerosol properties with respect to reference AERONET measurements.

  11. 40 CFR 63.8440 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... performance tests? (a) You must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Brick and Structural...

  12. 40 CFR 63.8440 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance tests? (a) You must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Brick and Structural...

  13. 40 CFR 63.8440 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performance tests? (a) You must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Brick and Structural...

  14. 40 CFR 63.8440 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... performance tests? (a) You must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Brick and Structural...

  15. 40 CFR 63.8440 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance tests? (a) You must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Brick and Structural...

  16. 49 CFR 40.229 - What devices are used to conduct alcohol screening tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... are allowed to use to conduct alcohol screening tests under this part. You may use an ASD that is on the NHTSA CPL for DOT alcohol tests only if there are instructions for its use in this part. An...

  17. 49 CFR 40.229 - What devices are used to conduct alcohol screening tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... are allowed to use to conduct alcohol screening tests under this part. You may use an ASD that is on the NHTSA CPL for DOT alcohol tests only if there are instructions for its use in this part. An...

  18. 49 CFR 40.229 - What devices are used to conduct alcohol screening tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... are allowed to use to conduct alcohol screening tests under this part. You may use an ASD that is on the NHTSA CPL for DOT alcohol tests only if there are instructions for its use in this part. An...

  19. 49 CFR 40.229 - What devices are used to conduct alcohol screening tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... are allowed to use to conduct alcohol screening tests under this part. You may use an ASD that is on the NHTSA CPL for DOT alcohol tests only if there are instructions for its use in this part. An...

  20. 49 CFR 40.229 - What devices are used to conduct alcohol screening tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... are allowed to use to conduct alcohol screening tests under this part. You may use an ASD that is on the NHTSA CPL for DOT alcohol tests only if there are instructions for its use in this part. An...

  1. 30 CFR 27.10 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS General Provisions § 27.10... letter of certification, MSHA may conduct such public demonstrations and tests of the certified...

  2. 30 CFR 27.10 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS General Provisions § 27.10... letter of certification, MSHA may conduct such public demonstrations and tests of the certified...

  3. Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and potential inhalation exposure during cleanup and treatment test at Area 11, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

    1985-08-13

    A Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test was conducted in 1981 at Area 11, Nevada Test Site. Its purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a large truck-mounted vacuum cleaner similar to those used to clean paved streets for cleaning radiological contamination from the surface of desert soils. We found that four passes with the vehicle removed 97% of the alpha contamination and reduced resuspension by 99.3 to 99.7%. Potential exposure to cleanup workers was slight when compared to natural background exposure. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. 49 CFR 40.91 - What validity tests must laboratories conduct on primary specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What validity tests must laboratories conduct on primary specimens? 40.91 Section 40.91 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.91 What validity tests must laboratories...

  5. 10 CFR 26.101 - Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reading is 0.00. If the reading is 0.00, the test may proceed. If not, then conduct another air blank; (3) If the reading on the second air blank is 0.00, the test may proceed. If the reading is greater than... confirmatory test result was known. (c) Unless there are problems in administering the breath test that...

  6. 49 CFR 40.91 - What validity tests must laboratories conduct on primary specimens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What validity tests must laboratories conduct on primary specimens? 40.91 Section 40.91 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Drug Testing Laboratories § 40.91 What validity tests must laboratories...

  7. 14 CFR 61.37 - Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Knowledge tests: Cheating or other....37 Knowledge tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) An applicant for a knowledge test may not: (1) Copy or intentionally remove any knowledge test; (2) Give to another applicant or...

  8. 49 CFR 40.253 - What are the procedures for conducting an alcohol confirmation test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... confirmation test, you must follow these steps in order to complete the confirmation test process: (a) In the... confirmation test and show the reading to the employee. (1) If the reading is 0.00, the test may proceed. If the reading is greater than 0.00, you must conduct another air blank. (2) If the reading on the...

  9. 40 CFR 63.11220 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and Institutional Boilers Area Sources Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.11220 When must I conduct subsequent performance tests? (a) If your boiler has a heat input capacity of 10 million Btu per hour or greater, you must conduct all applicable performance (stack) tests according to § 63.11212...

  10. 40 CFR 63.11220 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and Institutional Boilers Area Sources Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.11220 When must I conduct subsequent performance tests? (a) If your boiler has a heat input capacity of 10 million Btu per hour or greater, you must conduct all applicable performance (stack) tests according to § 63.11212...

  11. 40 CFR 60.2155 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity) over 3 consecutive years show that you comply... limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you may choose to conduct performance tests... matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you must conduct annual performance tests for that pollutant...

  12. 40 CFR 60.2155 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity) over 3 consecutive years show that you comply... limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you may choose to conduct performance tests... matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you must conduct annual performance tests for that pollutant...

  13. 40 CFR 60.2155 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity) over 3 consecutive years show that you comply... limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you may choose to conduct performance tests... matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you must conduct annual performance tests for that pollutant...

  14. 14 CFR 65.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 65.18 Section 65.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  15. 14 CFR 63.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 63.18 Section 63.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  16. 14 CFR 63.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 63.18 Section 63.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  17. 14 CFR 63.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 63.18 Section 63.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  18. 14 CFR 65.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 65.18 Section 65.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  19. 14 CFR 65.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 65.18 Section 65.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  20. 14 CFR 65.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 65.18 Section 65.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  1. 14 CFR 63.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 63.18 Section 63.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  2. 14 CFR 63.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 63.18 Section 63.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  3. 14 CFR 65.18 - Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Written tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. 65.18 Section 65.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... tests: Cheating or other unauthorized conduct. (a) Except as authorized by the Administrator, no...

  4. [A simple testing installation for the production of aerosols with constant bacteria-contaminated concentrations].

    PubMed

    Herbst, M; Lehmhus, H; Oldenburg, B; Orlowski, C; Ohgke, H

    1983-04-01

    A simple experimental set for the production and investigation of bacterially contaminated solid-state aerosols with constant concentration is described. The experimental set consists mainly of a fluidized bed-particle generator within a modified chamber for formaldehyde desinfection. The special conditions for the production of a defined concentration of particles and microorganisms are to be found out empirically. In a first application aerosol-sizing of an Andersen sampler is investigated. The findings of Andersen (1) are confirmed with respect to our experimental conditions.

  5. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-04

    We report the results of ongoing high power tests of single-cell standing wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the maximum gradient possibilities for normal-conducting rf powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode launchers and short test structures powered by SLACs XL-4 klystron. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested at the SLAC klystron test laboratory.

  6. Demonstration of the Applicability of Novel Photoacoustic Aerosol Monitor for Optical Absorption Coefficient Determination. Laboratory and Field Test.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, T.; Schnaiter, M.; Linke, C.; Vragel, M.; Filep, Á.; Fődi, L.; Motika, G.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2009-04-01

    apportionment studies. The present system was successfully tested both under the laboratory and field circumstances. The results of these studied, demonstrated here, is shown excellent agreements with reference methods and presents the main characteristic performances of the system verifying the potential of Wasul-MuWaPas to characterizing the spectral properties of atmospheric aerosols. These researches were funded by Hungarian Ministry of Economy and Transport NKFP_07_A4_AEROS_EU.

  7. Validation of non-Darcian flow effects in slug tests conducted in fractured rock boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patryk M.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryA series of rising and falling head slug tests with different initial applied head differentials (ΔHo) were conducted in open fractured dolostone and sandstone boreholes using straddle packers isolating specific depth intervals (1.5 m length) to examine the influence of non-Darcian flow. The open holes were developed and inspected using video and acoustic televiewing (ATV) to ensure that evidence of skin effects due to drilling were absent. The transmissivity (T) values obtained from both the rising and falling head slug tests were very similar at low initial applied head; however, the T values were progressively smaller at larger ΔHo, suggesting error due to non-Darcian flow. Non-Darcian flow behavior was confirmed by constant head step tests conducted in the same test intervals where the injection rate (Q) vs. applied head (dH) relationship became non-linear at relatively low injection rates, and the non-Darcian data also resulted in lower T values. For a series of slug tests conducted at different ΔHo, non-Darcian flow effects gradually increased as ΔHo increased, consistent with the trends for constant head step tests conducted in the same test intervals. To maintain Darcian flow conditions in the fractured dolostone and sandstone tested in this study, ΔHo must be kept small, generally less than 0.2 m. This study demonstrates that by conducting both "stepped" slug tests and constant head step tests, the Darcian flow assumption for both types of tests can be rigorously validated. However, when only slug tests are conducted, it is necessary to conduct a series of "stepped" slug tests, including tests with small applied head differentials, to avoid errors due to non-Darcian flow.

  8. Development of a fungal spore aerosol generator: test with Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium citrinum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Uk; Kim, Young Joong; Lee, Chang Ho; Yun, Sun Hwa; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Ji, Jun-Ho

    2008-04-01

    As the first step to develop efficient means to control fungal spore bioaerosols, we designed, manufactured, and evaluated a fungal spore aerosol generator. We studied the physical and biological properties of the fungal spore bioaerosols on two common fungal species. The results demonstrated that the fungal spore bioaerosol generator effectively produces fungal spore bioaerosols.

  9. Compendium of Test Results of Recent Single Event Effect Tests Conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Steven S.; Allen, Gregory R.; Irom, Farokh; Scheick, Leif Z.; Adell, Philippe C.; Miyahira, Tetsuo F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports heavy ion and proton-induced single event effect (SEE) results from recent tests for a variety of microelectronic devices. The compendium covers devices tested over the last two years by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. Review of mechanical vibration tests conducted on control moment gyros and life test fixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchill, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental vibration studies performed on a number of flight control moment gyros and bearing life test fixtures are summarized. Tests were performed at MSFC, at Wyle Laboratories, Huntsville, Alabama, and at the Bendix Corporation facilities in Teterboro, New Jersey. A description of test and analysis equipment is included as well as test procedures and overall performance rankings. Advanced ultrasonic rolling element bearing fault detection techniques were applied for bearing analysis along with conventional vibration and sound analysis procedures.

  11. Li-ion conducting Li0.35La0.55TiO3 electrolyte thick films fabricated by aerosol deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jong-Jin; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Ryu, Jungho; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Kim, Jong-Woo; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Park, Dong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Lithium lanthanum titanium oxide (Li0.35La0.55TiO3, LLT) films with thickness of 5 ˜ 30 μm were fabricated on a stainless-steel substrates by using aerosol deposition with a micron-sized powder at room temperature, and their Li-ion conductivity values were analyzed and compared with bulk ceramics sintered using the same powder. The crystalline size of the film was controlled by controlling the initial particle size of the LLT powder. The phase formation and the microstructural evolution of the films for different deposition conditions were observed by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The lithium-ion conductivity of the film at room temperature was analyzed by the impedance measurement technique. The LLT bulk ceramic sintered at 1200 °C and LLT film deposited at room-temperature showed total lithium ion conductivity of 8.37 × 10-6 and 6.38 × 10-7 S/cm, respectively.

  12. 46 CFR 153.1600 - Equipment required for conducting the stripping quantity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... test. 153.1600 Section 153.1600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... MATERIALS Test and Calculation Procedures for Determining Stripping Quantity, Clingage NLS Residue, and Total NLS Residue § 153.1600 Equipment required for conducting the stripping quantity test. The...

  13. 46 CFR 153.1600 - Equipment required for conducting the stripping quantity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... test. 153.1600 Section 153.1600 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... MATERIALS Test and Calculation Procedures for Determining Stripping Quantity, Clingage NLS Residue, and Total NLS Residue § 153.1600 Equipment required for conducting the stripping quantity test. The...

  14. 40 CFR 62.14680 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... data for at least 3 years, and all performance tests for the pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen..., hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you may choose to conduct performance tests for these pollutants every third... test shows a deviation from an emission limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride,...

  15. 40 CFR 62.14680 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you may choose to conduct performance tests for these pollutants every third... test shows a deviation from an emission limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or... data for at least 3 years, and all performance tests for the pollutant (particulate matter,...

  16. Comparison of Nerve Excitability Testing, Nerve Conduction Velocity, and Behavioral Observations for Acrylamide Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nerve excitability (NE) testing is a sensitive method to test for peripheral neurotoxicity in humans,and may be more sensitive than compound nerve action potential (CNAP) or nerve conduction velocity (NCV).We used acrylamide to compare the NE and CNAP/NCV methods. Behavioral test...

  17. 49 CFR 40.253 - What are the procedures for conducting an alcohol confirmation test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What are the procedures for conducting an alcohol confirmation test? 40.253 Section 40.253 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Confirmation Tests §...

  18. 49 CFR 40.253 - What are the procedures for conducting an alcohol confirmation test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What are the procedures for conducting an alcohol confirmation test? 40.253 Section 40.253 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Alcohol Confirmation Tests §...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 240 - Recommended Procedures for Conducting Skill Performance Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Performance Tests FRA requires (see § 240.127 and § 240.211) that locomotive engineers be given a skill performance test prior to certification or recertification and establishes certain criteria for the conduct of... recommendations for the administration of skill performance testing that occurs during operation of an...

  20. 40 CFR 62.14680 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... data for at least 3 years, and all performance tests for the pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen..., hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you may choose to conduct performance tests for these pollutants every third... test shows a deviation from an emission limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride,...

  1. 40 CFR 62.14680 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... data for at least 3 years, and all performance tests for the pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen..., hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you may choose to conduct performance tests for these pollutants every third... test shows a deviation from an emission limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride,...

  2. 40 CFR 62.14680 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... data for at least 3 years, and all performance tests for the pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen..., hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you may choose to conduct performance tests for these pollutants every third... test shows a deviation from an emission limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride,...

  3. 40 CFR 790.55 - Modification of test standards or schedules during conduct of test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to modify the test schedule for the mandatory testing conditions or requirements (i.e., “shall... § 790.5(b), or by phone with written confirmation to follow within 10 working days. Applications must... to provide guidance or to clarify a non-mandatory testing requirement (i.e., “should statements”)...

  4. Analysis of Dissimilar Material Defect Based on Eddy Current Conductivity Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofan; Li, Lifu

    In this experiment, the conductivity distribution of lack of penetration (LOP) in friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar materials has been tested, and has been compared with the conductivity distribution of the same kind of material, by using eddy current conductivity meter. CZ state and M state LY12 aluminum alloy has been studied. The results show that when the depth of LOP is small, the conductivity of M state is the highest, the conductivity decreases gradually to the weld center, reduce to the minimum until reach the CZ state base metal. When the depth of LOP is larger, the conductivity of the weld center decreases sharply with the depth of LOP increases gradually. Scilicet, the larger the depth of LOP, the lower the conductivity. The conductivity distribution of other areas is similar to the distribution when the depth of LOP is small.

  5. Conducting and interpreting slug tests in monitoring wells with partially submerged screens

    SciTech Connect

    Binkhorst, G.K.; Robbins, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    Slug tests conducted in ground water monitoring wells are the most widely used method by the environmental consulting industry for determining hydraulic conductivity at contamination sites. Conducting and interpreting slug tests in wells with screen sections and sand packs that span the water table are severely complicated by sand pack drainage and resaturation. Sand pack drainage greatly reduces the actual head difference between the well and the formation. Resaturation of the drained sand pack must be properly accounted for, or the formation hydraulic conductivity will be underestimated. The magnitude of error is a function of the well geometry, sand pack properties, and the model chosen to interpret the data. A method has been developed to correct for sand pack resaturation by calculating the specific yield of a drained sand pack using the early recharge data of a slug test. Slug tests were conducted in one well in which the water table varied over time, creating both partially and fully submerged screen and sand pack conditions for comparative testing. The mid-time, log-linear portion of slug test data was corrected using the calculated specific yield of the drained sand pack to yield essentially the same hydraulic conductivity value as the fully submerged screen results. Not accounting for sand pack resaturation would have yielded a hydraulic conductivity value that was lower than the submerged screen results by a factor of seven.

  6. Electrical conductivity as a test for the integrity of latex gloves

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, J.F.; Kissane, R.J.; Schauer, S.M.

    1993-02-01

    Surgical latex gloves have been used to protect patients against bacterial infections introduced by health-care workers. As a result of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, the concern has shifted, with more emphasis on the protection of the health-care worker from the patient. These gloves often have defects, holes, which allow bacteria to penetrate. There are a number of methods to test the integrity of these gloves before they are donned. The present standard test is to fill the glove with 1000 ml of water and visually inspect the exterior for water leaks. Another method allows the gloves to be tested while being worn. This is done by measuring the electrical conductivity through the latex, from the hand to an external conductive solution. We have investigated the use of electrical conductivity to test sterile latex gloves, both with and without holes. We have studied various phenomena associated with this testing and conducted simultaneous electrical and viral penetration tests. Our conclusions are as follows. (1) Electrical conductivity test method for gloves while they are being worn is very dependent on the specific glove being tested, primarily on the conductivity of the intact glove. (2) In the best of cases, reliable results could be expected for only about one hour of wear and for holes larger than 10s of [mu]ms. (3) There are practical problems that may disqualify the electrical conductivity test for routine use. (4) The test may prove to be valuable as a QA test procedure for nonconductive materials and garments made from these materials because it has greater sensitivity than presently used methods. (5) The effective sizes of holes in latex increase much faster when the latex is stretched than would be predicted from the elongation of the latex.

  7. Electrical conductivity as a test for the integrity of latex gloves

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, J.F.; Kissane, R.J.; Schauer, S.M.

    1993-02-01

    Surgical latex gloves have been used to protect patients against bacterial infections introduced by health-care workers. As a result of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, the concern has shifted, with more emphasis on the protection of the health-care worker from the patient. These gloves often have defects, holes, which allow bacteria to penetrate. There are a number of methods to test the integrity of these gloves before they are donned. The present standard test is to fill the glove with 1000 ml of water and visually inspect the exterior for water leaks. Another method allows the gloves to be tested while being worn. This is done by measuring the electrical conductivity through the latex, from the hand to an external conductive solution. We have investigated the use of electrical conductivity to test sterile latex gloves, both with and without holes. We have studied various phenomena associated with this testing and conducted simultaneous electrical and viral penetration tests. Our conclusions are as follows. (1) Electrical conductivity test method for gloves while they are being worn is very dependent on the specific glove being tested, primarily on the conductivity of the intact glove. (2) In the best of cases, reliable results could be expected for only about one hour of wear and for holes larger than 10s of {mu}ms. (3) There are practical problems that may disqualify the electrical conductivity test for routine use. (4) The test may prove to be valuable as a QA test procedure for nonconductive materials and garments made from these materials because it has greater sensitivity than presently used methods. (5) The effective sizes of holes in latex increase much faster when the latex is stretched than would be predicted from the elongation of the latex.

  8. Methodology for the Assessment of 3D Conduction Effects in an Aerothermal Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Anthony Brandon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for the assessment of three-dimensional conduction effects during test in a Aerothermal Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to duplicate and extend tests that were performed during the 1960's on thermal conduction on proturberance on a flat plate. Slides review the 1D versus 3D conduction data reduction error, the analysis process, CFD-based analysis, loose coupling method that simulates a wind tunnel test run, verification of the CFD solution, Grid convergence, Mach number trend, size trends, and a Sumary of the CFD conduction analysis. Other slides show comparisons to pretest CFD at Mach 1.5 and 2.16 and the geometries of the models and grids.

  9. 40 CFR 63.8590 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., you must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating permit or at least... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Clay...

  10. 40 CFR 63.8590 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., you must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating permit or at least... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Clay...

  11. 40 CFR 63.8590 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., you must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating permit or at least... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Clay...

  12. 40 CFR 63.8590 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., you must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating permit or at least... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Clay...

  13. 40 CFR 63.8590 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., you must conduct a performance test before renewing your 40 CFR part 70 operating permit or at least... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Clay...

  14. 40 CFR 63.2162 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the procedures in § 63.2161, you must conduct an EPA Test Method 25A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Manufacturing of Nutritional...

  15. 40 CFR 63.2162 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the procedures in § 63.2161, you must conduct an EPA Test Method 25A of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Manufacturing of Nutritional...

  16. 9 CFR 55.8 - Official CWD tests and approval of laboratories to conduct official CWD tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official CWD tests and approval of laboratories to conduct official CWD tests. 55.8 Section 55.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY DISEASES CONTROL OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE Chronic Wasting Disease Indemnification Program §...

  17. Environmental Technology Verification: Supplement to Test/QA Plan for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners; Bioaerosol Inactivation Efficiency by HVAC In-Duct Ultraviolet Light Air Cleaners

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center has selected general ventilation air cleaners as a technology area. The Generic Verification Protocol for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners is on the Environmental Technology Verification we...

  18. 40 CFR 63.9630 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... characteristics remain representative for the duration of the stack tests. (c) You must conduct subsequent... conducted within a reasonable period of time, such that the ore dryer operating characteristics remain... available for inspection upon request. You must keep the plan for the life of the affected source or...

  19. 40 CFR 63.9630 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... characteristics remain representative for the duration of the stack tests. (c) You must conduct subsequent... conducted within a reasonable period of time, such that the ore dryer operating characteristics remain... available for inspection upon request. You must keep the plan for the life of the affected source or...

  20. 40 CFR 63.9630 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... characteristics remain representative for the duration of the stack tests. (c) You must conduct subsequent... conducted within a reasonable period of time, such that the ore dryer operating characteristics remain... available for inspection upon request. You must keep the plan for the life of the affected source or...

  1. 40 CFR 60.2720 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity) over 3 consecutive years show that you comply... emission limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you may choose to conduct... particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you must conduct annual performance tests for...

  2. Using Impedance Spectroscopy to Assess the Viability of the Rapid Chloride Test for Determining Concrete Conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, K. A.; Ferraris, C.; Martys, N. S.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    The suitability of using the initial current from the rapid chloride test (ASTM C 1202) to determine specimen conductivity is tested using impedance spectroscopy with a frequency spectrum of 10 Hz to 1 MHz. The specimen conductivity has an analytical relationship to specimen diffusivity and so is a useful quantity in service life prediction. Measurements made on specimens of different lengths indicate that the total charge passed during the six hour conduction test carried out according to ASTM C 1202 is not a direct measure of specimen conductivity. Further, ohmic heating during the 6 hour test makes it nearly impossible to directly measure any specimen transport property from the results. The total charge passed during the 6 hour conduction test is, therefore, not a reliable quantity for service life prediction. Results indicate that the direct current (dc) measurement of resistance using a voltage of 60 V is sufficient to overwhelm polarization effects, thereby yielding an accurate estimate of the true specimen conductivity. Impedance spectroscopy measurements also indicate that corrosion may form on the brass electrodes, adding bias to a conductivity estimate based upon a dc measurement. PMID:27551618

  3. Spectra Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Laboratory and Urban Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, Madhu S.

    Atmospheric aerosols considerably influence the climate, reduce visibility, and cause problems in human health. Aerosol light absorption and scattering are the important factors in the radiation transfer models. However, these properties are associated with large uncertainties in climate modeling. In addition, atmospheric aerosols widely vary in composition and size; their optical properties are highly wavelength dependent. This work presents the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering throughout the ultraviolet to near-infrared regions. Data were collected in Reno, NV from 2008 to 2010. Also presented in this study are the aerosol optical and physical properties during carbonaceous aerosols and radiative effects study (CARES) conducted in Sacramento area during 2010. Measurements were made using photoacoustic instruments (PA), including a novel UV 355 nm PA of our design and manufacture. Comparative analyses are presented for three main categories: (1) aerosols produced by wildfires and traffic emissions, (2) laboratory-generated and wintertime ambient urban aerosols, and (3) urban plume and biogenic emissions. In these categories, key questions regarding the light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOA), so-called brown carbon (BrC), and black carbon (BC) will be discussed. An effort is made to model the emission and aging of urban and biomass burning aerosol by applying shell-core calculations. Multispectral PA measurements of aerosols light absorption and scattering coefficients were used to calculate the Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The AEA and SSA values were analyzed to differentiate the aerosol sources. The California wildfire aerosols exhibited strong wavelength dependence of aerosol light absorption with AEA as lambda -1 for 405 and 870 nm, in contrast to the relatively weak wavelength dependence of traffic emissions aerosols for which AEA varied approximately as lambda-1. By using

  4. Characterizing particulate matter emissions from vehicles: chassis-dynamometer tests using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S.; Zhang, Q.; Forestieri, S.; Kleeman, M.; Cappa, C. D.; Kuwayama, T.

    2012-12-01

    During September of 2011 a suite of real-time instruments was used to sample vehicle emissions at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Schmidt facility in El Monte, CA. A representative fleet of 8 spark ignition gasoline vehicles, a diesel passenger vehicle, a gasoline direct-injection vehicle and an ultra-low emissions vehicle were tested on a chassis dynamometer. The emissions were sampled into the facility's standard CVS tunnel and diluted to atmospherically relevant levels (5-30 μg/m3) while controlling other factors such as relative humidity or background black carbon particulate loading concentrations. An Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-MS) was among the real-time instruments used and sampled vehicle emissions at 10 second time resolution in order to characterize the non-refractory organic and inorganic particulate matter (PM). PM composition and concentration were tracked throughout the cold start driving cycle which included periods of fast acceleration and high velocity cruise control, meant to recreate typical commuter driving behavior. Variations in inorganic and organic PM composition for a given vehicle throughout the driving cycle as well as for various vehicles with differing emissions loading were characterized. Differences in PM composition for a given vehicle whose emissions are being exposed to differing experimental conditions such as varying relative humidity will also be reported. In conjunction with measurements from a Multi Wavelength Photoacoustic Black Carbon Spectrometer (MWPA-BC) and real-time gas measurements from the CARB facility, we determine the real-time emission ratios of primary organic aerosols (POA) with respect to BC and common combustion gas phase pollutants and compared to different vehicle driving conditions. The results of these tests offer the vehicle emissions community a first time glimpse at the real-time behavior of vehicle PM emissions for a variety of conditions and

  5. Conducting Closed Habitation Experiments: Experience from the Lunar Mars Life Support Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Edeen, Marybeth A.; Henninger, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    The Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project (LMLSTP) was conducted from 1995 through 1997 at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) to demonstrate increasingly longer duration operation of integrated, closed-loop life support systems that employed biological and physicochemical techniques for water recycling, waste processing, air revitalization, thermal control, and food production. An analog environment for long-duration human space travel, the conditions of isolation and confinement also enabled studies of human factors, medical sciences (both physiology and psychology) and crew training. Four tests were conducted, Phases I, II, IIa and III, with durations of 15, 30, 60 and 91 days, respectively. The first phase focused on biological air regeneration, using wheat to generate enough oxygen for one experimental subject. The systems demonstrated in the later phases were increasingly complex and interdependent, and provided life support for four crew members. The tests were conducted using two human-rated, atmospherically-closed test chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC) and the Integrated Life Support Systems Test Facility (ILSSTF). Systems included test articles (the life support hardware under evaluation), human accommodations (living quarters, kitchen, exercise equipment, etc.) and facility systems (emergency matrix system, power, cooling, etc.). The test team was managed by a lead engineer and a test director, and included test article engineers responsible for specific systems, subsystems or test articles, test conductors, facility engineers, chamber operators and engineering technicians, medical and safety officers, and science experimenters. A crew selection committee, comprised of psychologists, engineers and managers involved in the test, evaluated male and female volunteers who applied to be test subjects. Selection was based on the skills mix anticipated for each particular test, and utilized

  6. Conducting Closed Habitation Experiments: Experience from the Lunar Mars Life Support Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Edeen, Marybeth A.; Henninger, Donald L.

    2004-01-01

    The Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project (LMLSTP) was conducted from 1995 through 1997 at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) to demonstrate increasingly longer duration operation of integrated, closed-loop life support systems that employed biological and physicochemical techniques for water recycling, waste processing, air revitalization, thermal control, and food production. An analog environment for long-duration human space travel, the conditions of isolation and confinement also enabled studies of human factors, medical sciences (both physiology and psychology) and crew training. Four tests were conducted, Phases I, II, IIa and III, with durations of 15, 30,60 and 91 days, respectively. The first phase focused on biological air regeneration, using wheat to generate enough oxygen for one experimental subject. The systems demonstrated in the later phases were increasingly complex and interdependent, and provided life support for four crew members. The tests were conducted using two human-rated, atmospherically-closed test chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC) and the Integrated Life Support Systems Test Facility (ILSSTF). Systems included test articles (the life support hardware under evaluation), human accommodations (living quarters, kitchen, exercise equipment, etc.) and facility systems (emergency matrix system, power, cooling, etc.). The test team was managed by a lead engineer and a test director, and included test article engineers responsible for specific systems, subsystems or test articles, test conductors, facility engineers, chamber operators and engineering technicians, medical and safety officers, and science experimenters. A crew selection committee, comprised of psychologists, engineers and managers involved in the test, evaluated male and female volunteers who applied to be test subjects. Selection was based on the skills mix anticipated for each particular test, and utilized

  7. The development of a test system for investigating the performances of personal aerosol samplers under actual workplace conditions.

    PubMed

    Botham, R A; Hughson, G W; Vincent, J H; Mark, D

    1991-10-01

    The performances of new "total" aerosol samplers for use in workplaces are required to match the inhalability criteria as contained in the latest recommendations of the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In the past, practical evaluations have been carried out under idealized conditions in wind tunnels, and there is now the need to extend these to more realistic workplace conditions. This paper describes a new test system that was designed and built for this purpose. It consisted of a life-size mannequin mounted on a trolley so that it can be taken to and wheeled around in workplaces. The mannequin itself incorporated a robotic arm so that, under joystick control, it can be made to simulate a range of worker movements, orientations, and attitudes. An electronically controlled, compact breathing machine provided a range of typical breathing parameters for the mannequin. The pump also provided air movement for a number of personal samplers that were mounted on the torso of the mannequin and tested in that position. Sampler performance should be assessed by comparing directly the aerosol collected by the sampler with that inhaled by the mannequin (and collected on filters inside the head).

  8. 30 CFR 33.8 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations. 33.8 Section 33.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH...

  9. 40 CFR 63.11220 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests or fuel analyses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers Area Sources Continuous Compliance Requirements § 63.11220 When must I conduct subsequent performance tests or fuel analyses? (a) If your boiler has a heat input... performance (stack) tests according to § 63.11212 on a triennial basis, except as specified in paragraphs...

  10. 30 CFR 33.8 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations. 33.8 Section 33.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH...

  11. 30 CFR 33.8 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations. 33.8 Section 33.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH...

  12. 30 CFR 33.8 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations. 33.8 Section 33.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH...

  13. 40 CFR 63.2262 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Methods 204A through 204F of 40 CFR part 51, appendix M, which require three separate test runs of at least 3 hours each; and testing of an enclosure conducted using the alternative tracer gas method in...; B = new thickness you are converting to, inches. (k) Establishing thermal oxidizer...

  14. 30 CFR 35.8 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FIRE-RESISTANT HYDRAULIC FLUIDS General Provisions... shall not disclose features of this hydraulic fluid such as the chemical analysis, specifications... demonstrations and tests of the approved hydraulic fluid as it deems appropriate. The conduct of...

  15. "Vernonia v. Acton": Should Schools Conduct Random Drug Tests of Student Athletes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, J. Patrick

    1995-01-01

    In June 1995, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Vernonia (Oregon) School District's right to conduct random drug tests of its student athletes. The court balanced a seventh grader's privacy interest with the state's interest in curbing drug abuse among student athletes. Before adopting drug-testing policies, school boards should assess the local…

  16. 40 CFR 63.10006 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests or tune-ups?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... limit, you must conduct all applicable periodic HCl emissions tests according to Table 5 to this subpart... performance tests according to Table 5 to this subpart and § 63.10007 at least every year. (b) For affected... years (once every year for Hg) according to Table 5 and § 63.10007. Should subsequent emissions...

  17. 40 CFR 63.6615 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When must I conduct subsequent performance tests? 63.6615 Section 63.6615 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Internal Combustion Engines Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.6615 When must I...

  18. Measurement uncertainty for the Uniform Engine Testing Program conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelwahab, Mahmood; Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Silver, Dean

    1987-01-01

    An uncertainty analysis was conducted to determine the bias and precision errors and total uncertainty of measured turbojet engine performance parameters. The engine tests were conducted as part of the Uniform Engine Test Program which was sponsored by the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD). With the same engines, support hardware, and instrumentation, performance parameters were measured twice, once during tests conducted in test cell number 3 and again during tests conducted in test cell number 4 of the NASA Lewis Propulsion Systems Laboratory. The analysis covers 15 engine parameters, including engine inlet airflow, engine net thrust, and engine specific fuel consumption measured at high rotor speed of 8875 rpm. Measurements were taken at three flight conditions defined by the following engine inlet pressure, engine inlet total temperature, and engine ram ratio: (1) 82.7 kPa, 288 K, 1.0, (2) 82.7 kPa, 288 K, 1.3, and (3) 20.7 kPa, 288 K, 1.3. In terms of bias, precision, and uncertainty magnitudes, there were no differences between most measurements made in test cells number 3 and 4. The magnitude of the errors increased for both test cells as engine pressure level decreased. Also, the level of the bias error was two to three times larger than that of the precision error.

  19. 30 CFR 33.8 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations. 33.8 Section 33.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH...

  20. Thermoluminescent aerosol analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Long, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for detecting and measuring trace amounts of aerosols when reacted with ozone in a gaseous environment was examined. A sample aerosol was exposed to a fixed ozone concentration for a fixed period of time, and a fluorescer was added to the exposed sample. The sample was heated in a 30 C/minute linear temperature profile to 200 C. The trace peak was measured and recorded as a function of the test aerosol and the recorded thermoluminescence trace peak of the fluorescer is specific to the aerosol being tested.

  1. 40 CFR 63.2993 - What test methods must I use in conducting performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance tests? (a) Use EPA Method 1 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for selecting the sampling port location and the number of sampling ports. (b) Use EPA Method 2 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for measuring the volumetric flow rate. (c) Use EPA Method 316 or 318 (40 CFR part 63, appendix A) for measuring...

  2. 40 CFR 63.2993 - What test methods must I use in conducting performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance tests? (a) Use EPA Method 1 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for selecting the sampling port location and the number of sampling ports. (b) Use EPA Method 2 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) for measuring the volumetric flow rate. (c) Use EPA Method 316 or 318 (40 CFR part 63, appendix A) for measuring...

  3. The use of slug tests to describe vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Bohling, G.C.; Hyder, Z.; McElwee, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    Multilevel slug tests provide one means of obtaining estimates of hydraulic conductivity on a scale of relevance for contaminant transport investigations. A numerical model is employed here to assess the potential of multilevel slug tests to provide information about vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity under conditions commonly faced in field settings. The results of the numerical simulations raise several important issues concerning the effectiveness of this technique. If the length of the test interval is of the order of the average layer thickness, considerable error may be introduced into the conductivity estimates owing to the effects of adjoining layers. The influence of adjoining layers is dependent on the aspect ratio (length of test interval/well radius) of the tesy interval and the flow properties of the individual layers. If a low-permeability skin is present at the well, the measured vertical variations will be much less than the actual variations, owing to the influence of the skin conductivity on the parameter estimates. A high-permeability skin can also produce apparent vertical variations that are much less than the actual, owing to water flowing vertically along the conductive skin. In cases where the test interval spans a number of layers, a slug test will yield an approximate thickness-weighted average of the hydraulic conductivities of the intersected layers. In most cases, packer circumvention should not be a major concern when packers of 0.75 m or longer are employed. Results of this study are substantiated by recently reported field tests that demonstrate the importance of well emplacement and development activities for obtaining meaningful estimates from a program of multilevel slug tests. ?? 1994.

  4. Results From a Pressure Sensitive Paint Test Conducted at the National Transonic Facility on Test 197: The Common Research Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Lipford, William E.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Goad, William K.; Goad, Linda R.

    2011-01-01

    This report will serve to present results of a test of the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique on the Common Research Model (CRM). This test was conducted at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center. PSP data was collected on several surfaces with the tunnel operating in both cryogenic mode and standard air mode. This report will also outline lessons learned from the test as well as possible approaches to challenges faced in the test that can be applied to later entries.

  5. LOAC: A light aerosol counter/sizer for atmospheric balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Thaury, Claire; Mineau, Jean-Luc; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Mallet, Marc; Berthet, Gwenael; Gaubicher, Bertrand; Coute, Benoit

    nature of the aerosols in the different size classes. The first tests already conducted with a laboratory prototype have shown that the concept works well, in particular for the identification of the aerosol natures using the 2-angles method. The first test flight of LOAC is expected to be performed at the end of 2010. LOAC is planned to be flown in future projects, in particular for the study of aerosols transport over Mediterranean Sea using low altitude drifting balloons (ChArMEx project, see presentation by Dulac et al.), and using high altitude (35-40 km) stratospheric balloons for the determination of the nature of stratospheric aerosol layer in the middle stratosphere.

  6. NASA Processes and Requirements for Conducting Human-in-the-Loop Closed Chamber Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Montz, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has specific processes and requirements that must be followed for tests involving human subjects to be conducted in a safe and effective manner. There are five distinct phases of test operations. Phase one, the test request phase, consists of those activities related to initiating, processing, reviewing, and evaluating the test request. Phase two, the test preparation phase consists of those activities related to planning, coordinating, documenting, and building up the test. Phase three, the test readiness phase consists of those activities related to verifying and reviewing the planned test operations. Phase four, the test activity phase, consists of all pretest operations, functional checkouts, emergency drills, and test operations. Phase five, the post test activity phase, consists of those activities performed once the test is completed, including briefings, documentation of anomalies, data reduction and archiving, and reporting. Project management processes must be followed for facility modifications and major test buildup, which include six phases: initiation and assessment, requirements evaluation, preliminary design, detailed design, use readiness review (URR) and acceptance. Compliance with requirements for safety and quality assurance are documented throughout the test buildup and test operation processes. Tests involving human subjects must be reviewed by the applicable Institutional Review Board (IRB).

  7. Regression models for hydraulic conductivity and field test of borehole permeameter

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Daniel B.; Watson, David B; Lambert, Kevin

    1987-12-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity K{sub s} of sediments in the vadose zone is an important parameter in predicting the seepage rates of water and contaminants. The borehole permeameter is an in situ technique to test a relatively large sample size at any depth. Solutions are presented which account for the effects of unsaturated flow. These solutions are derived from a regression analysis of results of numerical simulations in which unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is represented by one or two parameters. The results of a borehole permeameter test in a uniform sand are compared with field ponding tests and air entry permeameter tests. The regression-based solutions for the borehole permeameter which account for capillarity provide very good agreement with other permeameter results. Depending upon the approach used to solve the borehole problem K{sub s} values determined by methods which neglected and included capillary effects varied by a factor of only about two for the soil tested.

  8. Regression models for hydraulic conductivity and field test of the borehole permeameter

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D.B.; Lambert, K.; Watson, D.

    1987-12-01

    The saturated hydraulic conductivity K/sub s/ of sediments in the vadose zone is an important parameter in predicting the seepage rates of water and contaminants. The borehole permeameter is an in situ technique to test a relatively large sample size at any depth. Solutions are presented which account for the effects of unsaturated flow. These solutions are derived from a regression analysis of results of numerical simulations in which unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is represented by one or two parameters. The results of a borehole permeameter test in a uniform sand are compared with field ponding tests and air entry permeameter tests. The regression-based solutions for the borehole permeameter which account for capillarity provide very good agreement with other permeameter results. Depending upon the approach used to solve the borehole problem K/sub s/ values determined by methods which neglected and included capillary effects varied by a factor of only about two for the soil test.

  9. Design and testing of Electrostatic Aerosol in Vitro Exposure System (EAVES): an alternative exposure system for particles.

    PubMed

    de Bruijne, K; Ebersviller, S; Sexton, K G; Lake, S; Leith, D; Goodman, R; Jetters, J; Walters, G W; Doyle-Eisele, M; Woodside, R; Jeffries, H E; Jaspers, I

    2009-02-01

    Conventional in vitro exposure methods for cultured human lung cells rely on prior suspension of particles in a liquid medium; these have limitations for exposure intensity and may modify the particle composition. Here electrostatic precipitation was used as an effective method for such in vitro exposures. An obsolete electrostatic aerosol sampler was modified to provide a viable environment within the deposition field for human lung cells grown on membranous support. Particle deposition and particle-induced toxicological effects for a variety of particles including standardized polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and diesel exhaust emission particle mixtures are reported. The Electrostatic Aerosol in Vitro Exposure System (EAVES) efficiently deposited particles from an air stream directly onto cells. Cells exposed to the electric field of the EAVES in clean air or in the presence of charged PSL spheres exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, and their release of inflammatory cytokines was indistinguishable from that of the controls. For the responses tested here, there are no significant adverse effects caused neither by the electric field alone nor by the mildly charged particles. Exposure to diesel exhaust emissions using the EAVES system induced a threefold increase in cytokines and cytotoxicity as compared to the control. Taken together, these data show that the EAVES can be used to expose human lung cells directly to particles without prior collection in media, thereby providing an efficient and effective alternative to the more conventional particle in vitro exposure methods.

  10. Ice nucleation onto Arizona test dust at cirrus temperatures: effect of temperature and aerosol size on onset relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Kanji, Z A; Abbatt, J P D

    2010-01-21

    The University of Toronto Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (UT-CFDC) was used to study ice formation onto monodisperse Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. The onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(i)) was measured as a function of temperature in the range 251-223 K for 100 nm ATD particles. It was found that for 0.1% of the particles to freeze, water saturation was required at all temperatures except 223 K where particles activated at RH(i) below water saturation. At this temperature, where deposition mode freezing is occurring, we find that the larger the particle size, the lower the onset RH(i). We also demonstrate that the total number of particles present may influence the onset RH(i) observed. The surface area for ice activation, aerosol size, and temperature must all be considered when reporting onset values of ice formation onto ATD mineral dust particles. In addition, we calculate nucleation rates and contact angles of ice germs with ATD aerosols which indicate that there exists a range of active sites on the surface with different efficiencies for activating ice formation. PMID:19888714

  11. Results from simulated upper-plenum aerosol transport and aerosol resuspension experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.L.; Pattison, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    Recent calculational results published as part of the Battelle-Columbus BMI-2104 source term study indicate that, for some LWR accident sequences, aerosol deposition in the reactor primary coolant system (PCS) can lead to significant reductions in the radionuclide source term. Aerosol transport and deposition in the PCS have been calculated in this study using the TRAP-MELT 2 computer code, which was developed at Battelle-Columbus; the status of validation of the TRAP-MELT 2 code has been described in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report. The objective of the ORNL TRAP-MELT Validation Project, which is sponsored by the Fuel Systems Behavior Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is to conduct simulated reactor-vessel upper-plenum aerosol deposition and transport tests. The results from these tests will be used in the ongoing effort to validate TRAP-MELT 2. The TRAP-MELT Validation Project includes two experimental subtasks. In the Aerosol Transport Tests, aerosol transport in a vertical pipe is being studied; this geometry was chosen to simulate aerosol deposition and transport in the reactor-vessel upper-plenum. To date, four experiments have been performed; the results from these tests are presented in this paper. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. [Animal testing ethics and human testing. Thoughts on our conduct with and our relationship to animals].

    PubMed

    Locker, Alfred

    2004-01-01

    After many years of experimental work with animals of diverse species, the author felt confronted with the question whether the great expenditure of sacrificed animal life would pay off when compared with the results gained. By self-critically considering his work, he gradually experienced a conversion from an unconcerned experimenter to a man feeling a deep sympathy with his fellow creatures. This motivated him to ponder the true nature of animals. Instead of applying ethics--though justified in its own realm--the author preferred to look at the problem using the General Systems Theory (GST), which can describe "the other side" of any system, the side into which any system may occasionally or necessarily transform. It occurred to him to assume that--provided we see a living organism as a system (as Ludwig von Bertalanffy, the founder of GST, did)--the "other side" of the animal would correspond to an innocent "genius" who suffers for man (thereby assuming a Christ-like position), whereas in its transitory life the true essence of the animal is hidden. Thus, by fancifully viewing the role of animals destined to suffer, a connection between GST and theology or religion arises. The consequence for us would be to pay honour to the test animal, irrespective of whether or not painful experiments could be avoided. The differentiation between a sacrifice (spiritually surrendering for a greater good) and a victim (involuntarily subjected to suffering) reveals that the experimental animal primarily belongs to the latter. But it can be elevated to the former when the full meaning of its suffering becomes obvious. The same holds true for "human testing", if, in contrast to the formidable atrocities, e.g. of concentration camps, the momentum of voluntariness is guaranteed, as pioneers of medical research frequently demonstrated by carrying out experiments on themselves.

  13. Analytical study of electrophoretic characterization of kidney cells. [conducted during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Embryonic kidney cells were studied as a follow-up to the MA-011 Electrophoresis Technology Experiment which was conducted during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). The postflight analysis of the performance of the ASTP zone electrophoresis experiment involving embryonic kidney cells is reported. The feasibility of producing standard particles for electrophoresis was also studied. This work was undertaken in response to a need for standardization of methods for producing, calibrating, and storing electrophoretic particle standards which could be employed in performance tests of various types of electrophoresis equipment. Promising procedures were tested for their suitability in the production of standard test particles from red blood cells.

  14. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Martynenko, D.; Klüser, L.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.; Ducos, F.; Deuzé, J. L.; Graigner, R. G.; Heckel, A.; von Hoyningen-Hüne, W.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; North, P.; Poulsen, C. A.; Ramon, D.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanre, D.; Thomas, G. E.; Vountas, M.; Descloitres, J.; Griesfeller, J.; Kinne, S.; Schulz, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-03-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (2010-2013) algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1) a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2) a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome) applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3) a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components and their mixing ratios. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008) of data qualitatively by visible analysis of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing global daily gridded satellite data against daily

  15. Results of acute and chronic toxicity tests conducted at SRS NPDES outfalls, July--October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Acute (48 hour LC50) and chronic (7-day reproductive impairment) toxicity tests were conducted on Ceriodaphnia dubia in water collected from 53 NPDES outfalls. All tests were conducted at the in-stream waste concentration. only 12 of the 53 outfalls showed no evidence of toxicity. Twenty-eight of the outfalls were acutely toxic, often producing 100% mortality during the first day of exposure. Fourteen outfalls had no discharge at the time of sampling and could not be tested. Three outfalls were not tested because their toxicity has been adequately characterized in other investigations. Elevated concentrations of total residual chlorine are suspected to be responsible for the observed toxicity of many NPDES outfalls, particularly the sanitary wastewater treatment plants. Chemical data from previous studies indicate that metals may also be present in toxic concentrations at many outfalls. Toxicity identification and reduction options are discussed.

  16. Summary report on 49 L ferrocyanide aerosol tests TO208-1 and TO209-1

    SciTech Connect

    Fauske, H.K.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results of the first test conducted in a series of tests directed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). For the record, Ref.[l] is included as Appendix A. The test discussed in this document, designated as T0127-1, is a ferrocyanide reaction propagation rate determination test conducted under an inert argon atmosphere of 10 atm. abs. (130 psig). The test was conducted in a new 49 L containment volume described in Section 2.0. The test sample was dry In-Farm 1 bottom flow sheet material. The test protocol was similar to that described in Refs.[2 and 3]. However, as requested in Ref.[l] supplemental gas sample taking procedures were prepared and followed as described in Section 4.0 and Appendix B. Test results shoved an inverse reaction propagation velocity of {approx}4 sec/cm. This is about 50% faster than a prior similar test conducted under 1 atm. abs. pressure. For further comparison, this burn velocity of the ferrocyanide test is also about an order-of-magnitude slower than a slow burn gun powder at 1 atm. Pre- and post-test gas samples were taken and have been forwarded to WHC for further analyses. Details of these results are presented in Section 5.0 and comparisons with other similar reaction propagation rate tests are discussed in Section 6.0.

  17. Comparison of in situ and columnar aerosol spectral measurements during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006: testing parameterizations for estimating aerosol fine mode properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. B.; Massoli, P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Quinn, P. K.; Brooks, S.; Lefer, B.

    2009-08-01

    During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study and Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006), the optical, chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on multiple mobile platforms and at ground based stations. In situ measurements of the aerosol light extinction coefficient (σep) were performed by two multi-wavelength cavity ring-down (CRD) instruments, one located on board the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB) and the other located at the University of Houston, Moody Tower (UHMT). An AERONET sunphotometer was also located at the UHMT to measure the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD). The σep data were used to extract the extinction Ångström exponent (åep), a measure of the wavelength dependence of σep. There was general agreement between the åep (and to a lesser degree σep measurements by the two spatially separated CRD instruments during multi-day periods, suggesting a regional scale consistency of the sampled aerosols. Two spectral models are applied to the σep and AOD data to extract the fine mode fraction of extinction (η) and the fine mode effective radius (Reff f). These two parameters are robust measures of the fine mode contribution to total extinction and the fine mode size distribution respectively. The results of the analysis are compared to Reff f values extracted using AERONET V2 retrievals and calculated from in situ particle size measurements on the RHB and at UHMT. During a time period when fine mode aerosols dominated the extinction over a large area extending from Houston/Galveston Bay and out into the Gulf of Mexico, the various methods for obtaining Reff f agree qualitatively (showing the same temporal trend) and quantitatively (pooled standard deviation=28 nm).

  18. Comparison of in situ and columnar aerosol spectral measurements during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006: testing parameterizations for estimating aerosol fine mode properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. B.; Massoli, P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Quinn, P. K.; Brooks, S. D.; Lefer, B.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study and Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006), the optical, chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on multiple mobile platforms and at ground based stations. In situ measurements of the aerosol light extinction coefficient (σep) were performed by two multi-wavelength cavity ring-down (CRD) instruments, one located on board the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB) and the other located at the University of Houston, Moody Tower (UHMT). An AERONET sunphotometer was also located at the UHMT to measure the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD). The σep data were used to extract the extinction Ångström exponent (åep), a measure of the wavelength dependence of σep. There was general agreement between the åep (and to a lesser degree σep) measurements by the two spatially separated CRD instruments during multi-day periods, suggesting a regional scale consistency of the sampled aerosols. Two spectral models are applied to the σep and AOD data to extract the fine mode fraction of extinction (η) and the fine mode effective radius (Reff,f). These two parameters are robust measures of the fine mode contribution to total extinction and the fine mode size distribution, respectively. The results of the analysis are compared to Reff,f values extracted using AERONET V2 retrievals and calculated from in situ particle size measurements on the RHB and at UHMT. During a time period when fine mode aerosols dominated the extinction over a large area extending from Houston/Galveston Bay and out into the Gulf of Mexico, the various methods for obtaining Reff,f agree qualitatively (showing the same temporal trend) and quantitatively (pooled standard deviation = 28 nm).

  19. Evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test conducted at the project Gnome Underground Nuclear Test Site, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Pohll, G.; Pohlmann, K.

    1996-08-01

    A radionuclide tracer test was conducted in 1963 by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Project Gnome underground nuclear test site, approximately 40 km southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The tracer study was carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to study the transport behavior of radionuclides in fractured rock aquifers. The Culebra Dolomite was chosen for the test because it was considered to be a reasonable analogue of the fractured carbonate aquifer at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the principal location of U.S. underground nuclear tests. Project Gnome was one of a small number of underground nuclear tests conducted by the AEC at sites distant from the NTS. The Gnome device was detonated on December 10, 1961 in an evaporate unit at a depth of 360 m below ground surface. Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close these offsite nuclear test areas. An early step in this process is performance of a preliminary risk analysis of the hazard posed by each site. The Desert Research Institute has performed preliminary hydrologic risk evaluations for the groundwater transport pathway at Gnome. That evaluation included the radioactive tracer test as a possible source because the test introduced radionuclides directly into the Culebra Dolomite, which is the only aquifer at the site. This report presents a preliminary evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test as a source for radionuclide migration in the Culebra Dolomite. The results of this study will assist in planning site characterization activities and refining estimates of the radionuclide source for comprehensive models of groundwater transport st the Gnome site.

  20. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  1. Statistical Tests Conducted with School Environment Data: The Effect of Teachers Being Clustered in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of clustering on statistical tests conducted with school environment data. Because most school environment studies involve the collection of data from teachers nested within schools, the hierarchical nature to these data cannot be ignored. In particular, this article considers the influence of intraschool…

  2. 40 CFR 63.8445 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating limits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating limits? 63.8445 Section 63.8445 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)...

  3. 30 CFR 27.10 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... disclose principles or patentable features, nor shall it disclose any details of drawings, specifications... paragraph (b) of this section. (a) Prior to the issuance of a letter of certification, necessary Government... letter of certification, MSHA may conduct such public demonstrations and tests of the certified...

  4. 30 CFR 27.10 - Conduct of investigations, tests, and demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... disclose principles or patentable features, nor shall it disclose any details of drawings, specifications... paragraph (b) of this section. (a) Prior to the issuance of a letter of certification, necessary Government... letter of certification, MSHA may conduct such public demonstrations and tests of the certified...

  5. 40 CFR 63.2262 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (TTE) conducted using Methods 204A through 204F of 40 CFR part 51, appendix M, which require three... thermal oxidizers, you may measure the temperature in multiple locations (e.g., one location per burner... performance tests. Replacement of the biofilter media with the same type of material is not considered...

  6. Predicting Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity from Percolation Test Results in Layered Silt Loam Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The size of on-site waste disposal systems is usually determined by one or more percolation tests performed on the proposed site. The objectives of this study were to develop an empirical relationship between the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of layered soils and their percolation times (PT)...

  7. 40 CFR 63.3360 - What performance tests must I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... atmosphere according to § 63.3360(g). (2) Using a capture and control system Conduct a performance test for each capture and control system to determine: the destruction or removal efficiency of each control device other than solvent recovery according to § 63.3360(e), and the capture efficiency of each...

  8. 40 CFR 63.3360 - What performance tests must I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... atmosphere according to § 63.3360(g). (2) Using a capture and control system Conduct a performance test for each capture and control system to determine: the destruction or removal efficiency of each control device other than solvent recovery according to § 63.3360(e), and the capture efficiency of each...

  9. 40 CFR 60.2140 - By what date must I conduct the initial performance test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Initial Compliance Requirements § 60.2140... waste at an existing combustion unit at any commercial or industrial facility, and you conducted a test consistent with the provisions of this subpart while combusting the solid waste within the 6 months...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2140 - By what date must I conduct the initial performance test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units Initial Compliance Requirements § 60.2140... waste at an existing combustion unit at any commercial or industrial facility, and you conducted a test consistent with the provisions of this subpart while combusting the solid waste within the 6 months...

  11. 30 CFR 250.460 - What are the requirements for conducting a well test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the requirements for conducting a well test? 250.460 Section 250.460 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil...

  12. 30 CFR 250.460 - What are the requirements for conducting a well test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for conducting a well test? 250.460 Section 250.460 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1775 - What types of stack tests must I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What types of stack tests must I conduct? 60.1775 Section 60.1775 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal...

  14. 40 CFR 62.14675 - By what date must I conduct the annual performance test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false By what date must I conduct the annual performance test? 62.14675 Section 62.14675 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15230 - What types of stack tests must I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What types of stack tests must I conduct? 62.15230 Section 62.15230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1285 - What types of stack tests must I conduct?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What types of stack tests must I conduct? 60.1285 Section 60.1285 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units...

  17. 40 CFR 63.8595 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating limits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating limits? 63.8595 Section 63.8595 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)...

  18. 40 CFR 63.8445 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating limits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating limits? 63.8445 Section 63.8445 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)...

  19. 30 CFR 250.407 - What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of oil, gas, sulphur, and water in the formations penetrated by logging, formation sampling, or well... OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations General Requirements § 250.407 What tests must I conduct to...

  20. 30 CFR 250.407 - What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics? 250.407 Section 250.407 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... determine reservoir characteristics? You must determine the presence, quantity, quality, and...

  1. 30 CFR 250.407 - What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics? 250.407 Section 250.407 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... determine reservoir characteristics? You must determine the presence, quantity, quality, and...

  2. 30 CFR 250.407 - What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics? 250.407 Section 250.407 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... determine reservoir characteristics? You must determine the presence, quantity, quality, and...

  3. 40 CFR 63.2991 - When must I conduct performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 5 years. You must conduct a performance test every 5 years as part of renewing your 40 CFR part 70...? 63.2991 Section 63.2991 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  4. Product consistency test round robin conducted by the Materials Characterization Center - Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, G.F.; Jones, T.E.; Eggett, D.L.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1989-09-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) Product Consistency Test (PCT) was developed as a short duration leach test that could be used to evaluate the consistency of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass. The goals were to develop a test that would be sensitive to glass composition and homogeneity, rapid enough to support quality control of the production process, and easily conducted remotely to facilitate working with highly radioactive materials. The long-term SRL goal is to show that the PCT can be used to demonstrate that DWPF glass meets the elemental and radionuclide release requirements of the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS). The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was requested by SRL to conduct a multi-laboratory round robin to evaluate the effectiveness of the PCT methodology. 12 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE 30) Module Conductivity Test Thermal Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Jose; Phelps, Lisa H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two SAFE 30 modules were tested to determinate the thermal conductivity efficiency of the tri-cusps filled between the heat pipe and the heater cores. The modules consisted of four one-inch diameter tubes with heaters joined to an empty 1 inch diam. tube. The test was conducted on a vacuum chamber with 4 configurations: tri-cusps filled with and without radiation shielding and non-filled tri-cusps with and without radiation shielding. The tri-cusps material helps the bonding of the heat pipe to the four electric heater cores, filling the gap between the pipes. The baseline configuration is a brazed joint between the pipe. The test consisted of controlling the power applied to the heaters until a set surface temperature is reach. The temperatures varied between a max. of 800 C to 500 C. Test data, input energy and chamber surface temperature from each individual test, was used as boundary conditions for the model. Nodes located on the same location as the test thermocouples were plotted again test data to determinate the accuracy of the analysis. The unknown n variables on the analysis are the radiation emissivity of the pipe and chamber and the radiation view factor between the module and the chamber. A correlation was determined using a parametric analysis varying the surface emissivity and view factor until a good match was reach.

  6. Toward A 3-D Picture of Hydraulic Conductivity With Multilevel Slug Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwee, C. D.; McElwee, C. D.; Ross, H. C.

    2001-12-01

    The GEMS (Geohydrologic Experiment and Monitoring Site) field area has been established (in the Kansas River valley near Lawrence, Kansas) for a variety of reasons relating to research and teaching in hydrogeology at the University of Kansas. Over 70 wells have been installed for various purposes. The site overlies an alluvial aquifer with a total thickness of about 70 feet. The water table is typically about 20 feet below the surface, giving a total saturated thickness of about 50 feet. The upper part of the aquifer is finer material consisting of silt and clay. Typically, the lower 35 feet of the aquifer is sand and gravel. A number of wells through out the site are fully screened through the sand and gravel aquifer. Some of these fully screened wells are larger diameters; however, most wells are constructed of 2 inch PVC casing. Slug tests are widely used in hydrogeology to measure hydraulic conductivity. Over the last several years we have been conducting research to improve the slug test method. We have previously reported the detailed structure of hydraulic conductivity that can be seen in a 5 inch well (McElwee and Zemansky, EOS, v. 80, no. 46, p. F397, 1999) at this site, using multilevel slug tests. The existing 2 inch, fully screened wells are spread out over the site and offer the opportunity for developing a 3-D picture of the hydraulic conductivity distribution. However, it is difficult to develop a system that allows multilevel slug tests to be done accurately and efficiently in a 2 inch well. This is especially true in regions of very high hydraulic conductivity, where the water velocity in the casing will be relatively high. The resistance caused by frictional forces in the equipment must be minimized and a model taking account of these forces must be used. We have developed a system (equipment, software, and technique) for performing multilevel slug tests in 2 inch wells. Some equipment configurations work better than others. The data that we have

  7. Design and Testing of D.C. Conduction Pump for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nashine, B.K.; Dash, S.K.; Gurumurthy, K.; Rajan, M.; Vaidyanathan, G.

    2006-07-01

    DC Conduction pump immersed in sodium forms a part of Failed Fuel Location Module (FFLM) of 500 MWe Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) currently under construction. FFLM housed in control plug of the reactor, is used to locate the failed fuel sub-assembly due to clad rupture in the fuel pin. The DC conduction pump sucks the sodium from the top of fuel sub-assemblies through the selector valve and pumps the sodium to hold up for detecting the presence of delayed neutrons. Presence of delayed neutron is the indication of failure in the sampled fuel sub-assembly. The DC Conduction Pump was chosen because of its low voltage operation (2 V) where argon/alumina ceramic can provide required electrical insulation even at operating temperature of 560 deg. C without much complication on the manufacturing front. Sampling of sodium from top of different sub-assemblies is achieved by operation of selector valve in-conjunction with the drive motor. FFLM requires the pump to be immersed in sodium pool at {approx} 560 deg. C located above the fuel sub-assemblies in the reactor. The Pump of 0.36 m{sup 3}/h capacity and developing 1.45 Kg/ cm{sup 2} pressure was designed, manufactured and tested. The DC Conduction Pump has a stainless steel duct filled with liquid sodium, which is to be pumped. The stainless steel duct is kept in magnetic field obtained by means of electromagnet. The electromagnet is made of soft iron and the coil made of copper conductor surrounds the yoke portion of electromagnet. The external DC source of 2000 Amps, 2 Volt is used to send current through sodium placed in the stainless steel duct and the same current is sent through copper coil of electromagnet for producing required magneto motive force, which in turn produces required magnetic field. The interaction of current in sodium (placed in stainless steel duct) and magnetic field produced by the electromagnet in the duct region produces pumping force in the sodium. Electromagnet, copper coil, stainless steel

  8. Using Pneumatics to Perform Laboratory Hydraulic Conductivity Tests on Gravel with Underdamped Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    A permeameter has been designed and built to perform laboratory hydraulic conductivity tests on various kinds of gravel samples with hydraulic conductivity values ranging from 0.1 to 1 m/s. The tests are commenced by applying 200 Pa of pneumatic pressure to the free surface of the water column in a riser connected above a cylinder that holds large gravel specimens. This setup forms a permeameter specially designed for these tests which is placed in a barrel filled with water, which acts as a reservoir. The applied pressure depresses the free surface in the riser 2 cm until it is instantly released by opening a ball valve. The water then flows through the base of the cylinder and the specimen like a falling head test, but the water level oscillates about the static value. The water pressure and the applied air pressure in the riser are measured with vented pressure transducers at 100 Hz. The change in diameter lowers the damping frequency of the fluctuations of the water level in the riser, which allows for underdamped responses to be observed for all tests. The results of tests without this diameter change would otherwise be a series of critically damped responses with only one or two oscillations that dampen within seconds and cannot be evaluated with equations for the falling head test. The underdamped responses oscillate about the static value at about 1 Hz and are very sensitive to the hydraulic conductivity of all the soils tested. These fluctuations are also very sensitive to the inertia and friction in the permeameter that are calculated considering the geometry of the permeameter and verified experimentally. Several gravel specimens of various shapes and sizes are tested that show distinct differences in water level fluctuations. The friction of the system is determined by calibrating the model with the results of tests performed where the cylinder had no soil in it. The calculation of the inertia in the response of the water column for the typical testing

  9. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Aerosol experiments ABCOVE AB5, AB6, AB7, and LACE LA2

    SciTech Connect

    Souto, F.J.; Haskin, F.E.; Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-10-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been used to model four of the large-scale aerosol behavior experiments conducted in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) vessel. Tests AB5, AB6 and AB7 of the ABCOVE program simulate the dry aerosol conditions during a hypothetical severe accident in an LMFBR. Test LA2 of the LACE program simulates aerosol behavior in a condensing steam environment during a postulated severe accident in an LWR with failure to isolate the containment. The comparison of code results to experimental data show that MELCOR is able to correctly predict most of the thermal-hydraulic results in the four tests. MELCOR predicts reasonably well the dry aerosol behavior of the ABCOVE tests, but significant disagreements are found in the aerosol behavior modelling for the LA2 experiment. These results tend to support some of the concerns about the MELCOR modelling of steam condensation onto aerosols expressed in previous works. During these analyses, a limitation in the MELCOR input was detected for the specification of the aerosol parameters for more than one component. A Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) sensitivity study of the aerosol dynamic constants is presented for test AB6. The study shows the importance of the aerosol shape factors in the aerosol deposition behavior, and reveals that MELCOR input/output processing is highly labor intensive for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on LHS.

  10. Development and Testing of a Variable Conductance Thermal Acquisition, Transport, and Switching System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugby, David C.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Stouffer, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a scalable thermal management architecture for instruments, subsystems, or systems that must operate in severe space environments with wide variations in sink temperature. The architecture involves a serial linkage of one or more hot-side variable conductance heat pipes (VCHPs) to one or more cold-side loop heat pipes (LHPs). The VCHPs provide wide area heat acquisition, limited distance thermal transport, modest against gravity pumping, concentrated LHP startup heating, and high switching ratio variable conductance operation. The LHPs provide localized heat acquisition, long distance thermal transport, significant against gravity pumping, and high switching ratio variable conductance operation. The single-VCHP, single-LHP system described herein was developed to maintain thermal control of a small robotic lunar lander throughout the lunar day-night thermal cycle. It is also applicable to other variable heat rejection space missions in severe environments. Operationally, despite a 60-70% gas blocked VCHP condenser during ON testing, the system was still able to provide 2-4 W/K ON conductance, 0.01 W/K OFF conductance, and an end-to-end switching ratio of 200-400. The paper provides a detailed analysis of VCHP condenser performance, which quantified the gas blockage situation. Future multi-VCHP/multi-LHP thermal management system concepts that provide power/transport length scalability are also discussed.

  11. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  12. Aerosol Climate Time Series in ESA Aerosol_cci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Thomas; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Pinnock, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Aerosol_cci (2010 - 2017) conducts intensive work to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors. Meanwhile, full mission time series of 2 GCOS-required aerosol parameters are completely validated and released: Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from dual view ATSR-2 / AATSR radiometers (3 algorithms, 1995 - 2012), and stratospheric extinction profiles from star occultation GOMOS spectrometer (2002 - 2012). Additionally, a 35-year multi-sensor time series of the qualitative Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) together with sensitivity information and an AAI model simulator is available. Complementary aerosol properties requested by GCOS are in a "round robin" phase, where various algorithms are inter-compared: fine mode AOD, mineral dust AOD (from the thermal IASI spectrometer, but also from ATSR instruments and the POLDER sensor), absorption information and aerosol layer height. As a quasi-reference for validation in few selected regions with sparse ground-based observations the multi-pixel GRASP algorithm for the POLDER instrument is used. Validation of first dataset versions (vs. AERONET, MAN) and inter-comparison to other satellite datasets (MODIS, MISR, SeaWIFS) proved the high quality of the available datasets comparable to other satellite retrievals and revealed needs for algorithm improvement (for example for higher AOD values) which were taken into account for a reprocessing. The datasets contain pixel level uncertainty estimates which were also validated and improved in the reprocessing. For the three ATSR algorithms the use of an ensemble method was tested. The paper will summarize and discuss the status of dataset reprocessing and validation. The focus will be on the ATSR, GOMOS and IASI datasets. Pixel level uncertainties validation will be summarized and discussed including unknown components and their potential usefulness and limitations. Opportunities for time series extension

  13. 40 CFR 60.4415 - How do I conduct the initial and subsequent performance tests for sulfur?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subsequent performance tests for sulfur? 60.4415 Section 60.4415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... initial and subsequent performance tests for sulfur? (a) You must conduct an initial performance test, as... conduct the performance tests. (1) If you choose to periodically determine the sulfur content of the...

  14. 40 CFR 60.4415 - How do I conduct the initial and subsequent performance tests for sulfur?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subsequent performance tests for sulfur? 60.4415 Section 60.4415 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... initial and subsequent performance tests for sulfur? (a) You must conduct an initial performance test, as... conduct the performance tests. (1) If you choose to periodically determine the sulfur content of the...

  15. Predicting saturated hydraulic conductivity from percolation test results in layered silt loam soils.

    PubMed

    Jabro, Jay D

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of the study discussed in this article were to develop an empirical relationship between the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of layered soils and their percolation times (PT) in order to understand the influence of individual layers and compare this with the equations developed by Winneberger (1974) and Fritton, Ratvasky, and Petersen (1986). Field research was conducted on three silt loam soils. Six holes were spaced evenly in two parallel rows of three holes. The Ks was measured at three different layers for each soil using a constant head well permeameter. After completion of the second Ks measurement, the percolation test was conducted. Three linear equations for the upper, middle, and lower layers were developed between the Ks values of each individual layer in all three sites and the corresponding PT. Significant differences were found between the author's results and those predicted by Winneberger (1974) and Fritton and co-authors (1986). PMID:20063609

  16. Analysis of aquifer tests conducted in borehole USW G-2, 1996, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, G.M.

    1998-08-01

    Borehole USW G-2 is located north of Yucca Mountain in a large-hydraulic-gradient area. Two single-borehole aquifer tests were conducted in the borehole during 1996. A 54.9-hour pumping period was conducted February 6--8, 1996, and a 408-hour pumping period was conducted April 8--25, 1996. The purpose of testing was to obtain estimates of the aquifer-system transmissivity and to determine if perched water was affecting the observed water level in borehole USW G-2. This report presents and analyzes data collected between February 6 and December 17, 1996. Analysis of the aquifer-test data indicated that fracture flow, dual-porosity flow, and boundary-affected flow conditions were observed in the drawdown and recovery data. Transmissivity estimates ranged from 2.3 to 12 meters squared per day. The most representative transmissivity estimate for the interval tested is the early-time mean transmissivity of 9.4 meters squared per day. The Calico Hills Formation was the primary formation tested, but the top 3 meters of the nonpumping water column was within the overlying Topopah Spring Tuff. Persistent residual drawdown following pumping more than 6 million liters of water during aquifer testing may indicate that the bore-hole intersected a perched water body. After 236 days of recovery, residual drawdown was 0.5 meter. The quantitative effect of the perched water on the observed water level in borehole USW G-2, however, cannot be determined with the available data.

  17. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Griesfeller, J.; Martynenko, D.; Klüser, L.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.; Ducos, F.; Deuzé, J. L.; Graigner, R. G.; Heckel, A.; von Hoyningen-Hüne, W.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; North, P.; Poulsen, C. A.; Ramon, D.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanre, D.; Thomas, G. E.; Vountas, M.; Descloitres, J.; Griesfeller, J.; Kinne, S.; Schulz, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-08-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (2010-2013), algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1) a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2) a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome) applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3) a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008) of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun photometer

  18. A protocol for conducting 7-day daily renewal tests with Lemna gibba.

    PubMed

    Brain, Richard A; Solomon, Keith R

    2007-01-01

    Lemna gibba (a duckweed) is a freshwater macrophyte commonly used in toxicity testing, and Lemna spp are currently the only aquatic higher plants required for evaluation of pesticides under the pesticide registration guidelines of the EPA. The methods currently available for toxicity testing by various organizations and agencies, including ASTM, OECD, EPA and Environment Canada, are largely static or semistatic tests with unspecified renewal intervals (OECD) and may not provide a consistent means of exposure owing to short toxicant half-life in aquatic media, uptake of chemical by plants and evaporation of nutrient media. The procedure outlined here details a simple and efficient 7-day daily static renewal procedure for conducting toxicity tests with L. gibba, the appropriate end points to assess, the statistical criteria necessary for analyzing the toxicity data, as well as the steps required to culture and maintain L. gibba. This protocol is based on a modified version of a widely accepted static method. PMID:17446897

  19. Evaluation of Fluid Conduction and Mixing within a Subassembly of the Actinide Burner Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cliff B. Davis

    2007-09-01

    The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid, including axial and radial heat conduction and subchannel mixing, that are not currently represented with internal code models. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor.

  20. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT PRESSURE RESPONSE FROM A CONSTANT FLOW RATE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Olsen, Harold W.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporating a flow pump into a conventional triaxial laboratory system allows fluid to be supplied to or withdrawn from the base of a sediment sample at small and constant rates. An initial transient record of hydraulic head versus time is observed which eventually stabilizes to a constant steady state gradient across the sample; values of hydraulic conductivity can subsequently be determined from Darcy's law. In this paper, analytical methods are presented for determining values of specific storage and hydraulic conductivity from the initial transient phase of such a constant flow rate test. These methods are based on a diffusion equation involving pore pressure and are analogous to those used to describe the soil consolidation process and also to interpret aquifer properties from pumping tests.

  1. A TEST OF THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM MODELS AND 3-D AIR QUALITY MODELS FOR PREDICTIONS OF AEROSOL NO3-

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inorganic species of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium constitute a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols. The behavior of nitrate is one of the most intriguing aspects of inorganic atmospheric aerosols because particulate nitrate concentrations depend not only on the amount of ...

  2. The precision of product consistency tests conducted with a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.; Johnson, S. G.

    2002-09-01

    The product consistency test (PCT) that is used for qualification of borosilicate high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glasses for disposal can be used for the same purpose in the qualification of the glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (CWF). The CWF was developed to immobilize radioactive salt wastes generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuels. An interlaboratory study was conducted to measure the precision of PCTs conducted with the CWF for comparison with the precision of PCTs conducted with HLW glasses. The six independent sets of triplicate PCT results generated in the study were used to calculate the intralaboratory and interlaboratory consistency based on the concentrations of Al, B, Na, and Si in the test solutions. The results indicate that PCTs can be conducted as precisely with the CWF as with HLW glasses. For example, the values of the reproducibility standard deviation for Al, B, Na, and Si were 1.36, 0.347, 3.40, and 2.97 mg/l for PCT with CWF. These values are within the range of values measured for borosilicate glasses, including reference HLW glasses.

  3. STS-31 MS Sullivan conducts DSO 473 test on Pilot Bolden on OV-103's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Mission Specialist (MS) Kathryn D. Sullivan conducts a Merieux skin test on Pilot Charles F. Bolden as part of Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) 473, Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity. In Sullivan's left hand is a bar filled with doses of a bacterial antigen to be administered to the subject's skin. The two crewmembers are in front of forward lockers on the middeck of the Earth-orbiting Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103.

  4. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... through which sample air is flowing during performance of this test. (3) A no-flow filter is a sample filter through which no sample air is intended to flow during performance of this test. (4) A channel is... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures...

  5. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of Reference Methods and Class I and Class II... sample collection filter) differs significantly from that specified for reference method samplers as specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and...

  6. Cross-institute evaluations of inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for direct testing of aerosol and blood samples containing biological warfare agent DNA.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Timothy D; Rachwal, Phillip A; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W; Weller, Simon A

    2014-02-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples-which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR.

  7. Cross-Institute Evaluations of Inhibitor-Resistant PCR Reagents for Direct Testing of Aerosol and Blood Samples Containing Biological Warfare Agent DNA

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Timothy D.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples—which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR. PMID:24334660

  8. Development of an electrical conductivity screening test for mine waste assessments.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Warner, Richard C; Honaker, Rick Q

    2016-10-01

    An environmental concern at mining operations is the potential leaching of trace elements from overburden and byproduct streams of processing plants. To provide a timely assessment of this concern, electrical conductivity of the leachate emanating from the plant waste streams can be measured as an indicator of the trace element content levels using the USGS Field Leach Test (FLT). However, the research reported in this publication revealed the need to modify the FLT procedure to improve the precision of the test results. The primary issue involved the importance of leachant volume-to-particle surface area ratio in the assessment of the leaching potential for a given source. To determine the key factors impacting leachability of a given material, a statistically-designed parametric study was performed. The experimental program evaluated the effects of particle surface area, the leachant volume-to-surface area ratio, and the amount of oxidant used to expedite the leaching rate during the test. The results revealed that the significant parameters are leachant volume-to-solid surface area ratio and the amount of oxidant. The findings were used to recommend a modification to the conductivity screening test.

  9. Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing for Conducted Susceptibility Along Interconnecting Signal Lines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, P. D.; Wood, R. T.; Korsah, K.; Shourbaji, A. A.; Wilson, T. L.; Beets, B. M.

    2002-07-31

    This document presents recommendations and the associated technical basis for addressing the effects of conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio-frequency interference (RFI) along interconnecting signal lines in safety-related instrumentation and control (I&C) systems. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in assisting the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research in developing the technical basis for regulatory guidance on EMIIRFI immunity and power surge withstand capability (SWC). Previous research efforts have provided recommendations on (1) electromagnetic compatibility design and installation practices, (2) the endorsement of EMI/RFI and SWC test criteria and test methods, (3) the determination of ambient electromagnetic conditions at nuclear power plants, and (4) the development of recommended electromagnetic operating envelopes applicable to locations where safety-related I&C systems will be installed. The current research focuses on the susceptibility of l&C systems to conducted EMIIRFI along interconnecting signal lines. Coverage of signal line susceptibility was identified as an open issue in previous research on establishing the technical basis for EMIIRFI and SWC in safety-related I&C systems. Research results provided in this report will be used to establish the technical basis for endorsing U.S. Department of Defense and European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization test criteria and test methods that address signal-line susceptibility. In addition, recommendations on operating envelopes are presented based on available technical information.

  10. Development of an electrical conductivity screening test for mine waste assessments.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Warner, Richard C; Honaker, Rick Q

    2016-10-01

    An environmental concern at mining operations is the potential leaching of trace elements from overburden and byproduct streams of processing plants. To provide a timely assessment of this concern, electrical conductivity of the leachate emanating from the plant waste streams can be measured as an indicator of the trace element content levels using the USGS Field Leach Test (FLT). However, the research reported in this publication revealed the need to modify the FLT procedure to improve the precision of the test results. The primary issue involved the importance of leachant volume-to-particle surface area ratio in the assessment of the leaching potential for a given source. To determine the key factors impacting leachability of a given material, a statistically-designed parametric study was performed. The experimental program evaluated the effects of particle surface area, the leachant volume-to-surface area ratio, and the amount of oxidant used to expedite the leaching rate during the test. The results revealed that the significant parameters are leachant volume-to-solid surface area ratio and the amount of oxidant. The findings were used to recommend a modification to the conductivity screening test. PMID:27351901

  11. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei; Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul T.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

  12. Development and Testing of a Variable Conductance Thermal Acquisition, Transport, and Switching System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugby, D. C.; Farmer, J. T.; Stouffer, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a scalable thermal control architecture for instruments, subsystems, or systems that must operate in severe space environments with wide variations in sink temperature. The architecture is comprised by linking one or more hot-side variable conductance heat pipes (VCHPs) in series with one or more cold-side loop heat pipes (LHPs). The VCHPs provide wide area heat acquisition, limited distance thermal transport, modest against gravity pumping, concentrated LHP startup heating, and high switching ratio variable conductance operation. The LHPs provide localized heat acquisition, long distance thermal transport, significant against gravity pumping, and high switching ratio variable conductance operation. Combining two variable conductance devices in series ensures very high switching ratio isolation from severe environments like the Earth's moon, where each lunar day spans 15 Earth days (270 K sink, with a surface-shielded/space viewing radiator) and each lunar night spans 15 Earth days (80-100 K radiative sink, depending on location). The single VCHP-single LHP system described herein was developed to maintain thermal control of International Lunar Network (ILN) anchor node lander electronics, but it is also applicable to other variable heat rejection space missions in severe environments. The LHPVCHP system utilizes a stainless steel wire mesh wick ammonia VCHP, a Teflon wick propylene LHP, a pair of one-third square meter high ? radiators (one capillary-pumped horizontal radiator and a second gravity-fed vertical radiator), a half-meter of transport distance, and a wick-bearing co-located flow regulator (CLFR) to allow operation with a hot (deactivated) radiator. The VCHP was designed with a small reservoir formed by extending the length of its stainless steel heat pipe tubing. The system was able to provide end-to-end switching ratios of 300-500 during thermal vacuum testing at ATK, including 3-5 W/K ON conductance

  13. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) Any list that may be prepared by the Food and Drug Administration of testing and...

  14. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) Any list that may be prepared by the Food and Drug Administration of testing and...

  15. 10 CFR 26.97 - Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a specimen of oral fluids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a specimen of oral fluids. 26.97 Section 26.97 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Collecting Specimens for Testing § 26.97 Conducting an initial test for alcohol using a specimen of...

  16. 40 CFR 63.6110 - By what date must I conduct the initial performance tests or other initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... date must I conduct the initial performance tests or other initial compliance demonstrations? (a) You... equipment changes. (5) The test must be conducted at any load condition within plus or minus 10 percent of... performance tests or other initial compliance demonstrations? 63.6110 Section 63.6110 Protection...

  17. Characteristics of acoustic wave from atmospheric nuclear explosions conducted at the USSR Test Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Inna

    2015-04-01

    Availability of the acoustic wave on the record of microbarograph is one of discriminate signs of atmospheric (surface layer of atmosphere) and contact explosions. Nowadays there is large number of air wave records from chemical explosions recorded by the IMS infrasound stations installed during recent decade. But there is small number of air wave records from nuclear explosions as air and contact nuclear explosions had been conducted since 1945 to 1962, before the Limited Test Ban Treaty was signed in 1963 (the treaty banning nuclear weapon tests in the atmosphere, in outer space and under water) by the Great Britain, USSR and USA. That time there was small number of installed microbarographs. First infrasound stations in the USSR appeared in 1954, and by the moment of the USSR collapse the network consisted of 25 infrasound stations, 3 of which were located on Kazakhstan territory - in Kurchatov (East Kazakhstan), in Borovoye Observatory (North Kazakhstan) and Talgar Observatory (Northern Tien Shan). The microbarograph of Talgar Observatory was installed in 1962 and recorded large number of air nuclear explosions conducted at Semipalatinsk Test Site and Novaya Zemlya Test Site. The epicentral distance to the STS was ~700 km, and to Novaya Zemlya Test Site ~3500 km. The historical analog records of the microbarograph were analyzed on the availability of the acoustic wave. The selected records were digitized, the database of acoustic signals from nuclear explosions was created. In addition, acoustic signals from atmospheric nuclear explosions conducted at the USSR Test Sites were recorded by analogue broadband seismic stations at wide range of epicentral distances, 300-3600 km. These signals coincide well by its form and spectral content with records of microbarographs and can be used for monitoring tasks and discrimination in places where infrasound observations are absent. Nuclear explosions which records contained acoustic wave were from 0.03 to 30 kt yield for

  18. SUBMERGED GRAVEL SCRUBBER DEMONSTRATION AS A PASSIVE AIR CLEANER FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING AND PURGING WITH SODIUM AEROSOLS -- CSTF TESTS AC7 - AC10

    SciTech Connect

    HILLIARD, R K.; MCCORMACK, J D.; POSTMA, A K.

    1981-11-01

    Four large-scale air cleaning tests (AC7 - AC10) were performed in the Containment Systems Test Facility (CS'lF) to demonstrate the performance of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber for cleaning the effluent gas from a vented and purged breeder reactor containment vessel. The test article, comprised of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber (SGS) followed by a high efficiency fiber demister, had a design gas flow rate of 0.47 m{sup 3}/s (1000 ft{sup 3}/min) at a pressure drop of 9.0 kPa (36 in. H{sub 2}O). The test aerosol was sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, or sodium carbonate generated in the 850-m{sup 3} CSTF vessel by continuously spraying sodium into the air-filled vessel while adding steam or carbon dioxide. Approximately 4500 kg (10,000 lb) of sodium was sprayed over a total period of 100 h during the tests. The SGS/Demister system was shown to be highly efficient (removing ~99.98% of the entering sodium aerosol mass), had a high mass loading capacity, and operated in a passive manner, with no electrical requirement. Models for predicting aerosol capture, gas cooling, and pressure drop are developed and compared with experimental results.

  19. A test of an optimal stomatal conductance scheme within the CABLE land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kauwe, M. G.; Kala, J.; Lin, Y.-S.; Pitman, A. J.; Medlyn, B. E.; Duursma, R. A.; Abramowitz, G.; Wang, Y.-P.; Miralles, D. G.

    2015-02-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) affects the fluxes of carbon, energy and water between the vegetated land surface and the atmosphere. We test an implementation of an optimal stomatal conductance model within the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) land surface model (LSM). In common with many LSMs, CABLE does not differentiate between gs model parameters in relation to plant functional type (PFT), but instead only in relation to photosynthetic pathway. We constrained the key model parameter "g1", which represents plant water use strategy, by PFT, based on a global synthesis of stomatal behaviour. As proof of concept, we also demonstrate that the g1 parameter can be estimated using two long-term average (1960-1990) bioclimatic variables: (i) temperature and (ii) an indirect estimate of annual plant water availability. The new stomatal model, in conjunction with PFT parameterisations, resulted in a large reduction in annual fluxes of transpiration (~ 30% compared to the standard CABLE simulations) across evergreen needleleaf, tundra and C4 grass regions. Differences in other regions of the globe were typically small. Model performance against upscaled data products was not degraded, but did not noticeably reduce existing model-data biases. We identified assumptions relating to the coupling of the vegetation to the atmosphere and the parameterisation of the minimum stomatal conductance as areas requiring further investigation in both CABLE and potentially other LSMs. We conclude that optimisation theory can yield a simple and tractable approach to predicting stomatal conductance in LSMs.

  20. A test of an optimal stomatal conductance scheme within the CABLE Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kauwe, M. G.; Kala, J.; Lin, Y.-S.; Pitman, A. J.; Medlyn, B. E.; Duursma, R. A.; Abramowitz, G.; Wang, Y.-P.; Miralles, D. G.

    2014-10-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) affects the fluxes of carbon, energy and water between the vegetated land surface and the atmosphere. We test an implementation of an optimal stomatal conductance model within the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) land surface model (LSM). In common with many LSMs, CABLE does not differentiate between gs model parameters in relation to plant functional type (PFT), but instead only in relation to photosynthetic pathway. We therefore constrained the key model parameter "g1" which represents a plants water use strategy by PFT based on a global synthesis of stomatal behaviour. As proof of concept, we also demonstrate that the g1 parameter can be estimated using two long-term average (1960-1990) bioclimatic variables: (i) temperature and (ii) an indirect estimate of annual plant water availability. The new stomatal models in conjunction with PFT parameterisations resulted in a large reduction in annual fluxes of transpiration (~ 30% compared to the standard CABLE simulations) across evergreen needleleaf, tundra and C4 grass regions. Differences in other regions of the globe were typically small. Model performance when compared to upscaled data products was not degraded, though the new stomatal conductance scheme did not noticeably change existing model-data biases. We conclude that optimisation theory can yield a simple and tractable approach to predicting stomatal conductance in LSMs.

  1. Using sequential self-calibration method to identify conductivity distribution: Conditioning on tracer test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, B.X.; He, C.

    2008-01-01

    An iterative inverse method, the sequential self-calibration method, is developed for mapping spatial distribution of a hydraulic conductivity field by conditioning on nonreactive tracer breakthrough curves. A streamline-based, semi-analytical simulator is adopted to simulate solute transport in a heterogeneous aquifer. The simulation is used as the forward modeling step. In this study, the hydraulic conductivity is assumed to be a deterministic or random variable. Within the framework of the streamline-based simulator, the efficient semi-analytical method is used to calculate sensitivity coefficients of the solute concentration with respect to the hydraulic conductivity variation. The calculated sensitivities account for spatial correlations between the solute concentration and parameters. The performance of the inverse method is assessed by two synthetic tracer tests conducted in an aquifer with a distinct spatial pattern of heterogeneity. The study results indicate that the developed iterative inverse method is able to identify and reproduce the large-scale heterogeneity pattern of the aquifer given appropriate observation wells in these synthetic cases. ?? International Association for Mathematical Geology 2008.

  2. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  3. Temperature and strain rate effects in high strength high conductivity copper alloys tested in air

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile properties of the three candidate alloys GlidCop{trademark} Al25, CuCrZr, and CuNiBe are known to be sensitive to the testing conditions such as strain rate and test temperature. This study was conducted on GlidCop Al25 (2 conditions) and Hycon 3HP (3 conditions) to ascertain the effect of test temperature and strain rate when tested in open air. The results show that the yield strength and elongation of the GlidCop Al25 alloys exhibit a strain rate dependence that increases with temperature. Both the GlidCop and the Hycon 3 HP exhibited an increase in strength as the strain rate increased, but the GlidCop alloys proved to be the most strain rate sensitive. The GlidCop failed in a ductile manner irrespective of the test conditions, however, their strength and uniform elongation decreased with increasing test temperature and the uniform elongation also decreased dramatically at the lower strain rates. The Hycon 3 HP alloys proved to be extremely sensitive to test temperature, rapidly losing their strength and ductility when the temperature increased above 250 C. As the test temperature increased and the strain rate decreased the fracture mode shifted from a ductile transgranular failure to a ductile intergranular failure with very localized ductility. This latter observation is based on the presence of dimples on the grain facets, indicating that some ductile deformation occurred near the grain boundaries. The material failed without any reduction in area at 450 C and 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1}, and in several cases failed prematurely.

  4. Estimating Hydraulic Conductivities in a Fractured Shale Formation from Pressure Pulse Testing and 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbet, C.; DICK, P.; Lefevre, M.; Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.; Barnichon, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the framework of its research on the deep disposal of radioactive waste in shale formations, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a large array of in situ programs concerning the confining properties of shales in their underground research laboratory at Tournemire (SW France). One of its aims is to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling radionuclide migration through the host rock, from the disposal system to the biosphere. Past research programs carried out at Tournemire covered mechanical, hydro-mechanical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire shale as well as water chemistry and long-term behaviour of the host rock. Studies show that fluid circulations in the undisturbed matrix are very slow (hydraulic conductivity of 10-14 to 10-15 m.s-1). However, recent work related to the occurrence of small scale fractures and clay-rich fault gouges indicate that fluid circulations may have been significantly modified in the vicinity of such features. To assess the transport properties associated with such faults, IRSN designed a series of in situ and laboratory experiments to evaluate the contribution of both diffusive and advective process on water and solute flux through a clay-rich fault zone (fault core and damaged zone) and in an undisturbed shale formation. As part of these studies, Modular Mini-Packer System (MMPS) hydraulic testing was conducted in multiple boreholes to characterize hydraulic conductivities within the formation. Pressure data collected during the hydraulic tests were analyzed using the nSIGHTS (n-dimensional Statistical Inverse Graphical Hydraulic Test Simulator) code to estimate hydraulic conductivity and formation pressures of the tested intervals. Preliminary results indicate hydraulic conductivities of 5.10-12 m.s-1 in the fault core and damaged zone and 10-14 m.s-1 in the adjacent undisturbed shale. Furthermore, when compared with neutron porosity data from borehole

  5. Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells

    SciTech Connect

    P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

    2007-10-31

    Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and

  6. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

    2011-03-02

    This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also fully exploiting data and findings from the first two activities. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) is a computational framework for the atmospheric sciences community that streamlines the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The AMT consists of a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of aerosol process modules via comparison with a wide range of field measurements. The philosophy of the AMT is to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules over local to regional spatial scales that are compatible with most field campaigns measurement strategies. The performance of new treatments can then be quantified and compared to existing treatments before they are incorporated into regional and global climate models. Since the AMT is a community tool, it also provides a means of enhancing collaboration and coordination among aerosol modelers.

  7. Safe affordable fission engine (SAFE 30) module conductivity test thermal model correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Jose

    2001-02-01

    The SAFE 30 is a simple, robust space fission power system that is comprised of several independent modules. Each module contains 4 fuel tubes bonded to a central heatpipe. Fission energy is conducted from the fuel tubes to the heatpipe, which in turn transfers the energy to a power conversion system. This paper benchmarks a thermal model of the SAFE 30 with actual test data from simulated SAFE 30 module tests. Two ``dummy'' SAFE 30 modules were fabricated-each consisted of 4 1-inch dia. tubes (simulating the fuel tubes) bonded to a central 1'' dia. tube (simulating the heatpipe). In the first module the fuel tubes were simply brazed to the heatpipe along the line of contact (leaving void space in the interstices), and in the second module the tubes and heatpipe were brazed via tri-cusps that completely fill the interstices between the tubes. In these tests, fission energy is simulated by placing resistance heaters within each of the 4 fuel tubes. The tests were conducted in a vacuum chamber in 4 configurations: tri-cusps filled with and without an outer insulation wrap, and no tri-cusps with and without an outer insulation wrap. The baseline SAFE 30 configuration uses the brazed tri-cusps. During the tests, the power applied to the heaters was varied in a stepwise fashion, until a steady-state temperature profile was reached. These temperature levels varied between 773 K and 1073 K. To benchmark the thermal model, the input energy and chamber surface temperature were used as boundary conditions for the model. The analytical results from the nodes at the same location as the test thermocouples were plotted again test data to determinate the accuracy of the analysis. The unknown variables on the analysis are the radiation emissivity of the pipe and chamber and the radiation view factor between the module and the chamber. A correlation was determined using a parametric analysis by varying the surface emissivity and view factor until a good match was reached. This

  8. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... electroless nickel coated as specified in § 53.64(d)(2). (6) Filters that are appropriate for use...

  9. Individualised headband simulation test for predicting outcome after percutaneous bone conductive implantation.

    PubMed

    Monini, S; Filippi, C; Atturo, F; Biagini, M; Lazzarino, A I; Barbara, M

    2015-10-01

    Trans-cutaneous bone conduction (BC) stimulators, when coupled to the HB (BC-HB), are generally used to predict the results that could be achieved after bone conductive implant (BCI) surgery, and their performance is generally considered inferior to that provided by the definitive percutaneous system. The aim of the present study was to compare the performances between BC-HB and BCI of the same typology, when the former's sound processor is fitted in accordance to the individual auditory situation. Twenty-two patients selected for surgical application of a BCI were evaluated and the same audiological protocol was used to select the candidate and assess the final outcome. The BC-HB was properly fitted based on individual hearing loss and personal auditory targets, and tested as primary step of the protocol to obtain the most reliable predictive value. The BAHA Divino and BP100 sound processors were applied in 12 patients with conductive/mixed hearing loss (CMHL) and in 10 subjects with single sided deafness (SSD). Audiometric evaluation included the pure tone average (PTA3) threshold between 250-1000 Hz; the PTA thresholds at 2000 and 4000 Hz; intelligibility scores as percentage of word recognition (WRS) in quiet and in noise; and subjective evaluation of perceived sound quality by a visual analogue scale (VAS). Statistical evaluation with a student's t test was used for assessment of efficacy of BC-HB and BCI compared with the unaided condition. Spearman's Rho coefficient was used to confirm the reliability of the BC-HB simulation test as a predictor of definitive outcome. The results showed that the mean PTA difference between BCI and BC-HB ranged from 2.54 to 8.27 decibels in the CMHL group and from 1.27 to 3.9 decibels in the SSD group. Compared with the BC-HB, BCI showed a better WRS both in CMHL (16% in quiet and 12% in noise) and in SSD (5% in quiet and a 1% in noise) groups. Spearman's Rho coefficient, calculated for PTA, WRS in quiet and in noise and VAS

  10. CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A NEW THERMODYNAMIC AEROSOL MODULE FOR URBAN AND REGIONAL AIR QUALITY MODELS. (R824793)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient and rigorous thermodynamic model (ISORROPIA) that predicts the physical state and composition of inorganic atmospheric aerosol is presented. The advantages of this particular model render it suitable for incorporation into urban and regional air qualit...

  11. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with scale of measurement during aquifer tests in heterogeneous, porous carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Cherkauer, Douglas S.

    Previous studies have shown that hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer seems to increase as the portion of the aquifer tested increases. To date, such studies have all relied on different methods to determine hydraulic conductivity at each scale of interest, which raises the possibility that the observed increase in hydraulic conductivity is due to the measurement method, not to the scale. This study analyzes hydraulic conductivity with respect to scale during individual aquifer tests in porous, heterogeneous carbonate rocks in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Results from this study indicate that hydraulic conductivity generally increases during an individual test as the volume of aquifer impacted increases, and the rate of this increase is the same as the rate of increase determined by using different measurement methods. Thus, scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity during single tests does not depend on the method of measurement. This conclusion is supported by 22 of 26 aquifer tests conducted in porous-flow-dominated carbonate units within the aquifer. Instead, scale dependency is probably caused by heterogeneities within the aquifer, a conclusion supported by digital simulation. All of the observed types of hydraulic-conductivity variations with scale during individual aquifer tests can be explained by a conceptual model of a simple heterogeneous aquifer composed of high-conductivity zones within a low-conductivity matrix. Résumé Certaines études ont montré que la conductivité hydraulique d'un aquifère semble augmenter en même temps que la partie testée de l'aquifère s'étend. Jusqu'à présent, ces études ont toutes reposé sur des méthodes de détermination de la conductivité hydraulique différentes pour chaque niveau d'échelle, ce qui a conduit à penser que l'augmentation observée de la conductivité hydraulique pouvait être due aux méthodes de mesure et non à l'effet d'échelle. Cette étude analyse la conductivité hydraulique par

  12. Brownian motion of a charged test particle in vacuum between two conducting plates

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hongwei; Chen Jun

    2004-12-15

    The Brownian motion of a charged test particle caused by quantum electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations between two perfectly conducting plates is examined and the mean squared fluctuations in the velocity and position of the test particle are calculated. Our results show that the Brownian motion in the direction normal to the plates is reinforced in comparison to that in the single plate case. The effective temperature associated with this normal Brownian motion could be three times as large as that in the single plate case. However, the negative dispersions for the velocity and position in the longitudinal directions, which could be interpreted as reducing the quantum uncertainties of the particle, acquire positive corrections due to the presence of the second plate, and are thus weakened.

  13. Brownian motion of a charged test particle in vacuum between two conducting plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongwei; Chen, Jun

    2004-12-01

    The Brownian motion of a charged test particle caused by quantum electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations between two perfectly conducting plates is examined and the mean squared fluctuations in the velocity and position of the test particle are calculated. Our results show that the Brownian motion in the direction normal to the plates is reinforced in comparison to that in the single plate case. The effective temperature associated with this normal Brownian motion could be three times as large as that in the single plate case. However, the negative dispersions for the velocity and position in the longitudinal directions, which could be interpreted as reducing the quantum uncertainties of the particle, acquire positive corrections due to the presence of the second plate, and are thus weakened.

  14. Stability test of conduction-cooled LTS/HTS composite coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying Min; Wang, Yin Shun; Lv, Gang; Pi, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A small LTS/HTS composite coil made of NbTi/Cu and YBCO, with an inner diameter of 80 mm, an outer diameter of 88mm, a height of 50 mm, and an inductance of 5.5 μH, was designed to test its heat disturbance performance in a GM cryocooler. For comparison, a conventional LTS coil of a similar size made of NbTi/Cu wire was also tested. Transport current was applied from 50 A to 700 A at 8 K and 8.5 K, respectively. The two coils’ heat disturbance, minimum quench energy and quench propagation velocity performance were investigated and simulated. The results indicate that the LTS/HTS composite coil shows better thermal stability and is more fit for operation in conductive cryocooler systems compared to LTS coils.

  15. Feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment for vanadium alloys in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment (DHCE) for vanadium alloys in the water-cooled Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being investigated as part of the U.S./Monbusho collaboration. Preliminary findings suggest that such an experiment is feasible, with certain constraints. Creating a suitable irradiation position in the ATR, designing an effective thermal neutron filter, incorporating thermocouples for limited specimen temperature monitoring, and handling of tritium during various phases of the assembly and reactor operation all appear to be feasible. An issue that would require special attention, however, is tritium permeation loss through the capsule wall at the higher design temperatures (>{approx}600{degrees}C). If permeation is excessive, the reduced amount of tritium entering the test specimens would limit the helium generation rates in them. At the lower design temperatures (<{approx}425{degrees}C), sodium, instead of lithium, may have to be used as the bond material to overcome the tritium solubility limitation.

  16. Drying tests conducted on Three Mile Island fuel canisters containing simulated debris

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    Drying tests were conducted on TMI-2 fuel canisters filled with simulated core debris. During these tests, canisters were dried by heating externally by a heating blanket while simultaneously purging the canisters` interior with hot, dry nitrogen. Canister drying was found to be dominated by moisture retention properties of a concrete filler material (LICON) used for geometry control. This material extends the drying process 10 days or more beyond what would be required were it not there. The LICON resides in a nonpurgeable chamber separate from the core debris, and because of this configuration, dew point measurements on the exhaust stream do not provide a good indication of the dew point in the canisters. If the canisters are not dried, but rather just dewatered, 140-240 lb of water (not including the LICON water of hydration) will remain in each canister, approximately 50-110 lb of which is pore water in the LICON and the remainder unbound water.

  17. 40 CFR 63.6110 - By what date must I conduct the initial performance tests or other initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Stationary Combustion Turbines Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.6110 By what... equipment changes. (5) The test must be conducted at any load condition within plus or minus 10 percent of 100 percent load....

  18. Techniques Employed to Conduct Postshot Drilling at the former Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dekin, W D

    2011-04-14

    Postshot drilling provided essential data on the results of the underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), now identified as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). It was the means by which samples from the zone of interest were obtained for radiochemical analysis. This handbook describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducted postshot drilling operations at the NTS, and it provides a general understanding of the process. Postshot drilling is a specialized application of rotary drilling. Accordingly, this handbook gives a brief description of rotary drilling in Section 2 to acquaint the reader with the general subject before proceeding to the specialized techniques used in postshot drilling. In Section 3, the handbook describes the typical postshot drilling situation at the former NTS and the drilling methods used. Section 4 describes the typical sequence of operations in postshot drilling at the former NTS. Detailed information on special equipment and techniques is given in a series of appendices (A through F) at the end of the handbook.

  19. Inversion of the anomalous diffraction approximation for variable complex index of refraction near unity. [numerical tests for water-haze aerosol model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Fymat analytic inversion method for retrieving a particle-area distribution function from anomalous diffraction multispectral extinction data and total area is generalized to the case of a variable complex refractive index m(lambda) near unity depending on spectral wavelength lambda. Inversion tests are presented for a water-haze aerosol model. An upper-phase shift limit of 5 pi/2 retrieved an accurate peak area distribution profile. Analytical corrections using both the total number and area improved the inversion.

  20. Intercomparison of aerosol instruments: number concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, E O; Sinclair, D; Tu, K W; Hinchliffe, L; Franklin, H

    1982-05-01

    An intercomparison of aerosol instruments conducted February 23-27, 1981, at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) focused on five instruments: the Pollak and TSI condensation nucleus counters; the Active Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer (ASAS-X); and two aerosol electrometers. Test aerosols of sodium chloride and ammonium fluorescein generated by nebulization/electrostatic classification were used to obtain 195 lines of comparison data. Concentrations measured by the ASAS-X and the TSI aerosol electrometer averaged respectively 1.388 and 1.581 times that measured by the Pollak. These ratios were very stable during the week and there was little effect of particle size or material. Most other comparisons were equally stable. However, a review of past work at EML and elsewhere led to the disturbing conclusion that these ratios may change from year to year, or from season to season. A filter sample was taken from microscopy, concurrent with readings from the ASAS-X and the TSI condensation nucleus counters. In this sample, the two instruments differed by 20%. Within its 20% uncertainty, the filter result matched both the TSI and ASAS-X readings.

  1. Effect of Two-Tier Diagnostic Tests on Promoting Learners' Conceptual Understanding of Variables in Conducting Scientific Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çil, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Taking a test generally improves the retention of the material tested. This is a phenomenon commonly referred to as testing effect. The present research investigated whether two-tier diagnostic tests promoted student teachers' conceptual understanding of variables in conducting scientific experiments, which is a scientific process skill. In this…

  2. Simulation of a long-term aquifer test conducted near the Rio Grande, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, Douglas P.

    2001-01-01

    A long-term aquifer test was conducted near the Rio Grande in Albuquerque during January and February 1995 using 22 wells and piezometers at nine sites, with the City of Albuquerque Griegos 1 production well as the pumped well. Griegos 1 discharge averaged about 2,330 gallons per minute for 54.4 days. A three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water-flow model was used to estimate aquifer properties in the vicinity of the Griegos well field and the amount of infiltration induced into the aquifer system from the Rio Grande and riverside drains as a result of pumping during the test. The model was initially calibrated by trial-and-error adjustments of the aquifer properties. The model was recalibrated using a nonlinear least-squares regression technique. The aquifer system in the area includes the middle Tertiary to Quaternary Santa Fe Group and post-Santa Fe Group valley- and basin-fill deposits of the Albuquerque Basin. The Rio Grande and adjacent riverside drains are in hydraulic connection with the aquifer system. The hydraulic-conductivity values of the upper part of the Santa Fe Group resulting from the model calibrated by trial and error varied by zone in the model and ranged from 12 to 33 feet per day. The hydraulic conductivity of the inner-valley alluvium was 45 feet per day. The vertical to horizontal anisotropy ratio was 1:140. Specific storage was 4 x 10-6 per foot of aquifer thickness, and specific yield was 0.15 (dimensionless). The sum of squared errors between the observed and simulated drawdowns was 130 feet squared. Not all aquifer properties could be estimated using nonlinear regression because of model insensitivity to some aquifer properties at observation locations. Hydraulic conductivity of the inner-valley alluvium, middle part of the Santa Fe Group, and riverbed and riverside-drain bed and specific yield had low sensitivity values and therefore could not be estimated. Of the properties estimated, hydraulic conductivity of the upper part of

  3. Assessing the Performance of Computationally Simple and Complex Representations of Aerosol Processes using a Testbed Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. D.; Ma, P.; Easter, R. C.; Liu, X.; Zaveri, R. A.; Rasch, P.

    2012-12-01

    Predictions of aerosol radiative forcing in climate models still contain large uncertainties, resulting from a poor understanding of certain aerosol processes, the level of complexity of aerosol processes represented in models, and the ability of models to account for sub-grid scale variability of aerosols and processes affecting them. In addition, comparing the performance and computational efficiency of new aerosol process modules used in various studies is problematic because different studies often employ different grid configurations, meteorology, trace gas chemistry, and emissions that affect the temporal and spatial evolution of aerosols. To address this issue, we have developed an Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules. The AMT consists of the modular Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a series of testbed cases for which extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties are available, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of meteorological, chemical, aerosol process modules. WRF contains various parameterizations of meteorological, chemical, and aerosol processes and includes interactive aerosol-cloud-radiation treatments similar to those employed by climate models. In addition, the physics suite from a global climate model, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), has also been ported to WRF so that these parameterizations can be tested at various spatial scales and compared directly with field campaign data and other parameterizations commonly used by the mesoscale modeling community. In this study, we evaluate simple and complex treatments of the aerosol size distribution and secondary organic aerosols using the AMT and measurements collected during three field campaigns: the Megacities Initiative Local and Global Observations (MILAGRO) campaign conducted in the vicinity of Mexico City during March 2006, the

  4. A system for conducting flow-through toxicity tests with larval fish

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.A.; Oris, J.T.; Guttman, S.I.

    1995-08-01

    Assessment of toxicological effects in aquatic systems commonly include larval fish 96-h LC50 determinations. The LC50 tests are conducted using static renewal as well as flow-through methods. However, in the case of chemicals with high vapor pressures or fugacity, static renewal methods may produce inconsistent results arising from the pulsed nature of exposure. In addition, in exposures involving these types of compounds, the fluctuation in concentration that can occur between renewals is unlike most exposure scenarios in nature. For these reasons, flow-through systems are often preferable. The authors report here on an inexpensive, easily constructed, flow-through system for toxicant exposure of small organisms. Data are presented to illustrate the capacity of the system to maintain uniform toxicant concentrations relative to static renewal methods.

  5. UNSATURATED FLOW IN A CENTRIFUGAL FIELD: MEASUREMENT OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND TESTING OF DARCY'S LAW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Rubin, J.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed to establish steady flow of water in unsaturated soil sample spinning in a centrifuge. Theoretical analysis predicts moisture conditions in the sample that depend strongly on soil type and certain operating parameter. For Oakley sand, measurements of flux, water content, and matric potential during and after centrifugation verify that steady state flow can be achieved. Experiments have confirmed the theoretical prediction of a nearly uniform moisture distribution for this medium and have demonstrated that the flow can be effectively one-dimensional. The method was used for steady state measurements of hydraulic conductivity K for relatively dry soil, giving values at low as 7. 6 multiplied by 10** minus **1**1 m/s with data obtained in a few hours. Darcy's law was tested by measuring K for different centrifugal driving forces but with the same water content.

  6. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, D.A.

    1998-07-27

    Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

  7. Enhancements in Glovebox Design Resulting from Laboratory-Conducted FIre Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Wunderlich, Gregory M.; Mcentire, James R.; Richmond, William G.

    2013-06-14

    The primary mission of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project was to disassemble nuclear weapons pits and convert the resulting special nuclear materials to a form suitable for further disposition. Because of the nature of materials involved, the fundamental system which allowed PDCF to perform its mission was a series of integrated and interconnected gloveboxes which provided confinement and containment of the radioactive materials being processed. The high throughput planned for PDCF and the relatively high neutron and gamma radiation levels of the pits required that gloveboxes be shielded to meet worker dose limits. The glovebox shielding material was required to contain high hydrogen concentrations which typically result in these materials being combustible. High combustible loadings created design challenges for the facility fire suppression and ventilation system design. Combustible loading estimates for the PDCF Plutonium (Pu) Processing Building increased significantly due to these shielding requirements. As a result, the estimates of combustible loading substantially exceeded values used to support fire and facility safety analyses. To ensure a valid basis for combustible loading contributed by the glovebox system, the PDCF Project funded a series of fire tests conducted by the Southwest Research Institute on door panels and a representative glovebox containing Water Extended Polyester (WEP) radiological shielding to observe their behavior during a fire event. Improvements to PDCF glovebox designs were implemented based on lessons learned during the fire test. In particular, methods were developed to provide high levels of neutron shielding while maintaining combustible loading in the glovebox shells at low levels. Additionally, the fire test results led to design modifications to mitigate pressure increases observed during the fire test in order to maintain the integrity of the WEP cladding. These changes resulted in significantly

  8. Development of Low Conductivity and Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Coatings Using A High-Heat-Flux Testing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The development of low conductivity, robust thermal and environmental barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity and cyclic resistance at very high surface temperatures (up to 17OOOC) under large thermal gradients. In this study, a laser high-heat-flux test approach is established for evaluating advanced low conductivity, ultra-high temperature ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings under the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. The test approach emphasizes the real-time monitoring and assessment of the coating thermal conductivity: the initial conductivity rise under a steady-state high temperature thermal gradient test due to coating sintering, and the later coating conductivity reduction under a subsequent cyclic thermal gradient test due to coating cracking/delamination. The coating system is then evaluated based on the damage accumulations and failure after the combined steady-state and cyclic thermal gradient tests. The lattice and radiation thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic coatings can also be evaluated using laser heat-flux techniques. The coating external radiation resistance is assessed based on the measured specimen temperature response under a laser heated intense radiation flux source. The coating internal radiation contribution is investigated based on the measured apparent coating conductivity increases with the coating surface test temperature under large thermal gradient test conditions. Since an increased radiation contribution is observed at these very high surface test temperatures, by varying the laser heat-flux and coating average test temperature, the complex relation between the lattice and radiation conductivity as a function of surface and interface test temperature is derived.

  9. Manipulator having thermally conductive rotary joint for transferring heat from a test specimen

    DOEpatents

    Haney, Steven J.; Stulen, Richard H.; Toly, Norman F.

    1985-01-01

    A manipulator for rotatably moving a test specimen in an ultra-high vacuum chamber includes a translational unit movable in three mutually perpendicular directions. A manipulator frame is rigidly secured to the translational unit for rotatably supporting a rotary shaft. A first copper disc is rigidly secured to an end of the rotary shaft for rotary movement within the vacuum chamber. A second copper disc is supported upon the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. A sapphire plate is interposed between the first and second discs to prevent galling of the copper material while maintaining high thermal conductivity between the first and second discs. A spring is disposed on the shaft to urge the second disc toward the first disc and compressingly engage the interposed sapphire plate. A specimen mount is secured to the first disc for rotation within the vacuum chamber. The specimen maintains high thermal conductivity with the second disc receiving the cryogenic transfer line.

  10. Manipulator having thermally conductive rotary joint for transferring heat from a test specimen

    DOEpatents

    Haney, S.J.; Stulen, R.H.; Toly, N.F.

    1983-05-03

    A manipulator for rotatably moving a test specimen in an ultra-high vacuum chamber includes a translational unit movable in three mutually perpendicular directions. A manipulator frame is rigidly secured to the translational unit for rotatably supporting a rotary shaft. A first copper disc is rigidly secured to an end of the rotary shaft for rotary movement within the vacuum chamber. A second copper disc is supported upon the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. A sapphire plate is interposed between the first and second discs to prevent galling of the copper material while maintaining high thermal conductivity between the first and second discs. A spring is disposed on the shaft to urge the second disc toward the first disc and compressingly engage the interposed sapphire plate. A specimen mount is secured to the first disc for rotation within the vacuum chamber. The specimen maintains high thermal conductivity with the second disc receiving the cryogenic transfer line.

  11. Electro-Mechanical Testing of Conductive Materials Used in Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordill, Megan; Glushko, Oleksandr; Putz, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The use of flexible electronics has increased in recent years. In order to have robust and long lasting flexible displays and sensors, the combined electro-mechanical behavior needs to be assessed. The most common method to determine electrical and mechanical behavior of conductive thin films used in flexible electronics is the fragmentation test, or uniaxial tensile straining of the film and substrate. When performed in situ fracture and deformation behavior can be determined. The use of in situ electrical resistance measurements can be informative about the crack onset strain of brittle layers, such as transparent conductors, or the stretchability of metal interconnects. The combination of in situ electrical measurements with in situ X-ray or confocal laser scanning microscopy can provide even more information about the failure mechanisms of the material systems. Lattice strains and stresses can be measured with X-rays, while cracking and buckle delaminations can be studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy. These new combinations of in situ methods will be discussed as well as methods to quantify interfacial properties of conductive thin films on polymer substrates. The combined techniques provide valuable correlated electrical and mechanical data needed to understand failure mechanisms in flexible devices.

  12. Inversion of solar extinction data from the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (ASTP/SAM) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    The inversion methods are reported that have been used to determine the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient due to the stratospheric aerosols from data measured during the ASTP/SAM solar occultation experiment. Inversion methods include the onion skin peel technique and methods of solving the Fredholm equation for the problem subject to smoothing constraints. The latter of these approaches involves a double inversion scheme. Comparisons are made between the inverted results from the SAM experiment and near simultaneous measurements made by lidar and balloon born dustsonde. The results are used to demonstrate the assumptions required to perform the inversions for aerosols.

  13. Methodology for the passive detection and discrimination of chemical and biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, William J.; Shokhirev, Kirill N.; Konno, Daisei; Rossi, David C.; Richardson, Martin

    2013-05-01

    The standoff detection and discrimination of aerosolized biological and chemical agents has traditionally been addressed through LIDAR approaches, but sensor systems using these methods have yet to be deployed. We discuss the development and testing of an approach to detect these aerosols using the deployed base of passive infrared hyperspectral sensors used for chemical vapor detection. The detection of aerosols requires the inclusion of down welling sky and up welling ground radiation in the description of the radiative transfer process. The wavelength and size dependent ratio of absorption to scattering provides much of the discrimination capability. The approach to the detection of aerosols utilizes much of the same phenomenology employed in vapor detection; however, the sensor system must acquire information on non-line-of-sight sources of radiation contributing to the scattering process. We describe the general methodology developed to detect chemical or biological aerosols, including justifications for the simplifying assumptions that enable the development of a real-time sensor system. Mie scattering calculations, aerosol size distribution dependence, and the angular dependence of the scattering on the aerosol signature will be discussed. This methodology will then be applied to two test cases: the ground level release of a biological aerosol (BG) and a nonbiological confuser (kaolin clay) as well as the debris field resulting from the intercept of a cruise missile carrying a thickened VX warhead. A field measurement, conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range will be used to illustrate the issues associated with the use of the method.

  14. Anthropogenic Aerosols and Tropical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Kim, D.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Barth, M. C.; Rasch, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols can affect the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system and precipitation by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) and thus modifying the optical and microphysical properties as well as lifetimes of clouds. Recent studies have also suggested that the direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols, particularly absorbing aerosols, can perturb the large-scale circulation and cause a significant change in both quantity and distribution of critical tropical precipitation systems ranging from Pacific and Indian to Atlantic Oceans. This effect of aerosols on precipitation often appears in places away from aerosol-concentrated regions and current results suggest that the precipitation changes caused by it could be much more substantial than that by the microphysics-based aerosol effect. To understand the detailed mechanisms and strengths of such a "remote impact" and the climate response/feedback to anthropogenic aerosols in general, an interactive aerosol-climate model has been developed based on the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) of NCAR. Its aerosol module describes size, chemical composition, and mixing states of various sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols. Several model processes are derived based on 3D cloud-resolving model simulations. We have conducted a set of long integrations using the model driven by radiative effects of different combinations of various carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols and their mixtures. The responses of tropical precipitation systems to the forcing of these aerosols are analyzed using both model and observational data. Detailed analyses on the aerosol-precipitation causal relations of two systems: i.e., the Indian summer monsoon and Pacific ITCZ will be specifically presented.

  15. 40 CFR 63.7515 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests, fuel analyses, or tune-ups?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters Testing, Fuel... in the operation of the individual boiler or process heater or air pollution control equipment that... unless the stack test is conducted for HCl. The requirement to test at maximum mercury input level...

  16. Offering Parents Individualized Feedback on the Results of Psychological Testing Conducted for Research Purposes with Children: Ethical Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefaivre, Marie-josee; Chambers, Christine T.; Fernandez, Conrad V.

    2007-01-01

    Research protocols involving children often include psychological testing as part of an assessment battery. Inclusion of such testing raises the question of whether parents (or others) should be offered the individualized results of their children's psychological testing conducted for research purposes. The purpose of this article is to provide a…

  17. 40 CFR 63.7515 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests, fuel analyses, or tune-ups?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters Testing, Fuel Analyses, and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.7515 When must I conduct subsequent performance tests, fuel analyses, or tune... performance tests, fuel analyses, or tune-ups? 63.7515 Section 63.7515 Protection of Environment...

  18. 40 CFR 63.7515 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests, fuel analyses, or tune-ups?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters Testing, Fuel Analyses, and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.7515 When must I conduct subsequent performance tests, fuel analyses, or tune... performance tests, fuel analyses, or tune-ups? 63.7515 Section 63.7515 Protection of Environment...

  19. 40 CFR 63.4560 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-liquid material balances according to § 63.4561(j), you must conduct a performance test of each capture... performance tests specified in paragraph (a)(1) of this section. Instead, you must maintain a log detailing... parameter monitors during the period between the compliance date and the performance test. You must...

  20. Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and human pulmonary deposition calculations for Nuclear Site 201, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

    1982-06-21

    This study determined the plutonium-aerosol fluxes from the soil to quantify (1) the extent of potential human exposure by deep-lung retention of alpha-emitting particles; (2) the source term should there be any significant, long-term, transport of plutonium aerosols; and (3) the resuspension factor and rate so that, for the first time at any nuclear site, one may calculate how long it will take for wind erosion to carry away a significant amount of the contaminated soil. High-volume air samplers and cascade impactors were used to characterize the plutonium aerosols. Meteorological flux-profile methods were used to calculate dust and plutonium aerosol emission rates. A floorless wind tunnel (10-m long) was used to examine resuspension under steady-state, high wind speed. The resuspension factor was two orders of magnitude lower than the other comparable sites at NTS and elsewhere, and the average resuspension rate of 5.3 x 10/sup -8//d was also very low, so that the half-time for resuspension by wind erosion was about 36,000 y.

  1. Use of In Situ Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Extinction, and Aerosol Size Distribution Measurements to Test a Method for Retrieving Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profiles From Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Stephen J.; Rissman, Tracey A.; Ellman, Robert; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Flynn, Connor; Wang, Jian; Ogren, John; Hudson, James; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; VanReken, Timothy; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-01-01

    If the aerosol composition and size distribution below cloud are uniform, the vertical profile of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration can be retrieved entirely from surface measurements of CCN concentration and particle humidification function and surface-based retrievals of relative humidity and aerosol extinction or backscatter. This provides the potential for long-term measurements of CCN concentrations near cloud base. We have used a combination of aircraft, surface in situ, and surface remote sensing measurements to test various aspects of the retrieval scheme. Our analysis leads us to the following conclusions. The retrieval works better for supersaturations of 0.1% than for 1% because CCN concentrations at 0.1% are controlled by the same particles that control extinction and backscatter. If in situ measurements of extinction are used, the retrieval explains a majority of the CCN variance at high supersaturation for at least two and perhaps five of the eight flights examined. The retrieval of the vertical profile of the humidification factor is not the major limitation of the CCN retrieval scheme. Vertical structure in the aerosol size distribution and composition is the dominant source of error in the CCN retrieval, but this vertical structure is difficult to measure from remote sensing at visible wavelengths.

  2. Conduct overall test operations and evaluate two Doppler systems to detect, track and measure velocities in aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Krause, M. C.; Craven, C. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Coffey, E. W.; Huang, C. C.; Jetton, J. L.; Morrison, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    A program plan for system evaluation of the two-dimensional Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) is presented. In order to meet system evaluation and optimization objectives the following tests were conducted: (1) noise tests; (2) wind tests; (3) blower flowfield tests; (4) single unit (1-D) flyby tests; and (5) dual unit (2-D) flyby tests. Test results are reported. The final phase of the program included logistics preparation, equipment interface checkouts, and data processing. It is concluded that the SLDS is capable of accurately tracking aircraft wake vortices from small or large aircraft, and in any type of weather.

  3. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Austin Douglas; Runnels, Joel T.; Moore, Murray E.; Reeves, Kirk Patrick

    2014-11-02

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canister integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and hair

  4. 40 CFR 63.6610 - By what date must I conduct the initial performance tests or other initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.6610 By what date must I conduct the...

  5. 40 CFR 63.6610 - By what date must I conduct the initial performance tests or other initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.6610 By what date must I conduct the...

  6. 40 CFR 63.6610 - By what date must I conduct the initial performance tests or other initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.6610 By what date must I conduct the...

  7. 40 CFR 63.6610 - By what date must I conduct the initial performance tests or other initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.6610 By what date must I conduct the...

  8. High Conduction Neutron Absorber to Simulate Fast Reactor Environment in an Existing Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, Donna; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Parry, James

    2014-06-22

    A need was determined for a thermal neutron absorbing material that could be cooled in a gas reactor environment without using large amounts of a coolant that would thermalize the neutron flux. A new neutron absorbing material was developed that provided high conduction so a small amount of water would be sufficient for cooling thereby thermalizing the flux as little as possible. An irradiation experiment was performed to assess the effects of radiation and the performance of a new neutron absorbing material. Neutron fluence monitors were placed inside specially fabricated holders within a set of drop-in capsules and irradiated for up to four cycles in the Advanced Test Reactor. Following irradiation, the neutron fluence monitor wires were analyzed by gamma and x-ray spectrometry to determine the activities of the activation products. The adjusted neutron fluences were calculated and grouped into three bins – thermal, epithermal and fast to evaluate the spectral shift created by the new material. Fluence monitors were evaluated after four different irradiation periods to evaluate the effects of burn-up in the absorbing material. Additionally, activities of the three highest activity isotopes present in the specimens are given.

  9. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  10. 40 CFR 63.7941 - How do I conduct a performance test, design evaluation, or other type of initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., design evaluation, or other type of initial compliance demonstration? (a) You must conduct a performance... evaluation to demonstrate initial compliance instead of a performance test. You must perform a design... 760 °C or higher. (f) You must conduct a performance evaluation for each continuous monitoring...

  11. Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008

    SciTech Connect

    SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

    2007-11-01

    The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary

  12. GIS surface effects archive of underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.N.

    2001-11-02

    This report presents a new comprehensive, digital archive of more than 40 years of geologic surface effects maps produced at individual detonation sites throughout the Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa nuclear testing areas of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The Geographic Information System (GIS) surface effects map archive on CD-ROM (this report) comprehensively documents the surface effects of underground nuclear detonations conducted at two of the most extensively used testing areas of the Nevada Test Site. Between 1951 and 1992, numerous investigators of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency meticulously mapped the surface effects caused by underground nuclear testing. Their work documented the effects of more than seventy percent of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and all of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Pahute Mesa.

  13. Refining methods for conducting long-term sediment and water toxicity tests with Chironomus dilutus: Formation of a midge chronic testing work group

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard methods have been established by USEPA, ASTM International, Environment Canada and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for conducting sediment toxicity tests with various species of midges including Chironomus dilutus. Short-term 10-day exposures are ty...

  14. 9 CFR 55.8 - Official CWD tests and approval of laboratories to conduct official CWD tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... APHIS and, when appropriate, outside scientists, of: (1) A standardized test protocol that must include... determines that the laboratory: (1) Employs personnel assigned to supervise the testing who are qualified...

  15. 9 CFR 55.8 - Official CWD tests and approval of laboratories to conduct official CWD tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... APHIS and, when appropriate, outside scientists, of: (1) A standardized test protocol that must include... determines that the laboratory: (1) Employs personnel assigned to supervise the testing who are qualified...

  16. 9 CFR 55.8 - Official CWD tests and approval of laboratories to conduct official CWD tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... APHIS and, when appropriate, outside scientists, of: (1) A standardized test protocol that must include... determines that the laboratory: (1) Employs personnel assigned to supervise the testing who are qualified...

  17. 9 CFR 55.8 - Official CWD tests and approval of laboratories to conduct official CWD tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Laboratories (NVSL); (2) The use of proteinase-resistant protein analysis methods including but not limited to..., using test protocols provided by NVSL; or (3) Any other test method approved by the Administrator in... APHIS and, when appropriate, outside scientists, of: (1) A standardized test protocol that must...

  18. Development and first application of an Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) for quasi online compound specific aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohaus, Thorsten; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Trimborn, Dagmar; Jayne, John; Wahner, Andreas; Worsnop, Doug

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate and human health on regional and global scales (IPCC, 2007). In many environments organics are a major fraction of the aerosol influencing its properties. Due to the huge variety of organic compounds present in atmospheric aerosol current measurement techniques are far from providing a full speciation of organic aerosol (Hallquist et al., 2009). The development of new techniques for compound specific measurements with high time resolution is a timely issue in organic aerosol research. Here we present first laboratory characterisations of an aerosol collection module (ACM) which was developed to allow for the sampling and transfer of atmospheric PM1 aerosol. The system consists of an aerodynamic lens system focussing particles on a beam. This beam is directed to a 3.4 mm in diameter surface which is cooled to -30 °C with liquid nitrogen. After collection the aerosol sample can be evaporated from the surface by heating it to up to 270 °C. The sample is transferred through a 60cm long line with a carrier gas. In order to test the ACM for linearity and sensitivity we combined it with a GC-MS system. The tests were performed with octadecane aerosol. The octadecane mass as measured with the ACM-GC-MS was compared versus the mass as calculated from SMPS derived total volume. The data correlate well (R2 0.99, slope of linear fit 1.1) indicating 100 % collection efficiency. From 150 °C to 270 °C no effect of desorption temperature on transfer efficiency could be observed. The ACM-GC-MS system was proven to be linear over the mass range 2-100 ng and has a detection limit of ~ 2 ng. First experiments applying the ACM-GC-MS system were conducted at the Jülich Aerosol Chamber. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was formed from ozonolysis of 600 ppbv of b-pinene. The major oxidation product nopinone was detected in the aerosol and could be shown to decrease from 2 % of the total aerosol to 0.5 % of the aerosol over the 48 hours of

  19. 14 CFR 61.47 - Status of an examiner who is authorized by the Administrator to conduct practical tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ability to perform the areas of operation on the practical test. (b) The examiner is not the pilot in... the Administrator to conduct practical tests. 61.47 Section 61.47 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS,...

  20. Conducting High Cycle Fatigue Strength Step Tests on Gamma TiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Draper, Sue; Pereira, J. Mike

    2002-01-01

    High cycle fatigue strength testing of gamma TiAl by the step test method is investigated. A design of experiments was implemented to determine if the coaxing effect occurred during testing. Since coaxing was not observed, step testing was deemed a suitable method to define the fatigue strength at 106 cycles.

  1. Emission factors of fine particles, carbonaceous aerosols and traces gases from road vehicles: Recent tests in an urban tunnel in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Li, Guanghui; Yang, Weiqiang; Huang, Zhonghui; Zhang, Zhou; Huang, Xinyu; Deng, Wei; Liu, Tengyu; Huang, Zuzhao; Zhang, Zhanyi

    2015-12-01

    Motor vehicles contribute primarily and secondarily to air quality problems due to fine particle (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) pollution in China's megacities. Characterizing vehicle emission with the rapid change of vehicle numbers and fleet compositions is vital for both bottom-up emission survey and top-down source apportioning. To obtain emission factors (EFs) of PM2.5, carbonaceous aerosols and trace gases for road vehicles, in urban Guangzhou we conducted a field campaign in 2014 in the Zhujiang Tunnel, a heavily burdened tunnel with about 40,000 motor vehicles passing through each of its two separated bores per day. PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled for offline analysis while trace gases including SO2, NOx and CO were measured online and in situ. An eddy covariance system with an integrated 3-D sonic anemometer was also adopted to measure CO2 and winds inside the tunnel. We recorded an average fleet composition of 61% light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDVs) + 12% heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDVs) + 27% liquefied petroleum gas vehicles (LPGVs), and EFs of 82.7 ± 28.3, 19.3 ± 4.7 and 13.3 ± 3.3 mg veh-1 km-1, respectively, for PM2.5, organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). These EFs were respectively 23.4%, 18.3% and 72.3% lower when compared to that measured in the same tunnel in 2004. EFs of PM2.5, OC and EC were higher at night time (148 ± 126, 29 ± 24 and 21 ± 18 mg veh-1 km-1, respectively) due to significantly elevated fractions of HDVs in the traffic fleets. An average ratio of OC to EC 1.45 from this tunnel study was much higher than that of ∼0.5 in previous tunnel studies. The EFs of SO2, NOx, CO, CO2 and NMHCs for road traffic were also obtained from our tunnel tests, and they were 20.7 ± 2.9, (1.29 ± 0.2)E+03, (3.10 ± 0.68)E+03, (3.90 ± 0.49)E+05, and 448 ± 39 mg veh-1 km-1, respectively.

  2. 40 CFR 790.62 - Submission of study plans and conduct of testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tested, including physical constants, spectral data, chemical analysis, and stability under test and... final reports to EPA. (c) Review and modification. (1) Upon receipt of a study plan, EPA will review it... responsibility of the test sponsor to review the study protocols to determine if they comply with all...

  3. 40 CFR 790.62 - Submission of study plans and conduct of testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Identity of the consent agreement under which testing will be performed. (2) The specific test requirements... , microbiologist , and laboratory assistants. (8) Identity and supporting data on the chemical substance being... of any proposed changes in standards for the development of data, study plans or testing...

  4. Comparison of hydraulic conductivities by grain-size analysis pumping, and slug tests in Quaternary gravels, NE Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucko, Tatjana; Verbovšek, Timotej

    2015-08-01

    Hydraulic conductivities (K) can be obtained from pumping and slug tests as well as grain size analysis. Although empirical methods for such estimations are longstanding, there is still insufficient comparison of K values among the various approaches. Six grain-size analysis methods were tested on coarse-grained alluvial sediments from 12 water wells in NE Slovenia. Values of K from grainsize methods were compared to those of pumping tests and slug tests. Six grain-size methods (USBR, Slichter, Hazen, Beyer, Kozeny-Carman, and Terzaghi) were used for comparison with the Theis and Neuman pumping test method and the Bouwer-Rice method for slug tests. The results show that the USBR (US Bureau of Reclamation) method overestimates K values and there is no correlation with other results, so its use is not advised. Conversely, whilst the Slichter method gives much lower estimates of K, it is the only one to completely fulfill the grain size requirements. Other methods (Hazen, Beyer, Kozeny- Carman, and Terzaghi) result in intermediate values and are similar to the Slichter method; however they should be used for smaller-sized sediments. Due to their high transmissivity and small radius of inffiuence, slug tests should be avoided in the analysis of gravels, as they only test a small portion of the aquifer compared to pumping tests. This is confirmed by the low correlation coefficients between hydraulic conductivities obtained from pumping tests and slug tests.

  5. Large-scale V/STOL testing. [conducted in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D. G.; Aiken, T. N.; Aoyagi, K.; Falarshi, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Several facets of large-scale testing of V/STOL aircraft configurations are discussed with particular emphasis on test experience in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Examples of powered-lift test programs are presented in order to illustrate tradeoffs confronting the planner of V/STOL test programs. Large-scale V/STOL wind-tunnel testing can sometimes compete with small-scale testing in the effort required (overall test time) and program costs because of the possibility of conducting a number of different tests with a single large-scale model where several small-scale models would be required. The benefits of both high- or full-scale Reynolds numbers, more detailed configuration simulation, and number and type of onboard measurements are studied.

  6. Fracture hydraulic conductivity in the Mexico City clayey aquitard: Field piezometer rising-head tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    A regional lacustrine aquitard covers the main aquifer of the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The aquitard's hydraulic conductivity (K') is fundamental for evaluating the natural protection of the aquifer against a variety of contaminants present on the surface and its hydraulic response. This study analyzes the distribution and variation of K' in the plains of Chalco, Texcoco and Mexico City (three of the six former lakes that existed in the Basin of Mexico), on the basis of 225 field-permeability tests, in nests of existing piezometers located at depths of 2-85 m. Tests were interpreted using the Hvorslev method and some by the Bouwer-Rice method. Results indicate that the distribution of K' fits log-Gaussian regression models. Dominant frequencies for K' in the Chalco and Texcoco plains range between 1E-09 and 1E-08 m/s, with similar population means of 1.19E-09 and 1.7E-09 m/s, respectively, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than the matrix conductivity. In the Mexico City Plain the population mean is near by one order of magnitude lower; K'=2.6E-10 m/s. The contrast between the measured K' and that of the matrix is attributed to the presence of fractures in the upper 25-40 m, which is consistent with the findings of previous studies on solute migration in the aquitard. Un imperméable régional d'origine lacustre recouvre le principal aquifère de la zone urbaine de la ville de Mexico. La conductivité hydraulique K' de cet imperméable est fondamentale pour évaluer la protection naturelle de l'aquifère, contre les différents contaminants présents en surface, et sa réponse hydraulique. Cette étude analyse et les variations de K' dans les plaines de Chalco, Texcoco et Mexico (trois des six anciens lacs qui existaient dans le Bassin de Mexico), sur la base de 225 essais de perméabilité sur le terrain, réalisés en grappes dans des piézomètres existants entre 2 et 85 m de profondeur. Les essais ont été interprétés avec la m

  7. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  8. Evaluations of Thin Cirrus Contamination and Screening in Ground Aerosol Observations Using Collocated Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Berkoff, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Cirrus clouds, particularly sub visual high thin cirrus with low optical thickness, are difficult to be screened in operational aerosol retrieval algorithms. Collocated aerosol and cirrus observations from ground measurements, such as the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET), provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to examine the susceptibility of operational aerosol products to thin cirrus contamination. Quality assured aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements were also tested against the CALIPSO vertical feature mask (VFM) and the MODIS-derived thin cirrus screening parameters for the purpose of evaluating thin cirrus contamination. Key results of this study include: (1) Quantitative evaluations of data uncertainties in AERONET AOT retrievals are conducted. Although AERONET cirrus screening schemes are successful in removing most cirrus contamination, strong residuals displaying strong spatial and seasonal variability still exist, particularly over thin cirrus prevalent regions during cirrus peak seasons, (2) Challenges in matching up different data for analysis are highlighted and corresponding solutions proposed, and (3) Estimation of the relative contributions from cirrus contamination to aerosol retrievals are discussed. The results are valuable for better understanding and further improving ground aerosol measurements that are critical for aerosol-related climate research.

  9. Results of an interlaboratory fatigue test program conducted on alloy 800H at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental approach adopted for low cycle fatigue tests of alloy 800H involved the use of electrohydraulic test systems, hour glass geometry specimens, diametral extensometers, and axial strain computers. Attempts to identify possible problem areas were complicated by the lack of reliable data for the heat of Alloy 800H under investigation. The method adopted was to generate definitive test data in an Interlaboratory Fatigue Test Program. The laboratories participating in the program were Argonne National Laboratory, Battelle Columbus, Mar-Test, and NASA Lewis. Fatigue tests were conducted on both solid and turbular specimens at temperatures of 20, 593, and 760 C and strain ranges of 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5 percent. The subject test method can, under certain circumstances, produce fatigue data which are serious in error. This approach subsequently was abandoned at General Atomic Company in favor of parallel gage length specimens and axial extensiometers.

  10. 40 CFR 63.5850 - How do I conduct performance tests, performance evaluations, and design evaluations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5850... performance test, performance evaluation, and design evaluation in 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, that applies to... requirements in § 63.7(e)(1) and under the specific conditions that 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, specifies....

  11. 40 CFR 63.5850 - How do I conduct performance tests, performance evaluations, and design evaluations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5850 How do I... test, performance evaluation, and design evaluation in 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, that applies to you... requirements in § 63.7(e)(1) and under the specific conditions that 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, specifies....

  12. 40 CFR 63.5850 - How do I conduct performance tests, performance evaluations, and design evaluations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5850... performance test, performance evaluation, and design evaluation in 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, that applies to... requirements in § 63.7(e)(1) and under the specific conditions that 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, specifies....

  13. 10 CFR 26.101 - Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... until the device indicates that an adequate amount of breath has been obtained; and (7) Show the donor... confirmatory test result was known. (c) Unless there are problems in administering the breath test that require an additional collection, the collector shall collect only one breath specimen for the...

  14. 10 CFR 26.101 - Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... until the device indicates that an adequate amount of breath has been obtained; and (7) Show the donor... confirmatory test result was known. (c) Unless there are problems in administering the breath test that require an additional collection, the collector shall collect only one breath specimen for the...

  15. 10 CFR 26.101 - Conducting a confirmatory test for alcohol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... until the device indicates that an adequate amount of breath has been obtained; and (7) Show the donor... confirmatory test result was known. (c) Unless there are problems in administering the breath test that require an additional collection, the collector shall collect only one breath specimen for the...

  16. 40 CFR 63.2262 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Methods 204A through 204F of 40 CFR part 51, appendix M, which require three separate test runs of at... thermal oxidizers, you may measure the temperature in multiple locations (e.g., one location per burner... performance tests. Replacement of the biofilter media with the same type of material is not considered...

  17. 40 CFR 60.2720 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... least 3 years, and all performance tests for the pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or... shows a deviation from an emission limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity, you... less frequent testing under this paragraph. (i) For particulate matter, hydrogen chloride,...

  18. 40 CFR 63.10006 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests or tune-ups?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... applicable periodic HCl emissions tests according to Table 5 to this subpart and § 63.10007 at least... performance tests according to Table 5 to this subpart and § 63.10007 at least every year. (b) For affected... years (once every year for Hg) according to Table 5 and § 63.10007. Should subsequent emissions...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15250 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... pollutants subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if... municipal waste combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1795 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or... combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 15 nanograms...

  1. 40 CFR 60.1795 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or... combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 15 nanograms...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15250 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... pollutants subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if... municipal waste combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1795 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or... combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 15 nanograms...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1795 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or... combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 15 nanograms...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1795 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or... combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 15 nanograms...

  6. 40 CFR 62.15250 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pollutants subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if... municipal waste combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal...

  7. 40 CFR 62.15250 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pollutants subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if... municipal waste combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15250 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... pollutants subject to stack testing requirements: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if... municipal waste combustion units have demonstrated levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal...

  9. 40 CFR 63.8595 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating limits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) emission limits in Table 1 to this subpart, you must calculate your mass emissions per unit of production for each test run using Equation 1 of this section: ER16MY03.003 Where: MP=mass per unit production... specific conditions in Table 4 to this subpart. (d) You must test while operating at the maximum...

  10. 40 CFR 63.7515 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests or fuel analyses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance tests or fuel analyses? 63.7515 Section 63.7515 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters Testing, Fuel Analyses, and Initial...

  11. 40 CFR 63.7515 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests or fuel analyses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performance tests or fuel analyses? 63.7515 Section 63.7515 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters Testing, Fuel Analyses, and Initial...

  12. 40 CFR 63.7515 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests or fuel analyses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance tests or fuel analyses? 63.7515 Section 63.7515 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters Testing, Fuel Analyses, and Initial...

  13. Uncertainties in satellite remote sensing of aerosols and impact on monitoring its long-term trend: a review and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Zhao, X.; Kahn, R.; Mishchenko, M.; Remer, L.; Lee, K.-H.; Wang, M.; Laszlo, I.; Nakajima, T.; Maring, H.

    2009-07-01

    As a result of increasing attention paid to aerosols in climate studies, numerous global satellite aerosol products have been generated. Aerosol parameters and underlining physical processes are now incorporated in many general circulation models (GCMs) in order to account for their direct and indirect effects on the earth's climate, through their interactions with the energy and water cycles. There exists, however, an outstanding problem that these satellite products have substantial discrepancies, that must be lowered substantially for narrowing the range of the estimates of aerosol's climate effects. In this paper, numerous key uncertain factors in the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) are articulated for some widely used and relatively long satellite aerosol products including the AVHRR, TOMS, MODIS, MISR, and SeaWiFS. We systematically review the algorithms developed for these sensors in terms of four key elements that influence the quality of passive satellite aerosol retrieval: calibration, cloud screening, classification of aerosol types, and surface effects. To gain further insights into these uncertain factors, the NOAA AVHRR data are employed to conduct various tests, which help estimate the ranges of uncertainties incurred by each of the factors. At the end, recommendations are made to cope with these issues and to produce a consistent and unified aerosol database of high quality for both environment monitoring and climate studies.

  14. 40 CFR 63.11220 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests or fuel analyses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compliance with the mercury emission limit based on fuel analysis, you must conduct a fuel analysis according... burning the new type of fuel or mixture in your boiler. You must recalculate the mercury emission rate using Equation 1 of § 63.11211. The recalculated mercury emission rate must be less than the...

  15. Parenting and Infant Difficulty: Testing a Mutual Exacerbation Hypothesis to Predict Early Onset Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorber, Michael F.; Egeland, Byron

    2011-01-01

    The prediction of conduct problems (CPs) from infant difficulty and parenting measured in the first 6 months of life was studied in a sample of 267 high-risk mother-child dyads. Stable, cross-situational CPs at school entry (5-6 years) were predicted by negative infancy parenting, mediated by mutually angry and hostile mother-toddler interactions…

  16. 40 CFR 63.9798 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... part of renewing your 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71 operating permit. (b) You must conduct a... processing rate. (2) Each affected kiln that follows an affected shape dryer or curing oven and is used to... kiln that is subject to the emission limits specified in item 5 or 9 of Table 1 to this subpart,...

  17. 40 CFR 63.9798 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... part of renewing your 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71 operating permit. (b) You must conduct a... processing rate. (2) Each affected kiln that follows an affected shape dryer or curing oven and is used to... kiln that is subject to the emission limits specified in item 5 or 9 of Table 1 to this subpart,...

  18. 40 CFR 63.9798 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... part of renewing your 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71 operating permit. (b) You must conduct a... processing rate. (2) Each affected kiln that follows an affected shape dryer or curing oven and is used to... kiln that is subject to the emission limits specified in item 5 or 9 of Table 1 to this subpart,...

  19. 40 CFR 63.9798 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... part of renewing your 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71 operating permit. (b) You must conduct a... processing rate. (2) Each affected kiln that follows an affected shape dryer or curing oven and is used to... kiln that is subject to the emission limits specified in item 5 or 9 of Table 1 to this subpart,...

  20. 40 CFR 63.9798 - When must I conduct subsequent performance tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... part of renewing your 40 CFR part 70 or 40 CFR part 71 operating permit. (b) You must conduct a... processing rate. (2) Each affected kiln that follows an affected shape dryer or curing oven and is used to... kiln that is subject to the emission limits specified in item 5 or 9 of Table 1 to this subpart,...

  1. 40 CFR 63.2262 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (TTE) conducted using Methods 204A through 204F of 40 CFR part 51, appendix M, which require three... acetaldehyde, acrolein, formaldehyde, methanol, phenol, and propionaldehyde), THC, formaldehyde, or methanol in... (calculated as the sum of the emission rates of acetaldehyde, acrolein, formaldehyde, methanol, phenol,...

  2. 40 CFR 63.2262 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (TTE) conducted using Methods 204A through 204F of 40 CFR part 51, appendix M, which require three... tracer gas method in appendix A to this subpart, which requires a minimum of three separate runs of at... biofilter to complete the requirements in paragraph (m)(1) of this section. (3) You may expand...

  3. 30 CFR 250.407 - What tests must I conduct to determine reservoir characteristics?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reservoir characteristics? 250.407 Section 250.407 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... conduct to determine reservoir characteristics? You must determine the presence, quantity, quality, and reservoir characteristics of oil, gas, sulphur, and water in the formations penetrated by logging,...

  4. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  5. SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM THE OXIDATION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN THE PRESENCE OF DRY SUBMICRON AMMONIUM SULFATE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine formation of secondary organic aerosols. A smog chamber system was developed for studying gas-aerosol interactions in a dynamic flow reactor. These experiments were conducted to investigate the fate of gas and aerosol phase compounds ...

  6. The tidal slug test: estimating intertidal sediment hydraulic conductivity twice-per-tide from passive monitoring of shallow piezometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, K. B.; Gorelick, S.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying sediment hydraulic properties is necessary to understand groundwater dynamics. In coastal settings, however, the corrosive and frequently flooded intertidal environment has historically hindered extensive hydraulic characterization. We present a method to easily and inexpensively quantify the hydraulic conductivity of fine intertidal sediments based on analysis of shallow piezometer response to tidal flooding. Specifically, we make use of the lag between surface water and groundwater tidal responses: during the flood (or ebb) tide, the surface water floods (or exposes) the intertidal sediment surface nearly instantaneously compared to the slower groundwater response. We analyze these tidal impulses as slug tests by extending the classic Bouwer and Rice [1976] slug test method to apply to the intertidal data. We test the 'tidal slug test' method using two sets of water level data from intertidal salt marshes in southern San Francisco Estuary: (i) two weeks of data from more than three-dozen piezometers in which manual slug tests were also conducted and (ii) three years of data from more than four-dozen piezometers at a site also characterized by inverse modeling and laboratory hydraulic tests. The method yields numerous comparable estimates of hydraulic conductivity, temporally-distributed twice per flooding tide (e.g., 14-28 times per spring tidal phase). We find good agreement among the conductivity values from the passive 'tidal slug tests' and the other methods. The simplicity and repeatability of the 'tidal slug test' method recommend it as a useful tool to aid in characterizing intertidal sediment heterogeneity and near-surface flow dynamics.

  7. Indian aerosols: present status.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A P; Sharma, C

    2002-12-01

    This article presents the status of aerosols in India based on the research activities undertaken during last few decades in this region. Programs, like International Geophysical Year (IGY), Monsoon Experiment (MONEX), Indian Middle Atmospheric Program (IMAP) and recently conducted Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), have thrown new lights on the role of aerosols in global change. INDOEX has proved that the effects of aerosols are no longer confined to the local levels but extend at regional as well as global scales due to occurrence of long range transportation of aerosols from source regions along with wind trajectories. The loading of aerosols in the atmosphere is on rising due to energy intensive activities for developmental processes and other anthropogenic activities. One of the significant observation of INDOEX is the presence of high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the near persistent winter time haze layer over tropical Indian Ocean which have probably been emitted from the burning of fossil-fuels and biofuels in the source region. These have significant bearing on the radiative forcing in the region and, therefore, have potential to alter monsoon and hydrological cycles. In general, the SPM concentrations have been found to be on higher sides in ambient atmosphere in many Indian cities but the NOx concentrations have been found to be on lower side. Even in the haze layer over Indian Ocean and surrounding areas, the NOx concentrations have been reported to be low which is not conducive of O3 formation in the haze/smog layer. The acid rain problem does not seem to exist at the moment in India because of the presence of neutralizing soil dust in the atmosphere. But the high particulate concentrations in most of the cities' atmosphere in India are of concern as it can cause deteriorated health conditions. PMID:12492171

  8. Indian aerosols: present status.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A P; Sharma, C

    2002-12-01

    This article presents the status of aerosols in India based on the research activities undertaken during last few decades in this region. Programs, like International Geophysical Year (IGY), Monsoon Experiment (MONEX), Indian Middle Atmospheric Program (IMAP) and recently conducted Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), have thrown new lights on the role of aerosols in global change. INDOEX has proved that the effects of aerosols are no longer confined to the local levels but extend at regional as well as global scales due to occurrence of long range transportation of aerosols from source regions along with wind trajectories. The loading of aerosols in the atmosphere is on rising due to energy intensive activities for developmental processes and other anthropogenic activities. One of the significant observation of INDOEX is the presence of high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the near persistent winter time haze layer over tropical Indian Ocean which have probably been emitted from the burning of fossil-fuels and biofuels in the source region. These have significant bearing on the radiative forcing in the region and, therefore, have potential to alter monsoon and hydrological cycles. In general, the SPM concentrations have been found to be on higher sides in ambient atmosphere in many Indian cities but the NOx concentrations have been found to be on lower side. Even in the haze layer over Indian Ocean and surrounding areas, the NOx concentrations have been reported to be low which is not conducive of O3 formation in the haze/smog layer. The acid rain problem does not seem to exist at the moment in India because of the presence of neutralizing soil dust in the atmosphere. But the high particulate concentrations in most of the cities' atmosphere in India are of concern as it can cause deteriorated health conditions.

  9. 40 CFR 60.2155 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the previous performance test for the pollutant. For cadmium and lead, both cadmium and lead must be... particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, mercury, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, cadmium, lead and...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2155 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the previous performance test for the pollutant. For cadmium and lead, both cadmium and lead must be... particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, mercury, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, cadmium, lead and...

  11. Test Results of Total Ionizing Dose Conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivas, Rosa M.; Johnston, Allan H.; Miyahira, Tetsuo F.; Rax, Bernard G.; Wiedeman, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports recent Total Ionizing Dose (TID) test results obtained at JPL. Several device samples were analyzed exhibiting significant failure levels and ELDRS effects under biased and unbiased condition.

  12. Compendium of Recent Test Results of Single Event Effects Conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Gregory R.; Guertin, Steven M.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Irom, Farokh; Zajac, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports heavy ion, proton, and laser induced single event effects results for a variety of microelectronic devices targeted for possible use in NASA spacecrafts. The compendium covers devices tested within the years of 2010 through 2012.

  13. Efficiency of the Needle Probe Test for Evaluation of Thermal Conductivity of Composite Materials: Two-Scale Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łydżba, Dariusz; Różański, Adrian; Rajczakowska, Magdalena; Stefaniuk, Damian

    2014-03-01

    The needle probe test, as a thermal conductivity measurement method, has become very popular in recent years. In the present study, the efficiency of this methodology, for the case of composite materials, is investigated based on the numerical simulations. The material under study is a two-phase composite with periodic microstructure of "matrix-inclusion" type. Two-scale analysis, incorporating micromechanics approach, is performed. First, the effective thermal conductivity of the composite considered is found by the solution of the appropriate boundary value problem stated for the single unit cell. Next, numerical simulations of the needle probe test are carried out. In this case, two different locations of the measuring sensor are considered. It is shown that the "equivalent" conductivity, derived from the probe test, is strongly affected by the location of the sensor. Moreover, comparing the results obtained for different scales, one can notice that the "equivalent" conductivity cannot be interpreted as the effective one for the composites considered. Hence, a crude approximation of the effective property is proposed based on the volume fractions of constituents and the equivalent conductivities derived from different sensor locations.

  14. Aerosol generation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Polk, William W; Sharma, Monita; Sayes, Christie M; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-04-23

    Aerosol generation and characterization are critical components in the assessment of the inhalation hazards of engineered nanomaterials (NMs). An extensive review was conducted on aerosol generation and exposure apparatus as part of an international expert workshop convened to discuss the design of an in vitro testing strategy to assess pulmonary toxicity following exposure to aerosolized particles. More specifically, this workshop focused on the design of an in vitro method to predict the development of pulmonary fibrosis in humans following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Aerosol generators, for dry or liquid particle suspension aerosolization, and exposure chambers, including both commercially available systems and those developed by independent researchers, were evaluated. Additionally, characterization methods that can be used and the time points at which characterization can be conducted in order to interpret in vitro exposure results were assessed. Summarized below is the information presented and discussed regarding the relevance of various aerosol generation and characterization techniques specific to aerosolized MWCNTs exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The generation of MWCNT aerosols relevant to human exposures and their characterization throughout exposure in an ALI system is critical for extrapolation of in vitro results to toxicological outcomes in humans.

  15. Technical Bases to Aid in the Decision of Conducting Full Power Ground Nuclear Tests for Space Fission Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hixson, Laurie L.; Houts, Michael G.; Clement, Steven D.

    2004-02-01

    The extent to which, if any, full power ground nuclear testing of space reactors should be performed has been a point of discussion within the industry for decades. Do the benefits outweigh the risks? Are there equivalent alternatives? Can a test facility be constructed (or modified) in a reasonable amount of time? Is the test article an accurate representation of the flight system? Are the costs too restrictive? The obvious benefits of full power ground nuclear testing; obtaining systems integrated reliability data on a full-scale, complete end-to-end system; come at some programmatic risk. Safety related information is not obtained from a full-power ground nuclear test. This paper will discuss and assess these and other technical considerations essential in the decision to conduct full power ground nuclear-or alternative-tests.

  16. Measurements of the effects of humidity on radio-aerosol penetration through ultrafine capillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, C.

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of humidity on radio-aerosol penetration through ultrafine capillaries. A number of tests were conducted at relative humidities of 20%, 50%, and 80%, with sampling times of 20, 40, and 60 min. The radio-aerosol consisted of polystyrene particles with a diameter of 0.1 {micro}m. The ultrafine capillaries had a diameter of 250 {micro}m. The data from these tests varied significantly. These results made the identification of radio-aerosol penetration trends inconclusive. The standard deviation for all penetration data ranged from 3% to 30%. The results of this study suggest that a better control of the experimental parameters was needed to obtain more accurate data from experiments associated with radio-aerosol penetration in the presence of moisture. The experimental parameters that may have contributed to the wide variance of data, include aerosol flow, radio-aerosol generation, capillary characteristics, humidity control, and radiation measurements. It was the uncertainty of these parameters that contributed to the poor data which made conclusive deductions about radio-aerosol penetration dependence on humidity difficult. The application of this study is to ultrafine leaks resulting from stress fractures in high-level nuclear waste transportation casks under accident scenarios.

  17. Stratospheric Aerosols for Solar Radiation Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Ben

    SRM in the context of this entry involves placing a large amount of aerosols in the stratosphere to reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface, thereby cooling the surface and counteracting some of the warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gases. The way this is accomplished depends on the specific aerosol used, but the basic mechanism involves backscattering and absorbing certain amounts of solar radiation aloft. Since warming from greenhouse gases is due to longwave (thermal) emission, compensating for this warming by reduction of shortwave (solar) energy is inherently imperfect, meaning SRM will have climate effects that are different from the effects of climate change. This will likely manifest in the form of regional inequalities, in that, similarly to climate change, some regions will benefit from SRM, while some will be adversely affected, viewed both in the context of present climate and a climate with high CO2 concentrations. These effects are highly dependent upon the means of SRM, including the type of aerosol to be used, the particle size and other microphysical concerns, and the methods by which the aerosol is placed in the stratosphere. SRM has never been performed, nor has deployment been tested, so the research up to this point has serious gaps. The amount of aerosols required is large enough that SRM would require a major engineering endeavor, although SRM is potentially cheap enough that it could be conducted unilaterally. Methods of governance must be in place before deployment is attempted, should deployment even be desired. Research in public policy, ethics, and economics, as well as many other disciplines, will be essential to the decision-making process. SRM is only a palliative treatment for climate change, and it is best viewed as part of a portfolio of responses, including mitigation, adaptation, and possibly CDR. At most, SRM is insurance against dangerous consequences that are directly due to increased surface air

  18. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED IN AN UNSATURATED FRACTURED-CLAY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confin...

  19. 40 CFR 63.4760 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations? 63.4760 Section 63.4760 Protection of Environment... Coating of Wood Building Products Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on...

  20. 40 CFR 63.4760 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations? 63.4760 Section 63.4760 Protection of Environment... Coating of Wood Building Products Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on...

  1. 40 CFR 63.4760 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations? 63.4760 Section 63.4760 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Surface Coating of Wood Building Products Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with...

  2. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests E Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods and Class I and Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 or PM10â2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. E, Table E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance...

  3. 40 CFR Table I-9 to Subpart I of... - Methods and Procedures for Conducting Emissions Test for Stack Systems

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methods and Procedures for Conducting Emissions Test for Stack Systems I Table I-9 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING...

  4. 40 CFR 63.3160 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... determine the mass of organic HAP emissions and volume of coating solids deposited in the initial compliance... that month plus the next month. You must determine the mass of organic HAP emissions and volume of... not required to conduct an initial test to determine transfer efficiency if you receive approval...

  5. 40 CFR 63.3160 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... determine the mass of organic HAP emissions and volume of coating solids deposited in the initial compliance... that month plus the next month. You must determine the mass of organic HAP emissions and volume of... not required to conduct an initial test to determine transfer efficiency if you receive approval...

  6. 40 CFR 63.7941 - How do I conduct a performance test, design evaluation, or other type of initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... device is used), as determined by Method 2 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, dscm/h; n = Number of organic... determined by Method 18 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A; MWi = Molecular weight of organic compound i in the... conduct the test using Method 21 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) and the procedures in § 63.925(a)...

  7. 40 CFR 63.7941 - How do I conduct a performance test, design evaluation, or other type of initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... device is used), as determined by Method 2 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, dscm/h; n = Number of organic... determined by Method 18 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A; MWi = Molecular weight of organic compound i in the... conduct the test using Method 21 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) and the procedures in § 63.925(a)...

  8. 40 CFR 63.7941 - How do I conduct a performance test, design evaluation, or other type of initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... device is used), as determined by Method 2 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, dscm/h; n = Number of organic... determined by Method 18 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A; MWi = Molecular weight of organic compound i in the... conduct the test using Method 21 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) and the procedures in § 63.925(a)...

  9. The Influence of Maternal Acculturation, Neighborhood Disadvantage, and Parenting on Chinese American Adolescents' Conduct Problems: Testing the Segmented Assimilation Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Lisa L.; Lau, Anna S.; Chen, Angela Chia-Chen; Dinh, Khanh T.; Kim, Su Yeong

    2009-01-01

    Associations among neighborhood disadvantage, maternal acculturation, parenting and conduct problems were investigated in a sample of 444 Chinese American adolescents. Adolescents (54% female, 46% male) ranged from 12 to 15 years of age (mean age = 13.0 years). Multilevel modeling was employed to test the hypothesis that the association between…

  10. 40 CFR 63.4350 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... according to § 63.4351(d)(5), you must conduct a performance test of each capture system and add-on control....4351(d)(5), you must initiate the first material balance no later than the applicable compliance date....4293 no later than the compliance date specified in § 63.4283. (3) You must complete the...

  11. 40 CFR 63.4350 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... according to § 63.4351(d)(5), you must conduct a performance test of each capture system and add-on control....4351(d)(5), you must initiate the first material balance no later than the applicable compliance date....4293 no later than the compliance date specified in § 63.4283. (3) You must complete the...

  12. 40 CFR 63.4350 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-liquid material balances according to § 63.4351(d)(5), you must conduct a performance test of each... balances according to § 63.4351(d)(5), you must initiate the first material balance no later than the... practice plan required by § 63.4293 no later than the compliance date specified in § 63.4283. (3) You...

  13. 40 CFR 63.4350 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... according to § 63.4351(d)(5), you must conduct a performance test of each capture system and add-on control....4351(d)(5), you must initiate the first material balance no later than the applicable compliance date....4293 no later than the compliance date specified in § 63.4283. (3) You must complete the...

  14. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests E Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods and Class I and Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 or PM10â2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. E, Table E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance...

  15. 40 CFR 63.3960 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... first material balance no later than the applicable compliance date specified in § 63.3883. For magnet wire coating operations you may, with approval, conduct a performance test of one representative magnet wire coating machine for each group of identical or very similar magnet wire coating machines. (2)...

  16. 40 CFR 63.3960 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance date specified in § 63.3883. For magnet wire coating operations you may, with approval, conduct a performance test of one representative magnet wire coating machine for each group of identical or very similar magnet wire coating machines. (2) You must develop and begin implementing the work practice plan...

  17. 40 CFR 63.3960 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... first material balance no later than the applicable compliance date specified in § 63.3883. For magnet wire coating operations you may, with approval, conduct a performance test of one representative magnet wire coating machine for each group of identical or very similar magnet wire coating machines. (2)...

  18. 40 CFR 63.3960 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compliance date specified in § 63.3883. For magnet wire coating operations you may, with approval, conduct a performance test of one representative magnet wire coating machine for each group of identical or very similar magnet wire coating machines. (2) You must develop and begin implementing the work practice plan...

  19. 40 CFR 63.3960 - By what date must I conduct performance tests and other initial compliance demonstrations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applicable compliance date specified in § 63.3883. For magnet wire coating operations you may, with approval, conduct a performance test of one representative magnet wire coating machine for each group of identical or very similar magnet wire coating machines. (2) You must develop and begin implementing the...

  20. 40 CFR 63.7941 - How do I conduct a performance test, design evaluation, or other type of initial compliance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... device is used), as determined by Method 2 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A, dscm/h; n = Number of organic... determined by Method 18 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A; MWi = Molecular weight of organic compound i in the... conduct the test using Method 21 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) and the procedures in § 63.925(a)...

  1. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Spectral Energy Distribution and..., Table E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests Characteristic Spectral Region Ultraviolet Visible Infrared Bandwidth (µm) 0.28...

  2. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Spectral Energy Distribution and..., Table E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests Characteristic Spectral Region Ultraviolet Visible Infrared Bandwidth (µm) 0.28...

  3. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Spectral Energy Distribution and... E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests Characteristic Spectral Region Ultraviolet Visible Infrared Bandwidth (µm) 0.28...

  4. Conduction time for a 6-cm segment of the ulnar nerve across the elbow: reference values for the 6-cm conduction time test.

    PubMed

    Landau, Mark E; Campbell, William W

    2009-06-01

    Current electrodiagnostic studies for Ulnar nerve mononeuropathy at the elbow have substandard sensitivity and specificity. Reference values for a novel, screening electrodiagnostic test for ulnar nerve mononeuropathy at the elbow were obtained bilaterally from 72 subjects without any upper extremity signs or symptoms. The test used two, 3-cm straight line distances, one proximal, and one distal to the medial epicondyle to avoid a curvilinear measurement. The mean conduction times (CTE) were 1.16 +/- 0.16 milliseconds, 1.23 +/- 0.18 milliseconds, 1.33 +/- 0.24 milliseconds, for subjects 20 to 40, 40 to 60, and >60 years old, respectively. A CTE >1.50 milliseconds, >1.60 milliseconds, and >1.80 milliseconds for each age group would be considered abnormal conferring 98% specificity. The median side-to-side difference of CTE (CTE-diff) was 0.10 milliseconds with a range of 0.00 to 0.55 milliseconds. A CTE-diff >0.45 milliseconds has a specificity of 97%. Potential advantages to this method include straight-line measurement distances to reduce experimental error, and a distance less than 10 cm to improve lesion detection.

  5. Sediment-contact and survival of fingernail clams: Implications for conducting short-term laboratory tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naimo, T.J.; Cope, W.G.; Bartsch, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Porewater toxicity tests have been used as indicators of whole sediment toxicity. However, many species commonly tested in porewater predominately reside in the water column and otherwise have little to no direct contact with sediment and associated porewater. We assessed the feasibility of porewater toxicity tests with fingernail clams Musculium transversum, a benthic macroinvertebrate that inhabits soft bottom sediments and feeds by filtering surface and porewater. Fingernail clams were exposed to water or sediment in a 96 h laboratory test with a 5 x 2 factorial experimental design. The five treatments included sediments from four sites in the Mississippi River and one sediment-free control (well water). In all treatments, clams were exposed to the sediments or water either directly (no enclosure) or indirectly (enclosure, suspended above the sediment surface). There were three replicates for each of the ten treatment combinations. Overall, survival of fingernail clams did not vary among the five treatments (p = 0.36). In treatments without enclosures, survival of clams in the sediment-free control was not significantly different (p = 0.34) from the sediment-containing treatments. Survival of clams in the sediment-free control averaged 85 - suggesting that direct sediment contact is not necessary for survival in short-term tests. In contrast, survival of clams in the sediment-containing treatments differed significantly (p = 0.03) between exposures with (mean, 77) and without (mean, 89) enclosures. Thus, fingernail clams may provide an alternative species for evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates in short-term laboratory porewater tests. However, more information on their physiological requirements and the development of sublethal endpoints is recommended before their use in tests of longer duration. (C) 2000 by John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

  6. Spatial variation in hydraulic conductivity determined by slug tests in the Canadian River alluvium near the Norman Landfill, Norman, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, Martha A.; Christenson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Slug tests were used to characterize hydraulic conductivity variations at a spatial scale on the order of meters in the alluvial aquifer downgradient of the Norman Landfill. Forty hydraulic conductivity measurements were made, most along a 215-meter flow path transect. Measured hydraulic conductivity, excluding clayey layers, ranged from 8.4 ? 10-7 to 2.8 ? 10-4 meters per second, with a median value of 6.6 ? 10-5 meters per second. The hydraulic conductivity measurements yield a preliminary concept of the permeability structure of the aquifer along this transect. A low hydraulic conductivity silt-clay layer at about 4 meters below the water table and a high hydraulic conductivity layer at the base of the aquifer appear to have the most potential to affect contaminant transport. Specific conductance measurements show the leachate plume along this transect becomes attenuated between 150 and 200 meters downgradient of the landfill, except at the base of the aquifer, where it extends at least 225 meters downgradient of the landfill.

  7. Testing of solar cell covers and encapsulants conducted in a simulated space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The materials included in the evaluation were 0211 micro-sheet, FEP-A used as a cover and as an adhesive, DC 93-500 adhesive, PFA "hard coat" used as a cover, GE 615/UV-24 used as a cover, GR 650 used as a cover, and electrostatically bonded 7070 glass. The test environments were 1 MeV electron irradiation interspersed with thermal cycling, 0.5 MeV proton irradiation interspersed with thermal cycling and UV exposure interspersed with thermal cycling. Summary data is given describing the response of the test materials both visually and electrically to the three different environments.

  8. Task 2 - Limits for High-Frequency Conducted Susceptibility Testing - CS114 (NRC-HQ-60-14-D-0015)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Ewing, Paul D.; Moses, Rebecca J.

    2015-09-01

    A principal focus of Task 2 under this project was for ORNL to evaluate the basis for susceptibility testing against high-frequency conducted interference and to establish recommendations to resolve concerns about the severity of test limits for the conducted susceptibility (CS) test, CS114, from MIL-STD-461. The primary concern about the test limit has been characterized by the EPRI EMI Working Group in the following terms: Demonstrating compliance with the CS114 test limits recommended in TR-102323 has proven to be problematic, even for components that have been tested to commercial standards and demonstrated proper operation in industrial applications [6]. Specifically, EPRI notes that the CS114 limits approved in regulatory documents are significantly higher than those invoked by the US military and similar commercial standards in the frequency range below 200 kHz. For this task, ORNL evaluated the original approach to establishing the test limit, EPRI technical findings from a review of the limit, and the regulatory basis through which the currently approved limits were accepted. Based on this analysis, strategies have been developed regarding changes to the CS114 limit that can resolve the technical concerns raised by the industry. Guided by the principles that reasonable assurance of safety must not be compromised but excessive conservatism should be reduced, recommendations on a suitable basis for a revised limit have been developed and can be incorporated into the planned Revision 2 of RG 1.180.

  9. 40 CFR 63.8445 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating limits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (HCl), and particulate matter (PM) emission limits in Table 1 to this subpart, you must calculate your... product ER=mass emission rate of pollutant (HF, HCl, or PM) during each performance test run, kilograms... per hour. (2) To determine compliance with the percent reduction HF and HCl emission limits in Table...

  10. 40 CFR 63.8595 - How do I conduct performance tests and establish operating limits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with the production-based hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and particulate matter (PM..., HCl, or PM) during each performance test run, kilograms (pounds) per hour P=production rate during... the percent reduction HF and HCl emission limits in Table 1 to this subpart, you must calculate...

  11. Conducting Maximum Treadmill Tests with Young Children--Procedures and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Donna; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Increased emphasis on pediatric exercise physiology has led to more sophisticated fitness testing of children. This report of a study of 25 participants in a preschool development program describes procedures and strategies that increase the likelihood of achieving maximal aerobic power in three- through six-year-old children. (Author/IAH)

  12. Calibration of Self-Efficacy for Conducting a Chi-Squared Test of Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Whitney Alicia; Goins, Deborah D.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy and knowledge, both concerning the chi-squared test of independence, were examined in education graduate students. Participants rated statements concerning self-efficacy and completed a related knowledge assessment. After completing a demographic survey, participants completed the self-efficacy and knowledge scales a second time.…

  13. The role of Rasch analysis when conducting science education research utilizing multiple-choice tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, William J.; Scantlebury, Kathryn

    2006-03-01

    Recent international studies note that countries whose students perform well on international science assessments report the need to change science education. Some countries use assessments for diagnostic purposes to assist teachers in addressing their students' needs. However, in the United States, standards-based reform has focused the national discussion on documenting students' attainment of high educational standards. Students' science achievement is one of those standards, and in many states, high-stakes tests determine the resultant achievement measures. Policymakers and administrators use those tests to rank school performance, to prevent students' graduation, and to evaluate teachers. With science test measures used in different ways, statistical confidence in the measures' validity and reliability is essential. Using a science achievement test from one state's systemic reform project as an example, this paper discusses the strengths of the Rasch model as a psychometric tool and analysis technique, referring to person item maps, anchoring, differential item functioning, and person item fit. Furthermore, the paper proposes that science educators should carefully inspect the tools they use to measure and document changes in educational systems.

  14. 40 CFR 60.2720 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... least 3 years, and all performance tests for the pollutant (particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or...) If your CISWI unit continues to meet the emission limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen... shows a deviation from an emission limitation for particulate matter, hydrogen chloride, or opacity,...

  15. 40 CFR 63.5719 - How do I conduct a performance test?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performance test? (a) You must capture the emissions using a permanent enclosure (such as a spray booth or... the control device is a permanent total enclosure as defined in Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR..., as defined in Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51, around the permanent enclosure. You...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1305 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or operate a municipal waste... levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 7 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1305 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or operate a municipal waste... levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 7 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1305 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or operate a municipal waste... levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 7 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1305 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or operate a municipal waste... levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 7 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1305 - May I conduct stack testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: dioxins/furans, cadmium, lead, mercury, particulate matter, opacity, hydrogen chloride, and fugitive ash. (b) You can test less often for dioxins/furans emissions if you own or operate a municipal waste... levels of dioxins/furans emissions less than or equal to 7 nanograms per dry standard cubic meter...

  1. 40 CFR 60.2720 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... more than 37 months following the previous performance test for the pollutant. For cadmium and lead, both cadmium and lead must be emitted at emission levels no greater than their respective emission... oxides, sulfur dioxide, cadmium, lead, and dioxins/furans, the emission level equal to 75 percent of...

  2. 40 CFR 60.2720 - May I conduct performance testing less often?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... more than 37 months following the previous performance test for the pollutant. For cadmium and lead, both cadmium and lead must be emitted at emission levels no greater than their respective emission... oxides, sulfur dioxide, cadmium, lead, and dioxins/furans, the emission level equal to 75 percent of...

  3. 40 CFR 63.5850 - How do I conduct performance tests, performance evaluations, and design evaluations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... performance test, performance evaluation, and design evaluation in 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, that applies to... requirements in § 63.7(e)(1) and under the specific conditions that 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, specifies. (c... and under the specific conditions that 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, specifies. (d) You may not...

  4. 40 CFR 63.5850 - How do I conduct performance tests, performance evaluations, and design evaluations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... test, performance evaluation, and design evaluation in 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, that applies to you... requirements in § 63.7(e)(1) and under the specific conditions that 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, specifies. (c... and under the specific conditions that 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS, specifies. (d) You may not...

  5. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  6. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  7. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  8. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  9. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The yard... (f). (2) At a minimum, yard air pressure shall be 60 psi at the end of the consist or block of cars... device. (3) If the air pressure of the yard test device is less than 80 psi, then a brake pipe leakage...

  10. High-Frequency Testing of Composite Fan Vanes With Erosion-Resistant Coating Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Sutter, James K.; Naik, Subhash; Otten, Kim D.; Perusek, Gail P.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical integrity of hard, erosion-resistant coatings were tested using the Structural Dynamics Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Under the guidance of Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch personnel, fixturing and test procedures were developed at Glenn to simulate engine vibratory conditions on coated polymer-matrix- composite bypass vanes using a slip table in the Structural Dynamics Laboratory. Results from the high-frequency mechanical bench testing, along with concurrent erosion testing of coupons and vanes, provided sufficient confidence to engine-endurance test similarly coated vane segments. The knowledge gained from this program will be applied to the development of oxidation- and erosion-resistant coatings for polymer matrix composite blades and vanes in future advanced turbine engines. Fan bypass vanes from the AE3007 (Rolls Royce America, Indianapolis, IN) gas turbine engine were coated by Engelhard (Windsor, CT) with compliant bond coatings and hard ceramic coatings. The coatings were developed collaboratively by Glenn and Allison Advanced Development Corporation (AADC)/Rolls Royce America through research sponsored by the High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Project (HITEMP) and the Higher Operating Temperature Propulsion Components (HOTPC) project. High-cycle fatigue was performed through high-frequency vibratory testing on a shaker table. Vane resonant frequency modes were surveyed from 50 to 3000 Hz at input loads from 1g to 55g on both uncoated production vanes and vanes with the erosion-resistant coating. Vanes were instrumented with both lightweight accelerometers and strain gauges to establish resonance, mode shape, and strain amplitudes. Two high-frequency dwell conditions were chosen to excite two strain levels: one approaching the vane's maximum allowable design strain and another near the expected maximum strain during engine operation. Six specimens were tested per dwell condition. Pretest and posttest

  11. Tests on conducted electrical noise on a storage ring dc-dc converter cabinet

    SciTech Connect

    Carwardine, J.J.

    1994-02-22

    Electrical noise is produced by switching transients in the power supply converters which excite resonances formed by stray capacitance and cable inductance. This noise is present not only on the load cables, but also on ground cables of the magnet and of the converter cabinet. Since there will eventually be a large number of cabinets running at one time, tests were carried out to characterize the noise and to investigate possible techniques for reducing the levels. The tests were carried out on the test girder and converter cabinet set up in 412 area. There were four magnets installed on the girder -- two 0.5m quadrupoles, a 0.8m quadrupole, and a sextupole. These tests were carried out on one of the 0.5m quadrupoles. It should be noted that with this setup, the raw dc power was supplied at around 70V. In the final configuration, a 0.5m quad will be fed from a 40V raw supply. Consequently, the switching transients observed during the tests are likely to be higher than will occur in reality. Noise currents contain two main components: a low frequency component at around 50kHz, and a higher frequency component at around lMHz. It is the latter component which is of primary concern. Currents measured on the dc load cables typically were around one ampere, while currents into the building ground system were only a few tens of milliamps. Several methods were used to try reducing the noise currents, but only the addition of a series impedance was successful -- other methods either had no effect or increased the ground currents.

  12. Testing ground GDR: Western pharmaceutical firms conducting clinical trials behind the Iron Curtain.

    PubMed

    Erices, Rainer; Frewer, Andreas; Gumz, Antje

    2015-07-01

    Western pharmaceutical companies conducted clinical trials in the Eastern Bloc during the Cold War. Recently, media reports about alleged human experimentation provoked a wave of indignation. However, a scientific and objective account of these trials is lacking. The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the clinical trials performed in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) based on archival material from the health system and the secret service. We found documents relating to 220 trials involving more than 14,000 patients and 68 Western companies. However, no record of patient information forms or systematic documentation regarding the provision of patient consent was discovered. There was no evidence to suggest that the trials systematically and intentionally damaged patients. The trials were conducted without the knowledge of the public. GDR legislation stipulated that patients must consent to the trials, but no evidence was found to suggest that patients were systematically informed. Documents suggest that at least some of the trials were carried out without patients having a comprehensive understanding of what the trial involved. The GDR agreed to the trials due to impending bankruptcy and Western pharmaceutical companies capitalised on this situation.

  13. Testing ground GDR: Western pharmaceutical firms conducting clinical trials behind the Iron Curtain.

    PubMed

    Erices, Rainer; Frewer, Andreas; Gumz, Antje

    2015-07-01

    Western pharmaceutical companies conducted clinical trials in the Eastern Bloc during the Cold War. Recently, media reports about alleged human experimentation provoked a wave of indignation. However, a scientific and objective account of these trials is lacking. The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the clinical trials performed in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) based on archival material from the health system and the secret service. We found documents relating to 220 trials involving more than 14,000 patients and 68 Western companies. However, no record of patient information forms or systematic documentation regarding the provision of patient consent was discovered. There was no evidence to suggest that the trials systematically and intentionally damaged patients. The trials were conducted without the knowledge of the public. GDR legislation stipulated that patients must consent to the trials, but no evidence was found to suggest that patients were systematically informed. Documents suggest that at least some of the trials were carried out without patients having a comprehensive understanding of what the trial involved. The GDR agreed to the trials due to impending bankruptcy and Western pharmaceutical companies capitalised on this situation. PMID:25341732

  14. Standard guide for conducting static toxicity tests with Lemna gibba G3. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-01

    This guide is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee E-47 on Biological Effects and Environmental Fate and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee E47.01 on Aquatic Toxicology. Current edition approved Apr. 15, 1991. Published June 1991. Reapproved 1998. Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  15. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  16. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  17. 300-Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of Well 399-3-21

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, Frank A.

    2007-07-19

    This report presents brief test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within well 399-3-21 as part of the 300-Area volatile organic compound characterization program. The test intervals were characterized as the borehole was advanced to its final drill depth (45.7 m) and before its completion as a monitor-well facility. The primary objective of the slug tests was to provide information pertaining to the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at this location and to select the final screen-depth interval for the monitor well. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor-well strategies within this area.

  18. Inorganic Components of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Anthony Stein

    The inorganic components comprise 15% to 50% of the mass of atmospheric aerosols. For about the past 10 years the mass of these components was predicted assuming thermodynamic equilibrium between the volatile aerosol -phase inorganic species NH_4NO _3 and NH_4Cl and their gas-phase counterparts NH_3, HNO_3, and HCl. In this thesis I examine this assumption and prove that (1) the time scales for equilibration between the gas and aerosol phases are often too long for equilibrium to hold, and (2) even when equilibrium holds, transport considerations often govern the size distribution of these aerosol components. Water can comprise a significant portion of atmospheric aerosols under conditions of high relative humidity, whereas under conditions of sufficiently low relative humidity atmospheric aerosols tend to be dry. The deliquescence point is the relative humidity where the aerosol goes from a solid dry phase to an aqueous or mixed solid-aqueous phase. In this thesis I derive the temperature dependence of the deliquescence point and prove that in multicomponent solutions the deliquescence point is lower than for corresponding single component solutions. These theories of the transport, thermodynamic, and deliquescent properties of atmospheric aerosols are integrated into an aerosol inorganics model, AIM. The predictions of AIM compare well to fundamental thermodynamic measurements. Comparison of the prediction of AIM to those of other aerosol equilibrium models shows substantial disagreement in the predicted water content at lower relative humidities. The disagreement is due the improved treatment in AIM of the deliquescence properties of multicomponent solutions. In the summer and fall of 1987 the California Air Resources Board conducted the Southern California Air Quality Study, SCAQS, during which atmospheric aerosols were measured in Los Angeles. The size and composition of the aerosol and the concentrations of their gas phase counterparts were measured. When the

  19. Thermal conductivity of zirconia based inert matrix fuel: use and abuse of the formal models for testing new experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Arima, T.; Lee, Y. W.

    2003-06-01

    An inert matrix fuel material based on yttria-stabilized cubic zirconia: Er xY yPu zZr 1- x- y- zO 2-( x + y)/2 ( x+ y=0.15, z: [0.05-0.15]) was proposed for burning excess plutonium in light water reactors. The studied inert matrix fuel is made of cubic stabilized zirconia. The limited number of experimental thermal conductivity data justifies this formal and intensive study. Approaches derived from Klemens theory were revisited and the derived conductivity model applied for zirconia, accounting the effects of phononic scattering centers. The hyperbolic thermal conductivity trend with temperature known for pure zirconia, is reduced by isotopes, impurities, dopants and oxygen vacancies, which act as scattering centers and contribute to conductivity reduction to a flat plot with temperature for stabilized zirconia. It is experimentally observed that the thermal conductivity derived from laser flash measurements for Er xY yM zZr 1- x- y- zO 2-( x + y)/2 (with M=Ce or Pu, z=0 or ˜0.1 and x+ y=0.15) is rather constant as a function of temperature in the range 300-1000 K. The thermal conductivity was observed to depend on the concentration of dopants such as YO 1.5 and/or ErO 1.5, CeO 2 (analogous of PuO 2) or PuO 2. The bulk material conductivity of Er 0.05Y 0.10Pu 0.10Zr 0.75O 1.925 is about 2 W m -1 K -1. In this study, the thermal conductivity data of both monoclinic and stabilized cubic zirconia based IMF are tested with the model approach in order to understand the experimental data in a semi-quantitative way.

  20. Aerosol Climate Time Series Evaluation In ESA Aerosol_cci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Pinnock, S.

    2015-12-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Aerosol_cci (2010 - 2017) conducts intensive work to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors. By the end of 2015 full mission time series of 2 GCOS-required aerosol parameters are completely validated and released: Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from dual view ATSR-2 / AATSR radiometers (3 algorithms, 1995 - 2012), and stratospheric extinction profiles from star occultation GOMOS spectrometer (2002 - 2012). Additionally, a 35-year multi-sensor time series of the qualitative Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) together with sensitivity information and an AAI model simulator is available. Complementary aerosol properties requested by GCOS are in a "round robin" phase, where various algorithms are inter-compared: fine mode AOD, mineral dust AOD (from the thermal IASI spectrometer), absorption information and aerosol layer height. As a quasi-reference for validation in few selected regions with sparse ground-based observations the multi-pixel GRASP algorithm for the POLDER instrument is used. Validation of first dataset versions (vs. AERONET, MAN) and inter-comparison to other satellite datasets (MODIS, MISR, SeaWIFS) proved the high quality of the available datasets comparable to other satellite retrievals and revealed needs for algorithm improvement (for example for higher AOD values) which were taken into account for a reprocessing. The datasets contain pixel level uncertainty estimates which are also validated. The paper will summarize and discuss the results of major reprocessing and validation conducted in 2015. The focus will be on the ATSR, GOMOS and IASI datasets. Pixel level uncertainties validation will be summarized and discussed including unknown components and their potential usefulness and limitations. Opportunities for time series extension with successor instruments of the Sentinel family will be described and the complementarity of the different satellite aerosol products