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Sample records for aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium

  1. A COMPARATIVE REVIEW OF INORGANIC AEROSOL THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM MODULES: SIMILARITIES, DIFFERENCES, AND THEIR LIKELY CAUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive comparison of five inorganic aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium modules, MARS-A, SEQUILIB, SCAPE2, EQUISOLV II, and AIM2, was conducted for a variety of atmospheric concentrations of particulate matter (PM) constituents, relative humidities (RHs), and temperatures....

  2. IS THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF URBAN AEROSOLS DETERMINED BY THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM? (R826371C005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A size-resolved equilibrium model, SELIQUID, is presented and used to simulate the size–composition distribution of semi-volatile inorganic aerosol in an urban environment. The model uses the efflorescence branch of aerosol behavior to predict the equilibrium partitioni...

  3. Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2005-01-01

    Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics fills a niche in the market by providing a comprehensive introduction to a new, emerging topic in the field. The importance of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is addressed in order to fully understand how a system works, whether it is in a biological system like the brain or a system that develops plastic. In order to fully grasp the subject, the book clearly explains the physical concepts and mathematics involved, as well as presenting problems and solutions; over 200 exercises and answers are included. Engineers, scientists, and applied mathematicians can all use the book to address their problems in modelling, calculating, and understanding dynamic responses of materials.

  4. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF 3-D AIR QUALITY MODELS WITH CURRENT THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM MODELS TO PREDICT AEROSOL NO3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partitioning of total nitrate (TNO3) and total ammonium (TNH4) between gas and aerosol phases is studied with two thermodynamic equilibrium models, ISORROPIA and AIM, and three datasets: high time-resolution measurement data from the 1999 Atlanta SuperSite Experiment and from...

  5. Sound speeds in suspensions in thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temkin, S.

    1992-11-01

    This work considers sound propagation in suspensions of particles of constant mass in fluids, in both relaxed and frozen thermodynamic equilibrium. Treating suspensions as relaxing media, thermodynamic arguments are used to obtain their sound speeds in equilibrium conditions. The results for relaxed equilibrium, which is applicable in the limit of low frequencies, agree with existing theories for aerosols, but disagree with Wood's equation. It is shown that the latter is thermodynamically correct only in the exceptional case when the specific heat ratios of the fluid and of the particles are equal to unity. In all other cases discrepancies occur. These may be significant when one of the two phases in the suspension is a gas, as is the case in aerosols and in bubbly liquids. The paper also includes a brief discussion of the sound speed in frozen equilibrium.

  6. Thermodynamic equilibrium at heterogeneous pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, J. C.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in metamorphic petrology point out the importance of grain-scale pressure variations in high-temperature metamorphic rocks. Pressure derived from chemical zonation using unconventional geobarometry based on equal chemical potentials fits mechanically feasible pressure variations. Here, a thermodynamic equilibrium method is presented that predicts chemical zoning as a result of pressure variations by Gibbs energy minimization. Equilibrium thermodynamic prediction of the chemical zoning in the case of pressure heterogeneity is done by constrained Gibbs minimization using linear programming techniques. In addition to constraining the system composition, a certain proportion of the system is constrained at a specified pressure. Input pressure variations need to be discretized, and each discrete pressure defines an additional constraint for the minimization. The Gibbs minimization method provides identical results to a geobarometry approach based on chemical potentials, thus validating the inferred pressure gradient. The thermodynamic consistency of the calculation is supported by the similar result obtained from two different approaches. In addition, the method can be used for multi-component, multi-phase systems of which several applications are given. A good fit to natural observations in multi-phase, multi-component systems demonstrates the possibility to explain phase assemblages and zoning by spatial pressure variations at equilibrium as an alternative to pressure variation in time due to disequilibrium.

  7. A Computationally Efficient Algorithm for Aerosol Phase Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2004-10-04

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient thermodynamic module that is repeatedly used to compute internal aerosol phase state equilibrium. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of a computationally efficient numerical solver called MESA (Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols). The unique formulation of MESA allows iteration of all the equilibrium equations simultaneously while maintaining overall mass conservation and electroneutrality in both the solid and liquid phases. MESA is unconditionally stable, shows robust convergence, and typically requires only 10 to 20 single-level iterations (where all activity coefficients and aerosol water content are updated) per internal aerosol phase equilibrium calculation. Accuracy of MESA is comparable to that of the highly accurate Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM), which uses a rigorous Gibbs free energy minimization approach. Performance evaluation will be presented for a number of complex multicomponent mixtures commonly found in urban and marine tropospheric aerosols.

  8. A TEST OF THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM MODELS AND 3-D AIR QUALITY MODELS FOR PREDICTIONS OF AEROSOL NO3-

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inorganic species of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium constitute a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols. The behavior of nitrate is one of the most intriguing aspects of inorganic atmospheric aerosols because particulate nitrate concentrations depend not only on the amount of ...

  9. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  10. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions. PMID:25974471

  11. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  12. Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol during MILAGRO 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Sullivan, A.; Weber, R.; VanReken, T.; Fischer, M.; Matias, E.; Moya, M.; Farmer, D.; Cohen, R.C.

    2008-12-05

    Fast measurements of aerosol and gas-phase constituents coupled with the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model are used to study the partitioning of semivolatile inorganic species and phase state of Mexico City aerosol sampled at the T1 site during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign. Overall, predicted semivolatile partitioning agrees well with measurements. PM{sub 2.5} is insensitive to changes in ammonia but is to acidic semivolatile species. For particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m diameter, semi-volatile partitioning requires 30-60 min to equilibrate; longer time is typically required during the night and early morning hours. When the aerosol sulfate-to-nitrate molar ratio is less than unity, predictions improve substantially if the aerosol is assumed to follow the deliquescent phase diagram. Treating crustal species as 'equivalent sodium' (rather than explicitly) in the thermodynamic equilibrium calculations introduces important biases in predicted aerosol water uptake, nitrate and ammonium; neglecting crustals further increases errors dramatically. This suggests that explicitly considering crustals in the thermodynamic calculations is required to accurately predict the partitioning and phase state of aerosols.

  13. Equilibrium thermodynamics in modified gravitational theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-04-01

    We show that it is possible to obtain a picture of equilibrium thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in the expanding cosmological background for a wide class of modified gravity theories with the Lagrangian density f(R,ϕ,X), where R is the Ricci scalar and X is the kinetic energy of a scalar field ϕ. This comes from a suitable definition of an energy-momentum tensor of the “dark” component that respects to a local energy conservation in the Jordan frame. In this framework the horizon entropy S corresponding to equilibrium thermodynamics is equal to a quarter of the horizon area A in units of gravitational constant G, as in Einstein gravity. For a flat cosmological background with a decreasing Hubble parameter, S globally increases with time, as it happens for viable f(R) inflation and dark energy models. We also show that the equilibrium description in terms of the horizon entropy S is convenient because it takes into account the contribution of both the horizon entropy S' in non-equilibrium thermodynamics and an entropy production term.

  14. Thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous tetrafluoromethane in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Boney, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Equations and in computer code are presented for the thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous, undissociated tetrafluoromethane (CF4) in chemical equilibrium. The computer code calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties of CF4 when given any two of five thermodynamic variables (entropy, temperature, volume, pressure, and enthalpy). Equilibrium thermodynamic and transport property data are tabulated and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented.

  15. Equilibrium molecular thermodynamics from Kirkwood sampling.

    PubMed

    Somani, Sandeep; Okamoto, Yuko; Ballard, Andrew J; Wales, David J

    2015-05-21

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide.

  16. Temperature of systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garden, J.-L.; Richard, J.; Guillou, H.

    2008-07-01

    Two phenomenological approaches are currently used in the study of the vitreous state. One is based on the concept of fictive temperature introduced by Tool [J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. 34, 199 (1945)] and recently revisited by Nieuwenhuizen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 5580 (1998)]. The other is based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes initiated by De Donder at the beginning of the last century [L'Affinité (Gauthier-Villars, Paris, 1927)] and recently used by Möller et al. for a thorough study of the glass transition [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 094505 (2006)]. This latter approach leads to the possibility of describing the glass transition by means of the freezing-in of one or more order parameters connected to the internal structural degrees of freedom involved in the vitrification process. In this paper, the equivalence of the two preceding approaches is demonstrated, not only for glasses but in a very general way for any system undergoing an irreversible transformation. This equivalence allows the definition of an effective temperature for all systems departed from equilibrium generating a positive amount of entropy. In fact, the initial fictive temperature concept of Tool leads to the generalization of the notion of temperature for systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium, for which glasses are just particular cases.

  17. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium and Thermodynamics in Undergraduate General Chemistry Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Anil C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses some of the conceptual difficulties encountered by undergraduate students in learning certain aspects of chemical equilibrium and thermodynamics. Discusses teaching strategies for dealing with these difficulties. (JRH)

  18. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Chemical Equilibrium in Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory of thermodynamics of the equilibrium in solution and dissociation-dimerization kinetics. Describes experimental procedure including determination of molar absorptivity and equilibrium constant, reaction enthalpy, and kinetics of the dissociation-dimerization reaction. (JM)

  19. Far-from-equilibrium measurements of thermodynamic length

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Edward H.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-11-05

    Thermodynamic length is a path function that generalizes the notion of length to the surface of thermodynamic states. Here, we show how to measure thermodynamic length in far-from-equilibrium experiments using the work fluctuation relations. For these microscopic systems, it proves necessary to define the thermodynamic length in terms of the Fisher information. Consequently, the thermodynamic length can be directly related to the magnitude of fluctuations about equilibrium. The work fluctuation relations link the work and the free energy change during an external perturbation on a system. We use this result to determine equilibrium averages at intermediate points of the protocol in which the system is out-of-equilibrium. This allows us to extend Bennett's method to determine the potential of mean force, as well as the thermodynamic length, in single molecule experiments.

  20. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  1. Electrolytes: transport properties and non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.G.

    1980-12-01

    This paper presents a review on the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics to transport in electrolyte solutions, and some recent experimental work and results for mutual diffusion in electrolyte solutions.

  2. Methane on Mars: Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Photochemical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.; Ewell, M.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars by Mars Express and Earth-based spectroscopy is very surprising, very puzzling, and very intriguing. On Earth, about 90% of atmospheric ozone is produced by living systems. A major question concerning methane on Mars is its origin - biological or geological. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations indicated that methane cannot be produced by atmospheric chemical/photochemical reactions. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for three gases, methane, ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the Earth s atmosphere are summarized in Table 1. The calculations indicate that these three gases should not exist in the Earth s atmosphere. Yet they do, with methane, ammonia and nitrous oxide enhanced 139, 50 and 12 orders of magnitude above their calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentration due to the impact of life! Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations have been performed for the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars based on the assumed composition of the Mars atmosphere shown in Table 2. The calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentrations of the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars is shown in Table 3. Clearly, based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, methane should not be present in the atmosphere of Mars, but it is in concentrations approaching 30 ppbv from three distinct regions on Mars.

  3. Composition and Thermodynamic Properties of Air in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W E; Weston, Kenneth C

    1958-01-01

    Charts have been prepared relating the thermodynamic properties of air in chemical equilibrium for temperatures to 15,000 degrees k and for pressures 10(-5) to 10 (plus 4) atmospheres. Also included are charts showing the composition of air, the isentropic exponent, and the speed of sound. These charts are based on thermodynamic data calculated by the National Bureau of Standards.

  4. Considerations on non equilibrium thermodynamics of interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    Nature can be considered the "first" engineer! For scientists and engineers, dynamics and evolution of complex systems are not easy to predict. A fundamental approach to study complex system is thermodynamics. But, the result is the origin of too many schools of thermodynamics with a consequent difficulty in communication between thermodynamicists and other scientists and, also, among themselves. The solution is to obtain a unified approach based on the fundamentals of physics. Here we suggest a possible unification of the schools of thermodynamics starting from two fundamental concepts of physics, interaction and flows.

  5. A computationally efficient Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols (MESA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Leonard K.

    2005-12-01

    Development and application of a new Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols (MESA) is described for systems containing H+, NH4+, Na+, Ca2+, SO42-, HSO4-, NO3-, and Cl- ions. The equilibrium solution is obtained by integrating a set of pseudo-transient ordinary differential equations describing the precipitation and dissolution reactions for all the possible salts to steady state. A comprehensive temperature dependent mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) parameterization is developed for all the possible salt mixtures, thereby eliminating the need for a rigorous numerical solution when ambient RH is less than MDRH(T). The solver is unconditionally stable, mass conserving, and shows robust convergence. Performance of MESA was evaluated against the Web-based AIM Model III, which served as a benchmark for accuracy, and the EQUISOLV II solver for speed. Important differences in the convergence and thermodynamic errors in MESA and EQUISOLV II are discussed. The average ratios of speeds of MESA over EQUISOLV II ranged between 1.4 and 5.8, with minimum and maximum ratios of 0.6 and 17, respectively. Because MESA directly diagnoses MDRH, it is significantly more efficient when RH < MDRH. MESA's superior performance is partially due to its "hard-wired" code for the present system as opposed to EQUISOLV II, which has a more generalized structure for solving any number and type of reactions at temperatures down to 190 K. These considerations suggest that MESA is highly attractive for use in 3-D aerosol/air-quality models for lower tropospheric applications (T > 240 K) in which both accuracy and computational efficiency are critical.

  6. Biochemical thermodynamics and rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2010-12-30

    Biochemical thermodynamics is based on the chemical thermodynamics of aqueous solutions, but it is quite different because pH is used as an independent variable. A transformed Gibbs energy G' is used, and that leads to transformed enthalpies H' and transformed entropies S'. Equilibrium constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are referred to as apparent equilibrium constants K' to indicate that they are functions of pH in addition to temperature and ionic strength. Despite this, the most useful way to store basic thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions is to give standard Gibbs energies of formation, standard enthalpies of formation, electric charges, and numbers of hydrogen atoms in species of biochemical reactants like ATP. This makes it possible to calculate standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation, standard transformed enthalpies of formation of reactants (sums of species), and apparent equilibrium constants at desired temperatures, pHs, and ionic strengths. These calculations are complicated, and therefore, a mathematical application in a computer is needed. Rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics is based on biochemical thermodynamics because all reactions in the mechanism prior to the rate-determining reaction are at equilibrium. The expression for the equilibrium concentration of the enzyme-substrate complex that yields products can be derived by applying Solve in a computer to the expressions for the equilibrium constants in the mechanism and the conservation equation for enzymatic sites. In 1979, Duggleby pointed out that the minimum number of velocities of enzyme-catalyzed reactions required to estimate the values of the kinetic parameters is equal to the number of kinetic parameters. Solve can be used to do this with steady-state rate equations as well as rapid-equilibrium rate equations, provided that the rate equation is a polynomial. Rapid-equilibrium rate equations can be derived for complicated mechanisms that involve several reactants

  7. Experimental determination of thermodynamic equilibrium in biocatalytic transamination.

    PubMed

    Tufvesson, Pär; Jensen, Jacob S; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Woodley, John M

    2012-08-01

    The equilibrium constant is a critical parameter for making rational design choices in biocatalytic transamination for the synthesis of chiral amines. However, very few reports are available in the scientific literature determining the equilibrium constant (K) for the transamination of ketones. Various methods for determining (or estimating) equilibrium have previously been suggested, both experimental as well as computational (based on group contribution methods). However, none of these were found suitable for determining the equilibrium constant for the transamination of ketones. Therefore, in this communication we suggest a simple experimental methodology which we hope will stimulate more accurate determination of thermodynamic equilibria when reporting the results of transaminase-catalyzed reactions in order to increase understanding of the relationship between substrate and product molecular structure on reaction thermodynamics.

  8. Atomistic modeling of thermodynamic equilibrium of plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tongsik; Valone, Steve; Baskes, Mike; Chen, Shao-Ping; Lawson, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Plutonium metal has complex thermodynamic properties. Among its six allotropes at ambient pressure, the fcc delta-phase exhibits a wide range of anomalous behavior: extraordinarily high elastic anisotropy, largest atomic volume despite the close-packed structure, negative thermal expansion, strong elastic softening at elevated temperature, and extreme sensitivity to dilute alloying. An accurate description of these thermodynamic properties goes far beyond the current capability of first-principle calculations. An elaborate modeling strategy at the atomic level is hence an urgent need. We propose a novel atomistic scheme to model elemental plutonium, in particular, to reproduce the anomalous characteristics of the delta-phase. A modified embedded atom method potential is fitted to two energy-volume curves that represent the distinct electronic states of plutonium in order to embody the mechanism of the two-state model of Weiss, in line with the insight originally proposed by Lawson et al. [Philos. Mag. 86, 2713 (2006)]. By the use of various techniques in Monte Carlo simulations, we are able to provide a unified perspective of diverse phenomenological aspects among thermal expansion, elasticity, and phase stability.

  9. Elucidation of Reaction Mechanisms Far from Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Raphael

    2016-04-01

    Far from equilibrium: This thesis provides a deep mechanistic analysis of the electrooxidation of methanol when the system is kept far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. Under an oscillatory regime, interesting characteristics between the elementary reaction steps were observed. We were able to elucidate the effect of the intrinsic drift in a potential time-series responsible for spontaneous transition of temporal patterns and the carbon dioxide decoupling from direct and indirect pathways.

  10. Elucidation of Reaction Mechanisms Far from Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Raphael

    2016-04-01

    Far from equilibrium: This thesis provides a deep mechanistic analysis of the electrooxidation of methanol when the system is kept far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. Under an oscillatory regime, interesting characteristics between the elementary reaction steps were observed. We were able to elucidate the effect of the intrinsic drift in a potential time-series responsible for spontaneous transition of temporal patterns and the carbon dioxide decoupling from direct and indirect pathways. PMID:27308227

  11. Reformulating atmospheric aerosol thermodynamics and hygroscopic growth into fog, haze and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-06-01

    Modeling atmospheric aerosol and cloud microphysics is rather complex, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that the thermodynamics can be considerably simplified by reformulating equilibrium to consistently include water, and transform laboratory-based concepts to atmospheric conditions. We generalize the thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis - merely based on solute solubilities - to explicitly account for the water mass consumed by hydration. As a result, in chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium the relative humidity (RH) suffices to determine the saturation molality, including solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients), since the water content is fixed by RH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning can be solved analytically and non-iteratively. Our new concept enables an efficient and accurate calculation of the aerosol water mass and directly links the aerosol hygroscopic growth to fog, haze and cloud formation. We apply our new concept in the 3rd Equilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM3) for use in regional and global chemistry-transport and climate models. Its input is limited to the species' solubilities from which a newly introduced stoichiometric coefficient for water is derived. Analogously, we introduce effective stoichiometric coefficients for the solutes to account for complete or incomplete dissociation. We show that these coefficients can be assumed constant over the entire activity range and calculated for various inorganic, organic and non-electrolyte compounds, including alcohols, sugars and dissolved gases. EQSAM3 calculates the aerosol composition and gas/liquid/solid partitioning of mixed inorganic/organic multicomponent solutions and the associated water uptake for almost 100 major compounds. It explicitly accounts for particle hygroscopic growth by computing aerosol properties such as

  12. Equilibrium absorptive partitioning theory between multiple aerosol particle modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, Matthew; Connolly, Paul; Topping, David; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    An existing equilibrium absorptive partitioning model for calculating the equilibrium gas and particle concentrations of multiple semi-volatile organics within a bulk aerosol is extended to allow for multiple involatile aerosol modes of different sizes and chemical compositions. In the bulk aerosol problem, the partitioning coefficient determines the fraction of the total concentration of semi-volatile material that is in the condensed phase of the aerosol. This work modifies this definition for multiple polydisperse aerosol modes to account for multiple condensed concentrations, one for each semi-volatile on each involatile aerosol mode. The pivotal assumption in this work is that each aerosol mode contains an involatile constituent, thus overcoming the potential problem of smaller particles evaporating completely and then condensing on the larger particles to create a monodisperse aerosol at equilibrium. A parameterisation is proposed in which the coupled non-linear system of equations is approximated by a simpler set of equations obtained by setting the organic mole fraction in the partitioning coefficient to be the same across all modes. By perturbing the condensed masses about this approximate solution a correction term is derived that accounts for many of the removed complexities. This method offers a greatly increased efficiency in calculating the solution without significant loss in accuracy, thus making it suitable for inclusion in large-scale models.

  13. Thermodynamics of the Rhodamine B Lactone--Zwitterion Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinckley, Daniel A.; Seybold, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of thermochromic transformations for studying thermodynamic properties. Describes an experiment that uses a commercially available dye, attains equilibrium rapidly, employs a simple, single-beam spectrophotometer, and is suitable for both physical chemistry and introductory chemistry laboratories. (TW)

  14. Local thermodynamic equilibrium for globally disequilibrium open systems under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury

    2016-04-01

    Predictive modeling of far and near equilibrium processes is essential for understanding of patterns formation and for quantifying of natural processes that are never in global equilibrium. Methods of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics are needed and have to be combined. For example, predicting temperature evolution due to heat conduction requires simultaneous use of equilibrium relationship between internal energy and temperature via heat capacity (the caloric equation of state) and disequilibrium relationship between heat flux and temperature gradient. Similarly, modeling of rocks deforming under stress, reactions in system open for the porous fluid flow, or kinetic overstepping of the equilibrium reaction boundary necessarily needs both equilibrium and disequilibrium material properties measured under fundamentally different laboratory conditions. Classical irreversible thermodynamics (CIT) is the well-developed discipline providing the working recipes for the combined application of mutually exclusive experimental data such as density and chemical potential at rest under constant pressure and temperature and viscosity of the flow under stress. Several examples will be presented.

  15. Local equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics for irreversible systems with thermodynamic inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Glavatskiy, K. S.

    2015-10-28

    Validity of local equilibrium has been questioned for non-equilibrium systems which are characterized by delayed response. In particular, for systems with non-zero thermodynamic inertia, the assumption of local equilibrium leads to negative values of the entropy production, which is in contradiction with the second law of thermodynamics. In this paper, we address this question by suggesting a variational formulation of irreversible evolution of a system with non-zero thermodynamic inertia. We introduce the Lagrangian, which depends on the properties of the normal and the so-called “mirror-image” systems. We show that the standard evolution equations, in particular, the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, can be derived from the variational procedure without going beyond the assumption of local equilibrium. We also argue that the second law of thermodynamics in non-equilibrium should be understood as a consequence of the variational procedure and the property of local equilibrium. For systems with instantaneous response this leads to the standard requirement of the local instantaneous entropy production being always positive. However, if a system is characterized by delayed response, the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics should be altered. In particular, the quantity, which is always positive, is not the instantaneous entropy production, but the entropy production averaged over a proper time interval.

  16. Local equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics for irreversible systems with thermodynamic inertia.

    PubMed

    Glavatskiy, K S

    2015-10-28

    Validity of local equilibrium has been questioned for non-equilibrium systems which are characterized by delayed response. In particular, for systems with non-zero thermodynamic inertia, the assumption of local equilibrium leads to negative values of the entropy production, which is in contradiction with the second law of thermodynamics. In this paper, we address this question by suggesting a variational formulation of irreversible evolution of a system with non-zero thermodynamic inertia. We introduce the Lagrangian, which depends on the properties of the normal and the so-called "mirror-image" systems. We show that the standard evolution equations, in particular, the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, can be derived from the variational procedure without going beyond the assumption of local equilibrium. We also argue that the second law of thermodynamics in non-equilibrium should be understood as a consequence of the variational procedure and the property of local equilibrium. For systems with instantaneous response this leads to the standard requirement of the local instantaneous entropy production being always positive. However, if a system is characterized by delayed response, the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics should be altered. In particular, the quantity, which is always positive, is not the instantaneous entropy production, but the entropy production averaged over a proper time interval.

  17. Local equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics for irreversible systems with thermodynamic inertia.

    PubMed

    Glavatskiy, K S

    2015-10-28

    Validity of local equilibrium has been questioned for non-equilibrium systems which are characterized by delayed response. In particular, for systems with non-zero thermodynamic inertia, the assumption of local equilibrium leads to negative values of the entropy production, which is in contradiction with the second law of thermodynamics. In this paper, we address this question by suggesting a variational formulation of irreversible evolution of a system with non-zero thermodynamic inertia. We introduce the Lagrangian, which depends on the properties of the normal and the so-called "mirror-image" systems. We show that the standard evolution equations, in particular, the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, can be derived from the variational procedure without going beyond the assumption of local equilibrium. We also argue that the second law of thermodynamics in non-equilibrium should be understood as a consequence of the variational procedure and the property of local equilibrium. For systems with instantaneous response this leads to the standard requirement of the local instantaneous entropy production being always positive. However, if a system is characterized by delayed response, the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics should be altered. In particular, the quantity, which is always positive, is not the instantaneous entropy production, but the entropy production averaged over a proper time interval. PMID:26520492

  18. Out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics of quantum optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunelli, M.; Xuereb, A.; Ferraro, A.; De Chiara, G.; Kiesel, N.; Paternostro, M.

    2015-03-01

    We address the out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics of an isolated quantum system consisting of a cavity optomechanical device. We explore the dynamical response of the system when driven out of equilibrium by a sudden quench of the coupling parameter and compute analytically the full distribution of the work generated by the process. We consider linear and quadratic optomechanical coupling, where the cavity field is parametrically coupled to either the position or the square of the position of a mechanical oscillator, respectively. In the former case we find that the average work generated by the quench is zero, whilst the latter leads to a non-zero average value. Through fluctuations theorems we access the most relevant thermodynamical figures of merit, such as the free energy difference and the amount of irreversible work generated. We thus provide a full characterization of the out-of-equilibrium thermodynamics in the quantum regime for nonlinearly coupled bosonic modes. Our study is the first due step towards the construction and full quantum analysis of an optomechanical machine working fully out of equilibrium.

  19. The Solubilities and Thermodynamic Equilibrium of Anhydrite and Gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafeimidis, K.; Anagnostou, G.

    2015-01-01

    Anhydritic claystones consist of a clay matrix with finely distributed anhydrite. Their swelling has led to severe damage and high repair costs in several tunnels. Gypsum growth combined with water uptake by the clay minerals is the main cause of the swelling process. Identifying the conditions under which gypsum rather than anhydrite represents the stable phase is crucial for understanding rock swelling. As existing studies on the anhydrite-gypsum-water equilibrium appear to be contradictory and do not provide all of the information required, we revisit this classic problem here by formulating and studying a thermodynamic model. In contrast to earlier research, our model is not limited to the anhydrite-gypsum equilibrium, but allows for the determination of the equilibrium concentrations of the individual anhydrite dissolution and gypsum precipitation reactions that underlie the sulphate transformation. The results of the paper are, therefore, also valuable for the formulation of comprehensive sulphate-water interaction models that consider diffusive and advective ion transport simultaneously with the chemical dissolution and precipitation reactions. Furthermore, in addition to the influencing factors that have been considered by previous studies (i.e., fluid and solid pressures, concentration of foreign ions, temperature), we consistently incorporate the effect of the surface energy of the sulphate crystals into the thermodynamic equations and discuss the effect of the clay minerals on the equilibrium conditions. The surface energy effects, which are important particularly in the case of claystones with extremely small pores, increase the solubility of gypsum, thus shifting the thermodynamic equilibrium in favour of anhydrite. Clay minerals also favour anhydrite because they lower the activity of the water. The predictions from the model are compared with experimental results and with predictions from other models in the literature. Finally, a comprehensive

  20. Chemical heterogeneities in the mantle: The equilibrium thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirone, M.; Buhre, S.; Schmück, H.; Faak, K.

    2016-02-01

    This study attempts to answer a simple and yet fundamental question in relation to our understanding of the chemical evolution of deep Earth and planetary interiors. Given two initially separate assemblages (lithologies) in chemical equilibrium can we predict the chemical and mineralogical compositions of the two assemblages when they are put together to form a new equilibrated system? Perhaps a common perception is that given sufficient time, the two assemblages will homogenize chemically and mineralogically, however from a chemical thermodynamic point of view, this is not the case. Certain petrological differences in terms of bulk composition, mineralogy and mineral abundance remain unless other processes, like melting or mechanical mixing come into play. While there is not a standard procedure to address this problem, in this study it is shown that by applying chemical thermodynamic principles and some reasonable assumptions, it is possible to determine the equilibrium composition of each of the two assemblages. Some examples that consider typical mantle rocks, peridotite, lherzolite, dunite and eclogite described by simplified chemical systems are used to illustrate the general approach. A preliminary application to evaluate the effect of melting a heterogeneous mantle in complete chemical equilibrium using a thermodynamic formulation coupled with a two-phase geodynamic model shows that major element composition of the melt product generated by different peridotites is very similar. This may explain the relative homogeneity of major elements of MORBs which could be the product of melting a relatively uniform mantle, as commonly accepted, or alternatively a peridotitic mantle with different compositions but in chemical equilibrium.

  1. Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Tannehill, J. C.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1987-01-01

    New, improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air have been developed. The curve fits are for pressure, speed of sound, temperature, entropy, enthalpy, density, and internal energy. These curve fits can be readily incorporated into new or existing computational fluid dynamics codes if real gas effects are desired. The curve fits are constructed from Grabau-type transition functions to model the thermodynamic surfaces in a piecewise manner. The accuracies and continuity of these curve fits are substantially improved over those of previous curve fits. These improvements are due to the incorporation of a small number of additional terms in the approximating polynomials and careful choices of the transition functions. The ranges of validity of the new curve fits are temperatures up to 25 000 K and densities from 10 to the -7 to 10 to the 3d power amagats.

  2. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of the Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Vittorio; Ferraro, Elena; Sola, Alessandro; Magni, Alessandro; Kuepferling, Michaela; Pasquale, Massimo

    In this paper we employ non equilibrium thermodynamics of fluxes and forces to describe magnetization and heat transport. By the theory we are able to identify the thermodynamic driving force of the magnetization current as the gradient of the effective field ▿H*. This definition permits to define the spin Seebeck coefficient ɛM which relates ▿H* and the temperature gradient ▿T. By applying the theory to the geometry of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect we are able to obtain the optimal conditions for generating large magnetization currents. Furthermore, by using the results of recent experiments, we obtain an order of magnitude for the value of ɛM ∼ 10-2 TK-1 for yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12).

  3. Equilibrium econophysics: A unified formalism for neoclassical economics and equilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago

    2006-11-01

    We develop a unified conceptual and mathematical structure for equilibrium econophysics, i.e., the use of concepts and tools of equilibrium thermodynamics in neoclassical microeconomics and vice versa. Within this conceptual structure the results obtained in microeconomic theory are: (1) the definition of irreversibility in economic behavior; (2) the clarification that the Engel curve and the offer curve are not descriptions of real processes dictated by the maximization of utility at constant endowment; (3) the derivation of a relation between elasticities proving that economic elasticities are not all independent; (4) the proof that Giffen goods do not exist in a stable equilibrium; (5) the derivation that ‘economic integrability’ is equivalent to the generalized Le Chatelier principle and (6) the definition of a first order phase transition, i.e., a transition between separate points in the utility function. In thermodynamics the results obtained are: (1) a relation between the non-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities and the increase or decrease in the thermodynamic potentials; (2) the distinction between mathematical integrability and optimization behavior and (3) the generalization of the Clapeyron equation.

  4. Comment on the Article ``Relativistic Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics Revisited''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschik, Wolfgang; von Borzeszkowski, Horst-Heino

    2007-05-01

    There are two problematic items in García-Colín and Sandoval-Villalbazo's approach to “relativistic non-equilibrium thermodynamics” (L.S. García- Colín and A. Sandoval-Villalbazo, J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 31, 2006, pp. 11-22). The paper does not follow the fundamentals of relativity theory; according to them, the energy-momentum tensor (EMT) has to include all energies of the considered system. Secondly, strange thermodynamic consequences result by using the presuppositions made by the authors. The paper is critically discussed and some shortcomings are elucidated.

  5. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-04-01

    Here, the fundamental problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS), where the two air masses at different temperatures, kept apart initially by a non-conducting horizontal interface in a 2D box, are allowed to mix. Upon removal of the partition, mixing is controlled by RTI, apart from mutual mass, momentum, and energy transfer. To accentuate the instability, the top chamber is filled with the heavier (lower temperature) air, which rests atop the chamber containing lighter air. The partition is positioned initially at mid-height of the box. As the fluid dynamical system considered is completely isolated from outside, the DNS results obtained without using Boussinesq approximation will enable one to study non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a finite reservoir undergoing strong irreversible processes. The barrier is removed impulsively, triggering baroclinic instability by non-alignment of density, and pressure gradient by ambient disturbances via the sharp discontinuity at the interface. Adopted DNS method has dispersion relation preservation properties with neutral stability and does not require any external initial perturbations. The complete inhomogeneous problem with non-periodic, no-slip boundary conditions is studied by solving compressible Navier-Stokes equation, without the Boussinesq approximation. This is important as the temperature difference between the two air masses considered is high enough (Δ T = 70 K) to invalidate Boussinesq approximation. We discuss non-equilibrium thermodynamical aspects of RTI with the help of numerical results for density, vorticity, entropy, energy, and enstrophy.

  6. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics analysis of transcriptional regulation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Tovar, Hugo; Mejía, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotic cells is an extremely complex and interesting phenomenon whose dynamics are controlled by a large number of subtle physicochemical processes commonly described by means of gene regulatory networks. Such networks consist in a series of coupled chemical reactions, conformational changes, and other biomolecular processes involving the interaction of the DNA molecule itself with a number of proteins usually called transcription factors as well as enzymes and other components. The kinetics behind the functioning of such gene regulatory networks are largely unknown, though its description in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics has been discussed recently. In this work we will derive general kinetic equations for a gene regulatory network from a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description and discuss its use in understanding the free energy constrains imposed in the network structure. We also will discuss explicit expressions for the kinetics of a simple model of gene regulation and show that the kinetic role of mRNA decay during the RNA synthesis stage (or transcription) is somehow limited due to the comparatively low values of decay rates. At the level discussed here, this implies a decoupling of the kinetics of mRNA synthesis and degradation a fact that may become quite useful when modeling gene regulatory networks from experimental data on whole genome gene expression.

  7. Non-Equilibrium Critical Behavior: An Extended Irreversible Thermodynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; García-Colín, Leopoldo S.

    2006-11-01

    Critical phenomena in non-equilibrium systems have been studied by means of a wide variety of theoretical and experimental approaches. Mode-coupling, renormalization group, complex Lie algebras and diagrammatic techniques are some of the usual theoretical tools. Experimental studies include light and inelastic neutron scattering, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, microwave interferometry and several other techniques. Nevertheless, no conclusive treatment has been developed from the basic principles of a thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes. We have developed a formalism in which we obtain correlation functions as field averages of the associated functions. By applying such formalism, we attempt to find out whether the resulting correlation functions will inherit the mathematical properties (integrability, generalized homogeneity, scaling laws) of its parent potentials, and we also use these correlation functions to study the behavior of macroscopic systems far from equilibrium, especially in the neighborhood of critical points or dynamic phase transitions. As a working example, we will consider the mono-critical behavior of a non-equilibrium binary fluid mixture close to its consolute point.

  8. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of templating reactions for the formation of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott M. D.; Houlton, Andrew; Horrocks, Benjamin R.

    2012-12-01

    The thermodynamics of the templating of materials on one-dimensional templates, such as DNA, is modeled by considering two terms: the surface tension of the material (γ) and a line energy (σ = 2πrTγT) that represents the adhesion of the material to the template (radius rT). We show that as long as the reaction stoichiometry does not exceed a certain limit (\\sqrt{\\frac{3 v}{2 \\pi }}\\lt {r}_{T}\\frac{\\vert {\\gamma }_{T}\\vert }{\\gamma }; v = volume of material per unit length of template) then a sample of smooth, uniform wires is the equilibrium state. If the amount of material exceeds this limit, then the material will comprise a single macroscopic particle at equilibrium. The behavior of the system is similar to a morphological wetting transition and the model can rationalize the available experimental data on the reaction conditions required to form smooth DNA-templated nanowires. Using the framework of linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics, we also show that the model can describe qualitatively the observed evolution of these nanostructures from beads-on-a-string morphologies to smooth nanowires and construct a stochastic differential equation for the process. Numerical simulations and scaling arguments suggest that the same scaling behavior as the Edwards-Wilkinson equation is observed.

  9. Computation of thermodynamic equilibrium in systems under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic reactions may be partly controlled by the local stress distribution as suggested by observations of phase assemblages around garnet inclusions related to an amphibolite shear zone in granulite of the Bergen Arcs in Norway. A particular example presented in fig. 14 of Mukai et al. [1] is discussed here. A garnet crystal embedded in a plagioclase matrix is replaced on the left side by a high pressure intergrowth of kyanite and quartz and on the right side by chlorite-amphibole. This texture apparently represents disequilibrium. In this case, the minerals adapt to the low pressure ambient conditions only where fluids were present. Alternatively, here we compute that this particular low pressure and high pressure assemblage around a stressed rigid inclusion such as garnet can coexist in equilibrium. To do the computations we developed the Thermolab software package. The core of the software package consists of Matlab functions that generate Gibbs energy of minerals and melts from the Holland and Powell database [2] and aqueous species from the SUPCRT92 database [3]. Most up to date solid solutions are included in a general formulation. The user provides a Matlab script to do the desired calculations using the core functions. Gibbs energy of all minerals, solutions and species are benchmarked versus THERMOCALC, PerpleX [4] and SUPCRT92 and are reproduced within round off computer error. Multi-component phase diagrams have been calculated using Gibbs minimization to benchmark with THERMOCALC and Perple_X. The Matlab script to compute equilibrium in a stressed system needs only two modifications of the standard phase diagram script. Firstly, Gibbs energy of phases considered in the calculation is generated for multiple values of thermodynamic pressure. Secondly, for the Gibbs minimization the proportion of the system at each particular thermodynamic pressure needs to be constrained. The user decides which part of the stress tensor is input as thermodynamic

  10. A survey of upwind methods for flows with equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemistry and thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Garrett, J.; Cinnella, P.

    1989-01-01

    Several versions of flux-vector split and flux-difference split algorithms were compared with regard to general applicability and complexity. Test computations were performed using curve-fit equilibrium air chemistry for an M = 5 high-temperature inviscid flow over a wedge, and an M = 24.5 inviscid flow over a blunt cylinder for test computations; for these cases, little difference in accuracy was found among the versions of the same flux-split algorithm. For flows with nonequilibrium chemistry, the effects of the thermodynamic model on the development of flux-vector split and flux-difference split algorithms were investigated using an equilibrium model, a general nonequilibrium model, and a simplified model based on vibrational relaxation. Several numerical examples are presented, including nonequilibrium air chemistry in a high-temperature shock tube and nonequilibrium hydrogen-air chemistry in a supersonic diffuser.

  11. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Calculations on Cd Transformation during Sewage Sludge Incineration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-yong; Huang, Limao; Sun, Shuiyu; Ning, Xun'an; Kuo, Jiahong; Sun, Jian; Wang, Yujie; Xie, Wuming

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were performed to reveal the distribution of cadmium during the sewage sludge incineration process. During sludge incineration in the presence of major minerals, such as SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO, the strongest effect was exerted by SiO2 on the Cd transformation compared with the effect of others. The stable solid product of CdSiO3 was formed easily with the reaction between Cd and SiO2, which can restrain the emissions of gaseous Cd pollutants. CdCl2 was formed more easily in the presence of chloride during incineration, thus, the volatilization of Cd was advanced by increasing chlorine content. At low temperatures, the volatilization of Cd was restrained due to the formation of the refractory solid metal sulfate. At high temperatures, the speciation of Cd was not affected by the presence of sulfur, but sulfur could affect the formation temperature of gaseous metals.

  12. Biosorption of uranium by melanin: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amardeep Singh; Melo, Jose Savio

    2013-12-01

    Limitation of conventional techniques for the removal of heavy metals present at low concentrations, has led to the need for developing alternate technologies like biosorption. In the present study we describe the use of melanin pigment synthesized through green technology, for sorption of uranium from aqueous system. Biosynthesized melanin showed good uptake over a broad pH range. Removal of uranium was rapid and equilibrium was reached within 2h of contact. It was observed that the kinetic data fits well into Lagergren's pseudo-second order equation. A maximum loading capacity of 588.24 mg g(-1) was calculated from Langmuir plot. Thermodynamic studies performed revealed that sorption process was favorable. Binding of uranium on the surface of melanin was confirmed by FT-IR and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Thus, biosynthesized melanin can be efficiently used as a sorbent for removal of uranium from aqueous solution. PMID:24099972

  13. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  14. SOLGAS refined: A computerized thermodynamic equilibrium calculation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1993-11-01

    SOLGAS, an early computer program for calculating equilibrium in a chemical system, has been made more user-friendly, and several{open_quote} bells and whistles{close_quotes} have been added. The necessity to include elemental species has been eliminated. The input of large numbers of starting conditions has been automated. A revised format for entering data simplifies and reduces chances for error. Calculated errors by SOLGAS are flagged, and several programming errors are corrected. Auxiliary programs are available to assemble and partially automate plotting of large amounts of data. Thermodynamic input data can be changed {open_quotes}on line.{close_quote} The program can be operated with or without a co-processor. Copies of the program, suitable for the IBM-PC or compatible with at least 384 bytes of low RAM, are available from the authors.

  15. Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Tannehill, J. C.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    New improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were developed. The curve fits are for p = p(e,rho), a = a(e,rho), T = T(e,rho), s = s(e,rho), T = T(p,rho), h = h(p,rho), rho = rho(p,s), e = e(p,s) and a = a(p,s). These curve fits can be readily incorporated into new or existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes if real-gas effects are desired. The curve fits were constructed using Grabau-type transition functions to model the thermodynamic surfaces in a piecewise manner. The accuracies and continuity of these curve fits are substantially improved over those of previous curve fits appearing in NASA CR-2470. These improvements were due to the incorporation of a small number of additional terms in the approximating polynomials and careful choices of the transition functions. The ranges of validity of the new curve fits are temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th to 100 amagats (rho/rho sub 0).

  16. Influence of radiation resorption on criteria of the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Denisova, N.V.; Preobrazhenskii, N.G.; Sevast'yanenko, V.G.

    1986-12-01

    The emission of radiation from a plasma volume upsets the Boltzmann equilibrium. A number of authors have proposed criteria for approximate testing of the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium on the basis of collision and radiation processes. However, those criteria give excessive values, because they do not take into account radiation resorption, which can moderate the test conditions. The present article is concerned with the influence of radiation resorption on the criterion of the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium in a low-temperature plasma. The domain of existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium (in the sense of Saha-Boltzmann equilibrium) is calculated for electric arcs.

  17. Thermodynamic characterization of an equilibrium folding intermediate of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, D.; Fox, R.; Freire, E.

    1994-01-01

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and CD spectroscopy have been used to probe the structural stability and measure the folding/unfolding thermodynamics of a Pro117-->Gly variant of staphylococcal nuclease. It is shown that at neutral pH the thermal denaturation of this protein is well accounted for by a 2-state mechanism and that the thermally denatured state is a fully hydrated unfolded polypeptide. At pH 3.5, thermal denaturation results in a compact denatured state in which most, if not all, of the helical structure is missing and the beta subdomain apparently remains largely intact. At pH 3.0, no thermal transition is observed and the molecule exists in the compact denatured state within the 0-100 degrees C temperature interval. At high salt concentration and pH 3.5, the thermal unfolding transition exhibits 2 cooperative peaks in the heat capacity function, the first one corresponding to the transition from the native to the intermediate state and the second one to the transition from the intermediate to the unfolded state. As is the case with other proteins, the enthalpy of the intermediate is higher than that of the unfolded state at low temperatures, indicating that, under those conditions, its stabilization must be of an entropic origin. The folding intermediate has been modeled by structural thermodynamic calculations. Structure-based thermodynamic calculations also predict that the most probable intermediate is one in which the beta subdomain is essentially intact and the rest of the molecule unfolded, in agreement with the experimental data. The structural features of the equilibrium intermediate are similar to those of a kinetic intermediate previously characterized by hydrogen exchange and NMR spectroscopy. PMID:7756977

  18. A Computationally Efficient Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols (MESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.

    2005-12-23

    This paper describes the development and application of a new multicomponent equilibrium solver for aerosol-phase (MESA) to predict the complex solid-liquid partitioning in atmospheric particles containing H+, NH4+, Na+, Ca2+, SO4=, HSO4-, NO3-, and Cl- ions. The algorithm of MESA involves integrating the set of ordinary differential equations describing the transient precipitation and dissolution reactions for each salt until the system satisfies the equilibrium or mass convergence criteria. Arbitrary values are chosen for the dissolution and precipitation rate constants such that their ratio is equal to the equilibrium constant. Numerically, this approach is equivalent to iterating all the equilibrium reactions simultaneously with a single iteration loop. Because CaSO4 is sparingly soluble, it is assumed to exist as a solid over the entire RH range to simplify the algorithm for calcium containing particles. Temperature-dependent mutual deliquescence relative humidity polynomials (valid from 240 to 310 K) for all the possible salt mixtures were constructed using the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg (PSC) activity coefficient model at 298.15 K and temperature-dependent equilibrium constants in MESA. Performance of MESA is evaluated for 16 representative mixed-electrolyte systems commonly found in tropospheric aerosols using PSC and two other multicomponent activity coefficient methods – Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Method (MTEM) of Zaveri et al. [2004], and the widely-used Kusik and Meissner method (KM), and the results are compared against the predictions of the Web-based AIM Model III or available experimental data. Excellent agreement was found between AIM, MESA-PSC, and MESA-MTEM predictions of the multistage deliquescence growth as a function of RH. On the other hand, MESA-KM displayed up to 20% deviations in the mass growth factors for common salt mixtures in the sulfate-poor cases while significant discrepancies were found in the predicted multistage

  19. The thermodynamic and kinetic impacts of organics on marine aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crahan, Kathleen

    Organics can change the manner in which aerosols scatter radiation directly as hydrated aerosols and indirectly as in-cloud activated aerosols, through changing the solution activity, the surface tension, and the accommodation coefficient of the hydrated aerosol. This work explores the kinetic and thermodynamic impacts of the organic component of marine aerosols through data collected over four field campaigns and through several models used to reproduce observations. The Rough Evaporation Duct (RED) project was conducted in the summer of 2001 off the coast of Oahu using the Twin Otter Aircraft and the Floating Instrument Platform research platform for data collection. The Cloud-Aerosol Research in the Marine Atmosphere (CARMA) campaigns were conducted over three summers (2002, 2004, 2005) off the coast of Monterey, California. During the CARMA campaigns, a thick, moist, stratocumulus deck was present during most days, and the Twin Otter Aircraft was the primary research platform used to collect data. However, the research goals and exact instrumentation onboard the Twin Otter varied from campaign to campaign, and each data set was analyzed individually. Data collected from CARMA I were used to explore the mechanism of oxalic acid production in cloud droplets. Oxalate was observed in the clouds in excess to below cloud concentrations by an average of 0.11 mug m-3, suggesting an in-cloud production. The tentative identification in cloud water of an intermediate species in the aqueous oxalate production mechanism lends further support to an in-cloud oxalate source. The data sets collected during the RED campaign and the CARMA II and CARMA III campaigns were used to investigate the impact of aerosol chemical speciation on aerosol hygroscopic behavior. Several models were used to correlate the observations in the subsaturated regime to theory including an explicit thermodynamic model, simple Kohler theory, and a parameterization of the solution activity. These models

  20. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  1. Thermodynamic Equilibrium Calculations on Cd Transformation during Sewage Sludge Incineration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-yong; Huang, Limao; Sun, Shuiyu; Ning, Xun'an; Kuo, Jiahong; Sun, Jian; Wang, Yujie; Xie, Wuming

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were performed to reveal the distribution of cadmium during the sewage sludge incineration process. During sludge incineration in the presence of major minerals, such as SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO, the strongest effect was exerted by SiO2 on the Cd transformation compared with the effect of others. The stable solid product of CdSiO3 was formed easily with the reaction between Cd and SiO2, which can restrain the emissions of gaseous Cd pollutants. CdCl2 was formed more easily in the presence of chloride during incineration, thus, the volatilization of Cd was advanced by increasing chlorine content. At low temperatures, the volatilization of Cd was restrained due to the formation of the refractory solid metal sulfate. At high temperatures, the speciation of Cd was not affected by the presence of sulfur, but sulfur could affect the formation temperature of gaseous metals. PMID:27225784

  2. Time-resolved inorganic chemical composition of fine aerosol and associated precursor gases over an urban environment in western India: Gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, A. K.; Rengarajan, R.

    2015-05-01

    Inorganic ionic constituents (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3- and SO42-) of PM2.5 and associated trace gases (NH3, HNO3 and HCl) were measured simultaneously by Ambient Ion Monitor - Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) system with a time resolution of one hour at an urban location in semi-arid region of western India during summer and winter. The average NH3, HNO3 and HCl concentrations were 11.6 ± 5.0, 2.9 ± 0.8 and 0.15 μg m-3, respectively, during winter. During summer, NH3 and HNO3 concentrations were of similar magnitude, whereas HCl concentration was less than ∼0.03 μg m-3. NH3 concentration exhibited a distinct diurnal variation during both seasons. However, HNO3 did not show a specific diurnal trend during the observation period in both seasons. The data obtained were used to study gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics using a thermodynamic equilibrium model, ISORROPIA II. The results suggest that NH3 exists in equilibrium between measured fine-mode particle and gas phase with a systematic bias of ∼14%, whereas HCl and HNO3 deviate significantly from the modelled data. These observations have implications on thermodynamic equilibrium assumptions used for estimating various aerosol parameters such as liquid water content, pH, etc., thus causing significant bias in chemical transport model results over the study region.

  3. Calculating and Visualizing Thermodynamic Equilibrium: A Tutorial on the Isolated System with an Internal Adiabatic Piston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of the equilibrium state of an isolated composite system with a movable internal adiabatic wall is a recurrent one in the literature. Classical equilibrium thermodynamics is unable to predict the equilibrium state, unless supplemented with information about the process taking place. This conclusion is clearly demonstrated in this…

  4. Simultaneous analysis of the equilibrium hygroscopicity and water transport kinetics of liquid aerosol.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Haddrell, Allen E; Rickards, Andrew M J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2013-06-18

    We demonstrate that the equilibrium hygroscopic response of an aerosol droplet and the kinetics of water condensation and evaporation can be retrieved with high accuracy, even close to saturation, through comparative measurements of probe and sample aerosol droplets. The experimental methodology is described and is based on an electrodynamic balance with a newly designed trapping chamber. Through use of a probe aerosol, composed of either pure water or a sodium chloride solution of known concentration, the gas-phase relative humidity (RH) can be accurately measured with an uncertainty of typically <0.005. By fast manipulation of the airflows into the chamber, a step-change in RH over a time scale of <0.5 s can be achieved. Using this approach, the kinetics of mass transfer are studied using the comparative procedure, and results are compared to theoretical mass flux predictions. The time-dependent measured mass fluxes for sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, sorbitol, and galactose are used to calculate droplet water activities as a function of the droplet growth factor, allowing retrieval of a hygroscopic growth curve in a matter of seconds. Comparisons with both new and established thermodynamic predictions of hygroscopicity, as well as to optical tweezers measurements, are presented, demonstrating good agreement within the experimental uncertainties. PMID:23662676

  5. Experimental Determination of Equilibrium and Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Propertiesof Natural Porous Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peluso, F.; Arienzo, I.

    Experimental investigation of the behavior of porous media is a field of interest of modern non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In the frame of a multi-disciplinary re- search project we are performing in our laboratory experimental tests to measure equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamic properties of natural porous media. Aim of our study is to characterize some stone samples and to verify whether a mass transport due to coupled pressure and temperature gradients (thermo-mechanic) is ap- preciable in this kind of porous medium. We have designed an apparatus that allows to measure the volume flux across a porous sample at various, predefined pressures and temperatures, both in isothermal and non isothermal conditions. A mechanical piston compels a liquid to flow through the sample, previously saturated under vacuum with the same fluid. Knowing the geometrical dimensions of the stone, the volume flux is estimated by measuring the time needed to a known amount of liquid to flow across the sample. Measurements have been performed in isothermal conditions at various temperatures and in non-isothermal conditions. Non-isothermal measurements have been performed both in unsteady and steady-state thermal conditions. Before to be undergone to a measurement cycle, samples are dried and weighted. Then they are sat- urated under vacuum with pure distilled water and weighted once again. By difference between the two measurements, porosity is determined. In all examined samples the volume flux has been found linear with respect to the applied pressure at the various temperatures. The values of volume flux in unsteady thermal conditions are consid- erably higher than the one obtained at the same pressure in isothermal conditions at the higher temperature (T=+45rC). This could be the evidence of a thermo-mechanic effect, pushing the water from hot to cold. Once the steady thermal state is reached, however, this effect disappears. Only measurements performed in unsteady thermal

  6. On Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Space-Time and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munkhammar, Joakim

    Based on recent results from general relativistic statistical mechanics and black hole information transfer limits, a space-time entropy-action equivalence is proposed as a generalization of the holographic principle. With this conjecture, the action principle can be replaced by the second law of thermodynamics, and for the Einstein-Hilbert action the Einstein field equations are conceptually the result of thermodynamic equilibrium. For non-equilibrium situations, Jaynes' information-theoretic approach to maximum entropy production is adopted instead of the second law of thermodynamics. As it turns out for appropriate choices of constants, quantum gravity is obtained. For the special case of a free particle the Bekenstein-Verlinde entropy-to-displacement relation of holographic gravity and thus the traditional holographic principle emerges. Although Jacobson's original thermodynamic equilibrium approach proposed that gravity might not necessarily be quantized, this particular non-equilibrium treatment might require it.

  7. Studies on the formulation of thermodynamics and stochastic theory for systems far from equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.

    1995-12-31

    We have been working for some time on the formulation of thermodynamics and the theory of fluctuations in systems far from equilibrium and progress in several aspects of that development are reported here.

  8. A Unified Graphical Representation of Chemical Thermodynamics and Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    During the years 1873-1879, J. Willard Gibbs published his now-famous set of articles that form the basis of the current perspective on chemical thermodynamics. The second article of this series, "A Method of Geometrical Representation of the Thermodynamic Properties of Substances by Means of Surfaces," published in 1873, is particularly notable…

  9. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics, maximum entropy production and Earth-system evolution.

    PubMed

    Kleidon, Axel

    2010-01-13

    The present-day atmosphere is in a unique state far from thermodynamic equilibrium. This uniqueness is for instance reflected in the high concentration of molecular oxygen and the low relative humidity in the atmosphere. Given that the concentration of atmospheric oxygen has likely increased throughout Earth-system history, we can ask whether this trend can be generalized to a trend of Earth-system evolution that is directed away from thermodynamic equilibrium, why we would expect such a trend to take place and what it would imply for Earth-system evolution as a whole. The justification for such a trend could be found in the proposed general principle of maximum entropy production (MEP), which states that non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems maintain steady states at which entropy production is maximized. Here, I justify and demonstrate this application of MEP to the Earth at the planetary scale. I first describe the non-equilibrium thermodynamic nature of Earth-system processes and distinguish processes that drive the system's state away from equilibrium from those that are directed towards equilibrium. I formulate the interactions among these processes from a thermodynamic perspective and then connect them to a holistic view of the planetary thermodynamic state of the Earth system. In conclusion, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and MEP have the potential to provide a simple and holistic theory of Earth-system functioning. This theory can be used to derive overall evolutionary trends of the Earth's past, identify the role that life plays in driving thermodynamic states far from equilibrium, identify habitability in other planetary environments and evaluate human impacts on Earth-system functioning.

  10. Thermodynamic modeling of atmospheric aerosols: 0-100% relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutcher, Cari S.; Ge, Xinlei; Asato, Caitlin; Wexler, Anthony S.; Clegg, Simon L.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate models of water and solute activities in aqueous atmospheric aerosols are central to predicting aerosol size, optical properties and cloud formation. A powerful method has been recently developed (Dutcher et al. JPC 2011, 2012, 2013) for representing the thermodynamic properties of multicomponent aerosols at low and intermediate levels of RH (< 90%RH) by applying the principles of multilayer sorption to ion hydration in solutions. In that work, statistical mechanics was used to model sorption of a solvent (water), onto each solute or ion in solution as n energetically distinct layers. This corresponds to n hydration layers surrounding each solute molecule. Here, we extend the model to the 100% RH limit and reduce the number of adjustable model parameters, allowing for a unified thermodynamic treatment for a wider range of atmospheric systems. The long-range interactions due to electrostatic screening of ions in solution are included as a mole fraction based Pitzer-Debye-Hückel (PDH) term. Equations for the Gibbs free energy, solvent and solute activity, and solute concentration are derived, yielding remarkable agreement between measured and fitted solute concentration and osmotic coefficients for solutions over the entire 0 to 100% RH range. By relating the values of the energy of sorption in each hydration layer to known short-range Coulombic electrostatic relationships governed by the size and dipole moment of the solute and solvent molecules, it may be possible to reduce the number of parameters for each solute. Modified equations for mixtures that take into account the long range PDH term will also be presented; these equations include no additional parameters.

  11. On the interpretation of chemical potentials computed from equilibrium thermodynamic codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, M. H. A.; Welland, M. J.; Stan, M.

    2015-09-01

    Great progress has been made within the nuclear community in developing and applying thermodynamic models to better understand a variety of materials, as evidenced by the large number of publications on this subject in the Journal of Nuclear Materials. However, the interpretation of chemical potential values from equilibrium thermodynamic calculations, although numerically correct, may potentially be misleading under certain conditions. This is an important point to clarify as equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are increasingly used to augment models of various phenomena in multi-physics simulations [1].

  12. Chemical equilibrium. [maximizing entropy of gas system to derive relations between thermodynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The entropy of a gas system with the number of particles subject to external control is maximized to derive relations between the thermodynamic variables that obtain at equilibrium. These relations are described in terms of the chemical potential, defined as equivalent partial derivatives of entropy, energy, enthalpy, free energy, or free enthalpy. At equilibrium, the change in total chemical potential must vanish. This fact is used to derive the equilibrium constants for chemical reactions in terms of the partition functions of the species involved in the reaction. Thus the equilibrium constants can be determined accurately, just as other thermodynamic properties, from a knowledge of the energy levels and degeneracies for the gas species involved. These equilibrium constants permit one to calculate the equilibrium concentrations or partial pressures of chemically reacting species that occur in gas mixtures at any given condition of pressure and temperature or volume and temperature.

  13. Vapor-liquid equilibrium thermodynamics of N2 + CH4 - Model and Titan applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. R.; Zollweg, John A.; Gabis, David H.

    1992-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented for vapor-liquid equilibrium in the N2 + CH4 system, which is implicated in calculations of the Titan tropospheric clouds' vapor-liquid equilibrium thermodynamics. This model imposes constraints on the consistency of experimental equilibrium data, and embodies temperature effects by encompassing enthalpy data; it readily calculates the saturation criteria, condensate composition, and latent heat for a given pressure-temperature profile of the Titan atmosphere. The N2 content of condensate is about half of that computed from Raoult's law, and about 30 percent greater than that computed from Henry's law.

  14. Local thermodynamical equilibrium and the frame for a quantum relativistic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, Francesco; Bucciantini, Leda; Grossi, Eduardo; Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the concept of local thermodynamical equilibrium in relativistic hydrodynamics in flat spacetime in a quantum statistical framework without an underlying kinetic description, suitable for strongly interacting fluids. We show that the appropriate definition of local equilibrium naturally leads to the introduction of a relativistic hydrodynamical frame in which the four-velocity vector is the one of a relativistic thermometer at equilibrium with the fluid, parallel to the inverse temperature four-vector , which then becomes a primary quantity. We show that this frame is the most appropriate for the expansion of the stress-energy tensor from local thermodynamical equilibrium and that therein the local laws of thermodynamics take on their simplest form. We discuss the difference between the frame and Landau frame and present an instance where they differ.

  15. Diffusion approximations to the chemical master equation only have a consistent stochastic thermodynamics at chemical equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Jordan M

    2015-07-28

    The stochastic thermodynamics of a dilute, well-stirred mixture of chemically reacting species is built on the stochastic trajectories of reaction events obtained from the chemical master equation. However, when the molecular populations are large, the discrete chemical master equation can be approximated with a continuous diffusion process, like the chemical Langevin equation or low noise approximation. In this paper, we investigate to what extent these diffusion approximations inherit the stochastic thermodynamics of the chemical master equation. We find that a stochastic-thermodynamic description is only valid at a detailed-balanced, equilibrium steady state. Away from equilibrium, where there is no consistent stochastic thermodynamics, we show that one can still use the diffusive solutions to approximate the underlying thermodynamics of the chemical master equation.

  16. Diffusion approximations to the chemical master equation only have a consistent stochastic thermodynamics at chemical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2015-07-28

    The stochastic thermodynamics of a dilute, well-stirred mixture of chemically reacting species is built on the stochastic trajectories of reaction events obtained from the chemical master equation. However, when the molecular populations are large, the discrete chemical master equation can be approximated with a continuous diffusion process, like the chemical Langevin equation or low noise approximation. In this paper, we investigate to what extent these diffusion approximations inherit the stochastic thermodynamics of the chemical master equation. We find that a stochastic-thermodynamic description is only valid at a detailed-balanced, equilibrium steady state. Away from equilibrium, where there is no consistent stochastic thermodynamics, we show that one can still use the diffusive solutions to approximate the underlying thermodynamics of the chemical master equation.

  17. Geochemical and thermodynamic specificity of volcanic, hydrothermal and soil aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamadiyarova, Renata V.; Alekhin, Yury V.; Karpov, Gennady A.; Makarova, Marina A.

    2010-05-01

    metals - Fe, Al, Zn, Cu. Geochemical specificity of aerosol carrying over in eruption columns at volcanic eruptions, often consists in high cleanliness individual many native metals allocations from typical elements - impurity. Presence of tungsten allocations without molybdenum and similar examples for other metals force to assume presence of the specific gas complexes which stability sharply changes at variations of pressure and temperatures in eruption columns at eruptions. Our analysis has shown that for a role of such forms of carrying over can apply metals carbonyls, widely used at reception of especially pure substances. These covalent compounds with formally 0-valency Me in a complex kernel contain variable quantity of groups CO in ligand parts and always complete the electronic cover to a cover of following inert gas, i.e. have in external sphere 4, 5, 6 groups CO, that together with the big distinctions in dependences of constants of formation on temperature their disintegration does non-simultaneous. The thermodynamical description superfluous components fugacity for aerosol systems is developed.

  18. Influence of pressure derivative of partition function on thermodynamic properties of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2015-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties (compressibility coefficient Z γ , specific heat at constant volume c v , adiabatic coefficient γ a , isentropic coefficient γ i s e n , and sound speed c s ) of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium hydrogen thermal plasma have been investigated for different values of pressure and non-equilibrium parameter θ (=Te/Th) in the electron temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. In order to estimate the influence of pressure derivative of partition function on thermodynamic properties, two cases have been considered: (a) in which pressure derivative of partition function is taken into account in the expressions and (b) without pressure derivative of partition function in their expressions. Here, the case (b) represents expressions already available in literature. It has been observed that the temperature from which pressure derivative of partition function starts influencing a given thermodynamic property increases with increase of pressure and non-equilibrium parameter θ. Thermodynamic property in the case (a) is always greater than its value in the case (b) for compressibility coefficient and specific heat at constant volume, whereas for adiabatic coefficient, isentropic coefficient, and sound speed, its value in the case (a) is always less than its value in the case (b). For a given value of θ, the relationship of compressibility coefficient with degree of ionization depends upon pressure in the case (a), whereas it is independent of pressure in the case (b). Relative deviation between the two cases shows that the influence of pressure derivative of partition function is significantly large and increases with the augmentation of pressure and θ for compressibility coefficient, specific heat at constant volume, and adiabatic coefficient, whereas for isentropic coefficient and sound speed, it is marginal even at high values of pressure and non-equilibrium parameter θ.

  19. Allowance for effects of thermodynamic nonideality in sedimentation equilibrium distributions reflecting protein dimerization.

    PubMed

    Wills, Peter R; Scott, David J; Winzor, Donald J

    2012-03-01

    This reexamination of a high-speed sedimentation equilibrium distribution for α-chymotrypsin under slightly acidic conditions (pH 4.1, I(M) 0.05) has provided experimental support for the adequacy of nearest-neighbor considerations in the allowance for effects of thermodynamic nonideality in the characterization of protein self-association over a moderate concentration range (up to 8 mg/mL). A widely held but previously untested notion about allowance for thermodynamic nonideality effects is thereby verified experimentally. However, it has also been shown that a greater obstacle to better characterization of protein self-association is likely to be the lack of a reliable estimate of monomer net charge, a parameter that has a far more profound effect on the magnitude of the measured equilibrium constant than any deficiency in current procedures for incorporating the effects of thermodynamic nonideality into the analysis of sedimentation equilibrium distributions reflecting reversible protein self-association.

  20. Gravitational energy, local holography and non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    We study the properties of gravitational systems in finite regions bounded by gravitational screens. We present a detailed construction of the total energy of such regions and of the energy and momentum balance equations due to the flow of matter and gravitational radiation through the screen. We establish that the gravitational screen possesses analogs of surface tension, internal energy, and viscous stress tensor, while the conservations are analogs of nonequilibrium balance equations for a viscous system. This gives a precise correspondence between gravity in finite regions and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

  1. Relativistic distribution function for particles with spin at local thermodynamical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Becattini, F.; Chandra, V.; Del Zanna, L.; Grossi, E.

    2013-11-15

    We present an extension of relativistic single-particle distribution function for weakly interacting particles at local thermodynamical equilibrium including spin degrees of freedom, for massive spin 1/2 particles. We infer, on the basis of the global equilibrium case, that at local thermodynamical equilibrium particles acquire a net polarization proportional to the vorticity of the inverse temperature four-vector field. The obtained formula for polarization also implies that a steady gradient of temperature entails a polarization orthogonal to particle momentum. The single-particle distribution function in momentum space extends the so-called Cooper–Frye formula to particles with spin 1/2 and allows us to predict their polarization in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the freeze-out. -- Highlights: •Single-particle distribution function in local thermodynamical equilibrium with spin. •Polarization of spin 1/2 particles in a fluid at local thermodynamical equilibrium. •Prediction of a new effect: a steady gradient of temperature induces a polarization. •Application to the calculation of polarization in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  2. Thermodynamic Equilibrium in Relativity: Four-temperature, Killing Vectors and Lie Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, F.

    The main concepts of general relativistic thermodynamics and general relativistic statistical mechanics are reviewed. The main building block of the proper relativistic extension of the classical thermodynamics laws is the four-temperature vector \\beta, which plays a major role in the quantum framework and defines a very convenient hydrodynamic frame. The general relativistic thermodynamic equilibrium condition demands \\beta to be a Killing vector field. We show that a remarkable consequence is that all Lie derivatives of all physical observables along the four-temperature flow must then vanish.

  3. Tested Demonstrations: Thermodynamic Changes, Kinetics, Equilibrium, and LeChatelier's Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for demonstrating thermodynamic changes, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, equilibrium, and LeChatelier's principle are presented. The only materials needed for these demonstrations are beakers, water, assorted wooden blocks of varying thickness, assorted rubber tubing, and a sponge. The concepts illustrated in each demonstration are…

  4. An Easy and Effective Demonstration of Enzyme Stereospecificity and Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herdman, Chelsea; Dickman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme stereospecificity and equilibrium thermodynamics can be demonstrated using the coupling of two amino acid derivatives by Thermoase C160. This protease will catalyze peptide bond formation between Z-L-AspOH and L-PheOMe to form the Aspartame precursor Z-L-Asp-L-PheOMe. Reaction completion manifests itself by precipitation of the product. As…

  5. On the effectiveness of nature-inspired metaheuristic algorithms for performing phase equilibrium thermodynamic calculations.

    PubMed

    Fateen, Seif-Eddeen K; Bonilla-Petriciolet, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The search for reliable and efficient global optimization algorithms for solving phase stability and phase equilibrium problems in applied thermodynamics is an ongoing area of research. In this study, we evaluated and compared the reliability and efficiency of eight selected nature-inspired metaheuristic algorithms for solving difficult phase stability and phase equilibrium problems. These algorithms are the cuckoo search (CS), intelligent firefly (IFA), bat (BA), artificial bee colony (ABC), MAKHA, a hybrid between monkey algorithm and krill herd algorithm, covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMAES), magnetic charged system search (MCSS), and bare bones particle swarm optimization (BBPSO). The results clearly showed that CS is the most reliable of all methods as it successfully solved all thermodynamic problems tested in this study. CS proved to be a promising nature-inspired optimization method to perform applied thermodynamic calculations for process design. PMID:24967430

  6. The Principle of Minimal Resistance in Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Analytical models describing the motion of colloidal particles in given force fields are presented. In addition to local approaches, leading to well known master equations such as the Langevin and the Fokker-Planck equations, a global description based on path integration is reviewed. A new result is presented, showing that under very broad conditions, during its evolution a dissipative system tends to minimize its energy dissipation in such a way to keep constant the Hamiltonian time rate, equal to the difference between the flux-based and the force-based Rayleigh dissipation functions. In fact, the Fokker-Planck equation can be interpreted as the Hamilton-Jacobi equation resulting from such minumum principle. At steady state, the Hamiltonian time rate is maximized, leading to a minimum resistance principle. In the unsteady case, we consider the relaxation to equilibrium of harmonic oscillators and the motion of a Brownian particle in shear flow, obtaining results that coincide with the solution of the Fokker-Planck and the Langevin equations.

  7. Possible evidence of thermodynamic equilibrium in dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Joshua; Sarker, Sanjoy K.; Stern, Allen E-mail: ssarker@ua.edu

    2014-06-10

    After deducing the density profiles and gravitational potential functions of eight galaxies from the rotation velocity data from THINGS, we find that the density decreases exponentially with the potential in substantial regions of the halos. This behavior is in agreement with that of a single-component isothermal Boltzmann gas, and it suggests that an effective description in terms of a Boltzmann gas is possible for dark matter in these regions. This could be an indication that dark matter self-interactions are sufficient in strength and number to lead to thermal equilibrium in these regions. We write down the dynamics and boundary conditions for a Boltzmann gas description and examine some of its qualitative and quantitative consequences. Solutions to the dynamical system are determined by three dimensionfull parameters, and they provide reasonable fits to the rotational velocity data in the regions where the Boltzmann-like behavior was found. Unlike in the usual approach to curve fitting, we do not assume a specific form for the dark matter density profile, and we do not require a detailed knowledge of the baryonic content of the galaxy.

  8. Equilibrium sampling to determine the thermodynamic potential for bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants from sediment.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Annika; MacLeod, Matthew; Wickström, Håkan; Mayer, Philipp

    2014-10-01

    Equilibrium partitioning (EqP) theory is currently the most widely used approach for linking sediment pollution by persistent hydrophobic organic chemicals to bioaccumulation. Most applications of the EqP approach assume (I) a generic relationship between organic carbon-normalized chemical concentrations in sediments and lipid-normalized concentrations in biota and (II) that bioaccumulation does not induce levels exceeding those expected from equilibrium partitioning. Here, we demonstrate that assumption I can be obviated by equilibrating a silicone sampler with chemicals in sediment, measuring chemical concentrations in the silicone, and applying lipid/silicone partition ratios to yield concentrations in lipid at thermodynamic equilibrium with the sediment (CLip⇌Sed). Furthermore, we evaluated the validity of assumption II by comparing CLip⇌Sed of selected persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic pollutants (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB)) to lipid-normalized concentrations for a range of biota from a Swedish background lake. PCBs in duck mussels, roach, eel, pikeperch, perch and pike were mostly below the equilibrium partitioning level relative to the sediment, i.e., lipid-normalized concentrations were ≤CLip⇌Sed, whereas HCB was near equilibrium between biota and sediment. Equilibrium sampling allows straightforward, sensitive and precise measurement of CLip⇌Sed. We propose CLip⇌Sed as a metric of the thermodynamic potential for bioaccumulation of persistent organic chemicals from sediment useful to prioritize management actions to remediate contaminated sites.

  9. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-09-14

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

  10. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-09-01

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

  11. Using equilibrium thermodynamics in the study of metasomatic alteration, illustrated by an application to serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. A.; Powell, R.; Frost, B. R.

    2013-05-01

    Metasomatic rocks, in which mineralogical change is driven by infiltration of an externally-derived fluid, are challenging for the application of equilibrium thermodynamics because fluid-driven changes in rock bulk composition can be faster than diffusive within-grain re-equilibration. Nevertheless, careful definition of systems in terms of appropriate length scales, an informed choice regarding the controlling variables, and detailed petrological analysis can provide useful results. Thermodynamic calculations using methods that solve for equilibrium between a set of independent end-member reactions produce valid results regardless of the identity of the controlling variables but determination of the relationship between cause and effect in metasomatic rocks is best performed with some knowledge of the parameters that drive the evolution of the system. The correspondence between observations of serpentinised harzburgites from New Caledonia and the results of the application of thermodynamic techniques suggest that equilibrium thermodynamics can be applied to these rocks on appropriate small length scales, varying from micron to cm. The primary drivers for mineralogical change are proposed to be (1) infiltration of a H2O fluid, which is buffered to lower aO_2 by the rock with resultant production of H2 and the resulting change in the redox budget of the rocks; and (2) gradients in aSiO_2 caused by mm to cm scale variation in Si:(Mg + Fe) inherited from the harzburgite protolith.

  12. Do persistent organic pollutants reach a thermodynamic equilibrium in the global environment?

    PubMed

    Schenker, Sebastian; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2014-05-01

    Equilibrium partitioning between different environmental media is one of the main driving forces that govern the environmental fate of organic chemicals. In the global environment, equilibrium partitioning is in competition with long-range transport, advective phase transfer processes such as wet deposition, and degradation. Here we investigate under what conditions equilibrium partitioning is strong enough to control the global distribution of organic chemicals. We use a global multimedia mass-balance model to calculate the Globally Balanced State (GBS) of organic chemicals. The GBS is the state where equilibrium partitioning is in balance with long-range transport; it represents the maximum influence of thermodynamic driving forces on the global distribution of a chemical. Next, we compare the GBS with the Temporal Remote State, which represents the long-term distribution of a chemical in the global environment when the chemical's distribution is influenced by all transport and degradation processes in combination. This comparison allows us to identify the chemical properties required for a substance to reach the GBS as a stable global distribution. We find that thermodynamically controlled distributions are rare and do not occur for most Persistent Organic Pollutants. They are only found for highly volatile and persistent substances, such as chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, we find that the thermodynamic cold-trap effect (i.e., accumulation of pollutants at the poles because of reduced vapor pressure at low temperatures) is often strongly attenuated by atmospheric and oceanic long-range transport.

  13. Do persistent organic pollutants reach a thermodynamic equilibrium in the global environment?

    PubMed

    Schenker, Sebastian; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2014-05-01

    Equilibrium partitioning between different environmental media is one of the main driving forces that govern the environmental fate of organic chemicals. In the global environment, equilibrium partitioning is in competition with long-range transport, advective phase transfer processes such as wet deposition, and degradation. Here we investigate under what conditions equilibrium partitioning is strong enough to control the global distribution of organic chemicals. We use a global multimedia mass-balance model to calculate the Globally Balanced State (GBS) of organic chemicals. The GBS is the state where equilibrium partitioning is in balance with long-range transport; it represents the maximum influence of thermodynamic driving forces on the global distribution of a chemical. Next, we compare the GBS with the Temporal Remote State, which represents the long-term distribution of a chemical in the global environment when the chemical's distribution is influenced by all transport and degradation processes in combination. This comparison allows us to identify the chemical properties required for a substance to reach the GBS as a stable global distribution. We find that thermodynamically controlled distributions are rare and do not occur for most Persistent Organic Pollutants. They are only found for highly volatile and persistent substances, such as chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, we find that the thermodynamic cold-trap effect (i.e., accumulation of pollutants at the poles because of reduced vapor pressure at low temperatures) is often strongly attenuated by atmospheric and oceanic long-range transport. PMID:24654605

  14. Thermodynamic parameters for adsorption equilibrium of heavy metals and dyes from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2014-05-01

    This meta-analysis evaluates adsorption studies that report thermodynamic parameters for heavy metals and dyes from wastewaters. The adsorbents were derived from agricultural waste, industrial wastes, inorganic particulates, or some natural products. The adsorption mechanisms, derivation of thermodynamic relationships, and possible flaws made in such evaluation are discussed. This analysis shows that conclusions from the examined standard enthalpy and entropy changes are highly contestable. The reason for this flaw may be the poor physical structure of adsorbents tested, such that pore transport controlled the solute flux, leaving a surface reaction process near equilibrium. PMID:24461254

  15. An easy and effective demonstration of enzyme stereospecificity and equilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Herdman, Chelsea; Dickman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme stereospecificity and equilibrium thermodynamics can be demonstrated using the coupling of two amino acid derivatives by Thermoase C160. This protease will catalyze peptide bond formation between Z-L-AspOH and L-PheOMe to form the Aspartame precursor Z-L-Asp-L-PheOMe. Reaction completion manifests itself by precipitation of the product. As the product has almost zero solubility, the equilibrium favors condensation and thus a normally hydrolytic enzyme catalyzes the opposite reaction. Neither Z-D-AspOH with L-PheOMe nor Z-L-AspOH with D-PheOMe produces any visible product. PMID:21948505

  16. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Chemistry and the Composition of the Atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    A high priority objective of the Mars Exploration Program is to Determine if life exists today (MEPAG Goal I, Objective A). The measurement of gases of biogenic origin may be an approach to detect the presence of microbial life on the surface or subsurface of Mars. Chemical thermodynamic calculations indicate that on both Earth and Mars, certain gases should exist in extremely low concentrations, if at all. Microbial metabolic activity is an important non-equilibrium chemistry process on Earth, and if microbial life exists on Mars, may be an important nonequilibrium chemistry process on Mars. The non-equilibrium chemistry of the atmosphere of Mars is discussed in this paper.

  17. An easy and effective demonstration of enzyme stereospecificity and equilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Herdman, Chelsea; Dickman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme stereospecificity and equilibrium thermodynamics can be demonstrated using the coupling of two amino acid derivatives by Thermoase C160. This protease will catalyze peptide bond formation between Z-L-AspOH and L-PheOMe to form the Aspartame precursor Z-L-Asp-L-PheOMe. Reaction completion manifests itself by precipitation of the product. As the product has almost zero solubility, the equilibrium favors condensation and thus a normally hydrolytic enzyme catalyzes the opposite reaction. Neither Z-D-AspOH with L-PheOMe nor Z-L-AspOH with D-PheOMe produces any visible product.

  18. Thermodynamic parameters for mixtures of quartz under shock wave loading in views of the equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Maevskii, K. K. Kinelovskii, S. A.

    2015-10-27

    The numerical results of modeling of shock wave loading of mixtures with the SiO{sub 2} component are presented. The TEC (thermodynamic equilibrium component) model is employed to describe the behavior of solid and porous multicomponent mixtures and alloys under shock wave loading. State equations of a Mie–Grüneisen type are used to describe the behavior of condensed phases, taking into account the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen coefficient, gas in pores is one of the components of the environment. The model is based on the assumption that all components of the mixture under shock-wave loading are in thermodynamic equilibrium. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data derived by various authors. The behavior of the mixture containing components with a phase transition under high dynamic loads is described.

  19. Radiative interactions in molecular gases under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Jha, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to investigate radiative heat interactions in diatomic and polyatomic gases under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Essential governing equations are presented for both gray and nongray gases. Information is provided on absorption models, relaxation times, and transfer equations. Radiative flux equations are developed which are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The problem is solved for fully developed laminar incompressible flows between two parallel plates under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For specific applications, three diatomic and three polyatomic gases are considered. The results are obtained numerically by employing the method of variation of parameters. The results are compared under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at different temperature and pressure conditions. Both gray and nongray studies are conducted extensively for all molecular gases considered. The particular gases selected for this investigation are CO, NO, OH, CO2, H2O, and CH4. The temperature and pressure range considered are 300-2000 K and 0.1-10 atmosphere, respectively. In general, results demonstrate that the gray gas approximation overestimates the effect of radiative interaction for all conditions. The conditions of NLTE, however, result in underestimation of radiative interactions. The method developed for this study can be extended to solve complex problems of radiative heat transfer involving nonequilibrium phenomena.

  20. Rapid computation of spectrally integrated non-local thermodynamic equilibrium limb emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Olander, Daphne S.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel

    1994-01-01

    The interpretation of infrared radiance measurements made by satellite-borne limb-scanning broadband radiometers requires accurate and computationally fast techniques with which to evaluate the equation of radiative transfer. This requirement is made even more stringent when analyzing measurements of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) emission from the terrestrial mesosphere and lower thermosphere. In principle, line-by-line calculations which explicitly account for the departure from thermodynamic equilibrium in both the source functions and the transmittances are necessary. In this paper we extend the emissivity growth approximation (EGA) technique developed for local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) limb radiance for the molecular oxygen dayglow (1.27 micrometers and 762 nm), ozone and carbon dioxide in the 9- to 11-micrometer spectral interval, carbon monoxide (4.6 micrometers), nitric oxide (5.3 micrometers), and the carbon dioxide bands (15 micrometers) are presented. Using the non-LTE form of the EGA, the spectrally integrated limb emission is calculated for 35 tangent heights in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (a total of 1200 atmospheric layers) with line-by-line accuracy in approximately 0.35 s of CPU time on readily available desktop computer hardware, while the corresponding line-by-line calculations may require several minutes. The non-LTE EGA technique will allow kinetic temperature and minor constituend retrieval algorithms to readily include non-LTE efects limited only by the a priori knowledge of the departure from LTE in the observed bands.

  1. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING OF LIQUID AEROSOLS CONTAINING DISSOLVED ORGANICS AND ELECTROLYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many tropospheric aerosols contain large fractions of soluble organic material, believed to derive from the oxidation of precursors such alpha-pinene. The chemical composition of aerosol organic matter is complex and not yet fully understood.

    The key properties of solu...

  2. Reconciling results of MOCVD of a CNT composite with equilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Sukanya; Arod, Pallavi; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Composition and microstructure of the composite films can be tailored by controlling the CVD process parameters if an appropriate model can be suggested for quantitative prediction of growth. This is possible by applying equilibrium thermodynamics. A modification of such standard modeling procedure was required to account for the deposition of a hybrid film comprised of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), metallic iron (Fe0), and magnetite (Fe3O4), a composite useful for energy storage. In contrast with such composite nature of the deposits obtained by inert-ambient CVD using Fe(acac)3 as precursor, equilibrium thermodynamic modeling with standard procedure predicts the deposition of only Fe3C and carbon, without any co-deposition of Fe and Fe3O4. A modification of the procedure comprising chemical reasoning is therefore proposed herein, which predicts simultaneous deposition of FeO1-x, Fe3C, Fe3O4 and C. At high temperatures and in a carbon-rich atmosphere, these convert to Fe3O4, Fe and C, in agreement with experimental CVD. Close quantitative agreement between the modified thermodynamic modeling and experiment validates the reliability of the modified procedure. Understanding of the chemical process through thermodynamic modeling provides potential for control of CVD process parameters to achieve desired hybrid growth.

  3. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  4. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  5. Non-equilibrium Dynamics in the Quantum Brownian Oscillator and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ilki

    2012-01-01

    We initially prepare a quantum linear oscillator weakly coupled to a bath in equilibrium at an arbitrary temperature. We disturb this system by varying a Hamiltonian parameter of the coupled oscillator, namely, either its spring constant or mass according to an arbitrary but pre-determined protocol in order to perform external work on it. We then derive a closed expression for the reduced density operator of the coupled oscillator along this non-equilibrium process as well as the exact expression pertaining to the corresponding quasi-static process. This immediately allows us to analytically discuss the second law of thermodynamics for non-equilibrium processes. Then we derive a Clausius inequality and obtain its validity supporting the second law, as a consistent generalization of the Clausius equality valid for the quasi-static counterpart, introduced in (Kim and Mahler in Phys. Rev. E 81:011101, 2010, [1]).

  6. Emergence of equilibrium thermodynamic properties in quantum pure states. I. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresch, Barbara; Moro, Giorgio J.

    2010-07-21

    Investigation on foundational aspects of quantum statistical mechanics recently entered a renaissance period due to novel intuitions from quantum information theory and to increasing attention on the dynamical aspects of single quantum systems. In the present contribution a simple but effective theoretical framework is introduced to clarify the connections between a purely mechanical description and the thermodynamic characterization of the equilibrium state of an isolated quantum system. A salient feature of our approach is the very transparent distinction between the statistical aspects and the dynamical aspects in the description of isolated quantum systems. Like in the classical statistical mechanics, the equilibrium distribution of any property is identified on the basis of the time evolution of the considered system. As a consequence equilibrium properties of quantum system appear to depend on the details of the initial state due to the abundance of constants of the motion in the Schroedinger dynamics. On the other hand the study of the probability distributions of some functions, such as the entropy or the equilibrium state of a subsystem, in statistical ensembles of pure states reveals the crucial role of typicality as the bridge between macroscopic thermodynamics and microscopic quantum dynamics. We shall consider two particular ensembles: the random pure state ensemble and the fixed expectation energy ensemble. The relation between the introduced ensembles, the properties of a given isolated system, and the standard quantum statistical description are discussed throughout the presentation. Finally we point out the conditions which should be satisfied by an ensemble in order to get meaningful thermodynamical characterization of an isolated quantum system.

  7. Emergence of equilibrium thermodynamic properties in quantum pure states. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Fresch, Barbara; Moro, Giorgio J

    2010-07-21

    Investigation on foundational aspects of quantum statistical mechanics recently entered a renaissance period due to novel intuitions from quantum information theory and to increasing attention on the dynamical aspects of single quantum systems. In the present contribution a simple but effective theoretical framework is introduced to clarify the connections between a purely mechanical description and the thermodynamic characterization of the equilibrium state of an isolated quantum system. A salient feature of our approach is the very transparent distinction between the statistical aspects and the dynamical aspects in the description of isolated quantum systems. Like in the classical statistical mechanics, the equilibrium distribution of any property is identified on the basis of the time evolution of the considered system. As a consequence equilibrium properties of quantum system appear to depend on the details of the initial state due to the abundance of constants of the motion in the Schrodinger dynamics. On the other hand the study of the probability distributions of some functions, such as the entropy or the equilibrium state of a subsystem, in statistical ensembles of pure states reveals the crucial role of typicality as the bridge between macroscopic thermodynamics and microscopic quantum dynamics. We shall consider two particular ensembles: the random pure state ensemble and the fixed expectation energy ensemble. The relation between the introduced ensembles, the properties of a given isolated system, and the standard quantum statistical description are discussed throughout the presentation. Finally we point out the conditions which should be satisfied by an ensemble in order to get meaningful thermodynamical characterization of an isolated quantum system.

  8. Thermodynamics of water condensation on a primary marine aerosol coated by surfactant organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Yuri S; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2014-10-23

    A large subset of primary marine aerosols can be initially (immediately upon formation) treated using an "inverted micelle" model. We study the thermodynamics of heterogeneous water condensation on such a marine aerosol. Its hydrophobic organic coating can be processed by chemical reactions with atmospheric species; this enables the marine aerosol to serve as a nucleating center for water condensation. The most probable pathway of such "aging" involves atmospheric hydroxyl radicals that abstract hydrogen atoms from organic molecules coating the aerosol (first step), the resulting radicals being quickly oxidized by ubiquitous atmospheric oxygen molecules to produce surface-bound peroxyl radicals (second step). Taking these two reactions into account, we derive an expression for the free energy of formation of an aqueous droplet on a marine aerosol. The model is illustrated by numerical calculations. The results suggest that the formation of aqueous droplets on marine aerosols is most likely to occur via Köhler activation rather than via nucleation. The model allows one to determine the threshold parameters necessary for the Köhler activation of such aerosols. Numerical results also corroborate previous suggestions that one can omit some chemical species of aerosols (and other details of their chemical composition) in investigating aerosol effects on climate.

  9. Equilibrium thermodynamics of radiation defect clusters in δ-phase Pu-Ga alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaev, A. V.; Dremov, V. V.; Ionov, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical investigation into the response of δ-phase Pu-Ga alloys to self-irradiation. Using classical molecular dynamics we investigate the long-term behavior of primary radiation defects (vacancies) in the face-centered cubic lattice of the alloys under ambient conditions. High diffusive migration energy barriers and the corresponding low mobility of vacancies do not allow us to track their dynamics in the lattice by direct molecular dynamics simulations. Instead, we use the Helmholtz free energy to investigate the equilibrium thermodynamics of metastable microconfigurations of Pu-Ga crystals with artificially introduced vacancy clusters in various regular and random configurations. The Helmholtz free energy of the microconfigurations are calculated with the thermodynamic integration method. Based on the free energy evaluation we draw conclusions about the relative thermodynamic stability of various microconfigurations under ambient conditions. The equilibrium parameters of vacancy clusters in the bulk of the lattice and in the presence of edge dislocations are estimated.

  10. Quantum corrections to the stress-energy tensor in thermodynamic equilibrium with acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becattini, F.; Grossi, E.

    2015-08-01

    We show that the stress-energy tensor has additional terms with respect to the ideal form in states of global thermodynamic equilibrium in flat spacetime with nonvanishing acceleration and vorticity. These corrections are of quantum origin and their leading terms are second order in the gradients of the thermodynamic fields. Their relevant coefficients can be expressed in terms of correlators of the stress-energy tensor operator and the generators of the Lorentz group. With respect to previous assessments, we find that there are more second-order coefficients and that all thermodynamic functions including energy density receive acceleration and vorticity dependent corrections. Notably, also the relation between ρ and p , that is, the equation of state, is affected by acceleration and vorticity. We have calculated the corrections for a free real scalar field—both massive and massless—and we have found that they increase, particularly for a massive field, at very high acceleration and vorticity and very low temperature. Finally, these nonideal terms depend on the explicit form of the stress-energy operator, implying that different stress-energy tensors of the scalar field—canonical or improved—are thermodynamically inequivalent.

  11. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon.

    PubMed

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J

    2016-09-14

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials.

  12. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials.

  13. Equilibrium p-T Phase Diagram of Boron: Experimental Study and Thermodynamic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state phase transformations and melting of high-purity crystalline boron have been in situ and ex situ studied at pressures to 20 GPa in the 1500–2500 K temperature range where diffusion processes become fast and lead to formation of thermodynamically stable phases. The equilibrium phase diagram of boron has been constructed based on thermodynamic analysis of experimental and literature data. The high-temperature part of the diagram contains p-T domains of thermodynamic stability of rhombohedral β-B106, orthorhombic γ-B28, pseudo-cubic (tetragonal) t'-B52, and liquid boron (L). The positions of two triple points have been experimentally estimated, i.e. β–t'–L at ~ 8.0 GPa and ~ 2490 K; and β–γ–t' at ~ 9.6 GPa and ~ 2230 K. Finally, the proposed phase diagram explains all thermodynamic aspects of boron allotropy and significantly improves our understanding of the fifth element. PMID:23912523

  14. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon.

    PubMed

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J

    2016-09-14

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials. PMID:27634265

  15. NON-EQUILIBRIUM THERMODYNAMIC PROCESSES: SPACE PLASMAS AND THE INNER HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-04-10

    Recently, empirical kappa distribution, commonly used to describe non-equilibrium systems like space plasmas, has been connected with non-extensive statistical mechanics. Here we show how a consistent definition of the temperature and pressure is developed for stationary states out of thermal equilibrium, so that the familiar ideal gas state equation still holds. In addition to the classical triplet of temperature, pressure, and density, this generalization requires the kappa index as a fourth independent thermodynamic variable that characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. All four of these thermodynamic variables have key roles in describing the governing thermodynamical processes and transitions in space plasmas. We introduce a novel characterization of isothermal and isobaric processes that describe a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the kappa index. In addition, we show how the variation of temperature or/and pressure can occur through an 'iso-q' process, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state (fixed kappa index). These processes have been detected in the proton plasma in the inner heliosheath via specialized data analysis of energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Interstellar Boundary Explorer. In particular, we find that the temperature is highly correlated with (1) kappa, asymptotically related to isothermal ({approx}1,000,000 K) and iso-q ({kappa} {approx} 1.7) processes; and (2) density, related to an isobaric process, which separates the 'Ribbon', P Almost-Equal-To 3.2 pdyn cm{sup -2}, from the globally distributed ENA flux, P Almost-Equal-To 2 pdyn cm{sup -2}.

  16. A new nonlocal thermodynamical equilibrium radiative transfer method for cool stars. Method and numerical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J.; Josselin, E.; Ryde, N.; Faure, A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The solution of the nonlocal thermodynamical equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer equation usually relies on stationary iterative methods, which may falsely converge in some cases. Furthermore, these methods are often unable to handle large-scale systems, such as molecular spectra emerging from, for example, cool stellar atmospheres. Aims: Our objective is to develop a new method, which aims to circumvent these problems, using nonstationary numerical techniques and taking advantage of parallel computers. Methods: The technique we develop may be seen as a generalization of the coupled escape probability method. It solves the statistical equilibrium equations in all layers of a discretized model simultaneously. The numerical scheme adopted is based on the generalized minimum residual method. Results: The code has already been applied to the special case of the water spectrum in a red supergiant stellar atmosphere. This demonstrates the fast convergence of this method, and opens the way to a wide variety of astrophysical problems.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons and isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and computer code are given for the thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons in chemical equilibrium. In addition, isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon are included. The computer code calculates the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and, in some cases, the transport properties for the following fluorocarbons: CCl2F, CCl2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CHCl2F, CHF3, CCL2F-CCl2F, CCLF2-CClF2, CF3-CF3, and C4F8. Equilibrium thermodynamic properties are tabulated for six of the fluorocarbons(CCl3F, CCL2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CF3-CF3, and C4F8) and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented for CBrF3.

  18. Impact of Aerosols and Atmospheric Thermodynamics on Cloud Properties within the Climate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Masunaga, Hirohiko; Pielke, Roger, Sr.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2003-01-01

    A combination of cloud-top and columnar droplet sizes derived from the multi Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) sensors reveals the sensitivity of the aerosols effect on cloud-precipitation process due to environmental vertical thermodynamic structure. First, the magnitude of aerosol indirect effect could be larger with the analysis of columnar droplet sizes than that derived from the cloud-top droplet sizes, since column-droplet size can account for the broader droplet spectra in the cloud layers. Second, a combination of cloud- top and columnar droplet sizes reveals that the warm rain process is prevented regardless of the aerosols concentration under a high static stability such as when a strong temperature inversion exists, while a high aerosol concentration suppresses the warm rain formulation under a low static stability.

  19. Thermodynamic equilibrium solubility measurements in simulated fluids by 96-well plate method in early drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sonali S; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2015-04-01

    An early prediction of solubility in physiological media (PBS, SGF and SIF) is useful to predict qualitatively bioavailability and absorption of lead candidates. Despite of the availability of multiple solubility estimation methods, none of the reported method involves simplified fixed protocol for diverse set of compounds. Therefore, a simple and medium-throughput solubility estimation protocol is highly desirable during lead optimization stage. The present work introduces a rapid method for assessment of thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of compounds in aqueous media using 96-well microplate. The developed protocol is straightforward to set up and takes advantage of the sensitivity of UV spectroscopy. The compound, in stock solution in methanol, is introduced in microgram quantities into microplate wells followed by drying at an ambient temperature. Microplates were shaken upon addition of test media and the supernatant was analyzed by UV method. A plot of absorbance versus concentration of a sample provides saturation point, which is thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of a sample. The established protocol was validated using a large panel of commercially available drugs and with conventional miniaturized shake flask method (r(2)>0.84). Additionally, the statistically significant QSPR models were established using experimental solubility values of 52 compounds.

  20. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation.

  1. Biosorption of food dyes onto Spirulina platensis nanoparticles: equilibrium isotherm and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Dotto, G L; Lima, E C; Pinto, L A A

    2012-01-01

    The biosorption of food dyes FD&C red no. 40 and acid blue 9 onto Spirulina platensis nanoparticles was studied at different conditions of pH and temperature. Four isotherm models were used to evaluate the biosorption equilibrium and the thermodynamic parameters were estimated. Infra red analysis (FT-IR) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to verify the biosorption behavior. The maximum biosorption capacities of FD&C red no. 40 and acid blue 9 were found at pH 4 and 298 K, and the values were 468.7 mg g(-1) and 1619.4 mg g(-1), respectively. The Sips model was more adequate to fit the equilibrium experimental data (R2>0.99 and ARE<5%). Thermodynamic study showed that the biosorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favorable. FT-IR and EDS analysis suggested that at pH 4 and 298 K, the biosorption of both dyes onto nanoparticles occurred by chemisorption.

  2. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation. PMID:26683820

  3. Computational Methods for Multi-phase Multi-reaction Thermodynamical Equilibrium Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caboussat, A.; Amundson, N. R.; He, J.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Yoo, K.

    2005-05-01

    The computation of phase and chemical equilibria of aqueous organic electrolytes mixtures is of significant interest in atmospheric aerosol modeling. The presence of organic species in solution may substantially influence the phase transitions of the deliquescence and efflorescence of salts with changes in relative humidity. Dissolved electrolytes can have appreciable effects on the solubility of organic components in solution. We present here some computational methods for the prediction of the physical state of atmospheric particles. In the case of inorganic aerosols, an Extended UNIQUAC model is used to compute the excess of Gibbs Free energy. Our method is derived from the minimization of the total Gibbs energy. The computational difficulty is to identify the solid phases existing at the equilibrium. Our algorithm is based on a primal-dual active sets-Newton method for the solution of the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions. The inequality constraints are tracked at each iteration so that possible solid salts remain sub-saturated. The corresponding inequality constraint becomes active when the saturation is reached. In the case of organic aerosols, liquid-liquid and liquid-solid equilibria as well as phase stability and separation are considered. The UNIFAC model is used for the calculation of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures. We propose a primal-dual interior-point Newton method to solve the KKT conditions of a relaxed minimization problem. We present numerical results for both inorganic and organic problems to show the ability of our approach, in the prediction of aerosol phases in the atmospheric particles.

  4. Absolute determination of the gelling point of gelatin under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Franco; Alberini, Ivana; Ferreyra, María G; Rintoul, Ignacio

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic studies on phase transformation of biopolymers in solution are useful to understand their nature and to evaluate their technological potentials. Thermodynamic studies should be conducted avoiding time-related phenomena. This condition is not easily achieved in hydrophilic biopolymers. In this contribution, the simultaneous effects of pH, salt concentration, and cooling rate (Cr) on the folding from random coil to triple helical collagen-like structures of gelatin were systematically studied. The phase transformation temperature at the absolute invariant condition of Cr = 0 °C/min (T(T)Cr=0) ) is introduced as a conceptual parameter to study phase transformations in biopolymers under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium and avoiding interferences coming from time-related phenomena. Experimental phase diagrams obtained at different Cr are presented. The T(T)(Cr=0) compared with pH and TT(Cr=0) compared with [NaCl] diagram allowed to explore the transformation process at Cr = 0 °C/min. The results were explained by electrostatic interactions between the biopolymers and its solvation milieu.

  5. Absolute determination of the gelling point of gelatin under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Franco; Alberini, Ivana; Ferreyra, María G; Rintoul, Ignacio

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic studies on phase transformation of biopolymers in solution are useful to understand their nature and to evaluate their technological potentials. Thermodynamic studies should be conducted avoiding time-related phenomena. This condition is not easily achieved in hydrophilic biopolymers. In this contribution, the simultaneous effects of pH, salt concentration, and cooling rate (Cr) on the folding from random coil to triple helical collagen-like structures of gelatin were systematically studied. The phase transformation temperature at the absolute invariant condition of Cr = 0 °C/min (T(T)Cr=0) ) is introduced as a conceptual parameter to study phase transformations in biopolymers under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium and avoiding interferences coming from time-related phenomena. Experimental phase diagrams obtained at different Cr are presented. The T(T)(Cr=0) compared with pH and TT(Cr=0) compared with [NaCl] diagram allowed to explore the transformation process at Cr = 0 °C/min. The results were explained by electrostatic interactions between the biopolymers and its solvation milieu. PMID:25832543

  6. Model-based analysis of coupled equilibrium-kinetic processes: indirect kinetic studies of thermodynamic parameters using the dynamic data.

    PubMed

    Emami, Fereshteh; Maeder, Marcel; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic studies of equilibrium chemical reactions linked with kinetic procedures are mostly impossible by traditional approaches. In this work, the new concept of generalized kinetic study of thermodynamic parameters is introduced for dynamic data. The examples of equilibria intertwined with kinetic chemical mechanisms include molecular charge transfer complex formation reactions, pH-dependent degradation of chemical compounds and tautomerization kinetics in micellar solutions. Model-based global analysis with the possibility of calculating and embedding the equilibrium and kinetic parameters into the fitting algorithm has allowed the complete analysis of the complex reaction mechanisms. After the fitting process, the optimal equilibrium and kinetic parameters together with an estimate of their standard deviations have been obtained. This work opens up a promising new avenue for obtaining equilibrium constants through the kinetic data analysis for the kinetic reactions that involve equilibrium processes.

  7. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and the lactone/carboxylate equilibrium of hydroxycamptothecin delivered via aerosol in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Wenjin; Fang, Yun; Hou, Wenjie

    2012-10-01

    Aerosol delivery is a route which is advantageous to the therapy of pulmonary diseases, such as lung cancer. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution after aerosol delivery of carboxylate form of hydroxycamptothecin (C-HCPT) were investigated. The concentrations of the three different types (lactone, carboxylate and the total of both forms) of HCPT were measured by HPLC analysis. The initial experiment showed no evident difference between lactone and carboxylate in the lungs during the aerosol treatment, compared with the HCPT content in plasma. The AUC(inf) value of lactone in the lungs was higher than that of carboxylate, which was 138,176.00 min ng g⁻¹ and 128,460.00 min ng g⁻¹, respectively. Meanwhile, AUC(inf) in the plasma during the entire treatment indicated that the lactone content was always at a lower level, and the carboxylate form tended to predominate, as shown by the lactone/carboxylate (L/C) equilibrium. The tissue distribution results showed that the lactone proportion in the liver increased up to the maximum value of 69.69% after aerosol administration, whereas the mean L/C equilibrium index for the liver was 2.07±1.06, and the C(max) and AUC(0-∞) values of the total HCPT were highest in the tissues. Based on these results we speculated that the initial wholly carboxylate form of the HCPT atomized liquid did not influence the transformation to lactone form. Moreover, the deposition of the total HCPT and lactone was higher in the lungs and other tissues than in the plasma after the aerosol treatment. This study will be beneficial to the therapy of pulmonary carcinoma. PMID:22858157

  8. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solution onto untreated coffee grounds: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Azouaou, N; Sadaoui, Z; Djaafri, A; Mokaddem, H

    2010-12-15

    Adsorption can be used as a cost effective and efficient technique for the removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewater. Waste materials with no further treatment such as coffee grounds from cafeterias may act as adsorbents for the removal of cadmium. Batch kinetic and equilibrium experiments were conducted to study the effects of contact time, adsorbent dose, initial pH, particle size, initial concentration of cadmium and temperature. Three adsorption isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich were used to analyse the equilibrium data. The Langmuir isotherm which provided the best correlation for Cd(2+) adsorption onto coffee grounds, shows that the adsorption was favourable and the adsorption capacity found was equal to 15.65 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and the adsorption was exothermic. The equilibrium was achieved less than 120 min. The adsorption kinetic data was fitted with first and second order kinetic models. Finally it was concluded that the cadmium adsorption kinetic onto coffee grounds was well fitted by second order kinetic model rather than first order model. The results suggest that coffee grounds have high possibility to be used as effective and economical adsorbent for Cd(2+) removal.

  9. CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A NEW THERMODYNAMIC AEROSOL MODULE FOR URBAN AND REGIONAL AIR QUALITY MODELS. (R824793)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient and rigorous thermodynamic model (ISORROPIA) that predicts the physical state and composition of inorganic atmospheric aerosol is presented. The advantages of this particular model render it suitable for incorporation into urban and regional air qualit...

  10. A basic introduction to the thermodynamics of the Earth system far from equilibrium and maximum entropy production.

    PubMed

    Kleidon, A

    2010-05-12

    The Earth system is remarkably different from its planetary neighbours in that it shows pronounced, strong global cycling of matter. These global cycles result in the maintenance of a unique thermodynamic state of the Earth's atmosphere which is far from thermodynamic equilibrium (TE). Here, I provide a simple introduction of the thermodynamic basis to understand why Earth system processes operate so far away from TE. I use a simple toy model to illustrate the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics and to classify applications of the proposed principle of maximum entropy production (MEP) to such processes into three different cases of contrasting flexibility in the boundary conditions. I then provide a brief overview of the different processes within the Earth system that produce entropy, review actual examples of MEP in environmental and ecological systems, and discuss the role of interactions among dissipative processes in making boundary conditions more flexible. I close with a brief summary and conclusion.

  11. Non-equilibrium thermodynamical description of rhythmic motion patterns of active systems: a canonical-dissipative approach.

    PubMed

    Dotov, D G; Kim, S; Frank, T D

    2015-02-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the non-equilibrium thermodynamical variables of a canonical-dissipative limit cycle oscillator describing rhythmic motion patterns of active systems. These variables are statistical entropy, non-equilibrium internal energy, and non-equilibrium free energy. In particular, the expression for the non-equilibrium free energy is derived as a function of a suitable control parameter. The control parameter determines the Hopf bifurcation point of the deterministic active system and describes the effective pumping of the oscillator. In analogy to the equilibrium free energy of the Landau theory, it is shown that the non-equilibrium free energy decays as a function of the control parameter. In doing so, a similarity between certain equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase transitions is pointed out. Data from an experiment on human rhythmic movements is presented. Estimates for pumping intensity as well as the thermodynamical variables are reported. It is shown that in the experiment the non-equilibrium free energy decayed when pumping intensity was increased, which is consistent with the theory. Moreover, pumping intensities close to zero could be observed at relatively slow intended rhythmic movements. In view of the Hopf bifurcation underlying the limit cycle oscillator model, this observation suggests that the intended limit cycle movements were actually more similar to trajectories of a randomly perturbed stable focus.

  12. Non-equilibrium thermodynamical description of rhythmic motion patterns of active systems: a canonical-dissipative approach.

    PubMed

    Dotov, D G; Kim, S; Frank, T D

    2015-02-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the non-equilibrium thermodynamical variables of a canonical-dissipative limit cycle oscillator describing rhythmic motion patterns of active systems. These variables are statistical entropy, non-equilibrium internal energy, and non-equilibrium free energy. In particular, the expression for the non-equilibrium free energy is derived as a function of a suitable control parameter. The control parameter determines the Hopf bifurcation point of the deterministic active system and describes the effective pumping of the oscillator. In analogy to the equilibrium free energy of the Landau theory, it is shown that the non-equilibrium free energy decays as a function of the control parameter. In doing so, a similarity between certain equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase transitions is pointed out. Data from an experiment on human rhythmic movements is presented. Estimates for pumping intensity as well as the thermodynamical variables are reported. It is shown that in the experiment the non-equilibrium free energy decayed when pumping intensity was increased, which is consistent with the theory. Moreover, pumping intensities close to zero could be observed at relatively slow intended rhythmic movements. In view of the Hopf bifurcation underlying the limit cycle oscillator model, this observation suggests that the intended limit cycle movements were actually more similar to trajectories of a randomly perturbed stable focus. PMID:25619737

  13. Computer codes for the evaluation of thermodynamic and transport properties for equilibrium air to 30000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Gupta, Roop N.

    1991-01-01

    The computer codes developed here provide self-consistent thermodynamic and transport properties for equilibrium air for temperatures from 500 to 30000 K over a temperature range of 10 (exp -4) to 10 (exp -2) atm. These properties are computed through the use of temperature dependent curve fits for discrete values of pressure. Interpolation is employed for intermediate values of pressure. The curve fits are based on mixture values calculated from an 11-species air model. Individual species properties used in the mixture relations are obtained from a recent study by the present authors. A review and discussion of the sources and accuracy of the curve fitted data used herein are given in NASA RP 1260.

  14. Adsorptive removal of heavy metals by magnetic nanoadsorbent: an equilibrium and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsath, D. S.; Shirivastava, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    An efficient and new magnetic nanoadsorbent photocatalyst was fabricated by co-precipitation technique. This research focuses on understanding metal removal process and developing a cost-effective technology for treatment of heavy metal-contaminated industrial wastewater. In this investigation, magnetic nanoadsorbent has been employed for the removal of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions by a batch adsorption technique. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted very well to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The thermodynamics of Zn(II) ions adsorption onto the magnetic nanoadsorbents indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous, endothermic and physical in nature. Surface morphology of magnetic nanoadsorbent by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental analysis by EDX technique. The structural and photocatalytic properties of magnetic nanoadsorbent were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR techniques. Also, the magnetic properties of synthesized magnetic nanoadsorbent were determined by vibrating spinning magnetometer (VSM).

  15. Modeling of DNA thermophoresis in dilute solutions using the non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamian, Morteza; Saghir, M. Ziad

    2012-03-01

    Our previous approach on thermodiffusion modeling of dilute polymer solutions is extended to dilute DNA solutions. The model is based on linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics and the concept of Eyring's activation energy of viscous flow to estimate the Soret coefficient in thermophoresis of macromolecules that are not in liquid phase. The net heat of transport of single- and double-stranded DNA molecules, which are in solid state, are replaced by the activation energy of viscous flow of liquid alkanes with comparable molecular weights. The proposed formula is tested against available experimental data and qualitative agreement is observed. For double-stranded DNA molecules, the experimental data are scattered and the model can qualitatively predict the data, whereas for single-stranded DNA experiments in the infinite dilution model, for which the model is prescribed, a very good agreement is observed.

  16. Equilibriums between Cu, Fe, and Zn sulfides and oxides in chloride solution: A thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strel'Tsova, N. I.

    2009-10-01

    The results of thermodynamic modeling of equilibriums between Cu, Fe, and Zn sulfides and oxides pertaining to the Cu-Fe-Zn-S-O2 system in water and aqueous chloride solution are presented. The system comprises solid phases of constant composition: pyrite, pyrrhotite, hematite, magnetite, wüstite, γ-iron, chalcocite, covellite, cuprite, native copper, chalcopyrite, and bornite, as well as more than 100 ions, complexes, and molecules in an aqueous solution. The GIBBS program with the UNITHERM thermodynamic dataset used in calculations allows numerical analysis of phase assemblages in a dry system and in equilibrium with an aqueous solution. How the temperature, pressure, and the composition of the solution in the system opened for oxygen and sulfur affects the composition of phase assemblages was considered in temperature and pressure ranges of 50-350 C and 100-1000 bar, respectively. Decrease in temperature leads to a shift in stability fields of the studied phases toward the region of elevated oxygen and sulfur partial pressures. Variation of temperature is an important factor affecting precipitation of ore minerals, primarily, Cu- and Zn-bearing. The calculation results are presented in tables and diagrams. Each point in the (log m_{S_{tot} } - log f_{O_2 } ) diagram is characterized by a single possible assemblage of phases equilibrated with a solution of the given composition within the considered temperature and pressure range. Since the composition of the mineral assemblage is controlled by physicochemical conditions at the moment of mineral formation, comparison of the calculation results with mineral assemblages at ore deposits makes it possible to estimate the parameters of ore deposition at the early stage of investigation, including oxygen and sulfur activity and, occasionally, the composition and salinity of the solution. These parameters control the formation of such assemblages.

  17. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 1.5D modeling of red giant stars

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Mitchell E.; Short, C. Ian

    2014-05-20

    Spectra for two-dimensional (2D) stars in the 1.5D approximation are created from synthetic spectra of one-dimensional (1D) non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) spherical model atmospheres produced by the PHOENIX code. The 1.5D stars have the spatially averaged Rayleigh-Jeans flux of a K3-4 III star while varying the temperature difference between the two 1D component models (ΔT {sub 1.5D}) and the relative surface area covered. Synthetic observable quantities from the 1.5D stars are fitted with quantities from NLTE and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) 1D models to assess the errors in inferred T {sub eff} values from assuming horizontal homogeneity and LTE. Five different quantities are fit to determine the T {sub eff} of the 1.5D stars: UBVRI photometric colors, absolute surface flux spectral energy distributions (SEDs), relative SEDs, continuum normalized spectra, and TiO band profiles. In all cases except the TiO band profiles, the inferred T {sub eff} value increases with increasing ΔT {sub 1.5D}. In all cases, the inferred T {sub eff} value from fitting 1D LTE quantities is higher than from fitting 1D NLTE quantities and is approximately constant as a function of ΔT {sub 1.5D} within each case. The difference between LTE and NLTE for the TiO bands is caused indirectly by the NLTE temperature structure of the upper atmosphere, as the bands are computed in LTE. We conclude that the difference between T {sub eff} values derived from NLTE and LTE modeling is relatively insensitive to the degree of the horizontal inhomogeneity of the star being modeled and largely depends on the observable quantity being fit.

  18. Cloud and Precipitation During GoAmazon: The Influence of Aerosol and Thermodynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, L.; Cecchin, M.; Biscaro, T.; Lima, W.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Albrecht, R. I.; Comstock, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Mei, F.; Schumacher, C.; Eichholz, C.; Giangrande, S. E.; Fan, J.; Wang, J.; Wendisch, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Martin, S. T.; Artaxo, P.; Thalman, R. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Poeschl, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Green Ocean Amazon, GOAmazon, intensive field campaign, hereafter called IOP1 (February-March) and IOP2 (September - October) 2014, was an opportunity for broad and joint campaigns of the CHUVA, IARA and ACRIDICON-CHUVA projects. GOAmazon intends to study how aerosols and surface fluxes influence cloud cycles under clean conditions, as well as how aerosol and cloud life cycles, including cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions, are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity. This study employs the SIPAM S band radar, the X Band dual polarization radar, GOES images, disdrometers, CCN counters, radiosondes and data collected by G1 and HALO airplanes. As ancillary data, we used the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, the TERRACLASS (INPE) and EVI from MODIS for surface topography, surface type classification and vegetation index, respectively. Cloud and precipitation are studied as function of aerosol concentration as well surface type and thermodynamic properties. Different sensors and space-time scales are employed to compare the life cycle and cloud size distribution using radar and satellite for different atmospheric conditions. For each IOP, the droplet size distribution using the airplanes or the particle size distribution using disdrometers are described discussing the aerosol, thermodynamic, surface type and topography effects on the clouds and precipitation. The typical precipitation behavior, for each IOP, is described using CFADs and reflectivity distributions. For few specific flights, those measuring ice particles, during the wet season (IOP1), some examples and classifications of convective and stratiform clouds are discussed. Finally, the microphysical properties of the clouds are presented using X band dual pol radar hydrometeor classifications and evaluating the effect of aerosol loading on the cloud vertical structure.

  19. A spreadsheet-coupled SOLGAS: A computerized thermodynamic equilibrium calculation tool. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    SOLGAS, an early computer program for calculating equilibrium in a chemical system, has been made more user-friendly, and several ``bells and whistles`` have been added. The necessity to include elemental species has been eliminated. The input of large numbers of starting conditions has been automated. A revised spreadsheet-based format for entering data, including non-ideal binary and ternary mixtures, simplifies and reduces chances for error. Calculational errors by SOLGAS are flagged, and several programming errors are corrected. Auxiliary programs are available to assemble and partially automate plotting of large amounts of data. Thermodynamic input data can be changed on line. The program can be operated with or without a co-processor. Copies of the program, suitable for the IBM-PC or compatibles with at least 384 bytes of low RAM, are available from the authors. This user manual contains appendices with examples of the use of SOLGAS. These range from elementary examples, such as, the relationships among water, ice, and water vapor, to more complex systems: phase diagram calculation of UF{sub 4} and UF{sub 6} system; burning UF{sub 4} in fluorine; thermodynamic calculation of the Cl-F-O-H system; equilibria calculations in the CCl{sub 4}--CH{sub 3}OH system; and limitations applicable to aqueous solutions. An appendix also contains the source code.

  20. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics and collective vibrational modes of liquid water in an inhomogeneous electric field.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Adam D; Drusová, Sandra; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C

    2016-06-28

    In this experiment liquid water is subject to an inhomogeneous electric field (∇(2)Ea≈ 10(10) V m(2)) using a high voltage (20 kV) point-plane electrode system. Using interferometry it was found that the application of a strong electric field gradient to water generates local changes in the refractive index of the liquid, polarizes the surface and creates a downward moving electro-convective jet. A maximum temperature difference of 1 °C is measured in the immediate vicinity of the point electrode. Raman spectroscopy performed on water reveals an enhancement of the vibrational collective modes (3250 cm(-1)) as well as an increase in the local mode (3490 cm(-1)) energy. This bimodal enhancement indicates that the spectral changes are not due to temperature changes. The intense field gradient thus establishes an excited subpopulation of vibrational oscillators far from thermal equilibrium. Delocalization of the collective vibrational mode spatially expands this excited population beyond the microscale. Hindered rotational freedom due to electric field pinning of molecular dipoles retards the heat flow and generates a chemical potential gradient. These changes are responsible for the observed changes in the refractive index and temperature. It is demonstrated that polar liquids can thus support local non-equilibrium thermodynamic transient states critical to biochemical and environmental processes. PMID:27253197

  1. Characterization of local thermodynamic equilibrium in a laser-induced aluminum alloy plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhenyang; Xu, Tao; Niu, GuangHui; Liu, Ying; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-04-01

    The electron temperature was evaluated using the line-to-continuum ratio method, and whether the plasma was close to the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state was investigated in detail. The results showed that approximately 5 μs after the plasma formed, the changes in the electron and excitation temperatures, which were determined using a Boltzmann plot, overlapped in the 15% error range, which indicated that the LTE state was reached. The recombination of electrons and ions and the free electron expansion process led to the deviation from the LTE state. The plasma's expansion rate slowed over time, and when the expansion time was close to the ionization equilibrium time, the LTE state was almost reached. The McWhirter criterion was adopted to calculate the threshold electron density for different species, and the results showed that experimental electron density was greater than the threshold electron density, which meant that the LTE state may have existed. However, for the nonmetal element N, the threshold electron density was greater than the value experimental value approximately 0.8 μs after the plasma formed, which meant that LTE state did not exist for N.

  2. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics and collective vibrational modes of liquid water in an inhomogeneous electric field.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Adam D; Drusová, Sandra; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C

    2016-06-28

    In this experiment liquid water is subject to an inhomogeneous electric field (∇(2)Ea≈ 10(10) V m(2)) using a high voltage (20 kV) point-plane electrode system. Using interferometry it was found that the application of a strong electric field gradient to water generates local changes in the refractive index of the liquid, polarizes the surface and creates a downward moving electro-convective jet. A maximum temperature difference of 1 °C is measured in the immediate vicinity of the point electrode. Raman spectroscopy performed on water reveals an enhancement of the vibrational collective modes (3250 cm(-1)) as well as an increase in the local mode (3490 cm(-1)) energy. This bimodal enhancement indicates that the spectral changes are not due to temperature changes. The intense field gradient thus establishes an excited subpopulation of vibrational oscillators far from thermal equilibrium. Delocalization of the collective vibrational mode spatially expands this excited population beyond the microscale. Hindered rotational freedom due to electric field pinning of molecular dipoles retards the heat flow and generates a chemical potential gradient. These changes are responsible for the observed changes in the refractive index and temperature. It is demonstrated that polar liquids can thus support local non-equilibrium thermodynamic transient states critical to biochemical and environmental processes.

  3. Low Temperature Thermodynamic Equilibrium of CO2 Dimer Anion Species in Cryogenic Argon and Krypton Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Michael E.; Moore, David T.

    2016-06-01

    The separated CO2 dimer anion, (CO2)(CO2-), is observed by FTIR spectroscopy in matrix isolation experiments at 1652 cm-1 upon deposition of high energy argon ions into an argon matrix doped with 0.5% CO2. It has previously been reported by Andrews that upon annealing the matrix to 25K, the separated species converts to an oxalate-like C2O4- species which appears at 1856 cm-1.a We have observed that subsequently holding the matrix at 10K caused the C2O4- species to fully convert back to (CO2)(CO2-). Upon further investigation, we determined that the two species reversibly interconvert between 19K and 23K, suggesting the species are in thermodynamic equilibrium. The associated van't Hoff plot has a linear trend and indicates an endothermic reaction driven by a large increase in entropy. An analogous experiment in a krypton matrix was performed, and the equilibrium was found to occur between 26K and 31K. Interestingly, analysis revealed the reaction in krypton is more endothermic, but has nearly the same entropy value as was observed in the argon experiment. aZhou, M.; Andrews, L.; J. Chem. Phys. 110, 2414 (1999).

  4. Calculations and curve fits of thermodynamic and transport properties for equilibrium air to 30000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Thompson, Richard A.; Yos, Jerrold M.

    1991-01-01

    A self-consistent set of equilibrium air values were computed for enthalpy, total specific heat at constant pressure, compressibility factor, viscosity, total thermal conductivity, and total Prandtl number from 500 to 30,000 K over a range of 10(exp -4) atm to 10(exp 2) atm. The mixture values are calculated from the transport and thermodynamic properties of the individual species provided in a recent study by the authors. The concentrations of the individual species, required in the mixture relations, are obtained from a free energy minimization calculation procedure. Present calculations are based on an 11-species air model. For pressures less than 10(exp -2) atm and temperatures of about 15,000 K and greater, the concentrations of N(++) and O(++) become important, and consequently, they are included in the calculations determining the various properties. The computed properties are curve fitted as a function of temperature at a constant value of pressure. These curve fits reproduce the computed values within 5 percent for the entire temperature range considered here at specific pressures and provide an efficient means for computing the flowfield properties of equilibrium air, provided the elemental composition remains constant at 0.24 for oxygen and 0.76 for nitrogen by mass.

  5. A procedure to find thermodynamic equilibrium constants for CO2 and CH4 adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Trinh, T T; van Erp, T S; Bedeaux, D; Kjelstrup, S; Grande, C A

    2015-03-28

    Thermodynamic equilibrium for adsorption means that the chemical potential of gas and adsorbed phase are equal. A precise knowledge of the chemical potential is, however, often lacking, because the activity coefficient of the adsorbate is not known. Adsorption isotherms are therefore commonly fitted to ideal models such as the Langmuir, Sips or Henry models. We propose here a new procedure to find the activity coefficient and the equilibrium constant for adsorption which uses the thermodynamic factor. Instead of fitting the data to a model, we calculate the thermodynamic factor and use this to find first the activity coefficient. We show, using published molecular simulation data, how this procedure gives the thermodynamic equilibrium constant and enthalpies of adsorption for CO2(g) on graphite. We also use published experimental data to find similar thermodynamic properties of CO2(g) and of CH4(g) adsorbed on activated carbon. The procedure gives a higher accuracy in the determination of enthalpies of adsorption than ideal models do.

  6. Atomistic-level non-equilibrium model for chemically reactive systems based on steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanchen; Al-Abbasi, Omar; von Spakovsky, Michael R.

    2014-10-01

    This paper outlines an atomistic-level framework for modeling the non-equilibrium behavior of chemically reactive systems. The framework called steepest- entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEA-QT) is based on the paradigm of intrinsic quantum thermodynamic (IQT), which is a theory that unifies quantum mechanics and thermodynamics into a single discipline with wide applications to the study of non-equilibrium phenomena at the atomistic level. SEA-QT is a novel approach for describing the state of chemically reactive systems as well as the kinetic and dynamic features of the reaction process without any assumptions of near-equilibrium states or weak-interactions with a reservoir or bath. Entropy generation is the basis of the dissipation which takes place internal to the system and is, thus, the driving force of the chemical reaction(s). The SEA-QT non-equilibrium model is able to provide detailed information during the reaction process, providing a picture of the changes occurring in key thermodynamic properties (e.g., the instantaneous species concentrations, entropy and entropy generation, reaction coordinate, chemical affinities, reaction rate, etc). As an illustration, the SEA-QT framework is applied to an atomistic-level chemically reactive system governed by the reaction mechanism F + H2 leftrightarrow FH + H.

  7. Linear thermodynamic analysis of the reversible Selkov model: An interpretation of the Chatelier-like principle for local concentration fluctuations near thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Arun K.

    1990-03-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of the reversible Selkov model (a simple kinetic model describing glycolytic oscillations) has been done by an entropy production technique of Prigogine and it is shown that only the autocatalytic step can destabilize the steady state in this model. It is derived that at thermodynamic equilibrium, the product δS δP is always a positive quantity which appears to be a Chatelier-like principle for local concentration fluctuation applicable to the autocatalytic step S ⇄ P of this model.

  8. Analysis of Hydrogen Generation through Thermochemical Gasification of Coconut Shell Using Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Considering Char and Tar.

    PubMed

    Rupesh, Shanmughom; Muraleedharan, Chandrasekharan; Arun, Palatel

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the potential of coconut shell for air-steam gasification using thermodynamic equilibrium model. A thermodynamic equilibrium model considering tar and realistic char conversion was developed using MATLAB software to predict the product gas composition. After comparing it with experimental results the prediction capability of the model is enhanced by multiplying equilibrium constants with suitable coefficients. The modified model is used to study the effect of key process parameters like temperature, steam to biomass ratio, and equivalence ratio on product gas yield, composition, and heating value of syngas along with gasification efficiency. For a steam to biomass ratio of unity, the maximum mole fraction of hydrogen in the product gas is found to be 36.14% with a lower heating value of 7.49 MJ/Nm(3) at a gasification temperature of 1500 K and equivalence ratio of 0.15.

  9. Analysis of Hydrogen Generation through Thermochemical Gasification of Coconut Shell Using Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Considering Char and Tar

    PubMed Central

    Rupesh, Shanmughom; Muraleedharan, Chandrasekharan; Arun, Palatel

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the potential of coconut shell for air-steam gasification using thermodynamic equilibrium model. A thermodynamic equilibrium model considering tar and realistic char conversion was developed using MATLAB software to predict the product gas composition. After comparing it with experimental results the prediction capability of the model is enhanced by multiplying equilibrium constants with suitable coefficients. The modified model is used to study the effect of key process parameters like temperature, steam to biomass ratio, and equivalence ratio on product gas yield, composition, and heating value of syngas along with gasification efficiency. For a steam to biomass ratio of unity, the maximum mole fraction of hydrogen in the product gas is found to be 36.14% with a lower heating value of 7.49 MJ/Nm3 at a gasification temperature of 1500 K and equivalence ratio of 0.15. PMID:27433487

  10. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on aluminum biosorption by a mycelial biomass (Streptomyces rimosus).

    PubMed

    Tassist, Amina; Lounici, Hakim; Abdi, Nadia; Mameri, Nabil

    2010-11-15

    This work focused on kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on aluminum biosorption by Streptomyces rimosus biomass. Infrared spectroscopy analysis shows that S. rimosus present some groups: hydroxyl, methyl, carboxyl, amine, thiol and phosphate. The maximum biosorption capacity of S. rimosus biomass was found to be 11.76 mg g(-1) for the following optimum conditions: particle size, [250-560] μm, pH 4-4.25, biomass content of 25 g L(-1), agitation of 250 rpm and temperature of 25 °C. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models were applied to describe the biosorption isotherms at free pH (pH(i) 4) and fixed pH (pH(f) 4). Langmuir model is the most adequate. With fixed pH, the maximum biosorption capacity is enhanced from 6.62 mg g(-1) to 11.76 mg g(-1). The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) showed the feasibility, endothermic and spontaneous nature of the biosorption at 10-80 °C. The activation energy (Ea) was determined as 52.18 kJ mol(-1) using the Arrhenius equation and the rate constant of pseudo-second-order model (the most adequate kinetic model). The mean free energy was calculated as 12.91 kJ mol(-1) using the D-R isotherm model. The mechanism of Al(III) biosorption on S. rimosus could be a chemical ion exchange and carboxyl groups are mainly involved in this mechanism.

  11. SPECIES - EVALUATING THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES & EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS OF AN 11-SPECIES AIR MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate numerical prediction of high-temperature, chemically reacting flowfields requires a knowledge of the physical properties and reaction kinetics for the species involved in the reacting gas mixture. Assuming an 11-species air model at temperatures below 30,000 degrees Kelvin, SPECIES (Computer Codes for the Evaluation of Thermodynamic Properties, Transport Properties, and Equilibrium Constants of an 11-Species Air Model) computes values for the species thermodynamic and transport properties, diffusion coefficients and collision cross sections for any combination of the eleven species, and reaction rates for the twenty reactions normally occurring. The species represented in the model are diatomic nitrogen, diatomic oxygen, atomic nitrogen, atomic oxygen, nitric oxide, ionized nitric oxide, the free electron, ionized atomic nitrogen, ionized atomic oxygen, ionized diatomic nitrogen, and ionized diatomic oxygen. Sixteen subroutines compute the following properties for both a single species, interaction pair, or reaction, and an array of all species, pairs, or reactions: species specific heat and static enthalpy, species viscosity, species frozen thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient, collision cross section (OMEGA 1,1), collision cross section (OMEGA 2,2), collision cross section ratio, and equilibrium constant. The program uses least squares polynomial curve-fits of the most accurate data believed available to provide the requested values more quickly than is possible with table look-up methods. The subroutines for computing transport coefficients and collision cross sections use additional code to correct for any electron pressure when working with ionic species. SPECIES was developed on a SUN 3/280 computer running the SunOS 3.5 operating system. It is written in standard FORTRAN 77 for use on any machine, and requires roughly 92K memory. The standard distribution medium for SPECIES is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the

  12. Early history of extended irreversible thermodynamics (1953-1983): An exploration beyond local equilibrium and classical transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, G.; Jou, D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper gives a historical account of the early years (1953-1983) of extended irreversible thermodynamics (EIT). The salient features of this formalism are to upgrade the thermodynamic fluxes of mass, momentum, energy, and others, to the status of independent variables, and to explore the consistency between generalized transport equations and a generalized version of the second law of thermodynamics. This requires going beyond classical irreversible thermodynamics by redefining entropy and entropy flux. EIT provides deeper foundations, closer relations with microscopic formalisms, a wider spectrum of applications, and a more exciting conceptual appeal to non-equilibrium thermodynamics. We first recall the historical contributions by Maxwell, Cattaneo, and Grad on generalized transport equations. A thermodynamic theory wide enough to cope with such transport equations was independently proposed between 1953 and 1983 by several authors, each emphasizing different kinds of problems. In 1983, the first international meeting on this theory took place in Bellaterra (Barcelona). It provided the opportunity for the various authors to meet together for the first time and to discuss the common points and the specific differences of their previous formulations. From then on, a large amount of applications and theoretical confirmations have emerged. From the historical point of view, the emergence of EIT has been an opportunity to revisit the foundations and to open new avenues in thermodynamics, one of the most classical and well consolidated physical theories.

  13. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics theory of econometric source discovery for large data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bergem, Rutger; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Benachenhou, Dalila; Szu, Harold

    2014-05-01

    Almost all consumer and firm transactions are achieved using computers and as a result gives rise to increasingly large amounts of data available for analysts. The gold standard in Economic data manipulation techniques matured during a period of limited data access, and the new Large Data Analysis (LDA) paradigm we all face may quickly obfuscate most tools used by Economists. When coupled with an increased availability of numerous unstructured, multi-modal data sets, the impending 'data tsunami' could have serious detrimental effects for Economic forecasting, analysis, and research in general. Given this reality we propose a decision-aid framework for Augmented-LDA (A-LDA) - a synergistic approach to LDA which combines traditional supervised, rule-based Machine Learning (ML) strategies to iteratively uncover hidden sources in large data, the artificial neural network (ANN) Unsupervised Learning (USL) at the minimum Helmholtz free energy for isothermal dynamic equilibrium strategies, and the Economic intuitions required to handle problems encountered when interpreting large amounts of Financial or Economic data. To make the ANN USL framework applicable to economics we define the temperature, entropy, and energy concepts in Economics from non-equilibrium molecular thermodynamics of Boltzmann viewpoint, as well as defining an information geometry, on which the ANN can operate using USL to reduce information saturation. An exemplar of such a system representation is given for firm industry equilibrium. We demonstrate the traditional ML methodology in the economics context and leverage firm financial data to explore a frontier concept known as behavioral heterogeneity. Behavioral heterogeneity on the firm level can be imagined as a firm's interactions with different types of Economic entities over time. These interactions could impose varying degrees of institutional constraints on a firm's business behavior. We specifically look at behavioral

  14. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of phenol onto graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of temperature on phenol adsorbed by graphene shows that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of phenol increases with the increase in temperature from 285 to 333 K. Increasing adsorption capacities with temperature indicates that the adsorption of phenol is controlled by an endothermic reaction. Highlights: ► The graphene has high phenol adsorption capacity. ► The graphene has a high specific surface area of 305 m{sup 2}/g. ► The adsorption capacity is high at acidic pH range. ► The graphene has rapid phenol adsorption rate. ► Phenol adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. -- Abstract: Graphene, a new member of carbon family, has been prepared, characterized and used as adsorbent to remove phenol from aqueous solution. The effect parameters including pH, dosage, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of phenol onto graphene were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity can reach 28.26 mg/g at the conditions of initial phenol concentration of 50 mg/L, pH 6.3 and 285 K. Adsorption data were well described by both Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene was endothermic and spontaneous.

  15. Numerical solution of 2D wet steam flow with non-equilibrium condensation and real thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hric, V.; Halama, J.

    2015-03-10

    An approach to modeling of wet steam flow with non-equilibrium condensation phenomenon is presented. The first part of our flow model is homogeneous Euler system of transport equations for mass, momentum and total energy of wet steam (mixture). The additional second part describes liquid phase via non-homogeneous system of transport equations for moments of droplets number distribution function and relies on corrected classical nucleation theory. Moment equations are closed by linearization of droplet growth rate model. All necessary relations for thermodynamic properties of steam are provided by IAPWS set of equations. However, properties of condensate are simply modeled by liquid saturation data. Two real equations of state are implemented. Recently developed CFD formulation for entropy (does not require iteration process) and so-called IAPWS special gas equation for Helmholtz energy (one iteration loop is necessary). Flow model is validated on converging-diverging supersonic nozzle with Barschdorff geometry. Simulations were performed by in-house CFD code based on finite volume method and stiff character of equations was solved by symmetrical time operator splitting. Achieved results satisfactorily agreed with experimental data.

  16. Removal of tetracycline from wastewater using pumice stone: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, pumice stone was used for the removal of tetracyline (TC) from aqueous solutions. It was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM and BET analyses. Cation exchange capacity of pumice stone was found to be 9.9 meq/100 g. Effect of various parameters such as solution pH (2–11), adsorbent dosage (0.5-10 g/L), contact time (2.5-120 min), initial TC concentration (5–300 mg/L) and temperature (20–50°C) on TC adsorption onto pumice was investigated. Also the adsorption of TC on pumice stone was studied as a function of Na+ and Cu2+ cations changing pH from 2 to 11 using batch experiments. The best removal efficiency performance was exhibited at adsorbent dosage 10 g/L, pH 3, contact time 120 min. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models were applied to the equilibrium data. The result has shown that the adsorption was favorable, physicochemical in nature and agrees well with Langmuir and Freundlich models. The maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 20.02 mg/g. The adsorption behavior of TC on pumices stone was fitted well in the pseudo-second order kinetics model. Thermodynamic parameters calculated from the adsorption data at different temperature showed that the adsorption reaction was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic. PMID:24936305

  17. A thermodynamic study of silica-saturated iron silicate slags in equilibrium with liquid copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Toshio; Kamuo, Morinori; Ono, Katsutoshi; Moriyama, Joichiro

    1983-03-01

    The thermodynamic properties of silica-saturated iron silicate slags in equilibrium with liquid copper have been studied from oxygen partial pressure measurements in the temperature range from 1490 to 1580 K by means of a solid electrolyte galvanic cell. The following cells were used: Pt, Ni-NiO/O=/slag-Cu(l), Cr2O3, Pt; Pt, Fe-FeO/O=/slag-Cu(Fe sat.), Fe. A strong correlation was found between oxygen pressure and the copper content of the slag; the copper content increased from less than 1 pct near iron saturation to about 4 pct at an oxygen partial pressure of 7.2 x 10-3 Pa. A similar correlation was found between the ferric iron/total iron ratio and the oxygen pressure. The oxygen content in liquid copper decreased with increasing iron content in liquid copper and increased slightly near iron saturation. This behavior could be explained qualitatively by using the standard free energy of formation of FeO and the activities of components.

  18. Model uncertainties of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium K-shell spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Blancard, C.; Chung, H. K.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Florido, R.; Fontes, C. J.; Gilleron, F.; Golovkin, I. E.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Loisel, G.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Pain, J.-C.; Rochau, G. A.; Sherrill, M. E.; Lee, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    Local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) K-shell spectroscopy is a common tool to diagnose electron density, ne, and electron temperature, Te, of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Knowing the accuracy of such diagnostics is important to provide quantitative conclusions of many HED-plasma research efforts. For example, Fe opacities were recently measured at multiple conditions at the Sandia National Laboratories Z machine (Bailey et al., 2015), showing significant disagreement with modeled opacities. Since the plasma conditions were measured using K-shell spectroscopy of tracer Mg (Nagayama et al., 2014), one concern is the accuracy of the inferred Fe conditions. In this article, we investigate the K-shell spectroscopy model uncertainties by analyzing the Mg spectra computed with 11 different models at the same conditions. We find that the inferred conditions differ by ±20-30% in ne and ±2-4% in Te depending on the choice of spectral model. Also, we find that half of the Te uncertainty comes from ne uncertainty. To refine the accuracy of the K-shell spectroscopy, it is important to scrutinize and experimentally validate line-shape theory. We investigate the impact of the inferred ne and Te model uncertainty on the Fe opacity measurements. Its impact is small and does not explain the reported discrepancies.

  19. Model uncertainties of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium K-shell spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Blancard, C.; Chung, H. K.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Florido, R.; Fontes, C. J.; Gilleron, F.; Golovkin, I. E.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Loisel, G.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Pain, J.-C.; Rochau, G. A.; Sherrill, M. E.; Lee, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    Local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) K-shell spectroscopy is a common tool to diagnose electron density, ne, and electron temperature, Te, of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Knowing the accuracy of such diagnostics is important to provide quantitative conclusions of many HED-plasma research efforts. For example, Fe opacities were recently measured at multiple conditions at the Sandia National Laboratories Z machine (Bailey et al., 2015), showing significant disagreement with modeled opacities. Since the plasma conditions were measured using K-shell spectroscopy of tracer Mg (Nagayama et al., 2014), one concern is the accuracy of the inferred Fe conditions. In this article, we investigate the K-shell spectroscopy model uncertainties by analyzing the Mg spectra computed with 11 different models at the same conditions. We find that the inferred conditions differ by ±20-30% in ne and ±2-4% in Te depending on the choice of spectral model. Also, we find that half of the Te uncertainty comes from ne uncertainty. To refine the accuracy of the K-shell spectroscopy, it is important to scrutinize and experimentally validate line-shape theory. We investigate the impact of the inferred ne and Te model uncertainty on the Fe opacity measurements. Its impact is small and does not explain the reported discrepancies.

  20. Removal of tetracycline from wastewater using pumice stone: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Guler, Ulker Asli; Sarioglu, Meltem

    2014-01-01

    In this study, pumice stone was used for the removal of tetracyline (TC) from aqueous solutions. It was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM and BET analyses. Cation exchange capacity of pumice stone was found to be 9.9 meq/100 g. Effect of various parameters such as solution pH (2-11), adsorbent dosage (0.5-10 g/L), contact time (2.5-120 min), initial TC concentration (5-300 mg/L) and temperature (20-50°C) on TC adsorption onto pumice was investigated. Also the adsorption of TC on pumice stone was studied as a function of Na(+) and Cu(2+) cations changing pH from 2 to 11 using batch experiments. The best removal efficiency performance was exhibited at adsorbent dosage 10 g/L, pH 3, contact time 120 min. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models were applied to the equilibrium data. The result has shown that the adsorption was favorable, physicochemical in nature and agrees well with Langmuir and Freundlich models. The maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 20.02 mg/g. The adsorption behavior of TC on pumices stone was fitted well in the pseudo-second order kinetics model. Thermodynamic parameters calculated from the adsorption data at different temperature showed that the adsorption reaction was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic.

  1. Removal of tetracycline from wastewater using pumice stone: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Guler, Ulker Asli; Sarioglu, Meltem

    2014-01-01

    In this study, pumice stone was used for the removal of tetracyline (TC) from aqueous solutions. It was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM and BET analyses. Cation exchange capacity of pumice stone was found to be 9.9 meq/100 g. Effect of various parameters such as solution pH (2-11), adsorbent dosage (0.5-10 g/L), contact time (2.5-120 min), initial TC concentration (5-300 mg/L) and temperature (20-50°C) on TC adsorption onto pumice was investigated. Also the adsorption of TC on pumice stone was studied as a function of Na(+) and Cu(2+) cations changing pH from 2 to 11 using batch experiments. The best removal efficiency performance was exhibited at adsorbent dosage 10 g/L, pH 3, contact time 120 min. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models were applied to the equilibrium data. The result has shown that the adsorption was favorable, physicochemical in nature and agrees well with Langmuir and Freundlich models. The maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 20.02 mg/g. The adsorption behavior of TC on pumices stone was fitted well in the pseudo-second order kinetics model. Thermodynamic parameters calculated from the adsorption data at different temperature showed that the adsorption reaction was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic. PMID:24936305

  2. THE EFFECT OF METASTABLE EQUILIBRIUM STATES ON THE PARTITIONING OF NITRATE BETWEEN THE GAS AND AEROSOL PHASES. (R826371C005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the aid of three atmospheric aerosol equilibrium models, we quantify the effect of metastable equilibrium states (efflorescence branch) in comparison to stable (deliquescence branch) on the partitioning of total nitrate between the gas and aerosol phases. On average, effl...

  3. Theoretical Aspects of Differential Scanning Calorimetry as a Tool for the Studies of Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Pharmaceutical Solid Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Faroongsarng, Damrongsak

    2016-06-01

    Although differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a non-equilibrium technique, it has been used to gain energetic information that involves phase equilibria. DSC has been widely used to characterize the equilibrium melting parameters of small organic pharmaceutical compounds. An understanding of how DSC measures an equilibrium event could make for a better interpretation of the results. The aim of this mini-review was to provide a theoretical insight into the DSC measurement to obtain the equilibrium thermodynamics of a phase transition especially the melting process. It was demonstrated that the heat quantity obtained from the DSC thermogram (ΔH) was related to the thermodynamic enthalpy of the phase transition (ΔH (P) ) via: ΔH = ΔH (P) /(1 + K (- 1)) where K was the equilibrium constant. In melting, the solid and liquefied phases presumably coexist resulting in a null Gibbs free energy that produces an infinitely larger K. Thus, ΔH could be interpreted as ΔH (P). Issues of DSC investigations on melting behavior of crystalline solids including polymorphism, degradation impurity due to heating in situ, and eutectic melting were discussed. In addition, DSC has been a tool for determination of the impurity based on an ideal solution of the melt that is one of the official methods used to establish the reference standard.

  4. Tables and charts of equilibrium thermodynamic properties of carbon dioxide for temperatures from 100 K to 25,000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1976-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic properties for pure carbon dioxide are presented in tabulated and graphical form for temperatures from 100 K to 25,000 K and pressures from 40 mN/sq m to 1 GN/sq m. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular weight ratio, specific heat at constant pressure, specific heat at constant volume, isentropic exponent, and species mole fractions.

  5. Biosorption studies on waste cotton seed for cationic dyes sequestration: equilibrium and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivarajasekar, N.; Baskar, R.; Ragu, T.; Sarika, K.; Preethi, N.; Radhika, T.

    2016-01-01

    The immature Gossypium hirsutum seeds—an agricultural waste was converted into a novel adsorbent and its effectiveness for cationic dyes removal was discussed in this study. Characterization revealed that sulfuric acid activated waste Gossypium hirsutum seed (WGSAB) contains surface area 496 m2 g-1. The ability of WGSAB to adsorb basic red 2 (BR2) and basic violet 3 (BV3) from aqueous solutions has been studied. Batch adsorption studies were carried out at different initial dye concentrations (100-300 mg l-1), contact time (1-5 h), pH (2-12) and temperature (293-323 K) to understand the adsorption mechanism. Adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich and Toth adsorption isotherms. Equilibrium data of the adsorption process fitted very well to the Toth model for both dyes. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity was 66.69 mg g-1 for BV3 and 50.11 mg g-1 for BR2 at optimum conditions. The near unity value of Toth isotherm constant (BR2: 0.999 and BV3: 1.0) indicates that WGSAB surface is heterogeneous in nature. The maximum adsorption capacity predicted by Toth isotherm of BV3 (66.699 mg g-1) is higher than BR2 (50.310 mg g-1). The kinetic investigation revealed that the BR2 and BV3 were chemisorbed on WGSAB surface following Avrami fractional order kinetics. Further, the fractional order and rate constant values are almost similar for every concentration in both the dyes. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH 0, ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 were evaluated. The dye adsorption process was found to be spontaneous and endothermic for the two dyes. Regeneration of WGSAB exhausted by the two dyes could be possible via acetic acid as elutant.

  6. Adsorption Properties of Tetracycline onto Graphene Oxide: Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghadim, Ehsan Ezzatpour; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Soleimani, Gholamreza; Hosseini, Hadi; Kimiagar, Salimeh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticle is a high potential effective absorbent. Tetracycline (TC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic produced, indicated for use against many bacterial infections. In the present research, a systematic study of the adsorption and release process of tetracycline on GO was performed by varying pH, sorption time and temperature. The results of our studies showed that tetracycline strongly loads on the GO surface via π–π interaction and cation–π bonding. Investigation of TC adsorption kinetics showed that the equilibrium was reached within 15 min following the pseudo-second-order model with observed rate constants of k2 = 0.2742–0.5362 g/mg min (at different temperatures). The sorption data has interpreted by the Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption of 323 mg/g (298 K). The mean energy of adsorption was determined 1.83 kJ/mol (298 K) based on the Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) adsorption isotherm. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° values for the adsorption were estimated which indicated the endothermic and spontaneous nature of the sorption process. The electrochemistry approved an ideal reaction for the adsorption under electrodic process. Simulation of GO and TC was done by LAMMPS. Force studies in z direction showed that tetracycline comes close to GO sheet by C8 direction. Then it goes far and turns and again comes close from amine group to the GO sheet. PMID:24302989

  7. Chromium Biosorption from Cr(VI) Aqueous Solutions by Cupressus lusitanica Bark: Kinetics, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Netzahuatl-Muñoz, Alma Rosa; Cristiani-Urbina, María del Carmen; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of chromium (Cr) ion biosorption from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by Cupressus lusitanica bark (CLB). CLB total Cr biosorption capacity strongly depended on operating variables such as initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time: as these variables rose, total Cr biosorption capacity increased significantly. Total Cr biosorption rate also increased with rising solution temperature. The pseudo-second-order model described the total Cr biosorption kinetic data best. Langmuir´s model fitted the experimental equilibrium biosorption data of total Cr best and predicted a maximum total Cr biosorption capacity of 305.4 mg g(-1). Total Cr biosorption by CLB is an endothermic and non-spontaneous process as indicated by the thermodynamic parameters. Results from the present kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies suggest that CLB biosorbs Cr ions from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions predominantly by a chemical sorption phenomenon. Low cost, availability, renewable nature, and effective total Cr biosorption make CLB a highly attractive and efficient method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated water and wastewater.

  8. Chromium Biosorption from Cr(VI) Aqueous Solutions by Cupressus lusitanica Bark: Kinetics, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Netzahuatl-Muñoz, Alma Rosa; Cristiani-Urbina, María del Carmen; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of chromium (Cr) ion biosorption from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by Cupressus lusitanica bark (CLB). CLB total Cr biosorption capacity strongly depended on operating variables such as initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time: as these variables rose, total Cr biosorption capacity increased significantly. Total Cr biosorption rate also increased with rising solution temperature. The pseudo-second-order model described the total Cr biosorption kinetic data best. Langmuir´s model fitted the experimental equilibrium biosorption data of total Cr best and predicted a maximum total Cr biosorption capacity of 305.4 mg g-1. Total Cr biosorption by CLB is an endothermic and non-spontaneous process as indicated by the thermodynamic parameters. Results from the present kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies suggest that CLB biosorbs Cr ions from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions predominantly by a chemical sorption phenomenon. Low cost, availability, renewable nature, and effective total Cr biosorption make CLB a highly attractive and efficient method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated water and wastewater. PMID:26352933

  9. Aerosols-cloud microphysics-thermodynamics-turbulence: evaluating supersaturation in a marine stratocumulus cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditas, F.; Shaw, R. A.; Siebert, H.; Simmel, M.; Wehner, B.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2011-11-01

    This work presents a unique combination of aerosol, cloud microphysical, thermodynamic and turbulence parameters to characterize supersaturation fluctuations in a turbulent marine stratocumulus (SC) layer. The analysis is based on observations with the helicopter-borne measurement platform ACTOS and a spectral cloud microphysical parcel model following three different approaches: (1) From the comparison of aerosol number size distributions inside and below the SC layer, the number of activated particles is calculated to 435±87 cm-3 and compares well with the observed median droplet number concentration of Nd=456 cm-3. Furthermore, a 50% activation diameter of Dp50 ≈ 115 nm was derived, which was linked to a critical supersaturation Scrit of 0.16% via Köhler theory. From the shape of the fraction of activated particles, we estimated a standard deviation of supersaturation fluctuations of σS' =0.09%. (2) These estimates are compared to more direct thermodynamic observations at cloud base. Therefore, supersaturation fluctuations (S') are calculated based on highly-resolved thermodynamic data showing a standard deviation of S' ranging within 0.1% ≤ σS' ≤ .3%. (3) The sensitivity of the supersaturation on observed vertical wind velocity fluctuations is investigated with the help of a spectral cloud microphysical model. These results show highest fluctuations of S' with σS' =0.1% at cloud base and a decreasing σS' with increasing liquid water content and droplet number concentration. All three approaches are independent of each other and vary only within a factor of about two.

  10. Aerosols-cloud microphysics-thermodynamics-turbulence: evaluating supersaturation in a marine stratocumulus cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditas, F.; Shaw, R. A.; Siebert, H.; Simmel, M.; Wehner, B.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2012-03-01

    This work presents a unique combination of aerosol, cloud microphysical, thermodynamic and turbulence variables to characterize supersaturation fluctuations in a turbulent marine stratocumulus (SC) layer. The analysis is based on observations with the helicopter-borne measurement platform ACTOS and a detailed cloud microphysical parcel model following three different approaches: (1) From the comparison of aerosol number size distributions inside and below the SC layer, the number of activated particles is calculated as 435±87 cm-3 and compares well with the observed median droplet number concentration of Nd = 464 cm-3. Furthermore, a 50% activation diameter of Dp50≈115 nm was derived, which was linked to a critical supersaturation Scrit of 0.16% via Köhler theory. From the shape of the fraction of activated particles, we estimated a standard deviation of supersaturation fluctuations of σS' = 0.09%. (2) These estimates are compared to more direct thermodynamic observations at cloud base. Therefore, supersaturation fluctuations (S') are calculated based on highly-resolved thermodynamic data showing a standard deviation of S' ranging within 0.1%≤σS'≤0.3 %. (3) The sensitivity of the supersaturation on observed vertical wind velocity fluctuations is investigated with the help of a detailed cloud microphysical model. These results show highest fluctuations of S' with σS'=0.1% at cloud base and a decreasing σS' with increasing liquid water content and droplet number concentration. All three approaches are independent of each other and vary only within a factor of about two.

  11. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Dissolution Theory for Multi-Component Solid/Liquid Surfaces Involving Surface Adsorption and Radiolysis Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R B

    2001-04-01

    A theoretical expression is developed for the dissolution rate response for multi-component radioactive materials that have surface adsorption kinetics and radiolysis kinetics when wetted by a multi-component aqueous solution. An application for this type of dissolution response is the performance evaluation of multi-component spent nuclear fuels (SNFs) for long term interim storage and for geological disposition. Typically, SNF compositions depend on initial composition, uranium oxide and metal alloys being most common, and on reactor burnup which results in a wide range of fission product and actinide concentrations that decay by alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. These compositional/burnup ranges of SNFs, whether placed in interim storage or emplaced in a geologic repository, will potentially be wetted by multi-component aqueous solutions, and these solutions may be further altered by radiolytic aqueous species due to three radiation fields. The solid states of the SNFs are not thermodynamically stable when wetted and will dissolve, with or without radiolysis. The following development of a dissolution theory is based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of energy reactions and energy transport across a solid-liquid phase change discontinuity that propagates at a quasi-steady, dissolution velocity. The integral form of the energy balance equation is used for this spatial surface discontinuity analysis. The integral formulation contains internal energy functional of classical thermodynamics for both the SNFs' solid state and surface adsorption species, and the adjacent liquid state, which includes radiolytic chemical species. The steady-state concentrations of radiolytic chemical species are expressed by an approximate analysis of the decay radiation transport equation. For purposes of illustration a modified Temkin adsorption isotherm was assumed for the surface adsorption kinetics on an arbitrary, finite area of the solid-liquid dissolution interface. For

  12. Measurements and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of mid-Z plasma emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, L.; Primout, M.; Kaiser, P.; Clouët, J. F.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.; Oudot, G.

    2015-12-01

    The x-ray yields from laser-irradiated thin foils of iron, copper, zinc, and germanium have been measured in the soft and multi-keV x-ray ranges at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The incident laser power had a pre-pulse to enhance the x-ray emission of a 1 ns flat-top main pulse. The experimental results have been compared with post-shot simulations performed with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code FCI2. A new non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model, NOO-RAD, have been incorporated into FCI2. In this approach, the plasma ionization state is in-line calculated by the atomic physics NOHEL package. In the soft x-ray bands, both simulations using RADIOM [M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] and NOO-RAD clearly over-predict the powers and energies measured by a broad-band spectrometer. In one case (the iron foil), the discrepancy between the measured and simulated x-ray output is nevertheless significantly reduced when NOO-RAD is used in the simulations. In the multi-keV x-ray bands, the simulations display a strong sensitivity to the coupling between the electron thermal conductivity and the NLTE models, and for some particular combinations of these, provide a close match to the measured emission. The comparison between the measured and simulated H-like to He-like line-intensity ratios deduced from high-resolution spectra indicates higher experimental electron temperatures were achieved, compared to the simulated ones. Measurements of the plasma conditions have been achieved using the Thomson-scattering diagnostic. The electron temperatures are found to range from 3 to 5 keV at the end of the laser pulse and are greater than predicted by the simulations. The measured flow velocities are in reasonable agreement with the calculated ones. This last finding gives us confidence in our numerical predictions for the plasma parameters, which are over that time mainly determined by hydrodynamics, such as the mass densities and the

  13. Measurements and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of mid-Z plasma emission

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, L. Primout, M.; Kaiser, P.; Clouët, J. F.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.; Oudot, G.

    2015-12-15

    The x-ray yields from laser-irradiated thin foils of iron, copper, zinc, and germanium have been measured in the soft and multi-keV x-ray ranges at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The incident laser power had a pre-pulse to enhance the x-ray emission of a 1 ns flat-top main pulse. The experimental results have been compared with post-shot simulations performed with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code FCI2. A new non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model, NOO-RAD, have been incorporated into FCI2. In this approach, the plasma ionization state is in-line calculated by the atomic physics NOHEL package. In the soft x-ray bands, both simulations using RADIOM [M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] and NOO-RAD clearly over-predict the powers and energies measured by a broad-band spectrometer. In one case (the iron foil), the discrepancy between the measured and simulated x-ray output is nevertheless significantly reduced when NOO-RAD is used in the simulations. In the multi-keV x-ray bands, the simulations display a strong sensitivity to the coupling between the electron thermal conductivity and the NLTE models, and for some particular combinations of these, provide a close match to the measured emission. The comparison between the measured and simulated H-like to He-like line-intensity ratios deduced from high-resolution spectra indicates higher experimental electron temperatures were achieved, compared to the simulated ones. Measurements of the plasma conditions have been achieved using the Thomson-scattering diagnostic. The electron temperatures are found to range from 3 to 5 keV at the end of the laser pulse and are greater than predicted by the simulations. The measured flow velocities are in reasonable agreement with the calculated ones. This last finding gives us confidence in our numerical predictions for the plasma parameters, which are over that time mainly determined by hydrodynamics, such as the mass densities and

  14. Electrodynamic balance measurements of thermodynamic, kinetic, and optical aerosol properties inaccessible to bulk methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimer, S. S.; Krieger, U. K.; Te, Y.-F.; Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Luo, B. P.; Ammann, M.; Peter, T.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of a single, levitated particle in an electrodynamic balance are an established tool for deriving thermodynamic and material data such as density, refractive index and activities of components of an aqueous solution under supersaturated conditions, where bulk measurements are not possible. The retrieval relies on combining mass-to-charge data and size data from light scattering. Here, we use a combination of low- and high-resolution Mie resonance spectroscopy to obtain radius data, enabling an accurate size determination not only when the particle is in equilibrium, but also when it is out of equilibrium due to kinetic limitation of mass transport. With the data measured under non-equilibrium conditions, it is possible to retrieve the water diffusivity. A challenge is that the radius retrieval by comparing measured light scattering with Mie theory requires the knowledge of refractive index as a function of concentration. Here, we show an iterative retrieval of refractive index and size for compounds for which data cannot be obtained in the bulk either due to lack of sufficient amounts of sample or limited solubility. We demonstrate the measurement strategy and the retrieval of water activity, density, refractive index and water diffusivity for aqueous shikimic acid. Water diffusivity in concentrated shikimic acid decreases by 6 orders of magnitude at 250 K compared to that at room temperature.

  15. Electrodynamic balance measurements of thermodynamic, kinetic, and optical aerosol properties inaccessible to bulk methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimer, S. S.; Krieger, U. K.; Te, Y.-F.; Lienhard, D. M.; Huisman, A. J.; Ammann, M.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of a single, levitated particle in an electrodynamic balance are an established tool for deriving thermodynamic and material data such as density, refractive index and activities of components of an aqueous solution under supersaturated conditions, where bulk measurements are not possible. The retrieval relies on combining mass-to-charge data and size data from light scattering. Here, we use a combination of low- and high-resolution Mie resonance spectroscopy to obtain radius data, enabling an accurate size determination not only when the particle is in equilibrium, but also when it is out of equilibrium due to kinetic limitation of mass transport. With the data measured under non-equilibrium conditions, it is possible to retrieve the water diffusivity. A challenge is that the radius retrieval by comparing measured light scattering with Mie theory requires the knowledge of refractive index as a function of concentration. Here, we show an iterative retrieval of refractive index and size for compounds for which data cannot be obtained in the bulk either due to lack of sufficient amounts of sample or limited solubility. We demonstrate the measurement strategy and the retrieval of water activity, density, refractive index and water diffusivity for aqueous shikimic acid. Water diffusivity in concentrated shikimic acid decreases by 6 orders of magnitude at 250 K compared to that at room temperature.

  16. Retention of phosphorous ions on natural and engineered waste pumice: Characterization, equilibrium, competing ions, regeneration, kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimaian, Kamal Aldin; Amrane, Abdeltif; Kazemian, Hossein; Panahi, Reza; Zarrabi, Mansur

    2013-11-01

    Natural and Mg2+ modified pumice were used for the removal of phosphorous. The adsorbents were characterized using XRF, XRD, SEM and FTIR instrumental techniques. In the optimal conditions, namely at equilibrium time (30 min), for a phosphorus concentration of 15 mg/L and pH 6, 69 and 97% phosphorus removals were achieved using 10 g/L of natural and modified pumice adsorbents, respectively. Maximum adsorption capacities were 11.88 and 17.71 mg/g by natural and modified pumice, respectively. Pseudo-second order kinetic model was the most relevant to describe the kinetic of phosphorus adsorption. External mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing phosphorous concentration and film diffusion was found to be the rate-controlling step. Only a very low dissolution of the adsorbent was observed, leading to a low increase in conductivity and turbidity. Removal efficiency decreased for increasing ionic strength. It also decreased in the presence of competing ions; however modified pumice remained effective, since 67% of phosphorus was removed, versus only 17% for the natural pumice. The efficiency of the modified pumice was confirmed during the regeneration tests, since 96% regeneration yield was obtained after 510 min experiment, while only 22% was observed for the raw pumice.

  17. Tables and charts of equilibrium thermodynamic properties of ammonia for temperatures from 500 to 50,000 K.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, A. L.; Miller, C. G., III; Nealy, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic properties for pure ammonia were generated for a range of temperature from 500 to 50,000 K and pressure from 0.01 to 40 MN/sq m and are presented in tabulated and graphical form. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular-weight ratio, specific heat at constant pressure, specific heat at constant volume, isentropic exponent, and species mole fractions. These properties were calculated by the method which is based on minimization of the Gibbs free energy. The data presented herein are for an 18-species ammonia model. Heats of formation and spectroscopic constants used as input data are presented. Comparison of several thermodynamic properties calculated with the present program and a second computer code is performed for a range of pressure and for temperatures up to 30,000 K.

  18. Removal of ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine in aqueous solution onto natural clay: equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazri, Hassen; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Kalfat, Rafik; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the adsorption of three pharmaceuticals compounds (ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine) onto natural clay on the basis of equilibrium parameters such as a function of time, effect of pH, varying of the concentration and the temperature. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren's first-order and the pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. The kinetic results of adsorption are described better using the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm results were tested in the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that the adsorption of pharmaceuticals on the clay is a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  19. Computer codes for the evaluation of thermodynamic properties, transport properties, and equilibrium constants of an 11-species air model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Gupta, Roop N.

    1990-01-01

    The computer codes developed provide data to 30000 K for the thermodynamic and transport properties of individual species and reaction rates for the prominent reactions occurring in an 11-species nonequilibrium air model. These properties and the reaction-rate data are computed through the use of curve-fit relations which are functions of temperature (and number density for the equilibrium constant). The curve fits were made using the most accurate data believed available. A detailed review and discussion of the sources and accuracy of the curve-fitted data used herein are given in NASA RP 1232.

  20. Catalytic supercritical water gasification of primary paper sludge using a homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst: Experimental vs thermodynamic equilibrium results.

    PubMed

    Louw, Jeanne; Schwarz, Cara E; Burger, Andries J

    2016-02-01

    H2, CH4, CO and CO2 yields were measured during supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of primary paper waste sludge (PWS) at 450°C. Comparing these yields with calculated thermodynamic equilibrium values offer an improved understanding of conditions required to produce near-equilibrium yields. Experiments were conducted at different catalyst loads (0-1g/gPWS) and different reaction times (15-120min) in a batch reactor, using either K2CO3 or Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 as catalyst. K2CO3 up to 1g/gPWS increased the H2 yield significantly to 7.5mol/kgPWS. However, these yields and composition were far from equilibrium values, with carbon efficiency (CE) and energy recovery (ER) of only 29% and 20%, respectively. Addition of 0.5-1g/gPWS Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 resulted in high H2 and CH4 yields (6.8 and 14.8mol/kgPWS), CE of 84-90%, ER of 83% and a gas composition relatively close to the equilibrium values (at hold times of 60-120min).

  1. Catalytic supercritical water gasification of primary paper sludge using a homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst: Experimental vs thermodynamic equilibrium results.

    PubMed

    Louw, Jeanne; Schwarz, Cara E; Burger, Andries J

    2016-02-01

    H2, CH4, CO and CO2 yields were measured during supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of primary paper waste sludge (PWS) at 450°C. Comparing these yields with calculated thermodynamic equilibrium values offer an improved understanding of conditions required to produce near-equilibrium yields. Experiments were conducted at different catalyst loads (0-1g/gPWS) and different reaction times (15-120min) in a batch reactor, using either K2CO3 or Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 as catalyst. K2CO3 up to 1g/gPWS increased the H2 yield significantly to 7.5mol/kgPWS. However, these yields and composition were far from equilibrium values, with carbon efficiency (CE) and energy recovery (ER) of only 29% and 20%, respectively. Addition of 0.5-1g/gPWS Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 resulted in high H2 and CH4 yields (6.8 and 14.8mol/kgPWS), CE of 84-90%, ER of 83% and a gas composition relatively close to the equilibrium values (at hold times of 60-120min). PMID:26638140

  2. New Thermodynamic Rules Regarding Non-Equilibrium Evolutions in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Nobuo

    2007-12-01

    In open systems, a number of nonequilibrium states that are stationary, oscillatory, or chaotic can coexist under given boundary conditions. These states are either stable or unstable. When a system is in an unstable state, it evolves to a coexistent stable state if subjected to appropriate perturbations. The present work is concerned with characterizing such spontaneous transitions from a thermodynamic viewpoint by focusing on thermodynamic forces and flows consisting of the rate of entropy production. It has been shown in a previous paper that the sum of products of the differences of these forces and flows between two nonequilibrium states is invariably nonpositive for a variety of open systems. It is here hypothesized on this basis that either the thermodynamic forces or the flows or both change in a way as to lower the entropy production for spontaneous transformations from unstable to stable states. This hypothesis is verified for flow reactors with diverse chemical schemes including cubic autocatalysis, the Brusselator, and the Oregonator. It may thus be concluded that spontaneous processes in open systems are marked by the moderation of thermodynamic forces or flows.

  3. Temperature lapse rates at restricted thermodynamic equilibrium in the Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnbom, Pehr

    2015-03-01

    Equilibrium temperature profiles obtained by maximizing the entropy of a column of fluid with a given height and volume under the influence of gravity are discussed by using numerical experiments. Calculations are made both for the case of an ideal gas and for a liquid with constant isobaric heat capacity, constant compressibility and constant thermal expansion coefficient representing idealized conditions corresponding to atmosphere and ocean. Calculations confirm the classical equilibrium condition by Gibbs that an isothermal temperature profile gives a maximum in entropy constrained by a constant mass and a constant sum of internal and potential energy. However, it was also found that an isentropic profile gives a maximum in entropy constrained by a constant mass and a constant internal energy of the fluid column. On the basis of this result a hypothesis is suggested that the adiabatic lapse rate represents a restricted or transitory and metastable equilibrium state, which has a maximum in entropy with lower value than the maximum in the state with an isothermal lapse rate. This transitory equilibrium state is maintained by passive forces, preventing or slowing down the transition of the system to the final or ultimate equilibrium state.

  4. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2014-03-15

    In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Zγ, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter θ(= T{sub e}/T{sub h}) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1 atm, 10 atm, and 100 atm in the temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Zγ with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter.

  5. The mechanism of inward rectification in Kir channels: A novel kinetic model with non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Pan; Chiang, Cheng-Chin; Huang, Chiung-Wei

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of the strong inward rectification in inward rectifier K(+) (Kir) channels are controversial because the drop in electrical potential due to the movement of the blocker and coupling ions is insufficient to explain the steep voltage-dependent block near the equilibrium potential. Here, we study the "driving force"-dependent block in Kir channels with a novel approach incorporating concepts from the non-equilibrium thermodynamics of small systems, and computer kinetic simulations based on the experimental data of internal Ba(2+) block on Kir2.1 channels. The steep exponential increase in the apparent binding rate near the equilibrium potential is explained, when the encounter frequency is construed as the likelihood of transfer events down or against the electrochemical potential gradient. The exponent of flux ratio, nf=2.62, implies that the blockage of the internal blocker may be coupled with the outward transport of 2 to 3K(+) ions. The flux-coupled block in the single-file multi-ion pore can be demonstrated by the concentration gradient alone, as well as when the driving force is the electrochemical potential difference across the membrane.

  6. Consistency between kinetics and thermodynamics: general scaling conditions for reaction rates of nonlinear chemical systems without constraints far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Marcel O; Popa, Vlad T; Ross, John

    2011-02-01

    We examine the problem of consistency between the kinetic and thermodynamic descriptions of reaction networks. We focus on reaction networks with linearly dependent (but generally kinetically independent) reactions for which only some of the stoichiometric vectors attached to the different reactions are linearly independent. We show that for elementary reactions without constraints preventing the system from approaching equilibrium there are general scaling relations for nonequilibrium rates, one for each linearly dependent reaction. These scaling relations express the ratios of the forward and backward rates of the linearly dependent reactions in terms of products of the ratios of the forward and backward rates of the linearly independent reactions raised to different scaling powers; the scaling powers are elements of the transformation matrix, which relates the linearly dependent stoichiometric vectors to the linearly independent stoichiometric vectors. These relations are valid for any network of elementary reactions without constraints, linear or nonlinear kinetics, far from equilibrium or close to equilibrium. We show that similar scaling relations for the reaction routes exist for networks of nonelementary reactions described by the Horiuti-Temkin theory of reaction routes where the linear dependence of the mechanistic (elementary) reactions is transferred to the overall (route) reactions. However, in this case, the scaling conditions are valid only at the steady state. General relationships between reaction rates of the two levels of description are presented. These relationships are illustrated for a specific complex reaction: radical chlorination of ethylene.

  7. Understanding of surface pit formation mechanism of GaN grown in MOCVD based on local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Yuan, Gao; Xiao-Wei, Xue; Jiang-Jiang, Li; Xun, Wang; Yan-Hui, Xing; Bi-Feng, Cui; De-Shu, Zou

    2016-06-01

    Frank’s theory describes that a screw dislocation will produce a pit on the surface, and has been evidenced in many material systems including GaN. However, the size of the pit calculated from the theory deviates significantly from experimental result. Through a careful observation of the variations of surface pits and local surface morphology with growing temperature and V/III ratio for c-plane GaN, we believe that Frank’s model is valid only in a small local surface area where thermodynamic equilibrium state can be assumed to stay the same. If the kinetic process is too vigorous or too slow to reach a balance, the local equilibrium range will be too small for the center and edge of the screw dislocation spiral to be kept in the same equilibrium state. When the curvature at the center of the dislocation core reaches the critical value 1/r 0, at the edge of the spiral, the accelerating rate of the curvature may not fall to zero, so the pit cannot reach a stationary shape and will keep enlarging under the control of minimization of surface energy to result in a large-sized surface pit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204009 and 61204011) and the Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 4142005).

  8. Implications of Modern Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics for Georgescu-Roegen's Macro-Economics: lessons from a comprehensive historical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Alexandre

    2011-12-01

    In the early 1970s, mathematician and economist Nicolas Georgescu-Roegen developed an alternative framework to macro-economics (his hourglass model) based on two principles of classical thermodynamics applied to the earth-system as a whole. The new model led him to the radical conclusion that "not only growth, but also a zero-growth state, nay, even a declining state which does not converge toward annihilation, cannot exist forever in a finite environment" (Georgescu-Roegen 1976, p.23). Georgescu-Roegen's novel approach long served as a devastating critique of standard neoclassical growth theories. It also helped establish the foundations for the new trans-disciplinary field of ecological economics. In recent decades however, it has remained unclear whether revolutionary developments in "modern non-equilibrium thermodynamics" (Kondepudi and Prigogine 1998) refute some of Georgescu-Roegen's initial conclusions and provide fundamentally new lessons for very long-term macro-economic analysis. Based on a broad historical review of literature from many fields (thermodynamics, cosmology, ecosystems ecology and economics), I argue that Georgescu-Roegen's hourglass model is largely based on old misconceptions and assumptions from 19th century thermodynamics (including an out-dated cosmology) which make it very misleading. Ironically, these assumptions (path independence and linearity of the entropy function in particular) replicate the non-evolutionary thinking he seemed to despise in his colleagues. In light of modern NET, I propose a different model. Contrary to Georgescu-Roegen's hourglass, I do not assume the path independence of the entropy function. In the new model, achieving critical free energy rate density thresholds can abruptly increase the level of complexity and maximum remaining lifespan of stock-based civilizations.

  9. Thermodynamics of open nonlinear systems far from equilibrium: The continuously stirred tank reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Nobuo

    1993-11-01

    A thermodynamic analysis is made of a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) which is fed with ideal gases and in which arbitrary types of chemical reactions take place. For stationary states and oscillatory ones in which limit cycles are established, expressions are derived which describe the change of entropy of the reactor contents relative to the feed in terms of explicit quantities, including the rate of entropy production due to the chemical reactions. This entropy change is shown to be always greater than what would be observed in closed systems under comparable circumstances. It is pointed out that this statement is beyond what the second law of thermodynamics can predict. In previous articles, entropy and entropy production have been found to follow certain systematic trends in some specific models based on the CSTR. That work is compared with the present theory.

  10. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to heavily underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model's low bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ˜ 2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day-1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond differently

  11. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day-1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond differently

  12. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2016-01-18

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to heavily underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model's low bias is due to aerosol extinctions below  ∼  2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over Southmore » Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to −0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and

  13. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to heavily underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model's low bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to

  14. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2015-06-19

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond

  15. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2015-06-19

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AODmore » and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond

  16. Investigation of oxidative phosphorylation in continuous cultures. A non-equilibrium thermodynamic approach to energy transduction for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafuri, Mohazabeh; Nosrati, Mohsen; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in living cells is very important. Different researches have shown that in terms of mathematical modeling, the domain of these investigations is essentially restricted. Recently the thermodynamic models have been suggested for calculation of the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation process and rate of energy loss in animal cells using chemiosmotic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics equations. In our previous work, we developed a mathematical model for mitochondria of animal cells. In this research, according to similarities between oxidative phosphorylation process in microorganisms and animal cells, Golfar's model was developed to predict the non-equilibrium thermodynamic behavior of the oxidative phosphorylation process for bacteria in aerobic condition. With this model the rate of energy loss, P/O ratio, and efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were calculated for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition. The results then were compared with experimental data given by other authors. The thermodynamic model had an acceptable agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Thermodynamic Bethe ansatz for non-equilibrium steady states: exact energy current and fluctuations in integrable QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Alvaredo, Olalla; Chen, Yixiong; Doyon, Benjamin; Hoogeveen, Marianne

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate the exact energy current and scaled cumulant generating function (related to the large-deviation function) in non-equilibrium steady states with energy flow, in any integrable model of relativistic quantum field theory (IQFT) with diagonal scattering. Our derivations are based on various recent results of Bernard and Doyon. The steady states are built by connecting homogeneously two infinite halves of the system thermalized at different temperatures Tl, Tr, and waiting for a long time. We evaluate the current J(Tl, Tr) using the exact QFT density matrix describing these non-equilibrium steady states and using Zamolodchikov’s method of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA). The scaled cumulant generating function is obtained from the extended fluctuation relations which hold in integrable models. We verify our formula in particular by showing that the conformal field theory (CFT) result is obtained in the high-temperature limit. We analyze numerically our non-equilibrium steady-state TBA equations for three models: the sinh-Gordon model, the roaming trajectories model, and the sine-Gordon model at a particular reflectionless point. Based on the numerics, we conjecture that an infinite family of non-equilibrium c-functions, associated with the scaled cumulants, can be defined, which we interpret physically. We study the full scaled distribution function and find that it can be described by a set of independent Poisson processes. Finally, we show that the ‘additivity’ property of the current, which is known to hold in CFT and was proposed to hold more generally, does not hold in general IQFT—that is, J(Tl, Tr) is not of the form f(Tl) - f(Tr).

  18. The Phosphorus Reaction in Oxygen Steelmaking: Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Metal Droplet Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis, Andre N.

    Phosphorus equilibrium between liquid metal and slag has been extensively studied since the 1940's. It is well known that CaO and FeO are the main slag constituents that help promote dephosphorization. On the other hand, dephosphorization decreases with temperature due to the endothermic nature of the reaction. Many correlations have been developed to predict the phosphorus partition ratio as a function of metal and slag composition as well as temperature. Nevertheless, there are still disagreements in the laboratory data and the equilibrium phosphorus partition can be predicted with an uncertainty of a factor of up to 5. The first part of the present work focuses on generating more reliable equilibrium data for BOF-type slags by approaching equilibrium from both sides of the reaction. The experimental results were combined with two other sets of data from different authors to produce a new correlation that includes the effect of SiO2 on the phosphorus partition coefficient, LP . Although the quantification of phosphorus equilibrium is extremely important, most industrial furnaces do not operate at equilibrium, usually due to liquid slag formation, kinetics and time constraints. Thus, it is important to know how close to equilibrium different furnaces operate in order to suggest optimal slag compositions to promote dephosphorization. The present work analyzed four large sets of data containing the chemical compositions of both slag and metal phase as well as the tapping temperature of each heat. Each set of data corresponded to different furnaces: one AOD (Argon Oxygen Decarburization), two top-blown BOFs and one Q-BOP or OBM. It was found that the bulk slag composition can greatly "mask" the data due to solid phases coexisting with the liquid slag. The author used the software package FactSage to estimate the amount of solids in the slag and liquid slag composition. It was found that the AOD is the reactor closest to equilibrium, followed by the Q-BOP (OBM) and

  19. Equilibrium and Kinetic Adsorption of Bacteria on Alluvial Sand and Surface Thermodynamic Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gang; Rockhold, Mark L.; Strevett, Keith A.

    2003-05-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of Escherichia coli HB 101, E. coli JM 109, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas sp. on alluvial sand from the Canadian River alluvium (Norman, OK) was investigated through column experiments. Equilibrium adsorption of these five bacterial strains followed the Freundlich expression and was a function of zero energy points, an indication of the zero energy buffer zone. Among the microorganisms studied, P. putida had the greatest equilibrium adsorption (162.4 x 108 cell/g sediment with a microbial injectate concentration of 108 cell/mL), followed by Pseudomonas sp. (127.9 x 108 cell/g sediment), E. coli HB 101 (62.8 x 108 cell/g sediment), E. coli JM 109 (58.4 x 108 cell/g sediment), and P. fluorescens (42.6 x 108 cell/g sediment). The first-order kinetic adsorption rate coefficient was an exponential function of the total interaction free energy between bacteria and sediment evaluated at the primary minimum, (PM). E. coli HB 101 had the greatest kinetic adsorption rate coefficient on the sediment (5.10 h-1), followed by E. coli JM 109 (4.52 h-1), P. fluorescens (2.12 h-1), P. putida (2.04 h-1), and Pseudomonas sp. (1.34 h-1).

  20. Interpreting equilibrium-conductivity and conductivity-relaxation measurements to establish thermodynamic and transport properties for multiple charged defect conducting ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huayang; Ricote, Sandrine; Coors, W Grover; Kee, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A model-based interpretation of measured equilibrium conductivity and conductivity relaxation is developed to establish thermodynamic, transport, and kinetics parameters for multiple charged defect conducting (MCDC) ceramic materials. The present study focuses on 10% yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY10). In principle, using the Nernst-Einstein relationship, equilibrium conductivity measurements are sufficient to establish thermodynamic and transport properties. However, in practice it is difficult to establish unique sets of properties using equilibrium conductivity alone. Combining equilibrium and conductivity-relaxation measurements serves to significantly improve the quantitative fidelity of the derived material properties. The models are developed using a Nernst-Planck-Poisson (NPP) formulation, which enables the quantitative representation of conductivity relaxations caused by very large changes in oxygen partial pressure.

  1. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of the biosorption of textile dye (Reactive Red 195) onto Pinus sylvestris L.

    PubMed

    Aksakal, Ozkan; Ucun, Handan

    2010-09-15

    This study investigated the biosorption of Reactive Red 195 (RR 195), an azo dye, from aqueous solution by using cone biomass of Pinus sylvestris Linneo. To this end, pH, initial dye concentration, biomass dosage and contact time were studied in a batch biosorption system. Maximum pH for efficient RR 195 biosorption was found to be 1.0 and the initial RR 195 concentration increased with decreasing percentage removal. Biosorption capacity increased from 6.69 mg/g at 20 degrees C to 7.38 mg/g at 50 degrees C for 200mg/L dye concentration. Kinetics of the interactions was tested by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetics, the Elovich equation and intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better correlation for the experimental data studied in comparison to the pseudo-first-order kinetic model and intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Moreover, the Elovich equation also showed a good fit to the experimental data. Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms were used for the mathematical description of the biosorption equilibrium data. The activation energy of biosorption (Ea) was found to be 8.904 kJ/mol by using the Arrhenius equation. Using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients obtained at different temperatures, the study also evaluated the thermodynamic constants of biosorption (DeltaG(o), DeltaH(o) and DeltaS). The results indicate that cone biomass can be used as an effective and low-cost biosorbent to remove reactive dyes from aqueous solution.

  2. Stochastic dynamics and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a bistable chemical system: the Schlögl model revisited.

    PubMed

    Vellela, Melissa; Qian, Hong

    2009-10-01

    Schlögl's model is the canonical example of a chemical reaction system that exhibits bistability. Because the biological examples of bistability and switching behaviour are increasingly numerous, this paper presents an integrated deterministic, stochastic and thermodynamic analysis of the model. After a brief review of the deterministic and stochastic modelling frameworks, the concepts of chemical and mathematical detailed balances are discussed and non-equilibrium conditions are shown to be necessary for bistability. Thermodynamic quantities such as the flux, chemical potential and entropy production rate are defined and compared across the two models. In the bistable region, the stochastic model exhibits an exchange of the global stability between the two stable states under changes in the pump parameters and volume size. The stochastic entropy production rate shows a sharp transition that mirrors this exchange. A new hybrid model that includes continuous diffusion and discrete jumps is suggested to deal with the multiscale dynamics of the bistable system. Accurate approximations of the exponentially small eigenvalue associated with the time scale of this switching and the full time-dependent solution are calculated using Matlab. A breakdown of previously known asymptotic approximations on small volume scales is observed through comparison with these and Monte Carlo results. Finally, in the appendix section is an illustration of how the diffusion approximation of the chemical master equation can fail to represent correctly the mesoscopically interesting steady-state behaviour of the system.

  3. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by native and activated bentonite: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Kul, Ali Riza; Koyuncu, Hülya

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of Pb(II) ions on native (NB) and acid activated (AAB) bentonites were examined. The specific surface areas, pore size and pore-size distributions of the samples were fully characterized. The adsorption efficiency of Pb(II) onto the NB and AAB was increased with increasing temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of Pb(II) ions was discussed using three kinetic models, the pseudo-first-order, the pseudo-second-order and the intra-particle diffusion model. The experimental data fitted very well the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The initial sorption rate and the activation energy were also calculated. The activation energy of the sorption was calculated as 16.51 and 13.66 kJ mol(-1) for NB and AAB, respectively. Experimental results were also analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich (D-R) isotherm equations at different temperatures. R(L) separation factor for Langmuir and the n value for Freundlich isotherm show that Pb(II) ions are favorably adsorbed by NB and AAB. Thermodynamic quantities such as Gibbs free energy (DeltaG), the enthalpy (DeltaH) and the entropy change of sorption (DeltaS) were determined as about -5.06, 10.29 and 0.017 kJ mol(-1) K(-1), respectively for AAB. It was shown that the sorption processes were an endothermic reactions, controlled by physical mechanisms and spontaneously.

  4. A new perspective on the electron transfer: recovering the Butler-Volmer equation in non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Wolfgang; Guhlke, Clemens; Müller, Rüdiger

    2016-09-28

    Electron transfer reactions are commonly described by the phenomenological Butler-Volmer equation which has its origin in kinetic theories. The Butler-Volmer equation relates interfacial reaction rates to bulk quantities like the electrostatic potential and electrolyte concentrations. Although the general structure of the equation is well accepted, for modern electrochemical systems like batteries and fuel cells there is still intensive discussion about the specific dependencies of the coefficients. A general guideline for the derivation of Butler-Volmer type equations is missing in the literature. We derive very general relations of Butler-Volmer structure which are based on a rigorous non-equilibrium thermodynamic model and allow for adaption to a wide variety of electrochemical systems. We discuss the application of the new thermodynamic approach to different scenarios like the classical electron transfer reactions at metal electrodes and the intercalation process in lithium-iron-phosphate electrodes. Furthermore we show that under appropriate conditions also adsorption processes can lead to Butler-Volmer equations. We illustrate the application of our theory by a strongly simplified example of electroplating. PMID:27560993

  5. Supramolecular Fibers in Gels Can Be at Thermodynamic Equilibrium: A Simple Packing Model Reveals Preferential Fibril Formation versus Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Sasselli, Ivan Ramos; Halling, Peter J; Ulijn, Rein V; Tuttle, Tell

    2016-02-23

    Low molecular weight gelators are able to form nanostructures, typically fibers, which entangle to form gel-phase materials. These materials have wide-ranging applications in biomedicine and nanotechnology. While it is known that supramolecular gels often represent metastable structures due to the restricted molecular dynamics in the gel state, the thermodynamic nature of the nanofibrous structure is not well understood. Clearly, 3D extended structures will be able to form more interactions than 1D structures. However, self-assembling molecules are typically amphiphilic, thus giving rise to a combination of solvophobic and solvophilic moieties where a level of solvent exposure at the nanostructure surface is favorable. In this study, we introduce a simple packing model, based on prisms with faces of different nature (solvophobic and solvophilic) and variable interaction parameters, to represent amphiphile self-assembly. This model demonstrates that by tuning shape and "self" or "solvent" interaction parameters either the 1D fiber or 3D crystal may represent the thermodynamic minimum. The model depends on parameters that relate to features of experimentally known systems: the number of faces exposed to the solvent or buried in the fiber; the overall shape of the prism; and the free energy penalties associated with the interactions can be adjusted to match their chemical nature. The model is applied to describe the pH-dependent gelation/precipitation of well-known gelator Fmoc-FF. We conclude that, despite the fact that most experimentally produced gels probably represent metastable states, one-dimensional fibers can represent thermodynamic equilibrium. This conclusion has critical implications for the theoretical treatment of gels. PMID:26812130

  6. Supramolecular Fibers in Gels Can Be at Thermodynamic Equilibrium: A Simple Packing Model Reveals Preferential Fibril Formation versus Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Sasselli, Ivan Ramos; Halling, Peter J; Ulijn, Rein V; Tuttle, Tell

    2016-02-23

    Low molecular weight gelators are able to form nanostructures, typically fibers, which entangle to form gel-phase materials. These materials have wide-ranging applications in biomedicine and nanotechnology. While it is known that supramolecular gels often represent metastable structures due to the restricted molecular dynamics in the gel state, the thermodynamic nature of the nanofibrous structure is not well understood. Clearly, 3D extended structures will be able to form more interactions than 1D structures. However, self-assembling molecules are typically amphiphilic, thus giving rise to a combination of solvophobic and solvophilic moieties where a level of solvent exposure at the nanostructure surface is favorable. In this study, we introduce a simple packing model, based on prisms with faces of different nature (solvophobic and solvophilic) and variable interaction parameters, to represent amphiphile self-assembly. This model demonstrates that by tuning shape and "self" or "solvent" interaction parameters either the 1D fiber or 3D crystal may represent the thermodynamic minimum. The model depends on parameters that relate to features of experimentally known systems: the number of faces exposed to the solvent or buried in the fiber; the overall shape of the prism; and the free energy penalties associated with the interactions can be adjusted to match their chemical nature. The model is applied to describe the pH-dependent gelation/precipitation of well-known gelator Fmoc-FF. We conclude that, despite the fact that most experimentally produced gels probably represent metastable states, one-dimensional fibers can represent thermodynamic equilibrium. This conclusion has critical implications for the theoretical treatment of gels.

  7. A modeling study of the aerosol effects on ice microphysics in convective cloud and precipitation development under different thermodynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hannah; Yum, Seong Soo; Lee, Seoung-Soo

    2014-08-01

    An improved approach for cloud droplet activation process parameterization is proposed that can utilize the empirically determined hygroscopicity information and practically limit the sizes of newly activated droplets. With the implementation of the improved approach in a cloud model, the aerosol effects on ice microphysics in convective cloud and precipitation development under different thermodynamic conditions is investigated. The model is run for four different thermodynamic soundings and three different aerosol types, maritime (M), continental (C) and polluted (P). Warm rain suppression by increased aerosol (i.e., CCN) is clearly demonstrated when weakly convective warm clouds are generated but the results are mixed when relatively stronger convective warm clouds are generated. For one of the two soundings that generate strong convective cold clouds, the accumulated precipitation amount is larger for C and P than for M, demonstrating the precipitation enhancement by increased CCN. For the maritime cloud, precipitation is initiated by the warm rain processes but ice hydrometeor particles form fast, which leads to early but weak cloud invigoration. Another stronger cloud invigoration occurs later for M but it is still weaker than that for C and P. It is the delayed accumulation of more water drops and ice particles for a burst of riming process and the latent heat release during the depositional growth of rimed ice particles that invigorate the cloud strongly for C and P. For the other sounding where freezing level is low, ice particles form fast for all three aerosol types and therefore warm rain suppression is not clearly shown. However, there still is more precipitation for C and P than for M until the accumulated precipitation amount becomes larger for M than for C near to the end of the model run. The results demonstrate that the precipitation response to aerosols indeed depends on the environmental conditions.

  8. Stochastic thermodynamics of fluctuating density fields: Non-equilibrium free energy differences under coarse-graining

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, T.; Lander, B.; Seifert, U.; Speck, T.

    2013-11-28

    We discuss the stochastic thermodynamics of systems that are described by a time-dependent density field, for example, simple liquids and colloidal suspensions. For a time-dependent change of external parameters, we show that the Jarzynski relation connecting work with the change of free energy holds if the time evolution of the density follows the Kawasaki-Dean equation. Specifically, we study the work distributions for the compression and expansion of a two-dimensional colloidal model suspension implementing a practical coarse-graining scheme of the microscopic particle positions. We demonstrate that even if coarse-grained dynamics and density functional do not match, the fluctuation relations for the work still hold albeit for a different, apparent, change of free energy.

  9. Insight into biosorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of crystal violet onto Ananas comosus (pineapple) leaf powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sagnik; Chowdhury, Shamik; Saha, Papita Das

    2012-06-01

    Biosorption performance of pineapple leaf powder (PLP) for removal of crystal violet (CV) from its aqueous solutions was investigated. To this end, the influence of operational parameters such as pH, biosorbent dose, initial dye concentration and temperature were studied employing a batch experimental setup. The biosorption process followed the Langmuir isotherm model with high correlation coefficients ( R 2 > 0.99) at different temperatures. The maximum monolayer biosorption capacity was found to be 78.22 mg g-1 at 293 K. The kinetic data conformed to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 58.96 kJ mol- 1 , indicating chemisorption nature of the ongoing biosorption process. A thermodynamic study showed spontaneous and exothermic nature of the biosorption process. Owing to its low cost and high dye uptake capacity, PLP has potential for application as biosorbent for removal of CV from aqueous solutions.

  10. General method and thermodynamic tables for computation of equilibrium composition and temperature of chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Vearl N; Gordon, Sanford; Morrell, Virginia E

    1951-01-01

    A rapidly convergent successive approximation process is described that simultaneously determines both composition and temperature resulting from a chemical reaction. This method is suitable for use with any set of reactants over the complete range of mixture ratios as long as the products of reaction are ideal gases. An approximate treatment of limited amounts of liquids and solids is also included. This method is particularly suited to problems having a large number of products of reaction and to problems that require determination of such properties as specific heat or velocity of sound of a dissociating mixture. The method presented is applicable to a wide variety of problems that include (1) combustion at constant pressure or volume; and (2) isentropic expansion to an assigned pressure, temperature, or Mach number. Tables of thermodynamic functions needed with this method are included for 42 substances for convenience in numerical computations.

  11. Using equilibrium thermodynamics to estimate pressure and porosity changes during reactive transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury; Vrijmoed, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Mineralogical reactions play a key role during transport in porous media by generating or consuming fluids and modifying the fluid pathways through volume changes. Here, we used a theoretical and numerical approach to determine the interplays between reaction, transport and deformation during metamorphic reactions. Mass conservations equations were written for a reacting system and a system of equations was obtained to describe the relationships between fluid pressure, porosity and three thermodynamic parameters (the density of the fluid, the density of the non-volatile solid and a function of the volume change). Thermodynamic parameters were calculated by energy minimization with PerpleX for three lithologies found in subduction zones: sedimentary, mafic and ultramafic rocks. The evolution of porosity and fluid pressure was predicted in several cases. First, the maximum pressure changes associated with volume change during reaction was estimated for univariant reactions. Then, multi-variant reactions were considered and the system of equations was solved with several assumptions. Typical equations for porosity waves were obtained by simplifying the system with a solid density as a simple function of pressure or with the assumption of a constant amount of non-volatile species. Numerical models were finally used to solve these equations for three cases: the dehydration of chlorite in mafic rocks (positive Clapeyron slope), the dehydration of serpentine in ultramafic rocks (negative Clapeyron slope) and the decarbonation of calcite (positive Clapeyron slope with a H2O-CO2 fluid). Such kind of models take into account the complexity of mineralogical reactions and allow to better understand the generation of fluid pathways in metamorphic rocks.

  12. Determination of the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of adsorption of copper(II) ions onto seeds of Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Adnan; Ozcan, A Safa; Tunali, Sibel; Akar, Tamer; Kiran, Ismail

    2005-09-30

    Adsorption of copper ions onto Capsicum annuum (red pepper) seeds was investigated with the variation in the parameters of pH, contact time, adsorbent and copper(II) concentrations and temperature. The nature of the possible adsorbent and metal ion interactions was examined by the FTIR technique. The copper(II) adsorption equilibrium was attained within 60 min. Adsorption of copper(II) ions onto C. annuum seeds followed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Maximum adsorption capacity (q(max)) of copper(II) ions onto red pepper seeds was 4.47x10(-4) molg(-1) at 50 degrees C. Three kinetic models including the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equations were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters such as rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and related correlation coefficients, for each kinetic model were calculated and discussed. It was indicated that the adsorption of copper(II) ions onto C. annuum seeds could be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and also followed the intraparticle diffusion model up to 60 min, but diffusion is not only the rate controlling step. Thermodynamics parameters such as the change of free energy, enthalpy and entropy were also evaluated for the adsorption of copper(II) ions onto C. annuum seeds.

  13. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC employing thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at moderate temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G.; Hallén, A.

    2015-12-21

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a major point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers limiting the minority charge carrier lifetime. In layers grown by chemical vapor deposition techniques, the V{sub C} concentration is typically in the range of 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −3}, and after device processing at temperatures approaching 2000 °C, it can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude. In the present study, both as-grown layers and a high-temperature processed one have been annealed at 1500 °C and the V{sub C} concentration is demonstrated to be strongly reduced, exhibiting a value of only a few times 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −3} as determined by deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements. The value is reached already after annealing times on the order of 1 h and is evidenced to reflect thermodynamic equilibrium under C-rich ambient conditions. The physical processes controlling the kinetics for establishment of the V{sub C} equilibrium are estimated to have an activation energy below ∼3 eV and both in-diffusion of carbon interstitials and out-diffusion of V{sub C}'s are discussed as candidates. This concept of V{sub C} elimination is flexible and readily integrated in a materials and device processing sequence.

  14. NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON THE IRON ABUNDANCE OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Massari, D.

    2014-12-20

    We present the iron abundance of 24 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, members of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, obtained with high-resolution spectra collected with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope. We find that the iron abundances derived from neutral lines (with a mean value [Fe I/H] =–0.94 ± 0.01, σ = 0.08 dex) are systematically lower than those derived from single ionized lines ([Fe II/H] =–0.83 ± 0.01, σ = 0.05 dex). Only the latter are in agreement with those obtained for a sample of red giant branch (RGB) cluster stars, for which the Fe I and Fe II lines provide the same iron abundance. This finding suggests that non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects driven by overionization mechanisms are present in the atmosphere of AGB stars and significantly affect the Fe I lines while leaving Fe II features unaltered. On the other hand, the very good ionization equilibrium found for RGB stars indicates that these NLTE effects may depend on the evolutionary stage. We discuss the impact of this finding on both the chemical analysis of AGB stars and on the search for evolved blue stragglers.

  15. Insights into the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamics of nickel removal by environmental friendly Lansium domesticum peel biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yun Fung; Lee, Lai Yee; Chua, Song Jun; Lim, Siew Shee; Gan, Suyin

    2016-05-01

    Lansium domesticum peel (LDP), a waste material generated from the fruit consumption, was evaluated as a biosorbent for nickel removal from aqueous media. The effects of dosage, contact time, initial pH, initial concentration and temperature on the biosorption process were investigated in batch experiments. Equilibrium data were fitted by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models using nonlinear regression method with the best-fit model evaluated based on coefficient of determination (R(2)) and Chi-square (χ(2)). The best-fit isotherm was found to be the Langmuir model exhibiting R(2) very close to unity (0.997-0.999), smallest χ(2) (0.0138-0.0562) and largest biosorption capacity (10.1mg/g) at 30°C. Kinetic studies showed that the initial nickel removal was rapid with the equilibrium state established within 30min. Pseudo-second-order model was the best-fit kinetic model indicating the chemisorption nature of the biosorption process. Further data analysis by the intraparticle diffusion model revealed the involvement of several rate-controlling steps such as boundary layer and intraparticle diffusion. Thermodynamically, the process was exothermic, spontaneous and feasible. Regeneration studies indicated that LDP biosorbent could be regenerated using hydrochloric acid solution with up to 85% efficiency. The present investigation proved that LDP having no economic value can be used as an alternative eco-friendly biosorbent for remediation of nickel contaminated water.

  16. Insights into the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamics of nickel removal by environmental friendly Lansium domesticum peel biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yun Fung; Lee, Lai Yee; Chua, Song Jun; Lim, Siew Shee; Gan, Suyin

    2016-05-01

    Lansium domesticum peel (LDP), a waste material generated from the fruit consumption, was evaluated as a biosorbent for nickel removal from aqueous media. The effects of dosage, contact time, initial pH, initial concentration and temperature on the biosorption process were investigated in batch experiments. Equilibrium data were fitted by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models using nonlinear regression method with the best-fit model evaluated based on coefficient of determination (R(2)) and Chi-square (χ(2)). The best-fit isotherm was found to be the Langmuir model exhibiting R(2) very close to unity (0.997-0.999), smallest χ(2) (0.0138-0.0562) and largest biosorption capacity (10.1mg/g) at 30°C. Kinetic studies showed that the initial nickel removal was rapid with the equilibrium state established within 30min. Pseudo-second-order model was the best-fit kinetic model indicating the chemisorption nature of the biosorption process. Further data analysis by the intraparticle diffusion model revealed the involvement of several rate-controlling steps such as boundary layer and intraparticle diffusion. Thermodynamically, the process was exothermic, spontaneous and feasible. Regeneration studies indicated that LDP biosorbent could be regenerated using hydrochloric acid solution with up to 85% efficiency. The present investigation proved that LDP having no economic value can be used as an alternative eco-friendly biosorbent for remediation of nickel contaminated water. PMID:26802563

  17. A breakthrough biosorbent in removing heavy metals: Equilibrium, kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanism analyses in a lab-scale study.

    PubMed

    Abdolali, Atefeh; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Lu, Shaoyong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Zhang, Xinbo; Wang, Jie; Wu, Yun

    2016-01-15

    A breakthrough biosorbent namely multi-metal binding biosorbent (MMBB) made from a combination of tea wastes, maple leaves and mandarin peels, was prepared to evaluate their biosorptive potential for removal of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) from multi-metal aqueous solutions. FTIR and SEM were conducted, before and after biosorption, to explore the intensity and position of the available functional groups and changes in adsorbent surface morphology. Carboxylic, hydroxyl and amine groups were found to be the principal functional groups for the sorption of metals. MMBB exhibited best performance at pH 5.5 with maximum sorption capacities of 31.73, 41.06, 76.25 and 26.63 mg/g for Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II), respectively. Pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order models represented the kinetic experimental data in different initial metal concentrations very well. Among two-parameter adsorption isotherm models, the Langmuir equation gave a better fit of the equilibrium data. For Cu(II) and Zn(II), the Khan isotherm describes better biosorption conditions while for Cd(II) and Pb(II), the Sips model was found to provide the best correlation of the biosorption equilibrium data. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated feasible, spontaneous and exothermic biosorption process. Overall, this novel MMBB can effectively be utilized as an adsorbent to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions.

  18. Evaluation of anthropogenic influence on thermodynamics, gas and aerosol composition of city air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzhegova, Nina; Belan, Boris; Antokhin, Pavel; Zhidovkhin, Evgenii; Ivlev, Georgii; Kozlov, Artem; Fofonov, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    In the last 40-50 years there is a global tendency of urbanisation, which is a consequence of most countries' economical development. Concurrently, the issue of environment's ecological state has become critical. Urban air pollution is among the most important ecological problems nowadays. World Health Organization (WHO) points out certain "classical" polluting agents: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), troposphere ozone (O3) (studied here), as well as lead, carbon dioxide (CO2), aldehydes, soot, benzpyrene and dredges (including dust, haze and smoke) [1]. An evaluation of antropogenic component's weight in the thermodynamical conditions and gas and aerosol composition of a city's atmosphere (by the example of Tomsk) is given in this paper. Tomsk is located at the South of West Siberia and is the administrative center of Tomsk region. The city's area is equal to 294,6 km2. Its population is 512.6 thousands of people. The overall number of registered motor vehicles in the city in 2008 was 131 700. That is, every fourth city inhabitant has a personal car. From 2002 to 2008 the number of motor vehicles in Tomsk has increased by 25 thousands units [2]. This increase consists mostly of passenger cars. There is also a positive trend in fuel consumtion by the city's industries and motor vehicles - from 2004 to 2007 it has increased by 10%. Such a quick rate of transport quantity's increase in the city provides reason to suggest an unfavorable ecological situation in Tomsk. For this study we have used the AKV-2 mobile station designed by the SB RAS Institute of Atmospheric Optics. The station's equipment provides the following measurements [3]: air temperature and humidity; aerosol disperse composition in 15 channels with a particle size range of 0.3-20 µm by use of the Grimm-1.108 aerosol spectrometer; NO, NO2, O3, SO2, CO, CO2 concentration. This paper describes a single experiment conducted in Tomsk. Date of

  19. Inorganic Components of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Anthony Stein

    The inorganic components comprise 15% to 50% of the mass of atmospheric aerosols. For about the past 10 years the mass of these components was predicted assuming thermodynamic equilibrium between the volatile aerosol -phase inorganic species NH_4NO _3 and NH_4Cl and their gas-phase counterparts NH_3, HNO_3, and HCl. In this thesis I examine this assumption and prove that (1) the time scales for equilibration between the gas and aerosol phases are often too long for equilibrium to hold, and (2) even when equilibrium holds, transport considerations often govern the size distribution of these aerosol components. Water can comprise a significant portion of atmospheric aerosols under conditions of high relative humidity, whereas under conditions of sufficiently low relative humidity atmospheric aerosols tend to be dry. The deliquescence point is the relative humidity where the aerosol goes from a solid dry phase to an aqueous or mixed solid-aqueous phase. In this thesis I derive the temperature dependence of the deliquescence point and prove that in multicomponent solutions the deliquescence point is lower than for corresponding single component solutions. These theories of the transport, thermodynamic, and deliquescent properties of atmospheric aerosols are integrated into an aerosol inorganics model, AIM. The predictions of AIM compare well to fundamental thermodynamic measurements. Comparison of the prediction of AIM to those of other aerosol equilibrium models shows substantial disagreement in the predicted water content at lower relative humidities. The disagreement is due the improved treatment in AIM of the deliquescence properties of multicomponent solutions. In the summer and fall of 1987 the California Air Resources Board conducted the Southern California Air Quality Study, SCAQS, during which atmospheric aerosols were measured in Los Angeles. The size and composition of the aerosol and the concentrations of their gas phase counterparts were measured. When the

  20. Reactivity, characterization, equilibrium thermodynamics and hetero-bimetallic studies of tridentate and tetradentate complexes relevant to syngas catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imler, Gregory H.

    The unifying objective of this work is the study of model systems that will assist in the development of new metal catalysts capable of converting carbon monoxide and hydrogen (syngas) into organic oxygenates at mild temperature and pressure. The selective catalytic transformation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen to liquid fuels and chemical feedstocks represents a major "Grand Challenge" of catalysis science. A core objective is the study of a macrocycle that is related to a porphyrin ligand in order to circumvent some of the disadvantages of utilizing porphyrins in catalysis. The rhodium complex of the macrocycle dibenzotetramethylaza[14]annulene ([(tmtaa)Rh]2]) was reacted with a series of small molecules relevant to CO reduction and hydrogenation. Several complexes were formed that demonstrated the ability to partially reduce and hydrogenate carbon monoxide, including the dirhodium ketone (Rh-C(O)-Rh) and an example of a thermodynamically favorable metal formyl complex ((tmtaa)Rh-C(O)H). An important feature of this work is the measurement of thermodynamic data to provide experimental benchmarks for obtaining key species in CO reduction and hydrogenation. A thorough study of the (tmtaa)Rh system will help in identifying structural features that assist or hinder CO hydrogenation. All reactions are monitored by 1H NMR which permits determination of solution thermodynamics from equilibrium constants obtained by NMR peak integrations. DFT calculations have supplemented experimental results by providing estimates to compare with the experimentally determined thermodynamic data. These computations also provide insight into the structures and thermodynamics of species that cannot be observed directly such as short lived intermediates and thermodynamically unfavorable products. Heterobimetallic complexes of (tmtaa)Rh• with a second metal radical have been utilized to attempt to convert CO to organic products. Reactivity with CO and H2 has been accomplished, with most

  1. Polymers pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore.

    PubMed

    Podgornik, R; Hopkins, J; Parsegian, V A; Muthukumar, M

    2012-11-13

    We investigate polymer partitioning from polymer mixtures into nanometer size cavities by formulating an equation of state for a binary polymer mixture assuming that only one (smaller) of the two polymer components can penetrate the cavity. Deriving the partitioning equilibrium equations and solving them numerically allows us to introduce the concept of "polymers-pushing-polymers" for the action of non-penetrating polymers on the partitioning of the penetrating polymers. Polymer partitioning into a pore even within a very simple model of a binary polymer mixture is shown to depend in a complicated way on the composition of the polymer mixture and/or the pore-penetration penalty. This can lead to enhanced as well as diminished partitioning, due to two separate energy scales that we analyse in detail.

  2. Thermodynamics of the general diffusion process: Equilibrium supercurrent and nonequilibrium driven circulation with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, H.

    2015-07-01

    Unbalanced probability circulation, which yields cyclic motions in phase space, is the defining characteristics of a stationary diffusion process without detailed balance. In over-damped soft matter systems, such behavior is a hallmark of the presence of a sustained external driving force accompanied with dissipations. In an under-damped and strongly correlated system, however, cyclic motions are often the consequences of a conservative dynamics. In the present paper, we give a novel interpretation of a class of diffusion processes with stationary circulation in terms of a Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium in which cyclic motions are on the level set of stationary probability density function thus non-dissipative, e.g., a supercurrent. This implies an orthogonality between stationary circulation J ss ( x) and the gradient of stationary probability density f ss ( x) > 0. A sufficient and necessary condition for the orthogonality is a decomposition of the drift b( x) = j( x) + D( x)∇φ( x) where ∇ṡ j( x) = 0 and j( x) ṡ∇φ( x) = 0. Stationary processes with such Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium has an underlying conservative dynamics , and a first integral ϕ( x) ≡ -ln f ss (x) = const, akin to a Hamiltonian system. At all time, an instantaneous free energy balance equation exists for a given diffusion system; and an extended energy conservation law among an entire family of diffusion processes with different parameter α can be established via a Helmholtz theorem. For the general diffusion process without the orthogonality, a nonequilibrium cycle emerges, which consists of external driven φ-ascending steps and spontaneous φ-descending movements, alternated with iso-φ motions. The theory presented here provides a rich mathematical narrative for complex mesoscopic dynamics, with contradistinction to an earlier one [H. Qian et al., J. Stat. Phys. 107, 1129 (2002)]. This article is supplemented with comments by H. Ouerdane and a final reply by the author.

  3. Arsenic (III) adsorption on iron acetate coated activated alumina: thermodynamic, kinetics and equilibrium approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption potential of iron acetate coated activated alumina (IACAA) for removal of arsenic [As (III)] as arsenite by batch sorption technique is described. IACAA was characterized by XRD, FTIR, EDAX and SEM instruments. Percentage adsorption on IACAA was determined as a function of pH, contact time and adsorbent dose. The study revealed that the removal of As (III) was best achieved at pH =7.4. The initial As (III) concentration (0.45 mg/L) came down to less than 0.01 mg/L at contact time 90 min with adsorbent dose of 1 g/100 mL. The sorption was reasonably explained with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and E a were calculated in order to understand the nature of sorption process. The sorption process was found to be controlled by pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. PMID:24359995

  4. Physical Properties Models for Simulation of Processes to Treat INEEL Tank Farm Waste: Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.

    2002-07-18

    A status is presented of the development during FY2002 of a database for physical properties models for the simulation of the treatment of Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. An activity coefficient model is needed for concentrated, aqueous, multi-electrolyte solutions that can be used by process design practitioners. Reasonable first-order estimates of activity coefficients in the relevant media are needed rather than an incremental improvement in theoretical approaches which are not usable by practitioners. A comparison of the Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (ENRTL) and Pitzer ion-interaction models for the thermodynamic representation of SBW is presented. It is concluded that Pitzer's model is superior to ENRTL in modeling treatment processes for SBW. The applicability of the Pitzer treatment to high concentrations of pertinent species and to the determination of solubilities and chemical equilibria is addressed. Alternate values of Pitzer parameters for HCl, H2SO4, and HNO3 are proposed, applicable up to 16m, and 12m, respectively. Partial validation of the implementation of Pitzer's treatment within the commercial process simulator ASPEN Plus was performed.

  5. Melanoidin Removal Mechanism in An Aqueous Adsorption System: An Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Diego L; Oliveira, Leandro S; Franca, Adriana S

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are colored products that can be found in food and drinks, formed by Maillard reactions. Sometimes these compounds are considered undesirable in certain food products, because they impart a brownish color and must be removed. An overview of recent patents related to melanoidin removal indicates that it can be performed by chemical/biological degradation or by adsorption processes. Therefore, in the present study, the adsorption mechanism for synthetic melanoidin removal from aqueous solutions was studied using different Raphanus sativus press-cake sorbents, with the precursor material being carbonized in a microwave oven, either with direct heating or after a chemical activation process with phosphoric acid, nitric acid or potassium hydroxide. Physical and chemical modifications were evaluated by FTIR, pHPZC, thermogravimetry and BET. The adsorption kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second order model for all activated carbons (ACs). Evaluation of the diffusion process showed dependence on the initial melanoidin concentration due to the wide range of sizes of the adsorbed molecules. The equilibrium data were best fitted by the Langmuir model for the acid-treated AC and by the Freundlich model for the base-treated and non-chemically treated ACs. Melanoidin adsorption was characterized as a spontaneous, favorable and endothermic process involving hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions between the adsorbents surfaces and the adsorbed molecules. PMID:26013772

  6. Contribution of the entropy on the thermodynamic equilibrium of vacancies in nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Metsue, Arnaud Oudriss, Abdelali; Bouhattate, Jamaa; Feaugas, Xavier

    2014-03-14

    The equilibrium vacancy concentration in nickel was determined from ab initio calculations performed with both generalized gradient approximation and local density approximation up to the melting point. We focus the study on the vacancy formation entropy expressed as a sum of a vibration and an electronic contribution, which were determined from the vibration modes and the electronic densities of states. Applying a method based on the quasi-harmonic approximation, the temperature dependence of the defect formation energy and entropy were calculated. We show that the vibrations of the first shell of atoms around the defect are predominant to the vibration formation entropy. On the other hand, the electronic formation entropy is very sensitive to the exchange-correlation potential used for the calculations. Finally, the vacancy concentration is computed at finite temperature with the calculated values for the defect formation energy and entropy. In order to reconcile point-defects concentration obtained with our calculations and experimental data, we conducted complementary calorimetric measurements of the vacancy concentration in the 1073–1273 K temperature range. Close agreement between theory and experiments at high temperature is achieved if the calculations are performed with the generalized gradient approximation and both vibration and electronic contributions to the formation entropy are taken into account.

  7. Comments on the compatibility of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with lattice propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Giacomini, Alex; Pais, Pablo; Rosa, Luigi; Zerwekh, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the compatibility is analyzed of the non-perturbative equations of state of quarks and gluons arising from the lattice with some natural requirements for self-gravitating objects at equilibrium: the existence of an equation of state (namely, the possibility to define the pressure as a function of the energy density), the absence of superluminal propagation and Le Chatelier's principle. It is discussed under which conditions it is possible to extract an equation of state (in the above sense) from the non-perturbative propagators arising from the fits of the latest lattice data. In the quark case, there is a small but non-vanishing range of temperatures in which it is not possible to define a single-valued functional relation between density and pressure. Interestingly enough, a small change of the parameters appearing in the fit of the lattice quark propagator (of around 10 %) could guarantee the fulfillment of all the three conditions (keeping alive, at the same time, the violation of positivity of the spectral representation, which is the expected signal of confinement). As far as gluons are concerned, the analysis shows very similar results. Whether or not the non-perturbative quark and gluon propagators satisfy these conditions can have a strong impact on the estimate of the maximal mass of quark stars.

  8. Oxygen nonstoichiometry, the defect equilibrium model and thermodynamic quantities of the Ruddlesden-Popper oxide Sr3Fe2O(7-δ).

    PubMed

    Ling, Yihan; Wang, Fang; Budiman, Riyan Achmad; Nakamura, Takashi; Amezawa, Koji

    2015-03-21

    Oxygen nonstoichiometry of the Ruddlesden-Popper oxide Sr3Fe2O7-δ was measured at intermediate temperatures (773-1073 K) by coulometric titration and high temperature gravimetry. The oxygen nonstoichiometric behavior was analyzed using the defect equilibrium model with localized electrons. From the defect chemical analysis, estimated oxygen vacancy concentration at the O3 sites increases and at the O1 sites decreases with the increasing temperature. This characteristic behavior is considered to be caused by the redistribution of oxygen and vacancies between the O1 and O3 sites. The obtained thermodynamic quantities of the partial molar enthalpy of oxygen, h(O) - h°(O), and the partial molar entropy of oxygen, s(O) - s°(O), calculated from the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation are in good agreement with those from the statistical thermodynamic calculation based on the defect equilibrium model, indicating that the proposed defect equilibrium model is reasonable.

  9. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of acid Orange 52 dye biosorption by Paulownia tomentosa Steud. leaf powder as a low-cost natural biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Fatih; Saygideger, Saadet D

    2010-07-01

    The biosorption of Acid Orange 52 onto the leaf powder of Paulownia tomentosa Steud. was studied in a batch adsorption system to estimate the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as a function of solution pH, biosorbent concentration, dye concentration, biosorbent size, temperature and contact time. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used for modeling the biosorption equilibrium. The experimental equilibrium data could be well interpreted by the Temkin and Langmuir isotherms with maximum adsorption capacity of 10.5 mg g(-1). In order to state the sorption kinetics, the fits of pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were investigated. It was obtained that the biosorption process followed the pseudo-second order rate kinetics. Thermodynamic studies indicated that this system was exothermic process. The results revealed that P. tomentosa leaf powder could be an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of wastewater containing Acid Orange 52. PMID:20194017

  10. EQAIRS - COMPUTER CODES FOR THE EVALUATION OF THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES FOR EQUILIBRIUM AIR TO 30000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    EQAIRS is a set of FORTRAN 77 routines for computing the thermodynamic and transport properties of equilibrium air for temperatures from 100 to 30000 K. EQAIRS computes these properties over a pressure range of 1.0e-4 to 1.0e2 atm. The properties computed include enthalpy, total specific heat, compressibility factor, viscosity, and the total values of thermal conductivity and Prandtl number. The various properties are calculated through the use of temperature dependent curve-fits for the pressure range given above. The curve fits are based on mixture values calculated from an 11-species air model. Individual species properties used in the mixture relations were obtained from a recent study by the program authors. It is desirable to have these equilibrium air properties computed by curve-fits as opposed to tabulated values because curve-fits generally permit more efficient computation for flow-field analyses. In addition, for accurate calculations, it is preferable that the thermodynamic and transport properties be computed in a self-consistent manner from the same set of data as in the present case. The EQAIRS routines were written in the form of FORTRAN subroutines for easy adaptation to existing programs. The subroutines are commented and can be easily modified to suit the user's needs. In an attempt to maintain generality, a total of six separate subroutines are available for use: 1) ENTHLPY (specific enthalpy); 2) SPECIFC (total specific heat at constant pressure); 3) COMPRES (compressibility factor); 4) VISCSTY (viscosity); 5) CONDUCT (total thermal conductivity; and 6) PRANDTL (total Prandtl number). EQAIRS has been successfully implemented on a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS, and an IBM PC compatible computer running MS-DOS. Sample input/output and a sample driver program are provided. The standard distribution medium for EQAIRS is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. This program is also available on a .25

  11. Biosorption of Cu(II) by immobilized microalgae using silica: kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongkyun; Shim, Eunjung; Yun, Hyun-Shik; Park, Young-Tae; Kim, Dohyeong; Ji, Min-Kyu; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Shin, Won-Sik; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized microalgae using silica (IMS) from Micractinium reisseri KGE33 was synthesized through a sol-gel reaction. Green algal waste biomass, the residue of M. reisseri KGE33 after oil extraction, was used as the biomaterial. The adsorption of Cu(II) on IMS was tested in batch experiments with varying algal doses, pH, contact times, initial Cu(II) concentrations, and temperatures. Three types of IMSs (IMS 14, 70, and 100) were synthesized according to different algal doses. The removal efficiency of Cu(II) in the aqueous phase was in the following order: IMS 14 (77.0%) < IMS 70 (83.3%) < IMS 100 (87.1%) at pH 5. The point of zero charge (PZC) value of IMS100 was 4.5, and the optimum pH for Cu(II) adsorption was 5. Equilibrium data were described using a Langmuir isotherm model. The Langmuir model maximum Cu(II) adsorption capacity (q m) increased with the algal dose in the following order: IMS 100 (1.710 mg g(-1)) > IMS 70 (1.548 mg g(-1)) > IMS 14 (1.282 mg g(-1)). The pseudo-second-order equation fitted the kinetics data well, and the value of the second-order rate constant increased with increasing algal dose. Gibbs free energies (ΔG°) were negative within the temperature range studied, which indicates that the adsorption process was spontaneous. The negative value of enthalpy (ΔH°) again indicates the exothermic nature of the adsorption process. In addition, SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of the IMS surface reveal that the algal biomass on IMS is the main site for Cu(II) binding. This study shows that immobilized microalgae using silica, a synthesized biosorbent, can be used as a cost-effective sorbent for Cu(II) removal from the aqueous phase.

  12. Biosorption of Cu(II) by immobilized microalgae using silica: kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongkyun; Shim, Eunjung; Yun, Hyun-Shik; Park, Young-Tae; Kim, Dohyeong; Ji, Min-Kyu; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Shin, Won-Sik; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized microalgae using silica (IMS) from Micractinium reisseri KGE33 was synthesized through a sol-gel reaction. Green algal waste biomass, the residue of M. reisseri KGE33 after oil extraction, was used as the biomaterial. The adsorption of Cu(II) on IMS was tested in batch experiments with varying algal doses, pH, contact times, initial Cu(II) concentrations, and temperatures. Three types of IMSs (IMS 14, 70, and 100) were synthesized according to different algal doses. The removal efficiency of Cu(II) in the aqueous phase was in the following order: IMS 14 (77.0%) < IMS 70 (83.3%) < IMS 100 (87.1%) at pH 5. The point of zero charge (PZC) value of IMS100 was 4.5, and the optimum pH for Cu(II) adsorption was 5. Equilibrium data were described using a Langmuir isotherm model. The Langmuir model maximum Cu(II) adsorption capacity (q m) increased with the algal dose in the following order: IMS 100 (1.710 mg g(-1)) > IMS 70 (1.548 mg g(-1)) > IMS 14 (1.282 mg g(-1)). The pseudo-second-order equation fitted the kinetics data well, and the value of the second-order rate constant increased with increasing algal dose. Gibbs free energies (ΔG°) were negative within the temperature range studied, which indicates that the adsorption process was spontaneous. The negative value of enthalpy (ΔH°) again indicates the exothermic nature of the adsorption process. In addition, SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of the IMS surface reveal that the algal biomass on IMS is the main site for Cu(II) binding. This study shows that immobilized microalgae using silica, a synthesized biosorbent, can be used as a cost-effective sorbent for Cu(II) removal from the aqueous phase. PMID:25953610

  13. A study of diurnal variations of PM2.5 acidity and related chemical species using a new thermodynamic equilibrium model.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sailesh N; Betha, Raghu; Liu, Ping; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol acidity is one of the most important parameters that can influence atmospheric visibility, climate change and human health. Based on continuous field measurements of inorganic aerosol species and their thermodynamic modeling on a time resolution of 1h, this study has investigated the acidic properties of PM2.5 and their relation with the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA). The study was conducted by taking into account the prevailing ambient temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) in a tropical urban atmosphere. The in-situ aerosol pH (pH(IS)) on a 12h basis ranged from -0.20 to 1.46 during daytime with an average value of 0.48 and 0.23 to 1.53 during nighttime with an average value of 0.72. These diurnal variations suggest that the daytime aerosol was more acidic than that caused by the nighttime aerosol. The hourly values of pH(IS) showed a reverse trend as compared to that of in-situ aerosol acidity ([H(+)]Ins). The pH(IS) had its maximum values at 3:00 and at 20:00 and its minimum during 11:00 to 12:00. Correlation analyses revealed that the molar concentration ratio of ammonium to sulfate (R(N/S)), equivalent concentration ratio of cations to anions (RC/A), T and RH can be used as independent variables for prediction of pH(IS). A multi-linear regression model consisting of RN/S, RC/A, T and RH was developed to estimate aerosol pH(IS).

  14. The α +ɛ Two-Phase Equilibrium in the Fe-N-C System: Experimental Investigations and Thermodynamic Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göhring, Holger; Leineweber, Andreas; Mittemeijer, Eric Jan

    2016-09-01

    The present work is dedicated to investigating the occurrence of the α +ɛ equilibrium at temperatures typically applied for nitrocarburizing treatments. To this end, pearlitic Fe-C specimens were treated between 823 K and 863 K (550 °C and 590 °C) in gaseous nitriding and gaseous nitrocarburizing atmospheres, allowing control of the chemical potentials of N and C. Subsequently, the resulting compound-layer microstructures were investigated using light microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Thermodynamic calculations, adopting several models for the Fe-N-C system from the literature, were performed, showing significantly different predictions for both the sequence of the invariant reactions and their temperatures. Comparison of the experimental data and the theoretical calculations led to the conclusion that none of the models from the literature is able to realistically describe the experimentally observed constitution in the Fe-N-C system in the considered temperature range. Values/value ranges for the temperatures of the invariant reactions were obtained.

  15. Adsorption of cesium from aqueous solution using agricultural residue--walnut shell: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dahu; Zhao, Yingxin; Yang, Shengjiong; Shi, Wansheng; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan

    2013-05-01

    A novel biosorbent derived from agricultural residue - walnut shell (WS) is reported to remove cesium from aqueous solution. Nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) was incorporated into this biosorbent, serving as a high selectivity trap agent for cesium. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) were utilized for the evaluation of the developed biosorbent. Determination of kinetic parameters for adsorption was carried out using pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order kinetic models and intra-particle diffusion models. Adsorption equilibrium was examined using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms. A satisfactory correlation coefficient and relatively low chi-square analysis parameter χ(2) between the experimental and predicted values of the Freundlich isotherm demonstrate that cesium adsorption by NiHCF-WS is a multilayer chemical adsorption. Thermodynamic studies were conducted under different reaction temperatures and results indicate that cesium adsorption by NiHCF-WS is an endothermic (ΔH° > 0) and spontaneous (ΔG° < 0) process.

  16. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qingling; Deng, Yali; Li, Huishu; Liu, Jie; Hu, Hongqing; Chen, Shouwen; Sa, Tongmin

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L -1. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ( ΔGmθr) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ( ΔHmθr) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  17. An experimental and thermodynamic equilibrium investigation of the Pb, Zn, Cr, Cu, Mn and Ni partitioning during sewage sludge incineration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyong; Fu, Jiewen; Ning, Xun'an; Sun, Shuiyu; Wang, Yujie; Xie, Wuming; Huang, Shaosong; Zhong, Sheng

    2015-09-01

    The effects of different chlorides and operational conditions on the distribution and speciation of six heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cr, Cu, Mn and Ni) during sludge incineration were investigated using a simulated laboratory tubular-furnace reactor. A thermodynamic equilibrium investigation using the FactSage software was performed to compare the experimental results. The results indicate that the volatility of the target metals was enhanced as the chlorine concentration increased. Inorganic-Cl influenced the volatilization of heavy metals in the order of Pb>Zn>Cr>Cu>Mn>Ni. However, the effects of organic-Cl on the volatility of Mn, Pb and Cu were greater than the effects on Zn, Cr and Ni. With increasing combustion temperature, the presence of organic-Cl (PVC) and inorganic-Cl (NaCl) improved the transfer of Pb and Zn from bottom ash to fly ash or fuse gas. However, the presence of chloride had no obvious influence on Mn, Cu and Ni. Increased retention time could increase the volatilization rate of heavy metals; however, this effect was insignificant. During the incineration process, Pb readily formed PbSiO4 and remained in the bottom ash. Different Pb compounds, primarily the volatile PbCl2, were found in the gas phase after the addition of NaCl; the dominant Pb compounds in the gas phase after the addition of PVC were PbCl2, Pb(ClO4)2 and PbCl2O4.

  18. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-Jie; Qin, Ye-Bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-Dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-Fei

    2013-07-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1530.67 mg(2)/g and 0.7826 cm(3)/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue.

  19. One-step fabricated Fe3O4@C core-shell composites for dye removal: Kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Lingling; Han, Tingting; Luo, Zhijun; Liu, Cancan; Mei, Yan; Zhu, Ting

    2015-03-01

    B-Fe3O4@C core-shell composites were synthesized via one-pot hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process and used as an adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution. By using sodium borate as the catalyst, the hydrothermal carbonization process of B-Fe3O4@C core-shell composites was optimized and a higher surface area was obtained. The adsorbent was characterized by XRD, Raman spectra, SEM, TEM and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms. We studied the dye adsorption process at different conditions and analyzed the data by employing the Langmuir and Freundlich models, and the equilibrium data fitted well with both models. Kinetic analyses were conducted by using the Lagergren pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model and the results showed that the adsorption process was more consistent with the pseudo-second-order kinetics. To better understand the dye adsorption process from the thermodynamics perspective, we also calculated ΔHο, ΔSο, ΔGο and Ea, the results suggesting that the MB adsorption process was physisorption endothermic process, and spontaneous at room temperature. The as-synthesized B-Fe3O4@C showing high magnetic sensitivity provides a facile and efficient way to recycle from aqueous solution.

  20. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-jie; Qin, Ye-bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-fei

    2013-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1 530.67 mg2/g and 0.782 6 cm3/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue. PMID:23825151

  1. Adsorption behavior of activated carbon derived from pyrolusite-modified sewage sludge: equilibrium modeling, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Jiang, Li; Ji, Xiujuan

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was developed from sewage sludge using pyrolusite as an additive. It was demonstrated that the removal efficiency of two synthetic dyes (Tracid orange GS and Direct fast turquoise blue GL) by the produced adsorbent was up to 97.6%. The activated carbon with pyrolusite addition had 38.2% higher surface area, 43.8% larger micropore and 54.4% larger mesopore production than ordinary sludge-based activated carbons. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on dyes adsorption tests. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, and the results fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equation. The experimental data fitted very well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Activation energies for the adsorption processes ranged between 8.7 and 19.1 kJ mol 1. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (deltaG0), standard enthalpy (deltaH0) and standard entropy (deltaS0) were evaluated. The adsorption of these two dyes on the activated carbon was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature.

  2. Thermodynamic equilibrium between blue and green copper sites and the role of the protein in controlling function

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Somdatta; Xie, Xiangjin; Dey, Abhishek; Sun, Yan; Scholes, Charles P.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2009-01-01

    A combination of spectroscopies and density functional theory calculations indicate that there are large temperature-dependent absorption spectral changes present in green nitrite reductases (NiRs) due to a thermodynamic equilibrium between a green and a blue type 1 (T1) copper site. The axial methionine (Met) ligand is unconstrained in the oxidized NiRs, which results in an enthalpically favored (ΔH ≈4.6 kcal/mol) Met-bound green copper site at low temperatures, and an entropically favored (TΔS ≈4.5 kcal/mol, at room temperature) Met-elongated blue copper site at elevated temperatures. In contrast to the NiRs, the classic blue copper sites in plastocyanin and azurin show no temperature-dependent behavior, indicating that a single species is present at all temperatures. For these blue copper proteins, the polypeptide matrix opposes the gain in entropy that would be associated with the loss of the weak axial Met ligand at physiological temperatures by constraining its coordination to copper. The potential energy surfaces of Met binding indicate that it stabilizes the oxidized state more than the reduced state. This provides a mechanism to tune down the reduction potential of blue copper sites by >200 mV. PMID:19282479

  3. Removal of aluminium from aqueous solutions using PAN-based adsorbents: characterisation, kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Aly, Zaynab; Graulet, Adrien; Scales, Nicholas; Hanley, Tracey

    2014-03-01

    Economic adsorbents in bead form were fabricated and utilised for the adsorption of Al(3+) from aqueous solutions. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) beads, PAN powder and the thermally treated PAN beads (250 °C/48 h/Ar and 600 °C/48 h/Ar-H2) were characterised using different techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface analysis (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller), thermogravimetric analysis as well as scanning electron microscopy. Effects of pH, contact time, kinetics and adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were investigated in batch mode experiments. Aluminium kinetic data best fit the Lagergren pseudo-second-order adsorption model indicating a one-step, surface-only, adsorption process with chemisorption being the rate limiting step. Equilibrium adsorption data followed a Langmuir adsorption model with fairly low monolayer adsorption capacities suitable for freshwater clean-up only. Various constants including thermodynamic constants were evaluated from the experimental results obtained at 20, 40 and 60 °C. Positive values of ΔH° indicated that the adsorption of Al(3+) onto all three adsorbents was endothermic with less energy input required for PAN powder compared to PAN beads and low-temperature thermally treated PAN. Negative ΔG° values indicated that the aluminium adsorption process was spontaneous for all adsorbents examined.

  4. Roles of bulk viscosity on Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Non-equilibrium thermodynamics due to spatio-temporal pressure fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sharma, Nidhi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) between two air masses with a temperature difference of 70 K is presented using compressible Navier-Stokes formulation in a non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework. The two-dimensional flow is studied in an isolated box with non-periodic walls in both vertical and horizontal directions. The non-conducting interface separating the two air masses is impulsively removed at t = 0 (depicting a heaviside function). No external perturbation has been used at the interface to instigate the instability at the onset. Computations have been carried out for rectangular and square cross sections. The formulation is free of Boussinesq approximation commonly used in many Navier-Stokes formulations for RTI. Effect of Stokes' hypothesis is quantified, by using models from acoustic attenuation measurement for the second coefficient of viscosity from two experiments. Effects of Stokes' hypothesis on growth of mixing layer and evolution of total entropy for the Rayleigh-Taylor system are reported. The initial rate of growth is observed to be independent of Stokes' hypothesis and the geometry of the box. Following this stage, growth rate is dependent on the geometry of the box and is sensitive to the model used. As a consequence of compressible formulation, we capture pressure wave-packets with associated reflection and rarefaction from the non-periodic walls. The pattern and frequency of reflections of pressure waves noted specifically at the initial stages are reflected in entropy variation of the system.

  5. Adsorption behavior of activated carbon derived from pyrolusite-modified sewage sludge: equilibrium modeling, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Jiang, Li; Ji, Xiujuan

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was developed from sewage sludge using pyrolusite as an additive. It was demonstrated that the removal efficiency of two synthetic dyes (Tracid orange GS and Direct fast turquoise blue GL) by the produced adsorbent was up to 97.6%. The activated carbon with pyrolusite addition had 38.2% higher surface area, 43.8% larger micropore and 54.4% larger mesopore production than ordinary sludge-based activated carbons. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on dyes adsorption tests. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, and the results fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equation. The experimental data fitted very well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Activation energies for the adsorption processes ranged between 8.7 and 19.1 kJ mol 1. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (deltaG0), standard enthalpy (deltaH0) and standard entropy (deltaS0) were evaluated. The adsorption of these two dyes on the activated carbon was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. PMID:22097045

  6. Reversible control of the equilibrium size of a single aerosol droplet by change in relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Shoji; Yamauchi, Kunihiro; Kitamura, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Noncontact levitation of single micrometer-sized water droplets in air can be achieved by a laser trapping technique. The equilibrium size of a water droplet is quite sensitive to relative humidity in the surrounding gas phase. In order to investigate the physical and chemical properties of single water droplets in air as a function of the droplet size or solute concentration, laser trapping experiments were conducted under controlled humidity conditions. In this study, we developed a trapping chamber equipped with a relative humidity controller and demonstrated the reversible control of the equilibrium size of a single droplet levitated in air through a change in relative humidity. Furthermore, relative humidity was successfully evaluated by means of cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy of a trapped water droplet. PMID:25382044

  7. Dynamics of a femtosecond/picosecond laser-induced aluminum plasma out of thermodynamic equilibrium in a nitrogen background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Vincent; Bultel, Arnaud; Annaloro, Julien; Chambrelan, Cédric; Edouard, Guillaume; Grisolia, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the experimental studies, the assessment of the ability of ultra-short (femto or picosecond) laser pulses to provide correct estimates of the elemental composition of unknown samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy requires the modeling of a typical situation. The present article deals with this modeling for aluminum in nitrogen. A spherical layer model is developed. The central aluminum plasma is produced by the ultra-short pulse. This plasma is described using our collisional-radiative model CoRaM-Al in an upgraded version involving 250 levels. Its expansion and relaxation take place in nitrogen, where the formation and the propagation of a shock wave are taken into account. In this shocked nitrogen layer, the equilibrium conditions are assumed. Mass, momentum and energy conservation equations written under an Eulerian form are used to correctly model the global dynamics. Energy losses are due to radiative recombination, thermal Bremsstrahlung and spontaneous emission. These elementary processes are implemented. The only input parameters are the pulse energy E0, the ablated mass M of the sample and the pressure p0 of the surrounding gas. The equilibrium composition involving N2, N, N2+, N+ and free electrons of the shocked nitrogen layer is calculated from the thermodynamic database of our collisional-radiative model CoRaM-N2. The conditions E0 = 10 mJ and M ≃ 10- 10 kg corresponding to a 532 nm laser pulse are chosen. The model assumes the initial equilibrium of the aluminum plasma produced by the laser pulse absorbed by the sample. Then, owing to the significant overpressure with respect to the background gas (p0 is assumed atmospheric), the surrounding gas starts to be compressed while the propagation of a shock wave takes place. The shock layer maximum pressure is obtained at approximately 20 ns. At this characteristic time, the nitrogen pressure is around 400 times the atmospheric pressure. A shock velocity of 7 km s- 1 is predicted. The

  8. Heat capacity and thermodynamic properties for coesite and jadeite, reexamination of the quartz-coesite equilibrium boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Bohlen, S.R.; Hankins, W.B.; Westrum, E.F.; Kuskov, O.L.

    1998-01-01

    The heat capacities of synthetic coesite and jadeite were measured between about 15 and 850 K by adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry. The experimental data were smoothed and estimates were made of heat capacities to 1800 K. The following equations represent our estimate of the heat capacities of coesite and jadeite between 298.15 and 1800 K: [see original article for formula]. Tables of thermodynamic values for coesite and jadeite to 1800 K are presented. The entropies of coesite and jadeite are 40.38 ?? 0.12 and 136.5 ?? 0.32 J/(mol.K), respectively, at 298.15 K. The entropy for coesite derived here confirms the value published earlier by Holm et al. (1967). We have derived an equation to describe the quartz-coesite boundary over the temperature range of 600 to 1500 K, P(GPa) = 1.76 + 0.001T(K). Our results are in agreement with the enthalpy of transition reported by Akaogi and Navrotsky (1984) and yield -907.6 ?? 1.4 kJ/mol for the enthalpy of formation of coesite from the elements at 298.15 K and 1 bar, in agreement with the value recommended by CODATA (Khodakovsky et al. 1995). Several sources of uncertainty remain unacceptably high, including: the heat capacities of coesite at temperatures above about 1000 K; the heat capacities and volumetric properties of ?? quartz at higher pressures and at temperatures above 844 K; the pressure corrections for the piston cylinder apparatus used to determine the quartz-coesite equilibrium boundary.

  9. Radiative Forcing, Satellite Validation, and Thermodynamic Impact of Aerosols during Aerose Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, A.; Joseph, E.; Nalli, N. R.; Smirnov, A.; Morris, V. R.; Wolfe, D. E.; Aerose Team

    2011-12-01

    An estimated three billion metric tons of mineral aerosols are injected into the troposphere annually from the Saharan desert [Prospero et al., 1996]. These windswept aerosols from the African continent are responsible for a variety of climate, health, and environmental impacts on both global and regional scales that span the Western Hemisphere [Morris et al., 2006]. The Aerosol and Ocean Science Expeditions (AEROSE) are a great opportunity to tackle these impacts. The Saharan Air Layer (SAL) appears to retain its Saharan characteristics of warm, stable air near its base, and dryness and dustiness throughout its depth as it is carried as far as the western Caribbean Sea [Dunion & Velden, 2004]. AEROSE provides insitu characterization of the impact of aerosols of African origin on energy balance and microphysical evolution of mineral dust outflow over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. By quantifying the radiative properties of the SAL, aerosol optical depths (AOD) as high as 1.6 was detected over the Atlantic [Nalli et al., 2011], producing a shortwave forcing of 200 W/m2 and therefore a warming just above the marine boundary layer for this particular case. Also in this study, AOD values from AEROSE have been compared with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), showing variety on each campaign.

  10. An Investigation of Applications for Thermodynamic Work Potential Methods: Working Tables and Charts for Estimation of Thermodynamic Work Potential in Equilibrium Mixtures of Jet-A and Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri; Roth, Bryce; McDonald, Rob

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a tool to facilitate the application of thermodynamic work potential methods to aircraft and engine analysis. This starts with a discussion of the theoretical background underlying these methods, which is then used to derive various equations useful for thermodynamic analysis of aircraft engines. The work potential analysis method is implemented in the form of a set of working charts and tables that can be used to graphically evaluate work potential stored in high-enthalpy gas. The range of validity for these tables is 300 to 36,000 R, pressures between between 0.01 atm and 100 atm, and fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric. The derivations and charts assume mixtures of Jet-A and air as the working fluid. The thermodynamic properties presented in these charts were calculated based upon standard thermodynamic curve fits.

  11. Investigating Chemical and Thermodynamic Conditions that Determine the Aerosol Inorganic Nitrate Size Distribution: Insights from Speciated PM2.5 and PM10 Hourly Datasets from an Urban Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, S. M.; Huang, X. H. H.; Louie, P. K. K.; Yu, J. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Nitric acid (HNO3), the gas-phase precursor to aerosol nitrate is known to rapidly transfer to aerosols where NH4+ is in excess to SO42- present in the aerosol, but the HNO3 is also subject to the slower uptake onto sea salt and dust laden particles. Understanding the competition between these routes is necessary to predict the NO3- distribution and impact on aerosols. In this study, we investigated the conditions leading to predominant fine or coarse mode aerosol nitrate using an hourly MARGA 2S dataset from an urban site in Hong Kong. The hourly dataset of inorganic ions (SO42-, NH4+, NO3-, Na+, Cl-, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+) in 2 size ranges (fine, < 2.5 μm; fine+coarse, < 10 μm) and water-soluble gases (HNO3, HCl, and NH3) spanning more than 1 year provides a rich trove for analyzing aerosol nitrate chemistry and the underlying mechanisms that ultimately determine the fraction of NO3- in the fine mode. The urban site in this study is initially characterized for seasonal environmental conditions and the aerosol chemical composition. The relationship between excess NH4+ and NO3- in the fine mode is detailed and contrasted with the influence on fine mode NO3- from uptake on sea salt and dust, which is typically relegated as a 'coarse-mode' mechanism. The distribution of NO3- in the fine and coarse modes is compared with the distribution of the other inorganic ions, where sea-salt ion (Na+, Mg2+) distributions yield the highest explained variability for the nitrate distributions. As a complement to that finding, the cation equivalency (excluding NH4+) in the coarse mode proves to be a crucial factor in leveraging the distribution away from fine mode nitrate. The uptake potential of the water-soluble gases is used to drive a mass transfer model and compare with thermodynamic equilibrium results. In the modeling, the partitioning cycles of fine and coarse mode aerosol nitrate highlight the dynamic relationship between NO3- and Cl- in both the fine and coarse modes, where the

  12. The development of flux-split algorithms for flows with non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Cinella, P.

    1988-01-01

    A finite-volume method for the numerical computation of flows with nonequilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry is presented. A thermodynamic model is described which simplifies the coupling between the chemistry and thermodynamics and also results in the retention of the homogeneity property of the Euler equations (including all the species continuity and vibrational energy conservation equations). Flux-splitting procedures are developed for the fully coupled equations involving fluid dynamics, chemical production and thermodynamic relaxation processes. New forms of flux-vector split and flux-difference split algorithms are embodied in a fully coupled, implicit, large-block structure, including all the species conservation and energy production equations. Several numerical examples are presented, including high-temperature shock tube and nozzle flows. The methodology is compared to other existing techniques, including spectral and central-differenced procedures, and favorable comparisons are shown regarding accuracy, shock-capturing and convergence rates.

  13. Nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium effects in stratospheric HF by collisional energy transfer from electronically excited O2 and implications for infrared remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, Jack A.

    1989-01-01

    A possible nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) effect involving stratospheric HF arising from the direct photochemical excitation of vibrationally excited HF by collisional energy transfer from electronically excited O2 is presented. Although this non-LTE effect is smaller that one associated with the direct solar excitation of both HF(nv = 1) and HF(nv = 2), calculations show that inclusion of the mechanism into retrieval algorithms is necessary if correct daytime upper stratosphere HF profiles are to be inferred in future IR thermal emission measurements.

  14. Investigation of thermodynamic equilibrium in laser-induced aluminum plasma using the H{sub α} line profiles and Thomson scattering spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Cvejić, M. E-mail: krzysztof.dzierzega@uj.edu.pl; Dzierżęga, K. E-mail: krzysztof.dzierzega@uj.edu.pl; Pięta, T.

    2015-07-13

    We have studied isothermal equilibrium in the laser-induced plasma from aluminum pellets in argon at pressure of 200 mbar by using a method which combines the standard laser Thomson scattering and analysis of the H{sub α}, Stark-broadened, line profiles. Plasma was created using 4.5 ns, 4 mJ pulses from a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. While electron density and temperature were determined from the electron feature of Thomson scattering spectra, the heavy particle temperature was obtained from the H{sub α} full profile applying computer simulation including ion-dynamical effects. We have found strong imbalance between these two temperatures during entire plasma evolution which indicates its non-isothermal character. At the same time, according to the McWhirter criterion, the electron density was high enough to establish plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  15. Departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium in cutting arc plasmas derived from electron and gas density measurements using a two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2011-03-15

    A two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique that allows inferring the electron and gas densities of axisymmetric arc plasmas without imposing any assumption regarding statistical equilibrium models is reported. This technique was applied to the study of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) departures within the core of a 30 A high-energy density cutting arc. In order to derive the electron and heavy particle temperatures from the inferred density profiles, a generalized two-temperature Saha equation together with the plasma equation of state and the quasineutrality condition were employed. Factors such as arc fluctuations that influence the accuracy of the measurements and the validity of the assumptions used to derive the plasma species temperature were considered. Significant deviations from chemical equilibrium as well as kinetic equilibrium were found at elevated electron temperatures and gas densities toward the arc core edge. An electron temperature profile nearly constant through the arc core with a value of about 14000-15000 K, well decoupled from the heavy particle temperature of about 1500 K at the arc core edge, was inferred.

  16. Thermodynamic quantities and defect equilibrium in the perovskite-type oxide solid solution La 1- xSr xFeO 3-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizusaki, Junichiro; Yoshihiro, Masafumi; Yamauchi, Shigeru; Fueki, Kazuo

    1987-03-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between the thermodynamic quantities and the defect equilibrium of the solid solution La 1- xSr xFeO 3-δ, analysis and statistical thermodynamic calculations were made using the authors' previously reported nonstoichiometry data. From the δ-log PO 2 T relationships, using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, the partial molar enthalpy ( h0 - h° 0) and the partial molar entropy ( s0 - s° 0) of oxygen in La 1- xSr xFeO 3-δ were determined as functions of x and δ. Here, the standard states of h0 and s0, h° 0, and s° 0 are in equilibrium with 1 atm oxygen gas. For δ < {x}/{2} and δ > {x}/{2}, ( h0 - h° 0) is essentially constant and ( s0 - s° 0) increases with δ. Around δ = {x}/{2}, drastic decreases in ( h0 - h° 0) and ( s0 - s° 0) are observed. Statistical thermodynamic calculations were made for the oxygen chemical potential, μ0, the partial molar enthalpy, h0, and the partial molar entropy, s0, assuming random distribution of the defects, V ··O, Fe' Fe, and Fe ·Fe, on each lattice site. Numerical calculations for ( h0 - h° 0) and ( s0 - s° 0) were made using the defect concentrations, the equilibrium constant, Ki, for the reaction of 2Fe xFe = Fe' Fe + Fe ·Fe, and Kox for the reaction of {1}/{2}O 2(g) + V ··O + 2Fe xFe = 2 Fe ·Fe + O xO. The calculated h0 - h° 0) and s0 - s° 0) vs δ relationships based on the statistical thermodynamic model agreed quite well with those determined from the experimental data using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  17. Comment on the role of thermodynamic representations in the study of fluids in far from equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llebot, J. E.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    1986-03-01

    It is shown that calculations of fluctuations in fluids driven into a stationary state by a temperature gradient are independent of the thermodynamic representation even to nonlinear order in the temperature gradient. The contrast between this result and the conjecture of Garibay-Jiménez and García-Colin, Physica 130A (1985) 616, is clarified.

  18. An Introduction to Equilibrium Thermodynamics. A Rational Approach to Its Teaching. Part 2: Internal Energy, Entropy, and Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Donald F.; Glasser, David

    1991-01-01

    An approach that may be used to introduce the fundamental ideas of thermodynamics using a mathematical background with the knowledge of the behavior of matter is described. The physical background, conservation of energy, predicting the behavior of a system, and solving problems are topics of discussion. (KR)

  19. PREDICTION OF MULTICOMPONENT INORGANIC ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL BEHAVIOR. (R824793)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many existing models calculate the composition of the atmospheric aerosol system by solving a set of algebraic equations based on reversible reactions derived from thermodynamic equilibrium. Some models rely on an a priori knowledge of the presence of components in certain relati...

  20. Statistical Thermodynamics of an "Open" Hard Sphere System on the Equilibrium Fluid Isotherm: Study of Properties of the Freezing Transition Without Direct Involvement of the Equilibrium Solid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard; Manzanares, José A.

    2016-09-01

    Using several theoretical toolsldots (i) the nucleation theorem, (ii) an equivalent cavity, (iii) the reversible work of adding a cavity to an open hard sphere system, and (iv) the theory of "stability"... the authors estimated the density at which the hard sphere freezing transition occurs. No direct involvement of the equilibrium solid phase is involved. The reduced density \\uppi a^3ρ _f/6 (where a is the hard sphere diameter and ρ _f is the actual density at which freezing occurs) is found to be 0.4937 while the value obtained by computer simulation is 0.494. The agreement is good, but the new method still contains some approximation. However, the approximation is based on the idea that at a density just below ρ _f the fluid adopts a distorted structure resembling the solid, but different enough so that long-range order vanishes. Initial loss of stability may not be involved in every fluid-solid transition, but it may be an early step in the hard sphere and related systems.

  1. Thermodynamic Equilibrium-Driven Formation of Single-Sized Nanocrystals: Reaction Media Tuning CdSe Magic-Sized versus Regular Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kui; Hu, Michael Z.; Wang, Ruibing; Le Piolet, Mickael; Frotey, Marion; Zaman, Md. Badruz; Wu, Xiaohua; Leek, Donald M.; Tao, Ye; Wilkinson, Diana; Li, Chunsheng

    2010-01-01

    A concept for the fundamental science of nanoparticle synthesis, thermodynamic equilibrium-driven formation of colloidal single-sized nanoparticle ensembles, is proposed and demonstrated in this manuscript, which addresses the controlled formation of CdSe magic-sized and regular quantum dots (MSQDs and RQDs). During formation, the former are magic-sized nuclei without further growth in size, while the latter experience nucleation and growth. Both MSQDs and RQDs exhibit bandgap emission, while the former have homogeneous spectra broadening only and the latter both homogeneous and inhomogeneous spectra broadening. The former are single-sized and the latter have size distribution. With continuous and homogeneous nucleation, the thermodynamically driven formation of MSQDs was realized via our one-pot noninjection approach, which features highly synthetic reproducibility and large-scale capability. With the proper tuning of the synthetic parameters, such as the nature of the reaction medium, that affect the thermodynamic equilibria, various CdSe MSQDs and RQDs were synthesized discriminately under otherwise identical synthetic formulation and reaction conditions; the reaction media were noncoordinating 1-octadecene, coordinating trioctylphosphine, and mixtures of the two. The nature of Cd precursors, affected also by the reaction media, plays a major role in the formation of MSQDs versus RQDs. The present investigation on the thermodynamically driven formation of CdSe single-sized nanoparticles via tuning of the reaction medium, mainly, brings novel insights into the formation mechanism and into the surface ligands of the resulting colloidal nanocrystals. More importantly, the present study provides novel experimental design and approaches to single-sized nanoparticles desired for various applications.

  2. Cloud-resolving modeling of aerosol indirect effects in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium with interactive and fixed sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairoutdinov, M. F.; Yang, C.-E.

    2012-11-01

    The study attempts to evaluate the aerosol indirect effects over tropical oceans in regions of deep convection applying a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model run over a doubly-periodic domain. The Tropics are modeled using a radiative-convective equilibrium idealization when the radiation, turbulence, cloud microphysics, and surface fluxes are explicitly represented while the effects of large-scale circulation are ignored. The aerosol effects are modeled by varying the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at 1% supersaturation, which serves as a proxy for the aerosol amount in the environment, over a wide range, starting from pristine maritime (50 cm-3) to polluted (1000 cm-3) conditions. No direct effects of aerosol on radiation are included. Two sets of simulations have been run to equilibrium: fixed (non-interactive) sea surface temperature (SST) and interactive SST as predicted by a simple slab-ocean model responding to the surface radiative fluxes and surface enthalpy flux. Both sets of experiments agree on the tendency to make the shortwave cloud forcing more negative and reduce the longwave cloud forcing in response to increasing CCN concentration. These, in turn, tend to cool the SST in interactive-SST case. It is interesting that the absolute change of the SST and most other bulk quantities depends only on relative change of CCN concentration; that is, same SST change can be the result of doubling CCN concentration regardless of clean or polluted conditions. It is found that the 10-fold increase of CCN concentration can cool the SST by as much as 1.5 K. This is quite comparable to 2 K warming obtained in a simulation for clean maritime conditions, but doubled CO2 concentration. Qualitative differences between the interactive and fixed SST cases have been found in sensitivity of the hydrological cycle to the increase in CCN concentration; namely, the precipitation rate shows some tendency to increase in fixed SST case, but robust

  3. Cloud-resolving modelling of aerosol indirect effects in idealised radiative-convective equilibrium with interactive and fixed sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairoutdinov, M. F.; Yang, C.-E.

    2013-04-01

    The study attempts to evaluate the aerosol indirect effects over tropical oceans in regions of deep convection applying a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model run over a doubly-periodic domain. The Tropics are modelled using a radiative-convective equilibrium idealisation when the radiation, turbulence, cloud microphysics and surface fluxes are explicitly represented while the effects of large-scale circulation are ignored. The aerosol effects are modelled by varying the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at 1% supersaturation, which serves as a proxy for the aerosol amount in the environment, over a wide range, from pristine maritime (50 cm-3) to polluted (1000 cm-3) conditions. No direct effects of aerosol on radiation are included. Two sets of simulations have been run: fixed (non-interactive) sea surface temperature (SST) and interactive SST as predicted by a simple slab-ocean model responding to the surface radiative fluxes and surface enthalpy flux. Both sets of experiments agree on the tendency of increased aerosol concentrations to make the shortwave cloud forcing more negative and reduce the longwave cloud forcing in response to increasing CCN concentration. These, in turn, tend to cool the SST in interactive-SST case. It is interesting that the absolute change of the SST and most other bulk quantities depends only on relative change of CCN concentration; that is, same SST change can be the result of doubling CCN concentration regardless of clean or polluted conditions. It is found that the 10-fold increase of CCN concentration can cool the SST by as much as 1.5 K. This is quite comparable to 2.1-2.3 K SST warming obtained in a simulation for clean maritime conditions, but doubled CO2 concentration. Assuming the aerosol concentration has increased from preindustrial time by 30%, the radiative forcing due to indirect aerosol effects is estimated to be -0.3 W m-2. It is found that the indirect aerosol effect is dominated by the first

  4. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  5. Measuring Thermodynamic Length

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2007-09-07

    Thermodynamic length is a metric distance between equilibrium thermodynamic states. Among other interesting properties, this metric asymptotically bounds the dissipation induced by a finite time transformation of a thermodynamic system. It is also connected to the Jensen-Shannon divergence, Fisher information, and Rao's entropy differential metric. Therefore, thermodynamic length is of central interestin understanding matter out of equilibrium. In this Letter, we will consider how to denethermodynamic length for a small system described by equilibrium statistical mechanics and how to measure thermodynamic length within a computer simulation. Surprisingly, Bennett's classic acceptance ratio method for measuring free energy differences also measures thermodynamic length.

  6. LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE gas temperatures in loaded and unloaded plasmas during spraying of NiAl powders

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, T.L.; Detering, B.A.; Wilson, G.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to contribute to the science of the complex particle plasma interaction in the plasma spray process. The relationship between the chaotic torch, the nonequilibrium plasma, the accelerating vaporizing particle, and the particle substrate interaction must be understood to relate coating characteristics to process parameters. This will lead to improved models, scalability, and appropriate monitoring and control of the process. This work focuses on the nonequilibrium plasma plume through which the particles must pass. Present models are based on the best knowledge available, but do not predict particle size, velocity, and surface temperatures that are consistent with experiments. Plasmas at pressures at and below atmospheric have been shown to deviate from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). 15 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Removal of Direct Red 12B by garlic peel as a cheap adsorbent: Kinetics, thermodynamic and equilibrium isotherms study of removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaram, A.; Fathi, M. R.; Khodadoust, S.; Naraki, M.

    2014-06-01

    The removal of dyes from industrial waste is very important from health and hygiene point of view and for environmental protection. In this work, efficiency and performance of garlic peel (GP) adsorbent for the removal of Direct Red 12B (DR12B) from wastewater was investigated. The influence of variables including pH, concentration of the dye and amount of adsorbent, particle size, contact time and temperature on the dye removal has been investigated. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better with good correlation coefficient and the equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model. More than 99% removal efficiency was obtained within 25 min at adsorbent dose of 0.2 g per 50 ml for initial dye concentration of 50 mg L-1. Calculation of various thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibb's free energy, entropy and enthalpy of the on-going adsorption process indicate feasibility and endothermic nature of DR12B adsorption.

  8. Improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air suitable for numerical computation using time-dependent or shock-capturing methods, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.; Mugge, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were devised for use in either the time-dependent or shock-capturing computational methods. For the time-dependent method, curve fits were developed for p = p(e, rho), a = a(e, rho), and T = T(e, rho). For the shock-capturing method, curve fits were developed for h = h(p, rho) and T = T(p, rho). The ranges of validity for these curves fits were for temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th power to 10 to the 3d power amagats. These approximate curve fits are considered particularly useful when employed on advanced computers such as the Burroughs ILLIAC 4 or the CDC STAR.

  9. Kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of adsorption of 2-biphenylamine and dibenzylamine from aqueous solutions by Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasheghani F., B.; Rajabi, F. H.; Omidi, M. H.; Shabanian, S.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite is synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. Experimental data are modelled by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm model fitted the equilibrium data for the dibenzylamine (DBA) and 2-biphenylamine (BPA) respectively, compared to the other isotherm models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, Δ G°, Δ H°, and Δ S° showed that the DBA and BPA adsorption on bentonite nanocomposite is spontaneous and endothermic under examined conditions. Experimental data were also modeled using the adsorption kinetic models. The results show that the adsorption processes of DBA and BPA followed well the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Results indicated that Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite could be an alternative for more costly adsorbents used for organic toxicants removal.

  10. Verification of ab-initio mixing enthalpy using thermodynamic simulation of phase equilibrium and the temperature dependences of the heat capacity of the bcc Fe- Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovsky, A. L.; Vasilyev, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with application of physical-empirical models for the thermodynamic description of the bcc Fe-Cr alloys and phase equilibrium, as well as prediction of behavior of the temperature dependences of the specific heat of alloys. This approach allowed performing verification of ab-initio calculations results obtained by different authors for the mixing enthalpy at 0K which were used to assess the chemical part of the mixing enthalpy. Analysis of calculated phase diagram fragments and the temperature dependences of heat capacities for two alloy compositions and their comparison with experimental data, has allowed us to estimate the degree of reliability of various approximations used in ab-initio calculations, and thereby realize their verification for further practical use.

  11. A Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy application based on Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium assumption for the elemental analysis of alexandrite gemstone and copper-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Giacomo, A.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Santagata, A.; Senesi, G. S.; Rossi, M.; Ghiara, M. R.; Capitelli, F.; De Pascale, O.

    2012-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an appealing technique to study laser-induced plasmas (LIPs), both from the basic diagnostics point of view and for analytical applications. LIPs are complex dynamic systems, expanding at supersonic velocities and undergoing a transition between different plasma regimes. If the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition is valid for such plasmas, several analytical methods can be employed and fast quantitative analyses can be performed on a variety of samples. In the present paper, a discussion about LTE is carried out and an innovative application to the analysis of the alexandrite gemstone is presented. In addition, a study about the influence of plasma parameters on the performance of LTE-based methods is reported for bronze and brass targets.

  12. Thermodynamic, Kinetic, and Equilibrium Parameters for the Removal of Lead and Cadmium from Aqueous Solutions with Calcium Alginate Beads

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Cuevas-Villanueva, Ruth; Hidalgo-Vázquez, Aura Roxana; Cortés Penagos, Consuelo de Jesús; Cortés-Martínez, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    The sorption of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) by calcium alginate beads (CAB) from aqueous solutions in batch systems was investigated. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, as well as the sorption capacities of CAB in each system at different temperatures, were evaluated. The rate of sorption for both metals was rapid in the first 10 minutes and reached a maximum in 50 minutes. Sorption kinetic data were fitted to Lagergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models and it was found that the second-order kinetic model describes these data for the two metals; comparing kinetic parameters for Cd and Pb sorption a higher kinetic rate (K2) for Pb was observed, indicating that the interaction between lead cations and alginate beads was faster than for cadmium. Similarly, isotherm data were fitted to different models reported in literature and it was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich (L-F) and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models describe the isotherms in all cases. CAB sorption capacity for cadmium was 27.4 mg/g and 150.4 mg/g for lead, at 25°C. Sorption capacities of Cd and Pb increase as temperature rises. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the cadmium and lead adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. It was also found that pH has an important effect on the adsorption of these metals by CAB, as more were removed at pH values between 6 and 7. PMID:24587740

  13. Solution of the Krook kinetic equation model and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a rarefied gas affected by a non-linear thermal radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abourabia, Aly Maher; Wahid, Taha Zakaraia Abdel

    2011-05-01

    A new approach for studying the influence of a thermal radiation field upon a rarefied neutral gas is introduced. We insert the radiation field effect in the force term of the Boltzmann equation. In a frame co-moving with the fluid, the BGK (Bhatnager-Gross-Krook) model kinetic equation is applied analytically. The one-dimensional steady problem is studied using the Liu-Lees model. We apply the moment method to follow the behavior of the macroscopic properties of the gas, such as the temperature and concentration. They are substituted into the corresponding two-stream Maxwellian distribution functions, permitting the investigation of the non-equilibrium thermodynamic properties of the system (gas + heated plate). The entropy, entropy flux, entropy production, thermodynamic forces and the kinetic coefficients are obtained. We verify the celebrated Onsager reciprocity relations for the system. The ratios between the different contributions of the internal energy changes based upon the total derivatives of the extensive parameters are estimated via the Gibbs formula. The results are applied to the Helium gas for various radiation field intensities due to different plate temperatures. Figures illustrating the calculated variables are drawn to predict their behavior and the results are discussed.

  14. Removal of cadmium(II) ions from aqueous solution using Ni (15 wt.%)-doped α-Fe2O3 nanocrystals: equilibrium, thermodynamic, and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    OuldM'hamed, Mohamed; Khezami, L; Alshammari, Abdulrahman G; Ould-Mame, S M; Ghiloufi, I; Lemine, O M

    2015-01-01

    The present publication investigates the performance of nanocrystalline Ni (15 wt.%)-doped α-Fe2O3 as an effective nanomaterial for the removal of Cd(II) ions from aqueous solutions. The nanocrystalline Ni-doped α-Fe2O3 powders were prepared by mechanical alloying, and characterized by X-ray diffraction and a vibrating sample magnetometer. Batch-mode experiments were realized to determine the adsorption equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamic parameters of toxic heavy metal ions by Ni (15 wt.%)-doped α-Fe2O3. The adsorption isotherms data were found to be in good agreement with the Langmuir model. The adsorption capacity of Cd(II) ion reached a maximum value of about 90.91 mg g(-1) at 328 K and pH 7. The adsorption process kinetics was found to comply with pseudo-second-order rate law. Thermodynamic parameters related to the adsorption reaction, free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change, were evaluated. The found values of free energy and enthalpy revealed a spontaneous endothermic adsorption-process. Moreover, the positive entropy suggests an increase of randomness during the process of heavy metal removal at the adsorbent-solution interface. PMID:26247760

  15. Application of Glycyrrhiza glabra root as a novel adsorbent in the removal of toluene vapors: equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Moghadam, Fazel; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Khiadani Hajian, Mehdi; Momenbeik, Fariborz; Nourmoradi, Heshmatollah; Hatamipour, Mohammad Sadegh

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the removal of toluene from gaseous solution through Glycyrrhiza glabra root (GGR) as a waste material. The batch adsorption experiments were conducted at various conditions including contact time, adsorbate concentration, humidity, and temperature. The adsorption capacity was increased by raising the sorbent humidity up to 50 percent. The adsorption of toluene was also increased over contact time by 12 h when the sorbent was saturated. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich model fitted the adsorption data better than other kinetic and isotherm models, respectively. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm also showed that the sorption by GGR was physical in nature. The results of the thermodynamic analysis illustrated that the adsorption process is exothermic. GGR as a novel adsorbent has not previously been used for the adsorption of pollutants.

  16. Application of Glycyrrhiza glabra Root as a Novel Adsorbent in the Removal of Toluene Vapors: Equilibrium, Kinetic, and Thermodynamic Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi-Moghadam, Fazel; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Khiadani (Hajian), Mehdi; Momenbeik, Fariborz; Nourmoradi, Heshmatollah; Hatamipour, Mohammad Sadegh

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the removal of toluene from gaseous solution through Glycyrrhiza glabra root (GGR) as a waste material. The batch adsorption experiments were conducted at various conditions including contact time, adsorbate concentration, humidity, and temperature. The adsorption capacity was increased by raising the sorbent humidity up to 50 percent. The adsorption of toluene was also increased over contact time by 12 h when the sorbent was saturated. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich model fitted the adsorption data better than other kinetic and isotherm models, respectively. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm also showed that the sorption by GGR was physical in nature. The results of the thermodynamic analysis illustrated that the adsorption process is exothermic. GGR as a novel adsorbent has not previously been used for the adsorption of pollutants. PMID:23554821

  17. Phase equilibrium in argon films stabilized by homogeneous surfaces and thermodynamics of two-stage melting transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2014-02-21

    Freezing of gases adsorbed on open surfaces (e.g., graphite) and in narrow pores is a widespread phenomenon which is a subject of a large number of publications. Modeling of the gas/liquid–solid transition is usually accomplished with a molecular simulation technique. However, quantitative analysis of the gas/liquid–solid coexistence and thermodynamic properties of the solid layer still encounters serious difficulties. This is mainly due to the effect of simulation box size on the lattice constant. Since the lattice constant is a function of loading and temperature, once the ordering transition has occurred, the simulation box size must be corrected in the course of simulation according to the Gibbs–Duhem equation. A significant problem is also associated with accurate prediction of the two-dimensional liquid–solid coexistence because of a small difference in densities of coexisting phases. The aim of this study is thermodynamic analysis of the two-dimensional phase coexistence in systems involving crystal-like free of defects layers in narrow slit pores. A special attention was paid to the determination of triple point temperatures. It is shown that intrinsic properties of argon monolayer adsorbed on the graphite surface are similar to those of isolated monolayer accommodated in the slit pore having width of two argon collision diameters. Analysis of the latter system is shown to be clearer and less time-consuming than the former one, which has allowed for explanation of the experimentally observed two-stage melting transition of argon monolayer on graphite without invoking the periodic surface potential modulation and orientational transition.

  18. Removal of malathion from aqueous solution using De-Acidite FF-IP resin and determination by UPLC-MS/MS: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Mu; Alothman, Z A; Khan, M R

    2013-10-15

    In the present study, De-Acidite FF-IP resin was used to remove a highly toxic and persistent organophosphorus pesticide (malathion) from the aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed as a function of various experimental parameters such as effect of pH (2-10), contact time (10-120 min), resin dose (0.05-0.5 g), initial malathion concentration (0.5-2.5 µg mL(-1)) and temperature (25-65°C). The concentration of malathion was determined using a sensitive, selective and rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. The uptake rate of malathion on De-Acidite FF-IP resin was rapid and equilibrium established within 40 min. Kinetics studies showed better applicability for pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data was fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and the isotherm constants were calculated for malathion. The values of thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) were computed from the Van't Hoff plot of lnKC vs. 1/T which showed that the adsorption of malathion was feasible, endothermic and spontaneous. The regeneration studies were carried out which demonstrated a decrease in the recovery of malathion from 95% to 68% after five consecutive cycles. Breakthrough and exhaustive capacities of malathion were found to be 1.25 mg g(-1) and 3.5 mg g(-1), respectively.

  19. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3− aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; Ault, A.; Bondy, A.; Takahama, S.; Modini, R. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Knote, C.; et al

    2015-09-25

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3−) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3more » and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. In addition, calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3− is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3− and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas–aerosol phase partitioning.« less

  20. Thermodynamics of Radiation Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, Eduardo; de la Selva, Sara Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of the electromagnetic radiation in a cavity of a given volume and temperature. We found three levels of description, the thermodynamics of one mode, the thermodynamics of the distribution of frequencies in a band by summing over the frequencies in it and the global thermodynamics by summing over all the…

  1. Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce E. Penner

    2005-03-14

    Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near

  2. On the 2D-transition, hysteresis and thermodynamic equilibrium of Kr adsorption on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Diao, Rui; Fan, Chunyan; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2015-12-15

    The adsorption and desorption of Kr on graphite at temperatures in the range 60-88K, was systematically investigated using a combination of several simulation techniques including: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC), Canonical kinetic-Monte Carlo (C-kMC) and the Mid-Density Scheme (MDS). Particular emphasis was placed on the gas-solid, gas-liquid and liquid-solid 2D phase transitions. For temperatures below the bulk triple point, the transition from a 2D-liquid-like monolayer to a 2D-solid-like state is manifested as a sub-step in the isotherm. A further increase in the chemical potential leads to another rearrangement of the 2D-solid-like state from a disordered structure to an ordered structure that is signalled by (1) another sub-step in the monolayer region and (2) a spike in the plot of the isosteric heat versus density at loadings close to the dense monolayer coverage concentration. Whenever a 2D transition occurs in a grand canonical isotherm it is always associated with a hysteresis, a feature that is not widely recognised in the literature. We studied in details this hysteresis with the analysis of the canonical isotherm, obtained with C-kMC, which exhibits a van der Waals (vdW) type loop with a vertical segment in the middle. We complemented the hysteresis loop and the vdW curve with the analysis of the equilibrium transition obtained with the MDS, and found that the equilibrium transition coincides exactly with the vertical segment of the C-kMC isotherm, indicating the co-existence of two phases at equilibrium. We also analysed adsorption at higher layers and found that the 2D-coexistence is also observed, provided that the temperature is well below the triple point. Finally the 2D-critical temperatures were obtained for the first three layers and they are in good agreement with the experimental data in the literature.

  3. On the 2D-transition, hysteresis and thermodynamic equilibrium of Kr adsorption on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Diao, Rui; Fan, Chunyan; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2015-12-15

    The adsorption and desorption of Kr on graphite at temperatures in the range 60-88K, was systematically investigated using a combination of several simulation techniques including: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC), Canonical kinetic-Monte Carlo (C-kMC) and the Mid-Density Scheme (MDS). Particular emphasis was placed on the gas-solid, gas-liquid and liquid-solid 2D phase transitions. For temperatures below the bulk triple point, the transition from a 2D-liquid-like monolayer to a 2D-solid-like state is manifested as a sub-step in the isotherm. A further increase in the chemical potential leads to another rearrangement of the 2D-solid-like state from a disordered structure to an ordered structure that is signalled by (1) another sub-step in the monolayer region and (2) a spike in the plot of the isosteric heat versus density at loadings close to the dense monolayer coverage concentration. Whenever a 2D transition occurs in a grand canonical isotherm it is always associated with a hysteresis, a feature that is not widely recognised in the literature. We studied in details this hysteresis with the analysis of the canonical isotherm, obtained with C-kMC, which exhibits a van der Waals (vdW) type loop with a vertical segment in the middle. We complemented the hysteresis loop and the vdW curve with the analysis of the equilibrium transition obtained with the MDS, and found that the equilibrium transition coincides exactly with the vertical segment of the C-kMC isotherm, indicating the co-existence of two phases at equilibrium. We also analysed adsorption at higher layers and found that the 2D-coexistence is also observed, provided that the temperature is well below the triple point. Finally the 2D-critical temperatures were obtained for the first three layers and they are in good agreement with the experimental data in the literature. PMID:26364074

  4. Non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium effects in the x-ray emission of radiatively heated materials of different atomic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földes, I. B.; Eidmann, K.; Veres, G.; Bakos, J. S.; Witte, K.

    2001-07-01

    X-ray self-emission of radiatively heated materials with different values of Z has been investigated. Thin foils were uniformly heated by a 120-eV Hohlraum radiation of 400-ps duration in order to study the self-emission of a homogeneous, optically thin material. The x-ray emission spectra were followed for more than 2 ns. The spectrally integrated emission shows not only a strong Z dependence, but different temporal behaviors for different values of Z. The lower is the value of Z of the x-ray heated matter, the longer is the duration of self-emission. Theoretical comparison with a hydrocode and FLY post-processing shows a non-local-thermal equilibrium behavior caused by direct photoionization due to the thermal pumping radiation, which has a higher brightness temperature than the matter temperature of the heated material.

  5. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment.

  6. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment. PMID:25409587

  7. Monitoring Thermodynamic Equilibrium Processes at 10 K: Conformational Isomerization and Photochromism of O4+ in Argon Matrices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ryan M.; Moore, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Bands corresponding to structural isomers of matrix-isolated O4+ are observed upon deposition of ions into argon matrices doped with moderate (0.1-1%) concentrations of O2. These bands have been assigned based on previous matrix isolation spectroscopy, as well as high-level computational studies. In the current work, these bands are observed upon co-deposition of Cu- and Ar+ ions at low-energies. The Cu- is present only as a non-interacting counter-ion, as is verified by studies using exclusively high-energy Ar+ beams; in this case, the spectroscopy of the O4+ species is completely equivalent, however there is now also an intense peak corresponding to O4- counter-ion species. Following deposition at 20 K, the matrices are cooled to 10 K, where the FTIR spectra show a band at 1119 wn for the trans-O4+ isomer, and a doublet at 1329/1331 wn, corresponding to the cyclic-O4+ isomer, based on earlier work. There is also a band at 1186 wn that was previously assigned to a larger O6+ complex. A temperature series taken in 1 K increments between 10 and 20 K reveal two reversible interconversion processes: the 1119 wn band decreases between 10 and 14 K while a new band grows in at 1242 wn, and the 1186 band shows a similar interconversion between 11 and 16 K with the 1331 wn peak of the cyclic-O4+ doublet, while the 1329 wn peak diminishes and broadens over the same temperature range. The interconverting peak pairs can be converted into equilibrium constants based on relative changes in integrated intensities, and the associated van't Hoff plots show linear trends with ΔH values in the range expected based on computational work. Finally, the 1186 wn and 1331 wn peak pair exhibit strong photochromism at 10 K: irradiation with red light converts 1186 to 1331, while irradiation with blue light shifts the equilibrium in the other direction. In both cases the phenomena is completely reversible and reproducible, with the original intensity ratio being restored after a few minutes

  8. Thermodynamic and Structural Aspects of Equilibrium and Mechanically Milled Yttrium BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXYGEN(6+DELTA) Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, David Soong-Hua

    The equilibrium relationships between partial pressure of oxygen, temperature, lattice parameters and oxygen content in the YBa_2Cu_3O _{6+delta} superconductor were examined by differential scanning calorimetry, high -temperature x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and measurement of pressure versus concentration isotherms. Oxygen pressures ranged from 1 mbar to 1013 mbar and temperatures ranged from 400^circC to 750 ^circC. Lattice parameters as a function of temperature and partial pressure of oxygen were measured. P(c) isotherms and TGA were used to measure oxygen content as a function of temperature. A phase line separating the low temperature orthorhombic phase and the high temperature tetragonal phase was determined. No evidence of a miscibility gap between the two phases was found in the range of temperatures and oxygen pressures explored. From the data, the excess enthalpy and entropy through the orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transition was calculated. It was found that the excess entropy is less than the entropy of mixing for an ideal solution. DSC was used to measure enthalpies for the transition and to calculate activation energies for the process. High temperature x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry were used to study the effect of high energy mechanical deformation on the structural and thermal characteristics of YBa_2Cu_3O _{6+delta} powder. Broadening of Bragg peaks due to the reduction of grain size makes the distinction between orthorhombic and tetragonal phases of YBa_2Cu _3O_{6+delta} difficult after only one hour of ball milling. The equilibrium orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transition may occur within the first hour of ball-milling. Longer milling times (> 5hrs) produce a cationic disorder on the yttrium and barium sites. A metastable cubic (Y_ {1/3}Ba_{2/3} )CuO_{2+delta} structure with a = 3.86A is formed. Further mechanical deformation does not induce the formation of an amorphous phase; rather, an

  9. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  10. Kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of the sorption of p-nitrophenol on two variable charge soils of Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiyang; Wu, Chunde; Jia, Aiyin; Hu, Bing

    2014-04-01

    The sorption of p-nitrophenol (PNP) on two variable charge soils was studied under a series of batch experimental conditions of solution pH, contact time, and temperature. Their kinetic and equilibrium parameters were assessed. The optimum pH for sorption of PNP was 5.0 for Xuwen soil and 5.4 for Guangzhou soil, respectively. Langmuir and Freundlich models were successfully used to describe the sorption isotherms. Results implied that monolayer sorption and heterogeneous energetic distribution of active sites on the surface of the soils were possible. The kinetic data were fitted with pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intra-particle diffusion models. The sorption process was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the sole rate-controlling step. The negative standard Gibbs free energy (ΔrGm0) values of the sorption implied that the sorption of PNP on soils was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy (ΔrHm0) showed that the sorption as endothermic. In addition, the soils were characterized by surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.

  11. Thermodynamic Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaston, Scot

    1999-02-01

    Thermodynamic data such as equilibrium constants, standard cell potentials, molar enthalpies of formation, and standard entropies of substances can be a very useful basis for an organized presentation of knowledge in diverse areas of applied chemistry. Thermodynamic data can become particularly useful when incorporated into thermodynamic diagrams that are designed to be easy to recall, to serve as a basis for reconstructing previous knowledge, and to determine whether reactions can occur exergonically or only with the help of an external energy source. Few students in our chemistry-based courses would want to acquire the depth of knowledge or rigor of professional thermodynamicists. But they should nevertheless learn how to make good use of thermodynamic data in their professional occupations that span the chemical, biological, environmental, and medical laboratory fields. This article discusses examples of three thermodynamic diagrams that have been developed for this purpose. They are the thermodynamic energy account (TEA), the total entropy scale, and the thermodynamic scale diagrams. These diagrams help in the teaching and learning of thermodynamics by bringing the imagination into the process of developing a better understanding of abstract thermodynamic functions, and by allowing the reader to keep track of specialist thermodynamic discourses in the literature.

  12. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multi-layer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: (1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), (2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and (3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. These salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar like amorphous phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material accumulates in the particle surface layer upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass transfer limited uptake of condensable organic compounds onto wall deposited particles or directly onto the Teflon chamber walls of smog chambers can have profound influence on the

  13. Thermodynamic approaches using group contribution methods to model partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds on atmospheric particulate matter: Temperature, humidity, and composition of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Myoseon

    The partitioning of organic compounds between particulate matter and the gas phase is strongly influenced by temperature, water vapor concentration, the chemical composition of particles, and the amount of organic material in particles. To describe the partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) between the gas phase and particles (G/P), a partitioning constant, Kp, has been estimated from experimental measurements and theory. Because the true or observed Kp of SOCs determined from a given particle medium includes the activity coefficient term, the linearity between log Kp and the liquid (or subcooled liquid) vapor pressure, log pLo must be corrected by the activity coefficients of individual compounds. To calculate activity coefficients in different particle liquid media such as wood combustion, diesel combustion exhaust, and the secondary aerosols from α-pinene-ozone reaction, thermodynamic models (Hildebrand-Hansen cohesive energy density and UNIFAC) which use an additive group contribution method were used. Humidity effects on the G/P partitioning of the different types of semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) in the organic layer of different particles, were studied. The equilibrated water uptake in the organic layer of chemically different particles was computed from the activity coefficient of water in the organic liquid layer of an aerosol and the ambient relative humidity (RH). It was concluded that the humidity effect on partitioning was most important for hydrophobic compounds in polar aerosols and this effect was significant. Secondary aerosols from the α-pinene reaction with ozone were characterized using derivation methods. Products were identified by using instrumental techniques such as GC/CI-MS-ECD, GC/EI-MS-ECD, and GC/FT-IR. For oxy functional groups such as acids, ketones and aldehydes, derivatization was performed using fluorinated reagents to reinforce the analytical power on GC development: O- (2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl

  14. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid.

    PubMed

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid-liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions. PMID:25576783

  15. Synthesis and properties of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles for removal of aniline from aqueous solution: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, powder activated carbon (PAC) and magnetic nanoparticles of iron (III) oxide were used for synthesis of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles (AC-Fe3O4 MNPs) as an adsorbent for the removal of aniline. The characteristics of adsorbent were evaluated by SEM, TEM, XRD and BET. Also, the impact of different parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, aniline initials concentration and solution temperature were studied. The experimental data investigated by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and two models kinetically of pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order. The results indicated that the adsorption followed Langmuir and pseudo second-order models with correlation r2 > 0.98 and r2 > 0.99, respectively. The equilibrium time was obtained after 5 h. According to Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity was 90.91 mg/g at pH = 6, and 20°C. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that adsorption of aniline on magnetic activated carbon was exothermic and spontaneous. This synthesized AC-Fe3O4 MNPs due to have advantages such as easy and rapid separation from solution could be applied as an adsorbent effective for removal of pollutants such as aniline from water and wastewater. PMID:23414171

  16. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid.

    PubMed

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid-liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions.

  17. Removal of hazardous azopyrazole dye from an aqueous solution using rice straw as a waste adsorbent: Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bindary, Ashraf A.; El-Sonbati, Adel Z.; Al-Sarawy, Ahmad A.; Mohamed, Khaled S.; Farid, Mansour A.

    2015-02-01

    In this research, activated carbonmade from rice straw (ACRS) was synthesized simply by a low cost and nontoxic procedure and used for the adsorption of hazardous azopyrazole dye. The effect of different variables in the batch method as a function of solution pH, contact time, concentration of adsorbate, adsorbent dosage and temperature were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertaine. Surface modification of ACRS using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was obtained. More than 75% removal efficiency was obtained within 75 min at adsorbent dose of 0.5 g for initial dye concentration of 30-100 mg L-1 at pH 3. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by the isotherm models namely, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption and the isotherm constants were determined. The kinetic data obtained with different initial concentration and temperature were analyzed using a pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated and found to be +13.25 kJ mol-1 indicating that the adsorption is physisorption. The thermodynamics of the adsorption indicated spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. The results indicate that ACRS could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of acid dyes from aqueous solution.

  18. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by a waste mud from copper mine industry: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Kemer, Baris; Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-07-30

    The objective of this study was to assess the adsorption potential of a waste mud (WM) for the removal of lead (Pb(II)) ions from aqueous solutions. The WM was activated with NaOH in order to increase its adsorption capacity. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch system as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, activated-waste mud (a-WM) concentration, temperature, etc. Optimum pH was specified as 4.0. The adsorption kinetic studies indicated that the overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of a-WM was obtained by using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and both models fitted well. Adsorption capacity for Pb(II) was found to be 24.4 mg g(-1) for 10 g L(-1) of a-WM concentration. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (Delta G degrees), enthalpy (Delta H degrees), and entropy (DeltaS degrees) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on the a-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic, at temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. Desorption studies were carried out successfully with diluted HCl solutions. The results indicate that a-WM can be used as an effective and no-cost adsorbent for the treatment of industrial wastewaters contaminated with Pb(II) ions.

  19. Retrieval of Kinetic Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Abundance from Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Limb Emission Measurements made by the SABER Experiment on the TIMED Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Wintersteiner, Peter P.; Picard, Richard H.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Gordley, Larry L.; Russell, James M., III

    2002-01-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment was launched onboard the TIMED satellite in December, 2001. SABER is designed to provide measurements of the key radiative and chemical sources and sinks of energy in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). SABER measures Earth limb emission in 10 broadband radiometer channels ranging from 1.27 micrometers to 17 micrometers. Measurements are made both day and night over the latitude range from 54 deg. S to 87 deg. N with alternating hemisphere coverage every 60 days. In this paper we concentrate on retrieved profiles of kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) and CO2 volume mixing ratio (vmr), inferred from SABER-observed 15 micrometer and 4.3 micrometer limb emissions, respectively. SABER-measured limb radiances are in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) in the MLT region. The complexity of non-LTE radiation transfer combined with the large volume of data measured by SABER requires new retrieval approaches and radiative transfer techniques to accurately and efficiently retrieve the data products. In this paper we present the salient features of the coupled non-LTE T(sub k)/CO2 retrieval algorithm, along with preliminary results.

  20. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas-phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2 (MCMv3.2), an aerosol dynamics and particle-phase chemistry module (which considers acid-catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion-limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study (1) the evaporation of liquid dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles, (2) the slow and almost particle-size-independent evaporation of α-pinene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, (3) the mass-transfer-limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), and (4) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. In the smog chamber experiments, these salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar-like amorphous-phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if the concentration of low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material at the particle surface increases upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass-transfer-limited uptake of condensable organic compounds

  1. Thallium-205 NMR determination of the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monovalent and divalent cations to gramicidin A and C incorporated into model phospholipid membranes: An equilibrium study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters have been determined for the binding of monovalent and divalent cations to gramicidin A and C incorporated in lyso-{alpha}-phosphatidylcholine dispersions. The thermodynamic analyses used equilibrium constants derived from the analysis of Tl-205 NMR chemical shifts using a one-site binding model of the gramicidin channel. Initial experiments determined the thermodynamic parameters of the Tl{sup +} ion binding to gramicidin A. Next, the competitive binding-Tl-205 NMR technique was used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Ag{sup +} cations to gramicidin A. A similar experiment for the binding of the Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Rb{sup +} cations to gramicidin C was performed. Similar experiments determined the thermodynamic parameter for the Cd{sup ++}, Mg{sup ++}, Ca{sup ++}, Sr{sup ++} and Ba{sup ++} cations. Thermodynamic parameters have also been determined for the binding of the Tl{sup +} ion to gramicidin A incorporated into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles using Tl-205 NMR spectroscopy.

  2. Stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Aurell, Erik

    2014-04-01

    'Stochastic thermodynamics as a conceptual framework combines the stochastic energetics approach introduced a decade ago by Sekimoto [1] with the idea that entropy can consistently be assigned to a single fluctuating trajectory [2]'. This quote, taken from Udo Seifert's [3] 2008 review, nicely summarizes the basic ideas behind stochastic thermodynamics: for small systems, driven by external forces and in contact with a heat bath at a well-defined temperature, stochastic energetics [4] defines the exchanged work and heat along a single fluctuating trajectory and connects them to changes in the internal (system) energy by an energy balance analogous to the first law of thermodynamics. Additionally, providing a consistent definition of trajectory-wise entropy production gives rise to second-law-like relations and forms the basis for a 'stochastic thermodynamics' along individual fluctuating trajectories. In order to construct meaningful concepts of work, heat and entropy production for single trajectories, their definitions are based on the stochastic equations of motion modeling the physical system of interest. Because of this, they are valid even for systems that are prevented from equilibrating with the thermal environment by external driving forces (or other sources of non-equilibrium). In that way, the central notions of equilibrium thermodynamics, such as heat, work and entropy, are consistently extended to the non-equilibrium realm. In the (non-equilibrium) ensemble, the trajectory-wise quantities acquire distributions. General statements derived within stochastic thermodynamics typically refer to properties of these distributions, and are valid in the non-equilibrium regime even beyond the linear response. The extension of statistical mechanics and of exact thermodynamic statements to the non-equilibrium realm has been discussed from the early days of statistical mechanics more than 100 years ago. This debate culminated in the development of linear response

  3. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed. PMID:27043733

  4. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed.

  5. A non-local thermodynamical equilibrium line formation for neutral and singly ionized titanium in model atmospheres of reference A-K stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnova, T. M.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Ryabchikova, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    We construct a model atom for Ti I-II using more than 3600 measured and predicted energy levels of Ti I and 1800 energy levels of Ti II, and quantum mechanical photoionization cross-sections. Non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Ti I and Ti II is treated through a wide range of spectral types from A to K, including metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] down to -2.6 dex. NLTE leads to weakened Ti I lines and positive abundance corrections. The magnitude of NLTE corrections is smaller compared to the literature data for FGK atmospheres. NLTE leads to strengthened Ti II lines and negative NLTE abundance corrections. For the first time, we have performed NLTE calculations for Ti I-II in the 6500 ≤ Teff ≤ 13 000 K range. For four A-type stars, we derived in LTE an abundance discrepancy of up to 0.22 dex between Ti I and Ti II, which vanishes in NLTE. For four other A-B stars, with only Ti II lines observed, NLTE leads to a decrease of line-to-line scatter. An efficiency of inelastic Ti I + H I collisions was estimated from an analysis of Ti I and Ti II lines in 17 cool stars with -2.6 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.0. Consistent NLTE abundances from Ti I and Ti II were obtained by applying classical Drawinian rates for the stars with log g ≥ 4.1, and neglecting inelastic collisions with H I for the very metal-poor (VMP) giant HD 122563. For the VMP turn-off stars ([Fe/H] ≤ -2 and log g ≤ 4.1), we obtained the positive abundance difference Ti I-II already in LTE, which increases in NLTE. Accurate collisional data for Ti I and Ti II are necessary to help solve this problem.

  6. Stability, equilibrium morphology and hydration of ZrC(111) and (110) surfaces with H₂O: a combined periodic DFT and atomistic thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Osei-Agyemang, Eric; Paul, Jean-Francois; Lucas, Romain; Foucaud, Sylvie; Cristol, Sylvain

    2015-09-01

    ZrC is a non-oxide ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC) material with excellent physical and mechanical properties used in nuclear plants and jet propulsion engines. However, the mechanical properties can be lost because of the easy oxidation of its grain surfaces. One way of dealing with such a problem is to coat the surface with inert carbides like SiC which can be grafted onto the ZrC surface by first modifying the exposed surfaces with reactive molecules. The stability of different terminations of the (111) facet was studied and the most stable is the termination on both surface layers by Zr atoms as it has been observed experimentally. A DFT calculation study jointly with atomistic thermodynamic modelling has been used to study the reactivity of the (111) and (110) facets with H2O. H2O dissociates into surface hydroxyl groups with the release of H2 and the OH groups preferentially adsorb at high surface coverage (high adsorption energies at 1 ML coverage). The study of adsorption of H2O onto other low index surfaces allows the determination of the equilibrium morphology of the ZrC nanocrystallites in different environments. In vacuum, ZrC nanocrystallites reveal a cubic structure with much of the (100) surface and a small amount of the (111) facets at the corners. Hydration of the (111) surface was a strong process and hence water can be removed from the surface at temperatures above 1200 K and pressures lower than 10(-9) bar while higher pressures of H2 in the gas phase enhance the removal of water. The Wulff construction of the nanocrystallites after hydration indicates only the (111) surface at lower temperatures while revealing the (100) facets at higher temperatures. Thus whatever the experimental conditions be, the (110) facet does not have to be considered. PMID:26219436

  7. Thermodynamics Behavior of Germanium During Equilibrium Reactions between FeOx-CaO-SiO2-MgO Slag and Molten Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuva, M. A. H.; Rhamdhani, M. A.; Brooks, G. A.; Masood, S.; Reuter, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The distribution ratio of germanium (Ge), L_{{Ge}}^{s/m} during equilibrium reactions between magnesia-saturated FeOx-CaO-SiO2 (FCS) slag and molten copper has been measured under oxygen partial pressures from 10-10 to 10-7 atm and at temperatures 1473 to 1623 K (1200 to 1350 °C). It was observed that the Ge distribution ratio increases with increasing oxygen partial pressure, and with decreasing temperature. It was also observed that the distribution ratio is strongly dependent on slag basicity. The distribution ratio was observed to increase with increasing optical basicity. At fixed CaO concentration in the slag, the distribution ratio was found to increase with increasing Fe/SiO2 ratio, tending to a plateau at L_{{Ge}}^{s/m} = 0.8. This behavior is consistent with the assessment of ionic bond fraction carried out in this study, and suggested the acidic nature of germanium oxide (GeO2) in the slag system studied. The characterisation results of the quenched slag suggested that Ge is present in the FeOx-CaO-SiO2-MgO slag predominantly as GeO2. At 1573 K (1300 °C) and p_{{{{O}}2 }} = 10-8 atm, the activity coefficient of GeO2 in the slag was calculated to be in the range of 0.24 to 1.50. The results from the current study suggested that less-basic slag, high operating temperature, and low oxygen partial pressure promote a low Ge distribution ratio. These conditions are desired for maximizing Ge recovery, for example, during pyrometallurgical processing of Ge-containing e-waste through secondary copper smelting. Overall, the thermodynamics data generated from this study can be used for process modeling purposes for improving recovery of Ge in primary and secondary copper smelting processes.

  8. Errors in Sounding of the Atmosphere Using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Kinetic Temperature Caused by Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Comas, Maya; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Bermejo-Pantaleon, D.; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Gordley, L. L.; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The vast set of near global and continuous atmospheric measurements made by the SABER instrument since 2002, including daytime and nighttime kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) from 20 to 105 km, is available to the scientific community. The temperature is retrieved from SABER measurements of the atmospheric 15 micron CO2 limb emission. This emission separates from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions in the rarefied mesosphere and thermosphere, making it necessary to consider the CO2 vibrational state non-LTE populations in the retrieval algorithm above 70 km. Those populations depend on kinetic parameters describing the rate at which energy exchange between atmospheric molecules take place, but some of these collisional rates are not well known. We consider current uncertainties in the rates of quenching of CO2 (v2 ) by N2 , O2 and O, and the CO2 (v2 ) vibrational-vibrational exchange to estimate their impact on SABER T(sub k) for different atmospheric conditions. The T(sub k) is more sensitive to the uncertainty in the latter two and their effects depend on altitude. The T(sub k) combined systematic error due to non-LTE kinetic parameters does not exceed +/- 1.5 K below 95 km and +/- 4-5 K at 100 km for most latitudes and seasons (except for polar summer) if the Tk profile does not have pronounced vertical structure. The error is +/- 3 K at 80 km, +/- 6 K at 84 km and +/- 18 K at 100 km under the less favourable polar summer conditions. For strong temperature inversion layers, the errors reach +/- 3 K at 82 km and +/- 8 K at 90 km. This particularly affects tide amplitude estimates, with errors of up to +/- 3 K.

  9. On the role of thermodynamics and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions over thunderstorm activity during GoAmazon and ACRIDICON-CHUVA field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Morales, C. A.; Hoeller, H.; Braga, R. C.; Machado, L.; Wendisch, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Rosenfeld, D.; Poeschl, U.; Biscaro, T.; Lima, W.; Eichholz, C.; Oliveira, R. A. J.; Sperling, V.; Carvalho, I.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Amaral, L. F.; Cecchin, M.; Saraiva, J.; Saraiva, I.; Schumacher, C.; Funk, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    lightning activity and retrieved microphysics from radar and aircraft measurements (G-1 and HALO) will simultaneously show the influence of the shift from warm- to mixed-phase dominated microphysics caused by aerosol and thermodynamic variability.

  10. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3- aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Hannah M.; Draper, Danielle C.; Ayres, Benjamin R.; Ault, Andrew P.; Bondy, Amy L.; Takahama, S.; Modini, Robert; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Knote, Christoph; Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Bingbing; Fry, Juliane L.

    2015-09-25

    The inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 1 June to 15 July 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA), an ion chromatograph coupled with a wet rotating denuder and a steam-jet aerosol collector for monitoring of ambient inorganic gas and aerosol species, revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3 ) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of coarse mode mineral or sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 um) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of mineral dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. Calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral dust surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas/aerosol phase partitioning.

  11. Single-particle measurements of phase partitioning between primary and secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Donahue, Neil M; Ahern, Adam T; Ye, Qing; Lipsky, Eric

    2016-07-18

    Organic aerosols provide a measure of complexity in the urban atmosphere. This is because the aerosols start as an external mixture, with many populations from varied local sources, that all interact with each other, with background aerosols, and with condensing vapors from secondary organic aerosol formation. The externally mixed particle populations start to evolve immediately after emission because the organic molecules constituting the particles also form thermodynamic mixtures - solutions - in which a large fraction of the constituents are semi-volatile. The external mixtures are thus well out of thermodynamic equilibrium, with very different activities for many constituents, and yet also have the capacity to relax toward equilibrium via gas-phase exchange of semi-volatile vapors. Here we describe experiments employing quantitative single-particle mass spectrometry designed to explore the extent to which various primary organic aerosol particle populations can interact with each other or with secondary organic aerosols representative of background aerosol populations. These methods allow us to determine when these populations will and when they will not mix with each other, and then to constrain the timescales for that mixing.

  12. The importance of aerosol water for air pollution effects on weather and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-12-01

    We apply a new concept to study air pollution effects on weather and climate, which is based on thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis - including the required transformation of laboratory based concepts to atmospheric conditions. Under ambient conditions the equilibrium relative humidity (ERH) determines the saturation molality, solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients), and the aerosol associated water mass, sine the water content is fixed by ERH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, aerosol water drives the gas/liquid/solid aerosol partitioning, ambient aerosol size-distributions and directly links aerosol hygroscopic growth into fog, haze and clouds. Various modeling results indicate that a) our new concept is not limited to dilute binary solutions, b) sensitive aerosol properties such as the pH of binary and mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions up to saturation can be computed accurately, and c) that anthropogenic emissions can be directly linked to visibility reduction, cloud formation and climate forcing, if we explicitly account for the aerosol water mass. Our new concept is more explicit than the traditional CCN concept as it abandons the use of ambiguous terms such as "marine" and "continental" aerosols, and refines lumped categories such as mineral dust, biomass burning, sea salt, organic or sulfate aerosols currently used in atmospheric modeling. Despite, our concept is computationally very efficient as it allows solving the whole gas/liquid/solid aerosol partitioning analytically without numerical iterations. It is therefore especially suited for regional high resolution, or global climate applications.

  13. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

  14. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  15. Formation and reactivity of a porphyrin iridium hydride in water: acid dissociation constants and equilibrium thermodynamics relevant to Ir-H, Ir-OH, and Ir-CH2- bond dissociation energetics.

    PubMed

    Bhagan, Salome; Wayland, Bradford B

    2011-11-01

    Aqueous solutions of group nine metal(III) (M = Co, Rh, Ir) complexes of tetra(3,5-disulfonatomesityl)porphyrin [(TMPS)M(III)] form an equilibrium distribution of aquo and hydroxo complexes ([(TMPS)M(III)(D(2)O)(2-n)(OD)(n)]((7+n)-)). Evaluation of acid dissociation constants for coordinated water show that the extent of proton dissociation from water increases regularly on moving down the group from cobalt to iridium, which is consistent with the expected order of increasing metal-ligand bond strengths. Aqueous (D(2)O) solutions of [(TMPS)Ir(III)(D(2)O)(2)](7-) react with dihydrogen to form an iridium hydride complex ([(TMPS)Ir-D(D(2)O)](8-)) with an acid dissociation constant of 1.8(0.5) × 10(-12) (298 K), which is much smaller than the Rh-D derivative (4.3 (0.4) × 10(-8)), reflecting a stronger Ir-D bond. The iridium hydride complex adds with ethene and acetaldehyde to form organometallic derivatives [(TMPS)Ir-CH(2)CH(2)D(D(2)O)](8-) and [(TMPS)Ir-CH(OD)CH(3)(D(2)O)](8-). Only a six-coordinate carbonyl complex [(TMPS)Ir-D(CO)](8-) is observed for reaction of the Ir-D with CO (P(CO) = 0.2-2.0 atm), which contrasts with the (TMPS)Rh-D analog which reacts with CO to produce an equilibrium with a rhodium formyl complex ([(TMPS)Rh-CDO(D(2)O)](8-)). Reactivity studies and equilibrium thermodynamic measurements were used to discuss the relative M-X bond energetics (M = Rh, Ir; X = H, OH, and CH(2)-) and the thermodynamically favorable oxidative addition of water with the (TMPS)Ir(II) derivatives.

  16. Thermodynamics of Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hernan G.; Kondev, Jane; Orme, Nigel; Theriot, Julie A.; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    There is a long and rich tradition of using ideas from both equilibrium thermodynamics and its microscopic partner theory of equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this chapter, we provide some background on the origins of the seemingly unreasonable effectiveness of ideas from both thermodynamics and statistical mechanics in biology. After making a description of these foundational issues, we turn to a series of case studies primarily focused on binding that are intended to illustrate the broad biological reach of equilibrium thinking in biology. These case studies include ligand-gated ion channels, thermodynamic models of transcription, and recent applications to the problem of bacterial chemotaxis. As part of the description of these case studies, we explore a number of different uses of the famed Monod–Wyman–Changeux (MWC) model as a generic tool for providing a mathematical characterization of two-state systems. These case studies should provide a template for tailoring equilibrium ideas to other problems of biological interest. PMID:21333788

  17. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  18. Numerical Solution of Transonic Wet Steam Flow in Blade-to-Blade Cascade with Non-equilibrium Condensation and Real Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hric, Vladimír; Halama, Jan

    2015-05-01

    We present an engineering approach to mathematical modeling and numerical solution of 2D inviscid transonic flow of wet steam in a steam turbine cascade channel of penultimate stage at rotor tip section in full Eulerian framework. Our flow model consists of the Euler system for the mixture (dry steam + homogeneously dispersed water droplets) and transport equations for moments of droplet number distribution function known as method of moments. Thermodynamic properties of vapor steam are provided by set of IAPWS equations. For equation of state for vapor phase valid both in superheated and wet (meta-stable) region we adopted recently developed equation in CFD formulation for low pressures provi1ded by Hrubý et al. [9], [8], [10]. For extraction of vapor parameters from the mixture ones we implemented simple relations in polynomial form describing thermodynamic properties of saturated liquid state. Nucleation model is resorting to modified classical nucleation theory. Linear droplet growth model is implemented for calculation of liquid sources. Numerical method is simple: cell-centered finite volume approach, 1st-order AUSM+ scheme for spatial derivatives, symmetrical fractional step method for separation of convection and condensation part, explicit 2-stage 2nd-order Runge-Kutta method for time integration. Geometry of blade profile and experimental results are provided by Bakhtar's work [22], [23]. Results were obtained for one subsonic inlet/subsonic outlet regime and gave quite reasonable accordance with experiment.

  19. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  20. Final Report: Process Models of the Equilibrium Size & State of Organic/Inorganic Aerosols for the Development of Large Scale Atmospheric Models & the Analysis of Field Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, Anthony Stein; Clegg, Simon Leslie

    2013-10-26

    Our work addressed the following elements of the Call for Proposals: (i) “to improve the theoretical representation of aerosol processes studied in ASP laboratory or field studies”, (ii) “to enhance the incorporation of aerosol process information into modules suitable for large-scale or global atmospheric models”, and (iii) “provide systematic experimental validation of process model predictions ... using data from targeted laboratory and field experiments”. Achievements to the end of 2012 are described in four previous reports, and include: new models of densities and surface tensions of pure (single solute) and mixed aqueous solutions of typical aerosol composition under all atmospheric conditions (0 to 100% RH and T > 150 K); inclusion of these models into the widely used Extended Aerosol Inorganics model (E-AIM, http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php); the addition of vapor pressure calculators for organic compounds to the E-AIM website; the ability of include user-defined organic compounds and/or lumped surrogates in gas/aerosol partitioning calculations; the development of new equations to represent the properties of soluble aerosols over the entire concentration range (using methods based upon adsorption isotherms, and derived using statistical mechanics), including systems at close to zero RH. These results are described in publications 1-6 at the end of this report, and on the “News” page of the E-AIM website (http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/info/news.html). During 2012 and 2013 we have collaborated in a combined observation and lab-based study of the water uptake of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols (PI Gannet Hallar, of the Desert Research Institute). The aerosol samples were analyzed using several complementary techniques (GC/MS, FT-ICR MS, and ion chromatography) to produce a very complete organic “speciation” including both polar and non-polar compounds. Hygroscopic growth factors of the samples were measured, and

  1. Thermodynamics of the hydration equilibrium derived from the luminescence spectra of the solid state for the case of the Eu-EDTA system.

    PubMed

    Janicki, R; Mondry, A

    2015-11-28

    The luminescence properties of two compounds, [C(NH2)3][Eu(EDTA)(H2O)3] (I) and [C(NH2)3]2[Yb0.97Eu0.03(EDTA)(H2O)2]ClO4·6H2O (II), were determined. The weighted sum of luminescence spectra of I and II was used to reproduce the spectra of the Eu-EDTA system in aqueous solution in the temperature range 276-363 K. By implementing this method it was possible to determine the thermodynamic functions (ΔH = 18113 ± 506 J mole(-1) and ΔS = 62.5 ± 4.9 J mole(-1) K(-1)) of the reaction [Eu(EDTA)(H2O)3](-)⇆ [Eu(EDTA)(H2O)2](-) + H2O, which is difficult using other methods.

  2. Synthesis of a novel magnetic zeolite nanocomposite for removal of Cs+ and Sr2+ from aqueous solution: kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Faghihian, Hossein; Moayed, Mohammad; Firooz, Alireza; Iravani, Mozhgan

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a novel magnetic zeolite nanocomposite (MZNC) was prepared by nanozeolite A and iron oxide. Nanocrystalline zeolite A was synthesized, and then, iron oxide nanocrystals were prepared in the presence of nanozeolite. The prepared nanocomposite was characterized by XRD, XRF, FT-IR, DTG, VSM, and TEM methods. The applicability of the synthesized nanocomposite for removal of Cs(+) and Sr(2+) from aqueous solutions was assessed, and the effective parameters such as initial concentration, initial pH, contact time, and temperature on the sorption process were studied and optimized. The composite was able to remove 95.2% and 81.4% of Sr(+2) and Cs(+1) from 0.01 N aqueous solutions, respectively. The kinetic studies showed that the process was quite rapid, and 90% of equilibrium capacity was achieved within 30 min. Experimental kinetic data were found to be well fitted with pseudo-second-order kinetic model with rate constant of 0.2845 and 0.2722 g mmol(-1) min(-1) for Cs(+) and Sr(2+), respectively. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and D-R isotherm models were used to describe the equilibrium data. The saturation magnetization of nanocomposite was measured as 19.50 emu g(-1), which facilitated magnetic separation of the sample after adsorption process.

  3. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3 aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; Ault, A.; Bondy, A.; Takahama, S.; Modini, R. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Knote, C.; Laskin, A.; Wang, B.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-09-25

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. In addition, calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas–aerosol phase partitioning.

  4. Equilibrium, Thermodynamics, and Kinetic Sorption Studies for the Removal of Coomassie Brilliant Blue on Wheat Bran as a Low-Cost Adsorbent

    PubMed Central

    Ata, Sadia; Imran Din, Muhammad; Rasool, Atta; Qasim, Imran; Ul Mohsin, Ijaz

    2012-01-01

    The sorption studies of coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) from aqueous solution have been carried out on wheat bran (WB). Coomassie brilliant blue on wheat bran was used to study the adsorption behavior under various parameters such as pH, dosage amount, and contact time. It was observed that under optimized conditions up to 95.70% dye could be removed from solution onto WB. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were used to elaborate the results. Freundlich model was found to be fitted well and favored multilayer adsorption. The Freundlich constants n and KF were determined as 0.53 and 2.5 × 10−4. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS studied were taking into account, showed spontaneous and favorable reaction for coomassie brilliant blue on wheat bran. The maximum adsorption capacity qm was found to be 6.410 mg/g. The investigations show that non treated WB is a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of dyes from textile industry effluents. PMID:22567559

  5. Enhanced adsorptive removal of Safranine T from aqueous solutions by waste sea buckthorn branch powder modified with dopamine: Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Bai, Bo; Wang, Honglun; Suo, Yourui

    2015-12-01

    Polydopamine coated sea buckthorn branch powder (PDA@SBP) was facilely synthesized via a one-pot bio-inspired dip-coating approach. The as-synthesized PDA@SBP was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption progresses of Safranine T on the surface of PDA@SBP adsorbent were systematically investigated. More specifically, the effects of solution pH, contact time, initial concentration and temperature were evaluated, respectively. The experimental results showed the adsorption capacity of PDA@SBP at 293.15 K could reach up to 54.0 mg/g; the adsorption increased by 201.7% compared to that of native SBP (17.9 mg/g). Besides, kinetics studies showed that pseudo-second-order kinetic model adequately described the adsorption behavior. The adsorption experimental data could be fitted well a Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic analyses showed that the ST adsorption was a physisorption endothermic process. Regeneration of the spent PDA@SBP adsorbent was conducted with 0.1 M HCl without significant reduction in adsorption capacity. On the basis of these investigations, it is believed that the PDA@SBP adsorbent could have potential applications in sewage disposal areas because of their considerable adsorption capacities, brilliant regeneration capability, and cost-effective and eco-friendly preparation and use.

  6. Adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 and Congo Red dye from aqueous solution by amino-functionalized Fe3O4 particles: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ting-guo; Wang, Li-Juan

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic adsorbent was synthesized by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modification of Fe(3)O(4) particles using a two-step process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and vibration sample magnetometry were used to characterize the obtained magnetic adsorbent. EDS and XPS showed that APTES polymer was successfully introduced onto the as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particle surfaces. The saturation magnetization of the magnetic adsorbent was around 65 emu g(-1), which indicated that the dye can be removed fast and efficiently from aqueous solution with an external magnetic field. The maximum adsorption capacities of Fe(3)O(4)/APTES for C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) were 51.4 and 118.8 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of C.I. Reactive Red 228 (RR 228) and Congo Red (CR) on Fe(3)O(4)/APTES particles corresponded well to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich model, respectively. The adsorption processes for RR 228 and CR followed the pseudo-second-order model. The Boyd's film-diffusion model showed that film diffusion also played a major role in the studied adsorption processes for both dyes. Thermodynamic study indicated that both of the adsorption processes of the two dyes are spontaneous exothermic. PMID:24552735

  7. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle. PMID:16722770

  8. Spectral Signatures of Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Sulfate Aerosol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, S. T.; Bailey, P. L.; Gille, J. C.; Lee, E. C.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Fishbein, E. F.; Waters, J. W.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1994-10-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm1 (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculations and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles.

  9. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C.; Lee, E.C.; Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B.; Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Biosorptive uptake of ibuprofen by steam activated biochar derived from mung bean husk: Equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, modeling and eco-toxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sandip; Bobde, Kiran; Aikat, Kaustav; Halder, Gopinath

    2016-11-01

    The present study explores the use of steam activated mung bean husk biochar (SA-MBHB) as a potential sorbent for the removal of non-steroidal and anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen from aqueous solution. SA-MBHB was characterized by SEM, FTIR, BET, TGA, point of zero charge (pHPZC) and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The relation between removal percentages of ibuprofen and parameters such as adsorbent dose (0.05 g-250 g), contact time (5 min-210 min), pH (2-10), speed of agitation (40-280 rpm), temperature (293-308 K) and initial ibuprofen concentration (5-100 ppm) was investigated and optimized by a series of batch sorption experiments. The optimized conditions achieved were: adsorbent dose 0.1 g/L, agitation speed 200 rpm, pH 2, initial ibuprofen concentration 20 mg L(-1), equilibrium time 120 min and temperature 20 °C for more than 99% adsorptive removal of ibuprofen. The equilibrium adsorption data were well fitted into the Langmuir isotherm model while kinetic data suggested the removal process to follow pseudo second order reaction. The adsorption phenomena were optimized and simulated by using response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network (ANN). Effect of process variables viz. dose, agitation speed and pH on the sorbed amount of IBP was studied through a 2(3) full factorial central composite design (CCD). The comparative analysis was done for ibuprofen removal by constructing ANN model training using same experimental matrix of CCD. The growth of Scenedesmus abundans was also observed to be affected by the IBP solution whereas the biochar treated with IBP solution did not significantly affect the growth of the Scenedesmus abundans. The results revealed that SA-MBHB could be a cost-effective, efficient and non-hazardous adsorbent for the removal of ibuprofen from aqueous solution. PMID:27544645

  11. Application of acidic treated pumice as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solutions: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Samarghandi, Mohammad Reza; Zarrabi, Mansur; Sepehr, Mohammad Noori; Amrane, Abdeltif; Safari, Gholam Hossein; Bashiri, Saied

    2012-11-05

    Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as an efficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal of AR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99) and Langmuir (r2>0.99) isotherm models. Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99) and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98) models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer. Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89% regeneration for AR14 and AR18, respectively.

  12. Application of novel, low-cost, laterite-based adsorbent for removal of lead from water: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somak; De, Sirshendu

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by carcinogenic heavy metal, e.g., lead is an important issue and possibility of using a natural rock, laterite, is explored in this work to mitigate this problem. Treated laterite (TL- prepared using hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide) was successfully utilized for this purpose. The adsorbent was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to highlight its physical and chemical properties. Optimized equilibrium conditions were 1 g L(-1) adsorbent concentration, 0.26 mm size and a pH of 7 ± 0.2. Monolayer adsorption capacity of lead on treated laterite was 15 mg/g, 14.5 and 13 mg g(-1) at temperatures of 303 K, 313 K and 323 K, respectively. The adsorption was exothermic and physical in nature. At 303 K, value of effective diffusivity of (De) and mass transfer co-efficient (Kf) of lead onto TL were 6.5 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 3.3 × 10(-4) m/s, respectively (solved from shrinking core model of adsorption kinetics). Magnesium and sulphate show highest interference effect on the adsorption of lead by TL. Efficacy of the adsorbent has been verified using real-life contaminated groundwater. Thus, this work demonstrates performance of a cost-effective media for lead removal. PMID:26646980

  13. Application of acidic treated pumice as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solutions: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Samarghandi, Mohammad Reza; Zarrabi, Mansur; Sepehr, Mohammad Noori; Amrane, Abdeltif; Safari, Gholam Hossein; Bashiri, Saied

    2012-01-01

    Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as an efficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal of AR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99) and Langmuir (r2>0.99) isotherm models. Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99) and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98) models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer. Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89% regeneration for AR14 and AR18, respectively. PMID:23369579

  14. Application of novel, low-cost, laterite-based adsorbent for removal of lead from water: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somak; De, Sirshendu

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by carcinogenic heavy metal, e.g., lead is an important issue and possibility of using a natural rock, laterite, is explored in this work to mitigate this problem. Treated laterite (TL- prepared using hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide) was successfully utilized for this purpose. The adsorbent was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to highlight its physical and chemical properties. Optimized equilibrium conditions were 1 g L(-1) adsorbent concentration, 0.26 mm size and a pH of 7 ± 0.2. Monolayer adsorption capacity of lead on treated laterite was 15 mg/g, 14.5 and 13 mg g(-1) at temperatures of 303 K, 313 K and 323 K, respectively. The adsorption was exothermic and physical in nature. At 303 K, value of effective diffusivity of (De) and mass transfer co-efficient (Kf) of lead onto TL were 6.5 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 3.3 × 10(-4) m/s, respectively (solved from shrinking core model of adsorption kinetics). Magnesium and sulphate show highest interference effect on the adsorption of lead by TL. Efficacy of the adsorbent has been verified using real-life contaminated groundwater. Thus, this work demonstrates performance of a cost-effective media for lead removal.

  15. Optimization, equilibrium, kinetic, thermodynamic and desorption studies on the sorption of Cu(II) from an aqueous solution using marine green algae: Halimeda gracilis.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, R; Rajasimman, M; Karthikeyan, C

    2015-11-01

    The aptitude of marine green algae Helimeda gracilis for sorption of Cu(II) ions from an aqueous solution was studied in batch experiments. The effect of relevant parameters such as function of pH, sorbent dosage, agitation speed and contact time was evaluated by using Response surface methodology (RSM). A maximum percentage removal of Cu (II) by Halimeda gracilis occurs at pH-4.49, sorbent dosage-1.98g/L, agitation speed-119.43rpm and contact time-60.21min. Further, the sorbent was characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. Experimental data were analyzed in terms of pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, intraparticle diffusion, power function and elovich kinetic models. The results showed that the sorption process of Cu(II) ions followed well pseudo-second order kinetics. The sorption data of Cu(II) ions at 308.15K are fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R), Temkin, Sips and Toth isotherms. Sorption of Cu(II) onto marine green algae Helimeda gracilis followed the Langmuir and Toth isotherm models (R(2)=0.998 and R(2)=0.999) with the maximum sorption capacity of 38.46 and 38.07mg/g. The calculated thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° showed that the sorption of Cu(II) ions onto Helimeda gracilis biomass was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic. Desorption study shows that the sorbent could be regenerated using 0.2M HCl solution, with up to 89% recovery.

  16. Compositional Analysis of Aerosols Using Calibration-Free Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Boudhib, Mohamed; Hermann, Jörg; Dutouquet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that the elemental composition of aerosols can be measured using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) without any preliminary calibration with standard samples. Therefore, a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam was focused into a flux of helium charged with alumina aerosols of a few micrometers diameter. The emission spectrum of the laser-generated breakdown plasma was recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector. The spectral features including emission from both the helium carrier gas and the Al2O3 aerosols were analyzed on the base of a partial local thermodynamic equilibrium. Thus, Boltzmann equilibrium distributions of population number densities were assumed for all plasma species except of helium atoms and ions. By analyzing spectra recorded for different delays between the laser pulse and the detector gate, it is shown that accurate composition measurements are only possible for delays ≤1 μs, when the electron density is large enough to ensure collisional equilibrium for the aerosol vapor species. The results are consistent with previous studies of calibration-free LIBS measurements of solid alumina and glass and promote compositional analysis of aerosols via laser-induced breakdown in helium.

  17. Compositional Analysis of Aerosols Using Calibration-Free Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Boudhib, Mohamed; Hermann, Jörg; Dutouquet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that the elemental composition of aerosols can be measured using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) without any preliminary calibration with standard samples. Therefore, a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam was focused into a flux of helium charged with alumina aerosols of a few micrometers diameter. The emission spectrum of the laser-generated breakdown plasma was recorded with an echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector. The spectral features including emission from both the helium carrier gas and the Al2O3 aerosols were analyzed on the base of a partial local thermodynamic equilibrium. Thus, Boltzmann equilibrium distributions of population number densities were assumed for all plasma species except of helium atoms and ions. By analyzing spectra recorded for different delays between the laser pulse and the detector gate, it is shown that accurate composition measurements are only possible for delays ≤1 μs, when the electron density is large enough to ensure collisional equilibrium for the aerosol vapor species. The results are consistent with previous studies of calibration-free LIBS measurements of solid alumina and glass and promote compositional analysis of aerosols via laser-induced breakdown in helium. PMID:26974717

  18. Speciation of the major inorganic salts in atmospheric aerosols of Beijing, China: Measurements and comparison with model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Ci, Zhijia; Guo, Jia; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-05-01

    In the winter and summer of 2013-2014, we used a sampling system, which consists of annular denuder, back-up filter and thermal desorption set-up, to measure the speciation of major inorganic salts in aerosols and the associated trace gases in Beijing. This sampling system can separate volatile ammonium salts (NH4NO3 and NH4Cl) from non-volatile ammonium salts ((NH4)2SO4), as well as the non-volatile nitrate and chloride. The measurement data was used as input of a thermodynamic equilibrium model (ISORROPIA II) to investigate the gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics. Results show that (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and NH4Cl were the major inorganic salts in aerosols and mainly existed in the fine particles. The sulfate, nitrate and chloride associated with crustal ions were also important in Beijing where mineral dust concentrations were high. About 19% of sulfate in winter and 11% of sulfate in summer were associated with crustal ions and originated from heterogeneous reactions or direct emissions. The non-volatile nitrate contributed about 33% and 15% of nitrate in winter and summer, respectively. Theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for NH4NO3 and NH4Cl suggest that the gaseous precursors were sufficient to form stable volatile ammonium salts in winter, whereas the internal mixing with sulfate and crustal species were important for the formation of volatile ammonium salts in summer. The results of the thermodynamic equilibrium model reasonably agreed with the measurements of aerosols and gases, but large discrepancy existed in predicting the speciation of inorganic ammonium salts. This indicates that the assumption on crustal species in the model was important for obtaining better understanding on gas-aerosol partitioning and improving the model prediction.

  19. Novel Measurements of Aerosol Particle Interfaces Using Biphasic Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, A. R.; Dutcher, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are nearly ubiquitous in the atmosphere and yet there remains large uncertainties in their formation processes and ambient properties. These particles are complex microenvironments, which can contain multiple interfaces due to internal aqueous-organic phase partitioning and to the external liquid-vapor surface. These aerosol interfaces can profoundly affect the fate of condensable organic compounds emitted into the atmosphere by altering the way in which organic vapors interact with the ambient aerosol. Aerosol interfaces affect particle internal structure, species uptake, equilibrium partitioning, activation to cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and optical properties. For example, organic thin films can shield the core of the aerosol from the ambient environment, which may disrupt equilibrium partitioning and mass transfer. To improve our ability to accurately predict the fate of SOA in the atmosphere, we must improve our knowledge of aerosol interfaces and their interactions with the ambient environment. Few technologies exist to accurately probe aerosol interfaces at atmospherically-relevant conditions. In this talk, a novel method using biphasic microscale flows will be introduced for generating, trapping, and perturbing complex interfaces at atmospherically relevant conditions. These microfluidic experiments utilize high-speed imaging to monitor interfacial phenomena at the microscale and are performed with phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy on a temperature-controlled inverted microscope stage. From these experiments, interfacial thermodynamic properties such as surface tension, rheological properties such as interfacial moduli, and kinetic properties such as mass transfer coefficients can be measured or inferred. Chemical compositions of the liquid phases studied here span a range of viscosities and include electrolyte and water soluble organic acid species often observed in the atmosphere, such as mixtures

  20. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-08-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are applied. Equilibrium can be approached from different distributions of balls in the container under different conditions. The Le Châtelier principle can be demonstrated. Kinetic concepts can be demonstrated by changing the nature of the barrier, either changing the height or by having various sized holes in the barrier. Thermodynamic concepts can be demonstrated by taping over some or all of the openings and restricting air flow into container on either side of the barrier.

  1. Ch. 33 Modeling: Computational Thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2012-01-01

    This chapter considers methods and techniques for computational modeling for nuclear materials with a focus on fuels. The basic concepts for chemical thermodynamics are described and various current models for complex crystalline and liquid phases are illustrated. Also included are descriptions of available databases for use in chemical thermodynamic studies and commercial codes for performing complex equilibrium calculations.

  2. Removal of phenol from aqueous solution using carbonized Terminalia chebula-activated carbon: process parametric optimization using conventional method and Taguchi's experimental design, adsorption kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Prateek; Kumar, Arvind

    2012-12-01

    In the present paper, the phenol removal from wastewater was investigated using agri-based adsorbent: Terminalia chebula-activated carbon (TCAC) produced by carbonization of Terminalia chebula (TC) in air-controlled atmosphere at 600 °C for 4 h. The surface area of TCAC was measured as 364 m2/g using BET method. The surface characteristic of TCAC was analyzed based on the value of point of zero charge. The effect of parameters such as TCAC dosage, pH, initial concentration of phenol, time of contact and temperature on the sorption of phenol by TCAC was investigated using conventional method and Taguchi experimental design. The total adsorption capacity of phenol was obtained as 36.77 mg/g using Langmuir model at the temperature of 30 °C at pH = 5.5. The maximum removal of phenol (294.86 mg/g) was obtained using Taguchi's method. The equilibrium study of phenol on TCAC showed that experimental data fitted well to R-P model. The results also showed that kinetic data were followed more closely the pseudo-first-order model. The results of thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption of phenol on TCAC was spontaneous and an exothermic in nature.

  3. Evidence from the limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium in the nu2 mode of mesospheric water vapour and the nu3 mode of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, Brian J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.

    1989-01-01

    Data from the 6.9-micron H2O channel and the 6.2-micron NO2 channel of the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) have been used to investigate the daytime enhancement to H2O; the high concentration of H2O sometimes observed in the polar night mesosphere; and the high ratio of daytime to nighttime NO2 in the upper stratosphere. These three phenomena deviate noticeably from the predictions of photochemical theory. The 20 to 30 percent diurnal variation in stratospheric H2O apparent in LIMS data cannot be reconciled with a photochemical lifetime in excess of four months. This is attributed to departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium of daytime emission which had not been accounted for in retrievals. Speculative possibilities of NLTE emission from the H2O nu2 and NO2 nu3 hot bands are discussed. It is found that the nonthermal emission from NO2 significantly affects retrieval of H2O in the polar nighttime and NO2 in the daytime stratosphere at low latitudes.

  4. Use of lipophilic ion adsorption isotherms to determine the surface area and the monolayer capacity of a chromatographic packing, as well as the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for its adsorption.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, T

    2005-04-29

    A method that champions the approaches of two independent research groups, to quantitate the chromatographic stationary phase surface available for lipophilic ion adsorption, is presented. For the first time the non-approximated expression of the electrostatically modified Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used. The non approximated Gouy-Chapman (G-C) theory equation was used to give the rigorous surface potential. The method helps model makers, interested in ionic interactions, determine whether the potential modified Langmuir isotherm can be linearized, and, accordingly, whether simplified retention equations can be properly used. The theory cultivated here allows the estimates not only of the chromatographically accessible surface area, but also of the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for the adsorption of the amphiphile, the standard free energy of its adsorption, and the monolayer capacity of the packing. In addition, it establishes the limit between a theoretical and an empirical use of the Freundlich isotherm to determine the surface area. Estimates of the parameters characterising the chromatographic system are reliable from the physical point of view, and this greatly validates the present comprehensive approach.

  5. Determination of external and internal mixing of organic and inorganic aerosol components from equilibrium water uptake by sub-micrometer particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklilu, Y.; Mozurkewich, M.

    2002-12-01

    The ability of a particle to gain and lose water with changes in relative humidity is fundamental to particle's effectiveness as a cloud condensation nucleus, chemical reactivity, atmospheric residence time and influence on global radiation balance. We describe a method developed to measure particle hygroscopicity over a range of relative humidities (RH) from 50% to 85%. Ambient aerosol particles were dried, monodisperse particles with diameters of usually 50 and 114 nm were selected, and their size distribution following humidification was measured. We measured particle hygroscopicity at Golden Ears Provincial Park and Eagle Ridge Mountain as part of the Pacific 2001 field study in the lower Fraser Valley in August of 2001. The humidified size distributions were sometimes monomodal and sometimes bimodal distribution with less and more hygroscopic peaks. The hygroscopicity of the monomodal particles varied between that of the less and more hygroscopic particles. The less hygroscopic particles were probably almost entirely organic in composition; they had consistent growth curves with wet/dry diameter ratios that increased from 1.04 at 50% relative humidity to 1.09 at 80% RH. These less hygroscopic particles constituted almost all the sampled aerosol at the forested site in Golden Ears Park and during the rainy periods at Eagle Ridge. At other times there were more hygroscopic particles, either as a single mixed mode or as a distinct mode in addition to the less hygroscopic particles. These showed little growth below 70% RH and pronounced growth above 70%. The increased water sorption above 70% RH is likely due to the particles containing (NH4)3H(SO4)2 or (NH4)2(SO4), as these salts deliquesce at 70% and 80% RH, respectively. Since the growth of these particles was less than expected for the pure salts, we conclude that these particles consisted of a mixture of the organic and inorganic components. An estimate of the relative organic fraction was made using the

  6. Aerosol Acidity in the New England Coastal Atmosphere During Summer 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pszenny, A. A.; Keene, W. C.; Maben, J. R.; Stevenson, E.; Wall, A.

    2003-12-01

    Aerosol pH controls important multiphase chemical pathways in the atmosphere but absolute values are poorly constrained. As part of the New England Air Quality Study, aerosol pH was quantified based on multiple independent approaches and results were intercompared for consistency. Soluble, reactive trace gases with pH-dependent solubilities (HNO3, NH3, HCl, HCOOH, and CH3COOH) were sampled with mist chambers. Size-segregated aerosols were sampled in parallel with cascade impactors and analyzed for major ionic constituents. H+ was measured directly in minimally diluted, 5-μ L spots on surfaces of impaction substrates with a flat-surface, field-effect transistor. Aerosol liquid water contents (LWCs) were calculated with hygrospocity models. Aerosol pHs required to sustain the measured phase partitioning of each analyte were inferred based on corresponding thermodynamic properties and direct pH measurements were extrapolated to ambient LWCs. The ensemble of approaches yielded coherent results. Sea-salt pHs ranged from about 2 to the mid 4s and sub-μ m aerosol pHs ranged from <1 to the mid 3s. The H+ + SO42-<-> HSO4- equilibrium strongly buffered aerosol pH in all size fractions.

  7. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  8. Statistical Thermodynamics and Microscale Thermophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Van P.

    1999-08-01

    Many exciting new developments in microscale engineering are based on the application of traditional principles of statistical thermodynamics. In this text Van Carey offers a modern view of thermodynamics, interweaving classical and statistical thermodynamic principles and applying them to current engineering systems. He begins with coverage of microscale energy storage mechanisms from a quantum mechanics perspective and then develops the fundamental elements of classical and statistical thermodynamics. Subsequent chapters discuss applications of equilibrium statistical thermodynamics to solid, liquid, and gas phase systems. The remainder of the book is devoted to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of transport phenomena and to nonequilibrium effects and noncontinuum behavior at the microscale. Although the text emphasizes mathematical development, Carey includes many examples and exercises to illustrate how the theoretical concepts are applied to systems of scientific and engineering interest. In the process he offers a fresh view of statistical thermodynamics for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, as well as practitioners, in mechanical, chemical, and materials engineering.

  9. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, Leslie

    2013-10-15

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy

  10. Understanding thermal equilibrium through activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-03-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education pp 169-72) we found that students in India have a rather unsatisfactory understanding of thermal equilibrium. We have designed and developed a module of five activities, which are presented in succession to the students. These activities address the students’ alternative conceptions that underlie their lack of understanding of thermal equilibrium and aim at enhancing their understanding of the concept.

  11. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  12. Equilibrium gas flow computations. I - Accurate and efficient calculation of equilibrium gas properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel

    1989-01-01

    This paper treats the accurate and efficient calculation of thermodynamic properties of arbitrary gas mixtures for equilibrium flow computations. New improvements in the Stupochenko-Jaffe model for the calculation of thermodynamic properties of diatomic molecules are presented. A unified formulation of equilibrium calculations for gas mixtures in terms of irreversible entropy is given. Using a highly accurate thermo-chemical data base, a new, efficient and vectorizable search algorithm is used to construct piecewise interpolation procedures with generate accurate thermodynamic variable and their derivatives required by modern computational algorithms. Results are presented for equilibrium air, and compared with those given by the Srinivasan program.

  13. Spectroscopy of growing and evaporating water droplets: exploring the variation in equilibrium droplet size with relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Mitchem, Laura; Buajarern, Jariya; Hopkins, Rebecca J; Ward, Andrew D; Gilham, Richard J J; Johnston, Roy L; Reid, Jonathan P

    2006-07-01

    We demonstrate that the thermodynamic properties of a single liquid aerosol droplet can be explored through the combination of a single-beam gradient force optical trap with Raman spectroscopy. A single aqueous droplet, 2-6 microm in radius, can be trapped in air indefinitely and the response of the particle to variations in relative humidity investigated. The Raman spectrum provides a unique fingerprint of droplet composition, temperature, and size. Spontaneous Raman scattering is shown to be consistent with that from a bulk phase sample, with the shape of the OH stretching band dependent on the concentration of sodium chloride in the aqueous phase and on the polarization of the scattered light. Stimulated Raman scattering at wavelengths commensurate with whispering gallery modes is demonstrated to provide a method for determining the size of the trapped droplet with nanometer precision and with a time resolution of 1 s. The polarization dependence of the stimulated scatter is consistent with the dependence observed for the spontaneous scatter from the droplet. By characterizing the spontaneous and stimulated Raman scattering from the droplet, we demonstrate that it is possible to measure the equilibrium size and composition of an aqueous droplet with variation in relative humidity. For this benchmark study we investigate the variation in equilibrium size with relative humidity for a simple binary sodium chloride/aqueous aerosol, a typical representative inorganic/aqueous aerosol that has been studied extensively in the literature. The measured equilibrium sizes are shown to be in excellent agreement with the predictions of Köhler theory. We suggest that this approach could provide an important new strategy for characterizing the thermodynamic properties and kinetics of transformation of aerosol particles.

  14. Contact symmetries and Hamiltonian thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bravetti, A.; Lopez-Monsalvo, C.S.; Nettel, F.

    2015-10-15

    It has been shown that contact geometry is the proper framework underlying classical thermodynamics and that thermodynamic fluctuations are captured by an additional metric structure related to Fisher’s Information Matrix. In this work we analyse several unaddressed aspects about the application of contact and metric geometry to thermodynamics. We consider here the Thermodynamic Phase Space and start by investigating the role of gauge transformations and Legendre symmetries for metric contact manifolds and their significance in thermodynamics. Then we present a novel mathematical characterization of first order phase transitions as equilibrium processes on the Thermodynamic Phase Space for which the Legendre symmetry is broken. Moreover, we use contact Hamiltonian dynamics to represent thermodynamic processes in a way that resembles the classical Hamiltonian formulation of conservative mechanics and we show that the relevant Hamiltonian coincides with the irreversible entropy production along thermodynamic processes. Therefore, we use such property to give a geometric definition of thermodynamically admissible fluctuations according to the Second Law of thermodynamics. Finally, we show that the length of a curve describing a thermodynamic process measures its entropy production.

  15. Zeroth Law, Entropy, Equilibrium, and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The place of the zeroth law in the teaching of thermodynamics is examined in the context of the recent discussion by Gislason and Craig of some problems involving the establishment of thermal equilibrium. The concept of thermal equilibrium is introduced through the zeroth law. The relation between the zeroth law and the second law in the…

  16. Modeling of aerosol properties related to direct climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloutsou-Vakakis, Sotiria; Rood, Mark J.; Nenes, Athanasios; Pilinis, Christodoulos

    1998-07-01

    A long-term local experiment was designed with the purpose to accurately quantify aerosol parameters needed in order to estimate aerosol climate forcing at an anthropogenically perturbed continental site. Total light-scattering σλ,sp and backscattering σλ,bsp coefficients at wavelength λ, the hygroscopic growth factors with respect to scattering, ƒ(RH)λ,s, and the backscatter ratio bλ are the parameters considered in the paper. Reference and controlled relative humidity nephelometry measurements were taken at a ground level field sampling station, located near Bondville Illinois (40°03'12″N, W 88°22'19″W). Aerosol particle chemical composition and mass particle size distributions were also measured. The target parameters were also estimated from models. The modeling approach involved a two-step process. In the first step, aerosol properties were parameterized with an approach that made use of a modified thermodynamic equilibrium model, published laboratory measurements of single hygroscopic particle properties, and empirical mixing rules. In the second step, the parameterized aerosol properties were used as inputs into a code that calculate σλ,sp and σλ,bsp as functions of λ, RH, particle size, and composition. Comparison between the measured and the modeled results showed that depending on the assumptions, the differences between the modeled and observed results were within 5 to 28% for ƒ(RH)λ,s and within 22-35% for bλ at low RH and 0-20% for bλ at high RH. The temporal variation of the particle size distribution, the equilibrium state of the particles, and the hygroscopicity of the material characterized as residual were the major factors limiting the predictive ability of the models.

  17. Stochastic thermodynamics of resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Jaco; Goldt, Sebastian; Seifert, Udo

    2016-03-01

    Stochastic dynamics with random resetting leads to a non-equilibrium steady state. Here, we consider the thermodynamics of resetting by deriving the first and second law for resetting processes far from equilibrium. We identify the contributions to the entropy production of the system which arise due to resetting and show that they correspond to the rate with which information is either erased or created. Using Landauer's principle, we derive a bound on the amount of work that is required to maintain a resetting process. We discuss different regimes of resetting, including a Maxwell demon scenario where heat is extracted from a bath at constant temperature.

  18. Computing Properties Of Chemical Mixtures At Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.; Gordon, S.

    1995-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need data on chemical equilibrium compositions to calculate theoretical thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93 is general program that calculates chemical equilibrium compositions and properties of mixtures for any chemical system for which thermodynamic data are available. Includes thermodynamic data for more than 1,300 gaseous and condensed species and thermal-transport data for 151 gases. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  19. Estimation Using an Enhancement Factor on Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Behavior of High-lying Energy Levels of Neutral Atom in Argon Radio-Frequency Inductively-Coupled Plasma.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Satoh, Kozue

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a plasma-diagnostic method using an enhancement factor on the Boltzmann distribution among emission lines of iron atom in an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP). It indicated that Boltzmann plots of the atomic lines having lower excitation energies (3.4 to 4.8 eV) were well fitted on a straight line while those having more than 5.5 eV deviated upwards from a linear relationship. This observation could be explained by the fact that ICP is not in a complete thermodynamic equilibrium between direct excitation to energy levels of iron atom, ionization of iron atom, and radiative decay processes to the ground state. Especially, the recombination of iron ion with captured electron should accompany cascade de-excitations between closely-spaced excited levels just below the ionization limit, the rates of which become slower as a whole; as a result, these high-lying levels might be more populated than the low-lying levels as if a different LTE condition coexists on the high energy side. This overpopulation could be quantitatively estimated using an enhancement factor (EF), which was a ratio of the observed intensity to the expected value extrapolated from the normal distribution on the low energy side. The EFs were generally small (less than 3); therefore, the cascade de-excitation process would slightly contribute to the population of these excited levels. It could be considered from variations of the EF that the overpopulation proceeded to a larger extent at lower radio-frequency forward powers, at higher flow rates of the carrier gas, or at higher observation heights. The reason for this is that the kinetic energy of energetic particles, such as electrons, becomes reduced under all of these plasma conditions, thus enabling the high-lying levels to be more populated by cascade de-excitation processes from iron ion rather than by collisional excitation processes with the energetic particles. A similar Boltzmann analysis using the EF

  20. Estimation Using an Enhancement Factor on Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Behavior of High-lying Energy Levels of Neutral Atom in Argon Radio-Frequency Inductively-Coupled Plasma.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Satoh, Kozue

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a plasma-diagnostic method using an enhancement factor on the Boltzmann distribution among emission lines of iron atom in an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP). It indicated that Boltzmann plots of the atomic lines having lower excitation energies (3.4 to 4.8 eV) were well fitted on a straight line while those having more than 5.5 eV deviated upwards from a linear relationship. This observation could be explained by the fact that ICP is not in a complete thermodynamic equilibrium between direct excitation to energy levels of iron atom, ionization of iron atom, and radiative decay processes to the ground state. Especially, the recombination of iron ion with captured electron should accompany cascade de-excitations between closely-spaced excited levels just below the ionization limit, the rates of which become slower as a whole; as a result, these high-lying levels might be more populated than the low-lying levels as if a different LTE condition coexists on the high energy side. This overpopulation could be quantitatively estimated using an enhancement factor (EF), which was a ratio of the observed intensity to the expected value extrapolated from the normal distribution on the low energy side. The EFs were generally small (less than 3); therefore, the cascade de-excitation process would slightly contribute to the population of these excited levels. It could be considered from variations of the EF that the overpopulation proceeded to a larger extent at lower radio-frequency forward powers, at higher flow rates of the carrier gas, or at higher observation heights. The reason for this is that the kinetic energy of energetic particles, such as electrons, becomes reduced under all of these plasma conditions, thus enabling the high-lying levels to be more populated by cascade de-excitation processes from iron ion rather than by collisional excitation processes with the energetic particles. A similar Boltzmann analysis using the EF

  1. Direct comparison of the hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride aerosol at relative humidities approaching saturation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jim S; Wills, Jon B; Reid, Jonathan P; Wang, Liangyu; Topping, David O; Butler, Jason R; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Holographic optical tweezers are used to make comparative measurements of the hygroscopic properties of single component aqueous aerosol containing sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate over a range of relative humidity from 84% to 96%. The change in RH over the course of the experiment is monitored precisely using a sodium chloride probe droplet with accuracy better than ±0.09%. The measurements are used to assess the accuracy of thermodynamic treatments of the relationship between water activity and solute mass fraction with particular attention focused on the dilute solute limit approaching saturation vapor pressure. The consistency of the frequently used Clegg-Brimblecombe-Wexler (CBW) treatment for predicting the hygroscopic properties of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol is confirmed. Measurements of the equilibrium size of ammonium sulfate aerosol are found to agree with predictions to within an uncertainty of ±0.2%. Given the accuracy of treating equilibrium composition, the inconsistencies highlighted in recent calibration measurements of critical supersaturations of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol cannot be attributed to uncertainties associated with the thermodynamic predictions and must have an alternative origin. It is concluded that the CBW treatment can allow the critical supersaturation to be estimated for sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol with an accuracy of better than ±0.002% in RH. This corresponds to an uncertainty of ≤1% in the critical supersaturation for typical supersaturations of 0.2% and above. This supports the view that these systems can be used to accurately calibrate instruments that measure cloud condensation nuclei concentrations at selected supersaturations. These measurements represent the first study in which the equilibrium properties of two particles of chemically distinct composition have been compared simultaneously and directly alongside each other in the same environment.

  2. Thermodynamics of diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuszak, Daniel

    Diffusion is the migration of molecules in the reference frame of a system's center of mass and it is a physical process that occurs in all chemical and biological systems. Diffusion generally involves intermolecular interactions that lead to clustering, adsorption, and phase transitions; as such, it is difficult to describe theoretically on a molecular level in systems containing both intermolecular repulsions and attractions. This work describes a simple thermodynamic approach that accounts for intermolecular attractions and repulsions (much like how the van der Waals equation does) to model and help provide an understanding of diffusion. The approach is an extension of the equilibrium Lattice Density Functional Theory of Aranovich and Donohue; it was developed with Mason and Lonsdale's guidelines on how to construct and test a transport theory. In the framework of lattice fluids, this new approach gives (a) correct equilibrium limits, (b) Fickian behavior for non-interacting systems, (c) correct departures from Fickian behavior in non-ideal systems, (d) the correct Maxwell-Stefan formulation, (e) symmetry behavior upon re-labeling species, (f) reasonable non-equilibrium phase behavior, (g) agreement with Molecular Dynamics simulations, (h) agreement with the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, (i) a vanishing diffusive flux at the critical point, and (j) other qualitatively-correct behaviors when applied to problems in porous membranes and in packed beds.

  3. Thermodynamic Metrics and Optimal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2012-05-08

    A fundamental problem in modern thermodynamics is how a molecular-scale machine performs useful work, while operating away from thermal equilibrium without excessive dissipation. To this end, we derive a friction tensor that induces a Riemannian manifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within the linear-response regime, this metric structure controls the dissipation of finite-time transformations, and bestows optimal protocols with many useful properties. We discuss the connection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism, and demonstrate the utility of this metric by solving for optimal control parameter protocols in a simple nonequilibrium model.

  4. CRC handbook of applied thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A. . Research and Development Dept.)

    1987-01-01

    This book feature an overview of the importance of physical properties and thermodynamics; and the use of thermodynamics to predict the extent of reaction in proposed new chemical combinations. The use of special types of data and prediction methods to develop flowsheets for probing projects; and sources of critically evaluated data, dividing the published works into three categories depending on quality are given. Methods of doing one's own critical evaluation of literature, a list of known North American contract experimentalist with the types of data measured by each, methods for measuring equilibrium data, and thermodynamic concepts to carry out process optimization are also featured.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2016-06-01

    We review thermodynamic properties of modified gravity theories, such as F(R) gravity and f(T) gravity, where R is the scalar curvature and T is the torsion scalar in teleparallelism. In particular, we explore the equivalence between the equations of motion for modified gravity theories and the Clausius relation in thermodynamics. In addition, thermodynamics of the cosmological apparent horizon is investigated in f(T) gravity. We show both equilibrium and nonequilibrium descriptions of thermodynamics. It is demonstrated that the second law of thermodynamics in the universe can be met, when the temperature of the outside of the apparent horizon is equivalent to that of the inside of it.

  6. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  7. Aerosol formation in basaltic lava fountaining: Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Martin, Robert S.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2012-10-01

    A short-lived episode of basaltic lava fountaining at Eyjafjallajökull volcano (March - April 2010) produced a low-altitude, ash-poor plume. We measured the composition of aerosol particles (sampled using a cascade impactor and filter packs), gases (sampled using filter packs), and volatile species scavenged by scoria and external water in order to investigate the formation and speciation of near-source aerosol (<2 min from emission). Samples were analyzed for volatile species (S, Cl and F) and metals (Na, K, Ca and Mg). The aerosol mass showed two unusual features: the prevalent size mode was finer than typically found in volcanic plumes (˜0.2μm, compared to >0.4 μm), and its composition was dominated by chloride rather than sulfate. We used two thermodynamic equilibrium models (E-AIM and HSC Chemistry v5.1) to show that the formation of particulate Cl- by condensation of HCl gas is more responsive to changes in ambient temperature than the oxidation of SO2 to SO42-, so that a low SO42-/Cl- ratio in aerosol particles is characteristic of volcanic emissions in cold climates. Field measurements suggested that the efficiency of SO2 to SO42- conversion inside the vent increased with lower explosivity. Volatiles adsorbed on the surface of scoria had significantly higher SO42-/halogen molar ratios than the aerosol samples. Several potential explanations for these differences are discussed.

  8. Equilibrium Studies of Designed Metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Gibney, B R

    2016-01-01

    Complete thermodynamic descriptions of the interactions of cofactors with proteins via equilibrium studies are challenging, but are essential to the evaluation of designed metalloproteins. While decades of studies on protein-protein interaction thermodynamics provide a strong underpinning to the successful computational design of novel protein folds and de novo proteins with enzymatic activity, the corresponding paucity of data on metal-protein interaction thermodynamics limits the success of computational metalloprotein design efforts. By evaluating the thermodynamics of metal-protein interactions via equilibrium binding studies, protein unfolding free energy determinations, proton competition equilibria, and electrochemistry, a more robust basis for the computational design of metalloproteins may be provided. Our laboratory has shown that such studies provide detailed insight into the assembly and stability of designed metalloproteins, allow for parsing apart the free energy contributions of metal-ligand interactions from those of porphyrin-protein interactions in hemeproteins, and even reveal their mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer. Here, we highlight studies that reveal the complex interplay between the various equilibria that underlie metalloprotein assembly and stability and the utility of making these detailed measurements. PMID:27586343

  9. Analogy between Thermodynamics and Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark A.

    1979-01-01

    Establishes and illustrates a formal analogy between the motion of a particle and the "motion" of the equilibrium state of a homogeneous system in a quasistatic process. The purpose is to show that there is a much larger set of natural coordinate transformations in thermodynamics. (GA)

  10. Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry

    2004-09-01

    The Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package is a general library for aerosol modeling to address aerosol general dynamics, including formation from gas phase reactions, surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis with linkage to DSMC studies, and thermal radiative transport. The library is based upon Cantera, a C++ Cal Tech code that handles gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics. The method uses a discontinuous galerkin formulation for the condensation and coagulation operator that conserves particles, elements, and enthalpy up to round-off error. Both O-D and 1-D time dependent applications have been developed with the library. Multiple species in the solid phase are handled as well. The O-D application, called Tdcads (Time Dependent CADS) is distributed with the library. Tdcads can address both constant volume and constant pressure adiabatic homogeneous problems. An extensive set of sample problems for Tdcads is also provided.

  11. Impact of gas-to-particle partitioning approaches on the simulated radiative effects of biogenic secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, C. E.; Spracklen, D. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Riipinen, I.; D'Andrea, S. D.; Rap, A.; Carslaw, K. S.; Forster, P. M.; Kulmala, M.; Mann, G. W.; Pringle, K. J.

    2015-02-01

    The oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) gives a range of products, from semi-volatile to extremely low-volatility compounds. To treat the interaction of these secondary organic vapours with the particle phase, global aerosol microphysics models generally use either a thermodynamic partitioning approach (assuming instant equilibrium between semi-volatile oxidation products and the particle phase) or a kinetic approach (accounting for the size-dependence of condensation). We show that model treatment of the partitioning of biogenic organic vapours into the particle phase, and consequent distribution of material across the size distribution, controls the magnitude of the first aerosol indirect effect (AIE) due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). With a kinetic partitioning approach, SOA is distributed according to the existing condensation sink, enhancing the growth of the smallest particles, i.e., those in the nucleation mode. This process tends to increase cloud droplet number concentrations in the presence of biogenic SOA. By contrast, a thermodynamic approach distributes SOA according to pre-existing organic mass, restricting the growth of the smallest particles, limiting the number that are able to form cloud droplets. With an organically medicated new particle formation mechanism, applying a thermodynamic rather than a kinetic approach reduces our calculated global mean AIE due to biogenic SOA by 24%. Our results suggest that the mechanisms driving organic partitioning need to be fully understood in order to accurately describe the climatic effects of SOA.

  12. Role of Climate Change in Global Predictions of Future Tropospheric Ozone and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Chen, Wei-Ting; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-01-01

    A unified tropospheric chemistry-aerosol model within the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model II is applied to simulate an equilibrium CO2-forced climate in the year 2100 to examine the effects of climate change on global distributions of tropospheric ozone and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust aerosols. The year 2100 CO2 concentration as well as the anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors and aerosols/aerosol precursors are based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A2. Year 2100 global O3 and aerosol burdens predicted with changes in both climate and emissions are generally 5-20% lower than those simulated with changes in emissions alone; as exceptions, the nitrate burden is 38% lower, and the secondary organic aerosol burden is 17% higher. Although the CO2-driven climate change alone is predicted to reduce the global O3 concentrations over or near populated and biomass burning areas because of slower transport, enhanced biogenic hydrocarbon emissions, decomposition of peroxyacetyl nitrate at higher temperatures, and the increase of O3 production by increased water vapor at high NOx levels. The warmer climate influences aerosol burdens by increasing aerosol wet deposition, altering climate-sensitive emissions, and shifting aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium. Climate change affects the estimates of the year 2100 direct radiative forcing as a result of the climate-induced changes in burdens and different climatological conditions; with full gas-aerosol coupling and accounting for ozone and direct radiative forcings by the O2, sulfate, nitrate, black carbon, and organic carbon are predicted to be +0.93, -0.72, -1.0, +1.26, and -0.56 W m(exp -2), respectively, using present-day climate and year 2100 emissions, while they are predicted to be +0.76, -0.72, 0.74, +0.97, and -0.58 W m(exp -2

  13. Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Peters, Len K.

    2008-07-03

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a new Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC), with a special focus on addressing the long-standing issues associated with solving the dynamic partitioning of semi-volatile inorganic gases (HNO3, HCl, and NH3) to size-distributed atmospheric aerosol particles. The coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE) for dynamic gas-particle mass transfer are extremely stiff, and the available numerical techniques are either too expensive or produce oscillatory and/or inaccurate steady-state solutions. These limitations are overcome in MOSAIC, which couples an accurate and computationally efficient thermodynamic module [Zaveri et al., 2005a,b] with a new dynamic gas-particle partitioning module described here. The algorithm involves time-split integrations of non-volatile and semi-volatile species, and a new concept of “dynamic pH” and an adaptive time-stepping scheme hold the key to smooth, accurate, and efficient solutions over the entire relative humidity range. MOSAIC is found to be in excellent agreement with a benchmark version of the model that uses LSODES (a Gear solver) for rigorously integrating the stiff ODEs. The steady-state MOSAIC results for monodisperse aerosol test cases are also in excellent agreement with those obtained with the benchmark equilibrium model AIM. MOSAIC is also evaluated within a 3-D model, and the average CPU speed is estimated to be over 100 times faster than the dynamic aerosol model MADM [Pilinis et al., 2000]. These results suggest that MOSAIC is highly attractive for use in 3-D aerosol and air quality models in which both accuracy and efficiency are critically important.

  14. Use of the semi-equilibrium dialysis method in studying the thermodynamics of solubilization of org nic compounds in surfactant micelles. system n-hexadecylpyridinium chloride-phenol-water

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G,A.; Christian, S.D.; Scamehorn, J.F.; Tucker, E.E.

    1986-06-01

    The semi-equilibrium dialysis method has been used to infer solubilization equilibrium constants or, alternatively, activity coefficients of solutes solubilized into micelles of aqueous surfactant solutions. Methods are described for inferring the concentrationa of monomers of the organic solute and of the surfactant on both sides of the dialysis membrane, under conditions where the organic solute is in equilibrium with both the high-concentration (retentate) and low-concentration (permeate) solutions. By using a form of the Gibbs-Duhem equation, activity coefficients of both phenol (the solubilizate) and n-hexadecylpyridinium chloride (the surfactant) are obtained for aqueous solutions at 25 /sup 0/C throughout a wide range of relative compositions of surfactant and solubilizate within the micelle. The apparent solubilization constant, K = (solubilized phenol)/((monomeric phenol) (micellar surfactant)), is found to decrease significantly as the mole fraction of phenol in the micelle increases.

  15. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  16. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computing time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption on the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients, phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only on the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only on the organic phase of particles) or both (condenses on both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the AIOMFAC parameterization for medium and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium and a dynamic representation of the organic aerosol. In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol (OA) is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phase could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation or evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phase due to the high viscosity. A dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is used with OA divided into layers, the first layer at the center of the particle (slowly reaches equilibrium) and the final layer near the interface with the gas phase (quickly reaches equilibrium).

  17. a Study on the Physical and Chemical Properties of Stratospheric Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    The physical and chemical properties of stratospheric aerosols under background and perturbed conditions are discussed. First, a multi-component aerosol physical chemistry model was developed to study the composition and reactivity of stratospheric aerosols. The compositions are predicted from an equilibrium assumption between the condensed-and gas-phases, and they are calculated as a function of ambient temperature, relative humidity, and the total mass of nitric acid and sulfuric acid present per unit volume of air. The water and solute activity parameters in the aerosol model are derived from various laboratory sources, and the set of equilibrium equations are solved using a unique numerical scheme. The aerosol model is applied to study the formation of nitric acid-containing aerosols in the stratosphere. Also, the equilibrium compositions are used to estimate the extent of aqueous phase processing of chlorine species in the aerosol solutions. This processing can contribute to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, especially after major volcanic eruptions where sulfate aerosols are more abundant. Second, a surface chemistry model was constructed that includes Langmuir trace-gas adsorption and desorption, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller adsorption of water vapor, surface poisoning, solvation and diffusion of molecules on the surface, chemical activation and reaction of adsorbates, and product desorption or reaction. This model is used to study the effects of relative humidity and other physical parameters on the efficiency of heterogeneous chemical processes which occur on the surfaces of solid polar stratospheric clouds. These heterogeneous chemical processes are responsible for the formation of the "ozone hole", can contribute to global ozone depletion, and may have tropospheric significance. Finally, a fluid dynamics and thermodynamics model of volcanic eruption columns was used to develop a scheme for predicting the extent of HCl removal from volcanic

  18. Thermodynamic black di-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi

    2010-10-15

    Previously the five dimensional S{sup 1}-rotating black rings have been superposed in a concentric way by some solitonic methods, and regular systems of two S{sup 1}-rotating black rings were constructed by the authors and then Evslin and Krishnan (we called these solutions 'black di-rings'). In this place we show some characteristics of the solutions of five dimensional black di-rings, especially in thermodynamic equilibrium. After the summary of the di-ring expressions and their physical quantities, first we comment on the equivalence of the two different solution sets of the black di-rings. Then the existence of thermodynamic black di-rings is shown, in which both isothermality and isorotation between the inner black ring and the outer black ring are realized. We also give detailed analysis of peculiar properties of the thermodynamic black di-ring including discussion about a certain kind of thermodynamic stability (instability) of the system.

  19. Local temperature of out-of-equilibrium quantum electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meair, J.; Bergfield, J. P.; Stafford, C. A.; Jacquod, Ph.

    2014-07-01

    We show how the local temperature of out-of-equilibrium, quantum electron systems can be consistently defined with the help of an external voltage and temperature probe. We determine sufficient conditions under which the temperature measured by the probe (i) is independent of details of the system-probe coupling, (ii) is equal to the temperature obtained from an independent current-noise measurement, (iii) satisfies the transitivity condition expressed by the zeroth law of thermodynamics, and (iv) is consistent with Carnot's theorem. This local temperature therefore characterizes the system in the common sense of equilibrium thermodynamics, but remains well defined even in out-of-equilibrium situations with no local equilibrium.

  20. Conversion of Chemical Reaction Energy into Useful Work in the Van't Hoff Equilibrium Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazhin, N. M.; Parmon, V. N.

    2007-01-01

    The ideal van't Hoff equilibrium box is described in detail. It shows that van't Hoff equilibrium box divided in two parts can simultaneously produce heat and useful work without violation of the first law of thermodynamics.

  1. Thermodynamic holography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  2. Thermodynamic holography

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  3. Stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure.

    PubMed

    Kazinski, P O

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure is studied. The stochastic deformation is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables such as deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). Gauge symmetries of thermodynamics and corresponding stochastic mechanics, which describes fluctuations of a thermodynamic system, are revealed and gauge fields are introduced. A physical interpretation to the gauge transformations and gauge fields is given. An application of the formalism to a description of systems with distributed parameters in a local thermodynamic equilibrium is considered.

  4. Stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic deformation of a thermodynamic symplectic structure is studied. The stochastic deformation is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables such as deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). Gauge symmetries of thermodynamics and corresponding stochastic mechanics, which describes fluctuations of a thermodynamic system, are revealed and gauge fields are introduced. A physical interpretation to the gauge transformations and gauge fields is given. An application of the formalism to a description of systems with distributed parameters in a local thermodynamic equilibrium is considered.

  5. A Robust Computational Method for Coupled Liquid-liquid Phase Separation and Gas-particle Partitioning Predictions of Multicomponent Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Di Stefano, A.

    2014-12-01

    Providing efficient and reliable model predictions for the partitioning of atmospheric aerosol components between different phases (gas, liquids, solids) is a challenging problem. The partitioning of water, various semivolatile organic components, inorganic acids, bases, and salts, depends simultaneously on the chemical properties and interaction effects among all constituents of a gas + aerosol system. The effects of hygroscopic particle growth on the water contents and physical states of potentially two or more liquid and/or solid aerosol phases in turn may significantly affect multiphase chemistry, the direct effect of aerosols on climate, and the ability of specific particles to act as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Considering the presence of a liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles, which typically leads to one phase being enriched in rather hydrophobic compounds and the other phase enriched in water and dissolved electrolytes, adds a high degree of complexity to the goal of predicting the gas-particle partitioning of all components. Coupled gas-particle partitioning and phase separation methods are required to correctly account for the phase behaviour of aerosols exposed to varying environmental conditions, such as changes to relative humidity. We present new theoretical insights and a substantially improved algorithm for the reliable prediction of gas-particle partitioning at thermodynamic equilibrium based on the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. We introduce a new approach for the accurate prediction of the phase distribution of multiple inorganic ions between two liquid phases, constrained by charge balance, and the coupling of the liquid-liquid equilibrium model to a robust gas-particle partitioning algorithm. Such coupled models are useful for exploring the range of environmental conditions leading to complete or incomplete miscibility of aerosol constituents which will affect

  6. Dynamics of aerosol size during inhalation: hygroscopic growth of commercial nebulizer formulations.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Davies, James F; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Dailey, Lea Ann; Murnane, Darragh

    2014-03-10

    The size of aerosol particles prior to, and during, inhalation influences the site of deposition within the lung. As such, a detailed understanding of the hygroscopic growth of an aerosol during inhalation is necessary to accurately model the deposited dose. In the first part of this study, it is demonstrated that the aerosol produced by a nebulizer, depending on the airflows rates, may experience a (predictable) wide range of relative humidity prior to inhalation and undergo dramatic changes in both size and solute concentration. A series of sensitive single aerosol analysis techniques are then used to make measurements of the relative humidity dependent thermodynamic equilibrium properties of aerosol generated from four common nebulizer formulations. Measurements are also reported of the kinetics of mass transport during the evaporation or condensation of water from the aerosol. Combined, these measurements allow accurate prediction of the temporal response of the aerosol size prior to and during inhalation. Specifically, we compare aerosol composed of pure saline (150 mM sodium chloride solution in ultrapure water) with two commercially available nebulizer products containing relatively low compound doses: Breath®, consisting of a simple salbutamol sulfate solution (5 mg/2.5 mL; 1.7 mM) in saline, and Flixotide® Nebules, consisting of a more complex stabilized fluticasone propionate suspension (0.25 mg/mL; 0.5 mM in saline. A mimic of the commercial product Tobi© (60 mg/mL tobramycin and 2.25 mg/mL NaCl, pH 5.5-6.5) is also studied, which was prepared in house. In all cases, the presence of the pharmaceutical was shown to have a profound effect on the magnitude, and in some cases the rate, of the mass flux of water to and from the aerosol as compared to saline. These findings provide physical chemical evidence supporting observations from human inhalation studies, and suggest that using the growth dynamics of a pure saline aerosol in a lung inhalation model

  7. Dynamics of aerosol size during inhalation: hygroscopic growth of commercial nebulizer formulations.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Davies, James F; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Dailey, Lea Ann; Murnane, Darragh

    2014-03-10

    The size of aerosol particles prior to, and during, inhalation influences the site of deposition within the lung. As such, a detailed understanding of the hygroscopic growth of an aerosol during inhalation is necessary to accurately model the deposited dose. In the first part of this study, it is demonstrated that the aerosol produced by a nebulizer, depending on the airflows rates, may experience a (predictable) wide range of relative humidity prior to inhalation and undergo dramatic changes in both size and solute concentration. A series of sensitive single aerosol analysis techniques are then used to make measurements of the relative humidity dependent thermodynamic equilibrium properties of aerosol generated from four common nebulizer formulations. Measurements are also reported of the kinetics of mass transport during the evaporation or condensation of water from the aerosol. Combined, these measurements allow accurate prediction of the temporal response of the aerosol size prior to and during inhalation. Specifically, we compare aerosol composed of pure saline (150 mM sodium chloride solution in ultrapure water) with two commercially available nebulizer products containing relatively low compound doses: Breath®, consisting of a simple salbutamol sulfate solution (5 mg/2.5 mL; 1.7 mM) in saline, and Flixotide® Nebules, consisting of a more complex stabilized fluticasone propionate suspension (0.25 mg/mL; 0.5 mM in saline. A mimic of the commercial product Tobi© (60 mg/mL tobramycin and 2.25 mg/mL NaCl, pH 5.5-6.5) is also studied, which was prepared in house. In all cases, the presence of the pharmaceutical was shown to have a profound effect on the magnitude, and in some cases the rate, of the mass flux of water to and from the aerosol as compared to saline. These findings provide physical chemical evidence supporting observations from human inhalation studies, and suggest that using the growth dynamics of a pure saline aerosol in a lung inhalation model

  8. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  9. Spontaneity and Equilibrium II: Multireaction Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic criteria for spontaneity and equilibrium in multireaction systems are developed and discussed. When N reactions are occurring simultaneously, it is shown that G and A will depend upon N independent reaction coordinates, ?a (a = 1,2, ..., N), in addition to T and p for G or T and V for A. The general criteria for spontaneity and…

  10. Probing local equilibrium in nonequilibrium fluids.

    PubMed

    del Pozo, J J; Garrido, P L; Hurtado, P I

    2015-08-01

    We use extensive computer simulations to probe local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in a quintessential model fluid, the two-dimensional hard-disks system. We show that macroscopic LTE is a property much stronger than previously anticipated, even in the presence of important finite-size effects, revealing a remarkable bulk-boundary decoupling phenomenon in fluids out of equilibrium. This allows us to measure the fluid's equation of state in simulations far from equilibrium, with an excellent accuracy comparable to the best equilibrium simulations. Subtle corrections to LTE are found in the fluctuations of the total energy which strongly point to the nonlocality of the nonequilibrium potential governing the fluid's macroscopic behavior out of equilibrium.

  11. Aerosols, Clouds, and Precipitation as Scale Interactions in the Climate System and Controls on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Leo

    Clouds are major regulators of atmospheric energy flows. Their character depends on atmospheric composition, dynamics, and thermodynamic state. Clouds can assume organized structures whose scales are planetary, while processes important for determining basic properties occur on the scale of microns. The range of processes, scales, and interactions among them has precluded the development of concise theories for the role of clouds in climate, and limitations in modeling clouds in complex climate models remain among the key uncertainties in understanding and projecting climate change. The distribution function of vertical velocities (updraft speeds) in clouds is an important control on climate forcing by clouds and possibly a strong correlate with climate sensitivity. (Climate forcing refers to the change in Earth's energy balance as atmospheric composition changes, in particular, due to human activity. Climate sensitivity is defined here as the equilibrium change in globally averaged annual surface temperature as a result of doubled carbon dioxide.) Vertical velocities are central because they determine the thermodynamic environment governing phase changes of water, with both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena important. The spatial and temporal spectra of relevant vertical velocities includes scales both numerically resolved by climate models and below their resolution limit. The latter implies a requirement to parameterize these smaller scale motions in models. The scale dependence of vertical velocities and emerging observational constraints on their distribution provide new opportunities for representing aerosols, clouds, and precipitation in climate models. Success in doing so could provide important breakthroughs in understanding both climate forcing and sensitivity.

  12. Methodology of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohan, Gyan

    1969-01-01

    Presents a systematization of the mathematical formulae in thermodynamics. From the set of thermodynamic variables, four equations are derived which contain the total mathematical jargon of thermodynamics. (LC)

  13. Chemical evolution of multicomponent aerosol particles during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, Alessandro; Riipinen, Ilona; Pagels, Joakim; Eriksson, Axel; Worsnop, Douglas; Switieckli, Erik; Kulmala, Markku; Bilde, Merete

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have an important but not well quantified effect on climate and human health. Despite the efforts made in the last decades, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not fully understood. The uncertainty is partly due to the complex chemical composition of the particles which comprise inorganic and organic compounds. Many organics (like dicarboxylic acids) can be present both in the gas and in the condensed phase due to their low vapor pressure. Clearly, an understanding of this partition is crucial to address any other issue in atmospheric physics and chemistry. Moreover, many organics are water soluble, and their influence on the properties of aqueous solution droplets is still poorly characterized. The solid and sub-cooled liquid state vapor pressures of some organic compounds have been previously determined by measuring the evaporation rate of single-compound crystals [1-3] or binary aqueous droplets [4-6]. In this work, we deploy the HTDMA technique (Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) coupled with a 3.5m laminar flow-tube and an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) for determining the chemical evolution during evaporation of ternary droplets made of one dicarboxylic acid (succinic acid, commonly found in atmospheric samples) and one inorganic compound (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) in different mixing ratios, in equilibrium with water vapor at a fixed relative humidity. In addition, we investigate the evaporation of multicomponent droplets and crystals made of three organic species (dicarboxylic acids and sugars), of which one or two are semi-volatile. 1. Bilde M. and Pandis, S.N.: Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of Individual Aerosol Species Formed in the Atmospheric Oxidation of alpha- and beta-Pinene. Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2001. 2. Bilde M., et al.: Even-Odd Alternation of Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of C3-C9 Dicarboxylic Acid Aerosols

  14. SIMULATING EQUILIBRIUM WITHIN AEROSOLS AND NON-EQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN GASES AND AEROSOLS. (R823186)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    Ambient aerosols frequently contain large portions of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as chlorides, nitrates, and sulfates in either pure or mixed forms. Such inorganic salt aerosols exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in air. The phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet usually occurs spontaneously when the relative humidity of the atmosphere reaches a level specific to the chemical composition of the aerosol particle. Conversely, when the relative humidity decreases and becomes low enough, the saline droplet will evaporate and suddenly crystallize, expelling all its water content. The phase transformation and growth of aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climate changes. In this chapter, an exposition of the underlying thermodynamic principles is given, and recent advances in experimental methods utilizing single-particle levitation are discussed. In addition, pertinent and available thermodynamic data, which are needed for predicting the deliquescence properties of single and multi-component aerosols, are compiled. This chapter is useful to research scientists who are either interested in pursuing further studies of aerosol thermodynamics, or required to model the dynamic behavior of hygroscopic aerosols in a humid environment.

  16. A Better Way of Dealing with Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tykodi, Ralph J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses how to address the concept of chemical equilibrium through the use of thermodynamic activities. Describes the advantages of setting up an equilibrium constant in terms of activities and demonstrates how to approximate those activities by practical measures such as partial pressures, mole fractions, and molar concentrations. (TW)

  17. [Thermodynamics of the origin of life, evolution and aging].

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, G P

    2014-01-01

    Briefly discusses the history of the search of thermodynamic approach to explain the origin of life, evolution and aging of living beings. The origin of life is the result of requirement by the quasi-equilibrium hierarchical thermodynamics, in particular, the supramolecular thermodynamics. The evolution and aging of living beings is accompanied with changes of chemical and supramolecular compositions of living bodies, as well as with changes in the composition and structure of all hierarchies of the living world. The thermodynamic principle of substance stability predicts the existence of a single genetic code in our universe. The thermodynamic theory optimizes physiology and medicine and recommends antiaging diets and medicines. Hierarchical thermodynamics forms the design diversity of culture and art. The thermodynamic theory of origin of life, evolution and aging is the development of Clausius-Gibbs thermodynamics. Hierarchical thermodynamics is the mirror of Darwin-Wallace's-theory.

  18. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of pressure solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, F. K.; Bataille, J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of solution and precipitation processes in wet crustal rocks and with the mechanism of steady pressure-solution slip in ‘contact zones,’ such as grain-to-grain contacts, fracture surfaces, and permeable gouge layers, that are infiltrated by a mobile aqueous solution phase. A local dissipation jump condition at the phase boundary is fundamental to identifying the thermodynamic force driving the solution and precipitation process and is used here in setting up linear phenomenological relations to model near-equilibrium phase transformation kinetics. The local thermodynamic equilibrium of a stressed pure solid in contact with its melt or solution phase is governed by Gibbs's relation, which is rederived here, in a manner emphasizing its independence of constitutive assumptions for the solid while neglecting surface tension and diffusion in the solid. Fluid-infiltrated contact zones, such as those formed by rough surfaces, cannot generally be in thermodynamic equilibrium, especially during an ongoing process of pressure-solution slip, and the existing equilibrium formulations are incorrect in overlooking dissipative processes tending to eliminate fluctuations in superficial free energies due to stress concentrations near asperities, defects, or impurities. Steady pressure-solution slip is likely to exhibit a nonlinear dependence of slip rate on shear stress and effective normal stress, due to a dependence of the contact-zone state on the latter. Given that this dependence is negligible within some range, linear relations for pressure-solution slip can be derived for the limiting cases of diffusion-controlled and interface-reaction-controlled rates. A criterion for rate control by one of these mechanisms is set by the magnitude of the dimensionless quantity kδ/2C pD, where k is the interfacial transfer coefficient, δ is the mean diffusion path length, C p is the solubility at pressure p, and D is the mass

  19. Control over hygroscopic growth of saline aqueous aerosol using Pluronic polymer additives.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Hargreaves, Graham; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2013-02-25

    The hygroscopic properties of an aerosol originating from a nebulizer solution can affect the extent of peripheral deposition within the respiratory tract, which in turn affects drug efficacy of drugs delivered to the lungs. Thus, the ability to tailor the degree and rate of hygroscopic growth of an aerosol produced by a nebulizer through modification of the formulation would serve to improve drug efficacy through targeted lung deposition. In this study, the kinetic and thermodynamic hygroscopic properties of sodium chloride aerosol mixed with commercially available Pluronic polymers, specifically F77 and F127, are reported using three complementary single aerosol analysis techniques, specifically aerosol optical tweezers, a double ring electrodynamic balance and a concentric cylinder electrodynamic balance. The F77 polymer is shown to have a predictable effect on the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol: the ability of the droplet to uptake water from the air depends on the solute weight percent of sodium chloride present in a linear dose dependant manner. Unlike the smaller F77, a non-linear relationship was observed for the larger molecular weight F127 polymer, with significant suppression of hygroscopic growth (>50% by mass) for solution aerosol containing even only 1 wt% of the polymer and 99 wt% sodium chloride. The suppression of growth is shown to be consistent with the formation of mixed phase aerosol particles containing hydrophilic inorganic rich domains and hydrophobic polymer rich domains that sequester some of the inorganic component, with the two phases responding to changes in relative humidity independently. This independence of coupling with the gas phase is apparent in both the equilibrium state and the kinetics of water evaporation/condensation. By starting with a saline nebulizer solution with a concentration of F127 ∼10(-2)mM, a 12% reduction in the radius of all aerosol produced at a relative humidity (RH) of 84% is possible. The

  20. Simulating Secondary Inorganic Aerosols using the chemistry transport model MOCAGE version R2.15.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, J.; Josse, B.; Marécal, V.; Joly, M.

    2015-04-01

    In this study we develop a Secondary Inorganic Aerosol (SIA) module for the chemistry transport model MOCAGE developed at CNRM. Based on the thermodynamic equilibrium module ISORROPIA II, the new version of the model is evaluated both at the global scale and at the regional scale. The results show high concentrations of secondary inorganic aerosols in the most polluted regions being Europe, Asia and the eastern part of North America. Asia shows higher sulfate concentrations than other regions thanks to emissions reduction in Europe and North America. Using two simulations, one with and the other without secondary inorganic aerosol formation, the model global outputs are compared to previous studies, to MODIS AOD retrievals, and also to in situ measurements from the HTAP database. The model shows a better agreement in all geographical regions with MODIS AOD retrievals when introducing SIA. It also provides a good statistical agreement with in situ measurements of secondary inorganic aerosol composition: sulfate, nitrate and ammonium. In addition, the simulation with SIA gives generally a better agreement for secondary inorganic aerosols precursors (nitric acid, sulfur dioxide, ammonia) in particular with a reduction of the Modified Normalised Mean Bias (MNMB). At the regional scale, over Europe, the model simulation with SIA are compared to the in situ measurements from the EMEP database and shows a good agreement with secondary inorganic aerosol composition. The results at the regional scale are consistent with those obtained with the global simulations. The AIRBASE database was used to compare the model to regulated air quality pollutants being particulate matter, ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations. The introduction of the SIA in MOCAGE provides a reduction of the PM2.5 MNMB of 0.44 on a yearly basis and even 0.52 on a three spring months period (March, April, May) when SIA are maximum.

  1. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Marco; Öttinger, Hans Christian; Savin, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Interfacial thermodynamics has deep ramifications in understanding the boundary conditions of transport theories. We present a formulation of local equilibrium for interfaces that extends the thermodynamics of the "dividing surface," as introduced by Gibbs, to nonequilibrium settings such as evaporation or condensation. By identifying the precise position of the dividing surface in the interfacial region with a gauge degree of freedom, we exploit gauge-invariance requirements to consistently define the intensive variables for the interface. The model is verified under stringent conditions by employing high-precision nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of a coexisting vapor-liquid Lennard-Jones fluid. We conclude that the interfacial temperature is determined using the surface tension as a "thermometer," and it can be significantly different from the temperatures of the adjacent phases. Our findings lay foundations for nonequilibrium interfacial thermodynamics.

  2. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-03-01

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Furthermore, we propose two setups to test our predictions, namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model.

  3. Statistical thermodynamics of clustered populations.

    PubMed

    Matsoukas, Themis

    2014-08-01

    We present a thermodynamic theory for a generic population of M individuals distributed into N groups (clusters). We construct the ensemble of all distributions with fixed M and N, introduce a selection functional that embodies the physics that governs the population, and obtain the distribution that emerges in the scaling limit as the most probable among all distributions consistent with the given physics. We develop the thermodynamics of the ensemble and establish a rigorous mapping to regular thermodynamics. We treat the emergence of a so-called giant component as a formal phase transition and show that the criteria for its emergence are entirely analogous to the equilibrium conditions in molecular systems. We demonstrate the theory by an analytic model and confirm the predictions by Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Furthermore, we propose two setups to test our predictions, namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model. PMID:27003686

  5. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Furthermore, we propose two setups to test our predictions, namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model. PMID:27003686

  6. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-03-22

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Lastly, we propose two setups to test our predictions,more » namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model.« less

  7. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an interface.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Marco; Öttinger, Hans Christian; Savin, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Interfacial thermodynamics has deep ramifications in understanding the boundary conditions of transport theories. We present a formulation of local equilibrium for interfaces that extends the thermodynamics of the "dividing surface," as introduced by Gibbs, to nonequilibrium settings such as evaporation or condensation. By identifying the precise position of the dividing surface in the interfacial region with a gauge degree of freedom, we exploit gauge-invariance requirements to consistently define the intensive variables for the interface. The model is verified under stringent conditions by employing high-precision nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of a coexisting vapor-liquid Lennard-Jones fluid. We conclude that the interfacial temperature is determined using the surface tension as a "thermometer," and it can be significantly different from the temperatures of the adjacent phases. Our findings lay foundations for nonequilibrium interfacial thermodynamics.

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an interface.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Marco; Öttinger, Hans Christian; Savin, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Interfacial thermodynamics has deep ramifications in understanding the boundary conditions of transport theories. We present a formulation of local equilibrium for interfaces that extends the thermodynamics of the "dividing surface," as introduced by Gibbs, to nonequilibrium settings such as evaporation or condensation. By identifying the precise position of the dividing surface in the interfacial region with a gauge degree of freedom, we exploit gauge-invariance requirements to consistently define the intensive variables for the interface. The model is verified under stringent conditions by employing high-precision nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of a coexisting vapor-liquid Lennard-Jones fluid. We conclude that the interfacial temperature is determined using the surface tension as a "thermometer," and it can be significantly different from the temperatures of the adjacent phases. Our findings lay foundations for nonequilibrium interfacial thermodynamics. PMID:27300960

  9. Thermodynamics of electrochemical lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Maier, Joachim

    2013-05-01

    The thermodynamics of electrochemical lithium storage are examined by taking into account that it is the point defects that enable storage. While the Li defects are mobile, most of the other point defects have to be considered as frozen owing to the performance temperature being low compared to the melting point of the electrode materials. The defect chemistry needs to be considered to fully understand equilibrium charge/discharge curves. On this basis, single phase and multiphase storage mechanisms can be discussed in terms of theoretical storage capacity and theoretical voltage. Of paramount interest in the field of Li batteries are metastable materials, in particular nanocrystalline and amorphous materials. The thermodynamics of storage and voltage, also at interfaces, thus deserve a special treatment. The relationship between reversible cell voltage and lithium content is derived for the novel job-sharing mechanism. With respect to the classic storage modes, thermodynamic differences for cathodes and anodes are elaborated with a special attention being paid to the search for new materials. As this contribution concentrates on the equilibrium state, current-related phenomena (irreversible thermodynamics) are only briefly touched upon. PMID:23630067

  10. Thermodynamics of electrochemical lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Maier, Joachim

    2013-05-01

    The thermodynamics of electrochemical lithium storage are examined by taking into account that it is the point defects that enable storage. While the Li defects are mobile, most of the other point defects have to be considered as frozen owing to the performance temperature being low compared to the melting point of the electrode materials. The defect chemistry needs to be considered to fully understand equilibrium charge/discharge curves. On this basis, single phase and multiphase storage mechanisms can be discussed in terms of theoretical storage capacity and theoretical voltage. Of paramount interest in the field of Li batteries are metastable materials, in particular nanocrystalline and amorphous materials. The thermodynamics of storage and voltage, also at interfaces, thus deserve a special treatment. The relationship between reversible cell voltage and lithium content is derived for the novel job-sharing mechanism. With respect to the classic storage modes, thermodynamic differences for cathodes and anodes are elaborated with a special attention being paid to the search for new materials. As this contribution concentrates on the equilibrium state, current-related phenomena (irreversible thermodynamics) are only briefly touched upon.

  11. The Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Program with parametric study capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevigny, R.

    1981-01-01

    The program was developed to determine chemical equilibrium in complex systems. Using a free energy minimization technique, the program permits calculations such as: chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states; theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion; incident and reflected shock properties; and Chapman-Jouget detonation properties. It is shown that the same program can handle solid coal in an entrained flow coal gasification problem.

  12. The equilibrium of neural firing: A mathematical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Sizhong

    2014-12-15

    Inspired by statistical thermodynamics, we presume that neuron system has equilibrium condition with respect to neural firing. We show that, even with dynamically changeable neural connections, it is inevitable for neural firing to evolve to equilibrium. To study the dynamics between neural firing and neural connections, we propose an extended communication system where noisy channel has the tendency towards fixed point, implying that neural connections are always attracted into fixed points such that equilibrium can be reached. The extended communication system and its mathematics could be useful back in thermodynamics.

  13. Descriptive thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, David; Huntsman, Steven

    2006-06-01

    Thermodynamics (in concert with its sister discipline, statistical physics) can be regarded as a data reduction scheme based on partitioning a total system into a subsystem and a bath that weakly interact with each other. Whereas conventionally, the systems investigated require this form of data reduction in order to facilitate prediction, a different problem also occurs, in the context of communication networks, markets, etc. Such “empirically accessible” systems typically overwhelm observers with the sort of information that in the case of (say) a gas is effectively unobtainable. What is required for such complex interacting systems is not prediction (this may be impossible when humans besides the observer are responsible for the interactions) but rather, description as a route to understanding. Still, the need for a thermodynamical data reduction scheme remains. In this paper, we show how an empirical temperature can be computed for finite, empirically accessible systems, and further outline how this construction allows the age-old science of thermodynamics to be fruitfully applied to them.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of UF6 at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, H. A.; Deese, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    The equilibrium composition and the thermodynamic properties of the mixture resulting from the decomposition of uranium hexafluoride is calculated for temperatures ranging from 600 K to 4000 K at pressures from 0.01 atmospheres to 10 atmospheres.

  15. Co-gasification of biomass and plastics: pyrolysis kinetics studies, experiments on 100 kW dual fluidized bed pilot plant and development of thermodynamic equilibrium model and balances.

    PubMed

    Narobe, M; Golob, J; Klinar, D; Francetič, V; Likozar, B

    2014-06-01

    Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) of volatilization reaction kinetics for 50 wt.% mixtures of plastics (PE) and biomass (wood pellets) as well as for 100 wt.% plastics was conducted to predict decomposition times at 850°C and 900°C using iso-conversional model method. For mixtures, agreement with residence time of dual fluidized bed (DFB) reactor, treated as continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR), was obtained at large conversions. Mono-gasification of plastics and its co-gasification with biomass were performed in DFB pilot plant, using olivine as heterogeneous catalyst and heat transfer agent. It was found that co-gasification led to successful thermochemical conversion of plastics as opposed to mono-gasification. Unknown flow rates were determined applying nonlinear regression to energy and mass balances acknowledging combustion fuel, air, steam, feedstock, but also exiting char, tar, steam and other components in DFB gasification unit. Water-gas shift equilibrium and methanol synthesis requirements were incorporated into gasification model, based on measurements. PMID:24736208

  16. Co-gasification of biomass and plastics: pyrolysis kinetics studies, experiments on 100 kW dual fluidized bed pilot plant and development of thermodynamic equilibrium model and balances.

    PubMed

    Narobe, M; Golob, J; Klinar, D; Francetič, V; Likozar, B

    2014-06-01

    Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) of volatilization reaction kinetics for 50 wt.% mixtures of plastics (PE) and biomass (wood pellets) as well as for 100 wt.% plastics was conducted to predict decomposition times at 850°C and 900°C using iso-conversional model method. For mixtures, agreement with residence time of dual fluidized bed (DFB) reactor, treated as continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR), was obtained at large conversions. Mono-gasification of plastics and its co-gasification with biomass were performed in DFB pilot plant, using olivine as heterogeneous catalyst and heat transfer agent. It was found that co-gasification led to successful thermochemical conversion of plastics as opposed to mono-gasification. Unknown flow rates were determined applying nonlinear regression to energy and mass balances acknowledging combustion fuel, air, steam, feedstock, but also exiting char, tar, steam and other components in DFB gasification unit. Water-gas shift equilibrium and methanol synthesis requirements were incorporated into gasification model, based on measurements.

  17. Thermodynamical Aspects in Heavy Ion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; D'Agostino, M.; de Sanctis, J.; Fabbri, S.; Fuschini, E.; Geraci, E.; Guiot, B.; Vannini, G.; Verondini, E.; Gulminelli, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; Nannini, A.; Barlini, S.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.; Lanchais, A.; Vannucci, L.; Moroni, A.; Ordine, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Margagliotti, G. V.

    2005-12-01

    The excited nuclear systems formed in heavy ion collisions can be studied from a thermodynamical point of view. Charged finite systems have different behaviors with respect to infinite ones. After experimental selection of such equilibrated systems the extraction of thermodynamic coordinates is performed. Different signals compatible with a liquid-gas phase transition have been obtained. In particular a bimodal distribution of the asymmetry between the first two heaviest fragments is presented. Abnormally large fluctuations, which in thermodynamic equilibrium are associated to a negative branch of the heat capacity give indications of a first order phase transition. Perspectives for new generation experiments are indicated.

  18. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines.

    PubMed

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamics-independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. Our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentally relevant examples.

  19. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines.

    PubMed

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamics-independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. Our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentally relevant examples. PMID:26565187

  20. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-12

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamic —independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. As a result, our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentally relevant examples.

  1. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines

    DOE PAGES

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-12

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamic —independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. As a result, our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentallymore » relevant examples.« less

  2. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  3. Application of thermodynamics to silicate crystalline solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    A review of thermodynamic relations is presented, describing Guggenheim's regular solution models, the simple mixture, the zeroth approximation, and the quasi-chemical model. The possibilities of retrieving useful thermodynamic quantities from phase equilibrium studies are discussed. Such quantities include the activity-composition relations and the free energy of mixing in crystalline solutions. Theory and results of the study of partitioning of elements in coexisting minerals are briefly reviewed. A thermodynamic study of the intercrystalline and intracrystalline ion exchange relations gives useful information on the thermodynamic behavior of the crystalline solutions involved. Such information is necessary for the solution of most petrogenic problems and for geothermometry. Thermodynamic quantities for tungstates (CaWO4-SrWO4) are calculated.

  4. Competing effects of viscosity and surface-tension depression on the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Shiraiwa, M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.; Schilling, K.; Berkemeier, T.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of oligomers in biomass burning aerosol, as well as secondary organic aerosol derived from other sources, influences particle viscosity and can introduce kinetic limitations to water uptake. This, in turn, impacts aerosol optical properties and the efficiency with which these particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). To explore the influence of organic-component viscosity on aerosol hygroscopicity, the water-uptake behavior of aerosol systems comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and mixtures of PEG and ammonium sulfate (AS) was measured under sub- and supersaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions. Experiments were conducted with systems containing PEG with average molecular weights ranging from 200 to 10,000 g/mol, corresponding to a range in viscosity of 0.004 - 4.5 Pa s under dry conditions. While evidence suggests that viscous aerosol components can suppress water uptake at RH < 90%, under supersaturated conditions (with respect to RH), an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular weight was observed. We attribute this to an increase in the efficiency with which PEG serves as a surfactant with increasing molecular weight. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures and, in fact, a modest increase in CCN activity is observed for the PEG 10,000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 4% reduction in critical activation diameter. Experimental results are compared with calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients model and the potential influence of kinetic limitations to observed water uptake is further explored with the Kinetic Multi-Layer Model of Gas-Particle Interactions. Results suggest the competing effects of organic-component viscosity and surface-tension depression may lead to RH-dependent differences in hygroscopicity for oligomers and other surface-active compounds present in atmospheric

  5. Thermodynamic aspects of vitrification.

    PubMed

    Wowk, Brian

    2010-02-01

    Vitrification is a process in which a liquid begins to behave as a solid during cooling without any substantial change in molecular arrangement or thermodynamic state variables. The physical phenomenon of vitrification is relevant to both cryopreservation by freezing, in which cells survive in glass between ice crystals, and cryopreservation by vitrification in which a whole sample is vitrified. The change from liquid to solid behavior is called the glass transition. It is coincident with liquid viscosity reaching 10(13) Poise during cooling, which corresponds to a shear stress relaxation time of several minutes. The glass transition can be understood on a molecular level as a loss of rotational and translational degrees of freedom over a particular measurement timescale, leaving only bond vibration within a fixed molecular structure. Reduced freedom of molecular movement results in decreased heat capacity and thermal expansivity in glass relative to the liquid state. In cryoprotectant solutions, the change from liquid to solid properties happens over a approximately 10 degrees C temperature interval centered on a glass transition temperature, typically near -120 degrees C (+/-10 degrees C) for solutions used for vitrification. Loss of freedom to quickly rearrange molecular position causes liquids to depart from thermodynamic equilibrium as they turn into a glass during vitrification. Residual molecular mobility below the glass transition temperature allows glass to very slowly contract, release heat, and decrease entropy during relaxation toward equilibrium. Although diffusion is practically non-existent below the glass transition temperature, small local movements of molecules related to relaxation have consequences for cryobiology. In particular, ice nucleation in supercooled vitrification solutions occurs at remarkable speed until at least 15 degrees C below the glass transition temperature. PMID:19538955

  6. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed.

  7. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kammerlander, P; Anders, J

    2016-02-26

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed.

  8. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kammerlander, P; Anders, J

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed. PMID:26916503

  9. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed. PMID:26916503

  10. Thermodynamics and flow-frames for dissipative relativistic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ván, P.; Biró, T. S.

    2014-01-14

    A general thermodynamic treatment of dissipative relativistic fluids is introduced, where the temperature four vector is not parallel to the velocity field of the fluid. Generic stability and kinetic equilibrium points out a particular thermodynamics, where the temperature vector is parallel to the enthalpy flow vector and the choice of the flow fixes the constitutive functions for viscous stress and heat. The linear stability of the homogeneous equilibrium is proved in a mixed particle-energy flow-frame.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of the disorder-to-α-helical transition of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein reveals an equilibrium intermediate representing the most compact conformation.

    PubMed

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Jenkins, Andrew D; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George

    2015-05-22

    The intrinsically disordered, 18.5-kDa isoform of myelin basic protein (MBP) is a peripheral membrane protein that is essential to proper myelin formation in the central nervous system. MBP acts in oligodendrocytes both to adjoin membrane leaflets to each other in forming myelin and as a hub in numerous protein-protein and protein-membrane interaction networks. Like many intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), MBP multifunctionality arises from its high conformational plasticity and its ability to undergo reversible disorder-to-order transitions. One such transition is the disorder-to-α-helical conformational change that is induced upon MBP-membrane binding. Here, we have investigated the disorder-to-α-helical transition of MBP-derived α-peptides and the full-length 18.5-kDa protein. This transition was induced through titration of the membrane-mimetic solvent trifluoroethanol into both protein and peptide solutions, and conformational change was monitored using circular dichroism spectroscopy, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid binding, tryptophan fluorescence quenching, and Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer measurements. The data suggest that the disorder-to-α-helical transition of MBP follows a 3-state model: disordered↔intermediate↔α-helical, with each of the identified equilibrium states likely representing a conformational ensemble. The disordered state is characterized by slight compaction with little regular secondary structure, whereas the intermediate is also disordered but globally more compact. Surprisingly, the α-helical conformation is less compact than the intermediate. This study suggests that multifunctionality in MBP could arise from differences in the population of energetically distinct ensembles under different conditions and also provides an example of an IDP that undergoes cooperative global conformation change.

  12. Nanoscopic Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weihong

    2016-09-20

    Conventional thermodynamics for bulk substances encounters challenges when one considers materials on the nanometer scale. Quantities such as entropy, enthalpy, free energy, melting temperature, ordering temperature, Debye temperature, and specific heat no longer remain constant but change with the crystal dimension, size, and morphology. Often, one phenomenon is associated with a variety of theories from different perspectives. Still, a model that can reconcile the size and shape dependence of the thermal properties of the nanoscaled substances remains one of the goals of nanoscience and nanotechnology. This Account highlights the nanoscopic thermodynamics for nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanofilms, with particular emphasis on the bond energy model. The central idea is that the atomic cohesive energy determines the thermodynamic performance of a substance and the cohesive energy varies with the atomic coordination environment. It is the cohesive energy difference between the core and the shell that dictates the nanoscopic thermodynamics. This bond energy model rationalizes the following: (i) how the surface dangling bonds depress the melting temperature, entropy, and enthalpy; (ii) how the order-disorder transition of the nanoparticles depends on particle size and how their stability may vary when they are embedded in an appropriate matrix; (iii) predictions of the existence of face-centered cubic structures of Ti, Zr, and Hf at small size; (iv) how two elements that are immiscible in the bulk can form an alloy on the nanoscale, where the critical size can be predicted. The model has enabled us to reproduce the size and shape dependence of a number of physical properties, such as melting temperature, melting entropy, melting enthalpy, ordering temperature, Gibbs free energy, and formation heat, among others, for materials such as Pd, Au, Ag, Cu, Ni, Sn, Pb, In, Bi, Al, Ti, Zr, Hf, In-Al, Ag-Ni, Co-Pt, Cu-Ag, Cu-Ni, Au-Ni, Ag-Pt, and Au-Pt on the nanometer scale

  13. Efficiency of muscle contraction. The chemimechanic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E. W.

    1991-10-01

    Although muscle contraction is one of the principal themes of biological research, the exact mechanism whereby the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis is converted into mechanical work remains elusive. The high thermodynamic efficiency of the process, above all, is difficult to explain on the basis of present theories. A model of the elementary effect in muscle contraction is proposed which aims at high thermodynamic efficiency based on an approximate equilibrium between chemical and mechanical forces throughout the transfer of free energy. The experimental results described in the literature support the assumption that chemimechanic equilibrium is approximated by a free energy transfer system based on the binding of divalent metal ions to the myosin light chains. Muscle contraction demonstrated without light chains is expected to proceed with a considerably lower efficiency. Free energy transfer systems based on the binding of ions to proteins seem to be widespread in the cell. By establishing an approximate chemimechanic equilibrium, they could facilitate biological reactions considerably and save large amounts of free energy. The concept of chemimechanic equilibrium is seen as a supplementation to the concept of chemiosmotic equilibrium introduced for the membrane transport by P. Mitchell.

  14. Far-from-equilibrium kinetic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubí, J. Miguel; Pérez-Madrid, Agustin

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the kinetics of activated processes that take place under far-from-equilibrium conditions, when the system is subjected to external driving forces or gradients or at high values of affinities. We use mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics to show that when a force is applied, the reaction rate depends on the force. In the case of a chemical reaction at high affinity values, the reaction rate is no longer constant but depends on affinity, which implies that the law of mass action is no longer valid. This result is in good agreement with the kinetic theory of reacting gases, which uses a Chapman-Enskog expansion of the probability distribution.

  15. Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator

    2004-09-01

    The Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package is a general library for aerosol modeling to address aerosol general dynamics, including formation from gas phase reactions, surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis with linkage to DSMC studies, and thermal radiative transport. The library is based upon Cantera, a C++ Cal Tech code that handles gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics. The method uses a discontinuous galerkinmore » formulation for the condensation and coagulation operator that conserves particles, elements, and enthalpy up to round-off error. Both O-D and 1-D time dependent applications have been developed with the library. Multiple species in the solid phase are handled as well. The O-D application, called Tdcads (Time Dependent CADS) is distributed with the library. Tdcads can address both constant volume and constant pressure adiabatic homogeneous problems. An extensive set of sample problems for Tdcads is also provided.« less

  16. Adsorption thermodynamics of Methylene Blue onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Hong, Song; Wen, Cheng; He, Jing; Gan, Fuxing; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2009-08-15

    The effect of temperature on the equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue dye from aqueous solution using bentonite was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using three widely applied isotherms: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson. A non-linear method was used for comparing the best fit of the isotherms. Best fit was found to be Redlich-Peterson isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, and DeltaS degrees were calculated using adsorption equilibrium constant obtained from the Langmuir isotherm. Results suggested that the Methylene Blue adsorption on bentonite was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  17. Concentrations and Fluxes of Water-Soluble Reactive Nitrogen Gases and Aerosol Compounds Above a Forest Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, V.; Trebs, I.; Moravek, A.; Zhu, Z.; Meixner, F. X.

    2008-12-01

    HNO3 gradients are indicating net deposition. These gradients may be biased by micrometeorology and chemistry. For example, gradients in NH3 and HNO3 may be product of a phase change in the thermodynamic equilibrium between NH3, HNO3 and particulate NH4NO3, induced by a temperature and/or humidity gradient above the forest canopy. The equilibrium will be investigated for the pure NH3- HNO3- NH4NO3 triad as well as for more complex inorganic aerosol mixtures and chemical timescales will be compared to turbulent timescales, to estimate the potential of chemical interferences affecting the gradient. If compounds react sufficiently slow and may therefore be treated as passive tracers, prerequisites for the application of micrometeorological methods to derive fluxes from gradients will be investigated.

  18. Tracking Water Diffusion Fronts in a Highly Viscous Aerosol Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements indicate that atmospheric secondary aerosol particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state [1]. In contrast to liquid state particles, the gas phase equilibration is kinetically limited and governed by condensed phase diffusion. In recent water diffusion experiments on highly viscous single aerosol particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) we observed a characteristic shift behavior of the Mie whispering gallery modes (WGM) indicative of the changing radial structure of the particle, thus providing us with an experimental method to track the diffusion process inside the particle. When a highly viscous, homogeneous particle is exposed to an abrupt increase in relative humidity, the rapid gas phase diffusion and strong concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the condensed phase lead to extremely steep water concentration gradients inside the particle, reminiscent of diffusion fronts. The resulting quasi step-like concentration profile motivates the introduction of a simple core-shell model describing the morphology of the non-equilibrium particle during humidification. The subsequent particle growth and reduction of the shell refractive index can be observed as red and blueshift behavior of the WGM, respectively. The shift pattern can be attributed to a core-shell radius ratio and particle radius derived from model calculations [2]. If supplemented with growth information obtained from the WGM redshift and thermodynamic equilibrium data, we can infer a comprehensive picture of the time evolution of the diffusion fronts in the framework of our core-shell model. The measured time dependent concentration profile is then compared with simulations solving the non-linear diffusion equation [3] [1] Virtanen, A., et al., Nature, 467, 824-827, 2010 [2] Kaiser, T., Schweiger, G., Computers in Physics, Vol. 7, No. 6, 682-686, Nov/Dec 1993 [3] Zobrist, B., Soonsin, V., Luo, B.P., Peter, T. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem

  19. First law of black Saturn thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2007-06-15

    The physical process version and equilibrium state version of the first law of thermodynamics for a black object consisting of n-dimensional charged stationary axisymmetric black hole surrounded by a black rings, the so-called black Saturn, was derived. The general setting for our derivations is n-dimensional dilaton gravity with p+1 strength form fields.

  20. First law of p-brane thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2009-08-15

    We study the physical process version and the equilibrium state version of the first law of thermodynamics for a charged p-brane. The general setting for our investigations is (n+p+1)-dimensional Einstein dilaton gravity with (p+2) strength form fields.

  1. Modeling Gas-Particle Partitioning of SOA: Effects of Aerosol Physical State and RH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    Aged tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. In liquid aerosol particles non-ideal mixing of all species determines whether the condensed phase undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation or whether it is stable in a single mixed phase, and whether it contains solid salts in equilibrium with their saturated solution. The extended thermodynamic model AIOMFAC is able to predict such phase states by representing the variety of organic components using functional groups within a group-contribution concept. The number and composition of different condensed phases impacts the diversity of reaction media for multiphase chemistry and the gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile species. Recent studies show that under certain conditions biogenic and other organic-rich particles can be present in a highly viscous, semisolid or amorphous solid physical state, with consequences regarding reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. We present results of new gas-particle partitioning computations for aerosol chamber data using a model based on AIOMFAC activity coefficients and state-of-the-art vapor pressure estimation methods. Different environmental conditions in terms of temperature, relative humidity (RH), salt content, amount of precursor VOCs, and physical state of the particles are considered. We show how modifications of absorptive and adsorptive gas-particle mass transfer affects the total aerosol mass in the calculations and how the results of these modeling approaches compare to data of aerosol chamber experiments, such as alpha-pinene oxidation SOA. For a condensed phase in a mixed liquid state containing ammonium sulfate, the model predicts liquid-liquid phase separation up to high RH in case of, on average, moderately hydrophilic organic compounds, such as first generation oxidation products of alpha-pinene. The computations also reveal that treating liquid phases as ideal

  2. Natural thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annila, Arto

    2016-02-01

    The principle of increasing entropy is derived from statistical physics of open systems assuming that quanta of actions, as undividable basic build blocks, embody everything. According to this tenet, all systems evolve from one state to another either by acquiring quanta from their surroundings or by discarding quanta to the surroundings in order to attain energetic balance in least time. These natural processes result in ubiquitous scale-free patterns: skewed distributions that accumulate in a sigmoid manner and hence span log-log scales mostly as straight lines. Moreover, the equation for least-time motions reveals that evolution is by nature a non-deterministic process. Although the obtained insight in thermodynamics from the notion of quanta in motion yields nothing new, it accentuates that contemporary comprehension is impaired when modeling evolution as a computable process by imposing conservation of energy and thereby ignoring that quantum of actions are the carriers of energy from the system to its surroundings.

  3. Advances in thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sieniutycz, S. ); Salamon, P. )

    1990-01-01

    This book covers: nonequilibrium thermodynamics for solar energy applications; finite-time thermodynamics as applied to solar power conversion; thermodynamics and economics; exergy analysis; and an analysis of cumulative exergy consumption and exergy losses.

  4. A New Application for Radioimmunoassay: Measurement of Thermodynamic Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angstadt, Carol N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which an equilibrium radioimmunoassay (RIA) is used to estimate thermodynamic parameters such as equilibrium constants. The experiment is simple and inexpensive, and it introduces a technique that is important in the clinical chemistry and research laboratory. Background information, procedures, and results are…

  5. First implementation of secondary inorganic aerosols in the MOCAGE version R2.15.0 chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, J.; Josse, B.; Marécal, V.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop a secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) module for the MOCAGE chemistry transport model developed at CNRM. The aim is to have a module suitable for running at different model resolutions and for operational applications with reasonable computing times. Based on the ISORROPIA II thermodynamic equilibrium module, the new version of the model is presented and evaluated at both the global and regional scales. The results show high concentrations of secondary inorganic aerosols in the most polluted regions: Europe, Asia and the eastern part of North America. Asia shows higher sulfate concentrations than other regions thanks to emission reductions in Europe and North America. Using two simulations, one with and the other without secondary inorganic aerosol formation, the global model outputs are compared to previous studies, to MODIS AOD retrievals, and also to in situ measurements from the HTAP database. The model shows a better agreement with MODIS AOD retrievals in all geographical regions after introducing the new SIA scheme. It also provides a good statistical agreement with in situ measurements of secondary inorganic aerosol composition: sulfate, nitrate and ammonium. In addition, the simulation with SIA generally gives a better agreement with observations for secondary inorganic aerosol precursors (nitric acid, sulfur dioxide, ammonia), in particular with a reduction of the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB). At the regional scale, over Europe, the model simulation with SIA is compared to the in situ measurements from the EMEP database and shows a good agreement with secondary inorganic aerosol composition. The results at the regional scale are consistent with those obtained from the global simulations. The AIRBASE database was used to compare the model to regulated air quality pollutants: particulate matter, ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations. Introduction of the SIA in MOCAGE provides a reduction in the PM2.5 MNMB of 0.44 on a

  6. Key parameters controlling OH-initiated formation of secondary organic aerosol in the aqueous phase (aqSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, Barbara; Sorooshian, Armin; Lim, Yong B.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2014-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous phase of cloud droplets and aerosol particles (aqSOA) might contribute substantially to the total SOA burden and help to explain discrepancies between observed and predicted SOA properties. In order to implement aqSOA formation in models, key processes controlling formation within the multiphase system have to be identified. We explore parameters affecting phase transfer and OH(aq)-initiated aqSOA formation as a function of OH(aq) availability. Box model results suggest OH(aq)-limited photochemical aqSOA formation in cloud water even if aqueous OH(aq) sources are present. This limitation manifests itself as an apparent surface dependence of aqSOA formation. We estimate chemical OH(aq) production fluxes, necessary to establish thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases (based on Henry's law constants) for both cloud and aqueous particles. Estimates show that no (currently known) OH(aq) source in cloud water can remove this limitation, whereas in aerosol water, it might be feasible. Ambient organic mass (oxalate) measurements in stratocumulus clouds as a function of cloud drop surface area and liquid water content exhibit trends similar to model results. These findings support the use of parameterizations of cloud-aqSOA using effective droplet radius rather than liquid water volume or drop surface area. Sensitivity studies suggest that future laboratory studies should explore aqSOA yields in multiphase systems as a function of these parameters and at atmospherically relevant OH(aq) levels. Since aerosol-aqSOA formation significantly depends on OH(aq) availability, parameterizations might be less straightforward, and oxidant (OH) sources within aerosol water emerge as one of the major uncertainties in aerosol-aqSOA formation.

  7. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper the Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model determines the partitioning of organic compounds between the gas and particle phases. It is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computation time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption into the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients and phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only into the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only into the organic phases of particles) or both (condenses into both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC (UNIversal Functional group Activity Coefficient; Fredenslund et al., 1975) thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) parameterization for medium- and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium representation and a dynamic representation of organic aerosols (OAs). In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phases could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation-evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phases due to the high viscosity. An implicit dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) is available in SOAP with OAs divided into layers, the first layer being at the center of the particle (slowly

  8. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  9. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  10. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-09-01

    .5 components, PM2.5, and PM10 over Europe as well as AOD and CDNC on the global scale. The explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics using the ISORROPIA II model improves the prediction of all major PM2.5 components and their gaseous precursors in some regions as well as downwelling shortwave radiation, SWCF, and cloud condensation nuclei at a supersaturation of 0.5% on the global scale. For simulations of 2001-2005 with all the modified and new treatments, the improved model predicts that on global average, SWCF increases by 2.7 W m-2, reducing the normalized mean bias (NMB) of SWCF from -5.4 to 1.2%. Uncertainties in emissions can largely explain the inaccurate prediction of precursor gases (e.g., SO2, NH3, and NO) and primary aerosols (e.g., black carbon and primary organic matter). Additional factors leading to the discrepancies between model predictions and observations include assumptions associated with equilibrium partitioning for fine particles assumed in ISORROPIA II, irreversible gas/particle mass transfer treatment for coarse particles, uncertainties in model treatments such as dust emissions, secondary organic aerosol formation, multi-phase chemistry, cloud microphysics, aerosol-cloud interaction, dry and wet deposition, and model parameters (e.g., accommodation coefficients and prefactors of the nucleation power law) as well as uncertainties in model configuration such as the use of a coarse-grid resolution.

  11. Experimental study of elementary collection efficiency of aerosols by spray: Design of the experimental device

    SciTech Connect

    Ducret, D.; Vendel, J.; Garrec. S.L.

    1995-02-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant containment building, in which pressure and temperature could increase because of a overheating reactor accident, can be achieved by spraying water drops. The spray reduces the pressure and the temperature levels by condensation of steam on cold water drops. The more stringent thermodynamic conditions are a pressure of 5.10{sup 5} Pa (due to steam emission) and a temperature of 413 K. Moreover its energy dissipation function, the spray leads to the washout of fission product particles emitted in the reactor building atmosphere. The present study includes a large program devoted to the evaluation of realistic washout rates. The aim of this work is to develop experiments in order to determine the collection efficiency of aerosols by a single drop. To do this, the experimental device has to be designed with fundamental criteria:-Thermodynamic conditions have to be representative of post-accident atmosphere. Thermodynamic equilibrium has to be attained between the water drops and the gaseous phase. Thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and mechanical effects have to be studied independently. Operating conditions have to be homogenous and constant during each experiment. This paper presents the design of the experimental device. In practice, the consequences on the design of each of the criteria given previously and the necessity of being representative of the real conditions will be described.

  12. Community Radiative Transfer Model for Aerosol Radiance Assimilation in Global and Regional Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; van Delst, P. F.; Groff, D.; Collard, A.; Boukabara, S. A.; Weng, F.; Derber, J.

    2013-12-01

    Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM), developed at the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, has being operationally supporting satellite radiance assimilation for weather forecasting in NOAA and NASA. The CRTM is also supporting the MODIS, GOES-R and JPSS/NPP missions for instrument calibration, validation, monitoring long-term trending, and satellite products using a retrieval approach. The CRTM development is contributed to by multiple U.S. government agencies, universities as well as private companies. This paper will present the latest CRTM version 2.1, which is applicable for passive microwave, infrared and visible sensors. It supports all NOAA satellite instruments, NASA MODIS, and many foreign meteorological satellites. In this study, we will describe the CRTM functionalities and capabilities in the new release of version 2.1. The following are the highlights of the CRTM version: 1. Dual Transmittance models, ODAS and ODPS, 2. Sensor Specific Transmittance models: Fast Transmittance Model for Stratospheric Sounding Unit to take account for CO2 cell pressure variation, Fast Transmittance Model for SSMIS Upper Atmospheric Sounding (UAS) Channels including Zeeman-splitting. 3. Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) Radiative Transfer 4. Surface Emissivity/Reflectivity Models 5. Aerosol, Cloud, and Molecular Scattering Models Pre-computed look-up tables for extinction, scattering coefficients and phase functions 6. Dual Radiative Transfer Solver, Adding Double-Adding method [1][2], Adding Matrix Operator method, and SOI method. The CRTM is flexible for users' applications, for example one can simulate aircraft measurements, turn scattering off for fast calculations, use an aerosol optical depth (AOD) module for aerosol optical depth calculation, use an emissivity interface to input your own emissivity data base, and use a channel selection function for specified channel radiance calculations. In this presentation, we focus on aerosol product

  13. Simulating Metabolism with Statistical Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, William R.

    2014-01-01

    New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed. PMID:25089525

  14. Hierarchical condensation near phase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olemskoi, A. I.; Yushchenko, O. V.; Borisyuk, V. N.; Zhilenko, T. I.; Kosminska, Yu. O.; Perekrestov, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    A novel mechanism of new phase formation is studied both experimentally and theoretically in the example of quasi-equilibrium stationary condensation in an ion-plasma sputterer. Copper condensates are obtained to demonstrate that a specific network structure is formed as a result of self-assembly in the course of deposition. The fractal pattern related is inherent in the phenomena of diffusion limited aggregation. Condensate nuclei are shown to form statistical ensemble of hierarchically subordinated objects distributed in ultrametric space. The Langevin equation and the Fokker-Planck equation related are found to describe stationary distribution of thermodynamic potential variations at condensation. Time dependence of the formation probability of branching structures is found to clarify the experimental situation.

  15. Equilibrium Potentials of Membrane Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jui H.; Copeland, Eva

    1973-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic theory of the equilibrium potentials of membrane electrodes is formulated and applied to the glass electrode for measurement of pH. The new formulation assumes the selective adsorption or binding of specific ions on the surface of the membrane which may or may not be permeable to the ion, and includes the conventional derivation based on reversible ion transport across membranes as a special case. To test the theory, a platinum wire was coated with a mixture of stearic acid and methyl-tri-n-octyl-ammonium stearate. When this coated electrode was immersed in aqueous phosphate solution, its potential was found to be a linear function of pH from pH 2 to 12 with a slope equal to the theoretical value of 59.0 mV per pH unit at 24°. PMID:4516194

  16. CET89 - CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH TRANSPORT PROPERTIES, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B.

    1994-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need chemical equilibrium composition data to calculate the theoretical thermodynamic properties of a chemical system. This information is essential in the design and analysis of equipment such as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical processing equipment. The substantial amount of numerical computation required to obtain equilibrium compositions and transport properties for complex chemical systems led scientists at NASA's Lewis Research Center to develop CET89, a program designed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of these systems. CET89 is a general program which will calculate chemical equilibrium compositions and mixture properties for any chemical system with available thermodynamic data. Generally, mixtures may include condensed and gaseous products. CET89 performs the following operations: it 1) obtains chemical equilibrium compositions for assigned thermodynamic states, 2) calculates dilute-gas transport properties of complex chemical mixtures, 3) obtains Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties for gaseous species, 4) calculates incident and reflected shock properties in terms of assigned velocities, and 5) calculates theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion. The rocket performance function allows the option of assuming either a finite area or an infinite area combustor. CET89 accommodates problems involving up to 24 reactants, 20 elements, and 600 products (400 of which may be condensed). The program includes a library of thermodynamic and transport properties in the form of least squares coefficients for possible reaction products. It includes thermodynamic data for over 1300 gaseous and condensed species and transport data for 151 gases. The subroutines UTHERM and UTRAN convert thermodynamic and transport data to unformatted form for faster processing. The program conforms to the FORTRAN 77 standard, except for

  17. Measuring the Thermodynamics of the Alloy/Scale Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed for the direct measurement of the thermodynamic properties of the alloy and oxide compound at the alloy/scale interface observed during steady-state oxidation. The thermodynamic properties of the alloy/scale interface define the driving force for solid-state transport in the alloy and oxide compound. Accurate knowledge of thermodynamic properties of the interface will advance our understanding of oxidation behavior. The method is based on the concept of local equilibrium and assumes that an alloy+scale equilibrium very closely approximates the alloy/scale interface observed during steady-state oxidation. The thermodynamics activities of this alloy+scale equilibrium are measured directly by Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometer (KEMS) using the vapor pressure technique. The theory and some practical considerations of this method are discussed in terms of beta-NiAl oxidation.

  18. Exploring Equilibrium Chemistry for Hot Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Challener, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Young 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime of 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets (Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an updated thermodynamic library) is validated with the thermochemical model presented in Venot et al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis has then been extended to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated from both models’ abundances using the open source code transit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  19. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium in Hot Jovians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Yung 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets(Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an up-dated thermodynamic library) is compared with the thermochemical model presented in Venotet al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis is then applied to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated and we compare both models' outputs using the open source codetransit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. Thiswork was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  20. Approaches to the Treatment of Equilibrium Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2003-10-01

    Perturbations from equilibrium are treated in the textbooks by a combination of Le Châtelier's principle, the comparison of the equilibrium constant K with the reaction quotient Q,and the kinetic approach. Each of these methods is briefly reviewed. This is followed by derivations of the variation of the equilibrium value of the extent of reaction, ξeq, with various parameters on which it depends. Near equilibrium this relationship can be represented by a straight line. The equilibrium system can be regarded as moving on this line as the parameter is varied. The slope of the line depends on quantities like enthalpy of reaction, volume of reaction and so forth. The derivation shows that these quantities pertain to the equilibrium system, not the standard state. Also, the derivation makes clear what kind of assumptions underlie our conclusions. The derivation of these relations involves knowledge of thermodynamics that is well within the grasp of junior level physical chemistry students. The conclusions that follow from the derived relations are given as subsidiary rules in the form of the slope of ξeq, with T, p, et cetera. The rules are used to develop a visual way of predicting the direction of shift of a perturbed system. This method can be used to supplement one of the other methods even at the introductory level.

  1. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-11-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound.

  2. Thermodynamic benchmark study using Biacore technology.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Iva; Papalia, Giuseppe A; Rich, Rebecca L; Bedinger, Daniel; Brophy, Susan; Condon, Brad; Deng, Ta; Emerick, Anne W; Guan, Hann-Wen; Hayden, Tanya; Heutmekers, Thomas; Hoorelbeke, Bart; McCroskey, Mark C; Murphy, Mary M; Nakagawa, Terry; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Qin, Xiaochun; Rebe, Sabina; Tomasevic, Nenad; Tsang, Tiffany; Waddell, M Brett; Zhang, Fred Feiyu; Leavitt, Stephanie; Myszka, David G

    2007-05-01

    A total of 22 individuals participated in this benchmark study to characterize the thermodynamics of small-molecule inhibitor-enzyme interactions using Biacore instruments. Participants were provided with reagents (the enzyme carbonic anhydrase II, which was immobilized onto the sensor surface, and four sulfonamide-based inhibitors) and were instructed to collect response data from 6 to 36 degrees C. van't Hoff enthalpies and entropies were calculated from the temperature dependence of the binding constants. The equilibrium dissociation and thermodynamic constants determined from the Biacore analysis matched the values determined using isothermal titration calorimetry. These results demonstrate that immobilization of the enzyme onto the sensor surface did not alter the thermodynamics of these interactions. This benchmark study also provides insights into the opportunities and challenges in carrying out thermodynamic studies using optical biosensors.

  3. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  4. Preparation of silicon carbide SiC-based nanopowders by the aerosol-assisted synthesis and the DC thermal plasma synthesis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Czosnek, Cezary; Bućko, Mirosław M.; Janik, Jerzy F.; Olejniczak, Zbigniew; Bystrzejewski, Michał; Łabędź, Olga; Huczko, Andrzej

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Make-up of the SiC-based nanopowders is a function of the C:Si:O ratio in precursor. • Two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis offers conditions close to equilibrium. • DC thermal plasma synthesis yields kinetically controlled SiC products. - Abstract: Nanosized SiC-based powders were prepared from selected liquid-phase organosilicon precursors by the aerosol-assisted synthesis, the DC thermal plasma synthesis, and a combination of the two methods. The two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis method provides at the end conditions close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The single-stage thermal plasma method is characterized by short particle residence times in the reaction zone, which can lead to kinetically controlled products. The by-products and final nanopowders were characterized by powder XRD, infrared spectroscopy FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy SEM, and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. BET specific surface areas of the products were determined by standard physical adsorption of nitrogen at 77 K. The major component in all synthesis routes was found to be cubic silicon carbide β-SiC with average crystallite sizes ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. In some cases, it was accompanied by free carbon, elemental silicon or silica nanoparticles. The final mesoporous β-SiC-based nanopowders have a potential as affordable catalyst supports.

  5. Entropy production determination of the ambipolar solution nearest equilibrium. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, P.J.; Myra, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    A general derivation of the steady state entropy production equation is presented for a confined plasma which loses particles and energy via radial transport and, perhaps, end loss. The resulting equation is employed to determine which root or solution at each pressure surface is closest to local thermodynamic equilibrium when more than one self-consistent or ambipolar solution is possible. The solution closest to local thermodynamic equilibrium is presumed to be the one with the smallest total collisional entropy production rate. This solution makes the distribution functions as close to local Maxwellians as possible.

  6. Stochastic thermodynamics for active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The theoretical understanding of active matter, which is driven out of equilibrium by directed motion, is still fragmental and model oriented. Stochastic thermodynamics, on the other hand, is a comprehensive theoretical framework for driven systems that allows to define fluctuating work and heat. We apply these definitions to active matter, assuming that dissipation can be modelled by effective non-conservative forces. We show that, through the work, conjugate extensive and intensive observables can be defined even in non-equilibrium steady states lacking a free energy. As an illustration, we derive the expressions for the pressure and interfacial tension of active Brownian particles. The latter becomes negative despite the observed stable phase separation. We discuss this apparent contradiction, highlighting the role of fluctuations, and we offer a tentative explanation.

  7. Thermodynamics in f(R,T) theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M.; Zubair, M. E-mail: mzubairkk@gmail.com

    2012-03-01

    A non-equilibrium picture of thermodynamics is discussed at the apparent horizon of FRW universe in f(R,T) gravity, where R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We take two forms of the energy-momentum tensor of dark components and demonstrate that equilibrium description of thermodynamics is not achievable in both cases. We check the validity of the first and second law of thermodynamics in this scenario. It is shown that the Friedmann equations can be expressed in the form of first law of thermodynamics T{sub h}dS'{sub h}+T{sub h}d{sub jmath}S' = −dE'+W'dV, where d{sub jmath}S' is the entropy production term. Finally, we conclude that the second law of thermodynamics holds both in phantom and non-phantom phases.

  8. Conservation-dissipation formalism of irreversible thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Hong, Liu; Yang, Zaibao; Yong, Wen-An

    2015-06-01

    We propose a conservation-dissipation formalism (CDF) for coarse-grained descriptions of irreversible processes. This formalism is based on a stability criterion for non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The criterion ensures that non-equilibrium states tend to equilibrium in long time. As a systematic methodology, CDF provides a feasible procedure in choosing non-equilibrium state variables and determining their evolution equations. The equations derived in CDF have a unified elegant form. They are globally hyperbolic, allow a convenient definition of weak solutions, and are amenable to existing numerics. More importantly, CDF is a genuinely nonlinear formalism and works for systems far away from equilibrium. With this formalism, we formulate novel thermodynamics theories for heat conduction in rigid bodies and non-isothermal compressible Maxwell fluid flows as two typical examples. In these examples, the non-equilibrium variables are exactly the conjugate variables of the heat fluxes or stress tensors. The new theory generalizes Cattaneo's law or Maxwell's law in a regularized and nonlinear fashion.

  9. New Horizons in Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Geoffrey Gordon

    1991-02-01

    This thesis collects five papers which treat the theory of horizon thermodynamics and its applications to cosmology. In the first paper I consider general, spherically symmetric spacetimes with cosmological and black hole horizons. I find that a state of thermal equilibrium may exist in classical manifolds with two horizons so long as a matter distribution is present. I calculate the Euclidean action for non-classical manifolds with and without boundary and relate it to the grand canonical weighting factor. I find that the mean thermal energy of the cosmological horizon is negative. In the second paper I derive the first law of thermodynamics for bounded, static, spherically symmetric spacetimes which include a matter distribution and either a black hole or cosmological horizon. I calculate heat capacities associated with matter/horizon systems and find that they may be positive or negative depending on the matter configuration. I discuss the case in which the cosmological constant is allowed to vary and conclude that the Hawking/Coleman mechanisms for explaining the low value of the cosmological constant are not well formulated. In the third paper, co-authored by Jorma Louko, we analyze variational principles for non-smooth metrics. These principles give insight to the problem of constructing minisuperspace path integrals in horizon statistical mechanics and quantum cosmology. We demonstrate that smoothness conditions can be derived from the variational principle as equations of motion. We suggest a new prescription for minisuperspace path integrals on the manifold | D times S^2. In the fourth paper, I examine the contribution of the horizon energy density to black hole temperature. I show the existence of positive heat capacity solutions in the small mass regime. In the fifth paper, co-authored by Diego Pavon we investigate the role of primordial black holes in the very early universe under SU(3) times SU(2) times U (1), SU(5), and their supersymmetric

  10. Non-Equilibrium Transitions of Heliospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in Space Physics theory have established the connection between non-extensive Statistical Mechanics and space plasmas by providing a theoretical basis for the empirically derived kappa distributions commonly used to describe the phase space distribution functions of these systems [1]. The non-equilibrium temperature and the kappa index that govern these distributions are the two independent controlling parameters of non-equilibrium systems [1-3]. The significance of the kappa index is primarily given by its role in identifying the non-equilibrium stationary states, and measuring their "thermodynamic distance" from thermal equilibrium [4], while its physical meaning is connected to the correlation between the system's particles [5]. For example, analysis of the IBEX high Energetic Neutral Atom spectra [6] showed that the vast majority of measured kappa indices are between ~1.5 and ~2.5, consistent with the far-equilibrium "cavity" of minimum entropy discovered by Livadiotis & McComas [2]. Spontaneous procedures that can increase the entropy, move the system gradually toward equilibrium, that is the state with the maximum (infinite) kappa index. Other external factors that may decrease the entropy, move the system back to states further from equilibrium where the kappa indices are smaller. Newly formed pick-up ions can play this critical role in the solar wind and other space plasmas. We have analytically shown that their highly ordered motion can reduce the average entropy in the plasma beyond the termination shock, inside the inner heliosheath [7]. Non-equilibrium transitions have a key role in understanding the governing thermodynamical processes of space plasmas. References 1. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2009, JGR, 114, 11105. 2. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010a, ApJ, 714, 971. 3. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010c, in AIP Conf. Proc. 9, Pickup Ions Throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond, ed. J. LeRoux, V. Florinski, G. P. Zank, & A

  11. Amplification of terahertz pulses in gases beyond thermodynamic equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Schwaab, G. W.; Schroeck, K.; Havenith, M.

    2007-03-15

    In Ebbinghaus et al. [Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 15, 72 (2006)] we reported terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in a plasma at low pressure, we observed a simultaneous absorption and amplification process within each single rotational transition. Here we show that this observation is a direct consequence of the short interaction time of the pulsed terahertz radiation with the plasma, which is shorter than the average collision time between the molecules. Thus, during the measurement time the molecular states may be considered entangled. Solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation yields a linear term that may be neglected for long observation times, large frequencies, or nonentangled states. We determine the restrictions for the observation of this effect and calculate the spectrum of a simple diatomic molecule. Using this model we are able to explain the spectral features showing a change from emission to absorption as observed previously. In addition we find that the amplification and absorption do not follow the typical Lambert-Beer exponential law but an approximate square law.

  12. Atomistic modeling of thermodynamic equilibrium and polymorphism of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tongsik; Baskes, Michael I.; Valone, Steven M.; Doll, J. D.

    2012-06-01

    We develop two new modified embedded-atom method (MEAM) potentials for elemental iron, intended to reproduce the experimental phase stability with respect to both temperature and pressure. These simple interatomic potentials are fitted to a wide variety of material properties of bcc iron in close agreement with experiments. Numerous defect properties of bcc iron and bulk properties of the two close-packed structures calculated with these models are in reasonable agreement with the available first-principles calculations and experiments. Performance at finite temperatures of these models has also been examined using Monte Carlo simulations. We attempt to reproduce the experimental iron polymorphism at finite temperature by means of free energy computations, similar to the procedure previously pursued by Müller et al (2007 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 19 326220), and re-examine the adequacy of the conclusion drawn in the study by addressing two critical aspects missing in their analysis: (i) the stability of the hcp structure relative to the bcc and fcc structures and (ii) the compatibility between the temperature and pressure dependences of the phase stability. Using two MEAM potentials, we are able to represent all of the observed structural phase transitions in iron. We discuss that the correct reproductions of the phase stability among three crystal structures of iron with respect to both temperature and pressure are incompatible with each other due to the lack of magnetic effects in this class of empirical interatomic potential models. The MEAM potentials developed in this study correctly predict, in the bcc structure, the self-interstitial in the <110> orientation to be the most stable configuration, and the screw dislocation to have a non-degenerate core structure, in contrast to many embedded-atom method potentials for bcc iron in the literature.

  13. The thermodynamics of simple biomembrane mimetic systems

    PubMed Central

    Raudino, Antonio; Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Pannuzzo, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Insight into the forces governing a system is essential for understanding its behavior and function. Thermodynamic investigations provide a wealth of information that is not, or is hardly, available from other methods. This article reviews thermodynamic approaches and assays to measure collective properties such as heat adsorption / emission and volume variations. These methods can be successfully applied to the study of lipid vesicles (liposomes) and biological membranes. With respect to instrumentation, differential scanning calorimetry, pressure perturbation calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry, dilatometry, and acoustic techniques aimed at measuring the isothermal and adiabatic processes, two- and three-dimensional compressibilities are considered. Applications of these techniques to lipid systems include the measurement of different thermodynamic parameters and a detailed characterization of thermotropic, barotropic, and lyotropic phase behavior. The membrane binding and / or partitioning of solutes (proteins, peptides, drugs, surfactants, ions, etc.) can also be quantified and modeled. Many thermodynamic assays are available for studying the effect of proteins and other additives on membranes, characterizing non-ideal mixing, domain formation, bilayer stability, curvature strain, permeability, solubilization, and fusion. Studies of membrane proteins in lipid environments elucidate lipid–protein interactions in membranes. Finally, a plethora of relaxation phenomena toward equilibrium thermodynamic structures can be also investigated. The systems are described in terms of enthalpic and entropic forces, equilibrium constants, heat capacities, partial volume changes, volume and area compressibility, and so on, also shedding light on the stability of the structures and the molecular origin and mechanism of the structural changes. PMID:21430953

  14. Thermodynamic significance of human basal metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cuncheng

    1993-06-01

    The human basal state, a non-equilibrium steady state, is analysed in this paper in the light of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics whereby the thermodynamic significance of the basal metabolic rate and its distinction to the dissipation function and exergy loss are identified. The analysis demonstrates the correct expression of the effects of the blood flow on the heat balance in a human-body bio-heat model and the relationship between the basal metabolic rate and the blood perfusion.

  15. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamics—independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. Our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentally relevant examples.

  16. Lagrangian formulation of irreversible thermodynamics and the second law of thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Glavatskiy, K. S.

    2015-05-28

    We show that the equations which describe irreversible evolution of a system can be derived from a variational principle. We suggest a Lagrangian, which depends on the properties of the normal and the so-called “mirror-image” system. The Lagrangian is symmetric in time and therefore compatible with microscopic reversibility. The evolution equations in the normal and mirror-imaged systems are decoupled and describe therefore independent irreversible evolution of each of the systems. The second law of thermodynamics follows from a symmetry of the Lagrangian. Entropy increase in the normal system is balanced by the entropy decrease in the mirror-image system, such that there exists an “integral of evolution” which is a constant. The derivation relies on the property of local equilibrium, which states that the local relations between the thermodynamic quantities in non-equilibrium are the same as in equilibrium.

  17. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of finite-volume crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degawa, Masashi

    Finite volume effects on equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of nano-crystallites are studied theoretically and compared to both experiment and simulation. When a system is isolated or its size is small compared to the correlation length, all equilibrium and close-to-equilibrium properties will depend on the system boundary condition. Specifically for solid nano-crystallites, their finite size introduces global curvature to the system, which alters its equilibrium properties compared to the thermodynamic limit. Also such global curvature leads to capillary-induced morphology changes of the surface. Interesting dynamics can arise when the crystallite is supported on a substrate, with crossovers of the dominant driving force from the capillary force and crystallite-substrate interactions. To address these questions, we introduce thermodynamic functions for the boundary conditions, which can be derived from microscopic models. For nano-crystallites, the boundary is the surface (including interfaces), the thermodynamic description is based on the steps that define the shape of the surface, and the underlying microscopic model includes kinks. The global curvature of the surface introduces metastable states with different shapes governed by a constant of integration of the extra boundary condition, which we call the shape parameter c. The discrete height of the steps introduces transition states in between the metastable states, and the lowest energy accessible structure (energy barrier less 10k BT) as a function of the volume has been determined. The dynamics of nano-crystallites as they relax from a non-equilibrium structure is described quantitatively in terms of the motion of steps in both capillary-induced and interface-boundary-induced regimes. The step-edge fluctuations of the top facet are also influenced by global curvature and volume conservation and the effect yields different dynamic scaling exponents from a pure 1D system. Theoretical results are

  18. [Aerosol therapy].

    PubMed

    Wildhaber, J H

    1998-08-15

    Aerosol therapy plays a major role in the diagnosis and treatment of various lung diseases. The aim of inhalation therapy is to deposit a reproducible and adequate dose of a specific drug to the airways, in order to achieve a high, local, clinical effect while avoiding serious systemic side effects. To achieve this goal, it is therefore important to have an efficient inhalation device to deliver different medications. However, the currently available therapeutic inhalation devices (nebuliser, pressurised metered-dose inhaler and dry powder inhaler) are not very efficient in aerosol delivery and have several disadvantages. Inhalation devices can be assessed by in vitro studies, filter studies and radiolabelled deposition studies. Several radiolabelled deposition studies have shown that nebulisers and pressurised metered-dose inhalers are not very efficient in aerosol delivery. In children, before 1997, only 0.5% to 15% of the total nebulised or actuated dose from a nebuliser or pressurised metered-dose inhaler actually reached the lungs. These numbers were somewhat improved in adults, 30% of the total nebulised or actuated dose reaching the airways. Aerosol therapy with dry powder inhalers was the most efficient before 1997, 30% of the total dose being deposited in the lungs of adults and children. In 1997, new developments in pressurised metered-dose inhalers much improved their efficiency in aerosol delivery. Lung deposition can be increased by up to 60% with use of a non-electrostatic holding chamber and/or a pressurised metered-dose inhaler with a hydrofluoroalkane propellant possessing superior aerosol characteristics. Several studies comparing the clinical efficiency of different inhalation devices have shown that the choice of an optimal inhalation device is crucial. In addition to the aerosol characteristics, ventilation parameters and airway morphology have an important bearing on deposition patterns. These parameters may be greatly influenced by the

  19. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  20. Impact of gas-to-particle partitioning approaches on the simulated radiative effects of biogenic secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, C. E.; Spracklen, D. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Riipinen, I.; D'Andrea, S. D.; Rap, A.; Carslaw, K. S.; Forster, P. M.; Artaxo, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Swietlicki, E.; Mann, G. W.; Pringle, K. J.

    2015-11-01

    The oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) gives a range of products, from semi-volatile to extremely low-volatility compounds. To treat the interaction of these secondary organic vapours with the particle phase, global aerosol microphysics models generally use either a thermodynamic partitioning approach (assuming instant equilibrium between semi-volatile oxidation products and the particle phase) or a kinetic approach (accounting for the size dependence of condensation). We show that model treatment of the partitioning of biogenic organic vapours into the particle phase, and consequent distribution of material across the size distribution, controls the magnitude of the first aerosol indirect effect (AIE) due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). With a kinetic partitioning approach, SOA is distributed according to the existing condensation sink, enhancing the growth of the smallest particles, i.e. those in the nucleation mode. This process tends to increase cloud droplet number concentrations in the presence of biogenic SOA. By contrast, an approach that distributes SOA according to pre-existing organic mass restricts the growth of the smallest particles, limiting the number that are able to form cloud droplets. With an organically mediated new particle formation mechanism, applying a mass-based rather than a kinetic approach to partitioning reduces our calculated global mean AIE due to biogenic SOA by 24 %. Our results suggest that the mechanisms driving organic partitioning need to be fully understood in order to accurately describe the climatic effects of SOA.

  1. Thermodynamical Structure of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, S.; Turner, N.

    2009-12-01

    The thermodynamics of protoplanetary disks determines chemical and physical evolution of dust and gas in the disks, and thus is relevant for understanding the origin and formation of planetary systems. In this paper, the thermodynamical structure of protoplanetary disks around low-mass stars is studied using three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Local patches of the disk are modeled using the shearing box approximation with vertical gravity. For simplicity, the dust and gas are well mixed and have the same temperature, and ideal MHD is assumed. The frequency-integrated radiation field is evolved using the flux-limited diffusion approximation, adopting thermally averaged opacities. The heating arises from the dissipation of MHD turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability due to differential rotation of the disk, and the cooling comes from infrared radiation losses. Irradiation by the central star is treated by injecting appropriate amount of thermal energy near the disk photosphere for visible lights. The results indicate the heating is more concentrated in the disk atmosphere than in the classical model. The single-point heating rate in the atmosphere fluctuates by orders of magnitude over time intervals comparable to the orbital period due to magnetic reconnection and shocks, while the patch of disk overall sustains dynamical and thermodynamical equilibrium over many cooling times. We will discuss implications of our numerical results for line and continuum emission from protoplanetary disks.

  2. Thermodynamics of Oligonucleotide Duplex Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber-Gosche, Sherrie; Edwards, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Melting temperatures of oligonucleotides are useful for a number of molecular biology applications, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Although melting temperatures are often calculated with simplistic empirical equations, application of thermodynamics provides more accurate melting temperatures and an opportunity for students to apply rigorous thermodynamic analysis to an important biochemical problem. Because the stacking of base pairs on top of one another is a significant factor in the energetics of oligonucleotide melting, several investigators have applied van't Hoff analysis to melting temperature data using a nearest-neighbor model and have obtained entropies and enthalpies for the stacking of bases. The present article explains how the equilibrium constant for the dissociation of strands from double-stranded oligonucleotides can be expressed in terms of the total strand concentration and thus how the total strand concentration influences the melting temperature. It also presents a simplified analysis based on the entropies and enthalpies of stacking that is manually tractable so that students can work examples to help them understand the thermodynamics of oligonucleotide melting.

  3. A numerical determination of the evolution of cloud drop spectra due to condensation on natural aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, I. Y.; Haenel, G.; Pruppacher, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    The time variation in size of aerosol particles growing by condensation is studied numerically by means of an air parcel model which allows entrainment of air and aerosol particles. Particles of four types of aerosols typically occurring in atmospheric air masses were considered. The present model circumvents any assumption about the size distribution and chemical composition of the aerosol particles by basing the aerosol particle growth on actually observed size distributions and on observed amounts of water taken up under equilibrium by a deposit of the aerosol particles. Characteristic differences in the drop size distribution, liquid water content and supersaturation were found for the clouds which evolved from the four aerosol types considered.

  4. Influence of particle-phase state on the hygroscopic behavior of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Mui, W.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that organic and mixed organic-inorganic particles can exhibit multiple phase states depending on their chemical composition and on ambient conditions such as relative humidity (RH). To explore the extent to which water uptake varies with particle-phase behavior, hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs) of nine laboratory-generated, organic and organic-inorganic aerosol systems with physical states ranging from well-mixed liquids to phase-separated particles to viscous liquids or semi-solids were measured with the Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe at RH values ranging from 40 to 90%. Water-uptake measurements were accompanied by HGF and RH-dependent thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. In addition, AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are compared to several simplified HGF modeling approaches: (1) representing particles as ideal, well-mixed liquids; (2) forcing a single phase but accounting for non-ideal interactions through activity coefficient calculations; and (3) a Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson-like calculation in which complete separation of the inorganic and organic components is assumed at all RH values, with water uptake treated separately in each of the individual phases. We observed variability in the characteristics of measured hygroscopic growth curves across aerosol systems with differing phase behaviors, with growth curves approaching smoother, more continuous water uptake with decreasing prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation and increasing oxygen : carbon ratios of the organic aerosol components. We also observed indirect evidence for the dehydration-induced formation of highly viscous semi-solid phases and for kinetic limitations to the crystallization of ammonium sulfate at low RH for sucrose-containing particles. AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are generally in good agreement with the HGF

  5. Influence of particle phase state on the hygroscopic behavior of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Mui, W.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that organic and mixed organic-inorganic particles can exhibit multiple phase states depending on their chemical composition and on ambient conditions such as relative humidity (RH). To explore the extent to which water uptake varies with particle phase behavior, hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs) of nine laboratory-generated, organic and organic-inorganic aerosol systems with physical states ranging from well-mixed liquids, to phase-separated particles, to viscous liquids or semi-solids were measured with the Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe at RH values ranging from 40-90%. Water-uptake measurements were accompanied by HGF and RH-dependent thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. In addition, AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are compared to several simplified HGF modeling approaches: (1) representing particles as ideal, well-mixed liquids, (2) forcing a single phase, but accounting for non-ideal interactions through activity coefficient calculations, and (3) a Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson-like calculation in which complete separation between the inorganic and organic components is assumed at all RH values, with water-uptake treated separately in each of the individual phases. We observed variability in the characteristics of measured hygroscopic growth curves across aerosol systems with differing phase behaviors, with growth curves approaching smoother, more continuous water uptake with decreasing prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation and increasing oxygen : carbon ratios of the organic aerosol components. We also observed indirect evidence for the dehydration-induced formation of highly viscous semi-solid phases and for kinetic limitations to the crystallization of ammonium sulfate at low RH for sucrose-containing particles. AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are generally in good agreement with the HGF

  6. Experimental studies of gas-aerosol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-05-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is believed to the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO2 by H2O2 in the atmosphere. Growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO2 and H2O2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMA's) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charter capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 microns was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 particles with SO2 and H2O2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets greater than or equal to 0.3 microns, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets less than or equal to 0.2 microns, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH4)2SO4 particles exposed to SO2, H2O2, NH3, and H2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH4)2SO4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than

  7. Entropy production determination of the ambipolar solution nearest equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, P.J.; Myra, J.R.

    1984-10-01

    A general derivation of the steady state entropy production equation is presented for a confined plasma which loses particles and energy via radial transport and, perhaps, end loss. The resulting equation is employed to determine which root or solution is closest to thermodynamic equilibrium when more than one self-consistent or ambipolar solution is possible.

  8. Computer program determines chemical composition of physical system at equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, S. S.

    1966-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 digital computer program calculates equilibrium composition of complex, multiphase chemical systems. This is a free energy minimization method with solution of the problem reduced to mathematical operations, without concern for the chemistry involved. Also certain thermodynamic properties are determined as byproducts of the main calculations.

  9. A modelling methodology to predict the range of organic components expected to condense to atmospheric aerosol: Sensitivities to fundamental properties and routes for reduced complexity parameterisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G. B.; Barley, M.; Jenkin, M.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are an important yet uncertain component of climate change and air quality. Influencing climate directly by the scattering and absorption of solar radiation and indirectly through their role as cloud condensation nuclei, their radiatively important properties are determined by the chemical composition, mass loading, mixing state and size distribution, as are their impacts on human health. Mechanistic understanding and knowledge of individual compounds involved in the chemical evolution of aerosol particles is far from complete. A full chemical analysis of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols is not available. Whilst explicit hydrocarbon oxidation mechanisms that track many thousands of degradation products of volatile organic compounds (VOC) have been developed, aerosol schemes in large-scale models neglect the majority of chemical components predicted to occur in the organic mixture and will continue to do so in the future. This is a result of prohibitive computational expense of explicit mechanisms which must be avoided via a reduction in complexity (numerical, chemical or both). Reduction mechanisms that neglect compositional information are widely used to derive those parameters deemed important for climatic and health impacts. However, it is possible to make detailed predictions of the range of organic components expected to condense to atmospheric aerosol by combining a gas/particle partitioning model with a detailed gas phase chemical mechanism. Provided they are of sufficient skill, these predictions can be used as the basis for process and composition complexity reduction whilst retaining mechanistic understanding. Here we present development of compound selection methodologies that combine detailed gas phase mechanisms, pure component vapour pressure calculations, thermodynamic properties and a gas/aerosol partition model. As an example, we combine the methodology with the master chemical mechanism (MCM) to simulate

  10. Life, hierarchy, and the thermodynamic machinery of planet Earth.

    PubMed

    Kleidon, Axel

    2010-12-01

    Throughout Earth's history, life has increased greatly in abundance, complexity, and diversity. At the same time, it has substantially altered the Earth's environment, evolving some of its variables to states further and further away from thermodynamic equilibrium. For instance, concentrations in atmospheric oxygen have increased throughout Earth's history, resulting in an increased chemical disequilibrium in the atmosphere as well as an increased redox gradient between the atmosphere and the Earth's reducing crust. These trends seem to contradict the second law of thermodynamics, which states for isolated systems that gradients and free energy are dissipated over time, resulting in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. This seeming contradiction is resolved by considering planet Earth as a coupled, hierarchical and evolving non-equilibrium thermodynamic system that has been substantially altered by the input of free energy generated by photosynthetic life. Here, I present this hierarchical thermodynamic theory of the Earth system. I first present simple considerations to show that thermodynamic variables are driven away from a state of thermodynamic equilibrium by the transfer of power from some other process and that the resulting state of disequilibrium reflects the past net work done on the variable. This is applied to the processes of planet Earth to characterize the generation and transfer of free energy and its dissipation, from radiative gradients to temperature and chemical potential gradients that result in chemical, kinetic, and potential free energy and associated dynamics of the climate system and geochemical cycles. The maximization of power transfer among the processes within this hierarchy yields thermodynamic efficiencies much lower than the Carnot efficiency of equilibrium thermodynamics and is closely related to the proposed principle of Maximum Entropy Production (MEP). The role of life is then discussed as a photochemical process that generates

  11. A high-resolution study of surfactant partitioning and kinetic limitations for two-component internally mixed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, S. R.; Petters, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), altering cloud properties and ultimately affecting climate through their effect on the radiative balance. Aerosol CCN activity depends in part on aerosol composition and surfactant compounds are of particular interest because surfactants are enriched at the water/air interface, resulting in a radial concentration gradient within the aqueous droplet. Accurate treatment of the surfactant concentration gradient complicates the otherwise straightforward predictions of CCN activity for aerosols of known composition. To accurately evaluate predictions made by theory, laboratory studies investigating the relationship between critical supersaturation and dry diameter of particles that include surfactants require significant reduction in measurement uncertainty for both water-uptake and CCN measurements. Furthermore, uncertainties remain regarding kinetic limitations to surfactant partitioning that could result in deviation from predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics. This study attempts to address some of these issues through high-resolution analysis of CCN activity of two-component mixed surfactant/non-surfactant aerosols at different internal mixing ratios performed with and without a water-uptake time delay to ascertain whether or not the observed effects are kinetically limited. We present new data for the aerosols consisting of 1) the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with ammonium sulfate, 2) SDS with sodium chloride and 3) the strong non-ionic fluorosurfactant Zonyl with an organic proxy glucose. As a point of reference we also evaluated the mixture of ammonium sulfate with glucose. Aerosol activation diameters were determined using CCN analysis in conjunction with scanning mobility size classification and high sheath-to-aerosol flow ratios. This resulted in CCN-derived kappa values that could be determined within +/-5% relative error. To test whether dynamic surfactant partitioning

  12. Thermo-chemical dynamics and chemical quasi-equilibrium of plasmas in thermal non-equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Massot, Marc; Graille, Benjamin; Magin, Thierry E.

    2011-05-20

    We examine both processes of ionization by electron and heavy-particle impact in spatially uniform plasmas at rest in the absence of external forces. A singular perturbation analysis is used to study the following physical scenario, in which thermal relaxation becomes much slower than chemical reactions. First, electron-impact ionization is investigated. The dynamics of the system rapidly becomes close to a slow dynamics manifold that allows for defining a unique chemical quasi-equilibrium for two-temperature plasmas and proving that the second law of thermodynamics is satisfied. Then, all ionization reactions are taken into account simultaneously, leading to a surprising conclusion: the inner layer for short time scale (or time boundary layer) directly leads to thermal equilibrium. Global thermo-chemical equilibrium is reached within a short time scale, involving only chemical reactions, even if thermal relaxation through elastic collisions is assumed to be slow.

  13. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  14. Review: engineering particles using the aerosol-through-plasma method

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jonathan; Luhrs, Claudia C; Richard, Monique

    2009-01-01

    For decades, plasma processing of materials on the nanoscale has been an underlying enabling technology for many 'planar' technologies, particularly virtually every aspect of modern electronics from integrated-circuit fabrication with nanoscale elements to the newest generation of photovoltaics. However, it is only recent developments that suggest that plasma processing can be used to make 'particulate' structures of value in fields, including catalysis, drug delivery, imaging, higher energy density batteries, and other forms of energy storage. In this paper, the development of the science and technology of one class of plasma production of particulates, namely, aerosol-through-plasma (A-T-P), is reviewed. Various plasma systems, particularly RF and microwave, have been used to create nanoparticles of metals and ceramics, as well as supported metal catalysts. Gradually, the complexity of the nanoparticles, and concomitantly their potential value, has increased. First, unique two-layer particles were generated. These were postprocessed to create unique three-layer nanoscale particles. Also, the technique has been successfully employed to make other high-value materials, including carbon nanotubes, unsupported graphene, and spherical boron nitride. Some interesting plasma science has also emerged from efforts to characterize and map aerosol-containing plasmas. For example, it is clear that even a very low concentration of particles dramatically changes plasma characteristics. Some have also argued that the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium approach is inappropriate to these systems. Instead, it has been suggested that charged- and neutral-species models must be independently developed and allowed to 'interact' only in generation terms.

  15. The Second Law of Thermodynamics in Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Kemeny, Gabor

    1974-01-01

    Bioenergetic processes are viewed as processes of free energy transduction. The free energies of both local equilibrium and fluctuation states are being considered. It is shown that the exchange of thermal energy with the surrounding medium, acting as a reservoir, does not violate the second law of thermodynamics within broad limits. There is sufficient latitude for proteins to carry out their function of transduction utilizing thermal energy in the process. PMID:16592167

  16. Computing Thermodynamic And Transport Properties Of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Gupta, Roop N.; Lee, Kam-Pui

    1994-01-01

    EQAIRS computer program is set of FORTRAN 77 routines for computing thermodynamic and transport properties of equilibrium air for temperatures from 100 to 30,000 K. Computes properties from 11-species, curve-fit mathematical model. Successfully implemented on DEC VAX-series computer running VMS, Sun4-series computer running SunOS, and IBM PC-compatible computer running MS-DOS.

  17. AB INITIO AND CALPHAD THERMODYNAMICS OF MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, P A

    2004-04-14

    Ab initio electronic structure methods can supplement CALPHAD in two major ways for subsequent applications to stability in complex alloys. The first one is rather immediate and concerns the direct input of ab initio energetics in CALPHAD databases. The other way, more involved, is the assessment of ab initio thermodynamics {acute a} la CALPHAD. It will be shown how these results can be used within CALPHAD to predict the equilibrium properties of multi-component alloys.

  18. Thermodynamically consistent microstructure prediction of additively manufactured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing has risen to the top of research interest in advanced manufacturing in recent years due to process flexibility, achievability of geometric complexity, and the ability to locally modify and optimize materials. The present work is focused on providing an approach for incorporating thermodynamically consistent properties and microstructure evolution for non-equilibrium supercooling, as observed in additive manufacturing processes, into finite element analysis. There are two primary benefits of this work: (1) the resulting prediction is based on the material composition and (2) the nonlinear behavior caused by the thermodynamic properties of the material during the non-equilibrium solution is accounted for with extremely high resolution. The predicted temperature response and microstructure evolution for additively manufactured stainless steel 316L using standard handbook-obtained thermodynamic properties are compared with the thermodynamic properties calculated using the CALculation of PHAse Diagrams (CALPHAD) approach. Data transfer from the CALPHAD approach to finite element analysis is discussed.

  19. Near-equilibrium measurements of nonequilibrium free energy

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin

    2012-04-09

    A central endeavor of thermodynamics is the measurement of free energy changes. Regrettably, although we can measure the free energy of a system in thermodynamic equilibrium, typically all we can say about the free energy of a nonequilibrium ensemble is that it is larger than that of the same system at equilibrium. Herein, we derive a formally exact expression for the probability distribution of a driven system, which involves path ensemble averages of the work over trajectories of the time-reversed system. From this we find a simple near-equilibrium approximation for the free energy in terms of an excess mean time-reversed work, which can be experimentally measured on real systems. With analysis and computer simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our approximations for several simple models.

  20. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)