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Sample records for aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium

  1. A COMPARATIVE REVIEW OF INORGANIC AEROSOL THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM MODULES: SIMILARITIES, DIFFERENCES, AND THEIR LIKELY CAUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive comparison of five inorganic aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium modules, MARS-A, SEQUILIB, SCAPE2, EQUISOLV II, and AIM2, was conducted for a variety of atmospheric concentrations of particulate matter (PM) constituents, relative humidities (RHs), and temperatures....

  2. Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2005-01-01

    Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics fills a niche in the market by providing a comprehensive introduction to a new, emerging topic in the field. The importance of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is addressed in order to fully understand how a system works, whether it is in a biological system like the brain or a system that develops plastic. In order to fully grasp the subject, the book clearly explains the physical concepts and mathematics involved, as well as presenting problems and solutions; over 200 exercises and answers are included. Engineers, scientists, and applied mathematicians can all use the book to address their problems in modelling, calculating, and understanding dynamic responses of materials.

  3. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF 3-D AIR QUALITY MODELS WITH CURRENT THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM MODELS TO PREDICT AEROSOL NO3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partitioning of total nitrate (TNO3) and total ammonium (TNH4) between gas and aerosol phases is studied with two thermodynamic equilibrium models, ISORROPIA and AIM, and three datasets: high time-resolution measurement data from the 1999 Atlanta SuperSite Experiment and from...

  4. Reformulating Aerosol Thermodynamics and Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling aerosol composition and cloud microphysics is rather complex due to the required thermodynamics, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that for deliquescent atmospheric aerosols thermodynamics can be considerably simplified, if we reformulate chemical equilibrium to include water purely based on thermodynamic principles. In chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium, the relative humidity (RH) fixes the molality of atmospheric aerosols. Although this fact is in theory well known, it has hardly been utilized in aerosol modeling nor has been the fact that for the same reason also the aerosol activity (including activity coefficients) and water content are fixed (by RH) for a given aerosol concentration and type. The only model that successfully utilizes this fact is the computationally very efficient EQuilibrium Simplified thermodynamic gas/Aerosol partitioning Model, EQSAM (Metzger et al., 2002a), EQSAM2 (Metzger et al., 2006). In both versions the entire gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning is solved analytically and hence non-iteratively a substantial advantage in aerosol composition modeling. Here we briefly present the theoretical framework of EQSAM2, which differs from EQSAM in a way that the calculation of the water activity of saturated binary or mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions of multi-component aerosols has been generalized by including the Kelvin-term, thus allowing for any solute activity above the deliquescence relative humidity, including supersaturation. With application of our new concept to a numerical whether prediction (NWP) model, we demonstrate its wide implications for the computation of various aerosol and cloud properties, as our new concept allows to consistently and efficiently link the modeling of aerosol thermodynamics and cloud microphysics through the aerosol water mass, which therefore deserves special attention in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, NWP and climate

  5. Thermodynamic efficiency out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2011-03-01

    Molecular-scale machines typically operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium, limiting the applicability of equilibrium statistical mechanics to understand their efficiency. Thermodynamic length analysis relates a non-equilibrium property (dissipation) to equilibrium properties (equilibrium fluctuations and their relaxation time). Herein we demonstrate that the thermodynamic length framework follows directly from the assumptions of linear response theory. Uniting these two frameworks provides thermodynamic length analysis a firmer statistical mechanical grounding, and equips linear response theory with a metric structure to facilitate the prediction and discovery of optimal (minimum dissipation) paths in complicated free energy landscapes. To explore the applicability of this theoretical framework, we examine its accuracy for simple bistable systems, parametrized to model single-molecule force-extension experiments. Through analytic derivation of the equilibrium fluctuations and numerical calculation of the dissipation and relaxation time, we verify that thermodynamic length analysis (though derived in a near-equilibrium limit) provides a strikingly good approximation even far from equilibrium, and thus provides a useful framework for understanding molecular motor efficiency.

  6. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-12-15

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  7. A TEST OF THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM MODELS AND 3-D AIR QUALITY MODELS FOR PREDICTIONS OF AEROSOL NO3-

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inorganic species of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium constitute a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols. The behavior of nitrate is one of the most intriguing aspects of inorganic atmospheric aerosols because particulate nitrate concentrations depend not only on the amount of ...

  8. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  9. Thermodynamic characterization of Mexico City aerosol during MILAGRO 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Sullivan, A.; Weber, R.; Vanreken, T.; Fischer, M.; Matías, E.; Moya, M.; Farmer, D.; Cohen, R. C.

    2007-06-01

    Fast measurements of aerosol and gas-phase constituents coupled with the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model are used to study the partitioning of semivolatile inorganic species and phase state of Mexico City aerosol sampled at the T1 site during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign. Overall, predicted semivolatile partitioning agrees well with measurements. PM2.5 is insensitive to changes in ammonia but is to acidic semivolatile species. Semi-volatile partitioning equilibrates on a timescale between 6 and 20 min. When the aerosol sulfate-to-nitrate molar ratio is less than 1, predictions improve substantially if the aerosol is assumed to follow the deliquescent phase diagram. Treating crustal species as "equivalent sodium" (rather than explicitly) in the thermodynamic equilibrium calculations introduces important biases in predicted aerosol water uptake, nitrate and ammonium; neglecting crustals further increases errors dramatically. This suggests that explicitly considering crustals in the thermodynamic calculations are required to accurately predict the partitioning and phase state of aerosols.

  10. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  11. Thermodynamic characterization of Mexico City aerosol during MILAGRO 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Sullivan, A.; Weber, R.; van Reken, T.; Fischer, M.; Matías, E.; Moya, M.; Farmer, D.; Cohen, R. C.

    2009-03-01

    Fast measurements of aerosol and gas-phase constituents coupled with the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model are used to study the partitioning of semivolatile inorganic species and phase state of Mexico City aerosol sampled at the T1 site during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign. Overall, predicted semivolatile partitioning agrees well with measurements. PM2.5 is insensitive to changes in ammonia but is to acidic semivolatile species. For particle sizes up to 1μm diameter, semi-volatile partitioning requires 15-30 min to equilibrate; longer time is typically required during the night and early morning hours. Aerosol and gas-phase speciation always exhibits substantial temporal variability, so that aerosol composition measurements (bulk or size-resolved) obtained over large integration periods are not reflective of its true state. When the aerosol sulfate-to-nitrate molar ratio is less than unity, predictions improve substantially if the aerosol is assumed to follow the deliquescent phase diagram. Treating crustal species as "equivalent sodium" (rather than explicitly) in the thermodynamic equilibrium calculations introduces important biases in predicted aerosol water uptake, nitrate and ammonium; neglecting crustals further increases errors dramatically. This suggests that explicitly considering crustals in the thermodynamic calculations is required to accurately predict the partitioning and phase state of aerosols.

  12. Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol during MILAGRO 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Sullivan, A.; Weber, R.; VanReken, T.; Fischer, M.; Matias, E.; Moya, M.; Farmer, D.; Cohen, R.C.

    2008-12-05

    Fast measurements of aerosol and gas-phase constituents coupled with the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model are used to study the partitioning of semivolatile inorganic species and phase state of Mexico City aerosol sampled at the T1 site during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign. Overall, predicted semivolatile partitioning agrees well with measurements. PM{sub 2.5} is insensitive to changes in ammonia but is to acidic semivolatile species. For particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m diameter, semi-volatile partitioning requires 30-60 min to equilibrate; longer time is typically required during the night and early morning hours. When the aerosol sulfate-to-nitrate molar ratio is less than unity, predictions improve substantially if the aerosol is assumed to follow the deliquescent phase diagram. Treating crustal species as 'equivalent sodium' (rather than explicitly) in the thermodynamic equilibrium calculations introduces important biases in predicted aerosol water uptake, nitrate and ammonium; neglecting crustals further increases errors dramatically. This suggests that explicitly considering crustals in the thermodynamic calculations is required to accurately predict the partitioning and phase state of aerosols.

  13. Information thermodynamics of near-equilibrium computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopenko, Mikhail; Einav, Itai

    2015-06-01

    In studying fundamental physical limits and properties of computational processes, one is faced with the challenges of interpreting primitive information-processing functions through well-defined information-theoretic as well as thermodynamic quantities. In particular, transfer entropy, characterizing the function of computational transmission and its predictability, is known to peak near critical regimes. We focus on a thermodynamic interpretation of transfer entropy aiming to explain the underlying critical behavior by associating information flows intrinsic to computational transmission with particular physical fluxes. Specifically, in isothermal systems near thermodynamic equilibrium, the gradient of the average transfer entropy is shown to be dynamically related to Fisher information and the curvature of system's entropy. This relationship explicitly connects the predictability, sensitivity, and uncertainty of computational processes intrinsic to complex systems and allows us to consider thermodynamic interpretations of several important extreme cases and trade-offs.

  14. Information thermodynamics of near-equilibrium computation.

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, Mikhail; Einav, Itai

    2015-06-01

    In studying fundamental physical limits and properties of computational processes, one is faced with the challenges of interpreting primitive information-processing functions through well-defined information-theoretic as well as thermodynamic quantities. In particular, transfer entropy, characterizing the function of computational transmission and its predictability, is known to peak near critical regimes. We focus on a thermodynamic interpretation of transfer entropy aiming to explain the underlying critical behavior by associating information flows intrinsic to computational transmission with particular physical fluxes. Specifically, in isothermal systems near thermodynamic equilibrium, the gradient of the average transfer entropy is shown to be dynamically related to Fisher information and the curvature of system's entropy. This relationship explicitly connects the predictability, sensitivity, and uncertainty of computational processes intrinsic to complex systems and allows us to consider thermodynamic interpretations of several important extreme cases and trade-offs.

  15. Contact angle measurements under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions.

    PubMed

    Lages, Carol; Méndez, Eduardo

    2007-08-01

    The precise control of the ambient humidity during contact angle measurements is needed to obtain stable and valid data. For a such purpose, a simple low-cost device was designed, and several modified surfaces relevant to biosensor design were studied. Static contact angle values for these surfaces are lower than advancing contact angles published for ambient conditions, indicating that thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are needed to avoid drop evaporation during the measurements.

  16. Thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous tetrafluoromethane in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Boney, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Equations and in computer code are presented for the thermodynamic and transport properties of gaseous, undissociated tetrafluoromethane (CF4) in chemical equilibrium. The computer code calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties of CF4 when given any two of five thermodynamic variables (entropy, temperature, volume, pressure, and enthalpy). Equilibrium thermodynamic and transport property data are tabulated and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented.

  17. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of gravitational screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Yokokura, Yuki

    2015-11-01

    We study the Einstein gravity equations projected on a timelike surface, which represents the time evolution of what we call a gravitational screen. We show that such a screen behaves like a viscous bubble with a surface tension and an internal energy, and that the Einstein equations take the same forms as non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations for a viscous bubble. We provide a consistent dictionary between gravitational and thermodynamic variables. In the non-viscous cases there are three thermodynamic equations that characterize a bubble dynamics: these are the first law, the Marangoni flow equation and the Young-Laplace equation. In all three equations the surface tension plays a central role: in the first law it appears as a work term per unit area, in the Marangoni flow its gradient drives a force, and in the Young-Laplace equation it contributes to a pressure proportional to the surface curvature. The gravity equations appear as a natural generalization of these bubble equations when the bubble itself is viscous and dynamical. In particular, this approach shows that the mechanism of entropy production for the viscous bubble is mapped onto the production of gravitational waves. We also review the relationship between surface tension and temperature, and discuss black-hole thermodynamics.

  18. Equilibrium Molecular Thermodynamics from Kirkwood Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys.2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide. PMID:25915525

  19. Equilibrium molecular thermodynamics from Kirkwood sampling.

    PubMed

    Somani, Sandeep; Okamoto, Yuko; Ballard, Andrew J; Wales, David J

    2015-05-21

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide.

  20. Diffusion and thermodynamic equilibrium under pressure variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulas, Evangelos; Tajčmanová, Lucie; Vrijmoed, Johannes; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    Pressure is one of the most fundamental variables in mineral thermodynamics. In that respect, pressure-sensitive mineral reactions provide an important constraint on pressure under which the rock was developed. One implicit assumption when interpreting such pressure estimates is that the state-of-stress is close to hydrostatic, homogeneous and that the differential stress is negligible. Recent spectroscopic data from the mineral scale documenting pressure variations do not support this assumption. In addition to observations, mechanical models (numerical and analytical) suggest that rocks can develop and maintain heterogeneous pressure distributions at geological time scales. The recently developed unconventional barometry explains chemical zoning in minerals as a result of a pressure variation. We focus to apply the unconventional barometry in cases where chemical zoning in minerals cannot be explained by sluggish kinetics. In that respect, the unconventional barometry offers an alternative view of the chemical zoning which is consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium. However, to distinguish between a pressure-controlled chemical zoning and a zoning reflecting an incomplete chemical reaction is still challenging, especially for multicomponent systems. In this contribution, different types of chemical zoning are discussed. We investigate plagioclase rims around kyanite from an amphibolitized eclogite from Rhodope Metamorphic Complex (Greece-Bulgaria) as a case study and compare them with similar published textures from the Bohemian Massif. Mineral microstructures and phase equilibrium suggest that both rocks experienced near-isothermal decompression at high (>700C) temperatures. However, several distinct microstructural features suggest the development and/or the decay of mechanically maintained heterogeneous pressure distributions. We discuss our results and interpretations based on phase-equilibrium modeling, unconventional barometry and diffusion modeling under

  1. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium and Thermodynamics in Undergraduate General Chemistry Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Anil C.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses some of the conceptual difficulties encountered by undergraduate students in learning certain aspects of chemical equilibrium and thermodynamics. Discusses teaching strategies for dealing with these difficulties. (JRH)

  2. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Chemical Equilibrium in Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses theory of thermodynamics of the equilibrium in solution and dissociation-dimerization kinetics. Describes experimental procedure including determination of molar absorptivity and equilibrium constant, reaction enthalpy, and kinetics of the dissociation-dimerization reaction. (JM)

  3. Far-from-equilibrium measurements of thermodynamic length

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Edward H.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-11-05

    Thermodynamic length is a path function that generalizes the notion of length to the surface of thermodynamic states. Here, we show how to measure thermodynamic length in far-from-equilibrium experiments using the work fluctuation relations. For these microscopic systems, it proves necessary to define the thermodynamic length in terms of the Fisher information. Consequently, the thermodynamic length can be directly related to the magnitude of fluctuations about equilibrium. The work fluctuation relations link the work and the free energy change during an external perturbation on a system. We use this result to determine equilibrium averages at intermediate points of the protocol in which the system is out-of-equilibrium. This allows us to extend Bennett's method to determine the potential of mean force, as well as the thermodynamic length, in single molecule experiments.

  4. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  5. Equilibration time scales of organic aerosol inside thermodenuders: Evaporation kinetics versus thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riipinen, Ilona; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Donahue, Neil M.; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2010-02-01

    The interpretation of thermodenuder (TD) data often relies on the assumption that thermodynamic equilibrium is reached inside the instrument. We modeled the evaporation of three organic aerosol types (adipic acid, α-pinene SOA and aged OA) inside a thermodenuder with a mass transfer model, and calculated equilibration time scales for these systems at realistic conditions. The equilibrium times varied from less than a second to several hours, decreasing with increasing aerosol concentrations, decreasing particle sizes, decreasing volatilities and increasing mass accommodation coefficients. The results indicate that generally TDs measure particle evaporation rates rather than equilibria, and time-dependent modeling of the evaporation is usually needed to interpret the data. Measurements at varying residence times and temperatures, on the other hand, are desirable to investigate the equilibration of the studied aerosol and decouple the kinetic effects from the effects caused by the thermodynamic properties of the aerosol. Organic aerosol is likely to be further from equilibrium under typical field conditions compared with laboratory data. When determining the aerosol properties from TD data, assuming incorrectly equilibrium results in under-prediction of the vaporization enthalpy of the evaporating species. Similar under-estimation is predicted if multicomponent aerosols are approximated with single-component properties.

  6. Electrolytes: transport properties and non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.G.

    1980-12-01

    This paper presents a review on the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics to transport in electrolyte solutions, and some recent experimental work and results for mutual diffusion in electrolyte solutions.

  7. Methane on Mars: Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Photochemical Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.; Ewell, M.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars by Mars Express and Earth-based spectroscopy is very surprising, very puzzling, and very intriguing. On Earth, about 90% of atmospheric ozone is produced by living systems. A major question concerning methane on Mars is its origin - biological or geological. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations indicated that methane cannot be produced by atmospheric chemical/photochemical reactions. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for three gases, methane, ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the Earth s atmosphere are summarized in Table 1. The calculations indicate that these three gases should not exist in the Earth s atmosphere. Yet they do, with methane, ammonia and nitrous oxide enhanced 139, 50 and 12 orders of magnitude above their calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentration due to the impact of life! Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations have been performed for the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars based on the assumed composition of the Mars atmosphere shown in Table 2. The calculated thermodynamic equilibrium concentrations of the same three gases in the atmosphere of Mars is shown in Table 3. Clearly, based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, methane should not be present in the atmosphere of Mars, but it is in concentrations approaching 30 ppbv from three distinct regions on Mars.

  8. Composition and Thermodynamic Properties of Air in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W E; Weston, Kenneth C

    1958-01-01

    Charts have been prepared relating the thermodynamic properties of air in chemical equilibrium for temperatures to 15,000 degrees k and for pressures 10(-5) to 10 (plus 4) atmospheres. Also included are charts showing the composition of air, the isentropic exponent, and the speed of sound. These charts are based on thermodynamic data calculated by the National Bureau of Standards.

  9. Considerations on non equilibrium thermodynamics of interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    Nature can be considered the "first" engineer! For scientists and engineers, dynamics and evolution of complex systems are not easy to predict. A fundamental approach to study complex system is thermodynamics. But, the result is the origin of too many schools of thermodynamics with a consequent difficulty in communication between thermodynamicists and other scientists and, also, among themselves. The solution is to obtain a unified approach based on the fundamentals of physics. Here we suggest a possible unification of the schools of thermodynamics starting from two fundamental concepts of physics, interaction and flows.

  10. Thermodynamic equilibrium-air correlations for flowfield applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Moss, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Equilibrium-air thermodynamic correlations have been developed for flowfield calculation procedures. A comparison between the postshock results computed by the correlation equations and detailed chemistry calculations is very good. The thermodynamic correlations are incorporated in an approximate inviscid flowfield code with a convective heating capability for the purpose of defining the thermodynamic environment through the shock layer. Comparisons of heating rates computed by the approximate code and a viscous-shock-layer method are good. In addition to presenting the thermodynamic correlations, the impact of several viscosity models on the convective heat transfer is demonstrated.

  11. Introducing GMXe: A new global aerosol dynamics and thermodynamics model for climate and air quality studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, K.; Metzger, S.; Tost, H.; Steil, B.; Lelieveld, J.

    2009-04-01

    The treatment of aerosols in global atmospheric models has advanced significantly in the past decade, but the global aerosol distribution is very complex and simplifications must be made in order to treat aerosols in global models. One common simplification is in the treatment of the partitioning of semi-volatile species (e.g. NH3, HNO3 and H2O) between the gas and the aerosol phases, which is often neglected in models or treated in a simplified manner. The treatment of partitioning is, however, important as it controls the aerosol composition (including the aerosol water concentration) as well as affecting the concentration of both aerosol and gas phase pollutants. This paper introduces the newly developed GMXe aerosol model, which has been developed to investigate gas / aerosol partitioning on a global scale. The model (implemented within the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model) combines an extended version of an established aerosol microphysics model (the M7, Stier et al ACP 2005) with a thermodynamic equilibrium model (EQSAM3, Metzger et al ACP 2008). The resulting model is capable of calculating gas / aerosol partitioning with relatively little additional computational overhead. In this paper we give an overview of the modelling approach used and show various model inter-comparisons, including a detailed comparison of the results of the GMXe and M7 models. We show the effect of including additional aerosol components - such as nitrate aerosol - on the global aerosol distribution and on the behaviour of other aerosol species (e.g. sulphate). The water uptake behaviour of the aerosol is examined, a factor that is important for the aerosol lifetime and also for the aerosol radiative forcing. We examine our results in the context of future emissions scenarios and air quality standards.

  12. Biochemical thermodynamics and rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2010-12-30

    Biochemical thermodynamics is based on the chemical thermodynamics of aqueous solutions, but it is quite different because pH is used as an independent variable. A transformed Gibbs energy G' is used, and that leads to transformed enthalpies H' and transformed entropies S'. Equilibrium constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are referred to as apparent equilibrium constants K' to indicate that they are functions of pH in addition to temperature and ionic strength. Despite this, the most useful way to store basic thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions is to give standard Gibbs energies of formation, standard enthalpies of formation, electric charges, and numbers of hydrogen atoms in species of biochemical reactants like ATP. This makes it possible to calculate standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation, standard transformed enthalpies of formation of reactants (sums of species), and apparent equilibrium constants at desired temperatures, pHs, and ionic strengths. These calculations are complicated, and therefore, a mathematical application in a computer is needed. Rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics is based on biochemical thermodynamics because all reactions in the mechanism prior to the rate-determining reaction are at equilibrium. The expression for the equilibrium concentration of the enzyme-substrate complex that yields products can be derived by applying Solve in a computer to the expressions for the equilibrium constants in the mechanism and the conservation equation for enzymatic sites. In 1979, Duggleby pointed out that the minimum number of velocities of enzyme-catalyzed reactions required to estimate the values of the kinetic parameters is equal to the number of kinetic parameters. Solve can be used to do this with steady-state rate equations as well as rapid-equilibrium rate equations, provided that the rate equation is a polynomial. Rapid-equilibrium rate equations can be derived for complicated mechanisms that involve several reactants

  13. Equilibrium absorptive partitioning theory between multiple aerosol particle modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, Matthew; Connolly, Paul; Topping, David; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    An existing equilibrium absorptive partitioning model for calculating the equilibrium gas and particle concentrations of multiple semi-volatile organics within a bulk aerosol is extended to allow for multiple involatile aerosol modes of different sizes and chemical compositions. In the bulk aerosol problem, the partitioning coefficient determines the fraction of the total concentration of semi-volatile material that is in the condensed phase of the aerosol. This work modifies this definition for multiple polydisperse aerosol modes to account for multiple condensed concentrations, one for each semi-volatile on each involatile aerosol mode. The pivotal assumption in this work is that each aerosol mode contains an involatile constituent, thus overcoming the potential problem of smaller particles evaporating completely and then condensing on the larger particles to create a monodisperse aerosol at equilibrium. A parameterisation is proposed in which the coupled non-linear system of equations is approximated by a simpler set of equations obtained by setting the organic mole fraction in the partitioning coefficient to be the same across all modes. By perturbing the condensed masses about this approximate solution a correction term is derived that accounts for many of the removed complexities. This method offers a greatly increased efficiency in calculating the solution without significant loss in accuracy, thus making it suitable for inclusion in large-scale models.

  14. The thermodynamic analysis of weak protein interactions using sedimentation equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Dolinska, Monika B.; Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins self-associate to form dimers and tetramers. Purified proteins are used to study the thermodynamics of protein interactions using the analytical ultracentrifuge. In this approach, monomer – dimer equilibrium constants are directly measured at various temperatures. Data analysis is used to derive thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy which can predict which major forces are involved in protein association. PMID:25081741

  15. Experimental determination of thermodynamic equilibrium in biocatalytic transamination.

    PubMed

    Tufvesson, Pär; Jensen, Jacob S; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Woodley, John M

    2012-08-01

    The equilibrium constant is a critical parameter for making rational design choices in biocatalytic transamination for the synthesis of chiral amines. However, very few reports are available in the scientific literature determining the equilibrium constant (K) for the transamination of ketones. Various methods for determining (or estimating) equilibrium have previously been suggested, both experimental as well as computational (based on group contribution methods). However, none of these were found suitable for determining the equilibrium constant for the transamination of ketones. Therefore, in this communication we suggest a simple experimental methodology which we hope will stimulate more accurate determination of thermodynamic equilibria when reporting the results of transaminase-catalyzed reactions in order to increase understanding of the relationship between substrate and product molecular structure on reaction thermodynamics.

  16. Atomistic modeling of thermodynamic equilibrium of plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tongsik; Valone, Steve; Baskes, Mike; Chen, Shao-Ping; Lawson, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Plutonium metal has complex thermodynamic properties. Among its six allotropes at ambient pressure, the fcc delta-phase exhibits a wide range of anomalous behavior: extraordinarily high elastic anisotropy, largest atomic volume despite the close-packed structure, negative thermal expansion, strong elastic softening at elevated temperature, and extreme sensitivity to dilute alloying. An accurate description of these thermodynamic properties goes far beyond the current capability of first-principle calculations. An elaborate modeling strategy at the atomic level is hence an urgent need. We propose a novel atomistic scheme to model elemental plutonium, in particular, to reproduce the anomalous characteristics of the delta-phase. A modified embedded atom method potential is fitted to two energy-volume curves that represent the distinct electronic states of plutonium in order to embody the mechanism of the two-state model of Weiss, in line with the insight originally proposed by Lawson et al. [Philos. Mag. 86, 2713 (2006)]. By the use of various techniques in Monte Carlo simulations, we are able to provide a unified perspective of diverse phenomenological aspects among thermal expansion, elasticity, and phase stability.

  17. ON THE EQUILIBRIUM STRUCTURE AND THERMODYNAMICS OF SIMPLE LIQUIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The equilibrium structure and thermodynamics of a simple liquid is discussed. The particular system considered in our calculations is the Lennard ... Jones liquid in which the intermolecular interaction is the pairwise additive 6- 12 potential. The potential is separated into two parts, a reference

  18. Thermodynamics of the Rhodamine B Lactone--Zwitterion Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinckley, Daniel A.; Seybold, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of thermochromic transformations for studying thermodynamic properties. Describes an experiment that uses a commercially available dye, attains equilibrium rapidly, employs a simple, single-beam spectrophotometer, and is suitable for both physical chemistry and introductory chemistry laboratories. (TW)

  19. Thermodynamic Derivation of the Equilibrium Distribution Functions of Statistical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoeckly, Beth

    1979-01-01

    Presents a simplified derivation of the equilibrium distribution functions. The derivation proceeds from the change in the Helmholtz free energy when a particle is added to a system of fixed temperature, volume, and chemical potential. The derivations show the relationship between statistical mechanics and macroscopic thermodynamics. (Author/GA)

  20. Local thermodynamic equilibrium for globally disequilibrium open systems under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury

    2016-04-01

    Predictive modeling of far and near equilibrium processes is essential for understanding of patterns formation and for quantifying of natural processes that are never in global equilibrium. Methods of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics are needed and have to be combined. For example, predicting temperature evolution due to heat conduction requires simultaneous use of equilibrium relationship between internal energy and temperature via heat capacity (the caloric equation of state) and disequilibrium relationship between heat flux and temperature gradient. Similarly, modeling of rocks deforming under stress, reactions in system open for the porous fluid flow, or kinetic overstepping of the equilibrium reaction boundary necessarily needs both equilibrium and disequilibrium material properties measured under fundamentally different laboratory conditions. Classical irreversible thermodynamics (CIT) is the well-developed discipline providing the working recipes for the combined application of mutually exclusive experimental data such as density and chemical potential at rest under constant pressure and temperature and viscosity of the flow under stress. Several examples will be presented.

  1. Local equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics for irreversible systems with thermodynamic inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatskiy, K. S.

    2015-10-01

    Validity of local equilibrium has been questioned for non-equilibrium systems which are characterized by delayed response. In particular, for systems with non-zero thermodynamic inertia, the assumption of local equilibrium leads to negative values of the entropy production, which is in contradiction with the second law of thermodynamics. In this paper, we address this question by suggesting a variational formulation of irreversible evolution of a system with non-zero thermodynamic inertia. We introduce the Lagrangian, which depends on the properties of the normal and the so-called "mirror-image" systems. We show that the standard evolution equations, in particular, the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, can be derived from the variational procedure without going beyond the assumption of local equilibrium. We also argue that the second law of thermodynamics in non-equilibrium should be understood as a consequence of the variational procedure and the property of local equilibrium. For systems with instantaneous response this leads to the standard requirement of the local instantaneous entropy production being always positive. However, if a system is characterized by delayed response, the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics should be altered. In particular, the quantity, which is always positive, is not the instantaneous entropy production, but the entropy production averaged over a proper time interval.

  2. Local equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics for irreversible systems with thermodynamic inertia.

    PubMed

    Glavatskiy, K S

    2015-10-28

    Validity of local equilibrium has been questioned for non-equilibrium systems which are characterized by delayed response. In particular, for systems with non-zero thermodynamic inertia, the assumption of local equilibrium leads to negative values of the entropy production, which is in contradiction with the second law of thermodynamics. In this paper, we address this question by suggesting a variational formulation of irreversible evolution of a system with non-zero thermodynamic inertia. We introduce the Lagrangian, which depends on the properties of the normal and the so-called "mirror-image" systems. We show that the standard evolution equations, in particular, the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, can be derived from the variational procedure without going beyond the assumption of local equilibrium. We also argue that the second law of thermodynamics in non-equilibrium should be understood as a consequence of the variational procedure and the property of local equilibrium. For systems with instantaneous response this leads to the standard requirement of the local instantaneous entropy production being always positive. However, if a system is characterized by delayed response, the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics should be altered. In particular, the quantity, which is always positive, is not the instantaneous entropy production, but the entropy production averaged over a proper time interval.

  3. Local equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics for irreversible systems with thermodynamic inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Glavatskiy, K. S.

    2015-10-28

    Validity of local equilibrium has been questioned for non-equilibrium systems which are characterized by delayed response. In particular, for systems with non-zero thermodynamic inertia, the assumption of local equilibrium leads to negative values of the entropy production, which is in contradiction with the second law of thermodynamics. In this paper, we address this question by suggesting a variational formulation of irreversible evolution of a system with non-zero thermodynamic inertia. We introduce the Lagrangian, which depends on the properties of the normal and the so-called “mirror-image” systems. We show that the standard evolution equations, in particular, the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, can be derived from the variational procedure without going beyond the assumption of local equilibrium. We also argue that the second law of thermodynamics in non-equilibrium should be understood as a consequence of the variational procedure and the property of local equilibrium. For systems with instantaneous response this leads to the standard requirement of the local instantaneous entropy production being always positive. However, if a system is characterized by delayed response, the formulation of the second law of thermodynamics should be altered. In particular, the quantity, which is always positive, is not the instantaneous entropy production, but the entropy production averaged over a proper time interval.

  4. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Shruti, K. S.; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish

    2016-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) has been studied here as a non-equilibrium thermodynamics problem. Air masses with temperature difference of 70K, initially with heavier air resting on lighter air isolated by a partition, are allowed to mix by impulsively removing the partition. This results in interface instabilities, which are traced here by solving two dimensional (2D) compressible Navier-Stokes equation (NSE), without using Boussinesq approximation (BA henceforth). The non-periodic isolated system is studied by solving NSE by high accuracy, dispersion relation preserving (DRP) numerical methods described in Sengupta T.K.: High Accuracy Computing Method (Camb. Univ. Press, USA, 2013). The instability onset is due to misaligned pressure and density gradients and is evident via creation and evolution of spikes and bubbles (when lighter fluid penetrates heavier fluid and vice versa, associated with pressure waves). Assumptions inherent in compressible formulation are: (i) Stokes' hypothesis that uses zero bulk viscosity assumption and (ii) the equation of state for perfect gas which is a consequence of equilibrium thermodynamics. Present computations for a non-equilibrium thermodynamic process do not show monotonic rise of entropy with time, as one expects from equilibrium thermodynamics. This is investigated with respect to the thought-experiment. First, we replace Stokes' hypothesis, with another approach where non-zero bulk viscosity of air is taken from an experiment. Entropy of the isolated system is traced, with and without the use of Stokes' hypothesis. Without Stokes' hypothesis, one notes the rate of increase in entropy to be higher as compared to results with Stokes' hypothesis. We show this using the total entropy production for the thermodynamically isolated system. The entropy increase from the zero datum is due to mixing in general; punctuated by fluctuating entropy due to creation of compression and rarefaction fronts originating at the interface

  5. Scalar Fluctuations from Extended Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    In the framework of extended non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the local non-equilibrium state of a liquid is described by the density, temperature, and a structural variable, ζ, and its rate-of-change. ζ is the ensemble average of a function A (Q) of the configuration co-ordinates, and it is assumed to relax to local equilibrium in a time short compared to the time for diffusion of an appreciable number of particles into the system. By a projection operator technique of Grabert, an equation is derived from the Liouville equation for the distribution of fluctuations in TV, the particle number, and in A and Ȧ. An approximate solution is proposed which exhibits nonequilibrium corrections to the Einstein function in the form of a sum of thermodynamic forces. For a particular structural model, the corresponding non-Einstein contributions to correlation functions are estimated to be very small. For variables of the type considered here, the thermodynamic pressure is found to equal the pressure trace.

  6. Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Tannehill, J. C.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1987-01-01

    New, improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air have been developed. The curve fits are for pressure, speed of sound, temperature, entropy, enthalpy, density, and internal energy. These curve fits can be readily incorporated into new or existing computational fluid dynamics codes if real gas effects are desired. The curve fits are constructed from Grabau-type transition functions to model the thermodynamic surfaces in a piecewise manner. The accuracies and continuity of these curve fits are substantially improved over those of previous curve fits. These improvements are due to the incorporation of a small number of additional terms in the approximating polynomials and careful choices of the transition functions. The ranges of validity of the new curve fits are temperatures up to 25 000 K and densities from 10 to the -7 to 10 to the 3d power amagats.

  7. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of the Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Vittorio; Ferraro, Elena; Sola, Alessandro; Magni, Alessandro; Kuepferling, Michaela; Pasquale, Massimo

    In this paper we employ non equilibrium thermodynamics of fluxes and forces to describe magnetization and heat transport. By the theory we are able to identify the thermodynamic driving force of the magnetization current as the gradient of the effective field ▿H*. This definition permits to define the spin Seebeck coefficient ɛM which relates ▿H* and the temperature gradient ▿T. By applying the theory to the geometry of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect we are able to obtain the optimal conditions for generating large magnetization currents. Furthermore, by using the results of recent experiments, we obtain an order of magnitude for the value of ɛM ∼ 10-2 TK-1 for yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12).

  8. Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Rise of Complexity in an Accelerated Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradpour, H.; Riazi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Observational data (Supernovae type Ia data) indicate that the rate of the universe expansion is increasing, which means that, in the framework of General Relativity, the current phase of the expansion is due to an unknown source of energy. Therefore, the nature of dominated fluid in cosmos, as the source of energy, is mysterious. Here, by considering this property of current accelerating phase along with the concept of thermodynamics equilibrium we try to find possible values for the state parameter ( ω) of the dominated fluid in a ( n+1)-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. Our results are compatible with previous work for Gauss-Bonnet gravity and point to a universe which is so close to its thermodynamic equilibrium state. By the evolution of the cosmos, the baryonic content of the cosmos is participating in longer range interactions, including gravity and electromagnetism, and structure formation is begun which leads to an increase in the complexity content of the universe. Therefore, a true model for the cosmos should show this rise of complexity and information. In order to achieve this goal, we introduce a simple model including free particles in an expanding box and try to count the number of the states of energy. This configuration shows that the entropy of these number of states as the measure for complexity is increased when dominated fluid satisfies special condition ( ω ≥ -1) which is compatible with the results of the Supernovae type Ia data and the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Finally, We see that the rate of increase in the complexity content of the universe increases in the ω → -1 limit.

  9. Equilibrium econophysics: A unified formalism for neoclassical economics and equilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Tânia; Domingos, Tiago

    2006-11-01

    We develop a unified conceptual and mathematical structure for equilibrium econophysics, i.e., the use of concepts and tools of equilibrium thermodynamics in neoclassical microeconomics and vice versa. Within this conceptual structure the results obtained in microeconomic theory are: (1) the definition of irreversibility in economic behavior; (2) the clarification that the Engel curve and the offer curve are not descriptions of real processes dictated by the maximization of utility at constant endowment; (3) the derivation of a relation between elasticities proving that economic elasticities are not all independent; (4) the proof that Giffen goods do not exist in a stable equilibrium; (5) the derivation that ‘economic integrability’ is equivalent to the generalized Le Chatelier principle and (6) the definition of a first order phase transition, i.e., a transition between separate points in the utility function. In thermodynamics the results obtained are: (1) a relation between the non-dimensional isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities and the increase or decrease in the thermodynamic potentials; (2) the distinction between mathematical integrability and optimization behavior and (3) the generalization of the Clapeyron equation.

  10. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics analysis of transcriptional regulation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Tovar, Hugo; Mejía, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotic cells is an extremely complex and interesting phenomenon whose dynamics are controlled by a large number of subtle physicochemical processes commonly described by means of gene regulatory networks. Such networks consist in a series of coupled chemical reactions, conformational changes, and other biomolecular processes involving the interaction of the DNA molecule itself with a number of proteins usually called transcription factors as well as enzymes and other components. The kinetics behind the functioning of such gene regulatory networks are largely unknown, though its description in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics has been discussed recently. In this work we will derive general kinetic equations for a gene regulatory network from a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description and discuss its use in understanding the free energy constrains imposed in the network structure. We also will discuss explicit expressions for the kinetics of a simple model of gene regulation and show that the kinetic role of mRNA decay during the RNA synthesis stage (or transcription) is somehow limited due to the comparatively low values of decay rates. At the level discussed here, this implies a decoupling of the kinetics of mRNA synthesis and degradation a fact that may become quite useful when modeling gene regulatory networks from experimental data on whole genome gene expression.

  11. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-04-01

    Here, the fundamental problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS), where the two air masses at different temperatures, kept apart initially by a non-conducting horizontal interface in a 2D box, are allowed to mix. Upon removal of the partition, mixing is controlled by RTI, apart from mutual mass, momentum, and energy transfer. To accentuate the instability, the top chamber is filled with the heavier (lower temperature) air, which rests atop the chamber containing lighter air. The partition is positioned initially at mid-height of the box. As the fluid dynamical system considered is completely isolated from outside, the DNS results obtained without using Boussinesq approximation will enable one to study non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a finite reservoir undergoing strong irreversible processes. The barrier is removed impulsively, triggering baroclinic instability by non-alignment of density, and pressure gradient by ambient disturbances via the sharp discontinuity at the interface. Adopted DNS method has dispersion relation preservation properties with neutral stability and does not require any external initial perturbations. The complete inhomogeneous problem with non-periodic, no-slip boundary conditions is studied by solving compressible Navier-Stokes equation, without the Boussinesq approximation. This is important as the temperature difference between the two air masses considered is high enough (Δ T = 70 K) to invalidate Boussinesq approximation. We discuss non-equilibrium thermodynamical aspects of RTI with the help of numerical results for density, vorticity, entropy, energy, and enstrophy.

  12. Analysis of Arctic Cloud Thermodynamic Phase Susceptibility to Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopman, Q.; Garrett, T. J.; Riedi, J.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.

    2014-12-01

    Even if Arctic is remote from industrialized areas, this region is influenced by elevated concentration of aerosols from mid-latitude, especially during winter. This is mainly due to the decrease of wet scavenging and the surface temperature inversion, both acting as a trap for the atmospheric particles. Aerosols play a key role on cloud's microphysics, because they act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) or Ice Nuclei (IN). Both nuclei influence directly on cloud's presence and formation, potentially impacting also thermodynamic phase transition through different mechanisms, which in turn affect cloud radiative properties and forcing. In our study we used two sets of data: i) A combination of POLDER-3/PARASOL and MODIS/AQUA satellite measurements to retrieve cloud properties; ii) The numerical transport model FLEXPART which use carbon monoxide tracer to inform on concentration of biomass burning and anthropogenic aerosols. The main advantage of combining these two sets of data is to obtain large statistics about clouds that have been potentially influenced by varied concentrations of aerosol. We report here results of a study in which we analyze potential interaction between clouds and aerosols from biomass burning and anthropogenic sources. We first analyzed the temperature at which thermodynamic phase transition is most likely to occur according to the types and concentrations of aerosols. It is shown a correlation between the temperature of thermodynamic phase transition and aerosols concentrations and type. Unlike we could have expected from previous studies, preliminary analyses suggest that aerosols from anthropogenic sources accelerate the liquid-ice transition whereas aerosols from biomass burning inhibit the transition from water to ice. Different hypotheses can be responsible for this observation and we analyze parameters that can play a role on the transition temperature shift and how aerosols act as an inhibitor or activator of the phase transition, for

  13. Thermodynamic Modeling of Organic-Inorganic Aerosols with the Group-Contribution Model AIOMFAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2009-04-01

    Liquid aerosol particles are - from a physicochemical viewpoint - mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water and a large variety of organic compounds (Rogge et al., 1993; Zhang et al., 2007). Molecular interactions between these aerosol components lead to deviations from ideal thermodynamic behavior. Strong non-ideality between organics and dissolved ions may influence the aerosol phases at equilibrium by means of liquid-liquid phase separations into a mainly polar (aqueous) and a less polar (organic) phase. A number of activity models exists to successfully describe the thermodynamic equilibrium of aqueous electrolyte solutions. However, the large number of different, often multi-functional, organic compounds in mixed organic-inorganic particles is a challenging problem for the development of thermodynamic models. The group-contribution concept as introduced in the UNIFAC model by Fredenslund et al. (1975), is a practical method to handle this difficulty and to add a certain predictability for unknown organic substances. We present the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients), which explicitly accounts for molecular interactions between solution constituents, both organic and inorganic, to calculate activities, chemical potentials and the total Gibbs energy of mixed systems (Zuend et al., 2008). This model enables the computation of vapor-liquid (VLE), liquid-liquid (LLE) and solid-liquid (SLE) equilibria within one framework. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered eight different cations, five anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are very well represented up to high ionic strength. We show that the semi-empirical middle-range parametrization of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol-water-salt solutions enables accurate computations of vapor-liquid and liquid

  14. Computation of thermodynamic equilibrium in systems under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic reactions may be partly controlled by the local stress distribution as suggested by observations of phase assemblages around garnet inclusions related to an amphibolite shear zone in granulite of the Bergen Arcs in Norway. A particular example presented in fig. 14 of Mukai et al. [1] is discussed here. A garnet crystal embedded in a plagioclase matrix is replaced on the left side by a high pressure intergrowth of kyanite and quartz and on the right side by chlorite-amphibole. This texture apparently represents disequilibrium. In this case, the minerals adapt to the low pressure ambient conditions only where fluids were present. Alternatively, here we compute that this particular low pressure and high pressure assemblage around a stressed rigid inclusion such as garnet can coexist in equilibrium. To do the computations we developed the Thermolab software package. The core of the software package consists of Matlab functions that generate Gibbs energy of minerals and melts from the Holland and Powell database [2] and aqueous species from the SUPCRT92 database [3]. Most up to date solid solutions are included in a general formulation. The user provides a Matlab script to do the desired calculations using the core functions. Gibbs energy of all minerals, solutions and species are benchmarked versus THERMOCALC, PerpleX [4] and SUPCRT92 and are reproduced within round off computer error. Multi-component phase diagrams have been calculated using Gibbs minimization to benchmark with THERMOCALC and Perple_X. The Matlab script to compute equilibrium in a stressed system needs only two modifications of the standard phase diagram script. Firstly, Gibbs energy of phases considered in the calculation is generated for multiple values of thermodynamic pressure. Secondly, for the Gibbs minimization the proportion of the system at each particular thermodynamic pressure needs to be constrained. The user decides which part of the stress tensor is input as thermodynamic

  15. Unfolding single RNA molecules: bridging the gap between equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    During the last 15 years, scientists have developed methods that permit the direct mechanical manipulation of individual molecules. Using this approach, they have begun to investigate the effect of force and torque in chemical and biochemical reactions. These studies span from the study of the mechanical properties of macromolecules, to the characterization of molecular motors, to the mechanical unfolding of individual proteins and RNA. Here I present a review of some of our most recent results using mechanical force to unfold individual molecules of RNA. These studies make it possible to follow in real time the trajectory of each molecule as it unfolds and characterize the various intermediates of the reaction. Moreover, if the process takes place reversibly it is possible to extract both kinetic and thermodynamic information from these experiments at the same time that we characterize the forces that maintain the three-dimensional structure of the molecule in solution. These studies bring us closer to the biological unfolding processes in the cell as they simulate in vitro, the mechanical unfolding of RNAs carried out in the cell by helicases. If the unfolding process occurs irreversibly, I show here that single-molecule experiments can still provide equilibrium, thermodynamic information from non-equilibrium data by using recently discovered fluctuation theorems. Such theorems represent a bridge between equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In fact, first derived in 1997, the first experimental demonstration of the validity of fluctuation theorems was obtained by unfolding mechanically a single molecule of RNA. It is perhaps a sign of the times that important physical results are these days used to extract information about biological systems and that biological systems are being used to test and confirm fundamental new laws in physics.

  16. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  17. Constraints on Contact Angles for Multiple Phases in Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Blunt, Martin J.

    2001-07-01

    For three or more fluid phases in thermodynamic equilibrium and in contact with a solid surface, the Young equation can be used to find relations between the contact angles for different pairs of fluids. For an n-fluid-phase system, n(n-1)/2 contact angles can be defined, but there are (n-1)(n-2)/2 constraints between them, leaving only n-1 independent values of the contact angle. These constraints are very powerful in limiting and determining possible types of wetting behavior. The consequences are discussed for three- and four-phase flow. They have important applications for the understanding of gas injection processes in petroleum reservoirs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. SOLGAS refined: A computerized thermodynamic equilibrium calculation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1993-11-01

    SOLGAS, an early computer program for calculating equilibrium in a chemical system, has been made more user-friendly, and several{open_quote} bells and whistles{close_quotes} have been added. The necessity to include elemental species has been eliminated. The input of large numbers of starting conditions has been automated. A revised format for entering data simplifies and reduces chances for error. Calculated errors by SOLGAS are flagged, and several programming errors are corrected. Auxiliary programs are available to assemble and partially automate plotting of large amounts of data. Thermodynamic input data can be changed {open_quotes}on line.{close_quote} The program can be operated with or without a co-processor. Copies of the program, suitable for the IBM-PC or compatible with at least 384 bytes of low RAM, are available from the authors.

  19. Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Tannehill, J. C.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    New improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were developed. The curve fits are for p = p(e,rho), a = a(e,rho), T = T(e,rho), s = s(e,rho), T = T(p,rho), h = h(p,rho), rho = rho(p,s), e = e(p,s) and a = a(p,s). These curve fits can be readily incorporated into new or existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes if real-gas effects are desired. The curve fits were constructed using Grabau-type transition functions to model the thermodynamic surfaces in a piecewise manner. The accuracies and continuity of these curve fits are substantially improved over those of previous curve fits appearing in NASA CR-2470. These improvements were due to the incorporation of a small number of additional terms in the approximating polynomials and careful choices of the transition functions. The ranges of validity of the new curve fits are temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th to 100 amagats (rho/rho sub 0).

  20. Thermodynamic characterization of an equilibrium folding intermediate of staphylococcal nuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, D.; Fox, R.; Freire, E.

    1994-01-01

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and CD spectroscopy have been used to probe the structural stability and measure the folding/unfolding thermodynamics of a Pro117-->Gly variant of staphylococcal nuclease. It is shown that at neutral pH the thermal denaturation of this protein is well accounted for by a 2-state mechanism and that the thermally denatured state is a fully hydrated unfolded polypeptide. At pH 3.5, thermal denaturation results in a compact denatured state in which most, if not all, of the helical structure is missing and the beta subdomain apparently remains largely intact. At pH 3.0, no thermal transition is observed and the molecule exists in the compact denatured state within the 0-100 degrees C temperature interval. At high salt concentration and pH 3.5, the thermal unfolding transition exhibits 2 cooperative peaks in the heat capacity function, the first one corresponding to the transition from the native to the intermediate state and the second one to the transition from the intermediate to the unfolded state. As is the case with other proteins, the enthalpy of the intermediate is higher than that of the unfolded state at low temperatures, indicating that, under those conditions, its stabilization must be of an entropic origin. The folding intermediate has been modeled by structural thermodynamic calculations. Structure-based thermodynamic calculations also predict that the most probable intermediate is one in which the beta subdomain is essentially intact and the rest of the molecule unfolded, in agreement with the experimental data. The structural features of the equilibrium intermediate are similar to those of a kinetic intermediate previously characterized by hydrogen exchange and NMR spectroscopy. PMID:7756977

  1. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of harmonically trapped bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángel García-March, Miguel; Fogarty, Thomás; Campbell, Steve; Busch, Thomas; Paternostro, Mauro

    2016-10-01

    We apply the framework of non-equilibrium quantum thermodynamics to the physics of quenched small-sized bosonic quantum gases in a one-dimensional harmonic trap. We show that dynamical orthogonality can occur in these few-body systems with strong interactions after a quench and we find its occurrence analytically for an infinitely repulsive pair of atoms. We further show this phenomena is related to the fundamental excitations that dictate the dynamics from the spectral function. We establish a clear qualitative link between the amount of (irreversible) work performed on the system and the establishment of entanglement. We extend our analysis to multipartite systems by examining the case of three trapped atoms. We show the initial (pre-quench) interactions play a vital role in determining the dynamical features, while the qualitative features of the two particle case appear to remain valid. Finally, we propose the use of the atomic density profile as a readily accessible indicator of the non-equilibrium properties of the systems in question.

  2. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  3. Laser induced plasma expansion and existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skočić, Miloš; Bukvić, Srdjan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present a simple model of the laser induced plasma (LIP) expansion in a low pressure surrounding atmosphere. The model is based on assumption that expansion process is dominantly governed by kinematics of the heavy particles. The model is accompanied with a simple, yet effective, Monte-Carlo simulation. Results of the simulation are compared with spectroscopic measurements of the laser induced copper plasma expanding in low pressure (200 Pa) hydrogen atmosphere. We found that characteristic expansion time of the LIP is proportional to the linear dimension of the initial volume heated up by the laser. For sufficiently large initial volume copper plasma remains in local thermodynamic equilibrium on the submicrosecond-microsecond scale. It is shown that diagnostics based on the spectral lines of the hydrogen atmosphere is not suitable for characterization of the core of the copper plasma. We have demonstrated importance of radially resolved spectroscopic measurements as a key step for correct diagnostics and understanding of laser induced plasma.

  4. Calculating and Visualizing Thermodynamic Equilibrium: A Tutorial on the Isolated System with an Internal Adiabatic Piston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of the equilibrium state of an isolated composite system with a movable internal adiabatic wall is a recurrent one in the literature. Classical equilibrium thermodynamics is unable to predict the equilibrium state, unless supplemented with information about the process taking place. This conclusion is clearly demonstrated in this…

  5. Thermodynamics of stoichiometric biochemical networks in living systems far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Beard, Daniel A

    2005-04-22

    The principles of thermodynamics apply to both equilibrium and nonequilibrium biochemical systems. The mathematical machinery of the classic thermodynamics, however, mainly applies to systems in equilibrium. We introduce a thermodynamic formalism for the study of metabolic biochemical reaction (open, nonlinear) networks in both time-dependent and time-independent nonequilibrium states. Classical concepts in equilibrium thermodynamics-enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy of biochemical reaction systems-are generalized to nonequilibrium settings. Chemical motive force, heat dissipation rate, and entropy production (creation) rate, key concepts in nonequilibrium systems, are introduced. Dynamic equations for the thermodynamic quantities are presented in terms of the key observables of a biochemical network: stoichiometric matrix Q, reaction fluxes J, and chemical potentials of species mu without evoking empirical rate laws. Energy conservation and the Second Law are established for steady-state and dynamic biochemical networks. The theory provides the physiochemical basis for analyzing large-scale metabolic networks in living organisms.

  6. Studies on the formulation of thermodynamics and stochastic theory for systems far from equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.

    1995-12-31

    We have been working for some time on the formulation of thermodynamics and the theory of fluctuations in systems far from equilibrium and progress in several aspects of that development are reported here.

  7. A Unified Graphical Representation of Chemical Thermodynamics and Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    During the years 1873-1879, J. Willard Gibbs published his now-famous set of articles that form the basis of the current perspective on chemical thermodynamics. The second article of this series, "A Method of Geometrical Representation of the Thermodynamic Properties of Substances by Means of Surfaces," published in 1873, is particularly notable…

  8. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics, maximum entropy production and Earth-system evolution.

    PubMed

    Kleidon, Axel

    2010-01-13

    The present-day atmosphere is in a unique state far from thermodynamic equilibrium. This uniqueness is for instance reflected in the high concentration of molecular oxygen and the low relative humidity in the atmosphere. Given that the concentration of atmospheric oxygen has likely increased throughout Earth-system history, we can ask whether this trend can be generalized to a trend of Earth-system evolution that is directed away from thermodynamic equilibrium, why we would expect such a trend to take place and what it would imply for Earth-system evolution as a whole. The justification for such a trend could be found in the proposed general principle of maximum entropy production (MEP), which states that non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems maintain steady states at which entropy production is maximized. Here, I justify and demonstrate this application of MEP to the Earth at the planetary scale. I first describe the non-equilibrium thermodynamic nature of Earth-system processes and distinguish processes that drive the system's state away from equilibrium from those that are directed towards equilibrium. I formulate the interactions among these processes from a thermodynamic perspective and then connect them to a holistic view of the planetary thermodynamic state of the Earth system. In conclusion, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and MEP have the potential to provide a simple and holistic theory of Earth-system functioning. This theory can be used to derive overall evolutionary trends of the Earth's past, identify the role that life plays in driving thermodynamic states far from equilibrium, identify habitability in other planetary environments and evaluate human impacts on Earth-system functioning.

  9. Chemical Cycle Kinetics: Removing the Limitation of Linearity of a Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubi, J. M.; Bedeaux, D.; Kjelstrup, S.; Pagonabarraga, I.

    2013-07-01

    Chemical cycle kinetics is customarily analyzed by means of the law of mass action which describes how the concentrations of the substances vary with time. The connection of this approach with non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) has traditionally been restricted to the linear domain close to equilibrium in which the reaction rates are linear functions of the affinities. We show, by a pertinent formulation of the concept of local equilibrium in the mesoscopic description along the reaction coordinates, that the connection between kinetic and thermodynamic approaches is deeper than thought and holds in the nonlinear domain far from equilibrium, for higher values of the affinity. This new perspective indicates how to overcome the inherent limitation of classical NET in treating cyclic reactions, providing a description of closed and open cycles operating far from equilibrium, in accordance with thermodynamic principles. We propose that the new set of equations are tested and used for data reduction in chemical reaction kinetics.

  10. Chemical equilibrium. [maximizing entropy of gas system to derive relations between thermodynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The entropy of a gas system with the number of particles subject to external control is maximized to derive relations between the thermodynamic variables that obtain at equilibrium. These relations are described in terms of the chemical potential, defined as equivalent partial derivatives of entropy, energy, enthalpy, free energy, or free enthalpy. At equilibrium, the change in total chemical potential must vanish. This fact is used to derive the equilibrium constants for chemical reactions in terms of the partition functions of the species involved in the reaction. Thus the equilibrium constants can be determined accurately, just as other thermodynamic properties, from a knowledge of the energy levels and degeneracies for the gas species involved. These equilibrium constants permit one to calculate the equilibrium concentrations or partial pressures of chemically reacting species that occur in gas mixtures at any given condition of pressure and temperature or volume and temperature.

  11. Vapor-liquid equilibrium thermodynamics of N2 + CH4 - Model and Titan applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. R.; Zollweg, John A.; Gabis, David H.

    1992-01-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented for vapor-liquid equilibrium in the N2 + CH4 system, which is implicated in calculations of the Titan tropospheric clouds' vapor-liquid equilibrium thermodynamics. This model imposes constraints on the consistency of experimental equilibrium data, and embodies temperature effects by encompassing enthalpy data; it readily calculates the saturation criteria, condensate composition, and latent heat for a given pressure-temperature profile of the Titan atmosphere. The N2 content of condensate is about half of that computed from Raoult's law, and about 30 percent greater than that computed from Henry's law.

  12. Diffusion approximations to the chemical master equation only have a consistent stochastic thermodynamics at chemical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2015-07-28

    The stochastic thermodynamics of a dilute, well-stirred mixture of chemically reacting species is built on the stochastic trajectories of reaction events obtained from the chemical master equation. However, when the molecular populations are large, the discrete chemical master equation can be approximated with a continuous diffusion process, like the chemical Langevin equation or low noise approximation. In this paper, we investigate to what extent these diffusion approximations inherit the stochastic thermodynamics of the chemical master equation. We find that a stochastic-thermodynamic description is only valid at a detailed-balanced, equilibrium steady state. Away from equilibrium, where there is no consistent stochastic thermodynamics, we show that one can still use the diffusive solutions to approximate the underlying thermodynamics of the chemical master equation.

  13. Diffusion approximations to the chemical master equation only have a consistent stochastic thermodynamics at chemical equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Jordan M

    2015-07-28

    The stochastic thermodynamics of a dilute, well-stirred mixture of chemically reacting species is built on the stochastic trajectories of reaction events obtained from the chemical master equation. However, when the molecular populations are large, the discrete chemical master equation can be approximated with a continuous diffusion process, like the chemical Langevin equation or low noise approximation. In this paper, we investigate to what extent these diffusion approximations inherit the stochastic thermodynamics of the chemical master equation. We find that a stochastic-thermodynamic description is only valid at a detailed-balanced, equilibrium steady state. Away from equilibrium, where there is no consistent stochastic thermodynamics, we show that one can still use the diffusive solutions to approximate the underlying thermodynamics of the chemical master equation.

  14. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2008-08-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH+4, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO-3, HSO-4, and SO2-4 as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol+water+salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  15. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, Th.

    2008-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42- as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol + water + salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  16. Geochemical and thermodynamic specificity of volcanic, hydrothermal and soil aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamadiyarova, Renata V.; Alekhin, Yury V.; Karpov, Gennady A.; Makarova, Marina A.

    2010-05-01

    metals - Fe, Al, Zn, Cu. Geochemical specificity of aerosol carrying over in eruption columns at volcanic eruptions, often consists in high cleanliness individual many native metals allocations from typical elements - impurity. Presence of tungsten allocations without molybdenum and similar examples for other metals force to assume presence of the specific gas complexes which stability sharply changes at variations of pressure and temperatures in eruption columns at eruptions. Our analysis has shown that for a role of such forms of carrying over can apply metals carbonyls, widely used at reception of especially pure substances. These covalent compounds with formally 0-valency Me in a complex kernel contain variable quantity of groups CO in ligand parts and always complete the electronic cover to a cover of following inert gas, i.e. have in external sphere 4, 5, 6 groups CO, that together with the big distinctions in dependences of constants of formation on temperature their disintegration does non-simultaneous. The thermodynamical description superfluous components fugacity for aerosol systems is developed.

  17. The Analysis of Spontaneous Processes Using Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, J. M.; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2006-01-01

    The derivations based on the use of deficit functions provide a simple means of demonstrating the extremism conditions that are applicable to various thermodynamics function. The method shows that the maximum quantity of work is available from a system only when the processes are carried out reversibly since irreversible (spontaneous)…

  18. Thermodynamic Equilibrium in the Origin of Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Eck, R. V.; Lippincott, E. R.; Pratt, Y. T.

    1966-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental support is presented for the hypothesis that organic compounds occurring in carbonaceous chondrites may have formed under equilibrium or near equilibrium conditions. The equilibrium distributions of organic compounds at temperature between 300 and 1000 K and pressures of 10(exp 16) to 50 atmospheres for the C-H-O system have been computed. At high temperatures and low pressures aromatic compounds may form even in the presence of excess hydrogen. Equilibrium concentrations of numerous compounds possible at 1000 K when N, S, and C1 are added to the system have also been determined. A limited equilibrium method is employed in which those few compounds which form with most difficulty are excluded from the computations. This approach is shown to be useful in the interpretation of certain experimental data. In preliminary experiments it has been found that gases, converted to the plasma state by high energy radio frequency discharge, yield product mixtures which are in qualitative agreement with those predicted.

  19. He I lines in B stars - Comparison of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium models with observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heasley, J. N.; Timothy, J. G.; Wolff, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    Profiles of He gamma-gamma 4026, 4387, 4471, 4713, 5876, and 6678 have been obtained in 17 stars of spectral type B0-B5. Parameters of the nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium models appropriate to each star are determined from the Stromgren index and fits to H-alpha line profiles. These parameters yield generally good fits to the observed He I line profiles, with the best fits being found for the blue He I lines where departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium are relatively small. For the two red lines it is found that, in the early B stars and in stars with log g less than 3.5, both lines are systematically stronger than predicted by the nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium models.

  20. Equilibrium defects and solute site preferences in intermetallics: I. thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Gary S.; Zacate, Matthew O.

    2001-03-01

    A model was developed to describe equilibrium defects and site preferences of dilute solute atoms in compounds having the CsCl and Ni_2Al3 structures. Equilibrium defects considered were combinations of elementary point defects that preserve the composition. Equilibria among possible defect combinations were combined with appropriate equations of constraint to obtain defect concentrations as a function of temperature and possible deviation from the stoichiometric composition. As an application, site-energies of defects and solutes in AB and A_2B_3) systems were estimated using Miedema's empirical model, with A=(Ni, Pd, Pt) and B= (Al, Ga, In). Dominant equilibrium defects in the respective systems were found to be the "triple defect" (2V_A+ A_B) and "octal defect" (5V_A+ 3A_B). Site preferences were found to depend on concentrations of intrinsic defects as well as on site-energy differences, and results reveal how preferences generally depend on temperature and composition. Consider solute S which, based on site energies, prefers to replace atom B. It is found that S always occupies B-sites in B-deficient alloys. In B-rich alloys, however, S may or may not occupy B-sites, depending on site-energy differences and the formation energies of equilibrium defects. For a solute that prefers to replace atom A, analogous results are obtained but with A replacing B in the three preceding sentences. This work was supported in part by the NSF under grant DMR 96-12306.

  1. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of dimethyl ether steam reforming and dimethyl ether hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelsberger, Troy A.; Borup, Rodney L.

    The production of a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed by dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming was investigated using calculations of thermodynamic equilibrium as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (0.00-4.00), temperature (100-600 °C), pressure (1-5 atm), and product species. Species considered were acetone, acetylene, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, dimethyl ether, ethane, ethanol, ethylene, formaldehyde, formic acid, hydrogen, isopropanol, methane, methanol, methyl-ethyl ether, n-propanol and water. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of DME steam reforming indicate complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide at temperatures greater than 200 °C and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure ( P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure shifts the equilibrium toward the reactants; increasing the pressure from 1 to 5 atm decreases the conversion of dimethyl ether from 99.5 to 76.2%. The trend of thermodynamically stable products in decreasing mole fraction is methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol, methyl-ethyl ether and methanol-formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetylene were not observed. Based on the equilibrium calculations, the optimal processing conditions for dimethyl ether steam reforming occur at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.50, a pressure of 1 atm, and a temperature of 200 °C. These thermodynamic equilibrium calculations show dimethyl ether processed with steam will produce hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds—with hydrogen concentrations exceeding 70%. The conversion of dimethyl ether via hydrolysis (considering methanol as the only product) is limited by thermodynamic equilibrium. Equilibrium conversion increases with temperature and steam-to-carbon ratio. A maximum dimethyl ether conversion of 62% is achieved at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 5.00 and a processing temperature of 600 °C.

  2. An Easy and Effective Demonstration of Enzyme Stereospecificity and Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herdman, Chelsea; Dickman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme stereospecificity and equilibrium thermodynamics can be demonstrated using the coupling of two amino acid derivatives by Thermoase C160. This protease will catalyze peptide bond formation between Z-L-AspOH and L-PheOMe to form the Aspartame precursor Z-L-Asp-L-PheOMe. Reaction completion manifests itself by precipitation of the product. As…

  3. Tested Demonstrations: Thermodynamic Changes, Kinetics, Equilibrium, and LeChatelier's Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for demonstrating thermodynamic changes, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, equilibrium, and LeChatelier's principle are presented. The only materials needed for these demonstrations are beakers, water, assorted wooden blocks of varying thickness, assorted rubber tubing, and a sponge. The concepts illustrated in each demonstration are…

  4. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium Implications for the origin of natural gas

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    It is broadly accepted that so-called 'thermal' gas is the product of thermal cracking, 'primary' thermal gas from kerogen cracking, and 'secondary' thermal gas from oil cracking. Since thermal cracking of hydrocarbons does not generate products at equilibrium and thermal stress should not bring them to equilibrium over geologic time, we would not expect methane, ethane, and propane to be at equilibrium in subsurface deposits. Here we report compelling evidence of natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Molecular compositions are constrained to equilibrium, and isotopic compositions are also under equilibrium constraints: The functions [(CH4)*(C3H8)] and [(C2H6)2] exhibit a strong nonlinear correlation (R2 = 0.84) in which the quotient Q progresses to K as wet gas progresses to dry gas. There are striking similarities between natural gas and catalytic gas generated from marine shales. A Devonian/Mississippian New Albany shale generates gas with Q converging on K over time as wet gas progresses to dry gas at 200°C. The position that thermal cracking is the primary source of natural gas is no longer tenable. It is challenged by its inability to explain the composition of natural gas, natural gases at thermodynamic equilibrium, and by the existence of a catalytic path to gas that better explains gas compositions. PMID:19531233

  5. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Implications for the origin of natural gas.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel; Herriman, Eleanor

    2009-06-16

    It is broadly accepted that so-called 'thermal' gas is the product of thermal cracking, 'primary' thermal gas from kerogen cracking, and 'secondary' thermal gas from oil cracking. Since thermal cracking of hydrocarbons does not generate products at equilibrium and thermal stress should not bring them to equilibrium over geologic time, we would not expect methane, ethane, and propane to be at equilibrium in subsurface deposits. Here we report compelling evidence of natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Molecular compositions are constrained to equilibrium, [Formula in text] and isotopic compositions are also under equilibrium constraints: [Formula in text].The functions [(CH4)*(C3H8)] and [(C2H6)2] exhibit a strong nonlinear correlation (R2 = 0.84) in which the quotient Q progresses to K as wet gas progresses to dry gas. There are striking similarities between natural gas and catalytic gas generated from marine shales. A Devonian/Mississippian New Albany shale generates gas with Q converging on K over time as wet gas progresses to dry gas at 200 degrees C. The position that thermal cracking is the primary source of natural gas is no longer tenable. It is challenged by its inability to explain the composition of natural gas, natural gases at thermodynamic equilibrium, and by the existence of a catalytic path to gas that better explains gas compositions.

  6. Modelling non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems from the speed-gradient principle.

    PubMed

    Khantuleva, Tatiana A; Shalymov, Dmitry S

    2017-03-06

    The application of the speed-gradient (SG) principle to the non-equilibrium distribution systems far away from thermodynamic equilibrium is investigated. The options for applying the SG principle to describe the non-equilibrium transport processes in real-world environments are discussed. Investigation of a non-equilibrium system's evolution at different scale levels via the SG principle allows for a fresh look at the thermodynamics problems associated with the behaviour of the system entropy. Generalized dynamic equations for finite and infinite number of constraints are proposed. It is shown that the stationary solution to the equations, resulting from the SG principle, entirely coincides with the locally equilibrium distribution function obtained by Zubarev. A new approach to describe time evolution of systems far from equilibrium is proposed based on application of the SG principle at the intermediate scale level of the system's internal structure. The problem of the high-rate shear flow of viscous fluid near the rigid plane plate is discussed. It is shown that the SG principle allows closed mathematical models of non-equilibrium processes to be constructed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  7. Modelling non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems from the speed-gradient principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khantuleva, Tatiana A.; Shalymov, Dmitry S.

    2017-03-01

    The application of the speed-gradient (SG) principle to the non-equilibrium distribution systems far away from thermodynamic equilibrium is investigated. The options for applying the SG principle to describe the non-equilibrium transport processes in real-world environments are discussed. Investigation of a non-equilibrium system's evolution at different scale levels via the SG principle allows for a fresh look at the thermodynamics problems associated with the behaviour of the system entropy. Generalized dynamic equations for finite and infinite number of constraints are proposed. It is shown that the stationary solution to the equations, resulting from the SG principle, entirely coincides with the locally equilibrium distribution function obtained by Zubarev. A new approach to describe time evolution of systems far from equilibrium is proposed based on application of the SG principle at the intermediate scale level of the system's internal structure. The problem of the high-rate shear flow of viscous fluid near the rigid plane plate is discussed. It is shown that the SG principle allows closed mathematical models of non-equilibrium processes to be constructed. This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  8. Equilibrium sampling to determine the thermodynamic potential for bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants from sediment.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Annika; MacLeod, Matthew; Wickström, Håkan; Mayer, Philipp

    2014-10-07

    Equilibrium partitioning (EqP) theory is currently the most widely used approach for linking sediment pollution by persistent hydrophobic organic chemicals to bioaccumulation. Most applications of the EqP approach assume (I) a generic relationship between organic carbon-normalized chemical concentrations in sediments and lipid-normalized concentrations in biota and (II) that bioaccumulation does not induce levels exceeding those expected from equilibrium partitioning. Here, we demonstrate that assumption I can be obviated by equilibrating a silicone sampler with chemicals in sediment, measuring chemical concentrations in the silicone, and applying lipid/silicone partition ratios to yield concentrations in lipid at thermodynamic equilibrium with the sediment (CLip⇌Sed). Furthermore, we evaluated the validity of assumption II by comparing CLip⇌Sed of selected persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic pollutants (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB)) to lipid-normalized concentrations for a range of biota from a Swedish background lake. PCBs in duck mussels, roach, eel, pikeperch, perch and pike were mostly below the equilibrium partitioning level relative to the sediment, i.e., lipid-normalized concentrations were ≤CLip⇌Sed, whereas HCB was near equilibrium between biota and sediment. Equilibrium sampling allows straightforward, sensitive and precise measurement of CLip⇌Sed. We propose CLip⇌Sed as a metric of the thermodynamic potential for bioaccumulation of persistent organic chemicals from sediment useful to prioritize management actions to remediate contaminated sites.

  9. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-09-14

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

  10. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-09-14

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series.

  11. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of uranium biosorption by calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Fan, Fangli; Wu, Xiaolei; Tian, Wei; Zhao, Liang; Yin, Xiaojie; Fan, Fuyou; Li, Zhan; Tian, Longlong; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Guo, Junsheng

    2013-12-01

    Calcium alginate beads are potential biosorbent for radionuclides removal as they contain carboxyl groups. However, until now limited information is available concerning the uptake behavior of uranium by this polymer gel, especially when sorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics are concerned. In present work, batch experiments were carried out to study the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of uranium sorption by calcium alginate beads. The effects of initial solution pH, sorbent amount, initial uranium concentration and temperature on uranium sorption were also investigated. The determined optimal conditions were: initial solution pH of 3.0, added sorbent amount of 40 mg, and uranium sorption capacity increased with increasing initial uranium concentration and temperature. Equilibrium data obtained under different temperatures were fitted better with Langmuir model than Freundlich model, uranium sorption was dominated by a monolayer way. The kinetic data can be well depicted by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The activation energy derived from Arrhenius equation was 30.0 kJ/mol and the sorption process had a chemical nature. Thermodynamic constants such as ΔH(0), ΔS(0) and ΔG(0) were also evaluated, results of thermodynamic study showed that the sorption process was endothermic and spontaneous.

  12. The Donnan equilibrium: I. On the thermodynamic foundation of the Donnan equation of state.

    PubMed

    Philipse, A; Vrij, A

    2011-05-18

    The thermodynamic equilibrium between charged colloids and an electrolyte reservoir is named after Frederic Donnan who first published on it one century ago (Donnan 1911 Z. Electrochem. 17 572). One of the intriguing features of the Donnan equilibrium is the ensuing osmotic equation of state which is a nonlinear one, even when both colloids and ions obey Van 't Hoff's ideal osmotic pressure law. The Donnan equation of state, nevertheless, is internally consistent; we demonstrate it to be a rigorous consequence of the phenomenological thermodynamics of a neutral bulk suspension equilibrating with an infinite salt reservoir. Our proof is based on an exact thermodynamic relation between osmotic pressure and salt adsorption which, when applied to ideal ions, does indeed entail the Donnan equation of state. Our derivation also shows that, contrary to what is often assumed, the Donnan equilibrium does not require ideality of the colloids: the Donnan model merely evaluates the osmotic pressure of homogeneously distributed ions, in excess of the pressure exerted by an arbitrary reference fluid of uncharged colloids. We also conclude that results from the phenomenological Donnan model coincide with predictions from statistical thermodynamics in the limit of weakly charged, point-like colloids.

  13. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of the biosorption of uranium onto Cystoseria indica algae.

    PubMed

    Khani, M H; Keshtkar, A R; Ghannadi, M; Pahlavanzadeh, H

    2008-02-11

    Biosorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of binding of uranium ions to Cystoseria indica were studied in a batch system with respect to temperature and initial metal ion concentration. Algae biomass exhibited the highest uranium uptake capacity at 15 degrees C at an initial uranium ion concentration of 500 mg l(-1) and an initial pH of 4. Biosorption capacity increased from 198 to 233 mg g(-1) with an decrease in temperature from 45 to 15 degrees C at this initial uranium concentration. The Langmuir isotherm model were applied to experimental equilibrium data of uranium biosorption depending on temperature. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir model C. indica algae in the studied concentration range of Uranium ions at all the temperatures studied. The saturation type kinetic model was applied to experimental data at different temperatures changing from 15 to 45 degrees C to describe the batch biosorption kinetics assuming that the external mass transfer limitations in the system can be neglected and biosorption is chemical sorption controlled. The activation energy of biosorption (E(A)) was determined as -6.15 using the Arrhenius equation. Using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients obtained at different temperatures, the thermodynamic constants of biosorption (DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees ) were also evaluated.

  14. Do persistent organic pollutants reach a thermodynamic equilibrium in the global environment?

    PubMed

    Schenker, Sebastian; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2014-05-06

    Equilibrium partitioning between different environmental media is one of the main driving forces that govern the environmental fate of organic chemicals. In the global environment, equilibrium partitioning is in competition with long-range transport, advective phase transfer processes such as wet deposition, and degradation. Here we investigate under what conditions equilibrium partitioning is strong enough to control the global distribution of organic chemicals. We use a global multimedia mass-balance model to calculate the Globally Balanced State (GBS) of organic chemicals. The GBS is the state where equilibrium partitioning is in balance with long-range transport; it represents the maximum influence of thermodynamic driving forces on the global distribution of a chemical. Next, we compare the GBS with the Temporal Remote State, which represents the long-term distribution of a chemical in the global environment when the chemical's distribution is influenced by all transport and degradation processes in combination. This comparison allows us to identify the chemical properties required for a substance to reach the GBS as a stable global distribution. We find that thermodynamically controlled distributions are rare and do not occur for most Persistent Organic Pollutants. They are only found for highly volatile and persistent substances, such as chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, we find that the thermodynamic cold-trap effect (i.e., accumulation of pollutants at the poles because of reduced vapor pressure at low temperatures) is often strongly attenuated by atmospheric and oceanic long-range transport.

  15. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-04

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  16. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING OF LIQUID AEROSOLS CONTAINING DISSOLVED ORGANICS AND ELECTROLYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many tropospheric aerosols contain large fractions of soluble organic material, believed to derive from the oxidation of precursors such alpha-pinene. The chemical composition of aerosol organic matter is complex and not yet fully understood.

    The key properties of solu...

  17. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Chemistry and the Composition of the Atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Summers, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    A high priority objective of the Mars Exploration Program is to Determine if life exists today (MEPAG Goal I, Objective A). The measurement of gases of biogenic origin may be an approach to detect the presence of microbial life on the surface or subsurface of Mars. Chemical thermodynamic calculations indicate that on both Earth and Mars, certain gases should exist in extremely low concentrations, if at all. Microbial metabolic activity is an important non-equilibrium chemistry process on Earth, and if microbial life exists on Mars, may be an important nonequilibrium chemistry process on Mars. The non-equilibrium chemistry of the atmosphere of Mars is discussed in this paper.

  18. Thermodynamic parameters for mixtures of quartz under shock wave loading in views of the equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Maevskii, K. K. Kinelovskii, S. A.

    2015-10-27

    The numerical results of modeling of shock wave loading of mixtures with the SiO{sub 2} component are presented. The TEC (thermodynamic equilibrium component) model is employed to describe the behavior of solid and porous multicomponent mixtures and alloys under shock wave loading. State equations of a Mie–Grüneisen type are used to describe the behavior of condensed phases, taking into account the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen coefficient, gas in pores is one of the components of the environment. The model is based on the assumption that all components of the mixture under shock-wave loading are in thermodynamic equilibrium. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data derived by various authors. The behavior of the mixture containing components with a phase transition under high dynamic loads is described.

  19. Spatiotemporal study of the local thermodynamic equilibrium deviations in high-intensity discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Helali, H.; Bchir, T.; Araoud, Z.; Charrada, K.

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work is to study the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) deviations in arc discharges plasma generated in high-intensity discharge lamps operating under an ac (50 Hz) power supply. To achieve this goal, we elaborate a two-temperature, two-dimensional, and time-depending model. We have found numerical results almost reproducing the experimental data, which allows us to validate this model. After validation, we have discussed different energy term effects on the LTE deviations.

  20. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Processes: Space Plasmas and the Inner Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, empirical kappa distribution, commonly used to describe non-equilibrium systems like space plasmas, has been connected with non-extensive statistical mechanics. Here we show how a consistent definition of the temperature and pressure is developed for stationary states out of thermal equilibrium, so that the familiar ideal gas state equation still holds. In addition to the classical triplet of temperature, pressure, and density, this generalization requires the kappa index as a fourth independent thermodynamic variable that characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. All four of these thermodynamic variables have key roles in describing the governing thermodynamical processes and transitions in space plasmas. We introduce a novel characterization of isothermal and isobaric processes that describe a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the kappa index. In addition, we show how the variation of temperature or/and pressure can occur through an "iso-q" process, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state (fixed kappa index). These processes have been detected in the proton plasma in the inner heliosheath via specialized data analysis of energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Interstellar Boundary Explorer. In particular, we find that the temperature is highly correlated with (1) kappa, asymptotically related to isothermal (~1,000,000 K) and iso-q (κ ~ 1.7) processes; and (2) density, related to an isobaric process, which separates the "Ribbon," P ≈ 3.2 pdyn cm-2, from the globally distributed ENA flux, P ≈ 2 pdyn cm-2.

  1. Radiative interactions in molecular gases under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Jha, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to investigate radiative heat interactions in diatomic and polyatomic gases under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Essential governing equations are presented for both gray and nongray gases. Information is provided on absorption models, relaxation times, and transfer equations. Radiative flux equations are developed which are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The problem is solved for fully developed laminar incompressible flows between two parallel plates under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For specific applications, three diatomic and three polyatomic gases are considered. The results are obtained numerically by employing the method of variation of parameters. The results are compared under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at different temperature and pressure conditions. Both gray and nongray studies are conducted extensively for all molecular gases considered. The particular gases selected for this investigation are CO, NO, OH, CO2, H2O, and CH4. The temperature and pressure range considered are 300-2000 K and 0.1-10 atmosphere, respectively. In general, results demonstrate that the gray gas approximation overestimates the effect of radiative interaction for all conditions. The conditions of NLTE, however, result in underestimation of radiative interactions. The method developed for this study can be extended to solve complex problems of radiative heat transfer involving nonequilibrium phenomena.

  2. Rapid computation of spectrally integrated non-local thermodynamic equilibrium limb emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Olander, Daphne S.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel

    1994-01-01

    The interpretation of infrared radiance measurements made by satellite-borne limb-scanning broadband radiometers requires accurate and computationally fast techniques with which to evaluate the equation of radiative transfer. This requirement is made even more stringent when analyzing measurements of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) emission from the terrestrial mesosphere and lower thermosphere. In principle, line-by-line calculations which explicitly account for the departure from thermodynamic equilibrium in both the source functions and the transmittances are necessary. In this paper we extend the emissivity growth approximation (EGA) technique developed for local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) limb radiance for the molecular oxygen dayglow (1.27 micrometers and 762 nm), ozone and carbon dioxide in the 9- to 11-micrometer spectral interval, carbon monoxide (4.6 micrometers), nitric oxide (5.3 micrometers), and the carbon dioxide bands (15 micrometers) are presented. Using the non-LTE form of the EGA, the spectrally integrated limb emission is calculated for 35 tangent heights in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (a total of 1200 atmospheric layers) with line-by-line accuracy in approximately 0.35 s of CPU time on readily available desktop computer hardware, while the corresponding line-by-line calculations may require several minutes. The non-LTE EGA technique will allow kinetic temperature and minor constituend retrieval algorithms to readily include non-LTE efects limited only by the a priori knowledge of the departure from LTE in the observed bands.

  3. Punctuated equilibrium as an emergent process and its modified thermodynamic characterization.

    PubMed

    Wosniack, M E; Luz, M G E da; Schulman, L S

    2016-10-27

    We address evolutionary dynamics and consider under which conditions the ecosystem interaction network allows punctuated equilibrium (i.e., alternation between hectic and quasi-stable phases). We focus on the links connecting various species and on the strength and sign of those links. For this study we consider the Tangled Nature model, which allows considerable flexibility and plasticity in the analysis of interspecies interactions. We find that it is necessary to have a proper balance of connectivity and interaction intensities so as to establish the kind of mutual cooperation and competition found in nature. It suggests evolutionary punctuated equilibrium as an emergent process, thus displaying features of complex systems. To explicitly demonstrate this fact we consider an extended form of thermodynamics, defining (for the present context) relevant out-of-equilibrium "collective" functions. We then show how to characterize the punctuated equilibrium through entropy-like and free energy-like quantities. Finally, from a close analogy to thermodynamic systems, we propose a protocol similar to simulated annealing. It is based on controlling the species' rate of mutation during the hectic periods, in this way enhancing the exploration of the genome space (similar to the known behavior of bacteria in stressful environments). This allows the system to more rapidly converge to long-duration quasi-stable phases.

  4. Punctuated equilibrium as an emergent process and its modified thermodynamic characterization.

    PubMed

    Wosniack, M E; da Luz, M G E; Schulman, L S

    2017-01-07

    We address evolutionary dynamics and consider under which conditions the ecosystem interaction network allows punctuated equilibrium (i.e., alternation between hectic and quasi-stable phases). We focus on the links connecting various species and on the strength and sign of those links. For this study we consider the Tangled Nature model, which allows considerable flexibility and plasticity in the analysis of interspecies interactions. We find that it is necessary to have a proper balance of connectivity and interaction intensities so as to establish the kind of mutual cooperation and competition found in nature. It suggests evolutionary punctuated equilibrium as an emergent process, thus displaying features of complex systems. To explicitly demonstrate this fact we consider an extended form of thermodynamics, defining (for the present context) relevant out-of-equilibrium "collective" functions. We then show how to characterize the punctuated equilibrium through entropy-like and free energy-like quantities. Finally, from a close analogy to thermodynamic systems, we propose a protocol similar to simulated annealing. It is based on controlling the species' rate of mutation during the hectic periods, in this way enhancing the exploration of the genome space (similar to the known behavior of bacteria in stressful environments). This allows the system to more rapidly converge to long-duration quasi-stable phases.

  5. A non-equilibrium thermodynamics model of multicomponent mass and heat transport in pervaporation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaluenga, Juan P. G.; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2012-12-01

    The framework of non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) is used to derive heat and mass transport equations for pervaporation of a binary mixture in a membrane. In this study, the assumption of equilibrium of the sorbed phase in the membrane and the adjacent phases at the feed and permeate sides of the membrane is abandoned, defining the interface properties using local equilibrium. The transport equations have been used to model the pervaporation of a water-ethanol mixture, which is typically encountered in the dehydration of organics. The water and ethanol activities and temperature profiles are calculated taking mass and heat coupling effects and surfaces into account. The NET approach is deemed good because the temperature results provided by the model are comparable to experimental results available for water-alcohol systems.

  6. Emergence of equilibrium thermodynamic properties in quantum pure states. I. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresch, Barbara; Moro, Giorgio J.

    2010-07-21

    Investigation on foundational aspects of quantum statistical mechanics recently entered a renaissance period due to novel intuitions from quantum information theory and to increasing attention on the dynamical aspects of single quantum systems. In the present contribution a simple but effective theoretical framework is introduced to clarify the connections between a purely mechanical description and the thermodynamic characterization of the equilibrium state of an isolated quantum system. A salient feature of our approach is the very transparent distinction between the statistical aspects and the dynamical aspects in the description of isolated quantum systems. Like in the classical statistical mechanics, the equilibrium distribution of any property is identified on the basis of the time evolution of the considered system. As a consequence equilibrium properties of quantum system appear to depend on the details of the initial state due to the abundance of constants of the motion in the Schroedinger dynamics. On the other hand the study of the probability distributions of some functions, such as the entropy or the equilibrium state of a subsystem, in statistical ensembles of pure states reveals the crucial role of typicality as the bridge between macroscopic thermodynamics and microscopic quantum dynamics. We shall consider two particular ensembles: the random pure state ensemble and the fixed expectation energy ensemble. The relation between the introduced ensembles, the properties of a given isolated system, and the standard quantum statistical description are discussed throughout the presentation. Finally we point out the conditions which should be satisfied by an ensemble in order to get meaningful thermodynamical characterization of an isolated quantum system.

  7. The simultaneous influence of thermodynamics and aerosols on deep convection and lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, Douglas C.

    The dissertation consists of a multi-scale investigation of the relative contributions of thermodynamics and aerosols to the observed variability of deep convective clouds in the Tropics. First, estimates of thermodynamic quantities and cloud-condensation nuclei (CCN) in the environment are attributed to convective features (CFs) observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite for eight years (2004-2011) between 36?S-36?N across all longitudes. The collection of simultaneous observations was analyzed in order to assess the relevance of thermodynamic and aerosol hypotheses for explaining the spatial and temporal variability of the characteristics of deep convective clouds. Specifically, the impacts of normalized convective available potential energy (NCAPE) and warm cloud depth (WCD) as well as CCN concentrations (D ? 40 nm) on total lightning density (TLD), average height of 30 dBZ echoes (AVGHT30), and vertical profiles of radar reflectivity (VPRR) within individual CFs are the subject of initial curiosity. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  8. The solubility of (Ba,Sr)SO 4 precipitates: Thermodynamic equilibrium and reaction path analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Rai, Dhanpat; Moore, Dean A.

    1993-09-01

    The solubility of (Ba,Sr)SO 4 precipitates, varying in SrSO 4 mole fraction from 0.05-0.90, was investigated at room temperature with an equilibration period extending to almost three years. The data show that on or before 315 days of equilibration the precipitates reach a reversible equilibrium with the aqueous solution. The reversibility of this equilibrium was verified both by the attainment of steady-state concentrations with time and by heating the samples to perturb the equilibrium and then observing the slow return to the initial equilibrium state. The dissolution of the (Ba,Sr)SO 4 precipitates does not, in general, follow limiting reaction paths as defined by the Lippmann solutus or stoichiometric dissolution curves. In addition, activity coefficient calculations for the BaSO 4 and SrSO 4 components of the solid phase, using either total bulk analysis or near-surface analysis of the component mole fractions, do not satisfy the Gibbs-Duhem equation, demonstrating that a single solid-solution phase does not control both the aqueous Ba and Sr concentrations. Instead, our long-term equilibration data can be explained by the unavoidable formation of small amounts of barite and substitution of Sr into a solid-solution phase with the BaSO 4 component of the solid-solution phase never reaching thermodynamic equilibrium with the aqueous phase.

  9. Equilibrium p-T Phase Diagram of Boron: Experimental Study and Thermodynamic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state phase transformations and melting of high-purity crystalline boron have been in situ and ex situ studied at pressures to 20 GPa in the 1500–2500 K temperature range where diffusion processes become fast and lead to formation of thermodynamically stable phases. The equilibrium phase diagram of boron has been constructed based on thermodynamic analysis of experimental and literature data. The high-temperature part of the diagram contains p-T domains of thermodynamic stability of rhombohedral β-B106, orthorhombic γ-B28, pseudo-cubic (tetragonal) t'-B52, and liquid boron (L). The positions of two triple points have been experimentally estimated, i.e. β–t'–L at ~ 8.0 GPa and ~ 2490 K; and β–γ–t' at ~ 9.6 GPa and ~ 2230 K. Finally, the proposed phase diagram explains all thermodynamic aspects of boron allotropy and significantly improves our understanding of the fifth element. PMID:23912523

  10. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon.

    PubMed

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J

    2016-09-14

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials.

  11. Molecular simulation of the thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasiuk, Maryna; Frascoli, Federico; Sadus, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    The thermodynamic, structural, and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties of neon are comprehensively studied using ab initio, empirical, and semi-classical intermolecular potentials and classical Monte Carlo simulations. Path integral Monte Carlo simulations for isochoric heat capacity and structural properties are also reported for two empirical potentials and one ab initio potential. The isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal pressure coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and the speed of sound are reported and compared with experimental data for the entire range of liquid densities from the triple point to the critical point. Lustig's thermodynamic approach is formally extended for temperature-dependent intermolecular potentials. Quantum effects are incorporated using the Feynman-Hibbs quantum correction, which results in significant improvement in the accuracy of predicted thermodynamic properties. The new Feynman-Hibbs version of the Hellmann-Bich-Vogel potential predicts the isochoric heat capacity to an accuracy of 1.4% over the entire range of liquid densities. It also predicts other thermodynamic properties more accurately than alternative intermolecular potentials.

  12. Impact of Aerosols and Atmospheric Thermodynamics on Cloud Properties within the Climate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Masunaga, Hirohiko; Pielke, Roger, Sr.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2003-01-01

    A combination of cloud-top and columnar droplet sizes derived from the multi Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) sensors reveals the sensitivity of the aerosols effect on cloud-precipitation process due to environmental vertical thermodynamic structure. First, the magnitude of aerosol indirect effect could be larger with the analysis of columnar droplet sizes than that derived from the cloud-top droplet sizes, since column-droplet size can account for the broader droplet spectra in the cloud layers. Second, a combination of cloud- top and columnar droplet sizes reveals that the warm rain process is prevented regardless of the aerosols concentration under a high static stability such as when a strong temperature inversion exists, while a high aerosol concentration suppresses the warm rain formulation under a low static stability.

  13. NON-EQUILIBRIUM THERMODYNAMIC PROCESSES: SPACE PLASMAS AND THE INNER HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-04-10

    Recently, empirical kappa distribution, commonly used to describe non-equilibrium systems like space plasmas, has been connected with non-extensive statistical mechanics. Here we show how a consistent definition of the temperature and pressure is developed for stationary states out of thermal equilibrium, so that the familiar ideal gas state equation still holds. In addition to the classical triplet of temperature, pressure, and density, this generalization requires the kappa index as a fourth independent thermodynamic variable that characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. All four of these thermodynamic variables have key roles in describing the governing thermodynamical processes and transitions in space plasmas. We introduce a novel characterization of isothermal and isobaric processes that describe a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the kappa index. In addition, we show how the variation of temperature or/and pressure can occur through an 'iso-q' process, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state (fixed kappa index). These processes have been detected in the proton plasma in the inner heliosheath via specialized data analysis of energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Interstellar Boundary Explorer. In particular, we find that the temperature is highly correlated with (1) kappa, asymptotically related to isothermal ({approx}1,000,000 K) and iso-q ({kappa} {approx} 1.7) processes; and (2) density, related to an isobaric process, which separates the 'Ribbon', P Almost-Equal-To 3.2 pdyn cm{sup -2}, from the globally distributed ENA flux, P Almost-Equal-To 2 pdyn cm{sup -2}.

  14. A new nonlocal thermodynamical equilibrium radiative transfer method for cool stars. Method and numerical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J.; Josselin, E.; Ryde, N.; Faure, A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The solution of the nonlocal thermodynamical equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer equation usually relies on stationary iterative methods, which may falsely converge in some cases. Furthermore, these methods are often unable to handle large-scale systems, such as molecular spectra emerging from, for example, cool stellar atmospheres. Aims: Our objective is to develop a new method, which aims to circumvent these problems, using nonstationary numerical techniques and taking advantage of parallel computers. Methods: The technique we develop may be seen as a generalization of the coupled escape probability method. It solves the statistical equilibrium equations in all layers of a discretized model simultaneously. The numerical scheme adopted is based on the generalized minimum residual method. Results: The code has already been applied to the special case of the water spectrum in a red supergiant stellar atmosphere. This demonstrates the fast convergence of this method, and opens the way to a wide variety of astrophysical problems.

  15. Thermodynamic parameters for adsorption equilibrium of heavy metals and dyes from wastewaters: Research updated.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yingju; Lai, Juin-Yih; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-12-01

    The standard Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy change data for adsorption equilibrium reported in biosorption literature during January 2013-May2016 were listed. Since the studied biosorption systems are all near-equilibrium processes, the enthalpy and entropy change data evaluated by fitting temperature-dependent free energy data using van Hoff's equation reveal a compensation artifact. Additional confusion is introduced with arbitrarily chosen adsorbate concentration unit in bulk solution that added free energy change of mixing into the reported free energy and enthalpy change data. Different standard states may be chosen for properly describing biosorption processes; however, this makes the general comparison between data from different systems inappropriate. No conclusion should be drawn based on unjustified thermodynamic parameters reported in biosorption studies.

  16. Influence of small rings on the thermodynamics of equilibrium self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl F.

    2012-06-01

    The competition between the formation of linear chain clusters and ring structures in an equilibrium self-assembling system is reexamined by developing a new Flory-Huggins type theory that combines an estimate for the loss of configurational entropy ΔSring upon ring formation with the standard treatment of the free energy of a polydisperse solution of linear chains. The excess entropy of ring formation ΔSring is obtained from an analytical fit to exact enumeration data for self-avoiding chains and rings with 30 or fewer steps on a cubic lattice. Illustrative calculations of the spinodal curves and the extent and the average degree of self-assembly highlight the physical conditions for which the cyclic structures impact the thermodynamic characterization of equilibrium self-assembling systems.

  17. Thermal Behavior of Cd During Sludge Incineration: Experiments and Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyong; Zhuo, Zhongxu; Sun, Shuiyu; Xie, Wuming; Lu, Shaoyou; Sun, Jian; Kuo, Jiahong; Yujie, Wang

    2016-12-01

      Experiments and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were performed to investigate the behavior of Cd during sewage sludge incineration. The chemical equilibrium calculations indicated that chlorine significantly increased the volatilization of Cd in the form of CdCl2. In addition, SiO2-containing materials can function as sorbents for stabilizing Cd. The effect of PVC added to the sludge on the migration of Cd in the sludge was greater than that of NaCl. As the temperature increased, both organic and inorganic chlorides reduced the Cd distribution in the bottom ash. The chloride concentration, and the incineration time exhibited insignificant changes in Cd emission. With the addition of either NaCl or PVC into the sludge, the phases of Cd present in the bottom slag were primarily present in the form of silica-alumina oxides or multi-metal oxide, which could inhabit the Cd volatilization.

  18. Elemental transport coefficients in viscous plasma flows near local thermodynamic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Alessio; Kustova, Elena V

    2009-05-01

    We propose a convenient formulation of elemental transport coefficients in chemically reacting and plasma flows locally approaching thermodynamic equilibrium. A set of transport coefficients for elemental diffusion velocities, heat flux, and electric current is introduced. These coefficients relate the transport fluxes with the electric field and with the spatial gradients of elemental fractions, pressure, and temperature. The proposed formalism based on chemical elements and fully symmetric with the classical transport theory based on chemical species, is particularly suitable to model mixing and demixing phenomena due to diffusion of chemical elements. The aim of this work is threefold: to define a simple and rigorous framework suitable for numerical implementation, to allow order of magnitude estimations and qualitative predictions of elemental transport phenomena, and to gain a deeper insight into the physics of chemically reacting flows near local equilibrium.

  19. A conservative multicomponent diffusion algorithm for ambipolar plasma flows in local thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peerenboom, Kim; van Boxtel, Jochem; Janssen, Jesper; van Dijk, Jan

    2014-10-01

    The usage of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation can be a very powerful assumption for simulations of plasmas in or close to equilibrium. In general, the elemental composition in LTE is not constant in space and effects of mixing and demixing have to be taken into account using the Stefan-Maxwell diffusion description. In this paper, we will introduce a method to discretize the resulting coupled set of elemental continuity equations. The coupling between the equations is taken into account by the introduction of the concept of a Péclet matrix. It will be shown analytically and numerically that the mass and charge conservation constraints can be fulfilled exactly. Furthermore, a case study is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method to a simulation of a mercury-free metal-halide lamp. The source code for the simulations presented in this paper is provided as supplementary material (stacks.iop.org/JPhysD/47/425202/mmedia).

  20. Nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium self-consistent average-atom model for plasma physics.

    PubMed

    Faussurier, G; Blancard, C; Berthier, E

    2001-02-01

    A time-dependent collisional-radiative average-atom model is presented to study statistical properties of highly charged ion plasmas in off-equilibrium conditions. The time evolution of electron populations and the electron covariance matrix is obtained as approximate solutions of a master equation. Atomic structure is described either with a screened-hydrogenic model including l splitting, or by calculating one-electron states in a self-consistent average-atom potential. Collisional and radiative excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination rates, as well as autoionization and dielectronic recombination rates, are formulated within the average-configuration framework. Local thermodynamic equilibrium is obtained as a specific steady-state solution. The influence of atomic structure and the role of autoionization and dielectronic recombination processes are studied by calculating steady-state average ionization and ionization variance of hot plasmas with or without radiation field.

  1. Thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons and isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and computer code are given for the thermodynamic properties of gaseous fluorocarbons in chemical equilibrium. In addition, isentropic equilibrium expansions of two binary mixtures of fluorocarbons and argon are included. The computer code calculates the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and, in some cases, the transport properties for the following fluorocarbons: CCl2F, CCl2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CHCl2F, CHF3, CCL2F-CCl2F, CCLF2-CClF2, CF3-CF3, and C4F8. Equilibrium thermodynamic properties are tabulated for six of the fluorocarbons(CCl3F, CCL2F2, CBrF3, CF4, CF3-CF3, and C4F8) and pressure-enthalpy diagrams are presented for CBrF3.

  2. Statistical thermodynamics of aerosols and the gas-solid Joule-Thomson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierotti, Robert A.; Rybolt, Thomas R.

    1984-04-01

    Due to the adsorption of a gas by a solid, it is expected that an aerosol created by dispersing a fine powder in a gas would have unique thermodynamic properties not found in pure or mixed gases. The virial equation of state associated with an aerosol dusty gas is obtained from statistical thermodynamic considerations. In the theoretical model presented here, the aerosol is considered to be a two component fluid made up of solid particles and gas molecules. The aerosol virial equation of state is used to derive an expression for the Joule-Thomson effect associated with a gas-solid dispersion. The magnitude of the gas-solid Joule-Thomson effect is expressed in terms of gas and gas-solid virial coefficients. Previous adsorption data for an argon-porous carbon system is used to obtain gas-solid virial coefficients and to predict the magnitude of the gas-solid Joule-Thomson effect. A significant enhancement of the Joule-Thomson effect is predicted for gas-solid systems which display a strong interaction. For example, at a temperature of 300 K an argon-Saran 746 porous carbon aerosol system at a concentration of (0.4 g of powder/l of gas) is predicted to have a gas-solid Joule-Thomson coefficient of 3.6 K/atm which is ten times greater than the effect for pure argon.

  3. Modeling the Thermodynamics of Mixed Organic-Inorganic Aerosols to Predict Water Activities and Phase Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B.; Peter, T.

    2008-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behavior. While the thermodynamics of aqueous inorganic systems at atmospheric temperatures are well established, little is known about the physicochemistry of mixed organic-inorganic particles. Salting-out and salting-in effects result from organic-inorganic interactions and are used to improve industrial separation processes. In the atmosphere, they may influence the aerosol phases. Liquid-liquid phase separations into a mainly polar (aqueous) and a less polar organic phase may considerably influence the gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile substances compared to a single phase estimation. Moreover, the phases present in the aerosol define the reaction medium for heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry occurring in aerosol particles. A correct description of these phases is needed when gas- or cloud-phase reaction schemes are adapted to aerosols. Non-ideal thermodynamic behavior in mixtures is usually described by an expression for the excess Gibbs energy. We present the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients), which explicitly accounts for molecular interactions between solution constituents, both organic and inorganic, to calculate activities, chemical potentials and the total Gibbs energy of mixed systems. This model allows to compute vapor-liquid (VLE), liquid-liquid (LLE) and solid-liquid (SLE) equilibria within one framework. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered eight different cations, five anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are very well represented up to high ionic strength. We show that the semiempirical middle

  4. Thermodynamic equilibrium solubility measurements in simulated fluids by 96-well plate method in early drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sonali S; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2015-04-01

    An early prediction of solubility in physiological media (PBS, SGF and SIF) is useful to predict qualitatively bioavailability and absorption of lead candidates. Despite of the availability of multiple solubility estimation methods, none of the reported method involves simplified fixed protocol for diverse set of compounds. Therefore, a simple and medium-throughput solubility estimation protocol is highly desirable during lead optimization stage. The present work introduces a rapid method for assessment of thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of compounds in aqueous media using 96-well microplate. The developed protocol is straightforward to set up and takes advantage of the sensitivity of UV spectroscopy. The compound, in stock solution in methanol, is introduced in microgram quantities into microplate wells followed by drying at an ambient temperature. Microplates were shaken upon addition of test media and the supernatant was analyzed by UV method. A plot of absorbance versus concentration of a sample provides saturation point, which is thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of a sample. The established protocol was validated using a large panel of commercially available drugs and with conventional miniaturized shake flask method (r(2)>0.84). Additionally, the statistically significant QSPR models were established using experimental solubility values of 52 compounds.

  5. Adsorption laboratory experiment for undergraduate chemical engineering: Introducing kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muryanto, S.; Djatmiko Hadi, S.

    2016-11-01

    Adsorption laboratory experiment for undergraduate chemical engineering program is discussed. The experiment demonstrated adsorption of copper ions commonly found in wastewater using bio-sorbent, i.e. agricultural wastes. The adsorption was performed in a batch mode under various parameters: adsorption time (up to 120 min), initial pH (2 to 6), adsorbent dose (2.0 to 12.0 g L-1), adsorbent size (50 to 170 mesh), initial Cu2+ concentration (25 to 100 ppm) and temperatures (room temp to 40°C). The equilibrium and kinetic data of the experiments were calculated using the two commonly used isotherms: Langmuir and Lagergren pseudo-first-order kinetics. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cu2+ was found as 94.34 mg g-1. Thermodynamically, the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The calculated activation energy for the adsorption was observed as high as 127.94 kJ mol-1. Pedagogically, the experiment was assumed to be important in increasing student understanding of kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic concepts.

  6. Biosorption of food dyes onto Spirulina platensis nanoparticles: equilibrium isotherm and thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Dotto, G L; Lima, E C; Pinto, L A A

    2012-01-01

    The biosorption of food dyes FD&C red no. 40 and acid blue 9 onto Spirulina platensis nanoparticles was studied at different conditions of pH and temperature. Four isotherm models were used to evaluate the biosorption equilibrium and the thermodynamic parameters were estimated. Infra red analysis (FT-IR) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to verify the biosorption behavior. The maximum biosorption capacities of FD&C red no. 40 and acid blue 9 were found at pH 4 and 298 K, and the values were 468.7 mg g(-1) and 1619.4 mg g(-1), respectively. The Sips model was more adequate to fit the equilibrium experimental data (R2>0.99 and ARE<5%). Thermodynamic study showed that the biosorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favorable. FT-IR and EDS analysis suggested that at pH 4 and 298 K, the biosorption of both dyes onto nanoparticles occurred by chemisorption.

  7. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Analysis on the Performance of AN Irreversible Thermally Driven Brownian Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tianfu; Chen, Jincan

    Based on the general model of thermally-driven Brownian motors, an equivalent cycle system is established and the Onsager coefficients and efficiency at the maximum power output of the system are analytically calculated from non-equilibrium thermodynamics. It is found that the Onsager reciprocity relation holds and the Onsager coefficients are affected by the main irreversibilities existing in practical systems. Only when the heat leak and the kinetic energy change of the particle in the system are negligible, can the determinant of the Onsager matrix vanish. It is also found that in the frame of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the power output and efficiency of an irreversible Brownian motor can be expressed to be the same form as those of an irreversible Carnot heat engine, so the results obtained here are of general significance. Moreover, these results are used to analyze the performance characteristics of a class of thermally-driven Brownian motors so that some important conclusions in literature may be directly derived from the present paper.

  8. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation.

  9. CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A NEW THERMODYNAMIC AEROSOL MODULE FOR URBAN AND REGIONAL AIR QUALITY MODELS. (R824793)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient and rigorous thermodynamic model (ISORROPIA) that predicts the physical state and composition of inorganic atmospheric aerosol is presented. The advantages of this particular model render it suitable for incorporation into urban and regional air qualit...

  10. Absolute determination of the gelling point of gelatin under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Franco; Alberini, Ivana; Ferreyra, María G; Rintoul, Ignacio

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic studies on phase transformation of biopolymers in solution are useful to understand their nature and to evaluate their technological potentials. Thermodynamic studies should be conducted avoiding time-related phenomena. This condition is not easily achieved in hydrophilic biopolymers. In this contribution, the simultaneous effects of pH, salt concentration, and cooling rate (Cr) on the folding from random coil to triple helical collagen-like structures of gelatin were systematically studied. The phase transformation temperature at the absolute invariant condition of Cr = 0 °C/min (T(T)Cr=0) ) is introduced as a conceptual parameter to study phase transformations in biopolymers under quasi-thermodynamic equilibrium and avoiding interferences coming from time-related phenomena. Experimental phase diagrams obtained at different Cr are presented. The T(T)(Cr=0) compared with pH and TT(Cr=0) compared with [NaCl] diagram allowed to explore the transformation process at Cr = 0 °C/min. The results were explained by electrostatic interactions between the biopolymers and its solvation milieu.

  11. Model-based analysis of coupled equilibrium-kinetic processes: indirect kinetic studies of thermodynamic parameters using the dynamic data.

    PubMed

    Emami, Fereshteh; Maeder, Marcel; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-05-07

    Thermodynamic studies of equilibrium chemical reactions linked with kinetic procedures are mostly impossible by traditional approaches. In this work, the new concept of generalized kinetic study of thermodynamic parameters is introduced for dynamic data. The examples of equilibria intertwined with kinetic chemical mechanisms include molecular charge transfer complex formation reactions, pH-dependent degradation of chemical compounds and tautomerization kinetics in micellar solutions. Model-based global analysis with the possibility of calculating and embedding the equilibrium and kinetic parameters into the fitting algorithm has allowed the complete analysis of the complex reaction mechanisms. After the fitting process, the optimal equilibrium and kinetic parameters together with an estimate of their standard deviations have been obtained. This work opens up a promising new avenue for obtaining equilibrium constants through the kinetic data analysis for the kinetic reactions that involve equilibrium processes.

  12. Spectrophotometric and thermodynamic study on the dimerization equilibrium of ionic dyes in water by chemometrics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, Ali; Yazdanipour, Ateesa; Ghasemi, Jahanbakhsh; Kubista, Mikael

    2006-09-01

    The monomer-dimer equilibrium and thermodynamic of several ionic dyes (Neutral Red, Nile Blue A, Safranine T and Thionine) has been investigated by means of spectrophotometric and chemometrics methods. The dimerization constants of these ionic dyes have been determined by studying the dependence of their absorption spectra on the temperature in the range 20-75 °C at concentrations of Neutral Red (1.73 × 10 -5 M), Nile Blue A (3.94 × 10 -5 M), Safranine (6.59 × 10 -5 M) and Thionine (6.60 × 10 -5 M). The monomer-dimer equilibrium of these dyes has been determined by chemometrics refinement of the absorption spectra obtained by thermometric titrations performed. The processing of the data carried out for quantitative analysis of undefined mixtures, based on simultaneous resolution of the overlapping bands in the whole set of absorption spectra. The enthalpy and entropy of the dimerization reactions were determined from the dependence of the equilibrium constants to the temperature (van't Hoff equation).

  13. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solution onto untreated coffee grounds: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Azouaou, N; Sadaoui, Z; Djaafri, A; Mokaddem, H

    2010-12-15

    Adsorption can be used as a cost effective and efficient technique for the removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewater. Waste materials with no further treatment such as coffee grounds from cafeterias may act as adsorbents for the removal of cadmium. Batch kinetic and equilibrium experiments were conducted to study the effects of contact time, adsorbent dose, initial pH, particle size, initial concentration of cadmium and temperature. Three adsorption isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich were used to analyse the equilibrium data. The Langmuir isotherm which provided the best correlation for Cd(2+) adsorption onto coffee grounds, shows that the adsorption was favourable and the adsorption capacity found was equal to 15.65 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and the adsorption was exothermic. The equilibrium was achieved less than 120 min. The adsorption kinetic data was fitted with first and second order kinetic models. Finally it was concluded that the cadmium adsorption kinetic onto coffee grounds was well fitted by second order kinetic model rather than first order model. The results suggest that coffee grounds have high possibility to be used as effective and economical adsorbent for Cd(2+) removal.

  14. Cloud and Precipitation During GoAmazon: The Influence of Aerosol and Thermodynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, L.; Cecchin, M.; Biscaro, T.; Lima, W.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Albrecht, R. I.; Comstock, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Mei, F.; Schumacher, C.; Eichholz, C.; Giangrande, S. E.; Fan, J.; Wang, J.; Wendisch, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Martin, S. T.; Artaxo, P.; Thalman, R. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Poeschl, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Green Ocean Amazon, GOAmazon, intensive field campaign, hereafter called IOP1 (February-March) and IOP2 (September - October) 2014, was an opportunity for broad and joint campaigns of the CHUVA, IARA and ACRIDICON-CHUVA projects. GOAmazon intends to study how aerosols and surface fluxes influence cloud cycles under clean conditions, as well as how aerosol and cloud life cycles, including cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions, are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity. This study employs the SIPAM S band radar, the X Band dual polarization radar, GOES images, disdrometers, CCN counters, radiosondes and data collected by G1 and HALO airplanes. As ancillary data, we used the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, the TERRACLASS (INPE) and EVI from MODIS for surface topography, surface type classification and vegetation index, respectively. Cloud and precipitation are studied as function of aerosol concentration as well surface type and thermodynamic properties. Different sensors and space-time scales are employed to compare the life cycle and cloud size distribution using radar and satellite for different atmospheric conditions. For each IOP, the droplet size distribution using the airplanes or the particle size distribution using disdrometers are described discussing the aerosol, thermodynamic, surface type and topography effects on the clouds and precipitation. The typical precipitation behavior, for each IOP, is described using CFADs and reflectivity distributions. For few specific flights, those measuring ice particles, during the wet season (IOP1), some examples and classifications of convective and stratiform clouds are discussed. Finally, the microphysical properties of the clouds are presented using X band dual pol radar hydrometeor classifications and evaluating the effect of aerosol loading on the cloud vertical structure.

  15. A basic introduction to the thermodynamics of the Earth system far from equilibrium and maximum entropy production.

    PubMed

    Kleidon, A

    2010-05-12

    The Earth system is remarkably different from its planetary neighbours in that it shows pronounced, strong global cycling of matter. These global cycles result in the maintenance of a unique thermodynamic state of the Earth's atmosphere which is far from thermodynamic equilibrium (TE). Here, I provide a simple introduction of the thermodynamic basis to understand why Earth system processes operate so far away from TE. I use a simple toy model to illustrate the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics and to classify applications of the proposed principle of maximum entropy production (MEP) to such processes into three different cases of contrasting flexibility in the boundary conditions. I then provide a brief overview of the different processes within the Earth system that produce entropy, review actual examples of MEP in environmental and ecological systems, and discuss the role of interactions among dissipative processes in making boundary conditions more flexible. I close with a brief summary and conclusion.

  16. Non-equilibrium thermodynamical description of rhythmic motion patterns of active systems: a canonical-dissipative approach.

    PubMed

    Dotov, D G; Kim, S; Frank, T D

    2015-02-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the non-equilibrium thermodynamical variables of a canonical-dissipative limit cycle oscillator describing rhythmic motion patterns of active systems. These variables are statistical entropy, non-equilibrium internal energy, and non-equilibrium free energy. In particular, the expression for the non-equilibrium free energy is derived as a function of a suitable control parameter. The control parameter determines the Hopf bifurcation point of the deterministic active system and describes the effective pumping of the oscillator. In analogy to the equilibrium free energy of the Landau theory, it is shown that the non-equilibrium free energy decays as a function of the control parameter. In doing so, a similarity between certain equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase transitions is pointed out. Data from an experiment on human rhythmic movements is presented. Estimates for pumping intensity as well as the thermodynamical variables are reported. It is shown that in the experiment the non-equilibrium free energy decayed when pumping intensity was increased, which is consistent with the theory. Moreover, pumping intensities close to zero could be observed at relatively slow intended rhythmic movements. In view of the Hopf bifurcation underlying the limit cycle oscillator model, this observation suggests that the intended limit cycle movements were actually more similar to trajectories of a randomly perturbed stable focus.

  17. Modeling Hardenable Stainless Steels Using Calculated Martensite Start Temperatures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Merlin; Theisen, Werner

    2016-12-01

    In this work, martensite start temperatures of several martensitic stainless steels containing different amounts and types of carbides were calculated by means of thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Two different equations were introduced into the Thermo-Calc® software. The calculations were performed for the respective compositions at austenitization temperature and compared to martensite start temperatures measured using a quenching dilatometer. The purpose was to estimate hardenability and hardness of newly developed steels. Even though the equations used were determined empirically for specific alloying systems, general trends for the investigated steels were found to be reproduced very well. Thus, the comparison of martensite start temperatures of different steels in comparable alloying systems is highly effective for modeling new steels and for predicting their hardenability.

  18. Verifying thermodynamic equilibrium of molecular manifolds: Kennard-Stepanov spectroscopy of a molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulos, Stavros; Möller, Dominik; Cota, Roberto; Gerwers, Benedikt; Weitz, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The degree of thermalization of electronically excited state manifolds of an absorber can be tested via optical spectroscopy. In the thermalized-manifold case, the ratio of absorption and emission is expected to follow a universal Boltzmann-type frequency scaling, known as the Kennard-Stepanov relation. Here, we investigate absorption and emission spectral profiles of rubidium, cesium, and potassium molecular dimers in a high-pressure argon buffer-gas environment and study the effect of collisionally induced redistribution. We find that, despite the use of nonlinear excitation techniques, the ratio of absorption and emission well follows the Kennard-Stepanov scaling for a variety of molecular transitions. We conclude that the upper electronic state rovibrational manifold of the molecular gas is well in thermodynamic equilibrium. Further, we demonstrate an accurate, calibration-free determination of the gas temperature from the measured spectroscopic data.

  19. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 1.5D modeling of red giant stars

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Mitchell E.; Short, C. Ian

    2014-05-20

    Spectra for two-dimensional (2D) stars in the 1.5D approximation are created from synthetic spectra of one-dimensional (1D) non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) spherical model atmospheres produced by the PHOENIX code. The 1.5D stars have the spatially averaged Rayleigh-Jeans flux of a K3-4 III star while varying the temperature difference between the two 1D component models (ΔT {sub 1.5D}) and the relative surface area covered. Synthetic observable quantities from the 1.5D stars are fitted with quantities from NLTE and local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) 1D models to assess the errors in inferred T {sub eff} values from assuming horizontal homogeneity and LTE. Five different quantities are fit to determine the T {sub eff} of the 1.5D stars: UBVRI photometric colors, absolute surface flux spectral energy distributions (SEDs), relative SEDs, continuum normalized spectra, and TiO band profiles. In all cases except the TiO band profiles, the inferred T {sub eff} value increases with increasing ΔT {sub 1.5D}. In all cases, the inferred T {sub eff} value from fitting 1D LTE quantities is higher than from fitting 1D NLTE quantities and is approximately constant as a function of ΔT {sub 1.5D} within each case. The difference between LTE and NLTE for the TiO bands is caused indirectly by the NLTE temperature structure of the upper atmosphere, as the bands are computed in LTE. We conclude that the difference between T {sub eff} values derived from NLTE and LTE modeling is relatively insensitive to the degree of the horizontal inhomogeneity of the star being modeled and largely depends on the observable quantity being fit.

  20. Quantifying the equilibrium partitioning of substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aerosols and clouds using COSMOtherm.

    PubMed

    Awonaike, Boluwatife; Wang, Chen; Goss, Kai-Uwe; Wania, Frank

    2017-03-22

    Functional groups attached to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can significantly modify the environmental fate of the parent compound. Equilibrium partition coefficients, which are essential for describing the environmental phase distribution of a compound, are largely unavailable for substituted PAHs (SPAHs). Here, COSMOtherm, a software based on quantum-chemical calculations is used to estimate the atmospherically relevant partition coefficients between the gas phase, the aqueous bulk phase, the water surface and the water insoluble organic matter phase, as well as the salting-out coefficients, for naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, benz(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene and dibenz(a,h)anthracene and 62 of their substituted counterparts. They serve as input parameters for the calculation of equilibrium phase distribution of these compounds in aerosols and clouds. Our results, which were compared with available experimental data, show that the effect of salts, the adsorption to the water surface and the dissolution in a bulk aqueous phase can be safely neglected when estimating the gas-particle partitioning of SPAHs in aerosols. However, for small PAHs with more than one polar functional group the aqueous phase can be the dominant reservoir in a cloud.

  1. Calculations of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEET) in nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, P.; Meot, V.; Gosselin, G.; Faussurier, G.; Blancard, C.

    2010-03-15

    The nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEET) process may occur when the energy differences between two nuclear levels and between two electronic states are nearly equal, provided the quantum selection rules are fulfilled. These resonant conditions drastically limit the number of possible candidates, even though thermodynamic conditions encountered in hot dense plasmas do modify the orbital electronic binding energy and the resonance conditions. {sup 201}Hg, with a low-lying isomeric state located at 1.565 keV, can be excited by NEET process in a laser-created plasma. However, its correct calculation requires nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) atomic physics treatment because current laser-created plasmas do not reach high-enough temperature in the area at LTE. In this article, we describe the calculation leading to an estimated excitation rate and discuss the influence of LTE/non-LTE physics with an average-atom model and the use of a Gaussian variance calculation to estimate the broadening around the mean energy mismatch.

  2. A spreadsheet-coupled SOLGAS: A computerized thermodynamic equilibrium calculation tool. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    SOLGAS, an early computer program for calculating equilibrium in a chemical system, has been made more user-friendly, and several ``bells and whistles`` have been added. The necessity to include elemental species has been eliminated. The input of large numbers of starting conditions has been automated. A revised spreadsheet-based format for entering data, including non-ideal binary and ternary mixtures, simplifies and reduces chances for error. Calculational errors by SOLGAS are flagged, and several programming errors are corrected. Auxiliary programs are available to assemble and partially automate plotting of large amounts of data. Thermodynamic input data can be changed on line. The program can be operated with or without a co-processor. Copies of the program, suitable for the IBM-PC or compatibles with at least 384 bytes of low RAM, are available from the authors. This user manual contains appendices with examples of the use of SOLGAS. These range from elementary examples, such as, the relationships among water, ice, and water vapor, to more complex systems: phase diagram calculation of UF{sub 4} and UF{sub 6} system; burning UF{sub 4} in fluorine; thermodynamic calculation of the Cl-F-O-H system; equilibria calculations in the CCl{sub 4}--CH{sub 3}OH system; and limitations applicable to aqueous solutions. An appendix also contains the source code.

  3. Low Temperature Thermodynamic Equilibrium of CO2 Dimer Anion Species in Cryogenic Argon and Krypton Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Michael E.; Moore, David T.

    2016-06-01

    The separated CO2 dimer anion, (CO2)(CO2-), is observed by FTIR spectroscopy in matrix isolation experiments at 1652 cm-1 upon deposition of high energy argon ions into an argon matrix doped with 0.5% CO2. It has previously been reported by Andrews that upon annealing the matrix to 25K, the separated species converts to an oxalate-like C2O4- species which appears at 1856 cm-1.a We have observed that subsequently holding the matrix at 10K caused the C2O4- species to fully convert back to (CO2)(CO2-). Upon further investigation, we determined that the two species reversibly interconvert between 19K and 23K, suggesting the species are in thermodynamic equilibrium. The associated van't Hoff plot has a linear trend and indicates an endothermic reaction driven by a large increase in entropy. An analogous experiment in a krypton matrix was performed, and the equilibrium was found to occur between 26K and 31K. Interestingly, analysis revealed the reaction in krypton is more endothermic, but has nearly the same entropy value as was observed in the argon experiment. aZhou, M.; Andrews, L.; J. Chem. Phys. 110, 2414 (1999).

  4. Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of dichloroacetic acid from aqueous solution using mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Zhu, Jianzhong; Cao, Yang; Chen, Shenglu

    2014-08-01

    The presence of disinfection by-products, such as trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids in water, is believed to be harmful to human health. In this work, mesoporous carbon was synthesized with the evaporation-induced self-assembly method and employed to evaluate the effects of initial concentration, contact time, pH and temperature on the removal of dichloroacetic acid in batch experiments. Adsorption equilibrium was established in 480 min and the maximum adsorption (350mg/g) of dichloroacetic acid on the mesoporous carbon was observed to occur at 308 K and pH 3.0. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were used to analyse the equilibrium data at different temperatures; kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models and found that the adsorption capacity, mass transfer coefficient and diffusivity of dichloroacetic acid were directly affected by the physical and chemical parameters. In addition, the various thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (Delta G), enthalpy (Delta H = 54.35 kJmol-1) and entropy (Delta S = 258.36 Jmol-1 K-1) were calculated to analyse the adsorption process. The experimental results indicated that the mesoporous carbon was an excellent adsorbent for dichloroacetic acid removal from aqueous solutions.

  5. Calculations and curve fits of thermodynamic and transport properties for equilibrium air to 30000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Thompson, Richard A.; Yos, Jerrold M.

    1991-01-01

    A self-consistent set of equilibrium air values were computed for enthalpy, total specific heat at constant pressure, compressibility factor, viscosity, total thermal conductivity, and total Prandtl number from 500 to 30,000 K over a range of 10(exp -4) atm to 10(exp 2) atm. The mixture values are calculated from the transport and thermodynamic properties of the individual species provided in a recent study by the authors. The concentrations of the individual species, required in the mixture relations, are obtained from a free energy minimization calculation procedure. Present calculations are based on an 11-species air model. For pressures less than 10(exp -2) atm and temperatures of about 15,000 K and greater, the concentrations of N(++) and O(++) become important, and consequently, they are included in the calculations determining the various properties. The computed properties are curve fitted as a function of temperature at a constant value of pressure. These curve fits reproduce the computed values within 5 percent for the entire temperature range considered here at specific pressures and provide an efficient means for computing the flowfield properties of equilibrium air, provided the elemental composition remains constant at 0.24 for oxygen and 0.76 for nitrogen by mass.

  6. Characterization of local thermodynamic equilibrium in a laser-induced aluminum alloy plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhenyang; Xu, Tao; Niu, GuangHui; Liu, Ying; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-04-01

    The electron temperature was evaluated using the line-to-continuum ratio method, and whether the plasma was close to the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state was investigated in detail. The results showed that approximately 5 μs after the plasma formed, the changes in the electron and excitation temperatures, which were determined using a Boltzmann plot, overlapped in the 15% error range, which indicated that the LTE state was reached. The recombination of electrons and ions and the free electron expansion process led to the deviation from the LTE state. The plasma's expansion rate slowed over time, and when the expansion time was close to the ionization equilibrium time, the LTE state was almost reached. The McWhirter criterion was adopted to calculate the threshold electron density for different species, and the results showed that experimental electron density was greater than the threshold electron density, which meant that the LTE state may have existed. However, for the nonmetal element N, the threshold electron density was greater than the value experimental value approximately 0.8 μs after the plasma formed, which meant that LTE state did not exist for N.

  7. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics and collective vibrational modes of liquid water in an inhomogeneous electric field.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Adam D; Drusová, Sandra; Woisetschläger, Jakob; Fuchs, Elmar C

    2016-06-28

    In this experiment liquid water is subject to an inhomogeneous electric field (∇(2)Ea≈ 10(10) V m(2)) using a high voltage (20 kV) point-plane electrode system. Using interferometry it was found that the application of a strong electric field gradient to water generates local changes in the refractive index of the liquid, polarizes the surface and creates a downward moving electro-convective jet. A maximum temperature difference of 1 °C is measured in the immediate vicinity of the point electrode. Raman spectroscopy performed on water reveals an enhancement of the vibrational collective modes (3250 cm(-1)) as well as an increase in the local mode (3490 cm(-1)) energy. This bimodal enhancement indicates that the spectral changes are not due to temperature changes. The intense field gradient thus establishes an excited subpopulation of vibrational oscillators far from thermal equilibrium. Delocalization of the collective vibrational mode spatially expands this excited population beyond the microscale. Hindered rotational freedom due to electric field pinning of molecular dipoles retards the heat flow and generates a chemical potential gradient. These changes are responsible for the observed changes in the refractive index and temperature. It is demonstrated that polar liquids can thus support local non-equilibrium thermodynamic transient states critical to biochemical and environmental processes.

  8. Lithium abundances of halo dwarfs based on excitation temperatures. II. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosford, A.; García Pérez, A. E.; Collet, R.; Ryan, S. G.; Norris, J. E.; Olive, K. A.

    2010-02-01

    Context. The plateau in the abundance of 7Li in metal-poor stars was initially interpreted as an observational indicator of the primordial lithium abundance. However, this observational value is in disagreement with that deduced from calculations of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), when using the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe (WMAP) baryon density measurements. One of the most important factors in determining the stellar lithium abundance is the effective temperature. In a previous study by the authors, new effective temperatures (Teff) for sixteen metal-poor halo dwarfs were derived using a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) description of the formation of Fe lines. This new Teff scale reinforced the discrepancy. Aims: For six of the stars from our previous study we calculate revised temperatures using a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) approach. These are then used to derive a new mean primordial lithium abundance in an attempt to solve the lithium discrepancy. Methods: Using the code MULTI we calculate NLTE corrections to the LTE abundances for the Fe i lines measured in the six stars, and determine new Teff's. We keep other physical parameters, i.e. log g, [Fe/H] and ξ, constant at the values calculated in Paper I. With the revised Teff scale we derive new Li abundances. We compare the NLTE values of Teff with the photometric temperatures of Ryan et al. (1999, ApJ, 523, 654), the infrared flux method (IRFM) temperatures of Meléndez & Ramírez (2004, ApJ, 615, L33), and the Balmer line wing temperatures of Asplund et al. (2006, ApJ, 644, 229). Results: We find that our temperatures are hotter than both the Ryan et al. and Asplund et al. temperatures by typically ~110-160 K, but are still cooler than the temperatures of Meléndez & Ramírez by typically ~190 K. The temperatures imply a primordial Li abundance of 2.19 dex or 2.21 dex, depending on the magnitude of collisions with hydrogen in the calculations, still well below the value of 2

  9. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-01-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability. PMID:27929097

  10. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-12-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  11. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H

    2016-12-08

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field's thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  12. A procedure to find thermodynamic equilibrium constants for CO2 and CH4 adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Trinh, T T; van Erp, T S; Bedeaux, D; Kjelstrup, S; Grande, C A

    2015-03-28

    Thermodynamic equilibrium for adsorption means that the chemical potential of gas and adsorbed phase are equal. A precise knowledge of the chemical potential is, however, often lacking, because the activity coefficient of the adsorbate is not known. Adsorption isotherms are therefore commonly fitted to ideal models such as the Langmuir, Sips or Henry models. We propose here a new procedure to find the activity coefficient and the equilibrium constant for adsorption which uses the thermodynamic factor. Instead of fitting the data to a model, we calculate the thermodynamic factor and use this to find first the activity coefficient. We show, using published molecular simulation data, how this procedure gives the thermodynamic equilibrium constant and enthalpies of adsorption for CO2(g) on graphite. We also use published experimental data to find similar thermodynamic properties of CO2(g) and of CH4(g) adsorbed on activated carbon. The procedure gives a higher accuracy in the determination of enthalpies of adsorption than ideal models do.

  13. Atomistic-level non-equilibrium model for chemically reactive systems based on steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanchen; Al-Abbasi, Omar; von Spakovsky, Michael R.

    2014-10-01

    This paper outlines an atomistic-level framework for modeling the non-equilibrium behavior of chemically reactive systems. The framework called steepest- entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEA-QT) is based on the paradigm of intrinsic quantum thermodynamic (IQT), which is a theory that unifies quantum mechanics and thermodynamics into a single discipline with wide applications to the study of non-equilibrium phenomena at the atomistic level. SEA-QT is a novel approach for describing the state of chemically reactive systems as well as the kinetic and dynamic features of the reaction process without any assumptions of near-equilibrium states or weak-interactions with a reservoir or bath. Entropy generation is the basis of the dissipation which takes place internal to the system and is, thus, the driving force of the chemical reaction(s). The SEA-QT non-equilibrium model is able to provide detailed information during the reaction process, providing a picture of the changes occurring in key thermodynamic properties (e.g., the instantaneous species concentrations, entropy and entropy generation, reaction coordinate, chemical affinities, reaction rate, etc). As an illustration, the SEA-QT framework is applied to an atomistic-level chemically reactive system governed by the reaction mechanism F + H2 leftrightarrow FH + H.

  14. Interpretation of high-temperature tensile properties by thermodynamically calculated equilibrium phase diagrams of heat-resistant austenitic cast steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seungmun; Sohn, Seok Su; Choi, Won-Mi; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Oh, Yong-Jun; Jang, Seongsik; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-01-01

    High-temperature tensile properties of three heat-resistant austenitic cast steels fabricated by varying W, Mo, and Al contents were interpreted by thermodynamically calculated equilibrium phase diagrams of austenite, ferrite, and carbides as well as microstructural analyses. A two-step calculation method was adopted to cast steel microstructures below the liquid dissolution temperature because the casting route was not an equilibrium state. Thermodynamically calculated fractions of equilibrium phases were well matched with experimentally measured fractions. Ferrites existed at room and high temperatures in both equilibrium phase diagrams and actual microstructures, which has not been reported in previous researches on austenitic cast steels. In the W2Mo1Al1 steel, 38% and 12% of ferrite existed in the equilibrium phase diagram and actual microstructure, respectively, and led to the void initiation and coalescence at ferrites and consequently to the serious deterioration of high-temperature strengths. The present equilibrium phase diagrams, besides detailed microstructural analyses, effectively evaluated the high-temperature performance by estimating high-temperature equilibrium phases, and provided an important idea on whether ferrite were formed or not in the heat-resistant austenitic cast steels.

  15. Linear thermodynamic analysis of the reversible Selkov model: An interpretation of the Chatelier-like principle for local concentration fluctuations near thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Arun K.

    1990-03-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of the reversible Selkov model (a simple kinetic model describing glycolytic oscillations) has been done by an entropy production technique of Prigogine and it is shown that only the autocatalytic step can destabilize the steady state in this model. It is derived that at thermodynamic equilibrium, the product δS δP is always a positive quantity which appears to be a Chatelier-like principle for local concentration fluctuation applicable to the autocatalytic step S ⇄ P of this model.

  16. Effect of deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium on the Goldberg-Unno method. [turbulence effects on optical density in the solar photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troyan, V. I.

    1974-01-01

    The dependence of turbulent velocity on optical depth was studied by use of the Goldberg-Unno method, with allowance made for the influence of deviation from the local thermodynamic equilibrium. It was found that allowance for deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium displaces the curve of dependence of turbulent velocity on optical depth along two axes.

  17. Aerosol Particle Interfacial Thermodynamics and Phase Partitioning Measurements Using Biphasic Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutcher, Cari; Metcalf, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Secondary organic aerosol particles are nearly ubiquitous in the atmosphere and yet there remain large uncertainties in their formation processes and ambient properties. These particles are complex microenvironments, which can contain multiple interfaces due to internal aqueous-organic phase partitioning and to the external liquid-vapor surface. Interfacial properties affect the ambient aerosol morphology, or internal structure of the particle, which in turn can affect the way a particle interacts with an environment of condensable clusters and organic vapors. To improve our ability to accurately predict ambient aerosol morphology, we must improve our knowledge of aerosol interfaces and their interactions with the ambient environment. Unfortunately, many techniques employed to measure interfacial properties do so in bulk solutions or in the presence of a ternary (e.g. solid) phase. In this talk, a novel method using biphasic microscale flows will be introduced for generating, trapping, and perturbing complex interfaces at atmospherically relevant conditions. These microfluidic experiments utilize high-speed imaging to monitor interfacial phenomena at the microscale and are performed with phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy on a temperature-controlled inverted microscope stage. From these experiments, interfacial thermodynamic properties such as surface or interfacial tension, rheological properties such as interfacial moduli, and kinetic properties such as mass transfer coefficients can be measured or inferred.

  18. Analysis of Hydrogen Generation through Thermochemical Gasification of Coconut Shell Using Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Considering Char and Tar

    PubMed Central

    Rupesh, Shanmughom; Muraleedharan, Chandrasekharan; Arun, Palatel

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the potential of coconut shell for air-steam gasification using thermodynamic equilibrium model. A thermodynamic equilibrium model considering tar and realistic char conversion was developed using MATLAB software to predict the product gas composition. After comparing it with experimental results the prediction capability of the model is enhanced by multiplying equilibrium constants with suitable coefficients. The modified model is used to study the effect of key process parameters like temperature, steam to biomass ratio, and equivalence ratio on product gas yield, composition, and heating value of syngas along with gasification efficiency. For a steam to biomass ratio of unity, the maximum mole fraction of hydrogen in the product gas is found to be 36.14% with a lower heating value of 7.49 MJ/Nm3 at a gasification temperature of 1500 K and equivalence ratio of 0.15. PMID:27433487

  19. Analysis of Hydrogen Generation through Thermochemical Gasification of Coconut Shell Using Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Considering Char and Tar.

    PubMed

    Rupesh, Shanmughom; Muraleedharan, Chandrasekharan; Arun, Palatel

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the potential of coconut shell for air-steam gasification using thermodynamic equilibrium model. A thermodynamic equilibrium model considering tar and realistic char conversion was developed using MATLAB software to predict the product gas composition. After comparing it with experimental results the prediction capability of the model is enhanced by multiplying equilibrium constants with suitable coefficients. The modified model is used to study the effect of key process parameters like temperature, steam to biomass ratio, and equivalence ratio on product gas yield, composition, and heating value of syngas along with gasification efficiency. For a steam to biomass ratio of unity, the maximum mole fraction of hydrogen in the product gas is found to be 36.14% with a lower heating value of 7.49 MJ/Nm(3) at a gasification temperature of 1500 K and equivalence ratio of 0.15.

  20. The Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Focal Adhesion Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Olberding, Joseph E.; Thouless, Michael D.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Garikipati, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Background We consider a focal adhesion to be made up of molecular complexes, each consisting of a ligand, an integrin molecule, and associated plaque proteins. Free energy changes drive the binding and unbinding of these complexes and thereby controls the focal adhesion's dynamic modes of growth, treadmilling and resorption. Principal Findings We have identified a competition among four thermodynamic driving forces for focal adhesion dynamics: (i) the work done during the addition of a single molecular complex of a certain size, (ii) the chemical free energy change associated with the addition of a molecular complex, (iii) the elastic free energy change associated with deformation of focal adhesions and the cell membrane, and (iv) the work done on a molecular conformational change. We have developed a theoretical treatment of focal adhesion dynamics as a nonlinear rate process governed by a classical kinetic model. We also express the rates as being driven by out-of-equilibrium thermodynamic driving forces, and modulated by kinetics. The mechanisms governed by the above four effects allow focal adhesions to exhibit a rich variety of behavior without the need to introduce special constitutive assumptions for their response. For the reaction-limited case growth, treadmilling and resorption are all predicted by a very simple chemo-mechanical model. Treadmilling requires symmetry breaking between the ends of the focal adhesion, and is achieved by driving force (i) above. In contrast, depending on its numerical value (ii) causes symmetric growth, resorption or is neutral, (iii) causes symmetric resorption, and (iv) causes symmetric growth. These findings hold for a range of conditions: temporally-constant force or stress, and for spatially-uniform and non-uniform stress distribution over the FA. The symmetric growth mode dominates for temporally-constant stress, with a reduced treadmilling regime. Significance In addition to explaining focal adhesion dynamics, this

  1. SPECIES - EVALUATING THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES & EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS OF AN 11-SPECIES AIR MODEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate numerical prediction of high-temperature, chemically reacting flowfields requires a knowledge of the physical properties and reaction kinetics for the species involved in the reacting gas mixture. Assuming an 11-species air model at temperatures below 30,000 degrees Kelvin, SPECIES (Computer Codes for the Evaluation of Thermodynamic Properties, Transport Properties, and Equilibrium Constants of an 11-Species Air Model) computes values for the species thermodynamic and transport properties, diffusion coefficients and collision cross sections for any combination of the eleven species, and reaction rates for the twenty reactions normally occurring. The species represented in the model are diatomic nitrogen, diatomic oxygen, atomic nitrogen, atomic oxygen, nitric oxide, ionized nitric oxide, the free electron, ionized atomic nitrogen, ionized atomic oxygen, ionized diatomic nitrogen, and ionized diatomic oxygen. Sixteen subroutines compute the following properties for both a single species, interaction pair, or reaction, and an array of all species, pairs, or reactions: species specific heat and static enthalpy, species viscosity, species frozen thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient, collision cross section (OMEGA 1,1), collision cross section (OMEGA 2,2), collision cross section ratio, and equilibrium constant. The program uses least squares polynomial curve-fits of the most accurate data believed available to provide the requested values more quickly than is possible with table look-up methods. The subroutines for computing transport coefficients and collision cross sections use additional code to correct for any electron pressure when working with ionic species. SPECIES was developed on a SUN 3/280 computer running the SunOS 3.5 operating system. It is written in standard FORTRAN 77 for use on any machine, and requires roughly 92K memory. The standard distribution medium for SPECIES is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the

  2. Assessing life's effects on the interior dynamics of planet Earth using non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, J. G.; Gans, F.; Kleidon, A.

    2010-09-01

    Vernadsky described life as the geologic force, while Lovelock noted the role of life in driving the Earth's atmospheric composition to a unique state of thermodynamic disequilibrium. Here, we use these notions in conjunction with thermodynamics to quantify biotic activity as a driving force for geologic processes. Specifically, we explore the hypothesis that biologically-mediated processes operating on the surface of the Earth, such as the biotic enhancement of weathering of continental crust, affect interior processes such as mantle convection and have therefore shaped the evolution of the whole Earth system beyond its surface and atmosphere. We set up three simple models of mantle convection, oceanic crust recycling and continental crust recycling. We describe these models in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics in which the generation and dissipation of gradients is central to driving their dynamics and that such dynamics can be affected by their boundary conditions. We use these models to quantify the maximum power that is involved in these processes. The assumption that these processes, given a set of boundary conditions, operate at maximum levels of generation and dissipation of free energy lead to reasonable predictions of core temperature, seafloor spreading rates, and continental crust thickness. With a set of sensitivity simulations we then show how these models interact through the boundary conditions at the mantle-crust and oceanic-continental crust interfaces. These simulations hence support our hypothesis that the depletion of continental crust at the land surface can affect rates of oceanic crust recycling and mantle convection deep within the Earth's interior. We situate this hypothesis within a broader assessment of surface-interior interactions by setting up a work budget of the Earth's interior to compare the maximum power estimates that drive interior processes to the power that is associated with biotic activity. We estimate that the

  3. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics theory of econometric source discovery for large data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bergem, Rutger; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Benachenhou, Dalila; Szu, Harold

    2014-05-01

    Almost all consumer and firm transactions are achieved using computers and as a result gives rise to increasingly large amounts of data available for analysts. The gold standard in Economic data manipulation techniques matured during a period of limited data access, and the new Large Data Analysis (LDA) paradigm we all face may quickly obfuscate most tools used by Economists. When coupled with an increased availability of numerous unstructured, multi-modal data sets, the impending 'data tsunami' could have serious detrimental effects for Economic forecasting, analysis, and research in general. Given this reality we propose a decision-aid framework for Augmented-LDA (A-LDA) - a synergistic approach to LDA which combines traditional supervised, rule-based Machine Learning (ML) strategies to iteratively uncover hidden sources in large data, the artificial neural network (ANN) Unsupervised Learning (USL) at the minimum Helmholtz free energy for isothermal dynamic equilibrium strategies, and the Economic intuitions required to handle problems encountered when interpreting large amounts of Financial or Economic data. To make the ANN USL framework applicable to economics we define the temperature, entropy, and energy concepts in Economics from non-equilibrium molecular thermodynamics of Boltzmann viewpoint, as well as defining an information geometry, on which the ANN can operate using USL to reduce information saturation. An exemplar of such a system representation is given for firm industry equilibrium. We demonstrate the traditional ML methodology in the economics context and leverage firm financial data to explore a frontier concept known as behavioral heterogeneity. Behavioral heterogeneity on the firm level can be imagined as a firm's interactions with different types of Economic entities over time. These interactions could impose varying degrees of institutional constraints on a firm's business behavior. We specifically look at behavioral

  4. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of phenol onto graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of temperature on phenol adsorbed by graphene shows that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of phenol increases with the increase in temperature from 285 to 333 K. Increasing adsorption capacities with temperature indicates that the adsorption of phenol is controlled by an endothermic reaction. Highlights: ► The graphene has high phenol adsorption capacity. ► The graphene has a high specific surface area of 305 m{sup 2}/g. ► The adsorption capacity is high at acidic pH range. ► The graphene has rapid phenol adsorption rate. ► Phenol adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. -- Abstract: Graphene, a new member of carbon family, has been prepared, characterized and used as adsorbent to remove phenol from aqueous solution. The effect parameters including pH, dosage, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of phenol onto graphene were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity can reach 28.26 mg/g at the conditions of initial phenol concentration of 50 mg/L, pH 6.3 and 285 K. Adsorption data were well described by both Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene was endothermic and spontaneous.

  5. Removal of tetracycline from wastewater using pumice stone: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Guler, Ulker Asli; Sarioglu, Meltem

    2014-01-01

    In this study, pumice stone was used for the removal of tetracyline (TC) from aqueous solutions. It was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM and BET analyses. Cation exchange capacity of pumice stone was found to be 9.9 meq/100 g. Effect of various parameters such as solution pH (2-11), adsorbent dosage (0.5-10 g/L), contact time (2.5-120 min), initial TC concentration (5-300 mg/L) and temperature (20-50°C) on TC adsorption onto pumice was investigated. Also the adsorption of TC on pumice stone was studied as a function of Na(+) and Cu(2+) cations changing pH from 2 to 11 using batch experiments. The best removal efficiency performance was exhibited at adsorbent dosage 10 g/L, pH 3, contact time 120 min. Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models were applied to the equilibrium data. The result has shown that the adsorption was favorable, physicochemical in nature and agrees well with Langmuir and Freundlich models. The maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 20.02 mg/g. The adsorption behavior of TC on pumices stone was fitted well in the pseudo-second order kinetics model. Thermodynamic parameters calculated from the adsorption data at different temperature showed that the adsorption reaction was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic.

  6. Numerical solution of 2D wet steam flow with non-equilibrium condensation and real thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hric, V.; Halama, J.

    2015-03-10

    An approach to modeling of wet steam flow with non-equilibrium condensation phenomenon is presented. The first part of our flow model is homogeneous Euler system of transport equations for mass, momentum and total energy of wet steam (mixture). The additional second part describes liquid phase via non-homogeneous system of transport equations for moments of droplets number distribution function and relies on corrected classical nucleation theory. Moment equations are closed by linearization of droplet growth rate model. All necessary relations for thermodynamic properties of steam are provided by IAPWS set of equations. However, properties of condensate are simply modeled by liquid saturation data. Two real equations of state are implemented. Recently developed CFD formulation for entropy (does not require iteration process) and so-called IAPWS special gas equation for Helmholtz energy (one iteration loop is necessary). Flow model is validated on converging-diverging supersonic nozzle with Barschdorff geometry. Simulations were performed by in-house CFD code based on finite volume method and stiff character of equations was solved by symmetrical time operator splitting. Achieved results satisfactorily agreed with experimental data.

  7. Model uncertainties of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium K-shell spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; Hansen, S. B.; Blancard, C.; Chung, H. K.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Florido, R.; Fontes, C. J.; Gilleron, F.; Golovkin, I. E.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Loisel, G.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Pain, J.-C.; Rochau, G. A.; Sherrill, M. E.; Lee, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    Local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) K-shell spectroscopy is a common tool to diagnose electron density, ne, and electron temperature, Te, of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Knowing the accuracy of such diagnostics is important to provide quantitative conclusions of many HED-plasma research efforts. For example, Fe opacities were recently measured at multiple conditions at the Sandia National Laboratories Z machine (Bailey et al., 2015), showing significant disagreement with modeled opacities. Since the plasma conditions were measured using K-shell spectroscopy of tracer Mg (Nagayama et al., 2014), one concern is the accuracy of the inferred Fe conditions. In this article, we investigate the K-shell spectroscopy model uncertainties by analyzing the Mg spectra computed with 11 different models at the same conditions. We find that the inferred conditions differ by ±20-30% in ne and ±2-4% in Te depending on the choice of spectral model. Also, we find that half of the Te uncertainty comes from ne uncertainty. To refine the accuracy of the K-shell spectroscopy, it is important to scrutinize and experimentally validate line-shape theory. We investigate the impact of the inferred ne and Te model uncertainty on the Fe opacity measurements. Its impact is small and does not explain the reported discrepancies.

  8. Thermodynamic parameters of heterogeneous materials under shock-wave loading in presentation of equilibrium model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maevskii, K. K.; Kinelovskii, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The results of numerical experiments on modeling of shock wave loading of solid and porous heterogeneous materials on the example of molybdenum and some alloys included molybdenum as a component are presented. A thermodynamically equilibrium model is applied to describe the behavior of solid and porous materials. This model ensures good compliance with the experiment in a wide range of pressures. The gas in pores, which is a component of the medium, is taken into account in this model. The equation of state of the Mie-Grüneisen type with allowance for the dependence of the Grüneisen coefficient on temperature is used for condensed phases. The applied model allows the behavior of the molybdenum with porosity from 1 to 3 to be calculated under shock-wave loading at pressures above 5 GPa in the one-velocity and one-temperature approximations, as well as on the assumption of equal pressures for all the phases. Computational results are compared with the well-known experimental results obtained by different authors. The model permits the shock-wave loading of solid and porous alloys with molybdenum in their composition to be described reliably solely by using species parameters.

  9. Equilibrium isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics studies of phenolic compounds adsorption on palm-tree fruit stones.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muthanna J; Theydan, Samar K

    2012-10-01

    Adsorption capacity of an agricultural waste, palm-tree fruit stones (date stones), for phenolic compounds such as phenol (Ph) and p-nitro phenol (PNPh) at different temperatures was investigated. The characteristics of such waste biomass were determined and found to have a surface area and iodine number of 495.71 m2/g and 475.88 mg/g, respectively. The effects of pH (2-12), adsorbent dose (0.6-0.8 g/L) and contact time (0-150 min) on the adsorptive removal process were studied. Maximum removal percentages of 89.95% and 92.11% were achieved for Ph and PNPh, respectively. Experimental equilibrium data for adsorption of both components were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin isotherm models. The results show that the best fit was achieved with the Langmuir isotherm equation with maximum adsorption capacities of 132.37 and 161.44 mg/g for Ph and PNPh, respectively. The kinetic data were fitted to pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models, and was found to follow closely the pseudo-second order model for both components. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, namely ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS showed that adsorption of Ph and PNPh was spontaneous and endothermic under examined conditions.

  10. Theoretical Aspects of Differential Scanning Calorimetry as a Tool for the Studies of Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Pharmaceutical Solid Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Faroongsarng, Damrongsak

    2016-06-01

    Although differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a non-equilibrium technique, it has been used to gain energetic information that involves phase equilibria. DSC has been widely used to characterize the equilibrium melting parameters of small organic pharmaceutical compounds. An understanding of how DSC measures an equilibrium event could make for a better interpretation of the results. The aim of this mini-review was to provide a theoretical insight into the DSC measurement to obtain the equilibrium thermodynamics of a phase transition especially the melting process. It was demonstrated that the heat quantity obtained from the DSC thermogram (ΔH) was related to the thermodynamic enthalpy of the phase transition (ΔH (P) ) via: ΔH = ΔH (P) /(1 + K (- 1)) where K was the equilibrium constant. In melting, the solid and liquefied phases presumably coexist resulting in a null Gibbs free energy that produces an infinitely larger K. Thus, ΔH could be interpreted as ΔH (P). Issues of DSC investigations on melting behavior of crystalline solids including polymorphism, degradation impurity due to heating in situ, and eutectic melting were discussed. In addition, DSC has been a tool for determination of the impurity based on an ideal solution of the melt that is one of the official methods used to establish the reference standard.

  11. Tables and charts of equilibrium thermodynamic properties of carbon dioxide for temperatures from 100 K to 25,000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1976-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic properties for pure carbon dioxide are presented in tabulated and graphical form for temperatures from 100 K to 25,000 K and pressures from 40 mN/sq m to 1 GN/sq m. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular weight ratio, specific heat at constant pressure, specific heat at constant volume, isentropic exponent, and species mole fractions.

  12. Adsorption Properties of Tetracycline onto Graphene Oxide: Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghadim, Ehsan Ezzatpour; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Soleimani, Gholamreza; Hosseini, Hadi; Kimiagar, Salimeh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticle is a high potential effective absorbent. Tetracycline (TC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic produced, indicated for use against many bacterial infections. In the present research, a systematic study of the adsorption and release process of tetracycline on GO was performed by varying pH, sorption time and temperature. The results of our studies showed that tetracycline strongly loads on the GO surface via π–π interaction and cation–π bonding. Investigation of TC adsorption kinetics showed that the equilibrium was reached within 15 min following the pseudo-second-order model with observed rate constants of k2 = 0.2742–0.5362 g/mg min (at different temperatures). The sorption data has interpreted by the Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption of 323 mg/g (298 K). The mean energy of adsorption was determined 1.83 kJ/mol (298 K) based on the Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) adsorption isotherm. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH°, ΔS° and ΔG° values for the adsorption were estimated which indicated the endothermic and spontaneous nature of the sorption process. The electrochemistry approved an ideal reaction for the adsorption under electrodic process. Simulation of GO and TC was done by LAMMPS. Force studies in z direction showed that tetracycline comes close to GO sheet by C8 direction. Then it goes far and turns and again comes close from amine group to the GO sheet. PMID:24302989

  13. Biosorption studies on waste cotton seed for cationic dyes sequestration: equilibrium and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivarajasekar, N.; Baskar, R.; Ragu, T.; Sarika, K.; Preethi, N.; Radhika, T.

    2016-01-01

    The immature Gossypium hirsutum seeds—an agricultural waste was converted into a novel adsorbent and its effectiveness for cationic dyes removal was discussed in this study. Characterization revealed that sulfuric acid activated waste Gossypium hirsutum seed (WGSAB) contains surface area 496 m2 g-1. The ability of WGSAB to adsorb basic red 2 (BR2) and basic violet 3 (BV3) from aqueous solutions has been studied. Batch adsorption studies were carried out at different initial dye concentrations (100-300 mg l-1), contact time (1-5 h), pH (2-12) and temperature (293-323 K) to understand the adsorption mechanism. Adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich and Toth adsorption isotherms. Equilibrium data of the adsorption process fitted very well to the Toth model for both dyes. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity was 66.69 mg g-1 for BV3 and 50.11 mg g-1 for BR2 at optimum conditions. The near unity value of Toth isotherm constant (BR2: 0.999 and BV3: 1.0) indicates that WGSAB surface is heterogeneous in nature. The maximum adsorption capacity predicted by Toth isotherm of BV3 (66.699 mg g-1) is higher than BR2 (50.310 mg g-1). The kinetic investigation revealed that the BR2 and BV3 were chemisorbed on WGSAB surface following Avrami fractional order kinetics. Further, the fractional order and rate constant values are almost similar for every concentration in both the dyes. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH 0, ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 were evaluated. The dye adsorption process was found to be spontaneous and endothermic for the two dyes. Regeneration of WGSAB exhausted by the two dyes could be possible via acetic acid as elutant.

  14. Thermodynamics and equilibrium structure of Ne38 cluster: quantum mechanics versus classical.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Cristian; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2005-04-15

    The equilibrium properties of classical Lennard-Jones (LJ38) versus quantum Ne38 Lennard-Jones clusters are investigated. The quantum simulations use both the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and the recently developed variational-Gaussian wave packet Monte Carlo (VGW-MC) methods. The PIMC and the classical MC simulations are implemented in the parallel tempering framework. The classical heat capacity Cv(T) curve agrees well with that of Neirotti et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 10340 (2000)], although a much larger confining sphere is used in the present work. The classical Cv(T) shows a peak at about 6 K, interpreted as a solid-liquid transition, and a shoulder at approximately 4 K, attributed to a solid-solid transition involving structures from the global octahedral (Oh) minimum and the main icosahedral (C5v) minimum. The VGW method is used to locate and characterize the low energy states of Ne38, which are then further refined by PIMC calculations. Unlike the classical case, the ground state of Ne38 is a liquidlike structure. Among the several liquidlike states with energies below the two symmetric states (Oh and C5v), the lowest two exhibit strong delocalization over basins associated with at least two classical local minima. Because the symmetric structures do not play an essential role in the thermodynamics of Ne38, the quantum heat capacity is a featureless curve indicative of the absence of any structural transformations. Good agreement between the two methods, VGW and PIMC, is obtained. The present results are also consistent with the predictions by Calvo et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 7312 (2001)] based on the quantum superposition method within the harmonic approximation. However, because of its approximate nature, the latter method leads to an incorrect assignment of the Ne38 ground state as well as to a significant underestimation of the heat capacity.

  15. Chromium Biosorption from Cr(VI) Aqueous Solutions by Cupressus lusitanica Bark: Kinetics, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Netzahuatl-Muñoz, Alma Rosa; Cristiani-Urbina, María del Carmen; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of chromium (Cr) ion biosorption from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by Cupressus lusitanica bark (CLB). CLB total Cr biosorption capacity strongly depended on operating variables such as initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time: as these variables rose, total Cr biosorption capacity increased significantly. Total Cr biosorption rate also increased with rising solution temperature. The pseudo-second-order model described the total Cr biosorption kinetic data best. Langmuir´s model fitted the experimental equilibrium biosorption data of total Cr best and predicted a maximum total Cr biosorption capacity of 305.4 mg g-1. Total Cr biosorption by CLB is an endothermic and non-spontaneous process as indicated by the thermodynamic parameters. Results from the present kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies suggest that CLB biosorbs Cr ions from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions predominantly by a chemical sorption phenomenon. Low cost, availability, renewable nature, and effective total Cr biosorption make CLB a highly attractive and efficient method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated water and wastewater. PMID:26352933

  16. Chromium Biosorption from Cr(VI) Aqueous Solutions by Cupressus lusitanica Bark: Kinetics, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Netzahuatl-Muñoz, Alma Rosa; Cristiani-Urbina, María del Carmen; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of chromium (Cr) ion biosorption from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by Cupressus lusitanica bark (CLB). CLB total Cr biosorption capacity strongly depended on operating variables such as initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time: as these variables rose, total Cr biosorption capacity increased significantly. Total Cr biosorption rate also increased with rising solution temperature. The pseudo-second-order model described the total Cr biosorption kinetic data best. Langmuir´s model fitted the experimental equilibrium biosorption data of total Cr best and predicted a maximum total Cr biosorption capacity of 305.4 mg g(-1). Total Cr biosorption by CLB is an endothermic and non-spontaneous process as indicated by the thermodynamic parameters. Results from the present kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies suggest that CLB biosorbs Cr ions from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions predominantly by a chemical sorption phenomenon. Low cost, availability, renewable nature, and effective total Cr biosorption make CLB a highly attractive and efficient method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated water and wastewater.

  17. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Dissolution Theory for Multi-Component Solid/Liquid Surfaces Involving Surface Adsorption and Radiolysis Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R B

    2001-04-01

    A theoretical expression is developed for the dissolution rate response for multi-component radioactive materials that have surface adsorption kinetics and radiolysis kinetics when wetted by a multi-component aqueous solution. An application for this type of dissolution response is the performance evaluation of multi-component spent nuclear fuels (SNFs) for long term interim storage and for geological disposition. Typically, SNF compositions depend on initial composition, uranium oxide and metal alloys being most common, and on reactor burnup which results in a wide range of fission product and actinide concentrations that decay by alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. These compositional/burnup ranges of SNFs, whether placed in interim storage or emplaced in a geologic repository, will potentially be wetted by multi-component aqueous solutions, and these solutions may be further altered by radiolytic aqueous species due to three radiation fields. The solid states of the SNFs are not thermodynamically stable when wetted and will dissolve, with or without radiolysis. The following development of a dissolution theory is based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of energy reactions and energy transport across a solid-liquid phase change discontinuity that propagates at a quasi-steady, dissolution velocity. The integral form of the energy balance equation is used for this spatial surface discontinuity analysis. The integral formulation contains internal energy functional of classical thermodynamics for both the SNFs' solid state and surface adsorption species, and the adjacent liquid state, which includes radiolytic chemical species. The steady-state concentrations of radiolytic chemical species are expressed by an approximate analysis of the decay radiation transport equation. For purposes of illustration a modified Temkin adsorption isotherm was assumed for the surface adsorption kinetics on an arbitrary, finite area of the solid-liquid dissolution interface. For

  18. Measurements and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of mid-Z plasma emission

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, L. Primout, M.; Kaiser, P.; Clouët, J. F.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.; Oudot, G.

    2015-12-15

    The x-ray yields from laser-irradiated thin foils of iron, copper, zinc, and germanium have been measured in the soft and multi-keV x-ray ranges at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The incident laser power had a pre-pulse to enhance the x-ray emission of a 1 ns flat-top main pulse. The experimental results have been compared with post-shot simulations performed with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code FCI2. A new non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model, NOO-RAD, have been incorporated into FCI2. In this approach, the plasma ionization state is in-line calculated by the atomic physics NOHEL package. In the soft x-ray bands, both simulations using RADIOM [M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] and NOO-RAD clearly over-predict the powers and energies measured by a broad-band spectrometer. In one case (the iron foil), the discrepancy between the measured and simulated x-ray output is nevertheless significantly reduced when NOO-RAD is used in the simulations. In the multi-keV x-ray bands, the simulations display a strong sensitivity to the coupling between the electron thermal conductivity and the NLTE models, and for some particular combinations of these, provide a close match to the measured emission. The comparison between the measured and simulated H-like to He-like line-intensity ratios deduced from high-resolution spectra indicates higher experimental electron temperatures were achieved, compared to the simulated ones. Measurements of the plasma conditions have been achieved using the Thomson-scattering diagnostic. The electron temperatures are found to range from 3 to 5 keV at the end of the laser pulse and are greater than predicted by the simulations. The measured flow velocities are in reasonable agreement with the calculated ones. This last finding gives us confidence in our numerical predictions for the plasma parameters, which are over that time mainly determined by hydrodynamics, such as the mass densities and

  19. Measurements and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of mid-Z plasma emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, L.; Primout, M.; Kaiser, P.; Clouët, J. F.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.; Oudot, G.

    2015-12-01

    The x-ray yields from laser-irradiated thin foils of iron, copper, zinc, and germanium have been measured in the soft and multi-keV x-ray ranges at the OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The incident laser power had a pre-pulse to enhance the x-ray emission of a 1 ns flat-top main pulse. The experimental results have been compared with post-shot simulations performed with the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code FCI2. A new non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model, NOO-RAD, have been incorporated into FCI2. In this approach, the plasma ionization state is in-line calculated by the atomic physics NOHEL package. In the soft x-ray bands, both simulations using RADIOM [M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] and NOO-RAD clearly over-predict the powers and energies measured by a broad-band spectrometer. In one case (the iron foil), the discrepancy between the measured and simulated x-ray output is nevertheless significantly reduced when NOO-RAD is used in the simulations. In the multi-keV x-ray bands, the simulations display a strong sensitivity to the coupling between the electron thermal conductivity and the NLTE models, and for some particular combinations of these, provide a close match to the measured emission. The comparison between the measured and simulated H-like to He-like line-intensity ratios deduced from high-resolution spectra indicates higher experimental electron temperatures were achieved, compared to the simulated ones. Measurements of the plasma conditions have been achieved using the Thomson-scattering diagnostic. The electron temperatures are found to range from 3 to 5 keV at the end of the laser pulse and are greater than predicted by the simulations. The measured flow velocities are in reasonable agreement with the calculated ones. This last finding gives us confidence in our numerical predictions for the plasma parameters, which are over that time mainly determined by hydrodynamics, such as the mass densities and the

  20. Continued development and testing of a new thermodynamic aerosol module for urban and regional air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenes, Athanasios; Pandis, Spyros N.; Pilinis, Christodoulos

    A computationally efficient and rigorous thermodynamic model (ISORROPIA) that predicts the physical state and composition of inorganic atmospheric aerosol is presented. The advantages of this particular model render it suitable for incorporation into urban and regional air quality models. The model is embodied into the UAM-AERO air quality model, and the performance is compared with two other thermodynamic modules currently in use, SEQUILIB 1.5 and SEQUILIB 2.1. The new model yields predictions that agree with experimental measurements and the results of the other models, but at the same time proves to be much faster and computationally efficient. Using ISORROPIA accelerates the thermodynamic calculations by more than a factor of six, while the overall speed-up of UAM-AERO is at least twofold. This speedup is possible by the optimal solution of the thermodynamic equations, and the usage of precalculated tables, whenever possible.

  1. Tables and charts of equilibrium thermodynamic properties of ammonia for temperatures from 500 to 50,000 K.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, A. L.; Miller, C. G., III; Nealy, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic properties for pure ammonia were generated for a range of temperature from 500 to 50,000 K and pressure from 0.01 to 40 MN/sq m and are presented in tabulated and graphical form. Properties include pressure, temperature, density, enthalpy, speed of sound, entropy, molecular-weight ratio, specific heat at constant pressure, specific heat at constant volume, isentropic exponent, and species mole fractions. These properties were calculated by the method which is based on minimization of the Gibbs free energy. The data presented herein are for an 18-species ammonia model. Heats of formation and spectroscopic constants used as input data are presented. Comparison of several thermodynamic properties calculated with the present program and a second computer code is performed for a range of pressure and for temperatures up to 30,000 K.

  2. Temperature lapse rates at restricted thermodynamic equilibrium. Part II: Saturated air and further discussions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnbom, Pehr

    2016-03-01

    In the first part of this work equilibrium temperature profiles in fluid columns with ideal gas or ideal liquid were obtained by numerically minimizing the column energy at constant entropy, equivalent to maximizing column entropy at constant energy. A minimum in internal plus potential energy for an isothermal temperature profile was obtained in line with Gibbs' classical equilibrium criterion. However, a minimum in internal energy alone for adiabatic temperature profiles was also obtained. This led to a hypothesis that the adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state, a type of state in fact discussed already by Gibbs. In this paper similar numerical results for a fluid column with saturated air suggest that also the saturated adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state. The proposed hypothesis is further discussed and amended based on the previous and the present numerical results and a theoretical analysis based on Gibbs' equilibrium theory.

  3. Computer codes for the evaluation of thermodynamic properties, transport properties, and equilibrium constants of an 11-species air model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Gupta, Roop N.

    1990-01-01

    The computer codes developed provide data to 30000 K for the thermodynamic and transport properties of individual species and reaction rates for the prominent reactions occurring in an 11-species nonequilibrium air model. These properties and the reaction-rate data are computed through the use of curve-fit relations which are functions of temperature (and number density for the equilibrium constant). The curve fits were made using the most accurate data believed available. A detailed review and discussion of the sources and accuracy of the curve-fitted data used herein are given in NASA RP 1232.

  4. Removal of ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine in aqueous solution onto natural clay: equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazri, Hassen; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Kalfat, Rafik; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the adsorption of three pharmaceuticals compounds (ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine) onto natural clay on the basis of equilibrium parameters such as a function of time, effect of pH, varying of the concentration and the temperature. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren's first-order and the pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. The kinetic results of adsorption are described better using the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm results were tested in the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that the adsorption of pharmaceuticals on the clay is a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  5. Investigation of thermodynamic equilibrium in laser-induced aluminum plasma using the Hα line profiles and Thomson scattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejić, M.; DzierŻega, K.; Pieta, T.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied isothermal equilibrium in the laser-induced plasma from aluminum pellets in argon at pressure of 200 mbar by using a method which combines the standard laser Thomson scattering and analysis of the Hα, Stark-broadened, line profiles. Plasma was created using 4.5 ns, 4 mJ pulses from a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. While electron density and temperature were determined from the electron feature of Thomson scattering spectra, the heavy particle temperature was obtained from the Hα full profile applying computer simulation including ion-dynamical effects. We have found strong imbalance between these two temperatures during entire plasma evolution which indicates its non-isothermal character. At the same time, according to the McWhirter criterion, the electron density was high enough to establish plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  6. Catalytic supercritical water gasification of primary paper sludge using a homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst: Experimental vs thermodynamic equilibrium results.

    PubMed

    Louw, Jeanne; Schwarz, Cara E; Burger, Andries J

    2016-02-01

    H2, CH4, CO and CO2 yields were measured during supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of primary paper waste sludge (PWS) at 450°C. Comparing these yields with calculated thermodynamic equilibrium values offer an improved understanding of conditions required to produce near-equilibrium yields. Experiments were conducted at different catalyst loads (0-1g/gPWS) and different reaction times (15-120min) in a batch reactor, using either K2CO3 or Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 as catalyst. K2CO3 up to 1g/gPWS increased the H2 yield significantly to 7.5mol/kgPWS. However, these yields and composition were far from equilibrium values, with carbon efficiency (CE) and energy recovery (ER) of only 29% and 20%, respectively. Addition of 0.5-1g/gPWS Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 resulted in high H2 and CH4 yields (6.8 and 14.8mol/kgPWS), CE of 84-90%, ER of 83% and a gas composition relatively close to the equilibrium values (at hold times of 60-120min).

  7. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to heavily underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model's low bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to

  8. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; ...

    2015-06-19

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AODmore » and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond

  9. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2015-06-19

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond

  10. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; ...

    2016-01-18

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to heavily underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model's low bias is due to aerosol extinctions below  ∼  2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over Southmore » Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to −0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and

  11. Molecular-Level Thermodynamic Switch Controls Chemical Equilibrium in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction of 35 Dipeptide Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Paul W.

    2003-01-01

    Applying the Planck-Benzinger methodology, the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions of 35 dipeptide pairs were examined over a temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. The hydrophobic interaction in these sequence-specific dipeptide pairs is highly similar in its thermodynamic behavior to that of other biological systems. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy change minimum at a well-defined stable temperature, 〈Ts〉, where the bound unavailable energy, TΔSo = 0, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions, are highly dependent on details of molecular structure. Each case confirms the existence of a thermodynamic molecular switch wherein a change of sign in ΔCpo(T)reaction (change in specific heat capacity of reaction at constant pressure) leads to true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, ΔGo(T)reaction, and hence a maximum in the related equilibrium constant, Keq. Indeed, all interacting biological systems examined to date by Chun using the Planck-Benzinger methodology have shown such a thermodynamic switch at the molecular level, suggesting its existence may be universal. PMID:12547816

  12. Partition functions. I. Improved partition functions and thermodynamic quantities for normal, equilibrium, and ortho and para molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovas, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the Universe. Its thermodynamic quantities dominate the physical conditions in molecular clouds, protoplanetary disks, etc. It is also of high interest in plasma physics. Therefore thermodynamic data for molecular hydrogen have to be as accurate as possible in a wide temperature range. Aims: We here rigorously show the shortcomings of various simplifications that are used to calculate the total internal partition function. These shortcomings can lead to errors of up to 40 percent or more in the estimated partition function. These errors carry on to calculations of thermodynamic quantities. Therefore a more complicated approach has to be taken. Methods: Seven possible simplifications of various complexity are described, together with advantages and disadvantages of direct summation of experimental values. These were compared to what we consider the most accurate and most complete treatment (case 8). Dunham coefficients were determined from experimental and theoretical energy levels of a number of electronically excited states of H2. Both equilibrium and normal hydrogen was taken into consideration. Results: Various shortcomings in existing calculations are demonstrated, and the reasons for them are explained. New partition functions for equilibrium, normal, and ortho and para hydrogen are calculated and thermodynamic quantities are reported for the temperature range 1-20 000 K. Our results are compared to previous estimates in the literature. The calculations are not limited to the ground electronic state, but include all bound and quasi-bound levels of excited electronic states. Dunham coefficients of these states of H2 are also reported. Conclusions: For most of the relevant astrophysical cases it is strongly advised to avoid using simplifications, such as a harmonic oscillator and rigid rotor or ad hoc summation limits of the eigenstates to estimate accurate partition functions and to be particularly careful when

  13. Secondary organic aerosol formation during June 2010 in Central Europe: measurements and modelling studies with a mixed thermodynamic-kinetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmann, B.; Sellegri, K.; Freney, E.

    2013-10-01

    Until recently secondary organic carbon (SOC) aerosol mass concentrations have been systematically underestimated by three-dimensional atmospheric-chemistry-aerosol models. With a newly proposed concept of aging of organic vapours more realistic model results for organic carbon aerosol mass concentrations could be achieved. Applying a mixed thermodynamic-kinetic approach for SOC aerosol formation shifted the aerosol size distribution towards particles in the cloud condensation nuclei size range, thereby emphasising the importance of SOC aerosol formation schemes for modelling realistic cloud and precipitation formation. The additional importance of hetero-molecular nucleation between H2SO4 and organic vapours remains to be evaluated in three-dimensional atmospheric-chemistry-aerosol models. Here a case study is presented focusing on Puy-de-Dôme, France in June 2010. Even though nucleation events at Puy-de-Dôme were rare during the chosen period of investigation a weak event in the boundary layer could be reproduced by the model when nucleation of low-volatile secondary organic vapour is included. Differences in the model results with and without nucleation of organic vapour are visible in the lower free troposphere over several days of the period. Taking into account nucleation of organic vapour leads to an increase in accumulation mode particles due to coagulation of nucleation and aitken mode particles. Moreover, the measurements indicate a considerable increase in SOC aerosol mass concentration during the measurement campaign, which could be reproduced by modelling using a simplified thermodynamic-kinetic approach for SOC aerosol formation and increased biogenic VOC precursor emissions. Comparison with a thermodynamic SOC aerosol formation approach shows a huge improvement in modelled SOC aerosol mass concentration with the thermodynamic-kinetic approach for SOC aerosol formation and a slight improvement of modelled particle size distribution.

  14. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit; Singh, Kuldip

    2014-03-15

    In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Zγ, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter θ(= T{sub e}/T{sub h}) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1 atm, 10 atm, and 100 atm in the temperature range from 6000 K to 60 000 K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Zγ with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter.

  15. Understanding of surface pit formation mechanism of GaN grown in MOCVD based on local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Yuan, Gao; Xiao-Wei, Xue; Jiang-Jiang, Li; Xun, Wang; Yan-Hui, Xing; Bi-Feng, Cui; De-Shu, Zou

    2016-06-01

    Frank’s theory describes that a screw dislocation will produce a pit on the surface, and has been evidenced in many material systems including GaN. However, the size of the pit calculated from the theory deviates significantly from experimental result. Through a careful observation of the variations of surface pits and local surface morphology with growing temperature and V/III ratio for c-plane GaN, we believe that Frank’s model is valid only in a small local surface area where thermodynamic equilibrium state can be assumed to stay the same. If the kinetic process is too vigorous or too slow to reach a balance, the local equilibrium range will be too small for the center and edge of the screw dislocation spiral to be kept in the same equilibrium state. When the curvature at the center of the dislocation core reaches the critical value 1/r 0, at the edge of the spiral, the accelerating rate of the curvature may not fall to zero, so the pit cannot reach a stationary shape and will keep enlarging under the control of minimization of surface energy to result in a large-sized surface pit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204009 and 61204011) and the Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 4142005).

  16. Consistency between kinetics and thermodynamics: general scaling conditions for reaction rates of nonlinear chemical systems without constraints far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Marcel O; Popa, Vlad T; Ross, John

    2011-02-03

    We examine the problem of consistency between the kinetic and thermodynamic descriptions of reaction networks. We focus on reaction networks with linearly dependent (but generally kinetically independent) reactions for which only some of the stoichiometric vectors attached to the different reactions are linearly independent. We show that for elementary reactions without constraints preventing the system from approaching equilibrium there are general scaling relations for nonequilibrium rates, one for each linearly dependent reaction. These scaling relations express the ratios of the forward and backward rates of the linearly dependent reactions in terms of products of the ratios of the forward and backward rates of the linearly independent reactions raised to different scaling powers; the scaling powers are elements of the transformation matrix, which relates the linearly dependent stoichiometric vectors to the linearly independent stoichiometric vectors. These relations are valid for any network of elementary reactions without constraints, linear or nonlinear kinetics, far from equilibrium or close to equilibrium. We show that similar scaling relations for the reaction routes exist for networks of nonelementary reactions described by the Horiuti-Temkin theory of reaction routes where the linear dependence of the mechanistic (elementary) reactions is transferred to the overall (route) reactions. However, in this case, the scaling conditions are valid only at the steady state. General relationships between reaction rates of the two levels of description are presented. These relationships are illustrated for a specific complex reaction: radical chlorination of ethylene.

  17. Generalized thermodynamic relations for a system experiencing heat and mass diffusion in the far-from-equilibrium realm based on steepest entropy ascent.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanchen; von Spakovsky, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a nonequilibrium thermodynamic model for the relaxation of a local, isolated system in nonequilibrium using the principle of steepest entropy ascent (SEA), which can be expressed as a variational principle in thermodynamic state space. The model is able to arrive at the Onsager relations for such a system. Since no assumption of local equilibrium is made, the conjugate fluxes and forces are intrinsic to the subspaces of the system's state space and are defined using the concepts of hypoequilibrium state and nonequilibrium intensive properties, which describe the nonmutual equilibrium status between subspaces of the thermodynamic state space. The Onsager relations are shown to be a thermodynamic kinematic feature of the system independent of the specific details of the micromechanical dynamics. Two kinds of relaxation processes are studied with different constraints (i.e., conservation laws) corresponding to heat and mass diffusion. Linear behavior in the near-equilibrium region as well as nonlinear behavior in the far-from-equilibrium region are discussed. Thermodynamic relations in the equilibrium and near-equilibrium realm, including the Gibbs relation, the Clausius inequality, and the Onsager relations, are generalized to the far-from-equilibrium realm. The variational principle in the space spanned by the intrinsic conjugate fluxes and forces is expressed via the quadratic dissipation potential. As an application, the model is applied to the heat and mass diffusion of a system represented by a single-particle ensemble, which can also be applied to a simple system of many particles. Phenomenological transport coefficients are also derived in the near-equilibrium realm.

  18. Thermodynamics of open nonlinear systems far from equilibrium: The continuously stirred tank reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Nobuo

    1993-11-01

    A thermodynamic analysis is made of a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) which is fed with ideal gases and in which arbitrary types of chemical reactions take place. For stationary states and oscillatory ones in which limit cycles are established, expressions are derived which describe the change of entropy of the reactor contents relative to the feed in terms of explicit quantities, including the rate of entropy production due to the chemical reactions. This entropy change is shown to be always greater than what would be observed in closed systems under comparable circumstances. It is pointed out that this statement is beyond what the second law of thermodynamics can predict. In previous articles, entropy and entropy production have been found to follow certain systematic trends in some specific models based on the CSTR. That work is compared with the present theory.

  19. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of hydrogen production from the combined processes of dimethyl ether steam reforming and partial oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelsberger, Troy A.; Borup, Rodney L.

    Thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the combined processes of dimethyl ether (DME) partial oxidation and steam reforming were investigated as a function of oxygen-to-carbon ratio (0.00-2.80), steam-to-carbon ratio (0.00-4.00), temperature (100 °C-600 °C), pressure (1-5 atm) and product species. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with air and steam generates hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds; however, the hydrogen concentration is less than that for pure DME steam reforming. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 °C, oxygen-to-carbon ratios greater than 0.00 and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure has negligible effects on the hydrogen content. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether can produce concentrations of hydrogen and carbon monoxide of 52% and 2.2%, respectively, at a temperature of 300 °C, and oxygen-to-carbon ratio of 0.40, a pressure of 1 atm and a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.50. The order of thermodynamically stable products (excluding H 2, CO, CO 2, DME, NH 3 and H 2O) in decreasing mole fraction is methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol and methyl-ethyl ether; trace amounts of formaldehyde, formic acid and methanol are observed. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide are also thermodynamically favored products. Ammonia is favored at low temperatures in the range of oxygen-to-carbon ratios of 0.40-2.50 regardless of the steam-to-carbon ratio employed. The maximum ammonia content (i.e., 40%) occurs at an oxygen-to-carbon ratio of 0.40, a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.00 and a temperature of 100 °C. Hydrogen cyanide is favored at high temperatures and low oxygen-to-carbon ratios with a maximum of 3.18% occurring at an oxygen-to-carbon ratio of 0.40 and a steam

  20. Investigation of oxidative phosphorylation in continuous cultures. A non-equilibrium thermodynamic approach to energy transduction for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafuri, Mohazabeh; Nosrati, Mohsen; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in living cells is very important. Different researches have shown that in terms of mathematical modeling, the domain of these investigations is essentially restricted. Recently the thermodynamic models have been suggested for calculation of the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation process and rate of energy loss in animal cells using chemiosmotic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics equations. In our previous work, we developed a mathematical model for mitochondria of animal cells. In this research, according to similarities between oxidative phosphorylation process in microorganisms and animal cells, Golfar's model was developed to predict the non-equilibrium thermodynamic behavior of the oxidative phosphorylation process for bacteria in aerobic condition. With this model the rate of energy loss, P/O ratio, and efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were calculated for Escherichia coli in aerobic condition. The results then were compared with experimental data given by other authors. The thermodynamic model had an acceptable agreement with the experimental data.

  1. The Phosphorus Reaction in Oxygen Steelmaking: Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Metal Droplet Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis, Andre N.

    Phosphorus equilibrium between liquid metal and slag has been extensively studied since the 1940's. It is well known that CaO and FeO are the main slag constituents that help promote dephosphorization. On the other hand, dephosphorization decreases with temperature due to the endothermic nature of the reaction. Many correlations have been developed to predict the phosphorus partition ratio as a function of metal and slag composition as well as temperature. Nevertheless, there are still disagreements in the laboratory data and the equilibrium phosphorus partition can be predicted with an uncertainty of a factor of up to 5. The first part of the present work focuses on generating more reliable equilibrium data for BOF-type slags by approaching equilibrium from both sides of the reaction. The experimental results were combined with two other sets of data from different authors to produce a new correlation that includes the effect of SiO2 on the phosphorus partition coefficient, LP . Although the quantification of phosphorus equilibrium is extremely important, most industrial furnaces do not operate at equilibrium, usually due to liquid slag formation, kinetics and time constraints. Thus, it is important to know how close to equilibrium different furnaces operate in order to suggest optimal slag compositions to promote dephosphorization. The present work analyzed four large sets of data containing the chemical compositions of both slag and metal phase as well as the tapping temperature of each heat. Each set of data corresponded to different furnaces: one AOD (Argon Oxygen Decarburization), two top-blown BOFs and one Q-BOP or OBM. It was found that the bulk slag composition can greatly "mask" the data due to solid phases coexisting with the liquid slag. The author used the software package FactSage to estimate the amount of solids in the slag and liquid slag composition. It was found that the AOD is the reactor closest to equilibrium, followed by the Q-BOP (OBM) and

  2. Thermodynamic modeling of solute adsorption equilibrium from near-critical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoning

    2004-05-15

    Modeling of adsorption equilibrium for supercritical fluid mixtures, with as few parameters as possible, is important in applications of the technology of supercritical fluid adsorption. In this paper, a correlative model has been developed to represent the adsorption equilibria of solutes from the near-critical CO(2) fluid. A two-dimensional van der Waals equation of state and the three-dimensional P - R equation of state were used to describe the adsorbed and bulk phases, respectively. This model contains five parameters for adsorption equilibrium isotherms at finite concentrations and two parameters for adsorption equilibrium constants at infinite dilution. All the parameters are independent of temperature and pressure. By applying the model to the experimental data from the literature, it was shown that this model is capable of describing the adsorption behavior of solutes from supercritical carbon dioxide over relatively wide temperature and pressure ranges. In addition, the adsorption behavior of supercritical fluid mixtures was investigated at finite and infinite dilution conditions.

  3. Equilibrium thermodynamic properties of interacting two-component bosons in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Klauser, Antoine; Caux, Jean-Sebastien

    2011-09-15

    The interplay of quantum statistics, interactions, and temperature is studied within the framework of the bosonic two-component theory with repulsive delta-function interaction in one dimension. We numerically solve the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and obtain the equation of state as a function of temperature and of the interaction strength, the relative chemical potential, and either the total chemical potential or a fixed number of particles, allowing quantification of the full crossover behavior of the system between its low-temperature ferromagnetic and high-temperature unpolarized regime, and from the low coupling decoherent regime to the fermionization regime at high interaction.

  4. Thermodynamic aspects of phase equilibrium in binary water-organic solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizerovskii, L. N.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that the boundary curves of liquid equilibria in binary systems characterize the temperature-concentration boundary of the existence of homogeneous mixtures whose formation is not accompanied by changes in the Gibbs energy of the system and are a combination of two branches that do not convert into each other but intersect at the temperature of homogenization of a mixture of critical composition. The phase diagrams of a number of water-organic solvent systems are analyzed to determine the thermodynamic particularities of the latter.

  5. Sorption equilibrium, mechanism and thermodynamics studies of 1,3-propanediol on beta zeolite from an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Wu, Zhe; Tan, Tianwei

    2013-10-01

    To identify the adsorption characteristics of 1,3-propanediol on beta zeolite, the effects of temperature, zeolite dose, and 1,3-propanediol concentration were studied through batch experiments. The results showed that the pseudo-second order model expressed the kinetic data better. The experimental and theoretical adsorption capacities were 116.2 and 119.0 mg/g at 293 K, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium data were observed to satisfy the Freundlich isotherm model. Based on the Boyd plot, intraparticle diffusion primarily governed the uptake process. Moreover, thermodynamic parameters, such as changes in standard free energy (ΔG(0)), standard enthalpy (ΔH(0)), and standard entropy, were estimated. The negative values of ΔG(0) and ΔH(0) (-9.4 kJ/mol) indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous, exothermic, and feasible. Finally, the activation energy derived from the Arrhenius equation suggested that the interaction mainly constitute physical adsorption.

  6. Evaluation of anthropogenic influence on thermodynamics, gas and aerosol composition of city air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzhegova, Nina; Belan, Boris; Antokhin, Pavel; Zhidovkhin, Evgenii; Ivlev, Georgii; Kozlov, Artem; Fofonov, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    In the last 40-50 years there is a global tendency of urbanisation, which is a consequence of most countries' economical development. Concurrently, the issue of environment's ecological state has become critical. Urban air pollution is among the most important ecological problems nowadays. World Health Organization (WHO) points out certain "classical" polluting agents: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), troposphere ozone (O3) (studied here), as well as lead, carbon dioxide (CO2), aldehydes, soot, benzpyrene and dredges (including dust, haze and smoke) [1]. An evaluation of antropogenic component's weight in the thermodynamical conditions and gas and aerosol composition of a city's atmosphere (by the example of Tomsk) is given in this paper. Tomsk is located at the South of West Siberia and is the administrative center of Tomsk region. The city's area is equal to 294,6 km2. Its population is 512.6 thousands of people. The overall number of registered motor vehicles in the city in 2008 was 131 700. That is, every fourth city inhabitant has a personal car. From 2002 to 2008 the number of motor vehicles in Tomsk has increased by 25 thousands units [2]. This increase consists mostly of passenger cars. There is also a positive trend in fuel consumtion by the city's industries and motor vehicles - from 2004 to 2007 it has increased by 10%. Such a quick rate of transport quantity's increase in the city provides reason to suggest an unfavorable ecological situation in Tomsk. For this study we have used the AKV-2 mobile station designed by the SB RAS Institute of Atmospheric Optics. The station's equipment provides the following measurements [3]: air temperature and humidity; aerosol disperse composition in 15 channels with a particle size range of 0.3-20 µm by use of the Grimm-1.108 aerosol spectrometer; NO, NO2, O3, SO2, CO, CO2 concentration. This paper describes a single experiment conducted in Tomsk. Date of

  7. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by native and activated bentonite: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Kul, Ali Riza; Koyuncu, Hülya

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of Pb(II) ions on native (NB) and acid activated (AAB) bentonites were examined. The specific surface areas, pore size and pore-size distributions of the samples were fully characterized. The adsorption efficiency of Pb(II) onto the NB and AAB was increased with increasing temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of Pb(II) ions was discussed using three kinetic models, the pseudo-first-order, the pseudo-second-order and the intra-particle diffusion model. The experimental data fitted very well the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The initial sorption rate and the activation energy were also calculated. The activation energy of the sorption was calculated as 16.51 and 13.66 kJ mol(-1) for NB and AAB, respectively. Experimental results were also analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich (D-R) isotherm equations at different temperatures. R(L) separation factor for Langmuir and the n value for Freundlich isotherm show that Pb(II) ions are favorably adsorbed by NB and AAB. Thermodynamic quantities such as Gibbs free energy (DeltaG), the enthalpy (DeltaH) and the entropy change of sorption (DeltaS) were determined as about -5.06, 10.29 and 0.017 kJ mol(-1) K(-1), respectively for AAB. It was shown that the sorption processes were an endothermic reactions, controlled by physical mechanisms and spontaneously.

  8. Stochastic dynamics and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a bistable chemical system: the Schlögl model revisited.

    PubMed

    Vellela, Melissa; Qian, Hong

    2009-10-06

    Schlögl's model is the canonical example of a chemical reaction system that exhibits bistability. Because the biological examples of bistability and switching behaviour are increasingly numerous, this paper presents an integrated deterministic, stochastic and thermodynamic analysis of the model. After a brief review of the deterministic and stochastic modelling frameworks, the concepts of chemical and mathematical detailed balances are discussed and non-equilibrium conditions are shown to be necessary for bistability. Thermodynamic quantities such as the flux, chemical potential and entropy production rate are defined and compared across the two models. In the bistable region, the stochastic model exhibits an exchange of the global stability between the two stable states under changes in the pump parameters and volume size. The stochastic entropy production rate shows a sharp transition that mirrors this exchange. A new hybrid model that includes continuous diffusion and discrete jumps is suggested to deal with the multiscale dynamics of the bistable system. Accurate approximations of the exponentially small eigenvalue associated with the time scale of this switching and the full time-dependent solution are calculated using Matlab. A breakdown of previously known asymptotic approximations on small volume scales is observed through comparison with these and Monte Carlo results. Finally, in the appendix section is an illustration of how the diffusion approximation of the chemical master equation can fail to represent correctly the mesoscopically interesting steady-state behaviour of the system.

  9. Insight into biosorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of crystal violet onto Ananas comosus (pineapple) leaf powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sagnik; Chowdhury, Shamik; Saha, Papita Das

    2012-06-01

    Biosorption performance of pineapple leaf powder (PLP) for removal of crystal violet (CV) from its aqueous solutions was investigated. To this end, the influence of operational parameters such as pH, biosorbent dose, initial dye concentration and temperature were studied employing a batch experimental setup. The biosorption process followed the Langmuir isotherm model with high correlation coefficients ( R 2 > 0.99) at different temperatures. The maximum monolayer biosorption capacity was found to be 78.22 mg g-1 at 293 K. The kinetic data conformed to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 58.96 kJ mol- 1 , indicating chemisorption nature of the ongoing biosorption process. A thermodynamic study showed spontaneous and exothermic nature of the biosorption process. Owing to its low cost and high dye uptake capacity, PLP has potential for application as biosorbent for removal of CV from aqueous solutions.

  10. General method and thermodynamic tables for computation of equilibrium composition and temperature of chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Vearl N; Gordon, Sanford; Morrell, Virginia E

    1951-01-01

    A rapidly convergent successive approximation process is described that simultaneously determines both composition and temperature resulting from a chemical reaction. This method is suitable for use with any set of reactants over the complete range of mixture ratios as long as the products of reaction are ideal gases. An approximate treatment of limited amounts of liquids and solids is also included. This method is particularly suited to problems having a large number of products of reaction and to problems that require determination of such properties as specific heat or velocity of sound of a dissociating mixture. The method presented is applicable to a wide variety of problems that include (1) combustion at constant pressure or volume; and (2) isentropic expansion to an assigned pressure, temperature, or Mach number. Tables of thermodynamic functions needed with this method are included for 42 substances for convenience in numerical computations.

  11. NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON THE IRON ABUNDANCE OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Massari, D.

    2014-12-20

    We present the iron abundance of 24 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, members of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, obtained with high-resolution spectra collected with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope. We find that the iron abundances derived from neutral lines (with a mean value [Fe I/H] =–0.94 ± 0.01, σ = 0.08 dex) are systematically lower than those derived from single ionized lines ([Fe II/H] =–0.83 ± 0.01, σ = 0.05 dex). Only the latter are in agreement with those obtained for a sample of red giant branch (RGB) cluster stars, for which the Fe I and Fe II lines provide the same iron abundance. This finding suggests that non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects driven by overionization mechanisms are present in the atmosphere of AGB stars and significantly affect the Fe I lines while leaving Fe II features unaltered. On the other hand, the very good ionization equilibrium found for RGB stars indicates that these NLTE effects may depend on the evolutionary stage. We discuss the impact of this finding on both the chemical analysis of AGB stars and on the search for evolved blue stragglers.

  12. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC employing thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at moderate temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G.; Hallén, A.

    2015-12-21

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a major point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers limiting the minority charge carrier lifetime. In layers grown by chemical vapor deposition techniques, the V{sub C} concentration is typically in the range of 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −3}, and after device processing at temperatures approaching 2000 °C, it can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude. In the present study, both as-grown layers and a high-temperature processed one have been annealed at 1500 °C and the V{sub C} concentration is demonstrated to be strongly reduced, exhibiting a value of only a few times 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −3} as determined by deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements. The value is reached already after annealing times on the order of 1 h and is evidenced to reflect thermodynamic equilibrium under C-rich ambient conditions. The physical processes controlling the kinetics for establishment of the V{sub C} equilibrium are estimated to have an activation energy below ∼3 eV and both in-diffusion of carbon interstitials and out-diffusion of V{sub C}'s are discussed as candidates. This concept of V{sub C} elimination is flexible and readily integrated in a materials and device processing sequence.

  13. Insights into the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamics of nickel removal by environmental friendly Lansium domesticum peel biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yun Fung; Lee, Lai Yee; Chua, Song Jun; Lim, Siew Shee; Gan, Suyin

    2016-05-01

    Lansium domesticum peel (LDP), a waste material generated from the fruit consumption, was evaluated as a biosorbent for nickel removal from aqueous media. The effects of dosage, contact time, initial pH, initial concentration and temperature on the biosorption process were investigated in batch experiments. Equilibrium data were fitted by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models using nonlinear regression method with the best-fit model evaluated based on coefficient of determination (R(2)) and Chi-square (χ(2)). The best-fit isotherm was found to be the Langmuir model exhibiting R(2) very close to unity (0.997-0.999), smallest χ(2) (0.0138-0.0562) and largest biosorption capacity (10.1mg/g) at 30°C. Kinetic studies showed that the initial nickel removal was rapid with the equilibrium state established within 30min. Pseudo-second-order model was the best-fit kinetic model indicating the chemisorption nature of the biosorption process. Further data analysis by the intraparticle diffusion model revealed the involvement of several rate-controlling steps such as boundary layer and intraparticle diffusion. Thermodynamically, the process was exothermic, spontaneous and feasible. Regeneration studies indicated that LDP biosorbent could be regenerated using hydrochloric acid solution with up to 85% efficiency. The present investigation proved that LDP having no economic value can be used as an alternative eco-friendly biosorbent for remediation of nickel contaminated water.

  14. Adsorptive removal of acrylonitrile by commercial grade activated carbon: kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Prasad, B; Mishra, I M

    2008-04-01

    The potential of activated carbons--powdered (PAC) and granular (GAC), for the adsorption of acrylonitrile (AN) at different initial AN concentrations (50equilibrium isotherm data of AN adsorption on PAC and GAC, respectively. Error analysis also confirmed the efficacy of the R-P isotherm to best fit the experimental data. The pseudo-second order kinetic model best represents the kinetics of the adsorption of AN onto PAC and GAC. Maximum adsorption capacity of PAC and GAC at optimum conditions of AN removal (adsorbent dose approximately 20 g/l of solution, and equilibrium time approximately 5 h) was found to be 51.72 and 46.63 mg/g, respectively.

  15. Polymers pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore.

    PubMed

    Podgornik, R; Hopkins, J; Parsegian, V A; Muthukumar, M

    2012-11-13

    We investigate polymer partitioning from polymer mixtures into nanometer size cavities by formulating an equation of state for a binary polymer mixture assuming that only one (smaller) of the two polymer components can penetrate the cavity. Deriving the partitioning equilibrium equations and solving them numerically allows us to introduce the concept of "polymers-pushing-polymers" for the action of non-penetrating polymers on the partitioning of the penetrating polymers. Polymer partitioning into a pore even within a very simple model of a binary polymer mixture is shown to depend in a complicated way on the composition of the polymer mixture and/or the pore-penetration penalty. This can lead to enhanced as well as diminished partitioning, due to two separate energy scales that we analyse in detail.

  16. Thermodynamics of the general diffusion process: Equilibrium supercurrent and nonequilibrium driven circulation with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, H.

    2015-07-01

    Unbalanced probability circulation, which yields cyclic motions in phase space, is the defining characteristics of a stationary diffusion process without detailed balance. In over-damped soft matter systems, such behavior is a hallmark of the presence of a sustained external driving force accompanied with dissipations. In an under-damped and strongly correlated system, however, cyclic motions are often the consequences of a conservative dynamics. In the present paper, we give a novel interpretation of a class of diffusion processes with stationary circulation in terms of a Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium in which cyclic motions are on the level set of stationary probability density function thus non-dissipative, e.g., a supercurrent. This implies an orthogonality between stationary circulation J ss ( x) and the gradient of stationary probability density f ss ( x) > 0. A sufficient and necessary condition for the orthogonality is a decomposition of the drift b( x) = j( x) + D( x)∇φ( x) where ∇ṡ j( x) = 0 and j( x) ṡ∇φ( x) = 0. Stationary processes with such Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium has an underlying conservative dynamics , and a first integral ϕ( x) ≡ -ln f ss (x) = const, akin to a Hamiltonian system. At all time, an instantaneous free energy balance equation exists for a given diffusion system; and an extended energy conservation law among an entire family of diffusion processes with different parameter α can be established via a Helmholtz theorem. For the general diffusion process without the orthogonality, a nonequilibrium cycle emerges, which consists of external driven φ-ascending steps and spontaneous φ-descending movements, alternated with iso-φ motions. The theory presented here provides a rich mathematical narrative for complex mesoscopic dynamics, with contradistinction to an earlier one [H. Qian et al., J. Stat. Phys. 107, 1129 (2002)]. This article is supplemented with comments by H. Ouerdane and a final reply by the author.

  17. Physical Properties Models for Simulation of Processes to Treat INEEL Tank Farm Waste: Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.

    2002-07-18

    A status is presented of the development during FY2002 of a database for physical properties models for the simulation of the treatment of Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. An activity coefficient model is needed for concentrated, aqueous, multi-electrolyte solutions that can be used by process design practitioners. Reasonable first-order estimates of activity coefficients in the relevant media are needed rather than an incremental improvement in theoretical approaches which are not usable by practitioners. A comparison of the Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (ENRTL) and Pitzer ion-interaction models for the thermodynamic representation of SBW is presented. It is concluded that Pitzer's model is superior to ENRTL in modeling treatment processes for SBW. The applicability of the Pitzer treatment to high concentrations of pertinent species and to the determination of solubilities and chemical equilibria is addressed. Alternate values of Pitzer parameters for HCl, H2SO4, and HNO3 are proposed, applicable up to 16m, and 12m, respectively. Partial validation of the implementation of Pitzer's treatment within the commercial process simulator ASPEN Plus was performed.

  18. Biosorption of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions: kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics and desorption studies.

    PubMed

    Singha, Biswajit; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2011-05-01

    Cr(VI) is a major water pollutant from industrial effluent whose concentration is to be reduced within the permissible limit. Present study reports a systematic evaluation of six different natural adsorbents for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions in batch process. The adsorption kinetic data were best described by pseudo-second order model. The values of mass transfer coefficient for Cr(VI) adsorption indicated that the velocity of the adsorbate transport from the bulk to the solid phase was quite fast. The effective diffusivity of Cr(VI) removal for all the adsorbents were of the order of 10(-10) m(2)/s which suggested chemisorption of the process. The adsorption process was jointly controlled by film diffusion and intraparticle diffusion. Maximum monolayer adsorption capacities onto the natural adsorbents used were comparable to the other natural adsorbents used by other researchers. The thermodynamic studies and sorption energy calculation using Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm model indicated that the adsorption processes were endothermic and chemical in nature. FT-IR studies were carried out to understand the type of functional groups responsible for Cr(VI) binding process. Desorption study was carried out with different concentration of NaOH solutions. Application study was carried out using electroplating industrial wastewater.

  19. Efficient removal of cadmium using magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotube nanoadsorbents: equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashai Gatabi, Maliheh; Milani Moghaddam, Hossain; Ghorbani, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    Adsorptive potential of maghemite decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for the removal of cadmium ions from aqueous solution was investigated. The magnetic nanoadsorbent was synthesized using a versatile and cost effective chemical route. Structural, magnetic and surface charge properties of the adsorbent were characterized using FTIR, XRD, TEM, VSM analysis and pHPZC determination. Batch adsorption experiments were performed under varied system parameters such as pH, contact time, initial cadmium concentration and temperature. Highest cadmium adsorption was obtained at pH 8.0 and contact time of 30 min. Adsorption behavior was kinetically studied using pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order, and Weber-Morris intra particle diffusion models among which data were mostly correlated to pseudo second-order model. Adsorbate-adsorbent interactions as a function of temperature was assessed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Temkin isotherm models from which Freundlich model had the highest consistency with the data. The adsorption capacity increased with increasing temperature and maximum Langmuir's adsorption capacity was found to be 78.81 mg g-1 at 298 K. Thermodynamic parameters and activation energy value suggest that the process of cadmium removal was spontaneous and physical in nature, which lead to fast kinetics and high regeneration capability of the nanoadsorbent. Results of this work are of great significance for environmental applications of magnetic MWCNTs as promising adsorbent for heavy metals removal from aqueous solutions.

  20. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of mercury adsorption on almond shell.

    PubMed

    Khaloo, Shokooh Sadat; Matin, Amir Hossein; Sharifi, Sahar; Fadaeinia, Masoumeh; Kazempour, Narges; Mirzadeh, Shaghayegh

    2012-01-01

    The application of almond shell as a low cost natural adsorbent to remove Hg(2+) from aqueous solution was investigated. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the adsorption capacity of the material. The chemical and physical parameters such as pH, sorbent amount, initial ion concentration, and contact time were optimized for the maximum uptake of mercury onto the solid surface. Adsorption isotherms were expressed by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models, and the experimental data were found to fit the Langmuir model rather than the Freundlich. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir isotherm was 135.13 mg/g. A kinetic study was carried out with pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order reaction equations and it was found that the Hg(2+) uptake process followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression. The thermodynamic values, ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0), indicated that adsorption was an endothermic and spontaneous process. The potential of this material for mercury elimination was demonstrated by efficient Hg(2+) removal from a synthetic effluent.

  1. Dependence of calculated postshock thermodynamic variables on vibrational equilibrium and input uncertainty

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Matthew Frederick; Owen, Kyle G.; Davidson, David F.; ...

    2017-01-30

    The purpose of this article is to explore the dependence of calculated postshock thermodynamic properties in shock tube experiments upon the vibrational state of the test gas and upon the uncertainties inherent to calculation inputs. This paper first offers a comparison between state variables calculated according to a Rankine–Hugoniot–equation-based algorithm, known as FROSH, and those derived from shock tube experiments on vibrationally nonequilibrated gases. It is shown that incorrect vibrational relaxation assumptions could lead to errors in temperature as large as 8% for 25% oxygen/argon mixtures at 3500 K. Following this demonstration, this article employs the algorithm to show themore » importance of correct vibrational equilibration assumptions, noting, for instance, that errors in temperature of up to about 2% at 3500 K may be generated for 10% nitrogen/argon mixtures if vibrational relaxation is not treated properly. Lastly, this article presents an extensive uncertainty analysis, showing that postshock temperatures can be calculated with root-of-sum-of-square errors of better than ±1% given sufficiently accurate experimentally measured input parameters.« less

  2. Physical Properties Models for Simulation of Processes to Treat INEEL Tank Farm Waste: Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton

    2002-07-01

    A status is presented of the development during FY2002 of a database for physical properties models for the simulation of the treatment of Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. An activity coefficient model is needed for concentrated, aqueous, multi-electrolyte solutions that can be used by process design practitioners. Reasonable first-order estimates of activity coefficients in the relevant media are needed rather than an incremental improvement in theoretical approaches which are not usable by practitioners. A comparison of the Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (ENRTL) and Pitzer ion-interaction models for the thermodynamic representation of SBW is presented. It is concluded that Pitzer's model is superior to ENRTL in modeling treatment processes for SBW. The applicability of the Pitzer treatment to high concentrations of pertinent species and to the determination of solubilities and chemical equilibria is addressed. Alternate values of Pitzer parameters for HCl, H2SO4, and HNO3 are proposed, applicable up to 16m, and 12m, respectively. Partial validation of the implementation of Pitzer's treatment within the commercial process simulator ASPEN Plus was performed.

  3. Adsorption equilibrium and thermodynamics of CO2 and CH4 on carbon molecular sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xue; Wang, Li'ao; Ma, Xu; Zeng, Yunmin

    2017-02-01

    Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) are widely used in the separation of dioxide carbon and methane. In this research, three commercial CMS were utilized to analyze the pore structure and chemical properties. The adsorption isotherms of CO2 and CH4 were studied at 298 K, 308 K and 318 K over the pressure range of 0-1 MPa by an Intelligent Gravimetric analysis (IGA-100B, UK). Langmuir model was adopted to fit the experimental data. The working capacity and selectivity were employed to evaluate the adsorbents. The adsorption thermodynamics were discussed. The adsorbed amounts of both CO2 and CH4 are found to be highly related with the BET specific surface area and the volume of micropores, and also are interrelated with the total pore volume and micropore surface area. The standard enthalpy change (ΔHΘ), standard Gibbs free energy (ΔGΘ) and standard entropy change (ΔSΘ) at zero surface loading are negative, manifesting the adsorption process is exothermic and spontaneous, and the system tends to be ordered. With the increasing surface coverage, the absolute values of Gibbs free energy (ΔG) decrease whereas the absolute values of enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change(ΔS) increase. This indicates that as the adsorbed amount increases, the degree of the spontaneity reduces, the intermolecular forces among the adsorbate molecules increase, the orderliness of the system improves and the adsorbed amount approaches the maximum adsorbed capacity.

  4. Arsenic (III) adsorption on iron acetate coated activated alumina: thermodynamic, kinetics and equilibrium approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption potential of iron acetate coated activated alumina (IACAA) for removal of arsenic [As (III)] as arsenite by batch sorption technique is described. IACAA was characterized by XRD, FTIR, EDAX and SEM instruments. Percentage adsorption on IACAA was determined as a function of pH, contact time and adsorbent dose. The study revealed that the removal of As (III) was best achieved at pH =7.4. The initial As (III) concentration (0.45 mg/L) came down to less than 0.01 mg/L at contact time 90 min with adsorbent dose of 1 g/100 mL. The sorption was reasonably explained with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and E a were calculated in order to understand the nature of sorption process. The sorption process was found to be controlled by pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. PMID:24359995

  5. Equilibrium size of atmospheric aerosol sulfates as a function of the relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutrakis, Petros; Wolfson, Jack M.; Spengler, John D.; Stern, Bonnie; Franklin, Claire A.

    1989-05-01

    Size-fractionated acid aerosols were collected, using a microorifice cascade impactor, during the summer of 1986 in Dunnville, Ontario, as part of the Canadian Children Acute Respiratory Effects Study (CARES), sponsored by the Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada. Sulfate and hydrogen ions showed similar size distributions. The molar ratio of H+/SO42- varied little with particle size, but there was a considerable time-dependent variation in aerosol acid content. It was also found that there is a distinct relationship between the geometric mean aerodynamic diameter of sulfate, da, and ambient relative humidity (RH). Atmospheric sulfate particle sizes observed in this study were slightly higher than those found in laboratory experiments at corresponding humidities. However, considering the uncertainties involved, the agreement between the field and laboratory data was remarkable.

  6. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of thiol/disulfide redox systems: A perspective on redox systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Melissa; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of redox elements in biologic systems remains a major challenge for redox signaling and oxidative stress research. Central redox elements include evolutionarily conserved subsets of cysteines and methionines of proteins which function as sulfur switches and labile reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which function in redox signaling. The sulfur switches depend upon redox environments in which rates of oxidation are balanced with rates of reduction through the thioredoxins, glutathione/glutathione disulfide and cysteine/cystine redox couples. These central couples, which we term redox control nodes, are maintained at stable but non-equilibrium steady states, are largely independently regulated in different subcellular compartments and are quasi-independent from each other within compartments. Disruption of the redox control nodes can differentially affect sulfur switches, thereby creating a diversity of oxidative stress responses. Systems biology provides approaches to address the complexity of these responses. In the present review, we summarize thiol/disulfide pathway, redox potential and rate information as a basis for kinetic modeling of sulfur switches. The summary identifies gaps in knowledge especially related to redox communication between compartments, definition of redox pathways and discrimination between types of sulfur switches. A formulation for kinetic modeling of GSH/GSSG redox control indicates that systems biology could encourage novel therapeutic approaches to protect against oxidative stress by identifying specific redox-sensitive sites which could be targeted for intervention. PMID:18155672

  7. Comments on the compatibility of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with lattice propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfora, Fabrizio; Giacomini, Alex; Pais, Pablo; Rosa, Luigi; Zerwekh, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the compatibility is analyzed of the non-perturbative equations of state of quarks and gluons arising from the lattice with some natural requirements for self-gravitating objects at equilibrium: the existence of an equation of state (namely, the possibility to define the pressure as a function of the energy density), the absence of superluminal propagation and Le Chatelier's principle. It is discussed under which conditions it is possible to extract an equation of state (in the above sense) from the non-perturbative propagators arising from the fits of the latest lattice data. In the quark case, there is a small but non-vanishing range of temperatures in which it is not possible to define a single-valued functional relation between density and pressure. Interestingly enough, a small change of the parameters appearing in the fit of the lattice quark propagator (of around 10 %) could guarantee the fulfillment of all the three conditions (keeping alive, at the same time, the violation of positivity of the spectral representation, which is the expected signal of confinement). As far as gluons are concerned, the analysis shows very similar results. Whether or not the non-perturbative quark and gluon propagators satisfy these conditions can have a strong impact on the estimate of the maximal mass of quark stars.

  8. Contribution of the entropy on the thermodynamic equilibrium of vacancies in nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Metsue, Arnaud Oudriss, Abdelali; Bouhattate, Jamaa; Feaugas, Xavier

    2014-03-14

    The equilibrium vacancy concentration in nickel was determined from ab initio calculations performed with both generalized gradient approximation and local density approximation up to the melting point. We focus the study on the vacancy formation entropy expressed as a sum of a vibration and an electronic contribution, which were determined from the vibration modes and the electronic densities of states. Applying a method based on the quasi-harmonic approximation, the temperature dependence of the defect formation energy and entropy were calculated. We show that the vibrations of the first shell of atoms around the defect are predominant to the vibration formation entropy. On the other hand, the electronic formation entropy is very sensitive to the exchange-correlation potential used for the calculations. Finally, the vacancy concentration is computed at finite temperature with the calculated values for the defect formation energy and entropy. In order to reconcile point-defects concentration obtained with our calculations and experimental data, we conducted complementary calorimetric measurements of the vacancy concentration in the 1073–1273 K temperature range. Close agreement between theory and experiments at high temperature is achieved if the calculations are performed with the generalized gradient approximation and both vibration and electronic contributions to the formation entropy are taken into account.

  9. Superconfiguration accounting approach versus average-atom model in local-thermodynamic-equilibrium highly ionized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Faussurier, G

    1999-06-01

    Statistical methods of describing and simulating complex ionized plasmas requires the development of reliable and computationally tractable models. In that spirit, we propose the screened-hydrogenic average atom, augmented with corrections resulting from fluctuations of the occupation probabilities around the mean-field equilibrium, as an approximation to calculate the grand potential and related statistical properties. Our main objective is to check the validity of this approach by comparing its predictions with those given by the superconfiguration accounting method. The latter is well-suited to this purpose. In effect, this method makes it possible to go beyond the mean-field model by using nonperturbative, analytic, and systematic techniques. Besides, it allows us to establish the relationship between the detailed configuration accounting and the average-atom methods. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the superconfiguration description has been used in this context. Finally, this study is also the occasion for presenting a powerful technique from analytic number theory to calculate superconfiguration averaged quantities.

  10. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of acid Orange 52 dye biosorption by Paulownia tomentosa Steud. leaf powder as a low-cost natural biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Fatih; Saygideger, Saadet D

    2010-07-01

    The biosorption of Acid Orange 52 onto the leaf powder of Paulownia tomentosa Steud. was studied in a batch adsorption system to estimate the equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as a function of solution pH, biosorbent concentration, dye concentration, biosorbent size, temperature and contact time. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used for modeling the biosorption equilibrium. The experimental equilibrium data could be well interpreted by the Temkin and Langmuir isotherms with maximum adsorption capacity of 10.5 mg g(-1). In order to state the sorption kinetics, the fits of pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were investigated. It was obtained that the biosorption process followed the pseudo-second order rate kinetics. Thermodynamic studies indicated that this system was exothermic process. The results revealed that P. tomentosa leaf powder could be an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of wastewater containing Acid Orange 52.

  11. The lofting of Western Pacific regional aerosol by island thermodynamics as observed around Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, N. H.; Allan, J. D.; Trembath, J. A.; Rosenberg, P. D.; Allen, G.; Coe, H.

    2012-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol chemical composition, number concentration and size were measured throughout the lower troposphere of Borneo, a large tropical island in the western Pacific Ocean. Aerosol composition, size and number concentration measurements (using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe and Condensation Particle Counter, respectively) were made both upwind and downwind of Borneo, as well as over the island itself, on board the UK BAe-146 research aircraft as part of the OP3 project. Two meteorological regimes were identified - one dominated by isolated terrestrial convection (ITC) which peaked in the afternoon, and the other characterised by more regionally active mesoscale convective systems (MCS). Upwind profiles show aerosol to be confined to a shallow marine boundary layer below 930 ± 10 hPa (~760 m above sea level, a.s.l.). As this air mass advects over the island with the mean free troposphere synoptic flow during the ITC-dominated regime, it is convectively lofted above the terrestrial surface mixed layer to heights of between 945 ± 22 (~630 m a.s.l.) and 740 ± 44 hPa (~2740 m a.s.l.), consistent with a coupling between the synoptic steering level flow and island sea breeze circulations. Terrestrial aerosol was observed to be lofted into this higher layer through both moist convective uplift and transport through turbulent diurnal sea-breeze cells. At the peak of convective activity in the mid-afternoons, organic aerosol loadings in the lofted layer were observed to be substantially higher than in the morning (by a mean factor of three). This organic matter is dominated by secondary aerosol from processing of biogenic gas phase precursors. Aerosol number concentration profiles suggest formation of new particles aloft in the atmosphere. By the time the air mass reaches the west coast of the island, terrestrial aerosol is enhanced in the lofted layer. Such uplift of aerosol in Borneo is expected to

  12. Why Does the Human Body Maintain a Constant 37-Degree Temperature?: Thermodynamic Switch Controls Chemical Equilibrium in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    Applying the Planck-Benzinger methodology to biological systems, we have established that the negative Gibbs free energy minimum at a well-defined stable temperature, langTSrang, where the bound unavailable energy TΔS° = 0, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions. Each such system we have examined confirms the existence of a thermodynamic molecular switch wherein a change of sign in [ΔCp°]reaction leads to a true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, and hence a maximum in the related equilibrium constant, Keq. At this temperature, langTSrang, where ΔH°(TS)(-) = ΔG°(TS)(-)min, the maximum work can be accomplished in transpiration, digestion, reproduction or locomotion. In the human body, this temperature is 37°C. The langTSrang values may vary from one living organism to another, but the fact that the value of TΔS°(T) = 0 will not. There is a lower cutoff point, langThrang, where enthalpy is unfavorable but entropy is favorable, i.e. ΔH°(Th)(+) = TΔS°(Th)(+), and an upper limit, langTmrang, above which enthalpy is favorable but entropy is unfavorable, i.e. ΔH°(Tm)(-) = TΔS°(Tm)(-). Only between these two temperature limits, where ΔG°(T) = 0, is the net chemical driving force favorable for such biological processes as protein folding, protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid or protein-membrane interactions, and protein self-assembly. All interacting biological systems examined using the Planck-Benzinger methodology have shown such a thermodynamic switch at the molecular level, suggesting that its existence may be universal.

  13. EQAIRS - COMPUTER CODES FOR THE EVALUATION OF THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES FOR EQUILIBRIUM AIR TO 30000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    EQAIRS is a set of FORTRAN 77 routines for computing the thermodynamic and transport properties of equilibrium air for temperatures from 100 to 30000 K. EQAIRS computes these properties over a pressure range of 1.0e-4 to 1.0e2 atm. The properties computed include enthalpy, total specific heat, compressibility factor, viscosity, and the total values of thermal conductivity and Prandtl number. The various properties are calculated through the use of temperature dependent curve-fits for the pressure range given above. The curve fits are based on mixture values calculated from an 11-species air model. Individual species properties used in the mixture relations were obtained from a recent study by the program authors. It is desirable to have these equilibrium air properties computed by curve-fits as opposed to tabulated values because curve-fits generally permit more efficient computation for flow-field analyses. In addition, for accurate calculations, it is preferable that the thermodynamic and transport properties be computed in a self-consistent manner from the same set of data as in the present case. The EQAIRS routines were written in the form of FORTRAN subroutines for easy adaptation to existing programs. The subroutines are commented and can be easily modified to suit the user's needs. In an attempt to maintain generality, a total of six separate subroutines are available for use: 1) ENTHLPY (specific enthalpy); 2) SPECIFC (total specific heat at constant pressure); 3) COMPRES (compressibility factor); 4) VISCSTY (viscosity); 5) CONDUCT (total thermal conductivity; and 6) PRANDTL (total Prandtl number). EQAIRS has been successfully implemented on a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS, and an IBM PC compatible computer running MS-DOS. Sample input/output and a sample driver program are provided. The standard distribution medium for EQAIRS is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. This program is also available on a .25

  14. A study of diurnal variations of PM2.5 acidity and related chemical species using a new thermodynamic equilibrium model.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sailesh N; Betha, Raghu; Liu, Ping; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol acidity is one of the most important parameters that can influence atmospheric visibility, climate change and human health. Based on continuous field measurements of inorganic aerosol species and their thermodynamic modeling on a time resolution of 1h, this study has investigated the acidic properties of PM2.5 and their relation with the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA). The study was conducted by taking into account the prevailing ambient temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) in a tropical urban atmosphere. The in-situ aerosol pH (pH(IS)) on a 12h basis ranged from -0.20 to 1.46 during daytime with an average value of 0.48 and 0.23 to 1.53 during nighttime with an average value of 0.72. These diurnal variations suggest that the daytime aerosol was more acidic than that caused by the nighttime aerosol. The hourly values of pH(IS) showed a reverse trend as compared to that of in-situ aerosol acidity ([H(+)]Ins). The pH(IS) had its maximum values at 3:00 and at 20:00 and its minimum during 11:00 to 12:00. Correlation analyses revealed that the molar concentration ratio of ammonium to sulfate (R(N/S)), equivalent concentration ratio of cations to anions (RC/A), T and RH can be used as independent variables for prediction of pH(IS). A multi-linear regression model consisting of RN/S, RC/A, T and RH was developed to estimate aerosol pH(IS).

  15. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  16. Biosorption of Cu(II) by immobilized microalgae using silica: kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongkyun; Shim, Eunjung; Yun, Hyun-Shik; Park, Young-Tae; Kim, Dohyeong; Ji, Min-Kyu; Kim, Chi-Kyung; Shin, Won-Sik; Choi, Jaeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Immobilized microalgae using silica (IMS) from Micractinium reisseri KGE33 was synthesized through a sol-gel reaction. Green algal waste biomass, the residue of M. reisseri KGE33 after oil extraction, was used as the biomaterial. The adsorption of Cu(II) on IMS was tested in batch experiments with varying algal doses, pH, contact times, initial Cu(II) concentrations, and temperatures. Three types of IMSs (IMS 14, 70, and 100) were synthesized according to different algal doses. The removal efficiency of Cu(II) in the aqueous phase was in the following order: IMS 14 (77.0%) < IMS 70 (83.3%) < IMS 100 (87.1%) at pH 5. The point of zero charge (PZC) value of IMS100 was 4.5, and the optimum pH for Cu(II) adsorption was 5. Equilibrium data were described using a Langmuir isotherm model. The Langmuir model maximum Cu(II) adsorption capacity (q m) increased with the algal dose in the following order: IMS 100 (1.710 mg g(-1)) > IMS 70 (1.548 mg g(-1)) > IMS 14 (1.282 mg g(-1)). The pseudo-second-order equation fitted the kinetics data well, and the value of the second-order rate constant increased with increasing algal dose. Gibbs free energies (ΔG°) were negative within the temperature range studied, which indicates that the adsorption process was spontaneous. The negative value of enthalpy (ΔH°) again indicates the exothermic nature of the adsorption process. In addition, SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of the IMS surface reveal that the algal biomass on IMS is the main site for Cu(II) binding. This study shows that immobilized microalgae using silica, a synthesized biosorbent, can be used as a cost-effective sorbent for Cu(II) removal from the aqueous phase.

  17. Determining Ion-Aerosol Nucleation Rates in the Lower Atmosphere: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Modeling and Data Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    2005-12-01

    In situ measurements in the free troposphere [Eichkorn et al., 2002] have detected massive positively charged clusters (up to 2500 amu) that appear to be composed of water, acetone and sulfuric acid. Previous modeling studies have suggested that such ionic clusters participate in a number of atmospheric processes, including aerosol formation [Yu and Turco, 1999] and phase transitions in polar stratospheric clouds [D'Auria and Turco, 2001a]. Other work [Lee et al., 2003] indicates that ultrafine particle bursts detected in the upper troposphere can be explained by negative ion clustering mechanisms constrained by laboratory thermodynamic data [Lovejoy et al., 2004], offering further evidence for ion-mediated nucleation. In the lower troposphere, where charged clusters containing hydrated acids, ammonia and a variety of organic compounds are seen, ion-based modeling can often explain nucleation events observed in this region [Yu and Turco, 2001]. We discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of ion growth and activation in the atmosphere, and describe a "hybrid" representation for common ion families that integrates laboratory measurements with quantum mechanical simulations of charged cluster structure and energetics [D'Auria and Turco, 2001b]. We show that a kinetic model of ion cluster evolution applicable to atmospheric phenomena, including particle nucleation, can be constructed using a hybrid data approach. We present recent results--based on high-level quantum mechanical geometry optimization and thermochemical calculations--for positive ion clusters composed of water, sulfuric acid and acetone [D'Auria, 2005]. It is argued that ions with ternary compositions provide a high degree of cluster stabilization, and are therefore likely to generate pre-condensation nuclei throughout the lower atmosphere. We also discuss errors in the determination of cluster free energies and entropies under atmospheric conditions, and identify the types and precision of data

  18. Biosorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic modelling of naphthalene removal from aqueous solution onto modified spent tea leaves.

    PubMed

    Agarry, S E; Ogunleye, O O; Aworanti, O A

    2013-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using modified spent tea leaves to remove naphthalene from its aqueous solution under batch mode. The effects on the removal process of physical factors, such as initial naphthalene concentration, contact time, biosorbent dosage, pH and temperature, have been evaluated. The equilibrium biosorption data were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherm models. These models provided a good fit to the experimental data, but the Langmuir isotherm model provided the best correlation (R2 = 0.993) to the experimental data. The biosorption kinetic data of naphthalene were analyzed by pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion and surface mass transfer kinetic models. These four kinetic models fitted the biosorption kinetic data well, but the pseudo-first-order kinetic model gave the best fit. The activation energy (E(a)) was found to be 15.89 kJ per mole and the thermodynamic properties of the biosorption process, such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and the entropic change of biosorption, were also evaluated. It was established that the biosorption process was spontaneous, feasible and endothermic in nature.

  19. Roles of bulk viscosity on Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Non-equilibrium thermodynamics due to spatio-temporal pressure fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sharma, Nidhi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) between two air masses with a temperature difference of 70 K is presented using compressible Navier-Stokes formulation in a non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework. The two-dimensional flow is studied in an isolated box with non-periodic walls in both vertical and horizontal directions. The non-conducting interface separating the two air masses is impulsively removed at t = 0 (depicting a heaviside function). No external perturbation has been used at the interface to instigate the instability at the onset. Computations have been carried out for rectangular and square cross sections. The formulation is free of Boussinesq approximation commonly used in many Navier-Stokes formulations for RTI. Effect of Stokes' hypothesis is quantified, by using models from acoustic attenuation measurement for the second coefficient of viscosity from two experiments. Effects of Stokes' hypothesis on growth of mixing layer and evolution of total entropy for the Rayleigh-Taylor system are reported. The initial rate of growth is observed to be independent of Stokes' hypothesis and the geometry of the box. Following this stage, growth rate is dependent on the geometry of the box and is sensitive to the model used. As a consequence of compressible formulation, we capture pressure wave-packets with associated reflection and rarefaction from the non-periodic walls. The pattern and frequency of reflections of pressure waves noted specifically at the initial stages are reflected in entropy variation of the system.

  20. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-Jie; Qin, Ye-Bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-Dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-Fei

    2013-07-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1530.67 mg(2)/g and 0.7826 cm(3)/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue.

  1. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the removal of U(VI) by low cost agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Kausar, Abida; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; MacKinnon, Gillian

    2013-11-01

    In this research, biosorption efficiency of different agro-wastes was evaluated with rice husk showing maximum biosorption capacity among the selected biosorbents. Optimization of native, SDS-treated and immobilized rice husk adsorption parameters including pH, biosorbent amount, contact time, initial U(VI) concentration and temperature for maximum U(VI) removal was investigated. Maximum biosorption capacity for native (29.56 mg g(-1)) and immobilized biomass (17.59 mg g(-1)) was observed at pH 4 while SDS-treated biomass showed maximum removal (28.08 mg g(-1)) at pH 5. The Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlated best with the U(IV) biosorption equilibrium data for the 10-100 mg L(-1) concentration range. The kinetics of the reaction followed pseudo-second order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters like free energy (ΔG(0)) and enthalpy (ΔH°) confirmed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. Experiments to determine the regeneration capacity of the selected biosorbents and the effect of competing metal ions on biosorption capacity were also conducted. The biomass was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, surface area analysis, Fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. The study proved that rice husk has potential to treat uranium in wastewater.

  2. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of the toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki by clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qingling; Deng, Yali; Li, Huishu; Liu, Jie; Hu, Hongqing; Chen, Shouwen; Sa, Tongmin

    2009-02-01

    The persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) toxins in soil is further enhanced through association with soil particles. Such persistence may improve the effectiveness of controlling target pests, but impose a hazard to non-target organisms in soil ecosystems. In this study, the equilibrium adsorption of the Bt toxin by four clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, goethite, and silicon dioxide) was investigated, and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The results showed that Bt toxin could be adsorbed easily by minerals, and the adsorption was much easier at low temperature than at high temperature at the initial concentration varying from 0 to 1000 mg L -1. The adsorption fitted well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, but the Freundlich equation was more suitable. The pseudo-second-order (PSO) was the best application model to describe the adsorption kinetic. The adsorption process appeared to be controlled by chemical process, and the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. The negative standard free energy ( ΔGmθr) values of the adsorption indicated that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by the minerals was spontaneous, and the changes of the standard enthalpy ( ΔHmθr) showed that the adsorption of the Bt toxin by montmorillonite was endothermic while the adsorption by the other three minerals was exothermic.

  3. Thermodynamics of H in disordered Pd-Ag alloys from calorimetric and equilibrium pressure-composition-temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Ted B; Wang, Da; Luo, S

    2007-09-13

    In this research, the thermodynamics of H2 solution and hydride formation in a series of disordered Pd-Ag alloys has been determined using both reaction calorimetry and equilibrium PH2-composition-T data. Trends of DeltaHH and DeltaSH with both H and Ag concentration have been determined. For the Pd0.76Ag0.24 alloy, which does not form a hydride phase, DeltaHH and DeltaSH both exhibit minima with H/(Pd0.76Ag0.24) followed by a linear increase of the former. A linear increase of DeltaHH is found for all of the alloys in the high H content region beyond the two-phase region or, if, there is no two-phase region, in the high H content region. DeltaHH degrees at infinite dilution of H decreases with atom fraction Ag, XAg, up to about 0.40 and then increases. Enthalpies for hydride formation/decomposition, 1/2H2(g) + dilute <--> hydride, have been determined calorimetrically for alloys which form two phases (303 K). The enthalpies for hydride formation become more exothermic with XAg while the corresponding entropy magnitudes are nearly constant, 46 +/- 2 J/K mol H.

  4. Adsorption behavior of activated carbon derived from pyrolusite-modified sewage sludge: equilibrium modeling, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Jiang, Li; Ji, Xiujuan

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was developed from sewage sludge using pyrolusite as an additive. It was demonstrated that the removal efficiency of two synthetic dyes (Tracid orange GS and Direct fast turquoise blue GL) by the produced adsorbent was up to 97.6%. The activated carbon with pyrolusite addition had 38.2% higher surface area, 43.8% larger micropore and 54.4% larger mesopore production than ordinary sludge-based activated carbons. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on dyes adsorption tests. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, and the results fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equation. The experimental data fitted very well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Activation energies for the adsorption processes ranged between 8.7 and 19.1 kJ mol 1. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (deltaG0), standard enthalpy (deltaH0) and standard entropy (deltaS0) were evaluated. The adsorption of these two dyes on the activated carbon was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature.

  5. Removal of aluminium from aqueous solutions using PAN-based adsorbents: characterisation, kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Aly, Zaynab; Graulet, Adrien; Scales, Nicholas; Hanley, Tracey

    2014-03-01

    Economic adsorbents in bead form were fabricated and utilised for the adsorption of Al(3+) from aqueous solutions. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) beads, PAN powder and the thermally treated PAN beads (250 °C/48 h/Ar and 600 °C/48 h/Ar-H2) were characterised using different techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface analysis (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller), thermogravimetric analysis as well as scanning electron microscopy. Effects of pH, contact time, kinetics and adsorption isotherms at different temperatures were investigated in batch mode experiments. Aluminium kinetic data best fit the Lagergren pseudo-second-order adsorption model indicating a one-step, surface-only, adsorption process with chemisorption being the rate limiting step. Equilibrium adsorption data followed a Langmuir adsorption model with fairly low monolayer adsorption capacities suitable for freshwater clean-up only. Various constants including thermodynamic constants were evaluated from the experimental results obtained at 20, 40 and 60 °C. Positive values of ΔH° indicated that the adsorption of Al(3+) onto all three adsorbents was endothermic with less energy input required for PAN powder compared to PAN beads and low-temperature thermally treated PAN. Negative ΔG° values indicated that the aluminium adsorption process was spontaneous for all adsorbents examined.

  6. Removal of phenol from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto organomodified Tirebolu bentonite: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Hasan Basri; Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Duran, Celal; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-12-15

    A natural bentonite modified with a cationic surfactant, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), was used as an adsorbent for removal of phenol from aqueous solutions. The natural and modified bentonites (organobentonite) were characterized with some instrumental techniques (FTIR, XRD and SEM). Adsorption studies were performed in a batch system, and the effects of various experimental parameters such as solution pH, contact time, initial phenol concentration, organobentonite concentration, and temperature, etc. were evaluated upon the phenol adsorption onto organobentonite. Maximum phenol removal was observed at pH 9.0. Equilibrium was attained after contact of 1h only. The adsorption isotherms were described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, and both model fitted well. The monolayer adsorption capacity of organobentonite was found to be 333 mg g(-1). Desorption of phenol from the loaded adsorbent was achieved by using 20% acetone solution. The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption process was best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics (R(2) > 0.99). Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (DeltaG degrees), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees), and entropy (DeltaS degrees) were also calculated. These parameters indicated that adsorption of phenol onto organobentonite was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in the temperature range of 0-40 degrees C.

  7. Adsorption of Zn2+ ions onto NaA and NaX zeolites: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Nibou, D; Mekatel, H; Amokrane, S; Barkat, M; Trari, M

    2010-01-15

    The adsorption of Zn(2+) onto NaA and NaX zeolites was investigated. The samples were synthesized according to a hydrothermal crystallization using aluminium isopropoxide (Al[OCH(CH(3))(2)](3)) as a new alumina source. The effects of pH, initial concentration, solid/liquid ratio and temperature were studied in batch experiments. The Freundlich and the Langmuir models were applied and the adsorption equilibrium followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The uptake distribution coefficient (K(d)) indicated that the Zn(2+) removal was the highest at minimum concentration. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated. The negative values of standard enthalpy of adsorption revealed the exothermic nature of the adsorption process whereas the negative activation entropies reflected that no significant change occurs in the internal structure of the zeolites solid matrix during the sorption of Zn(2+). The negative values of Gibbs free energy were indicative of the spontaneity of the adsorption process. Analysis of the kinetic and rate data revealed that the pseudo second-order sorption mechanism is predominant and the intra particle diffusion was the determining step for the sorption of zinc ions. The obtained optimal parameters have been applied to wastewater from the industrial zone (Algeria) in order to remove the contained zinc effluents.

  8. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-jie; Qin, Ye-bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-fei

    2013-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1 530.67 mg2/g and 0.782 6 cm3/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue. PMID:23825151

  9. The α +ɛ Two-Phase Equilibrium in the Fe-N-C System: Experimental Investigations and Thermodynamic Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göhring, Holger; Leineweber, Andreas; Mittemeijer, Eric Jan

    2016-09-01

    The present work is dedicated to investigating the occurrence of the α +ɛ equilibrium at temperatures typically applied for nitrocarburizing treatments. To this end, pearlitic Fe-C specimens were treated between 823 K and 863 K (550 °C and 590 °C) in gaseous nitriding and gaseous nitrocarburizing atmospheres, allowing control of the chemical potentials of N and C. Subsequently, the resulting compound-layer microstructures were investigated using light microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Thermodynamic calculations, adopting several models for the Fe-N-C system from the literature, were performed, showing significantly different predictions for both the sequence of the invariant reactions and their temperatures. Comparison of the experimental data and the theoretical calculations led to the conclusion that none of the models from the literature is able to realistically describe the experimentally observed constitution in the Fe-N-C system in the considered temperature range. Values/value ranges for the temperatures of the invariant reactions were obtained.

  10. Equilibrium, Kinetic, and Thermodynamic Studies on the Adsorption of Cadmium from Aqueous Solution by Modified Biomass Ash

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuebo; Cui, Hongbiao; Zhu, Zhenqiu; Liang, Jiani

    2017-01-01

    Natural biomass ash of agricultural residuals was collected from a power plant and modified with hexagonal mesoporous silica and functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The physicochemical and morphological properties of the biomass ash were analyzed by ICP-OES, SEM, TEM-EDS, FTIR, and BET analysis. The adsorption behavior of the modified product for Cd2+ in aqueous solution was studied as a function of pH, initial metal concentration, equilibrium time, and temperature. Results showed that the specific surface area of the modified product was 9 times that of the natural biomass ash. The modified biomass ash exhibited high affinity for Cd2+ and its adsorption capacity increased sharply with increasing pH from 4.0 to 6.0. The maximum adsorption capacity was 23.95 mg/g in a pH 5 solution with an initial metal concentration of 50 mg/L and a contact time of 90 min. The adsorption of Cd2+ onto the modified biomass ash was well fitted to the Langmuir model and it followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Thermodynamic analysis results showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The results suggest that the modified biomass ash is promising for use as an inexpensive and effective adsorbent for Cd2+ removal from aqueous solution. PMID:28348509

  11. Adsorption of cesium from aqueous solution using agricultural residue--walnut shell: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dahu; Zhao, Yingxin; Yang, Shengjiong; Shi, Wansheng; Zhang, Zhenya; Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan

    2013-05-01

    A novel biosorbent derived from agricultural residue - walnut shell (WS) is reported to remove cesium from aqueous solution. Nickel hexacyanoferrate (NiHCF) was incorporated into this biosorbent, serving as a high selectivity trap agent for cesium. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) were utilized for the evaluation of the developed biosorbent. Determination of kinetic parameters for adsorption was carried out using pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order kinetic models and intra-particle diffusion models. Adsorption equilibrium was examined using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms. A satisfactory correlation coefficient and relatively low chi-square analysis parameter χ(2) between the experimental and predicted values of the Freundlich isotherm demonstrate that cesium adsorption by NiHCF-WS is a multilayer chemical adsorption. Thermodynamic studies were conducted under different reaction temperatures and results indicate that cesium adsorption by NiHCF-WS is an endothermic (ΔH° > 0) and spontaneous (ΔG° < 0) process.

  12. Dynamics of a femtosecond/picosecond laser-induced aluminum plasma out of thermodynamic equilibrium in a nitrogen background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Vincent; Bultel, Arnaud; Annaloro, Julien; Chambrelan, Cédric; Edouard, Guillaume; Grisolia, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the experimental studies, the assessment of the ability of ultra-short (femto or picosecond) laser pulses to provide correct estimates of the elemental composition of unknown samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy requires the modeling of a typical situation. The present article deals with this modeling for aluminum in nitrogen. A spherical layer model is developed. The central aluminum plasma is produced by the ultra-short pulse. This plasma is described using our collisional-radiative model CoRaM-Al in an upgraded version involving 250 levels. Its expansion and relaxation take place in nitrogen, where the formation and the propagation of a shock wave are taken into account. In this shocked nitrogen layer, the equilibrium conditions are assumed. Mass, momentum and energy conservation equations written under an Eulerian form are used to correctly model the global dynamics. Energy losses are due to radiative recombination, thermal Bremsstrahlung and spontaneous emission. These elementary processes are implemented. The only input parameters are the pulse energy E0, the ablated mass M of the sample and the pressure p0 of the surrounding gas. The equilibrium composition involving N2, N, N2+, N+ and free electrons of the shocked nitrogen layer is calculated from the thermodynamic database of our collisional-radiative model CoRaM-N2. The conditions E0 = 10 mJ and M ≃ 10- 10 kg corresponding to a 532 nm laser pulse are chosen. The model assumes the initial equilibrium of the aluminum plasma produced by the laser pulse absorbed by the sample. Then, owing to the significant overpressure with respect to the background gas (p0 is assumed atmospheric), the surrounding gas starts to be compressed while the propagation of a shock wave takes place. The shock layer maximum pressure is obtained at approximately 20 ns. At this characteristic time, the nitrogen pressure is around 400 times the atmospheric pressure. A shock velocity of 7 km s- 1 is predicted. The

  13. Heat capacity and thermodynamic properties for coesite and jadeite, reexamination of the quartz-coesite equilibrium boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemingway, B.S.; Bohlen, S.R.; Hankins, W.B.; Westrum, E.F.; Kuskov, O.L.

    1998-01-01

    The heat capacities of synthetic coesite and jadeite were measured between about 15 and 850 K by adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry. The experimental data were smoothed and estimates were made of heat capacities to 1800 K. The following equations represent our estimate of the heat capacities of coesite and jadeite between 298.15 and 1800 K: [see original article for formula]. Tables of thermodynamic values for coesite and jadeite to 1800 K are presented. The entropies of coesite and jadeite are 40.38 ?? 0.12 and 136.5 ?? 0.32 J/(mol.K), respectively, at 298.15 K. The entropy for coesite derived here confirms the value published earlier by Holm et al. (1967). We have derived an equation to describe the quartz-coesite boundary over the temperature range of 600 to 1500 K, P(GPa) = 1.76 + 0.001T(K). Our results are in agreement with the enthalpy of transition reported by Akaogi and Navrotsky (1984) and yield -907.6 ?? 1.4 kJ/mol for the enthalpy of formation of coesite from the elements at 298.15 K and 1 bar, in agreement with the value recommended by CODATA (Khodakovsky et al. 1995). Several sources of uncertainty remain unacceptably high, including: the heat capacities of coesite at temperatures above about 1000 K; the heat capacities and volumetric properties of ?? quartz at higher pressures and at temperatures above 844 K; the pressure corrections for the piston cylinder apparatus used to determine the quartz-coesite equilibrium boundary.

  14. An Investigation of Applications for Thermodynamic Work Potential Methods: Working Tables and Charts for Estimation of Thermodynamic Work Potential in Equilibrium Mixtures of Jet-A and Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri; Roth, Bryce; McDonald, Rob

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a tool to facilitate the application of thermodynamic work potential methods to aircraft and engine analysis. This starts with a discussion of the theoretical background underlying these methods, which is then used to derive various equations useful for thermodynamic analysis of aircraft engines. The work potential analysis method is implemented in the form of a set of working charts and tables that can be used to graphically evaluate work potential stored in high-enthalpy gas. The range of validity for these tables is 300 to 36,000 R, pressures between between 0.01 atm and 100 atm, and fuel-air ratios from zero to stoichiometric. The derivations and charts assume mixtures of Jet-A and air as the working fluid. The thermodynamic properties presented in these charts were calculated based upon standard thermodynamic curve fits.

  15. Secondary organic aerosol formation during June 2010 in Central Europe: measurements and modelling studies with a mixed thermodynamic-kinetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmann, B.; Sellegri, K.; Freney, E.

    2014-04-01

    Until recently secondary organic carbon aerosol (SOA) mass concentrations have been systematically underestimated by three-dimensional atmospheric-chemistry-aerosol models. With a newly proposed concept of aging of organic vapours, more realistic model results for organic carbon aerosol mass concentrations can be achieved. Applying a mixed thermodynamic-kinetic approach for SOA formation shifted the aerosol size distribution towards particles in the cloud condensation nuclei size range, thereby emphasising the importance of SOA formation schemes for modelling realistic cloud and precipitation formation. The additional importance of hetero-molecular nucleation between H2SO4 and organic vapours remains to be evaluated in three-dimensional atmospheric-chemistry-aerosol models. Here a case study is presented focusing on Puy-de-Dôme, France in June 2010. The measurements indicate a considerable increase in SOA mass concentration during the measurement campaign, which could be reproduced by modelling using a simplified thermodynamic-kinetic approach for SOA formation and increased biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) precursor emissions. Comparison with a thermodynamic SOA formation approach shows a huge improvement in modelled SOA mass concentration with the thermodynamic-kinetic approach for SOA formation. SOA mass concentration increases by a factor of up to 6 accompanied by a slight improvement of modelled particle size distribution. Even though nucleation events at Puy-de-Dôme were rare during the chosen period of investigation, a weak event in the boundary layer could be reproduced by the model in a sensitivity study when nucleation of low-volatile secondary organic vapour is included. Differences in the model results with and without nucleation of organic vapour are visible in the lower free troposphere over several days. Taking into account the nucleation of organic vapour leads to an increase in accumulation mode particles due to coagulation and

  16. [Non-equilibrium thermodynamic separation theory of nonlinear chromatography. II. The 0-1 model for nonlinear-mass transfer kinetic processes].

    PubMed

    Liang, Heng; Jia, Zhenbin

    2007-11-01

    In the optimal design and control of preparative chromatographic processes, the obstacles appear when one tries to link the Wilson' s framework of chromatographic theories based on partial differential equations (PDEs) with the Eulerian presentation to optimal control approaches based on discrete time states, such as Markov decision processes (MDP) or Model predictive control (MPC). In this paper, the 0-1 model is presented to overcome the obstacles for nonlinear transport chromatography (NTC). With the Lagrangian-Eulerian description (L-ED), one solute cell unit is split into two solute cells, one (SCm) in the mobile phase with the linear velocity of the mobile phase, and the other (SCs) in the stationary phase with zero-velocity. The thermodynamic state vector, S(k), which comprises four vector components, i.e., the sequence number, the position and the local solute concentrations in both SCms and SCses, is introduced to describe the local thermodynamic path (LTP) and the macroscopical thermodynamic path (MTP). For the NTC, the LTP is designed for a solute zone to evolve from the state, S(k), to the virtual migration state, S(M), undergoing the virtual net migration sub-process, and then to the state, S(k+1), undergoing the virtual net inter phase mass transfer sub-process in a short time interval. Complete thermodynamic state iterations with the Markov characteristics are derived by using the local equilibrium isotherm and the local lumped mass transfer coefficient. When the local thermodynamic equilibrium is retained, excellent properties, such as consistency, stability, conservation, accuracy, etc., of the numerical solution of the 0-1 model are observed in the theoretical analysis and in the numerical experiments of the nonlinear ideal chromatography. It is found that the 0-1 model could properly link up with the MDP or optimal control approaches based on discrete time states.

  17. The development of flux-split algorithms for flows with non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Cinella, P.

    1988-01-01

    A finite-volume method for the numerical computation of flows with nonequilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry is presented. A thermodynamic model is described which simplifies the coupling between the chemistry and thermodynamics and also results in the retention of the homogeneity property of the Euler equations (including all the species continuity and vibrational energy conservation equations). Flux-splitting procedures are developed for the fully coupled equations involving fluid dynamics, chemical production and thermodynamic relaxation processes. New forms of flux-vector split and flux-difference split algorithms are embodied in a fully coupled, implicit, large-block structure, including all the species conservation and energy production equations. Several numerical examples are presented, including high-temperature shock tube and nozzle flows. The methodology is compared to other existing techniques, including spectral and central-differenced procedures, and favorable comparisons are shown regarding accuracy, shock-capturing and convergence rates.

  18. A method of calculating of the thermodynamic properties and the composition of the explosion products of hydrocarbons and air under partial chemical equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shargatov, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    We examined the approximate method to calculate composition and thermodynamic parameters of hydrocarbons-air nonequilibrium explosion products based on the assumption of the existence of a partial chemical equilibrium. With excellent accuracy of calculating thermodynamic properties and species mass fraction the respective stiff system of detailed kinetics differential equations can be replaced by the one differential equation or the two differential equations and a system of algebraic equations. This method is always consistent with the detailed kinetic mechanism. The constituent equations of the method were derived and the respective computer code written. We examine the applicability of the method by solving the test problem. The proposed method simulation results are in excellent agreement with the detailed kinetics model results corresponding the stiff ordinary differential equation solver including NO time histories.

  19. Equilibrium crystal shape of BaZrO3 and space charge formation in the (011) surface by using ab-initio thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Su; Kim, Yeong-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the equilibrium crystal shape of BaZrO3 and the space charge formation in an O-terminated (011) surface by using ab-initio thermodynamics. Twenty-two low-indexed (001), (011), and (111) surfaces were calculated to analyze their surface Gibbs-free energy under the stable condition of BaZrO3. Based on the Gibbs-Wulff theorem, the equilibrium crystal shape of BaZrO3 changed from cubic to decaoctahedral with decreasing Ba chemical potential. The dominant facets of BaZrO3 were {001} and {011}, which were well consistent with experimental observations. The space charge formation in the (011) surface was evaluated using the space-charge model. We found that the (011) surface was even more resistive than the (001) surface.

  20. Investigation of thermodynamic equilibrium in laser-induced aluminum plasma using the H{sub α} line profiles and Thomson scattering spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Cvejić, M. E-mail: krzysztof.dzierzega@uj.edu.pl; Dzierżęga, K. E-mail: krzysztof.dzierzega@uj.edu.pl; Pięta, T.

    2015-07-13

    We have studied isothermal equilibrium in the laser-induced plasma from aluminum pellets in argon at pressure of 200 mbar by using a method which combines the standard laser Thomson scattering and analysis of the H{sub α}, Stark-broadened, line profiles. Plasma was created using 4.5 ns, 4 mJ pulses from a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. While electron density and temperature were determined from the electron feature of Thomson scattering spectra, the heavy particle temperature was obtained from the H{sub α} full profile applying computer simulation including ion-dynamical effects. We have found strong imbalance between these two temperatures during entire plasma evolution which indicates its non-isothermal character. At the same time, according to the McWhirter criterion, the electron density was high enough to establish plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  1. Thermodynamic study of binary system Propafenone Hydrocloride with Metoprolol Tartrate: solid-liquid equilibrium and compatibility with α-lactose monohydrate and corn starch.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Daniela-Crina; Pincu, Elena; Meltzer, Viorica

    2013-05-20

    Solid-liquid equilibrium (SLE) for binary mixture of Propafenone Hydrocloride (PP) with Metoprolol Tartrate (MT) was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and corresponding activity coefficients were calculated. Simple eutectic behavior for this system was observed. The excess thermodynamic functions: G(E) and S(E) for the pre-, post-, and eutectic composition have been obtained using the computed activity coefficients data of the eutectic phase with their excess chemical potentials μi(E) (i=1, 2). The experimental solid-liquid phase temperatures were compared with predictions obtained from available eutectic equilibrium models. The results indicate non-ideality in this mixture. Also, the compatibility of each component and their eutectic mixture with usual excipients was investigated, and the DSC experiments indicate possible weak interactions with α-lactose monohydrate and compatibility with corn starch. The results obtained were confirmed by FT-IR measurements.

  2. Thermodynamic parameters monitoring the equilibrium shift of enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis/synthesis reactions in favor of synthesis in mixtures of water and organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Deschrevel, Brigitte; Vincent, Jean-Claude; Ripoll, Camille; Thellier, Michel

    2003-01-20

    The main strategy developed to shift the equilibrium state of a hydrolase-catalyzed hydrolysis/synthesis reaction consists in reducing water activity by addition of organic solvents in the reaction medium. We have used several mixtures of water and 1,4-butanediol, ranging from pure water to pure 1,4-butanediol, to study the hydrolysis/synthesis reaction of the N-Cbz-L-tryptophanyl-glycineamide dipeptide, catalyzed by alpha-chymotrypsin. In the presence of 1,4-butanediol, alpha-chymotrypsin also catalyzed the esterification reaction between this diol and N-Cbz-L-tryptophan; this ester hydrolysis/synthesis reaction has thus also been examined. The dipeptide and ester equilibrium concentrations increase when the water content of the reaction medium is decreased. Using our experimental data, we have determined the equilibrium constants of the hydrolysis/synthesis equilibria involving the nonionized forms of the protected amino acids, the estimated values of which are Ksp = 8 10(5) for the dipeptide and Kse = 78 for the ester respectively. They are true thermodynamic equilibrium constants, each related to a single, well-defined reaction equilibrium and with water activity being taken into account. If an organic solvent is added to the reaction medium these equilibria can be shifted towards synthesis by decreasing the water activity but also by modifying the ionization/neutralization equilibrium constant of the ionizable groups. These two effects depend both on the water content and on the nature of the organic solvent used, and, in particular, on its dielectric constant. Because of the importance of this parameter in our study, we discuss using it as an indicator to select an appropriate organic solvent to perform an enzyme-catalyzed synthesis.

  3. Departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium in cutting arc plasmas derived from electron and gas density measurements using a two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2011-03-15

    A two-wavelength quantitative Schlieren technique that allows inferring the electron and gas densities of axisymmetric arc plasmas without imposing any assumption regarding statistical equilibrium models is reported. This technique was applied to the study of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) departures within the core of a 30 A high-energy density cutting arc. In order to derive the electron and heavy particle temperatures from the inferred density profiles, a generalized two-temperature Saha equation together with the plasma equation of state and the quasineutrality condition were employed. Factors such as arc fluctuations that influence the accuracy of the measurements and the validity of the assumptions used to derive the plasma species temperature were considered. Significant deviations from chemical equilibrium as well as kinetic equilibrium were found at elevated electron temperatures and gas densities toward the arc core edge. An electron temperature profile nearly constant through the arc core with a value of about 14000-15000 K, well decoupled from the heavy particle temperature of about 1500 K at the arc core edge, was inferred.

  4. PREDICTION OF MULTICOMPONENT INORGANIC ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL BEHAVIOR. (R824793)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many existing models calculate the composition of the atmospheric aerosol system by solving a set of algebraic equations based on reversible reactions derived from thermodynamic equilibrium. Some models rely on an a priori knowledge of the presence of components in certain relati...

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, Th.; Sebald, H.

    2003-04-01

    In our large Aerosol Chamber at the FZ Jülich we apply HR FTIR absorption spectroscopy for the determination of trace gases. In the FTIR spectra we also observe broad absorptions of several 10 to a few 100 cm-1 widths that arise from species in the condensed aerosol phase: liquid H_2O, NO_3^-, SO_42-, HSO_4^-, or dicarboxylic acids. Moreover, the aerosol droplets caused extinctions over several 1000 cm-1 by IR scattering. This allows for in-situ observation of changes in the condensed aerosol phase e.g. on HNO_3 uptake, like the shift of the sulfate/bisulfate equilibrium or the growth by water condensation. The IR absorptions of the condensed aerosol phase provide useful extra information in process studies, if they can be quantified. Therefore the absorption cross section, respective, the absorption index which is the imaginary part of the complex refractive index is needed. We set up an aerosol flow tube in which IR spectroscopy on a 8 m light path and aerosol size distribution measurements in the range from 20 nm - 10 μm can be performed simultaneously. We measured sulfate aerosols at several relative humidities (dry, metastable, deliquescent). We will demonstrate an iterative procedure based on Mie calculations and Kramers Kronig transformation to retrieve the absorption index from the observed IR spectra and the corresponding size distribution (for dry ammonium sulfate). We will compare resulting absorption indices for aqueous sodium bisulfate aerosols at several relative humidties with thermodynamic model calculations for the Na^+/H^+/HSO_4^-/SO_42-/H_2O system.

  6. Student understanding of the second law of thermodynamics and the underlying concepts of heat, temperature, and thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Matthew

    This dissertation reports on a project to improve student understanding of the second law of thermodynamics. Through the administration of written questions and individual student interviews, we have identified a variety of specific conceptual and reasoning difficulties students have with the second law of thermodynamics and the related concept of entropy. In addition, we have identified student difficulties with the concepts of heat and temperature that, in some cases, contribute to problems they have applying more the advanced ideas of the second law and entropy. All of these findings guided the design of curriculum to improve student learning in algebra- and calculus-based introductory physics courses. We comment on some formal problems with the way entropy and the second law are typically presented and argue for stricter use of the phrase "the second law of thermodynamics."

  7. Estimating equilibrium ensemble averages using multiple time slices from driven nonequilibrium processes: theory and application to free energies, moments, and thermodynamic length in single-molecule pulling experiments.

    PubMed

    Minh, David D L; Chodera, John D

    2011-01-14

    Recently discovered identities in statistical mechanics have enabled the calculation of equilibrium ensemble averages from realizations of driven nonequilibrium processes, including single-molecule pulling experiments and analogous computer simulations. Challenges in collecting large data sets motivate the pursuit of efficient statistical estimators that maximize use of available information. Along these lines, Hummer and Szabo developed an estimator that combines data from multiple time slices along a driven nonequilibrium process to compute the potential of mean force. Here, we generalize their approach, pooling information from multiple time slices to estimate arbitrary equilibrium expectations. Our expression may be combined with estimators of path-ensemble averages, including existing optimal estimators that use data collected by unidirectional and bidirectional protocols. We demonstrate the estimator by calculating free energies, moments of the polymer extension, the thermodynamic metric tensor, and the thermodynamic length in a model single-molecule pulling experiment. Compared to estimators that only use individual time slices, our multiple time-slice estimators yield substantially smoother estimates and achieve lower variance for higher-order moments.

  8. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies for the removal of lead (II) and copper (II) ions from aqueous solutions by nanocrystalline TiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, Fatemeh; Sarabi, Reza Sadeghi; Ghasemi, Zinab; Seif, Ahmad

    2010-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanocrystallites were synthesized as adsorbents through the hydrolysis of titanium tetrachloride as the precursor in hydrochloric acid. The product was analyzed by XRD, BET and SEM-EDX; analysis indicated that the particles were a mixture of 86.8% rutile and 13.2% anatase TiO 2 with spherical shapes. The adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II) metal ions from aqueous solution onto nano- TiO 2 were investigated with variations in pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. The kinetics, adsorption isotherm and adsorption thermodynamics of the heavy metals were studied. The kinetics data were analyzed by the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models; the best correlation coefficients were obtained for the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The adsorption results obtained from equilibrium experiments were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms with the Freundlich isotherm giving the best fitting isotherm to the equilibrium data. The thermodynamic parameters ( ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) were calculated and it was found that the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic and is favored at higher temperature.

  9. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  10. Development of Accurate Chemical Equilibrium Models for the Hanford Waste Tanks: New Thermodynamic Measurements and Model Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin; Qafoku, Odeta; Xia, Yuanxian; Wang, Zheming; MacLean, Graham

    2003-03-27

    Developing accurate thermodynamic models for predicting the chemistry of the high-level waste tanks at Hanford is an extremely daunting challenge in electrolyte and radionuclide chemistry. These challenges stem from the extremely high ionic strength of the tank waste supernatants, presence of chelating agents in selected tanks, wide temperature range in processing conditions and the presence of important actinide species in multiple oxidation states. This presentation summarizes progress made to date in developing accurate models for these tank waste solutions, how these data are being used at Hanford and the important challenges that remain. New thermodynamic measurements on Sr and actinide complexation with specific chelating agents (EDTA, HEDTA and gluconate) will also be presented.

  11. Large-scale screening of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage from first-principles calculations based on equilibrium reaction thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Chul; Kulkarni, Anant D; Johnson, J Karl; Sholl, David S

    2011-04-21

    Systematic thermodynamics calculations based on density functional theory-calculated energies for crystalline solids have been a useful complement to experimental studies of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides. We report the most comprehensive set of thermodynamics calculations for mixtures of light metal hydrides to date by performing grand canonical linear programming screening on a database of 359 compounds, including 147 compounds not previously examined by us. This database is used to categorize the reaction thermodynamics of all mixtures containing any four non-H elements among Al, B, C, Ca, K, Li, Mg, N, Na, Sc, Si, Ti, and V. Reactions are categorized according to the amount of H(2) that is released and the reaction's enthalpy. This approach identifies 74 distinct single step reactions having that a storage capacity >6 wt.% and zero temperature heats of reaction 15 ≤ΔU(0)≤ 75 kJ mol(-1) H(2). Many of these reactions, however, are likely to be problematic experimentally because of the role of refractory compounds, B(12)H(12)-containing compounds, or carbon. The single most promising reaction identified in this way involves LiNH(2)/LiH/KBH(4), storing 7.48 wt.% H(2) and having ΔU(0) = 43.6 kJ mol(-1) H(2). We also examined the complete range of reaction mixtures to identify multi-step reactions with useful properties; this yielded 23 multi-step reactions of potential interest.

  12. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3− aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; ...

    2015-09-25

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3−) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3more » and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. In addition, calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3− is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3− and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas–aerosol phase partitioning.« less

  13. Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce E. Penner

    2005-03-14

    Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near

  14. Thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibrium in system Ti-B-Si-C, synthesis and phases composition of borides and carbides layers on titanic alloyVT-1 at electron beam treatment in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnyagina, N. N.; Khaltanova, V. M.; Lapina, A. E.; Dasheev, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Composite layers on the basis of carbides and borides the titan and silicon on titanic alloy VT-1 are generated at diffused saturation in vacuum. Formation in a composite of MAX phase Ti3SiC2 is shown. Thermodynamic research of phase equilibrium in systems Ti-Si-C and Ti-B-C in the conditions of high vacuum is executed. The thermodynamics, formation mechanisms of superfirm layers borides and carbides of the titan and silicon are investigated.

  15. Thermodynamic calculation and experimental verification of the carbonitride-austenite equilibrium in Ti-Nb microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Heilong; Kirkaldy, J. S.

    1992-02-01

    The sublattice-regular solution model has been adapted to describe the thermodynamics of complex carbonitrides. This model has been applied to titanium- and niobium-bearing microalloyed steels for calculation of the mole fraction and composition of the carbonitride precipitates and the residual solute levels in the austenite. Both experimental results and calculations show that titanium nitride predominantly forms at very high temperatures and titanium-niobium carbides go to completion at low temperatures. Quantitative agreement between the experimental measurements and the predictions for carbonitride compositions as a function of temperature is demonstrated.

  16. Nested Markov Chain Monte Carlo Sampling of a Density Functional Theory Potential: Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Dense Fluid Nitrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    method [JChem. Phys. 130, 164104(2009) is applied to fluid N2. In this implementation of n(MC)2, isothermal - isobaric (NPT) ensemble sampling on the...Phys. 130, 164104 2009 is applied to fluid N2. In this implementation of nMC2, isothermal - isobaric NPT ensemble sampling on the basis of a pair...and Wk is a thermodynamic function appropriate to the ensemble being sampled. In the isothermal – isobaric NPT ensemble used below, W is defined as Wk

  17. Kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of adsorption of 2-biphenylamine and dibenzylamine from aqueous solutions by Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasheghani F., B.; Rajabi, F. H.; Omidi, M. H.; Shabanian, S.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite is synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. Experimental data are modelled by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm model fitted the equilibrium data for the dibenzylamine (DBA) and 2-biphenylamine (BPA) respectively, compared to the other isotherm models. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, Δ G°, Δ H°, and Δ S° showed that the DBA and BPA adsorption on bentonite nanocomposite is spontaneous and endothermic under examined conditions. Experimental data were also modeled using the adsorption kinetic models. The results show that the adsorption processes of DBA and BPA followed well the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Results indicated that Fe3O4/bentonite nanocomposite could be an alternative for more costly adsorbents used for organic toxicants removal.

  18. Removal of Direct Red 12B by garlic peel as a cheap adsorbent: Kinetics, thermodynamic and equilibrium isotherms study of removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaram, A.; Fathi, M. R.; Khodadoust, S.; Naraki, M.

    2014-06-01

    The removal of dyes from industrial waste is very important from health and hygiene point of view and for environmental protection. In this work, efficiency and performance of garlic peel (GP) adsorbent for the removal of Direct Red 12B (DR12B) from wastewater was investigated. The influence of variables including pH, concentration of the dye and amount of adsorbent, particle size, contact time and temperature on the dye removal has been investigated. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better with good correlation coefficient and the equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model. More than 99% removal efficiency was obtained within 25 min at adsorbent dose of 0.2 g per 50 ml for initial dye concentration of 50 mg L-1. Calculation of various thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibb's free energy, entropy and enthalpy of the on-going adsorption process indicate feasibility and endothermic nature of DR12B adsorption.

  19. LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE gas temperatures in loaded and unloaded plasmas during spraying of NiAl powders

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, T.L.; Detering, B.A.; Wilson, G.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to contribute to the science of the complex particle plasma interaction in the plasma spray process. The relationship between the chaotic torch, the nonequilibrium plasma, the accelerating vaporizing particle, and the particle substrate interaction must be understood to relate coating characteristics to process parameters. This will lead to improved models, scalability, and appropriate monitoring and control of the process. This work focuses on the nonequilibrium plasma plume through which the particles must pass. Present models are based on the best knowledge available, but do not predict particle size, velocity, and surface temperatures that are consistent with experiments. Plasmas at pressures at and below atmospheric have been shown to deviate from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). 15 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air suitable for numerical computation using time-dependent or shock-capturing methods, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.; Mugge, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were devised for use in either the time-dependent or shock-capturing computational methods. For the time-dependent method, curve fits were developed for p = p(e, rho), a = a(e, rho), and T = T(e, rho). For the shock-capturing method, curve fits were developed for h = h(p, rho) and T = T(p, rho). The ranges of validity for these curves fits were for temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th power to 10 to the 3d power amagats. These approximate curve fits are considered particularly useful when employed on advanced computers such as the Burroughs ILLIAC 4 or the CDC STAR.

  1. A Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy application based on Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium assumption for the elemental analysis of alexandrite gemstone and copper-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Giacomo, A.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Santagata, A.; Senesi, G. S.; Rossi, M.; Ghiara, M. R.; Capitelli, F.; De Pascale, O.

    2012-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an appealing technique to study laser-induced plasmas (LIPs), both from the basic diagnostics point of view and for analytical applications. LIPs are complex dynamic systems, expanding at supersonic velocities and undergoing a transition between different plasma regimes. If the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) condition is valid for such plasmas, several analytical methods can be employed and fast quantitative analyses can be performed on a variety of samples. In the present paper, a discussion about LTE is carried out and an innovative application to the analysis of the alexandrite gemstone is presented. In addition, a study about the influence of plasma parameters on the performance of LTE-based methods is reported for bronze and brass targets.

  2. A computationally efficient and accurate numerical representation of thermodynamic properties of steam and water for computations of non-equilibrium condensing steam flow in steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrubý, Jan

    2012-04-01

    Mathematical modeling of the non-equilibrium condensing transonic steam flow in the complex 3D geometry of a steam turbine is a demanding problem both concerning the physical concepts and the required computational power. Available accurate formulations of steam properties IAPWS-95 and IAPWS-IF97 require much computation time. For this reason, the modelers often accept the unrealistic ideal-gas behavior. Here we present a computation scheme based on a piecewise, thermodynamically consistent representation of the IAPWS-95 formulation. Density and internal energy are chosen as independent variables to avoid variable transformations and iterations. On the contrary to the previous Tabular Taylor Series Expansion Method, the pressure and temperature are continuous functions of the independent variables, which is a desirable property for the solution of the differential equations of the mass, energy, and momentum conservation for both phases.

  3. Thermodynamic, Kinetic, and Equilibrium Parameters for the Removal of Lead and Cadmium from Aqueous Solutions with Calcium Alginate Beads

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro-Cuevas-Villanueva, Ruth; Hidalgo-Vázquez, Aura Roxana; Cortés Penagos, Consuelo de Jesús; Cortés-Martínez, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    The sorption of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) by calcium alginate beads (CAB) from aqueous solutions in batch systems was investigated. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, as well as the sorption capacities of CAB in each system at different temperatures, were evaluated. The rate of sorption for both metals was rapid in the first 10 minutes and reached a maximum in 50 minutes. Sorption kinetic data were fitted to Lagergren, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models and it was found that the second-order kinetic model describes these data for the two metals; comparing kinetic parameters for Cd and Pb sorption a higher kinetic rate (K2) for Pb was observed, indicating that the interaction between lead cations and alginate beads was faster than for cadmium. Similarly, isotherm data were fitted to different models reported in literature and it was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich (L-F) and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) models describe the isotherms in all cases. CAB sorption capacity for cadmium was 27.4 mg/g and 150.4 mg/g for lead, at 25°C. Sorption capacities of Cd and Pb increase as temperature rises. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the cadmium and lead adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. It was also found that pH has an important effect on the adsorption of these metals by CAB, as more were removed at pH values between 6 and 7. PMID:24587740

  4. Kinetic, Equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on the biosorption of Cd(II) from aqueous solutions by the leaf biomass of Calotropis procera - 'Sodom apple'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwudumebi Overah, Loretta; Babalola, Oyebamiji.; Babarinde, Adesola; Oninla, Vincent; Olatunde, Abimbola

    2013-04-01

    The kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of the biosorption of Cd (II) from aqueous solution by the leaf biomass of Calotropis procera popularly known in western Nigeria as 'bom bom' and generally known as Sodom apple were investigated at different experimental conditions. Optimum conditions of pH,contact time, biomass dosage, initial metal ion concentration and temperature were determined to be 5, 60 minutes, 110 mg, 0.3 mM and 27°C respectively. The maximum biosorption capacity was found to be 8.91 mg/g. The kinetic studies indicated that the biosorption process of the metal ion followed the pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion models with an R-square value of 0.998 and 0.985 respectively. Equilibrium studies showed that the biosorption of Cd (II) is well represented by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms but the Langmuir model gave a better fit with an R-square value of 0.979,Langmuir constant, bm of 0.0080 and monolayer adsorption capacity, μm of 123.46. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG° -4.846 kJmol-1, ΔH° 10.60 kJmol-1 and ΔS° 0.052 kJK-1mol-1) showed that the biosorption of Cd (II)is feasible, spontaneous, endothermic and highly disordered in nature under the experimental conditions. Thesefindings indicate that the leaf of Calotropis procera could be employed in the removal of Cd (II) from industrial effluents. Key words: Calotropis procera, Cadmium, Adsorption isotherm.

  5. The thermodynamics of a black hole in equilibrium implies the breakdown of Einstein equations on a macroscopic near-horizon shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastopoulos, Charis; Savvidou, Ntina

    2016-01-01

    We study a black hole of mass M, enclosed within a spherical box, in equilibrium with its Hawking radiation. We show that the spacetime geometry inside the box is described by the Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations for radiation, except for a thin shell around the horizon. We use the maximum entropy principle to show that the invariant width of the shell is of order √{M} , its entropy is of order M and its temperature of order 1/√{M} (in Planck units). Thus, the width of the shell is much larger than the Planck length. Our approach is to insist on thermodynamic consistency when classical general relativity coexists with the Hawking temperature in the description of a gravitating system. No assumptions about an underlying theory are made and no restrictions are placed on the origins of the new physics near the horizon. We only employ classical general relativity and the principles of thermodynamics. Our result is strengthened by an analysis of the trace anomaly associated to the geometry inside the box, i.e., the regime where quantum field effects become significant correspond to the shells of maximum entropy around the horizon.

  6. Thermodynamics at the nanoscale: phase diagrams of nickel-carbon nanoclusters and equilibrium constants for phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Yannick; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C

    2014-10-21

    Using reactive molecular dynamics simulations, the melting behavior of nickel-carbon nanoclusters is examined. The phase diagrams of icosahedral and Wulff polyhedron clusters are determined using both the Lindemann index and the potential energy. Formulae are derived for calculating the equilibrium constants and the solid and liquid fractions during a phase transition, allowing more rational determination of the melting temperature with respect to the arbitrary Lindemann value. These results give more insight into the properties of nickel-carbon nanoclusters in general and can specifically be very useful for a better understanding of the synthesis of carbon nanotubes using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition method.

  7. Application of Glycyrrhiza glabra root as a novel adsorbent in the removal of toluene vapors: equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi-Moghadam, Fazel; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Khiadani Hajian, Mehdi; Momenbeik, Fariborz; Nourmoradi, Heshmatollah; Hatamipour, Mohammad Sadegh

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the removal of toluene from gaseous solution through Glycyrrhiza glabra root (GGR) as a waste material. The batch adsorption experiments were conducted at various conditions including contact time, adsorbate concentration, humidity, and temperature. The adsorption capacity was increased by raising the sorbent humidity up to 50 percent. The adsorption of toluene was also increased over contact time by 12 h when the sorbent was saturated. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich model fitted the adsorption data better than other kinetic and isotherm models, respectively. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm also showed that the sorption by GGR was physical in nature. The results of the thermodynamic analysis illustrated that the adsorption process is exothermic. GGR as a novel adsorbent has not previously been used for the adsorption of pollutants.

  8. Scaled effective solvent method for predicting the equilibrium ensemble of structures with analysis of thermodynamic properties of amorphous polyethylene glycol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeyoung; Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A; Kim, Hyungjun

    2013-01-24

    Water-soluble polymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) are critical components of industrial processes ranging from drug delivery to water purification. However, the understanding of the microscopic structure of these polymers in water and of the thermodynamics of the mixtures is limited because available experimental techniques (such as SLS and SANS) give little information about conformations and provide even the radius of gyration only in the dilute limit (<~5 wt % PEG). Computer simulations employing Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) techniques can provide an atomistic molecular structure; however, such approaches have difficulties in predicting the equilibrium polymer configurations of high-molecular-weight polymers at normal densities and in obtaining entropies and free energies directly from the MD. Here, we develop the scaled effective solvent (SES) method to predict the equilibrium ensemble of polymer configurations, which we illustrate for the case of a 20 kDa PEG (455 monomers) at a 25 wt % PEG aqueous solution (3339 waters per PEG chain). We evaluate the free energy and entropy of the members of this ensemble including explicit water, validating that it leads to average sizes (R(g)) observed experimentally and that all members of the ensemble have favorable free energies. With the SES method validated to provide well-equilibrated polymer chains in water, it should be useful for predicting ensembles of polymer chains in polymer melts and in solvents.

  9. Removal of malathion from aqueous solution using De-Acidite FF-IP resin and determination by UPLC-MS/MS: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Mu; Alothman, Z A; Khan, M R

    2013-10-15

    In the present study, De-Acidite FF-IP resin was used to remove a highly toxic and persistent organophosphorus pesticide (malathion) from the aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed as a function of various experimental parameters such as effect of pH (2-10), contact time (10-120 min), resin dose (0.05-0.5 g), initial malathion concentration (0.5-2.5 µg mL(-1)) and temperature (25-65°C). The concentration of malathion was determined using a sensitive, selective and rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. The uptake rate of malathion on De-Acidite FF-IP resin was rapid and equilibrium established within 40 min. Kinetics studies showed better applicability for pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data was fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and the isotherm constants were calculated for malathion. The values of thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) were computed from the Van't Hoff plot of lnKC vs. 1/T which showed that the adsorption of malathion was feasible, endothermic and spontaneous. The regeneration studies were carried out which demonstrated a decrease in the recovery of malathion from 95% to 68% after five consecutive cycles. Breakthrough and exhaustive capacities of malathion were found to be 1.25 mg g(-1) and 3.5 mg g(-1), respectively.

  10. Using the chemical equilibrium partitioning space to explore factors influencing the phase distribution of compounds involved in secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wania, F.; Lei, Y. D.; Wang, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Goss, K.-U.

    2015-03-01

    Many atmospheric and chemical variables influence the partitioning equilibrium between gas phase and condensed phases of compounds implicated in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The large number of factors and their interaction makes it often difficult to assess their relative importance and concerted impact. Here we introduce a two-dimensional space which maps regions of dominant atmospheric phase distribution within a coordinate system defined by equilibrium partition coefficients between the gas phase, an aqueous phase and a water-insoluble organic matter (WIOM) phase. Placing compounds formed from the oxidation of n-alkanes, terpenes and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons on the maps based on their predicted partitioning properties allows for a simple graphical assessment of their equilibrium phase distribution behaviour. Specifically, it allows for the simultaneous visualisation and quantitative comparison of the impact on phase distribution of changes in atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, salinity, WIOM-phase polarity, organic aerosol load, and liquid water content) and chemical properties (such as oxidation state, molecular size, functionalisation, and dimerisation). The graphical analysis reveals that the addition of hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups increases the affinity of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons for the aqueous phase more rapidly than their affinity for WIOM, suggesting that the aqueous phase may often be relevant even for substances that are considerably larger than the C2 and C3 compounds that are typically believed to be associated with aqueous SOA. In particular, the maps identify some compounds that contribute to SOA formation if partitioning to both WIOM and aqueous phase is considered but would remain in the gas phase if either condensed phase were neglected. For example, many semi-volatile α-pinene oxidation products will contribute to aqueous SOA under the conditions of high liquid water content

  11. Using the chemical equilibrium partitioning space to explore factors influencing the phase distribution of compounds involved in secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wania, F.; Lei, Y. D.; Wang, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Goss, K.-U.

    2014-10-01

    Many atmospheric and chemical variables influence the partitioning equilibrium between gas phase and condensed phases of compounds implicated in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The large number of factors and their interaction makes it often difficult to assess their relative importance and concerted impact. Here we introduce a two-dimensional space, which maps regions of dominant atmospheric phase distribution within a coordinate system defined by equilibrium partitioning coefficients between the gas phase, an aqueous phase and a water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) phase. Placing compounds formed from the oxidation of n-alkanes, terpenes and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons on the maps based on their predicted partitioning properties allows for a simple graphical assessment of their equilibrium phase distribution behaviour. Specifically, it allows for the simultaneous visualization and quantitative comparison of the impact on phase distribution of changes in atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, salinity, WIOM phase polarity, organic aerosol load, and liquid water content), and chemical properties (such as oxidation state, molecular size, functionalization, and dimerisation). The graphical analysis reveals that the addition of hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups increases the affinity of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons for the aqueous phase more rapidly than their affinity for WIOM, suggesting that the aqueous phase may often be relevant even for substances that are considerably larger than the C2 and C3 compounds that are typically believed to be associated with aqueous SOA. In particular, the maps identify some compounds that contribute to SOA formation if partitioning to both WIOM and aqueous phase is considered, but would remain in the gas phase if either condensed phase were neglected. For example, many semi-volatile α-pinene oxidation products will contribute to aqueous SOA under the high liquid water content

  12. Thermodynamics of Radiation Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, Eduardo; de la Selva, Sara Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of the electromagnetic radiation in a cavity of a given volume and temperature. We found three levels of description, the thermodynamics of one mode, the thermodynamics of the distribution of frequencies in a band by summing over the frequencies in it and the global thermodynamics by summing over all the…

  13. On the 2D-transition, hysteresis and thermodynamic equilibrium of Kr adsorption on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Diao, Rui; Fan, Chunyan; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2015-12-15

    The adsorption and desorption of Kr on graphite at temperatures in the range 60-88K, was systematically investigated using a combination of several simulation techniques including: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC), Canonical kinetic-Monte Carlo (C-kMC) and the Mid-Density Scheme (MDS). Particular emphasis was placed on the gas-solid, gas-liquid and liquid-solid 2D phase transitions. For temperatures below the bulk triple point, the transition from a 2D-liquid-like monolayer to a 2D-solid-like state is manifested as a sub-step in the isotherm. A further increase in the chemical potential leads to another rearrangement of the 2D-solid-like state from a disordered structure to an ordered structure that is signalled by (1) another sub-step in the monolayer region and (2) a spike in the plot of the isosteric heat versus density at loadings close to the dense monolayer coverage concentration. Whenever a 2D transition occurs in a grand canonical isotherm it is always associated with a hysteresis, a feature that is not widely recognised in the literature. We studied in details this hysteresis with the analysis of the canonical isotherm, obtained with C-kMC, which exhibits a van der Waals (vdW) type loop with a vertical segment in the middle. We complemented the hysteresis loop and the vdW curve with the analysis of the equilibrium transition obtained with the MDS, and found that the equilibrium transition coincides exactly with the vertical segment of the C-kMC isotherm, indicating the co-existence of two phases at equilibrium. We also analysed adsorption at higher layers and found that the 2D-coexistence is also observed, provided that the temperature is well below the triple point. Finally the 2D-critical temperatures were obtained for the first three layers and they are in good agreement with the experimental data in the literature.

  14. Nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium processes in ozone - Implications for the energy budget of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milynczak, Martin G.

    1991-01-01

    The conversion of chemical potential energy and infrared radiative energy to kinetic energy by non-LTE processes involving ozone is a potentially significant source of heat in the terrestrial upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Heating rates are calculated and compared using two different statistical equilibrium models previously applied in the analysis of measurements of limb emission from ozone. The calculated heating depends strongly on the assumed distribution and relaxation of energy in the quasi-nascent ozone molecule. Finally, in the absence of a detailed data base of rate coefficients it may be possible to estimate the heating rate due to non-LTE processes in ozone from appropriate satellite measurements of the ozone concentration and of the infrared emission from ozone in the 9-12 micron spectral interval.

  15. Stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Aurell, Erik

    2014-04-01

    'Stochastic thermodynamics as a conceptual framework combines the stochastic energetics approach introduced a decade ago by Sekimoto [1] with the idea that entropy can consistently be assigned to a single fluctuating trajectory [2]'. This quote, taken from Udo Seifert's [3] 2008 review, nicely summarizes the basic ideas behind stochastic thermodynamics: for small systems, driven by external forces and in contact with a heat bath at a well-defined temperature, stochastic energetics [4] defines the exchanged work and heat along a single fluctuating trajectory and connects them to changes in the internal (system) energy by an energy balance analogous to the first law of thermodynamics. Additionally, providing a consistent definition of trajectory-wise entropy production gives rise to second-law-like relations and forms the basis for a 'stochastic thermodynamics' along individual fluctuating trajectories. In order to construct meaningful concepts of work, heat and entropy production for single trajectories, their definitions are based on the stochastic equations of motion modeling the physical system of interest. Because of this, they are valid even for systems that are prevented from equilibrating with the thermal environment by external driving forces (or other sources of non-equilibrium). In that way, the central notions of equilibrium thermodynamics, such as heat, work and entropy, are consistently extended to the non-equilibrium realm. In the (non-equilibrium) ensemble, the trajectory-wise quantities acquire distributions. General statements derived within stochastic thermodynamics typically refer to properties of these distributions, and are valid in the non-equilibrium regime even beyond the linear response. The extension of statistical mechanics and of exact thermodynamic statements to the non-equilibrium realm has been discussed from the early days of statistical mechanics more than 100 years ago. This debate culminated in the development of linear response

  16. Equilibrium isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics studies for congo red adsorption using calcium alginate beads impregnated with nano-goethite.

    PubMed

    Munagapati, Venkata Subbaiah; Kim, Dong-Su

    2017-03-24

    The present study is concerned with the batch adsorption of congo red (CR) from an aqueous solution using calcium alginate beads impregnated with nano-goethite (CABI nano-goethite) as an adsorbent. The optimum conditions for CR removal were determined by studying operational variables viz. pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial dye ion concentration and temperature. The CABI nano-goethite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X- ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analysis. The CR sorption data onto CABI nano-goethite were described using Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Temkin isotherm models. The results show that the best fit was achieved with the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity (181.1mg/g) of CR was occurred at pH 3.0. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order model. Desorption experiments were carried out to explore the feasibility of regenerating the adsorbent and the adsorbed CR from CABI nano-goethite. The best desorbing agent was 0.1M NaOH with an efficiency of 94% recovery. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG°, ΔH°, and ΔS° for the CR adsorption were determined by using adsorption capacities at five different temperatures (293, 303, 313, 323 and 303K). Results show that the adsorption process was endothermic and favoured at high temperature.

  17. Nested Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling of a density functional theory potential: equilibrium thermodynamics of dense fluid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Coe, Joshua D; Sewell, Thomas D; Shaw, M Sam

    2009-08-21

    An optimized variant of the nested Markov chain Monte Carlo [n(MC)(2)] method [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 164104 (2009)] is applied to fluid N(2). In this implementation of n(MC)(2), isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensemble sampling on the basis of a pair potential (the "reference" system) is used to enhance the efficiency of sampling based on Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof density functional theory with a 6-31G(*) basis set (PBE6-31G(*), the "full" system). A long sequence of Monte Carlo steps taken in the reference system is converted into a trial step taken in the full system; for a good choice of reference potential, these trial steps have a high probability of acceptance. Using decorrelated samples drawn from the reference distribution, the pressure and temperature of the full system are varied such that its distribution overlaps maximally with that of the reference system. Optimized pressures and temperatures then serve as input parameters for n(MC)(2) sampling of dense fluid N(2) over a wide range of thermodynamic conditions. The simulation results are combined to construct the Hugoniot of nitrogen fluid, yielding predictions in excellent agreement with experiment.

  18. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment.

  19. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multi-layer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: (1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), (2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and (3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. These salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar like amorphous phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material accumulates in the particle surface layer upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass transfer limited uptake of condensable organic compounds onto wall deposited particles or directly onto the Teflon chamber walls of smog chambers can have profound influence on the

  20. Monitoring Thermodynamic Equilibrium Processes at 10 K: Conformational Isomerization and Photochromism of O4+ in Argon Matrices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ryan M.; Moore, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Bands corresponding to structural isomers of matrix-isolated O4+ are observed upon deposition of ions into argon matrices doped with moderate (0.1-1%) concentrations of O2. These bands have been assigned based on previous matrix isolation spectroscopy, as well as high-level computational studies. In the current work, these bands are observed upon co-deposition of Cu- and Ar+ ions at low-energies. The Cu- is present only as a non-interacting counter-ion, as is verified by studies using exclusively high-energy Ar+ beams; in this case, the spectroscopy of the O4+ species is completely equivalent, however there is now also an intense peak corresponding to O4- counter-ion species. Following deposition at 20 K, the matrices are cooled to 10 K, where the FTIR spectra show a band at 1119 wn for the trans-O4+ isomer, and a doublet at 1329/1331 wn, corresponding to the cyclic-O4+ isomer, based on earlier work. There is also a band at 1186 wn that was previously assigned to a larger O6+ complex. A temperature series taken in 1 K increments between 10 and 20 K reveal two reversible interconversion processes: the 1119 wn band decreases between 10 and 14 K while a new band grows in at 1242 wn, and the 1186 band shows a similar interconversion between 11 and 16 K with the 1331 wn peak of the cyclic-O4+ doublet, while the 1329 wn peak diminishes and broadens over the same temperature range. The interconverting peak pairs can be converted into equilibrium constants based on relative changes in integrated intensities, and the associated van't Hoff plots show linear trends with ΔH values in the range expected based on computational work. Finally, the 1186 wn and 1331 wn peak pair exhibit strong photochromism at 10 K: irradiation with red light converts 1186 to 1331, while irradiation with blue light shifts the equilibrium in the other direction. In both cases the phenomena is completely reversible and reproducible, with the original intensity ratio being restored after a few minutes

  1. Thermodynamic and Structural Aspects of Equilibrium and Mechanically Milled Yttrium BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXYGEN(6+DELTA) Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, David Soong-Hua

    The equilibrium relationships between partial pressure of oxygen, temperature, lattice parameters and oxygen content in the YBa_2Cu_3O _{6+delta} superconductor were examined by differential scanning calorimetry, high -temperature x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and measurement of pressure versus concentration isotherms. Oxygen pressures ranged from 1 mbar to 1013 mbar and temperatures ranged from 400^circC to 750 ^circC. Lattice parameters as a function of temperature and partial pressure of oxygen were measured. P(c) isotherms and TGA were used to measure oxygen content as a function of temperature. A phase line separating the low temperature orthorhombic phase and the high temperature tetragonal phase was determined. No evidence of a miscibility gap between the two phases was found in the range of temperatures and oxygen pressures explored. From the data, the excess enthalpy and entropy through the orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transition was calculated. It was found that the excess entropy is less than the entropy of mixing for an ideal solution. DSC was used to measure enthalpies for the transition and to calculate activation energies for the process. High temperature x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry were used to study the effect of high energy mechanical deformation on the structural and thermal characteristics of YBa_2Cu_3O _{6+delta} powder. Broadening of Bragg peaks due to the reduction of grain size makes the distinction between orthorhombic and tetragonal phases of YBa_2Cu _3O_{6+delta} difficult after only one hour of ball milling. The equilibrium orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transition may occur within the first hour of ball-milling. Longer milling times (> 5hrs) produce a cationic disorder on the yttrium and barium sites. A metastable cubic (Y_ {1/3}Ba_{2/3} )CuO_{2+delta} structure with a = 3.86A is formed. Further mechanical deformation does not induce the formation of an amorphous phase; rather, an

  2. High-temperature thermodynamics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margrave, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    High temperature thermodynamics requiring species and phases identification, crystal structures, molecular geometries and vibrational, rotational and electronic energy levels and equilibrium constants

  3. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of 2-nitroaniline onto activated carbon prepared from cotton stalk fibre.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunquan; Zheng, Zheng; Huang, Xingfa; Zhao, Guohua; Feng, Jingwei; Zhang, Jibiao

    2009-07-15

    Activated carbon prepared from cotton stalk fibre has been utilized as an adsorbent for the removal of 2-nitroaniline from aqueous solutions. The influence of adsorbent mass, contact time and temperature on the adsorption was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The equilibrium data at different temperatures were fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin, Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir-Freundlich models. The Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm was found to best describe the experimental data. The adsorption amount increased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacity of 2-nitroaniline was found to be 383 mg/g for initial 2-nitroaniline concentration of 200mg/L at 45 degrees C. The kinetic rates were modeled by using the Lagergren-first-order, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. The pseudo-second-order model was found to explain the adsorption kinetics most effectively. It was also found that the pore diffusion played an important role in the adsorption, and intraparticle diffusion was the rate-limiting step at the first 30 min for the temperatures of 25, 35 and 45 degrees C. FTIR and (13)C NMR study revealed that the amino and isocyanate groups present on the surface of the adsorbent were involved in chemical interaction with 2-nitroaniline. The negative change in free energy (Delta G degrees) and positive change in enthalpy (Delta H degrees) indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  4. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas-phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2 (MCMv3.2), an aerosol dynamics and particle-phase chemistry module (which considers acid-catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion-limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study (1) the evaporation of liquid dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles, (2) the slow and almost particle-size-independent evaporation of α-pinene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, (3) the mass-transfer-limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), and (4) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. In the smog chamber experiments, these salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar-like amorphous-phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if the concentration of low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material at the particle surface increases upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass-transfer-limited uptake of condensable organic compounds

  5. Refining thermodynamic constants for mercury(II)-sulfides in equilibrium with metacinnabar at sub-micromolar aqueous sulfide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Drott, A; Björn, E; Bouchet, S; Skyllberg, U

    2013-05-07

    An important issue in mercury (Hg) biogeochemistry is to explore the influence of aqueous Hg(II) forms on bacterial uptake, and subsequent methyl mercury formation, under iron(III) and sulfate reducing conditions. The success of this is dependent on relevant information on the thermodynamic stability of Hg-sulfides. In the present study, we determined the solubility of a commercially available HgS(s) phase, which was shown by X-ray diffraction to be a mixture of 83% metacinnabar and 17% cinnabar. At aqueous sulfide concentrations between 0.060 and 84 μM, well below levels in previous studies, we report a solubility product (log Ksp ± SE) of -36.8 ± 0.1 (HgS(s) + H(+) = Hg(2+) + HS(-), I = 0, T = 25 °C, pH 6-10, n = 20) for metacinnabar. This value is 0.7 log units higher than previous estimates. Complementing our data with data from Paquette and Helz (1997), we took advantage of a large data set (n = 65) covering a wide range of aqueous sulfide (0.06 μM-140 mM) and pH (1-11). On the basis of this, we report refined formation constants (±SE) for the three aqueous Hg(II)-sulfide species proposed by Schwarzenbach and Widmer (1963): Hg(2+) + 2HS(-) = Hg(SH)2(0); log K = 39.1 ± 0.1, Hg(2+) + 2HS(-) = HgS2H(-) + H(+); log K = 32.5 ± 0.1, Hg(2+) + 2HS(-) = HgS2(2-) + 2H(+); log K = 23.2 ± 0.1. Our refined log K values differ from previous estimates by 0.2-0.6 log units. Furthermore, at the low sulfide concentrations in our study we could rule out the value of -10.0 for the reaction HgS(s) + H2O = HgOHSH(aq) as reported by Dyrssén and Wedborg (1991). By establishing a solubility product for the most environmentally relevant HgS(s) phase, metacinnabar, and extending the range of aqueous sulfide concentrations to sub-micromolar levels, relevant for soils, sediments, and waters, this study decreases the uncertainty in stability constants for Hg-sulfides, thereby improving the basis for understanding the bioavailability and mobility of Hg(II) in the environment.

  6. Experimental studies on equilibrium adsorption isosteres and determination of the thermodynamic quantities of polar media on alumina Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonova, Albena

    2017-03-01

    The present work is a revieif of theoretical and experimental study on the adsorption performance of the adsorbent Alumina (Al2O3) used in the adsorption system. An experimental investigation on the equilibrium adsorption isosteres at low pressure (< 1 atm) of working pairs Al2O3/H2O and Al2O3/C2H6O2 is carried out. The isovolume measurement method is adopted in the test setup to directly measure the saturated vapor pressures of working pairs at vapor-liquid equilibrium (dG=0 and dμi=0). Quantity adsorbed is determined from pressure, volume and temperature using gas law. The isosteric heat of adsorption is calculated from the slope of the plot of lnP versus 1/T different amounts of adsorbate onto adsorbent as follows: 0,01 vol% Al2O3/H2O; 0,03 vol% Al2O3/H2O; 0,1 vol% Al2O3/H2O; 0,01 vol% Al2O3/C2H6O2; 0,03 vol% Al2O3/C2H6O2; 0,1 vol% Al2O3/C2H6O2. This study shows that adsorption working pair Al2O3 C2H6O2 has better adsorption performances than those of the A2O3/H2O. Surface acidity! is a most important property! far both adsorption and catalysis and therefore is examined structure of active sites of alumina surface. Thermodynamic parameters such as isosteric heat of adsorption, isosteric enthalpy and entropy of adsorption are critical design variables in estimating the performance and predicting the mechanism of an adsorption process and are also one of the basic requirements for the characterization and optimization of an adsorption process

  7. Removal of hazardous azopyrazole dye from an aqueous solution using rice straw as a waste adsorbent: Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bindary, Ashraf A.; El-Sonbati, Adel Z.; Al-Sarawy, Ahmad A.; Mohamed, Khaled S.; Farid, Mansour A.

    2015-02-01

    In this research, activated carbonmade from rice straw (ACRS) was synthesized simply by a low cost and nontoxic procedure and used for the adsorption of hazardous azopyrazole dye. The effect of different variables in the batch method as a function of solution pH, contact time, concentration of adsorbate, adsorbent dosage and temperature were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertaine. Surface modification of ACRS using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was obtained. More than 75% removal efficiency was obtained within 75 min at adsorbent dose of 0.5 g for initial dye concentration of 30-100 mg L-1 at pH 3. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by the isotherm models namely, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption and the isotherm constants were determined. The kinetic data obtained with different initial concentration and temperature were analyzed using a pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated and found to be +13.25 kJ mol-1 indicating that the adsorption is physisorption. The thermodynamics of the adsorption indicated spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. The results indicate that ACRS could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of acid dyes from aqueous solution.

  8. Kinetic, equilibrium isotherm and thermodynamic studies of Cr(VI) adsorption onto low-cost adsorbent developed from peanut shell activated with phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    ALOthman, Zeid A; Naushad, Mu; Ali, Rahmat

    2013-05-01

    A particular agricultural waste, peanut shell, has been used as precursor for activated carbon production by chemical activation with H₃PO₄. Unoxidized activated carbon was prepared in nitrogen atmosphere which was then heated in air at a desired temperature to get oxidized activated carbon. The prepared carbons were characterized for surface area, surface morphology, and pore volume and utilized for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. Batch mode experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, contact time, particle size, adsorbent dose, initial concentration of adsorbate, and temperature on the adsorption of Cr(VI). Cr(VI) adsorption was significantly dependent on solution pH, and the optimum adsorption was observed at pH 2. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data obtained at different initial Cr(VI) concentrations. The adsorption kinetic data were described very well by the pseudo-second-order model. Equilibrium isotherm data were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin models. The results showed that the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model fitted the data better in the temperature range studied. The adsorption capacity which was found to increase with temperature showed the endothermic nature of Cr(VI) adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's Free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°), and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were evaluated.

  9. An Internally Consistent Thermodynamic Model for the System CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 Derived Primarily from Phase Equilibrium Data.

    PubMed

    Gasparik

    2000-01-01

    An internally consistent thermodynamic model for the subsolidus system CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) was developed and refined using primarily data from phase equilibrium experiments. The solution properties of pyroxenes and garnet were approximated with an ionic model, with independent mixing on adjacent crystallographic sites. This approach simplified the calculation of phase relations by allowing sequential calculation of the site occupancies. Enthalpy, entropy, and volume differences, nominally at 970 K, were derived for all participating phases by matching as closely as possible the experimentally observed phase relations. Although thermochemical measurements were not used directly in the refinement, the results were continuously monitored and compared with the thermochemical data to achieve a close match. The new model can be used to calculate phase diagrams for the CMAS system and its subsystems in the whole pressure range of the upper mantle. Simple empirical corrections for the effects of Na, Fe, Cr, etc., could potentially be introduced to make the model applicable to the thermobarometry of chemically complex mantle materials. Application of the new model to garnet lherzolite xenoliths from northern Lesotho and garnet peridotites from Norway supports the proposals for higher temperatures of the continental lithosphere.

  10. Synthesis and properties of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles for removal of aniline from aqueous solution: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, powder activated carbon (PAC) and magnetic nanoparticles of iron (III) oxide were used for synthesis of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles (AC-Fe3O4 MNPs) as an adsorbent for the removal of aniline. The characteristics of adsorbent were evaluated by SEM, TEM, XRD and BET. Also, the impact of different parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, aniline initials concentration and solution temperature were studied. The experimental data investigated by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and two models kinetically of pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order. The results indicated that the adsorption followed Langmuir and pseudo second-order models with correlation r2 > 0.98 and r2 > 0.99, respectively. The equilibrium time was obtained after 5 h. According to Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity was 90.91 mg/g at pH = 6, and 20°C. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that adsorption of aniline on magnetic activated carbon was exothermic and spontaneous. This synthesized AC-Fe3O4 MNPs due to have advantages such as easy and rapid separation from solution could be applied as an adsorbent effective for removal of pollutants such as aniline from water and wastewater. PMID:23414171

  11. Removal of Bisphenol A aqueous solution using surfactant-modified natural zeolite: Taguchi's experimental design, adsorption kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Genç, Nevim; Kılıçoğlu, Ödül; Narci, Ali Oğuzhan

    2017-02-01

    In this study, surfactant-modified natural zeolite was used to remove Bisphenol A (BPA) from aqueous solutions. Kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of BPA adsorption on the adsorbent surfaces were investigated. The experimental data were described with the Temkin isotherm and the pseudo-second- order kinetic model. Taguchi's robust design approach was used to optimize adsorption of BPA. Experimentation was planned as per Taguchi's L27 orthogonal array. Tests were conducted with different adsorbate amount, pH, time, initial concentration of BPA, temperature and agitation speed. The optimum levels of control factors for maximum total organic carbon removal were defined (adsorbate amount at 0.25 g, pH at 7, time at 30 min, initial concentration of BPA at 50 mg/L, temperature at 30°C and agitation speed at 200 rpm). The ANOVA analysis shown that the most effective control factor is adsorbent dosage; its contribution is 56.4%. Contribution of pH and mixing rate are 7.5% and 7.6%, respectively. A confirmation experiment was conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the optimal combination. The observed value of S/N (ηobs = 39) ratio is compared with that of the predicted value (ηopt = 48). The prediction error, that is, ηopt - ηobs = 9, is within CI value.

  12. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by a waste mud from copper mine industry: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Kemer, Baris; Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-07-30

    The objective of this study was to assess the adsorption potential of a waste mud (WM) for the removal of lead (Pb(II)) ions from aqueous solutions. The WM was activated with NaOH in order to increase its adsorption capacity. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch system as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, activated-waste mud (a-WM) concentration, temperature, etc. Optimum pH was specified as 4.0. The adsorption kinetic studies indicated that the overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of a-WM was obtained by using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and both models fitted well. Adsorption capacity for Pb(II) was found to be 24.4 mg g(-1) for 10 g L(-1) of a-WM concentration. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (Delta G degrees), enthalpy (Delta H degrees), and entropy (DeltaS degrees) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on the a-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic, at temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. Desorption studies were carried out successfully with diluted HCl solutions. The results indicate that a-WM can be used as an effective and no-cost adsorbent for the treatment of industrial wastewaters contaminated with Pb(II) ions.

  13. Synthesis and properties of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles for removal of aniline from aqueous solution: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Kakavandi, Babak; Jonidi, Ahmad; Rezaei, Roshanak; Nasseri, Simin; Ameri, Ahmad; Esrafily, Ali

    2013-01-01

    In this study, powder activated carbon (PAC) and magnetic nanoparticles of iron (III) oxide were used for synthesis of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles (AC-Fe3O4 MNPs) as an adsorbent for the removal of aniline. The characteristics of adsorbent were evaluated by SEM, TEM, XRD and BET. Also, the impact of different parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, aniline initials concentration and solution temperature were studied. The experimental data investigated by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and two models kinetically of pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order. The results indicated that the adsorption followed Langmuir and pseudo second-order models with correlation r(2) > 0.98 and r(2) > 0.99, respectively. The equilibrium time was obtained after 5 h. According to Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity was 90.91 mg/g at pH = 6, and 20°C. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that adsorption of aniline on magnetic activated carbon was exothermic and spontaneous. This synthesized AC-Fe3O4 MNPs due to have advantages such as easy and rapid separation from solution could be applied as an adsorbent effective for removal of pollutants such as aniline from water and wastewater.

  14. Retrieval of Kinetic Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Abundance from Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Limb Emission Measurements made by the SABER Experiment on the TIMED Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Wintersteiner, Peter P.; Picard, Richard H.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Gordley, Larry L.; Russell, James M., III

    2002-01-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment was launched onboard the TIMED satellite in December, 2001. SABER is designed to provide measurements of the key radiative and chemical sources and sinks of energy in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). SABER measures Earth limb emission in 10 broadband radiometer channels ranging from 1.27 micrometers to 17 micrometers. Measurements are made both day and night over the latitude range from 54 deg. S to 87 deg. N with alternating hemisphere coverage every 60 days. In this paper we concentrate on retrieved profiles of kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) and CO2 volume mixing ratio (vmr), inferred from SABER-observed 15 micrometer and 4.3 micrometer limb emissions, respectively. SABER-measured limb radiances are in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) in the MLT region. The complexity of non-LTE radiation transfer combined with the large volume of data measured by SABER requires new retrieval approaches and radiative transfer techniques to accurately and efficiently retrieve the data products. In this paper we present the salient features of the coupled non-LTE T(sub k)/CO2 retrieval algorithm, along with preliminary results.

  15. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid.

    PubMed

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-04-09

    In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid-liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions.

  16. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium limb radiance from O3 and CO2 in the 9-11 micrometer spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David P.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Mlynczak, Martin G.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of mesospheric and thermospheric O3 abundance in the terrestrial atmosphere often uses 9-11 micrometer thermal emission. In this paper, we apply a line-by-line non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiance model to this spectral region and investigate the conditions of LTE breakdown and the effect that this has on the limb radiance measured by an i.r. sounder. Monochromatic and band-integrated radiance calculations have been performed for limb view tangent heights between 55 and 105 km under daytime and nighttime conditions. Non-LTE emission from both O3 and CO2 are shown to be important with the divergence of radiance from LTE values and the diurnal variation being band dependent. We have shown that the contribution of the CO2 bands to the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere O3 channel is significant for daytime conditions at tangent heights above about 60 km. A study has been made to choose O3 sounding channel spectral passbands for the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder. High resolution calculations are required to determine those spectral intervals that will filter radiance from selected bands and characterize their non-LTE behavior. This will allow for improved O3 retrievals above 70 km and non-LTE studies.

  17. Interactions between aerosol absorption, thermodynamics, dynamics, and microphysics and their impacts on a multiple-cloud system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Li, Zhanqing; Mok, Jungbin; Ahn, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Byung-Gon; Choi, Yong-Sang; Jung, Chang-Hoon; Yoo, Hye Lim

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates how the increasing concentration of black carbon aerosols, which act as radiation absorbers as well as agents for the cloud-particle nucleation, affects stability, dynamics and microphysics in a multiple-cloud system using simulations. Simulations show that despite increases in stability due to increasing concentrations of black carbon aerosols, there are increases in the averaged updraft mass fluxes (over the whole simulation domain and period). This is because aerosol-enhanced evaporative cooling intensifies convergence near the surface. This increase in the intensity of convergence induces an increase in the frequency of updrafts with the low range of speeds, leading to the increase in the averaged updraft mass fluxes. The increase in the frequency of updrafts induces that in the number of condensation entities and this leads to more condensation and cloud liquid that acts to be a source of the accretion of cloud liquid by precipitation. Hence, eventually, there is more accretion that offsets suppressed autoconversion, which results in negligible changes in cumulative precipitation as aerosol concentrations increase. The increase in the frequency of updrafts with the low range of speeds alters the cloud-system organization (represented by cloud-depth spatiotemporal distributions and cloud-cell population) by supporting more low-depth clouds. The altered organization in turn alters precipitation spatiotemporal distributions by generating more weak precipitation events. Aerosol-induced reduction in solar radiation that reaches the surface induces more occurrences of small-value surface heat fluxes, which in turn supports the more low-depth clouds and weak precipitation together with the greater occurrence of low-speed updrafts.

  18. Thermodynamics Behavior of Germanium During Equilibrium Reactions between FeOx-CaO-SiO2-MgO Slag and Molten Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuva, M. A. H.; Rhamdhani, M. A.; Brooks, G. A.; Masood, S.; Reuter, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The distribution ratio of germanium (Ge), L_{{Ge}}^{s/m} during equilibrium reactions between magnesia-saturated FeOx-CaO-SiO2 (FCS) slag and molten copper has been measured under oxygen partial pressures from 10-10 to 10-7 atm and at temperatures 1473 to 1623 K (1200 to 1350 °C). It was observed that the Ge distribution ratio increases with increasing oxygen partial pressure, and with decreasing temperature. It was also observed that the distribution ratio is strongly dependent on slag basicity. The distribution ratio was observed to increase with increasing optical basicity. At fixed CaO concentration in the slag, the distribution ratio was found to increase with increasing Fe/SiO2 ratio, tending to a plateau at L_{{Ge}}^{s/m} = 0.8. This behavior is consistent with the assessment of ionic bond fraction carried out in this study, and suggested the acidic nature of germanium oxide (GeO2) in the slag system studied. The characterisation results of the quenched slag suggested that Ge is present in the FeOx-CaO-SiO2-MgO slag predominantly as GeO2. At 1573 K (1300 °C) and p_{{{{O}}2 }} = 10-8 atm, the activity coefficient of GeO2 in the slag was calculated to be in the range of 0.24 to 1.50. The results from the current study suggested that less-basic slag, high operating temperature, and low oxygen partial pressure promote a low Ge distribution ratio. These conditions are desired for maximizing Ge recovery, for example, during pyrometallurgical processing of Ge-containing e-waste through secondary copper smelting. Overall, the thermodynamics data generated from this study can be used for process modeling purposes for improving recovery of Ge in primary and secondary copper smelting processes.

  19. Errors in Sounding of the Atmosphere Using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Kinetic Temperature Caused by Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Comas, Maya; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Bermejo-Pantaleon, D.; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Gordley, L. L.; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The vast set of near global and continuous atmospheric measurements made by the SABER instrument since 2002, including daytime and nighttime kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) from 20 to 105 km, is available to the scientific community. The temperature is retrieved from SABER measurements of the atmospheric 15 micron CO2 limb emission. This emission separates from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions in the rarefied mesosphere and thermosphere, making it necessary to consider the CO2 vibrational state non-LTE populations in the retrieval algorithm above 70 km. Those populations depend on kinetic parameters describing the rate at which energy exchange between atmospheric molecules take place, but some of these collisional rates are not well known. We consider current uncertainties in the rates of quenching of CO2 (v2 ) by N2 , O2 and O, and the CO2 (v2 ) vibrational-vibrational exchange to estimate their impact on SABER T(sub k) for different atmospheric conditions. The T(sub k) is more sensitive to the uncertainty in the latter two and their effects depend on altitude. The T(sub k) combined systematic error due to non-LTE kinetic parameters does not exceed +/- 1.5 K below 95 km and +/- 4-5 K at 100 km for most latitudes and seasons (except for polar summer) if the Tk profile does not have pronounced vertical structure. The error is +/- 3 K at 80 km, +/- 6 K at 84 km and +/- 18 K at 100 km under the less favourable polar summer conditions. For strong temperature inversion layers, the errors reach +/- 3 K at 82 km and +/- 8 K at 90 km. This particularly affects tide amplitude estimates, with errors of up to +/- 3 K.

  20. A non-local thermodynamical equilibrium line formation for neutral and singly ionized titanium in model atmospheres of reference A-K stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnova, T. M.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Ryabchikova, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    We construct a model atom for Ti I-II using more than 3600 measured and predicted energy levels of Ti I and 1800 energy levels of Ti II, and quantum mechanical photoionization cross-sections. Non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Ti I and Ti II is treated through a wide range of spectral types from A to K, including metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] down to -2.6 dex. NLTE leads to weakened Ti I lines and positive abundance corrections. The magnitude of NLTE corrections is smaller compared to the literature data for FGK atmospheres. NLTE leads to strengthened Ti II lines and negative NLTE abundance corrections. For the first time, we have performed NLTE calculations for Ti I-II in the 6500 ≤ Teff ≤ 13 000 K range. For four A-type stars, we derived in LTE an abundance discrepancy of up to 0.22 dex between Ti I and Ti II, which vanishes in NLTE. For four other A-B stars, with only Ti II lines observed, NLTE leads to a decrease of line-to-line scatter. An efficiency of inelastic Ti I + H I collisions was estimated from an analysis of Ti I and Ti II lines in 17 cool stars with -2.6 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ 0.0. Consistent NLTE abundances from Ti I and Ti II were obtained by applying classical Drawinian rates for the stars with log g ≥ 4.1, and neglecting inelastic collisions with H I for the very metal-poor (VMP) giant HD 122563. For the VMP turn-off stars ([Fe/H] ≤ -2 and log g ≤ 4.1), we obtained the positive abundance difference Ti I-II already in LTE, which increases in NLTE. Accurate collisional data for Ti I and Ti II are necessary to help solve this problem.

  1. Removal of anionic dye Congo red from aqueous solution by raw pine and acid-treated pine cone powder as adsorbent: equilibrium, thermodynamic, kinetics, mechanism and process design.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Sara; Sen, Tushar Kanti

    2012-04-15

    Pine cone a natural, low-cost agricultural by-product in Australia has been studied for its potential application as an adsorbent in its raw and hydrochloric acid modified form. Surface study of pine cone and treated pine cone was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The modification process leads to increases in the specific surface area and decreases mean particle sizes of acid-treated pine cone when compared to raw pine cone biomass. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to remove anionic dye Congo red from aqueous solution. It was found that the extent of Congo red adsorption by both raw pine cone biomass and acid-treated biomass increased with initial dye concentration, contact time, temperature but decreased with increasing solution pH and amount of adsorbent of the system. Overall, kinetic studies showed that the dye adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order kinetics based on pseudo-first-order and intra-particle diffusion models. The different kinetic parameters including rate constant, half-adsorption time, and diffusion coefficient were determined at different physico-chemical conditions. Equilibrium data were best represented by Freundlich isotherm model among Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. It was observed that the adsorption was pH dependent and the maximum adsorption of 32.65 mg/g occurred at pH of 3.55 for an initial dye concentration of 20 ppm by raw pine cone, whereas for acid-treated pine cone the maximum adsorption of 40.19 mg/g for the same experimental conditions. Freundlich constant 'n' also indicated favourable adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as ∆G(0), ∆H(0), and ∆S(0) were calculated. A single-stage batch absorber design for the Congo red adsorption onto pine cone biomass also presented based on the Freundlich isotherm model equation.

  2. Adsorption behavior of levulinic acid onto microporous hyper-cross-linked polymers in aqueous solution: Equilibrium, thermodynamic, kinetic simulation and fixed-bed column studies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoqing; Huang, Qianlin; Qi, Gaoxiang; Xiong, Lian; Huang, Chao; Chen, Xuefang; Li, Hailong; Chen, Xinde

    2017-03-01

    The recovery of levulinic acid (LA) from aqueous solution and actual biomass hydrolysate by a microporous hyper-cross-linked polymer, SY-01, was investigated for the first time under batch and fixed-bed column conditions. The results showed that the optimum pH should be in the acidic range (pH < 3.0) without adjusting the pH. In the single-component system equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fits the LA adsorption onto SY-01 resin better than the Freundlich isotherm model, indicating that LA adsorption onto SY-01 resin under the concentration range studied is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The maximum adsorption capacity of LA onto SY-01 resin decreased with increasing temperature, ranging from 103.74 to 95.70 mg/g. The obtained thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption of LA on SY-01 was spontaneous (ΔG(0)<-3.788 kJ/mol), and exothermic (ΔH(0) = -11.764 kJ/mol). For kinetic study, the adsorption of LA onto SY-01 resin at various operating conditions follows the pore diffusion model and the intraparticle diffusion is the rate-limiting step for the adsorption of LA onto SY-01 resin. The effective pore diffusivity was dependent upon temperature, but independent of initial LA concentration, and were 3.306 × 10(-10), 5.274 × 10(-10) and 7.707 × 10(-10) m(2)/s at 298, 318 and 338 K, respectively. In desorption process, the recovery efficiency of LA from SY-01 resin was 99.39%, and LA concentration in the eluent was raised 2.97-fold. In conclusion, our results show that the SY-01 resin has potential application in product recovery of LA from biomass hydrolysate.

  3. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1999-11-01

    Ambient aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climatic changes as well. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the formation of ambient aerosols, which are composed mostly of sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides in either pure or mixed forms. These inorganic salt aerosols are hygroscopic by nature and exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in humid air. For pure inorganic salt particles with diameter larger than 0.1 micron, the phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet occurs only when the relative humidity in the surrounding atmosphere reaches a certain critical level corresponding to the water activity of the saturated solution. The droplet size or mass in equilibrium with relative humidity can be calculated in a straightforward manner from thermodynamic considerations. For aqueous droplets 0.1 micron or smaller, the surface curvature effect on vapor pressure becomes important and the Kelvin equation must be used.

  4. On the role of thermodynamics and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions over thunderstorm activity during GoAmazon and ACRIDICON-CHUVA field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Morales, C. A.; Hoeller, H.; Braga, R. C.; Machado, L.; Wendisch, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Rosenfeld, D.; Poeschl, U.; Biscaro, T.; Lima, W.; Eichholz, C.; Oliveira, R. A. J.; Sperling, V.; Carvalho, I.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Amaral, L. F.; Cecchin, M.; Saraiva, J.; Saraiva, I.; Schumacher, C.; Funk, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    lightning activity and retrieved microphysics from radar and aircraft measurements (G-1 and HALO) will simultaneously show the influence of the shift from warm- to mixed-phase dominated microphysics caused by aerosol and thermodynamic variability.

  5. The use of ambient measurements to identify which precursor species limit aerosol nitrate formation.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C L; Roth, P M; Tanenbaum, S J; Ziman, S D; Seinfeld, J H

    2000-12-01

    A thermodynamic equilibrium model was used to investigate the response of aerosol NO3 to changes in concentrations of HNO3, NH3, and H2SO4. Over a range of temperatures and relative humidities (RHs), two parameters provided sufficient information for indicating the qualitative response of aerosol NO3. The first was the excess of aerosol NH4+ plus gas-phase NH3 over the sum of HNO3, particulate NO3, and particulate SO4(2-) concentrations. The second was the ratio of particulate to total NO3 concentrations. Computation of these quantities from ambient measurements provides a means to rapidly analyze large numbers of samples and identify cases in which inorganic aerosol NO3 formation is limited by the availability of NH3. Example calculations are presented using data from three field studies. The predictions of the indicator variables and the equilibrium model are compared.

  6. Available Energy via Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woollett, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    Presents basic relations involving the concept of available energy that are derived from the local equations of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The equations and applications of the local thermodynamic equilibrium LTD model are also presented. (HM)

  7. Modeling aerosol-water interactions in subsaturated and supersaturated environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoukis, Christos

    The current dissertation is motivated by the need for an improved understanding of aerosol - water interactions both in subsaturated and supersaturated atmospheric conditions with a strong emphasis on air pollution and climate change modeling. A cloud droplet formation parameterization was developed to (i) predict droplet formation from a lognormal representation of aerosol size distribution and composition, and, (ii) include a size-dependant mass transfer coefficient for the growth of water droplets which explicitly accounts for the impact of organics on droplet growth kinetics. The parameterization unravels most of the physics of droplet formation and is in remarkable agreement with detailed numerical parcel model simulations, even for low values of the accommodation coefficient. The parameterization offers a much needed rigorous and computationally inexpensive framework for directly linking complex chemical effects on aerosol activation in global climate models. The new aerosol activation parameterization was also tested against observations from highly polluted clouds (within the vicinity of power plant plumes). Remarkable closure was achieved (much less than the 20% measurement uncertainty). The error in predicted cloud droplet concentration was mostly sensitive to updraft velocity. Optimal closure is obtained if the water vapor uptake coefficient is equal to 0.06. These findings can serve as much needed constraints in modeling of aerosol-cloud interactions in the North America. Aerosol-water interactions in ambient relative humidities less than 100% were studied using a thermodynamic equilibrium model for inorganic aerosol and a three dimensional air quality model. We developed a new thermodynamic equilibrium model, ISORROPIA-II, which predicts the partitioning of semi-volatiles and the phase state of K+/Ca2+/M g2+ /NH4+/Na+/SO4 2-/NO3-/Cl-/H2O aerosols. A comprehensive evaluation of its performance was conducted over a wide range of atmospherically relevant

  8. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  9. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

  10. American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) `95

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Fourteenth annual meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research was held October 9-13, 1995 at Westin William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, PA. This volume contains the abstracts of the papers and poster sessions presented at this meeting, grouped by the session in which they were presented as follows: Radiation Effects; Aerosol Deposition; Collision Simulations and Microphysical Behavior; Filtration Theory and Measurements; Materials Synthesis; Radioactive and Nuclear Aerosols; Aerosol Formation, Thermodynamic Properties, and Behavior; Particle Contamination Issues in the Computer Industry; Pharmaceutical Aerosol Technology; Modeling Global/Regional Aerosols; Visibility; Respiratory Deposition; Biomass and Biogenic Aerosols; Aerosol Dynamics; Atmospheric Aerosols.

  11. Formation and reactivity of a porphyrin iridium hydride in water: acid dissociation constants and equilibrium thermodynamics relevant to Ir-H, Ir-OH, and Ir-CH2- bond dissociation energetics.

    PubMed

    Bhagan, Salome; Wayland, Bradford B

    2011-11-07

    Aqueous solutions of group nine metal(III) (M = Co, Rh, Ir) complexes of tetra(3,5-disulfonatomesityl)porphyrin [(TMPS)M(III)] form an equilibrium distribution of aquo and hydroxo complexes ([(TMPS)M(III)(D(2)O)(2-n)(OD)(n)]((7+n)-)). Evaluation of acid dissociation constants for coordinated water show that the extent of proton dissociation from water increases regularly on moving down the group from cobalt to iridium, which is consistent with the expected order of increasing metal-ligand bond strengths. Aqueous (D(2)O) solutions of [(TMPS)Ir(III)(D(2)O)(2)](7-) react with dihydrogen to form an iridium hydride complex ([(TMPS)Ir-D(D(2)O)](8-)) with an acid dissociation constant of 1.8(0.5) × 10(-12) (298 K), which is much smaller than the Rh-D derivative (4.3 (0.4) × 10(-8)), reflecting a stronger Ir-D bond. The iridium hydride complex adds with ethene and acetaldehyde to form organometallic derivatives [(TMPS)Ir-CH(2)CH(2)D(D(2)O)](8-) and [(TMPS)Ir-CH(OD)CH(3)(D(2)O)](8-). Only a six-coordinate carbonyl complex [(TMPS)Ir-D(CO)](8-) is observed for reaction of the Ir-D with CO (P(CO) = 0.2-2.0 atm), which contrasts with the (TMPS)Rh-D analog which reacts with CO to produce an equilibrium with a rhodium formyl complex ([(TMPS)Rh-CDO(D(2)O)](8-)). Reactivity studies and equilibrium thermodynamic measurements were used to discuss the relative M-X bond energetics (M = Rh, Ir; X = H, OH, and CH(2)-) and the thermodynamically favorable oxidative addition of water with the (TMPS)Ir(II) derivatives.

  12. Adsorptive performance of un-calcined sodium exchanged and acid modified montmorillonite for Ni2+ removal: equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Ijagbemi, Christianah Olakitan; Baek, Mi-Hwa; Kim, Dong-Su

    2010-02-15

    The efficacy of un-calcined sodium exchanged (Na-MMT) and acid modified montmorillonite (A-MMT) has been investigated for adsorptive removal of Ni(2+) from aqueous solution. Physico-chemical parameters such as pH, initial Ni(2+) concentration, and equilibrium contact time were studied in a series of batch adsorption experiments. The equilibrium time of contact for both adsorbents was about 230 min. The Redlich-Peterson model best described the equilibrium sorption of Ni(2+) onto Na-MMT and the Dubinin-Radushkevich model was the best model in predicting the equilibrium sorption of Ni(2+) onto A-MMT. The kinetics of Ni(2+) uptake by Na-MMT and A-MMT followed the pseudo second-order chemisorption mechanism. Sorptions of Ni(2+) onto Na-MMT and A-MMT were spontaneous and endothermic. Regeneration was tried for several cycles with a view to recover the adsorbed Ni(2+) and also to restore Na-MMT and A-MMT to their original states. The un-calcined Na-MMT and A-MMT have adsorptive potentials for removal of Ni(2+) from aqueous bodies.

  13. Mechanistic understanding of aerosol emissions from a brazing operation.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A T; Biswas, P

    2000-01-01

    Welding operations produce gaseous and aerosol by-products that can have adverse health effects. A laboratory furnace study was conducted to aid understanding of the chemical and aerosol behavior of a widely used, self-fluxing brazing alloy (89% Cu, 6% Ag, 5% P) that is also used with a supplemental fluxing compound to prevent oxidation at the molten metal surface. The results indicate that the aerosols generated by the alloy are transient (produced over a short duration of time) and are associated with mass transfer of phosphorus species from the molten metal surface to the surrounding gas. In contrast, when the alloy was used in conjunction with the supplemental fluxing compound, a relatively nontransient, submicron-size aerosol was generated that was several orders of magnitude higher in concentration. Thermodynamic equilibrium analysis suggests that fluoride (a major constituent in the fluxing compound) played a significant role in reacting with the brazing alloy metals to form gas phase metal fluoride compounds that had high vapor pressures when compared with their elemental or oxide forms. As these metal-fluoride vapors cooled, submicron-size particles were formed mainly through nucleation and condensation growth processes. In addition, the equilibrium results revealed the potential formation of severe pulmonary irritants (HF and BF3) from heating the supplemental fluxing compound. These results demonstrated the importance of fluxing compounds in the formation of brazing fumes, and suggest that fluxing compounds could be selected that serve their metallurgical intention and suppress the formation of aerosols.

  14. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  15. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3 aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; Ault, A.; Bondy, A.; Takahama, S.; Modini, R. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Knote, C.; Laskin, A.; Wang, B.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-09-25

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. In addition, calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas–aerosol phase partitioning.

  16. Final Report: Process Models of the Equilibrium Size & State of Organic/Inorganic Aerosols for the Development of Large Scale Atmospheric Models & the Analysis of Field Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, Anthony Stein; Clegg, Simon Leslie

    2013-10-26

    Our work addressed the following elements of the Call for Proposals: (i) “to improve the theoretical representation of aerosol processes studied in ASP laboratory or field studies”, (ii) “to enhance the incorporation of aerosol process information into modules suitable for large-scale or global atmospheric models”, and (iii) “provide systematic experimental validation of process model predictions ... using data from targeted laboratory and field experiments”. Achievements to the end of 2012 are described in four previous reports, and include: new models of densities and surface tensions of pure (single solute) and mixed aqueous solutions of typical aerosol composition under all atmospheric conditions (0 to 100% RH and T > 150 K); inclusion of these models into the widely used Extended Aerosol Inorganics model (E-AIM, http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php); the addition of vapor pressure calculators for organic compounds to the E-AIM website; the ability of include user-defined organic compounds and/or lumped surrogates in gas/aerosol partitioning calculations; the development of new equations to represent the properties of soluble aerosols over the entire concentration range (using methods based upon adsorption isotherms, and derived using statistical mechanics), including systems at close to zero RH. These results are described in publications 1-6 at the end of this report, and on the “News” page of the E-AIM website (http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/info/news.html). During 2012 and 2013 we have collaborated in a combined observation and lab-based study of the water uptake of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols (PI Gannet Hallar, of the Desert Research Institute). The aerosol samples were analyzed using several complementary techniques (GC/MS, FT-ICR MS, and ion chromatography) to produce a very complete organic “speciation” including both polar and non-polar compounds. Hygroscopic growth factors of the samples were measured, and

  17. Thermodynamics of Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hernan G.; Kondev, Jane; Orme, Nigel; Theriot, Julie A.; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    There is a long and rich tradition of using ideas from both equilibrium thermodynamics and its microscopic partner theory of equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this chapter, we provide some background on the origins of the seemingly unreasonable effectiveness of ideas from both thermodynamics and statistical mechanics in biology. After making a description of these foundational issues, we turn to a series of case studies primarily focused on binding that are intended to illustrate the broad biological reach of equilibrium thinking in biology. These case studies include ligand-gated ion channels, thermodynamic models of transcription, and recent applications to the problem of bacterial chemotaxis. As part of the description of these case studies, we explore a number of different uses of the famed Monod–Wyman–Changeux (MWC) model as a generic tool for providing a mathematical characterization of two-state systems. These case studies should provide a template for tailoring equilibrium ideas to other problems of biological interest. PMID:21333788

  18. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond; Sergi, Alessandro

    Statistical mechanics provides a well-established link between microscopic equilibrium states and thermodynamics. If one considers systems out of equilibrium, the link between microscopic dynamical properties and non-equilibrium macroscopic states is more difficult to establish [1,2]. For systems lying near equilibrium, linear response theory provides a route to derive linear macroscopic laws and the microscopic expressions for the transport properties that enter the constitutive relations. If the system is displaced far from equilibrium, no fully general theory exists to treat such systems. By restricting consideration to a class of non-equilibrium states which arise from perturbations (linear or non-linear) of an equilibrium state, methods can be developed to treat non-equilibrium states. Furthermore, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods can be devised to provide estimates for the transport properties of these systems.

  19. Controlled perturbation of the thermodynamic equilibrium by microfluidic separation of porphyrin-based aggregates in a multi-component self-assembling system.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Floris; Meijer, E W

    2013-03-04

    In a microfluidic H-cell, a multi-component self-assembled system is brought out-of-equilibrium by changing the bimodal composition of porphyrin stacks and pyridine-capped dimers. Driven by their different diffusivities, diffusion-controlled separation in methylcyclohexane reveals different compositions when detected in-line and off-line, which demonstrates the kinetic behaviour of this metastable system. The microfluidic technique also proves to be highly equipped to determine diffusion constants of the different assemblies.

  20. Molecular thermodynamic analysis for assessing the relationship between reentrant swelling behavior and ternary liquid-liquid equilibrium for poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanometer-sized gel particles in a water-tetrahydrofuran cosolvent system.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sang Chul; Bae, Young Chan

    2012-02-23

    The influence of phase separation on swelling behavior was investigated based on the thermodynamic framework of reswelling phenomena. The cloud-point for a ternary system of water(1)-tetrahydrofuran (THF)(2)-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(3) was examined by thermo-optical analysis (TOA). Nanometer-sized N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel particles were prepared by precipitation polymerization, and their swelling behaviors were determined using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS). NIPA gel particles underwent reswelling when the ratio of water to THF was varied. First, the modified double lattice model (MDL) was employed to determine ternary interaction energy parameters for the liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) of linear poly-NIPA in a water-THF cosolvent system. The reentrant swelling equilibria of the NIPA gel in the water-THF system were then calculated using the interaction energy parameters.

  1. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  2. Entanglement in ground and excited states of gapped free-fermion systems and their relationship with Fermi surface and thermodynamic equilibrium properties.

    PubMed

    Storms, Michelle; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2014-01-01

    We study bipartite entanglement entropies in the ground and excited states of free-fermion models, where a staggered potential, μs, induces a gap in the spectrum. Ground-state entanglement entropies satisfy the "area law", and the "area-law" coefficient is found to diverge as a logarithm of the staggered potential, when the system has an extended Fermi surface at μs=0. On the square lattice, we show that the coefficient of the logarithmic divergence depends on the Fermi surface geometry and its orientation with respect to the real-space interface between subsystems and is related to the Widom conjecture as enunciated by Gioev and Klich [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 100503 (2006)]. For point Fermi surfaces in two-dimension, the "area-law" coefficient stays finite as μs→0. The von Neumann entanglement entropy associated with the excited states follows a "volume law" and allows us to calculate an entropy density function sV(e), which is substantially different from the thermodynamic entropy density function sT(e), when the lattice is bipartitioned into two equal subsystems but approaches the thermodynamic entropy density as the fraction of sites in the larger subsystem, that is integrated out, approaches unity.

  3. Numerical Solution of Transonic Wet Steam Flow in Blade-to-Blade Cascade with Non-equilibrium Condensation and Real Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hric, Vladimír; Halama, Jan

    2015-05-01

    We present an engineering approach to mathematical modeling and numerical solution of 2D inviscid transonic flow of wet steam in a steam turbine cascade channel of penultimate stage at rotor tip section in full Eulerian framework. Our flow model consists of the Euler system for the mixture (dry steam + homogeneously dispersed water droplets) and transport equations for moments of droplet number distribution function known as method of moments. Thermodynamic properties of vapor steam are provided by set of IAPWS equations. For equation of state for vapor phase valid both in superheated and wet (meta-stable) region we adopted recently developed equation in CFD formulation for low pressures provi1ded by Hrubý et al. [9], [8], [10]. For extraction of vapor parameters from the mixture ones we implemented simple relations in polynomial form describing thermodynamic properties of saturated liquid state. Nucleation model is resorting to modified classical nucleation theory. Linear droplet growth model is implemented for calculation of liquid sources. Numerical method is simple: cell-centered finite volume approach, 1st-order AUSM+ scheme for spatial derivatives, symmetrical fractional step method for separation of convection and condensation part, explicit 2-stage 2nd-order Runge-Kutta method for time integration. Geometry of blade profile and experimental results are provided by Bakhtar's work [22], [23]. Results were obtained for one subsonic inlet/subsonic outlet regime and gave quite reasonable accordance with experiment.

  4. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C.; Lee, E.C.; Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B.; Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Bailey, P. L.; Gille, J. C.; Lee, E. C.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Fishbein, E. F.; Waters, J. W.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605/cm (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 micrometers) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheriodal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculations and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles.

  6. Thermodynamics of the hydration equilibrium derived from the luminescence spectra of the solid state for the case of the Eu-EDTA system.

    PubMed

    Janicki, R; Mondry, A

    2015-11-28

    The luminescence properties of two compounds, [C(NH2)3][Eu(EDTA)(H2O)3] (I) and [C(NH2)3]2[Yb0.97Eu0.03(EDTA)(H2O)2]ClO4·6H2O (II), were determined. The weighted sum of luminescence spectra of I and II was used to reproduce the spectra of the Eu-EDTA system in aqueous solution in the temperature range 276-363 K. By implementing this method it was possible to determine the thermodynamic functions (ΔH = 18113 ± 506 J mole(-1) and ΔS = 62.5 ± 4.9 J mole(-1) K(-1)) of the reaction [Eu(EDTA)(H2O)3](-)⇆ [Eu(EDTA)(H2O)2](-) + H2O, which is difficult using other methods.

  7. Application of carbon adsorbents prepared from Brazilian-pine fruit shell for the removal of reactive orange 16 from aqueous solution: Kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Tatiana; Lima, Eder C; Cardoso, Natali F; Vaghetti, Júlio C P; Dias, Silvio L P; Pavan, Flavio A

    2010-08-01

    Activated (AC-PW) and non-activated (C-PW) carbonaceous materials were prepared from the Brazilian-pine fruit shell (Araucaria angustifolia) and tested as adsorbents for the removal of reactive orange 16 dye (RO-16) from aqueous effluents. The effects of shaking time, adsorbent dosage and pH on the adsorption capacity were studied. RO-16 uptake was favorable at pH values ranging from 2.0 to 3.0 and from 2.0 to 7.0 for C-PW and AC-PW, respectively. The contact time required to obtain the equilibrium using C-PW and AC-PW as adsorbents was 5 and 4h at 298 K, respectively. The fractionary-order kinetic model provided the best fit to experimental data compared with other models. Equilibrium data were better fit to the Sips isotherm model using C-PW and AC-PW as adsorbents. The enthalpy and entropy of adsorption of RO-16 were obtained from adsorption experiments ranging from 298 to 323 K.

  8. Novel Measurements of Aerosol Particle Interfaces Using Biphasic Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, A. R.; Dutcher, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are nearly ubiquitous in the atmosphere and yet there remains large uncertainties in their formation processes and ambient properties. These particles are complex microenvironments, which can contain multiple interfaces due to internal aqueous-organic phase partitioning and to the external liquid-vapor surface. These aerosol interfaces can profoundly affect the fate of condensable organic compounds emitted into the atmosphere by altering the way in which organic vapors interact with the ambient aerosol. Aerosol interfaces affect particle internal structure, species uptake, equilibrium partitioning, activation to cloud condensation or ice nuclei, and optical properties. For example, organic thin films can shield the core of the aerosol from the ambient environment, which may disrupt equilibrium partitioning and mass transfer. To improve our ability to accurately predict the fate of SOA in the atmosphere, we must improve our knowledge of aerosol interfaces and their interactions with the ambient environment. Few technologies exist to accurately probe aerosol interfaces at atmospherically-relevant conditions. In this talk, a novel method using biphasic microscale flows will be introduced for generating, trapping, and perturbing complex interfaces at atmospherically relevant conditions. These microfluidic experiments utilize high-speed imaging to monitor interfacial phenomena at the microscale and are performed with phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy on a temperature-controlled inverted microscope stage. From these experiments, interfacial thermodynamic properties such as surface tension, rheological properties such as interfacial moduli, and kinetic properties such as mass transfer coefficients can be measured or inferred. Chemical compositions of the liquid phases studied here span a range of viscosities and include electrolyte and water soluble organic acid species often observed in the atmosphere, such as mixtures

  9. Thermodynamic Simulation of Carbonate Cements-Water-Carbon Dioxide Equilibrium in Sandstone for Prediction of Precipitation/Dissolution of Carbonate Cements

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xinyan; Shang, Ruishu; Huang, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    Carbonate cements, such as calcite, dolomite, ferrocalcite and ankerite, play important roles in the formation of pores in sandstones: precipitation of carbonate cements modifies pores and inhibits compaction, while dissolution creates secondary pores. This work proposed a precipitation-dissolution model for carbonate cements-CO2-H2O system by means of ion equilibrium concentration ([M2+], M = Ca, Mg, Fe or Mn) with different factors, such as temperature, depth, pH, PCO2, variable rock composition and overpressure. Precipitation-dissolution reaction routes were also analyzed by minimization of the total Gibbs free energy (ΔG). Δ[M2+], the variation of [Ca2+], [Fe2+], [Mg2+] or [Mn2+] for every 100 m of burial depths, is used to predict precipitation or dissolution. The calculation results indicate that the increasing temperature results in decrease of equilibrium constant of reactions, while the increasing pressure results in a relatively smaller increase of equilibrium constant; As a result, with increasing burial depth, which brings about increase of both temperature and pressure, carbonate cements dissolve firstly and produces the maximal dissolved amounts, and then precipitation happens with further increasing depth; For example, calcite is dissolving from 0.0 km to 3.0 km with a maximal value of [Ca2+] at depth of 0.8 km, and then precipitates with depth deeper than 3.0 km. Meanwhile, with an increasing CO2 mole fraction in the gaseous phase from 0.1% to 10.0% in carbonate systems, the aqueous concentration of metal ions increases, e.g., dissolved amount of CaFe0.7Mg0.3(CO3)2 increases and reaches maximum of 1.78 mmol·L-1 and 8.26 mmol·L-1 at burial depth of 0.7 km with CO2 mole fraction of 0.1% and 10.0%, respectively. For the influence of overpressure in the calcite system, with overpressure ranging from 36 MPa to 83 MPa, pH reaches a minimum of 6.8 at overpressure of 51 MPa; meanwhile, Δ[Ca2+] increases slightly from -2.24 mmol·L-1 to -2.17 mmol·L-1

  10. Thermodynamic Simulation of Carbonate Cements-Water-Carbon Dioxide Equilibrium in Sandstone for Prediction of Precipitation/Dissolution of Carbonate Cements.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yiping; Feng, Mingshi; Zhong, Xinyan; Shang, Ruishu; Huang, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    Carbonate cements, such as calcite, dolomite, ferrocalcite and ankerite, play important roles in the formation of pores in sandstones: precipitation of carbonate cements modifies pores and inhibits compaction, while dissolution creates secondary pores. This work proposed a precipitation-dissolution model for carbonate cements-CO2-H2O system by means of ion equilibrium concentration ([M2+], M = Ca, Mg, Fe or Mn) with different factors, such as temperature, depth, pH, [Formula: see text], variable rock composition and overpressure. Precipitation-dissolution reaction routes were also analyzed by minimization of the total Gibbs free energy (ΔG). Δ[M2+], the variation of [Ca2+], [Fe2+], [Mg2+] or [Mn2+] for every 100 m of burial depths, is used to predict precipitation or dissolution. The calculation results indicate that the increasing temperature results in decrease of equilibrium constant of reactions, while the increasing pressure results in a relatively smaller increase of equilibrium constant; As a result, with increasing burial depth, which brings about increase of both temperature and pressure, carbonate cements dissolve firstly and produces the maximal dissolved amounts, and then precipitation happens with further increasing depth; For example, calcite is dissolving from 0.0 km to 3.0 km with a maximal value of [Ca2+] at depth of 0.8 km, and then precipitates with depth deeper than 3.0 km. Meanwhile, with an increasing CO2 mole fraction in the gaseous phase from 0.1% to 10.0% in carbonate systems, the aqueous concentration of metal ions increases, e.g., dissolved amount of CaFe0.7Mg0.3(CO3)2 increases and reaches maximum of 1.78 mmol·L-1 and 8.26 mmol·L-1 at burial depth of 0.7 km with CO2 mole fraction of 0.1% and 10.0%, respectively. For the influence of overpressure in the calcite system, with overpressure ranging from 36 MPa to 83 MPa, pH reaches a minimum of 6.8 at overpressure of 51 MPa; meanwhile, Δ[Ca2+] increases slightly from -2.24 mmol·L-1 to

  11. Speciation of the major inorganic salts in atmospheric aerosols of Beijing, China: Measurements and comparison with model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Ci, Zhijia; Guo, Jia; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-05-01

    In the winter and summer of 2013-2014, we used a sampling system, which consists of annular denuder, back-up filter and thermal desorption set-up, to measure the speciation of major inorganic salts in aerosols and the associated trace gases in Beijing. This sampling system can separate volatile ammonium salts (NH4NO3 and NH4Cl) from non-volatile ammonium salts ((NH4)2SO4), as well as the non-volatile nitrate and chloride. The measurement data was used as input of a thermodynamic equilibrium model (ISORROPIA II) to investigate the gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics. Results show that (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 and NH4Cl were the major inorganic salts in aerosols and mainly existed in the fine particles. The sulfate, nitrate and chloride associated with crustal ions were also important in Beijing where mineral dust concentrations were high. About 19% of sulfate in winter and 11% of sulfate in summer were associated with crustal ions and originated from heterogeneous reactions or direct emissions. The non-volatile nitrate contributed about 33% and 15% of nitrate in winter and summer, respectively. Theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for NH4NO3 and NH4Cl suggest that the gaseous precursors were sufficient to form stable volatile ammonium salts in winter, whereas the internal mixing with sulfate and crustal species were important for the formation of volatile ammonium salts in summer. The results of the thermodynamic equilibrium model reasonably agreed with the measurements of aerosols and gases, but large discrepancy existed in predicting the speciation of inorganic ammonium salts. This indicates that the assumption on crustal species in the model was important for obtaining better understanding on gas-aerosol partitioning and improving the model prediction.

  12. Computing Thermodynamic And Transport Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B.; Gordon, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    CET89 calculates compositions in chemical equilibrium and properties of mixtures of any chemical system for which thermodynamic data available. Provides following options: obtains chemical-equilibrium compositions and corresponding thermodynamic mixture properties for assigned thermodynamic states; calculates dilute-gas transport properties of complex chemical mixtures; obtains Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties for gaseous mixtures; calculates properties of incident and reflected shocks in terms of assigned velocities; and calculates theoretical performance of rocket for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion. Rocket performance based on optional models of finite or infinite area combustor.

  13. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle.

  14. Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of α-amylase on poly(DVB-VIM)-Cu(+2) magnetic metal-chelate affinity sorbent.

    PubMed

    Osman, Bilgen; Kara, Ali; Demirbel, Emel; Kök, Senay; Beşirli, Necati

    2012-09-01

    Designing an immobilised metal ion affinity process on large-scale demands that a thorough understanding be developed regarding the adsorption behaviour of proteins on metal-loaded gels and the characteristic adsorption parameters to be evaluated. In view of this requirement, interaction of α-amylase as a model protein with newly synthesised magnetic-poly(divinylbenzene-1-vinylimidazole) [m-poly(DVB-VIM)] microbeads (average diameter, 53-212 μm) was investigated. The m-poly(DVB-VIM) microbeads were prepared by copolymerising of divinylbenzene (DVB) with 1-vinylimidazole (VIM). The m-poly(DVB-VIM) microbeads were characterised by N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms, electron spin resonance, elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope and swelling studies. Cu(2+) ions were chelated on the m-poly(DVB-VIM) beads and used in adsorption of α-amylase in a batch system. The maximum α-amylase adsorption capacity of the m-poly(DVB-VIM)-Cu(2+) beads was determined as 10.84 mg/g at pH 6.0, 25 °C. The adsorption data were analyzed using three isotherm models, which are the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, modified Ritchie's-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were used to test dynamic experimental data. The study of temperature effect was quantified by calculating various thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes.

  15. Enhanced adsorptive removal of Safranine T from aqueous solutions by waste sea buckthorn branch powder modified with dopamine: Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Bai, Bo; Wang, Honglun; Suo, Yourui

    2015-12-01

    Polydopamine coated sea buckthorn branch powder (PDA@SBP) was facilely synthesized via a one-pot bio-inspired dip-coating approach. The as-synthesized PDA@SBP was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption progresses of Safranine T on the surface of PDA@SBP adsorbent were systematically investigated. More specifically, the effects of solution pH, contact time, initial concentration and temperature were evaluated, respectively. The experimental results showed the adsorption capacity of PDA@SBP at 293.15 K could reach up to 54.0 mg/g; the adsorption increased by 201.7% compared to that of native SBP (17.9 mg/g). Besides, kinetics studies showed that pseudo-second-order kinetic model adequately described the adsorption behavior. The adsorption experimental data could be fitted well a Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic analyses showed that the ST adsorption was a physisorption endothermic process. Regeneration of the spent PDA@SBP adsorbent was conducted with 0.1 M HCl without significant reduction in adsorption capacity. On the basis of these investigations, it is believed that the PDA@SBP adsorbent could have potential applications in sewage disposal areas because of their considerable adsorption capacities, brilliant regeneration capability, and cost-effective and eco-friendly preparation and use.

  16. Cauliflower Leave, an Agricultural Waste Biomass Adsorbent, and Its Application for the Removal of MB Dye from Aqueous Solution: Equilibrium, Kinetics, and Thermodynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Seraj Anwar; Khan, Fauzia; Ahmad, Anees

    2016-01-01

    Cauliflower leaf powder (CLP), a biosorbent prepared from seasonal agricultural crop waste material, has been employed as a prospective adsorbent for the removal of a basic dye, methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution by the batch adsorption method under varying conditions, namely, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dose, solution pH, and temperature. Characterization of the material by FTIR and SEM indicates the presence of functional groups and rough coarse surface suitable for the adsorption of methylene blue over it. Efforts were made to fit the isotherm data using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equation. The experimental data were best described by Freundlich isotherm model, with an adsorption capacity of 149.22 mg/g at room temperature. To evaluate the rate of methylene blue adsorption onto CLP, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were employed. The experimental data were best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Evaluation of thermodynamic parameters such as changes in enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs' free energy showed the feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic nature of the adsorption process. On the basis of experimental results obtained, it may be concluded that the CLP prepared from agricultural waste has considerable potential as low-cost adsorbent in wastewater treatment for the removal of basic dye, MB.

  17. Application of activated carbon derived from 'waste' bamboo culms for the adsorption of azo disperse dye: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianggui

    2012-07-15

    The utilization of activated carbon derived from 'waste' bamboo culms (BAC) for the removal of Disperse Red 167 (DR167), an azo disperse dye, was investigated. Studies of the properties of the adsorbent, the effect of contact time, the initial pH of the solution, the initial concentration of the dye solution and temperature indicated that a low initial pH or concentration of dye solution favors the adsorption process; temperature exerts a greater effect on the removal of azo disperse red 167 dye from aqueous solution. Kinetic and isotherm data were fitted to five non-linear kinetic and nine non-linear isotherm equations. In addition, the fits were evaluated in terms of the non-linear coefficient, Chi-square test, Marquardt's percent standard deviation error function and small-sample-corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc) methodology. The results showed that the AICc analysis was the best statistical tool for analyzing the data, the intra-particle diffusion and the pseudo-first-order models played important roles in the controlling rate step, and the Temkin equation best described the BAC isotherm data. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous, endothermic, entropy-increasing and physical process. Two types of commercial activated carbon, Filtrasorb 400 and Filtrasorb (F400 and F300), were used as contrast adsorbents. The contrast experiments revealed that BAC exhibits similar properties to F400 and F300. The utilization of bamboo wastes as carbon precursors is feasible.

  18. Cauliflower Leave, an Agricultural Waste Biomass Adsorbent, and Its Application for the Removal of MB Dye from Aqueous Solution: Equilibrium, Kinetics, and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Seraj Anwar; Khan, Fauzia

    2016-01-01

    Cauliflower leaf powder (CLP), a biosorbent prepared from seasonal agricultural crop waste material, has been employed as a prospective adsorbent for the removal of a basic dye, methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution by the batch adsorption method under varying conditions, namely, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dose, solution pH, and temperature. Characterization of the material by FTIR and SEM indicates the presence of functional groups and rough coarse surface suitable for the adsorption of methylene blue over it. Efforts were made to fit the isotherm data using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equation. The experimental data were best described by Freundlich isotherm model, with an adsorption capacity of 149.22 mg/g at room temperature. To evaluate the rate of methylene blue adsorption onto CLP, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were employed. The experimental data were best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Evaluation of thermodynamic parameters such as changes in enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs' free energy showed the feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic nature of the adsorption process. On the basis of experimental results obtained, it may be concluded that the CLP prepared from agricultural waste has considerable potential as low-cost adsorbent in wastewater treatment for the removal of basic dye, MB. PMID:27974892

  19. Equilibrium, Thermodynamics, and Kinetic Sorption Studies for the Removal of Coomassie Brilliant Blue on Wheat Bran as a Low-Cost Adsorbent

    PubMed Central

    Ata, Sadia; Imran Din, Muhammad; Rasool, Atta; Qasim, Imran; Ul Mohsin, Ijaz

    2012-01-01

    The sorption studies of coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) from aqueous solution have been carried out on wheat bran (WB). Coomassie brilliant blue on wheat bran was used to study the adsorption behavior under various parameters such as pH, dosage amount, and contact time. It was observed that under optimized conditions up to 95.70% dye could be removed from solution onto WB. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were used to elaborate the results. Freundlich model was found to be fitted well and favored multilayer adsorption. The Freundlich constants n and KF were determined as 0.53 and 2.5 × 10−4. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS studied were taking into account, showed spontaneous and favorable reaction for coomassie brilliant blue on wheat bran. The maximum adsorption capacity qm was found to be 6.410 mg/g. The investigations show that non treated WB is a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of dyes from textile industry effluents. PMID:22567559

  20. Application of novel, low-cost, laterite-based adsorbent for removal of lead from water: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somak; De, Sirshendu

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by carcinogenic heavy metal, e.g., lead is an important issue and possibility of using a natural rock, laterite, is explored in this work to mitigate this problem. Treated laterite (TL- prepared using hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide) was successfully utilized for this purpose. The adsorbent was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to highlight its physical and chemical properties. Optimized equilibrium conditions were 1 g L(-1) adsorbent concentration, 0.26 mm size and a pH of 7 ± 0.2. Monolayer adsorption capacity of lead on treated laterite was 15 mg/g, 14.5 and 13 mg g(-1) at temperatures of 303 K, 313 K and 323 K, respectively. The adsorption was exothermic and physical in nature. At 303 K, value of effective diffusivity of (De) and mass transfer co-efficient (Kf) of lead onto TL were 6.5 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 3.3 × 10(-4) m/s, respectively (solved from shrinking core model of adsorption kinetics). Magnesium and sulphate show highest interference effect on the adsorption of lead by TL. Efficacy of the adsorbent has been verified using real-life contaminated groundwater. Thus, this work demonstrates performance of a cost-effective media for lead removal.

  1. Designed pendant chain covalently bonded to analogue of heulandite for removal of divalent toxic metals from aqueous solution: thermodynamic and equilibrium study.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Denis L; Viana, Rúbia R; Airoldi, Claudio

    2009-09-01

    An analogue of heulandite was synthesized by using inorganic salts as a source for silicon and aluminum in the hydrothermal synthesis of the material. The resulting solid was modified by organofunctionalization with 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and subsequent reaction with methylacrylate in a heterogeneous route. The original (HEU) and modified silicate (HEU(APPMA)) samples were characterized by textural analysis, SEM, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of (29)Si and (13)C. The chemically modified silicate sample showed modification of its physical-chemical properties including specific area 459.0-978.8 m(2) g(-1). The ability of this material to remove nickel(II), cobalt(II), and copper(II) from aqueous solutions was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation. The quick adsorption process reached the equilibrium before 10, 15, and 20 min for Cu(II), Ni(II), and Co(II), respectively, with maximum adsorptions at pH 4.0. Based on the capacity of adsorption of HEU(APPMA) to interact with metal ions, the following results were obtained 12.9, 9.8, and 7.5 mmol g(-1) for Cu(II), Ni(II), and Co(II), respectively, reflecting a maximum adsorption order of Cu(II)>Ni(II)>Co(II). The energetic effects caused by metal cation adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations.

  2. Application of acidic treated pumice as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solutions: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Samarghandi, Mohammad Reza; Zarrabi, Mansur; Sepehr, Mohammad Noori; Amrane, Abdeltif; Safari, Gholam Hossein; Bashiri, Saied

    2012-11-05

    Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as an efficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal of AR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99) and Langmuir (r2>0.99) isotherm models. Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99) and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98) models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer. Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89% regeneration for AR14 and AR18, respectively.

  3. Evaluation of free/labile concentrations of trace metals in Athabasca oil sands region streams (Alberta, Canada) using diffusive gradient in thin films and a thermodynamic equilibrium model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Guéguen, C

    2016-12-01

    The Athabasca's oil sands exploitation is controversial due to its potential risks to water quality but little is known about the temporal changes in the most bioavailable fraction of metal, the free/labile species. In this study, diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) and the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM VII) equilibrium model were used to examine the temporal changes in free/labile metal (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb) species in three tributaries of the north-flowing Athabasca River in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR). The influence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition (i.e. fulvic: humic ratio) on modeled Cu and Ni speciation showed a negligible effect on the labile concentration. The best agreements (92 ± 8%) between DGT-labile and WHAM calculated labile concentrations were found assuming the formation of iron oxyhydroxides (FeO(OH)). The agreement was only 70 ± 7% in the presence of inorganic colloidal aluminum oxyhydroxides (AlO(OH)) and in the absence of any inorganic colloids. Together these results suggest that a change in DOM composition had limited impacts on modeled free metal ion concentrations. Although the concentration of the main metal ligand (i.e. DOM), varied from 9 to 40 ppm, no significant temporal differences in the abundance of WHAM-modeled labile species were found, suggesting mobility and bioavailability of Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were comparable over the 2003-2012 period.

  4. Application of acidic treated pumice as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solutions: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as an efficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal of AR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99) and Langmuir (r2>0.99) isotherm models. Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99) and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98) models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer. Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89% regeneration for AR14 and AR18, respectively. PMID:23369579

  5. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-08-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are applied. Equilibrium can be approached from different distributions of balls in the container under different conditions. The Le Châtelier principle can be demonstrated. Kinetic concepts can be demonstrated by changing the nature of the barrier, either changing the height or by having various sized holes in the barrier. Thermodynamic concepts can be demonstrated by taping over some or all of the openings and restricting air flow into container on either side of the barrier.

  6. Solid-aqueous equilibrium in the BaSO4-RaSO4-H2O system: First-principles calculations and a thermodynamic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinograd, V. L.; Brandt, F.; Rozov, K.; Klinkenberg, M.; Refson, K.; Winkler, B.; Bosbach, D.

    2013-12-01

    Phase relations in the BaSO4-RaSO4-H2O system are important for understanding the role of barite-type minerals in controlling the concentration of Ra2+ in natural water reservoirs. These relations are extremely sensitive to the difference in the solubility products of the end-members and to the degree of non-ideality of the solid solution phase. Experimental constraints to the standard entropy of RaSO4 and the regular interaction parameter of the barite-RaSO4 solid solution are ambiguous. This study is focused on determination of these parameters from first principles. The phonon density of states of RaSO4 is computed with the aid of the density functional perturbation theory. The regular interaction parameter in the BaSO4-RaSO4 solid solution, WBaRa, is interpreted as the slope of the enthalpy of mixing in the limit of infinite dilution (xRa = 0) and is calculated from the change in the total energy of a 2 × 2 × 2 supercell of BaSO4 due to the insertion of a single substitutional defect of Ra. The method is validated by computing W values for a wider range of binary solid solutions with barite and aragonite structures. The computed value of WBaRa = 2.50 ± 1.00 kJ/mol implies that the solid-aqueous equilibrium in the BaSO4-RaSO4-H2O system may have an alyotropic point in close proximity to the BaSO4 end-member. The assessment of available data on re-crystallization of barite in Ra-bearing aqueous solutions suggests that the barite crystals may fully equilibrate on the time scale of hundred days.

  7. Retrieval of stratospheric NOx from 5.3 and 6.2 μm nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium emissions measured by Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on Envisat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, B.; López-Puertas, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G. P.; Fischer, H.; Glatthor, N.; Grabowski, U.; HöPfner, M.; Kellmann, S.; Kiefer, M.; Linden, A.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Milz, M.; Steck, T.; Wang, D. Y.

    2005-05-01

    We present the first global observations of stratospheric NOx(= NO + NO2) from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on Envisat during 24 July, 18 to 27 September, and 11 to 13 October 2002. Volume mixing ratio profiles of both NOx species were derived from MIPAS limb emission spectra by means of an innovative retrieval scheme under consideration of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) effects. In the quiescent atmosphere, the estimated accuracy of retrieved NOx at the altitude of its stratospheric mixing ratio maximum at 35-40 km is around 1-2 ppbv, and the vertical resolution is around 3.5-6.5 km at altitudes between 20 and 50 km. In order to correctly consider NO2 non-LTE effects in the retrievals, the photochemical excitation rate of NO2(v3 > 0) vibrational states was derived from NO2(002→001) emissions and was found to be about 50 times smaller than previously estimated from Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) measurements. The NOx partitioning of the retrieved data is in excellent agreement with steady state photochemistry, which confirms predicted stratospheric NO(v > 0) non-LTE population enhancements. The retrieved NOx abundances are also consistent with Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) NOx observations.

  8. Ch. 33 Modeling: Computational Thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2012-01-01

    This chapter considers methods and techniques for computational modeling for nuclear materials with a focus on fuels. The basic concepts for chemical thermodynamics are described and various current models for complex crystalline and liquid phases are illustrated. Also included are descriptions of available databases for use in chemical thermodynamic studies and commercial codes for performing complex equilibrium calculations.

  9. Single molecules: Thermodynamic limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liphardt, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Technologies aimed at single-molecule resolution of non-equilibrium systems increasingly require sophisticated new ways of thinking about thermodynamics. An elegant extension to standard fluctuation theory grants access to the kinetic intermediate states of these systems -- as DNA-pulling experiments now demonstrate.

  10. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  11. Evaluation of the modal aerosol model GMXe in the chemistry-climate model GEM-AC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, K.; Lupu, A.; Kaminski, J. W.; McConnell, J. C.; O'Neill, N. T.; Tost, H.

    2012-12-01

    We evaluate a modal aerosol model, GMXe, implemented in the atmospheric chemistry-climate model GEM-AC, against global ground-based observations of optical depths and speciated aerosol concentrations. The Global Environmental Multiscale Atmospheric Chemistry model (GEM-AC) is a global, tropospheric-stratospheric chemistry, general circulation model based on the GEM model developed by the Meteorological Service of Canada for operational weather forecasting. Gas-phase chemistry consists in detailed reactions of Ox, NOx, HOx, CO, CH4, NMVOCs, ClOx and BrOx. Tracers are advected using the semi-Lagrangian scheme native to GEM. The vertical transport includes parameterized subgrid scale turbulence and deep convection. Dry deposition is implemented as a flux boundary condition in the vertical diffusion equation. Wet removal comprises both in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging. The Global Modal-aerosol eXtension (GMXe) handles aerosol microphysics and gas-aerosol partitioning. The aerosol size distribution is described by the superposition of 4 hydrophilic and 3 hydrophobic interacting lognormal modes (nucleation, Aitken, accumulation and coarse). Aerosol dynamics includes nucleation, coagulation, and condensation/evaporation. Gas-aerosol partitioning is calculated by the thermodynamic equilibrium model ISORROPIA. The model was run for one year on a 1.5°×1.5° global grid with 73 hybrid levels from the surface to 0.15 hPa. We used aerosol emissions for year 2000 from AeroCom I. The output is compared with aerosol optical depth observations from AERONET, and with measured surface concentrations of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium from CASTNET, EMEP and EANET.

  12. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  13. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  14. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-03-28

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  15. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, Leslie

    2013-10-15

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy

  16. Zeroth Law, Entropy, Equilibrium, and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The place of the zeroth law in the teaching of thermodynamics is examined in the context of the recent discussion by Gislason and Craig of some problems involving the establishment of thermal equilibrium. The concept of thermal equilibrium is introduced through the zeroth law. The relation between the zeroth law and the second law in the…

  17. Contact symmetries and Hamiltonian thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bravetti, A.; Lopez-Monsalvo, C.S.; Nettel, F.

    2015-10-15

    It has been shown that contact geometry is the proper framework underlying classical thermodynamics and that thermodynamic fluctuations are captured by an additional metric structure related to Fisher’s Information Matrix. In this work we analyse several unaddressed aspects about the application of contact and metric geometry to thermodynamics. We consider here the Thermodynamic Phase Space and start by investigating the role of gauge transformations and Legendre symmetries for metric contact manifolds and their significance in thermodynamics. Then we present a novel mathematical characterization of first order phase transitions as equilibrium processes on the Thermodynamic Phase Space for which the Legendre symmetry is broken. Moreover, we use contact Hamiltonian dynamics to represent thermodynamic processes in a way that resembles the classical Hamiltonian formulation of conservative mechanics and we show that the relevant Hamiltonian coincides with the irreversible entropy production along thermodynamic processes. Therefore, we use such property to give a geometric definition of thermodynamically admissible fluctuations according to the Second Law of thermodynamics. Finally, we show that the length of a curve describing a thermodynamic process measures its entropy production.

  18. Computing Properties Of Chemical Mixtures At Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.; Gordon, S.

    1995-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need data on chemical equilibrium compositions to calculate theoretical thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93 is general program that calculates chemical equilibrium compositions and properties of mixtures for any chemical system for which thermodynamic data are available. Includes thermodynamic data for more than 1,300 gaseous and condensed species and thermal-transport data for 151 gases. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  19. Direct comparison of the hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride aerosol at relative humidities approaching saturation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jim S; Wills, Jon B; Reid, Jonathan P; Wang, Liangyu; Topping, David O; Butler, Jason R; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2010-12-09

    Holographic optical tweezers are used to make comparative measurements of the hygroscopic properties of single component aqueous aerosol containing sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate over a range of relative humidity from 84% to 96%. The change in RH over the course of the experiment is monitored precisely using a sodium chloride probe droplet with accuracy better than ±0.09%. The measurements are used to assess the accuracy of thermodynamic treatments of the relationship between water activity and solute mass fraction with particular attention focused on the dilute solute limit approaching saturation vapor pressure. The consistency of the frequently used Clegg-Brimblecombe-Wexler (CBW) treatment for predicting the hygroscopic properties of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol is confirmed. Measurements of the equilibrium size of ammonium sulfate aerosol are found to agree with predictions to within an uncertainty of ±0.2%. Given the accuracy of treating equilibrium composition, the inconsistencies highlighted in recent calibration measurements of critical supersaturations of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol cannot be attributed to uncertainties associated with the thermodynamic predictions and must have an alternative origin. It is concluded that the CBW treatment can allow the critical supersaturation to be estimated for sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol with an accuracy of better than ±0.002% in RH. This corresponds to an uncertainty of ≤1% in the critical supersaturation for typical supersaturations of 0.2% and above. This supports the view that these systems can be used to accurately calibrate instruments that measure cloud condensation nuclei concentrations at selected supersaturations. These measurements represent the first study in which the equilibrium properties of two particles of chemically distinct composition have been compared simultaneously and directly alongside each other in the same environment.

  20. Thermodynamics of adaptive molecular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.

    2016-11-01

    A relatively general thermodynamic formalism for adaptive molecular resolution (AMR) is presented. The description is based on the approximation of local thermodynamic equilibrium and considers the alchemic parameter λ as the conjugate variable of the potential energy difference between the atomistic and coarse-grained model Φ=U(1)-U(0). The thermodynamic formalism recovers the relations obtained from statistical mechanics of H-AdResS (Español et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064115, 2015 (doi:10.1063/1.4907006)) and provides relations between the free energy compensation and thermodynamic potentials. Inspired by this thermodynamic analogy, several generalizations of AMR are proposed, such as the exploration of new Maxwell relations and how to treat λ and Φ as `real' thermodynamic variables. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  1. Aerosol and monsoon climate interactions over Asia: AEROSOL AND MONSOON CLIMATE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing; Lau, W. K. -M.; Ramanathan, V.; Wu, G.; Ding, Y.; Manoj, M. G.; Liu, J.; Qian, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, T.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ming, Y.; Wang, Y.; Huang, J.; Wang, B.; Xu, X.; Lee, S. -S.; Cribb, M.; Zhang, F.; Yang, X.; Zhao, C.; Takemura, T.; Wang, K.; Xia, X.; Yin, Y.; Zhang, H.; Guo, J.; Zhai, P. M.; Sugimoto, N.; Babu, S. S.; Brasseur, G. P.

    2016-11-15

    Asian monsoons and aerosols have been studied extensively which are intertwined in influencing the climate of Asia. This paper provides a comprehensive review of ample studies on Asian aerosol, monsoon and their interactions. The region is the primary source of aerosol emissions of varies species, influenced by distinct weather and climatic regimes. On continental scale, aerosols reduce surface insolation and weaken the land-ocean thermal contrast, thus inhibiting the development of monsoons. Locally, aerosol radiative effects alter the thermodynamic stability and convective potential of the lower atmosphere leading to reduced temperatures, increased atmospheric stability, and weakened wind and atmospheric circulation. The atmospheric thermodynamic state may also be altered by the aerosol serving as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. Many mechanisms have been put forth regarding how aerosols modulate the amplitude, frequency, intensity, and phase of numerous monsoon climate variables. A wide range of theoretical, observational, and modeling findings on the Asian monsoon, aerosols, and their interactions are synthesized. A new paradigm is proposed on investigating aerosol-monsoon interactions, in which natural aerosols such as desert dust, black carbon from biomass burning, and biogenic aerosols from vegetation are considered integral components of an intrinsic aerosol-monsoon climate system, subject to external forcings of global warming, anthropogenic aerosols, and land use and change. Future research on aerosol-monsoon interactions calls for an integrated approach and international collaborations based on long-term sustained observations, process measurements, and improved models, as well as using observations to constrain model simulations and projections.

  2. Stochastic thermodynamics of resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Jaco; Goldt, Sebastian; Seifert, Udo

    2016-03-01

    Stochastic dynamics with random resetting leads to a non-equilibrium steady state. Here, we consider the thermodynamics of resetting by deriving the first and second law for resetting processes far from equilibrium. We identify the contributions to the entropy production of the system which arise due to resetting and show that they correspond to the rate with which information is either erased or created. Using Landauer's principle, we derive a bound on the amount of work that is required to maintain a resetting process. We discuss different regimes of resetting, including a Maxwell demon scenario where heat is extracted from a bath at constant temperature.

  3. Interfaces at equilibrium: A guide to fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Marmur, Abraham

    2016-05-20

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamics of interfaces are reviewed and concisely presented. The discussion starts with a short review of the elements of bulk thermodynamics that are also relevant to interfaces. It continues with the interfacial thermodynamics of two-phase systems, including the definition of interfacial tension and adsorption. Finally, the interfacial thermodynamics of three-phase (wetting) systems is discussed, including the topic of non-wettable surfaces. A clear distinction is made between equilibrium conditions, in terms of minimizing energies (internal, Gibbs or Helmholtz), and equilibrium indicators, in terms of measurable, intrinsic properties (temperature, chemical potential, pressure). It is emphasized that the equilibrium indicators are the same whatever energy is minimized, if the boundary conditions are properly chosen. Also, to avoid a common confusion, a distinction is made between systems of constant volume and systems with drops of constant volume.

  4. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  5. Aerosol formation in basaltic lava fountaining: Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Martin, Robert S.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2012-10-01

    A short-lived episode of basaltic lava fountaining at Eyjafjallajökull volcano (March - April 2010) produced a low-altitude, ash-poor plume. We measured the composition of aerosol particles (sampled using a cascade impactor and filter packs), gases (sampled using filter packs), and volatile species scavenged by scoria and external water in order to investigate the formation and speciation of near-source aerosol (<2 min from emission). Samples were analyzed for volatile species (S, Cl and F) and metals (Na, K, Ca and Mg). The aerosol mass showed two unusual features: the prevalent size mode was finer than typically found in volcanic plumes (˜0.2μm, compared to >0.4 μm), and its composition was dominated by chloride rather than sulfate. We used two thermodynamic equilibrium models (E-AIM and HSC Chemistry v5.1) to show that the formation of particulate Cl- by condensation of HCl gas is more responsive to changes in ambient temperature than the oxidation of SO2 to SO42-, so that a low SO42-/Cl- ratio in aerosol particles is characteristic of volcanic emissions in cold climates. Field measurements suggested that the efficiency of SO2 to SO42- conversion inside the vent increased with lower explosivity. Volatiles adsorbed on the surface of scoria had significantly higher SO42-/halogen molar ratios than the aerosol samples. Several potential explanations for these differences are discussed.

  6. Molecular Thermodynamics for Chemical Process Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prausnitz, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses that aspect of thermodynamics which is particularly important in chemical process design: the calculation of the equilibrium properties of fluid mixtures, especially as required in phase-separation operations. (MLH)

  7. Thermodynamic Metrics and Optimal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2012-05-08

    A fundamental problem in modern thermodynamics is how a molecular-scale machine performs useful work, while operating away from thermal equilibrium without excessive dissipation. To this end, we derive a friction tensor that induces a Riemannian manifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within the linear-response regime, this metric structure controls the dissipation of finite-time transformations, and bestows optimal protocols with many useful properties. We discuss the connection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism, and demonstrate the utility of this metric by solving for optimal control parameter protocols in a simple nonequilibrium model.

  8. Effects of mineral dust on the semivolatile inorganic aerosol components in a polluted Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Molina, L. T.; Pandis, S. N.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosols play a significant role in the atmosphere having adverse impacts on human health and directly affecting air quality, visibility and climate change. One of the most challenging tasks for models is the prediction of the partitioning of the semivolatile inorganic aerosol components (ammonia, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, etc) between the gas and particulate phases. Moreover, the effects of mineral aerosols in the atmosphere remain largely uncertain. As a result, most current models have serious difficulties in reproducing the observed particulate nitrate and chloride concentrations. The improved aerosol thermodynamic model ISORROPIA II (Fountoukis and Nenes, 2007) simulating explicitly the chemistry of Ca, Mg, and K salts has been linked to the regional chemical transport model PMCAMx (Gaydos et al., 2007). PMCAMx also includes the CMU inorganic aerosol growth module (Gaydos et al., 2003; Koo et al., 2003a) and the VSRM aqueous-phase chemistry module (Fahey and Pandis, 2001). The hybrid approach (Koo et al., 2003b) for modeling aerosol dynamics is applied in order to accurately simulate the inorganic components in the coarse mode. This approach assumes that the smallest particles are in equilibrium, while the condensation/evaporation equation is solved for the larger ones. PMCAMx is applied to the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The emission inventory has been improved and now includes more accurate dust and NaCl emissions. The April 2003 (MCMA Campaign) and the March 2006 (MILAGRO campaign) datasets are used to evaluate the inorganic aerosol module of PMCAMx in order to test our understanding of inorganic aerosol. The results from the new modeling framework are also compared with the results from the previous version of PMCAMx in order to investigate the influence of each of the added features to the formation of the semivolatile inorganic components. References Fountoukis, C. and Nenes, A., (2007). ISORROPIA II: a computationally efficient

  9. Informational Equilibrium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    that for variouis standard types of equilibria* they hold. In particular, if one uses the teaporary equilibrium framework one can use the standard ...T, the integral converges toward f’ia(da) f fU(b~dc)6(a,b,c)T( asdm ) A B C which is fR (da) f d(lib,c) U0 T (cab) A BxC Me converse Is obvious

  10. Thermodynamics and evolution.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    2000-09-07

    The science of thermodynamics is concerned with understanding the properties of inanimate matter in so far as they are determined by changes in temperature. The Second Law asserts that in irreversible processes there is a uni-directional increase in thermodynamic entropy, a measure of the degree of uncertainty in the thermal energy state of a randomly chosen particle in the aggregate. The science of evolution is concerned with understanding the properties of populations of living matter in so far as they are regulated by changes in generation time. Directionality theory, a mathematical model of the evolutionary process, establishes that in populations subject to bounded growth constraints, there is a uni-directional increase in evolutionary entropy, a measure of the degree of uncertainty in the age of the immediate ancestor of a randomly chosen newborn. This article reviews the mathematical basis of directionality theory and analyses the relation between directionality theory and statistical thermodynamics. We exploit an analytic relation between temperature, and generation time, to show that the directionality principle for evolutionary entropy is a non-equilibrium extension of the principle of a uni-directional increase of thermodynamic entropy. The analytic relation between these directionality principles is consistent with the hypothesis of the equivalence of fundamental laws as one moves up the hierarchy, from a molecular ensemble where the thermodynamic laws apply, to a population of replicating entities (molecules, cells, higher organisms), where evolutionary principles prevail.

  11. Role of Climate Change in Global Predictions of Future Tropospheric Ozone and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Chen, Wei-Ting; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-01-01

    A unified tropospheric chemistry-aerosol model within the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model II is applied to simulate an equilibrium CO2-forced climate in the year 2100 to examine the effects of climate change on global distributions of tropospheric ozone and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust aerosols. The year 2100 CO2 concentration as well as the anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors and aerosols/aerosol precursors are based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A2. Year 2100 global O3 and aerosol burdens predicted with changes in both climate and emissions are generally 5-20% lower than those simulated with changes in emissions alone; as exceptions, the nitrate burden is 38% lower, and the secondary organic aerosol burden is 17% higher. Although the CO2-driven climate change alone is predicted to reduce the global O3 concentrations over or near populated and biomass burning areas because of slower transport, enhanced biogenic hydrocarbon emissions, decomposition of peroxyacetyl nitrate at higher temperatures, and the increase of O3 production by increased water vapor at high NOx levels. The warmer climate influences aerosol burdens by increasing aerosol wet deposition, altering climate-sensitive emissions, and shifting aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium. Climate change affects the estimates of the year 2100 direct radiative forcing as a result of the climate-induced changes in burdens and different climatological conditions; with full gas-aerosol coupling and accounting for ozone and direct radiative forcings by the O2, sulfate, nitrate, black carbon, and organic carbon are predicted to be +0.93, -0.72, -1.0, +1.26, and -0.56 W m(exp -2), respectively, using present-day climate and year 2100 emissions, while they are predicted to be +0.76, -0.72, 0.74, +0.97, and -0.58 W m(exp -2

  12. Recent Studies Investigating Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.

    2009-05-01

    The metropolitan areas of Mexico City and Atlanta have very different emissions and meteorology, yet in both cities secondary organic aerosol (SOA) comprises a significant fraction of fine particle mass. SOA in Mexico City is predominately from anthropogenic emissions and a number of studies have investigated the role of dicarbonyl partitioning to aerosol liquid water as a SOA formation route [Volkamer et al., 2006; 2007]. Hennigan et al. [2008] noted a high correlation between SOA (measured as water-soluble organic carbon) and fine particle nitrate in Mexico City and used this to estimate the volatility of both species during periods of rapidly decreasing RH in late morning. Secondary aerosol may also form when particles are much drier. In Mexico City, both nitrate and SOA were also frequently observed and highly correlated in late afternoon when RH was below 30 percent. A thermodynamic model could reproduce the observed morning nitrate under high RH when equilibrium was between nitric acid and dissolved nitrate, whereas equilibrium between vapor and crystalline ammonium nitrate was predicted in the afternoon [Fountoukis et al., 2007]. By analogy, these results may suggest two different SOA partitioning mechanisms in Mexico City, occurring at different times of the day. In contrast, measurements suggest that SOA in the southeastern United States is largely from biogenic precursors, and there is evidence that liquid water also plays a role. The stability of dissolved organic aerosol in response to loss of liquid water is currently being investigated and preliminary data suggest that like Mexico City, there is some degree of volatility. Recent experiments comparing data from rural-urban sites shows that there are periods when anthropogenic emissions also substantially contribute to SOA in the Atlanta metropolitan region. However, the mechanisms, or organic precursors involved, are yet to be determined. Results from these various ongoing studies will be presented

  13. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Koop, Thomas; Mikhailov, Eugene; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Phase transitions of nanoparticles are of fundamental importance in atmospheric sciences. Current understanding is insufficient to explain observations at the nano-scale. In particular, discrepancies exist between observations and model predictions of deliquescence and efflorescence transitions and the hygroscopic growth of salt nanoparticles. Here we show that these discrepancies can be resolved by consideration of particle size effects with consistent thermodynamic data. We present a new method for the determination of water and solute activities and interfacial energies in highly supersaturated aqueous solution droplets. Our analysis reveals that particle size can strongly alter the characteristic concentration of phase separation in mixed systems, resembling the influence of temperature. Due to similar effects, atmospheric secondary organic aerosol particles at room temperature are expected to be always liquid at diameters below ~20 nm. We thus propose and demonstrate that particle size should be included as an additional dimension in the equilibrium phase diagram of aerosol nanoparticles. Reference: Cheng, Y. et al. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles. Nature Communications. 5:5923 doi: 10.1038/ncomms6850 (2015).

  14. Molecular thermodynamics for chemical process design.

    PubMed

    Prausnitz, J M

    1979-08-24

    Chemical process design requires quantitative information on the equilibrium properties of a variety of fluid mixtures. Since the experimental effort needed to provide this information is often prohibitive in cost and time, chemical engineers must utilize rational estimation techniques based on limited experimental data. The basis for such techniques is molecular thermodynamics, a synthesis of classical and statistical thermodynamics, molecular physics, and physical chemistry.

  15. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computing time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption on the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients, phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only on the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only on the organic phase of particles) or both (condenses on both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the AIOMFAC parameterization for medium and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium and a dynamic representation of the organic aerosol. In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol (OA) is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phase could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation or evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phase due to the high viscosity. A dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is used with OA divided into layers, the first layer at the center of the particle (slowly reaches equilibrium) and the final layer near the interface with the gas phase (quickly reaches equilibrium).

  16. Analogy between Thermodynamics and Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark A.

    1979-01-01

    Establishes and illustrates a formal analogy between the motion of a particle and the "motion" of the equilibrium state of a homogeneous system in a quasistatic process. The purpose is to show that there is a much larger set of natural coordinate transformations in thermodynamics. (GA)

  17. Effect of aerosol subgrid variability on aerosol optical depth and cloud condensation nuclei: implications for global aerosol modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigum, Natalie; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip

    2016-11-01

    A fundamental limitation of grid-based models is their inability to resolve variability on scales smaller than a grid box. Past research has shown that significant aerosol variability exists on scales smaller than these grid boxes, which can lead to discrepancies in simulated aerosol climate effects between high- and low-resolution models. This study investigates the impact of neglecting subgrid variability in present-day global microphysical aerosol models on aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We introduce a novel technique to isolate the effect of aerosol variability from other sources of model variability by varying the resolution of aerosol and trace gas fields while maintaining a constant resolution in the rest of the model. We compare WRF-Chem (Weather and Research Forecast model) runs in which aerosol and gases are simulated at 80 km and again at 10 km resolutions; in both simulations the other model components, such as meteorology and dynamics, are kept at the 10 km baseline resolution. We find that AOD is underestimated by 13 % and CCN is overestimated by 27 % when aerosol and gases are simulated at 80 km resolution compared to 10 km. The processes most affected by neglecting aerosol subgrid variability are gas-phase chemistry and aerosol uptake of water through aerosol-gas equilibrium reactions. The inherent non-linearities in these processes result in large changes in aerosol properties when aerosol and gaseous species are artificially mixed over large spatial scales. These changes in aerosol and gas concentrations are exaggerated by convective transport, which transports these altered concentrations to altitudes where their effect is more pronounced. These results demonstrate that aerosol variability can have a large impact on simulating aerosol climate effects, even when meteorology and dynamics are held constant. Future aerosol model development should focus on accounting for the effect of subgrid variability on these

  18. Dynamics of aerosol size during inhalation: hygroscopic growth of commercial nebulizer formulations.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Davies, James F; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Dailey, Lea Ann; Murnane, Darragh

    2014-03-10

    The size of aerosol particles prior to, and during, inhalation influences the site of deposition within the lung. As such, a detailed understanding of the hygroscopic growth of an aerosol during inhalation is necessary to accurately model the deposited dose. In the first part of this study, it is demonstrated that the aerosol produced by a nebulizer, depending on the airflows rates, may experience a (predictable) wide range of relative humidity prior to inhalation and undergo dramatic changes in both size and solute concentration. A series of sensitive single aerosol analysis techniques are then used to make measurements of the relative humidity dependent thermodynamic equilibrium properties of aerosol generated from four common nebulizer formulations. Measurements are also reported of the kinetics of mass transport during the evaporation or condensation of water from the aerosol. Combined, these measurements allow accurate prediction of the temporal response of the aerosol size prior to and during inhalation. Specifically, we compare aerosol composed of pure saline (150 mM sodium chloride solution in ultrapure water) with two commercially available nebulizer products containing relatively low compound doses: Breath®, consisting of a simple salbutamol sulfate solution (5 mg/2.5 mL; 1.7 mM) in saline, and Flixotide® Nebules, consisting of a more complex stabilized fluticasone propionate suspension (0.25 mg/mL; 0.5 mM in saline. A mimic of the commercial product Tobi© (60 mg/mL tobramycin and 2.25 mg/mL NaCl, pH 5.5-6.5) is also studied, which was prepared in house. In all cases, the presence of the pharmaceutical was shown to have a profound effect on the magnitude, and in some cases the rate, of the mass flux of water to and from the aerosol as compared to saline. These findings provide physical chemical evidence supporting observations from human inhalation studies, and suggest that using the growth dynamics of a pure saline aerosol in a lung inhalation model

  19. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  20. Relativistic like structure of classical thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, Hernando; Sánchez, Alberto; Vázquez, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    We analyze in the context of geometrothermodynamics a Legendre invariant metric structure in the equilibrium space of an ideal gas. We introduce the concept of thermodynamic geodesic as a succession of points, each corresponding to a state of equilibrium, so that the resulting curve represents a quasi-static process. A rigorous geometric structure is derived in which the thermodynamic geodesics at a given point split the equilibrium space into two disconnected regions separated by adiabatic geodesics. This resembles the causal structure of special relativity, which we use to introduce the concept of adiabatic cone for thermodynamic systems. This result might be interpreted as an alternative indication of the inter-relationship between relativistic physics and classical thermodynamics.

  1. Conversion of Chemical Reaction Energy into Useful Work in the Van't Hoff Equilibrium Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazhin, N. M.; Parmon, V. N.

    2007-01-01

    The ideal van't Hoff equilibrium box is described in detail. It shows that van't Hoff equilibrium box divided in two parts can simultaneously produce heat and useful work without violation of the first law of thermodynamics.

  2. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 1. Bulk water-soluble organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Liu, Jiumeng; Parker, Eric T.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-09-01

    The partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particle phase influences the mass, size and chemical composition of the secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed. Here we investigate the partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and the formation of SOA in Los Angeles (LA), California and Atlanta, Georgia; urban regions where anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are dominated by vehicles, but are contrasted by an additional large source of biogenic VOCs exclusive to Atlanta. In Atlanta, evidence for WSOC partitioning to aerosol water is observed throughout the day, but is most prevalent in the morning. During drier periods (RH < 70%), the WSOC partitioning coefficient (Fp) was in proportion to the organic mass, suggesting that both particle water and organic aerosol (OA) can serve as an absorbing phase. In contrast, despite the higher average RH, in LA the aerosol water was not an important absorbing phase, instead, Fp was correlated with OA mass. Particle water concentrations from thermodynamic predictions based on measured inorganic aerosol components do not indicate significant differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. The observed different WSOC partitioning behaviors may be attributed to the contrasting VOC mixture between the two cities. In addition, different OA composition may also play a role, as Atlanta OA is expected to have a substantially more aged regional character. These results are consistent with our companion studies that find similar partitioning differences for formic acid and additional contrasts in SOA optical properties. The findings provide direct evidence for SOA formation through an equilibrium partitioning process.

  3. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 1. Bulk water-soluble organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Liu, Jiumeng; Parker, Eric T.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Gouw, Joost A.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    The partitioning of semi-volatile compounds between the gas and particle phase influences the mass, size and chemical composition of the secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed. Here we investigate the partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and the formation of SOA in Los Angeles (LA), California and Atlanta, Georgia; urban regions where anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are dominated by vehicles, but are contrasted by an additional large source of biogenic VOCs exclusive to Atlanta. In Atlanta, evidence for WSOC partitioning to aerosol water is observed throughout the day, but is most prevalent in the morning. During drier periods (RH < 70%), the WSOC partitioning coefficient (Fp) was in proportion to the organic mass, suggesting that both particle water and organic aerosol (OA) can serve as an absorbing phase. In contrast, despite the higher average RH, in LA the aerosol water was not an important absorbing phase, instead, Fp was correlated with OA mass. Particle water concentrations from thermodynamic predictions based on measured inorganic aerosol components do not indicate significant differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. The observed different WSOC partitioning behaviors may be attributed to the contrasting VOC mixture between the two cities. In addition, different OA composition may also play a role, as Atlanta OA is expected to have a substantially more aged regional character. These results are consistent with our companion studies that find similar partitioning differences for formic acid and additional contrasts in SOA optical properties. The findings provide direct evidence for SOA formation through an equilibrium partitioning process.

  4. Thermodynamic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-10-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics.

  5. Chemical evolution of multicomponent aerosol particles during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, Alessandro; Riipinen, Ilona; Pagels, Joakim; Eriksson, Axel; Worsnop, Douglas; Switieckli, Erik; Kulmala, Markku; Bilde, Merete

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have an important but not well quantified effect on climate and human health. Despite the efforts made in the last decades, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not fully understood. The uncertainty is partly due to the complex chemical composition of the particles which comprise inorganic and organic compounds. Many organics (like dicarboxylic acids) can be present both in the gas and in the condensed phase due to their low vapor pressure. Clearly, an understanding of this partition is crucial to address any other issue in atmospheric physics and chemistry. Moreover, many organics are water soluble, and their influence on the properties of aqueous solution droplets is still poorly characterized. The solid and sub-cooled liquid state vapor pressures of some organic compounds have been previously determined by measuring the evaporation rate of single-compound crystals [1-3] or binary aqueous droplets [4-6]. In this work, we deploy the HTDMA technique (Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) coupled with a 3.5m laminar flow-tube and an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) for determining the chemical evolution during evaporation of ternary droplets made of one dicarboxylic acid (succinic acid, commonly found in atmospheric samples) and one inorganic compound (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) in different mixing ratios, in equilibrium with water vapor at a fixed relative humidity. In addition, we investigate the evaporation of multicomponent droplets and crystals made of three organic species (dicarboxylic acids and sugars), of which one or two are semi-volatile. 1. Bilde M. and Pandis, S.N.: Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of Individual Aerosol Species Formed in the Atmospheric Oxidation of alpha- and beta-Pinene. Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2001. 2. Bilde M., et al.: Even-Odd Alternation of Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of C3-C9 Dicarboxylic Acid Aerosols

  6. Aerosol hygroscopic growth parameterization based on a solute specific coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Steil, B.; Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.; Lelieveld, J.

    2011-09-01

    Water is a main component of atmospheric aerosols and its amount depends on the particle chemical composition. We introduce a new parameterization for the aerosol hygroscopic growth factor (HGF), based on an empirical relation between water activity (aw) and solute molality (μs) through a single solute specific coefficient νi. Three main advantages are: (1) wide applicability, (2) simplicity and (3) analytical nature. (1) Our approach considers the Kelvin effect and covers ideal solutions at large relative humidity (RH), including CCN activation, as well as concentrated solutions with high ionic strength at low RH such as the relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD). (2) A single νi coefficient suffices to parameterize the HGF for a wide range of particle sizes, from nanometer nucleation mode to micrometer coarse mode particles. (3) In contrast to previous methods, our analytical aw parameterization depends not only on a linear correction factor for the solute molality, instead νi also appears in the exponent in form x · ax. According to our findings, νi can be assumed constant for the entire aw range (0-1). Thus, the νi based method is computationally efficient. In this work we focus on single solute solutions, where νi is pre-determined with the bisection method from our analytical equations using RHD measurements and the saturation molality μssat. The computed aerosol HGF and supersaturation (Köhler-theory) compare well with the results of the thermodynamic reference model E-AIM for the key compounds NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 relevant for CCN modeling and calibration studies. The equations introduced here provide the basis of our revised gas-liquid-solid partitioning model, i.e. version 4 of the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM4), described in a companion paper.

  7. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    Ambient aerosols frequently contain large portions of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as chlorides, nitrates, and sulfates in either pure or mixed forms. Such inorganic salt aerosols exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in air. The phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet usually occurs spontaneously when the relative humidity of the atmosphere reaches a level specific to the chemical composition of the aerosol particle. Conversely, when the relative humidity decreases and becomes low enough, the saline droplet will evaporate and suddenly crystallize, expelling all its water content. The phase transformation and growth of aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climate changes. In this chapter, an exposition of the underlying thermodynamic principles is given, and recent advances in experimental methods utilizing single-particle levitation are discussed. In addition, pertinent and available thermodynamic data, which are needed for predicting the deliquescence properties of single and multi-component aerosols, are compiled. This chapter is useful to research scientists who are either interested in pursuing further studies of aerosol thermodynamics, or required to model the dynamic behavior of hygroscopic aerosols in a humid environment.

  8. PD-FiTE - an efficient method for calculating gas / liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D.; Lowe, D.; McFiggans, G.; Barley, M.

    2009-04-01

    Assessing the impact of atmospheric aerosol particles on the environment requires adequate representation of appropriate key processes within large scale models. In the absence of primary particulate material, interactions between the atmospheric gaseous components and particles means that the chemical nature of the particles is largely determined by the availability of condensable gaseous material, such as sulphuric and nitric acids, and by the ambient environmental conditions. Gas to particle mass transfer of semi-volatile components,driven by a difference in equilibrium and actual partial pressures above an aerosol particle, is an important factor in determining the evolving chemical composition of the particle and is necessary for predicting aerosol loading and composition. The design of an appropriate framework required for parameterizations of key variables is challenging. These thermodynamic frameworks are often numerically very complex, resulting in significant computational expense. Three dimensional chemical and aerosol transport models demand that computational expense be kept at a minimum,resulting in a trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. To calculate the equilibrium vapour pressure above a solution requires treatment of solution nonideality. This is manifest through activity coefficients of components pertinent to each condensing specie. However, activity coefficients are complex functions of the solution composition. Parameterisation of activity coefficients provides the main focus of this work largely because reducing the numerical complexity whilst retaining a good level of accuracy is very challenging. The approach presented here, the hybrid Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion (PDFiTE) (Topping et al 2008), builds on previously reported work, with an aim to derive parameters for an accurate and computationally efficient framework through coupling with a complex thermodynamic model. Such a reduction in complexity is important as it is

  9. Spontaneity and Equilibrium II: Multireaction Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic criteria for spontaneity and equilibrium in multireaction systems are developed and discussed. When N reactions are occurring simultaneously, it is shown that G and A will depend upon N independent reaction coordinates, ?a (a = 1,2, ..., N), in addition to T and p for G or T and V for A. The general criteria for spontaneity and…

  10. Control over hygroscopic growth of saline aqueous aerosol using Pluronic polymer additives.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Hargreaves, Graham; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2013-02-25

    The hygroscopic properties of an aerosol originating from a nebulizer solution can affect the extent of peripheral deposition within the respiratory tract, which in turn affects drug efficacy of drugs delivered to the lungs. Thus, the ability to tailor the degree and rate of hygroscopic growth of an aerosol produced by a nebulizer through modification of the formulation would serve to improve drug efficacy through targeted lung deposition. In this study, the kinetic and thermodynamic hygroscopic properties of sodium chloride aerosol mixed with commercially available Pluronic polymers, specifically F77 and F127, are reported using three complementary single aerosol analysis techniques, specifically aerosol optical tweezers, a double ring electrodynamic balance and a concentric cylinder electrodynamic balance. The F77 polymer is shown to have a predictable effect on the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol: the ability of the droplet to uptake water from the air depends on the solute weight percent of sodium chloride present in a linear dose dependant manner. Unlike the smaller F77, a non-linear relationship was observed for the larger molecular weight F127 polymer, with significant suppression of hygroscopic growth (>50% by mass) for solution aerosol containing even only 1 wt% of the polymer and 99 wt% sodium chloride. The suppression of growth is shown to be consistent with the formation of mixed phase aerosol particles containing hydrophilic inorganic rich domains and hydrophobic polymer rich domains that sequester some of the inorganic component, with the two phases responding to changes in relative humidity independently. This independence of coupling with the gas phase is apparent in both the equilibrium state and the kinetics of water evaporation/condensation. By starting with a saline nebulizer solution with a concentration of F127 ∼10(-2)mM, a 12% reduction in the radius of all aerosol produced at a relative humidity (RH) of 84% is possible. The

  11. Comparison of activity coefficient models for atmospheric aerosols containing mixtures of electrolytes, organics, and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chinghang; Clegg, Simon L.; Seinfeld, John H.

    Atmospheric aerosols generally comprise a mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Determining the gas-particle distribution of volatile compounds, including water, requires equilibrium or mass transfer calculations, at the heart of which are models for the activity coefficients of the particle-phase components. We evaluate here the performance of four recent activity coefficient models developed for electrolyte/organic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols. Two of the models, the CSB model [Clegg, S.L., Seinfeld, J.H., Brimblecombe, P., 2001. Thermodynamic modelling of aqueous aerosols containing electrolytes and dissolved organic compounds. Journal of Aerosol Science 32, 713-738] and the aerosol diameter dependent equilibrium model (ADDEM) [Topping, D.O., McFiggans, G.B., Coe, H., 2005. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: part 2—including organic compounds. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 1223-1242] treat ion-water and organic-water interactions but do not include ion-organic interactions; these can be referred to as "decoupled" models. The other two models, reparameterized Ming and Russell model 2005 [Raatikainen, T., Laaksonen, A., 2005. Application of several activity coefficient models to water-organic-electrolyte aerosols of atmospheric interest. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 2475-2495] and X-UNIFAC.3 [Erdakos, G.B., Change, E.I., Pandow, J.F., Seinfeld, J.H., 2006. Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water—Part 3: Organic compounds, water, and ionic constituents by consideration of short-, mid-, and long-range effects using X-UNIFAC.3. Atmospheric Environment 40, 6437-6452], include ion-organic interactions; these are referred to as "coupled" models. We address the question—Does the inclusion of a treatment of ion-organic interactions substantially improve the performance of the coupled models over

  12. Contrasting the Evaporation and Condensation of Water from Glassy and Amorphous Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J. P.; Bones, D. L.; Power, R.; Lienhard, D.; Krieger, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    The partitioning of water between the condensed and gas phases in atmospheric aerosol is usually assumed to occur instantaneously and to be regulated by solution thermodynamics. However, the persistence of high viscosity, glassy and amorphous aerosol to low relative humidity without crystallisation occurring is now widely recognised, suggesting that the timescale for water transport to or from the particle during condensation or evaporation may be significant. A kinetic limitation on water transport could have important implications for understanding hygroscopic growth measurements made on ambient particles, the ability of particles to act as ice nuclei or cloud condensation nuclei, the kinetics of chemical aging/heterogeneous chemistry, and the rate or condensation/evaporation of semi-volatile organic components. In this study we will report on measurements of the timescale of water transport to and from glassy aerosol and ultra-high viscosity solution droplets using aerosol optical tweezers to investigate the time-response of single particles to changes in relative humidity. As a benchmark system, mixed component aerosol particles containing sucrose and sodium chloride have been used; varying the mole fractions of the two solutes allows a wide range of solution viscosities to be studied. We will show that coarse particles can take many thousands of seconds to equilibrate in size and that the timescale correlates with the estimated bulk viscosity of the particle. We will also confirm that significant inhomogeneities in particle composition can be established during evaporation or condensation. Using the experimental data to benchmark a model for equilibration time, predictions can be made of the timescale for the equilibration of accumulation mode particles during water condensation or evaporation and these predictions will be described and their significance explored. Finally, the coalescence dynamics of highly viscous aerosol particles will be reported

  13. Probing local equilibrium in nonequilibrium fluids.

    PubMed

    del Pozo, J J; Garrido, P L; Hurtado, P I

    2015-08-01

    We use extensive computer simulations to probe local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in a quintessential model fluid, the two-dimensional hard-disks system. We show that macroscopic LTE is a property much stronger than previously anticipated, even in the presence of important finite-size effects, revealing a remarkable bulk-boundary decoupling phenomenon in fluids out of equilibrium. This allows us to measure the fluid's equation of state in simulations far from equilibrium, with an excellent accuracy comparable to the best equilibrium simulations. Subtle corrections to LTE are found in the fluctuations of the total energy which strongly point to the nonlocality of the nonequilibrium potential governing the fluid's macroscopic behavior out of equilibrium.

  14. Aerosol and monsoon climate interactions over Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing; Lau, W. K.-M.; Ramanathan, V.; Wu, G.; Ding, Y.; Manoj, M. G.; Liu, J.; Qian, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, T.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ming, Y.; Wang, Y.; Huang, J.; Wang, B.; Xu, X.; Lee, S.-S.; Cribb, M.; Zhang, F.; Yang, X.; Zhao, C.; Takemura, T.; Wang, K.; Xia, X.; Yin, Y.; Zhang, H.; Guo, J.; Zhai, P. M.; Sugimoto, N.; Babu, S. S.; Brasseur, G. P.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing severity of droughts/floods and worsening air quality from increasing aerosols in Asia monsoon regions are the two gravest threats facing over 60% of the world population living in Asian monsoon regions. These dual threats have fueled a large body of research in the last decade on the roles of aerosols in impacting Asian monsoon weather and climate. This paper provides a comprehensive review of studies on Asian aerosols, monsoons, and their interactions. The Asian monsoon region is a primary source of emissions of diverse species of aerosols from both anthropogenic and natural origins. The distributions of aerosol loading are strongly influenced by distinct weather and climatic regimes, which are, in turn, modulated by aerosol effects. On a continental scale, aerosols reduce surface insolation and weaken the land-ocean thermal contrast, thus inhibiting the development of monsoons. Locally, aerosol radiative effects alter the thermodynamic stability and convective potential of the lower atmosphere leading to reduced temperatures, increased atmospheric stability, and weakened wind and atmospheric circulations. The atmospheric thermodynamic state, which determines the formation of clouds, convection, and precipitation, may also be altered by aerosols serving as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. Absorbing aerosols such as black carbon and desert dust in Asian monsoon regions may also induce dynamical feedback processes, leading to a strengthening of the early monsoon and affecting the subsequent evolution of the monsoon. Many mechanisms have been put forth regarding how aerosols modulate the amplitude, frequency, intensity, and phase of different monsoon climate variables. A wide range of theoretical, observational, and modeling findings on the Asian monsoon, aerosols, and their interactions are synthesized. A new paradigm is proposed on investigating aerosol-monsoon interactions, in which natural aerosols such as desert dust, black carbon from

  15. Thermodynamics of discrete quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Janet; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2013-03-01

    We define thermodynamic configurations and identify two primitives of discrete quantum processes between configurations for which heat and work can be defined in a natural way. This allows us to uncover a general second law for any discrete trajectory that consists of a sequence of these primitives, linking both equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations. Moreover, in the limit of a discrete trajectory that passes through an infinite number of configurations, i.e. in the reversible limit, we recover the saturation of the second law. Finally, we show that for a discrete Carnot cycle operating between four configurations one recovers Carnot's thermal efficiency.

  16. A Better Way of Dealing with Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tykodi, Ralph J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses how to address the concept of chemical equilibrium through the use of thermodynamic activities. Describes the advantages of setting up an equilibrium constant in terms of activities and demonstrates how to approximate those activities by practical measures such as partial pressures, mole fractions, and molar concentrations. (TW)

  17. Transition of hemoglobin between two tertiary conformations: determination of equilibrium and thermodynamic parameters from the reaction of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) with the CysF9[93]beta sulfhydryl group.

    PubMed

    Okonjo, Kehinde Onwochei; Adediji, A Temilade; Fodeke, Adedayo A; Adeboye, Omolara; Ezeh, Chibuzo V

    2007-06-01

    The equilibrium constant of the reaction of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) with the CysF9[93]beta sulfhydryl group of hemoglobin decreases by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude between pH 5.6 and 9. The reaction is coupled to the ionizations of two groups on the protein. At 25 degrees C one group has a pK(a) of 5.31+/-0.2 when hemoglobin is in its (tertiary) r conformation, typified by the thiolate anion form of CysF9[93]beta; this changes to 7.73+/-0.4 in the (tertiary) t conformation, typified by the mixed disulfide form of the sulfhydryl. The second group ionizes with a pK(a) of 7.11+/-0.4 in the r conformation; this changes to 8.38+/-0.2 in the t conformation. K(rt), the equilibrium constant for the r<-->t isomerization process, is 0.22+/-0.06. The standard enthalpy and entropy changes for the isomerization are DeltaH(o)(rt)=24.2 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS(o)(rt)=68.8 JK(-1)mol(-1), respectively.

  18. Aerosols, light, and water: Measurements of aerosol optical properties at different relative humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, Daniel

    (RH) at a certain RH divided by sp at a dry value, was used to evaluate the aerosol hygroscopicity. Different empirical fits were evaluated using the f(RH) data. The widely used gamma model was found inappropriate, as it overestimates f(RH) for RH<75%. Abetter empirical fit with two power-law curve-fitting parameters c and k was found to replicate f(RH) accurately from the three sites. The relationship between the organic carbon mass (OMC) and the species that are affected by RH and f(RH) was also studied and categorized between the sites. A second experiment is reported where the first two elements of the scattering matrix of laboratory generated particles were studied under different humidity conditions. The non-spherical particles generated were ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, and ammonium nitrate. The optical measurements were performed with a polarized imaging nephelometer (PI-Neph) installed in series with the humidifier dryer apparatus. The inorganic salts experienced low (80%) RH levels so that the observations could contrast the differences when the salts were crystallized (low RH) and when the particles turned to aqueous solutions after deliquesence (high RH). The measurements with the PI-Neph produce the aerosol phase function and the polarized phase function in a range of angles that go from 3 to 177. The results showed significant changes in the phase function and polarized phase function due to the hygroscopic growth. Although the inorganic salts used inthe experiments were non-spherical, the dry measurements were successfully reproduced with the Mie theory using literature values for the dry index of refraction. Moreover, the changes in the particle size distribution and index of refraction were evaluated through classic thermodynamic equilibrium theory producing comparable results with the simulations performed with Mie formalism. The final experiment consisted in the measurements of phase function and degree of linear polarization of ambient aerosols

  19. A thermodynamic equation of jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kevin; Pirouz Kavehpour, H.

    2008-03-01

    Materials ranging from sand to fire-retardant to toothpaste are considered fragile, able to exhibit both solid and fluid-like properties across the jamming transition. Guided by granular flow experiments, our equation of jammed states is path-dependent, definable at different athermal equilibrium states. The non-equilibrium thermodynamics based on a structural temperature incorporate physical ageing to address the non-exponential, non-Arrhenious relaxation of granular flows. In short, jamming is simply viewed as a thermodynamic transition that occurs to preserve a positive configurational entropy above absolute zero. Without any free parameters, the proposed equation-of-state governs the mechanism of shear-banding and the associated features of shear-softening and thickness-invariance.

  20. [Thermodynamics of the origin of life, evolution and aging].

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, G P

    2014-01-01

    Briefly discusses the history of the search of thermodynamic approach to explain the origin of life, evolution and aging of living beings. The origin of life is the result of requirement by the quasi-equilibrium hierarchical thermodynamics, in particular, the supramolecular thermodynamics. The evolution and aging of living beings is accompanied with changes of chemical and supramolecular compositions of living bodies, as well as with changes in the composition and structure of all hierarchies of the living world. The thermodynamic principle of substance stability predicts the existence of a single genetic code in our universe. The thermodynamic theory optimizes physiology and medicine and recommends antiaging diets and medicines. Hierarchical thermodynamics forms the design diversity of culture and art. The thermodynamic theory of origin of life, evolution and aging is the development of Clausius-Gibbs thermodynamics. Hierarchical thermodynamics is the mirror of Darwin-Wallace's-theory.

  1. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of pressure solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, F. K.; Bataille, J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of solution and precipitation processes in wet crustal rocks and with the mechanism of steady pressure-solution slip in ‘contact zones,’ such as grain-to-grain contacts, fracture surfaces, and permeable gouge layers, that are infiltrated by a mobile aqueous solution phase. A local dissipation jump condition at the phase boundary is fundamental to identifying the thermodynamic force driving the solution and precipitation process and is used here in setting up linear phenomenological relations to model near-equilibrium phase transformation kinetics. The local thermodynamic equilibrium of a stressed pure solid in contact with its melt or solution phase is governed by Gibbs's relation, which is rederived here, in a manner emphasizing its independence of constitutive assumptions for the solid while neglecting surface tension and diffusion in the solid. Fluid-infiltrated contact zones, such as those formed by rough surfaces, cannot generally be in thermodynamic equilibrium, especially during an ongoing process of pressure-solution slip, and the existing equilibrium formulations are incorrect in overlooking dissipative processes tending to eliminate fluctuations in superficial free energies due to stress concentrations near asperities, defects, or impurities. Steady pressure-solution slip is likely to exhibit a nonlinear dependence of slip rate on shear stress and effective normal stress, due to a dependence of the contact-zone state on the latter. Given that this dependence is negligible within some range, linear relations for pressure-solution slip can be derived for the limiting cases of diffusion-controlled and interface-reaction-controlled rates. A criterion for rate control by one of these mechanisms is set by the magnitude of the dimensionless quantity kδ/2C pD, where k is the interfacial transfer coefficient, δ is the mean diffusion path length, C p is the solubility at pressure p, and D is the mass

  2. The Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Program with parametric study capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevigny, R.

    1981-01-01

    The program was developed to determine chemical equilibrium in complex systems. Using a free energy minimization technique, the program permits calculations such as: chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states; theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion; incident and reflected shock properties; and Chapman-Jouget detonation properties. It is shown that the same program can handle solid coal in an entrained flow coal gasification problem.

  3. Competing effects of viscosity and surface-tension depression on the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Shiraiwa, M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.; Schilling, K.; Berkemeier, T.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of oligomers in biomass burning aerosol, as well as secondary organic aerosol derived from other sources, influences particle viscosity and can introduce kinetic limitations to water uptake. This, in turn, impacts aerosol optical properties and the efficiency with which these particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). To explore the influence of organic-component viscosity on aerosol hygroscopicity, the water-uptake behavior of aerosol systems comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and mixtures of PEG and ammonium sulfate (AS) was measured under sub- and supersaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions. Experiments were conducted with systems containing PEG with average molecular weights ranging from 200 to 10,000 g/mol, corresponding to a range in viscosity of 0.004 - 4.5 Pa s under dry conditions. While evidence suggests that viscous aerosol components can suppress water uptake at RH < 90%, under supersaturated conditions (with respect to RH), an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular weight was observed. We attribute this to an increase in the efficiency with which PEG serves as a surfactant with increasing molecular weight. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures and, in fact, a modest increase in CCN activity is observed for the PEG 10,000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 4% reduction in critical activation diameter. Experimental results are compared with calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients model and the potential influence of kinetic limitations to observed water uptake is further explored with the Kinetic Multi-Layer Model of Gas-Particle Interactions. Results suggest the competing effects of organic-component viscosity and surface-tension depression may lead to RH-dependent differences in hygroscopicity for oligomers and other surface-active compounds present in atmospheric

  4. The equilibrium of neural firing: A mathematical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Sizhong

    2014-12-15

    Inspired by statistical thermodynamics, we presume that neuron system has equilibrium condition with respect to neural firing. We show that, even with dynamically changeable neural connections, it is inevitable for neural firing to evolve to equilibrium. To study the dynamics between neural firing and neural connections, we propose an extended communication system where noisy channel has the tendency towards fixed point, implying that neural connections are always attracted into fixed points such that equilibrium can be reached. The extended communication system and its mathematics could be useful back in thermodynamics.

  5. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Furthermore, we propose two setups to test our predictions, namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model. PMID:27003686

  6. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-03-22

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Lastly, we propose two setups to test our predictions, namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model.

  7. Statistical thermodynamics of clustered populations.

    PubMed

    Matsoukas, Themis

    2014-08-01

    We present a thermodynamic theory for a generic population of M individuals distributed into N groups (clusters). We construct the ensemble of all distributions with fixed M and N, introduce a selection functional that embodies the physics that governs the population, and obtain the distribution that emerges in the scaling limit as the most probable among all distributions consistent with the given physics. We develop the thermodynamics of the ensemble and establish a rigorous mapping to regular thermodynamics. We treat the emergence of a so-called giant component as a formal phase transition and show that the criteria for its emergence are entirely analogous to the equilibrium conditions in molecular systems. We demonstrate the theory by an analytic model and confirm the predictions by Monte Carlo simulation.

  8. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-03-22

    Thermodynamics is the phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law leads to the Carnot bound which is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Lastly, we propose two setups to test our predictions,more » namely with strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity and in the non-hermitian tight-binding model.« less

  9. Descriptive thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, David; Huntsman, Steven

    2006-06-01

    Thermodynamics (in concert with its sister discipline, statistical physics) can be regarded as a data reduction scheme based on partitioning a total system into a subsystem and a bath that weakly interact with each other. Whereas conventionally, the systems investigated require this form of data reduction in order to facilitate prediction, a different problem also occurs, in the context of communication networks, markets, etc. Such “empirically accessible” systems typically overwhelm observers with the sort of information that in the case of (say) a gas is effectively unobtainable. What is required for such complex interacting systems is not prediction (this may be impossible when humans besides the observer are responsible for the interactions) but rather, description as a route to understanding. Still, the need for a thermodynamical data reduction scheme remains. In this paper, we show how an empirical temperature can be computed for finite, empirically accessible systems, and further outline how this construction allows the age-old science of thermodynamics to be fruitfully applied to them.

  10. Co-gasification of biomass and plastics: pyrolysis kinetics studies, experiments on 100 kW dual fluidized bed pilot plant and development of thermodynamic equilibrium model and balances.

    PubMed

    Narobe, M; Golob, J; Klinar, D; Francetič, V; Likozar, B

    2014-06-01

    Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) of volatilization reaction kinetics for 50 wt.% mixtures of plastics (PE) and biomass (wood pellets) as well as for 100 wt.% plastics was conducted to predict decomposition times at 850°C and 900°C using iso-conversional model method. For mixtures, agreement with residence time of dual fluidized bed (DFB) reactor, treated as continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR), was obtained at large conversions. Mono-gasification of plastics and its co-gasification with biomass were performed in DFB pilot plant, using olivine as heterogeneous catalyst and heat transfer agent. It was found that co-gasification led to successful thermochemical conversion of plastics as opposed to mono-gasification. Unknown flow rates were determined applying nonlinear regression to energy and mass balances acknowledging combustion fuel, air, steam, feedstock, but also exiting char, tar, steam and other components in DFB gasification unit. Water-gas shift equilibrium and methanol synthesis requirements were incorporated into gasification model, based on measurements.

  11. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-12

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamic —independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. As a result, our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentally relevant examples.

  12. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines

    DOE PAGES

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-12

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamic —independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. As a result, our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentallymore » relevant examples.« less

  13. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines.

    PubMed

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamics-independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. Our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentally relevant examples.

  14. Tracking Water Diffusion Fronts in a Highly Viscous Aerosol Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastelberger, Sandra; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Field measurements indicate that atmospheric secondary aerosol particles can be present in a highly viscous, glassy state [1]. In contrast to liquid state particles, the gas phase equilibration is kinetically limited and governed by condensed phase diffusion. In recent water diffusion experiments on highly viscous single aerosol particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) we observed a characteristic shift behavior of the Mie whispering gallery modes (WGM) indicative of the changing radial structure of the particle, thus providing us with an experimental method to track the diffusion process inside the particle. When a highly viscous, homogeneous particle is exposed to an abrupt increase in relative humidity, the rapid gas phase diffusion and strong concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the condensed phase lead to extremely steep water concentration gradients inside the particle, reminiscent of diffusion fronts. The resulting quasi step-like concentration profile motivates the introduction of a simple core-shell model describing the morphology of the non-equilibrium particle during humidification. The subsequent particle growth and reduction of the shell refractive index can be observed as red and blueshift behavior of the WGM, respectively. The shift pattern can be attributed to a core-shell radius ratio and particle radius derived from model calculations [2]. If supplemented with growth information obtained from the WGM redshift and thermodynamic equilibrium data, we can infer a comprehensive picture of the time evolution of the diffusion fronts in the framework of our core-shell model. The measured time dependent concentration profile is then compared with simulations solving the non-linear diffusion equation [3] [1] Virtanen, A., et al., Nature, 467, 824-827, 2010 [2] Kaiser, T., Schweiger, G., Computers in Physics, Vol. 7, No. 6, 682-686, Nov/Dec 1993 [3] Zobrist, B., Soonsin, V., Luo, B.P., Peter, T. et al., Phys. Chem. Chem

  15. Modeling Gas-Particle Partitioning of SOA: Effects of Aerosol Physical State and RH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    Aged tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. In liquid aerosol particles non-ideal mixing of all species determines whether the condensed phase undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation or whether it is stable in a single mixed phase, and whether it contains solid salts in equilibrium with their saturated solution. The extended thermodynamic model AIOMFAC is able to predict such phase states by representing the variety of organic components using functional groups within a group-contribution concept. The number and composition of different condensed phases impacts the diversity of reaction media for multiphase chemistry and the gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile species. Recent studies show that under certain conditions biogenic and other organic-rich particles can be present in a highly viscous, semisolid or amorphous solid physical state, with consequences regarding reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. We present results of new gas-particle partitioning computations for aerosol chamber data using a model based on AIOMFAC activity coefficients and state-of-the-art vapor pressure estimation methods. Different environmental conditions in terms of temperature, relative humidity (RH), salt content, amount of precursor VOCs, and physical state of the particles are considered. We show how modifications of absorptive and adsorptive gas-particle mass transfer affects the total aerosol mass in the calculations and how the results of these modeling approaches compare to data of aerosol chamber experiments, such as alpha-pinene oxidation SOA. For a condensed phase in a mixed liquid state containing ammonium sulfate, the model predicts liquid-liquid phase separation up to high RH in case of, on average, moderately hydrophilic organic compounds, such as first generation oxidation products of alpha-pinene. The computations also reveal that treating liquid phases as ideal

  16. Application of thermodynamics to silicate crystalline solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    A review of thermodynamic relations is presented, describing Guggenheim's regular solution models, the simple mixture, the zeroth approximation, and the quasi-chemical model. The possibilities of retrieving useful thermodynamic quantities from phase equilibrium studies are discussed. Such quantities include the activity-composition relations and the free energy of mixing in crystalline solutions. Theory and results of the study of partitioning of elements in coexisting minerals are briefly reviewed. A thermodynamic study of the intercrystalline and intracrystalline ion exchange relations gives useful information on the thermodynamic behavior of the crystalline solutions involved. Such information is necessary for the solution of most petrogenic problems and for geothermometry. Thermodynamic quantities for tungstates (CaWO4-SrWO4) are calculated.

  17. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  18. Geometry of thermodynamic control.

    PubMed

    Zulkowski, Patrick R; Sivak, David A; Crooks, Gavin E; DeWeese, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    A deeper understanding of nonequilibrium phenomena is needed to reveal the principles governing natural and synthetic molecular machines. Recent work has shown that when a thermodynamic system is driven from equilibrium then, in the linear response regime, the space of controllable parameters has a Riemannian geometry induced by a generalized friction tensor. We exploit this geometric insight to construct closed-form expressions for minimal-dissipation protocols for a particle diffusing in a one-dimensional harmonic potential, where the spring constant, inverse temperature, and trap location are adjusted simultaneously. These optimal protocols are geodesics on the Riemannian manifold and reveal that this simple model has a surprisingly rich geometry. We test these optimal protocols via a numerical implementation of the Fokker-Planck equation and demonstrate that the friction tensor arises naturally from a first-order expansion in temporal derivatives of the control parameters, without appealing directly to linear response theory.

  19. Thermodynamics and flow-frames for dissipative relativistic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ván, P.; Biró, T. S.

    2014-01-14

    A general thermodynamic treatment of dissipative relativistic fluids is introduced, where the temperature four vector is not parallel to the velocity field of the fluid. Generic stability and kinetic equilibrium points out a particular thermodynamics, where the temperature vector is parallel to the enthalpy flow vector and the choice of the flow fixes the constitutive functions for viscous stress and heat. The linear stability of the homogeneous equilibrium is proved in a mixed particle-energy flow-frame.

  20. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed. PMID:26916503

  1. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kammerlander, P; Anders, J

    2016-02-26

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed.

  2. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed.

  3. Key parameters controlling OH-initiated formation of secondary organic aerosol in the aqueous phase (aqSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, Barbara; Sorooshian, Armin; Lim, Yong B.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2014-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous phase of cloud droplets and aerosol particles (aqSOA) might contribute substantially to the total SOA burden and help to explain discrepancies between observed and predicted SOA properties. In order to implement aqSOA formation in models, key processes controlling formation within the multiphase system have to be identified. We explore parameters affecting phase transfer and OH(aq)-initiated aqSOA formation as a function of OH(aq) availability. Box model results suggest OH(aq)-limited photochemical aqSOA formation in cloud water even if aqueous OH(aq) sources are present. This limitation manifests itself as an apparent surface dependence of aqSOA formation. We estimate chemical OH(aq) production fluxes, necessary to establish thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases (based on Henry's law constants) for both cloud and aqueous particles. Estimates show that no (currently known) OH(aq) source in cloud water can remove this limitation, whereas in aerosol water, it might be feasible. Ambient organic mass (oxalate) measurements in stratocumulus clouds as a function of cloud drop surface area and liquid water content exhibit trends similar to model results. These findings support the use of parameterizations of cloud-aqSOA using effective droplet radius rather than liquid water volume or drop surface area. Sensitivity studies suggest that future laboratory studies should explore aqSOA yields in multiphase systems as a function of these parameters and at atmospherically relevant OH(aq) levels. Since aerosol-aqSOA formation significantly depends on OH(aq) availability, parameterizations might be less straightforward, and oxidant (OH) sources within aerosol water emerge as one of the major uncertainties in aerosol-aqSOA formation.

  4. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate, polymerized rapidly and produced some polymer film encapsulation of the aerosol droplets. A two-stage microcapsule generator was designed...encapsulating material, the generator also produced microcapsules of dibutyl phosphite in polyethylene, nitrocellulose, and natural rubber.

  5. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-04-01

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 ..mu..m were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO/sub 2/ laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m/sup 2//g at 1087 cm/sup -1/. The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10/sup -8/ cm/sup -1/. The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations.

  6. Nanoscopic Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weihong

    2016-09-20

    Conventional thermodynamics for bulk substances encounters challenges when one considers materials on the nanometer scale. Quantities such as entropy, enthalpy, free energy, melting temperature, ordering temperature, Debye temperature, and specific heat no longer remain constant but change with the crystal dimension, size, and morphology. Often, one phenomenon is associated with a variety of theories from different perspectives. Still, a model that can reconcile the size and shape dependence of the thermal properties of the nanoscaled substances remains one of the goals of nanoscience and nanotechnology. This Account highlights the nanoscopic thermodynamics for nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanofilms, with particular emphasis on the bond energy model. The central idea is that the atomic cohesive energy determines the thermodynamic performance of a substance and the cohesive energy varies with the atomic coordination environment. It is the cohesive energy difference between the core and the shell that dictates the nanoscopic thermodynamics. This bond energy model rationalizes the following: (i) how the surface dangling bonds depress the melting temperature, entropy, and enthalpy; (ii) how the order-disorder transition of the nanoparticles depends on particle size and how their stability may vary when they are embedded in an appropriate matrix; (iii) predictions of the existence of face-centered cubic structures of Ti, Zr, and Hf at small size; (iv) how two elements that are immiscible in the bulk can form an alloy on the nanoscale, where the critical size can be predicted. The model has enabled us to reproduce the size and shape dependence of a number of physical properties, such as melting temperature, melting entropy, melting enthalpy, ordering temperature, Gibbs free energy, and formation heat, among others, for materials such as Pd, Au, Ag, Cu, Ni, Sn, Pb, In, Bi, Al, Ti, Zr, Hf, In-Al, Ag-Ni, Co-Pt, Cu-Ag, Cu-Ni, Au-Ni, Ag-Pt, and Au-Pt on the nanometer scale

  7. An Integrated Approach to Thermodynamics in the Introductory Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Marcelo; Finn, Edward J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an approach to combine the empirical approach of classical thermodynamics with the structural approach of statistical mechanics. Topics covered include dynamical foundation of the first law; mechanical work, heat, radiation, and the first law; thermal equilibrium; thermal processes; thermodynamic probability; entropy; the second law;…

  8. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper the Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model determines the partitioning of organic compounds between the gas and particle phases. It is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computation time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption into the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients and phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only into the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only into the organic phases of particles) or both (condenses into both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC (UNIversal Functional group Activity Coefficient; Fredenslund et al., 1975) thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) parameterization for medium- and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium representation and a dynamic representation of organic aerosols (OAs). In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phases could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation-evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phases due to the high viscosity. An implicit dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) is available in SOAP with OAs divided into layers, the first layer being at the center of the particle (slowly

  9. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-09-01

    .5 components, PM2.5, and PM10 over Europe as well as AOD and CDNC on the global scale. The explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics using the ISORROPIA II model improves the prediction of all major PM2.5 components and their gaseous precursors in some regions as well as downwelling shortwave radiation, SWCF, and cloud condensation nuclei at a supersaturation of 0.5% on the global scale. For simulations of 2001-2005 with all the modified and new treatments, the improved model predicts that on global average, SWCF increases by 2.7 W m-2, reducing the normalized mean bias (NMB) of SWCF from -5.4 to 1.2%. Uncertainties in emissions can largely explain the inaccurate prediction of precursor gases (e.g., SO2, NH3, and NO) and primary aerosols (e.g., black carbon and primary organic matter). Additional factors leading to the discrepancies between model predictions and observations include assumptions associated with equilibrium partitioning for fine particles assumed in ISORROPIA II, irreversible gas/particle mass transfer treatment for coarse particles, uncertainties in model treatments such as dust emissions, secondary organic aerosol formation, multi-phase chemistry, cloud microphysics, aerosol-cloud interaction, dry and wet deposition, and model parameters (e.g., accommodation coefficients and prefactors of the nucleation power law) as well as uncertainties in model configuration such as the use of a coarse-grid resolution.

  10. Unravelling the Complexity of Teams via a Thermodynamics Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    1 Unravelling the Complexity of Teams via a Thermodynamics Perspective W.F. Lawless, Math & Psychology, Paine College, 1235 15th Street...operate thermodynamically far from equilibrium, requiring sufficient free energy to offset the entropy produced as a byproduct of their activities...Nicolis & Prigogine, 1989). If social reality was rational, a model of team thermodynamics would have been discovered and validated decades ago

  11. Experimental study of elementary collection efficiency of aerosols by spray: Design of the experimental device

    SciTech Connect

    Ducret, D.; Vendel, J.; Garrec. S.L.

    1995-02-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant containment building, in which pressure and temperature could increase because of a overheating reactor accident, can be achieved by spraying water drops. The spray reduces the pressure and the temperature levels by condensation of steam on cold water drops. The more stringent thermodynamic conditions are a pressure of 5.10{sup 5} Pa (due to steam emission) and a temperature of 413 K. Moreover its energy dissipation function, the spray leads to the washout of fission product particles emitted in the reactor building atmosphere. The present study includes a large program devoted to the evaluation of realistic washout rates. The aim of this work is to develop experiments in order to determine the collection efficiency of aerosols by a single drop. To do this, the experimental device has to be designed with fundamental criteria:-Thermodynamic conditions have to be representative of post-accident atmosphere. Thermodynamic equilibrium has to be attained between the water drops and the gaseous phase. Thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and mechanical effects have to be studied independently. Operating conditions have to be homogenous and constant during each experiment. This paper presents the design of the experimental device. In practice, the consequences on the design of each of the criteria given previously and the necessity of being representative of the real conditions will be described.

  12. Flux Jacobian Matrices For Equilibrium Real Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Improved formulation includes generalized Roe average and extension to three dimensions. Flux Jacobian matrices derived for use in numerical solutions of conservation-law differential equations of inviscid flows of ideal gases extended to real gases. Real-gas formulation of these matrices retains simplifying assumptions of thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium, but adds effects of vibrational excitation, dissociation, and ionization of gas molecules via general equation of state.

  13. The mesoscopic dynamics of thermodynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Reguera, D; Rubí, J M; Vilar, J M G

    2005-11-24

    Concepts of everyday use such as energy, heat, and temperature have acquired a precise meaning after the development of thermodynamics. Thermodynamics provides the basis for understanding how heat and work are related and the general rules that the macroscopic properties of systems at equilibrium follow. Outside equilibrium and away from macroscopic regimes, most of those rules cannot be applied directly. Here we present recent developments that extend the applicability of thermodynamic concepts deep into mesoscopic and irreversible regimes. We show how the probabilistic interpretation of thermodynamics together with probability conservation laws can be used to obtain Fokker-Planck equations for the relevant degrees of freedom. This approach provides a systematic method to obtain the stochastic dynamics of a system directly from its equilibrium properties. A wide variety of situations can be studied in this way, including many that were thought to be out of reach of thermodynamic theories, such as nonlinear transport in the presence of potential barriers, activated processes, slow relaxation phenomena, and basic processes in biomolecules, such as translocation and stretching.

  14. First law of p-brane thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2009-08-15

    We study the physical process version and the equilibrium state version of the first law of thermodynamics for a charged p-brane. The general setting for our investigations is (n+p+1)-dimensional Einstein dilaton gravity with (p+2) strength form fields.

  15. First law of black Saturn thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2007-06-15

    The physical process version and equilibrium state version of the first law of thermodynamics for a black object consisting of n-dimensional charged stationary axisymmetric black hole surrounded by a black rings, the so-called black Saturn, was derived. The general setting for our derivations is n-dimensional dilaton gravity with p+1 strength form fields.

  16. SO2 on Io: A thermodynamic perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Fanale, Fraser P.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of condensed SO2 on Io mandates a finite abundance of SO2 vapor which must be present, regardless of plume activity. The absorption of SO2 was measured on particulate sulfur and the equilibrium between absorbed SO2, SO2 vapor, and SO2 ice examined, based upon measurements and simple thermodynamic considerations.

  17. Preparation of silicon carbide SiC-based nanopowders by the aerosol-assisted synthesis and the DC thermal plasma synthesis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Czosnek, Cezary; Bućko, Mirosław M.; Janik, Jerzy F.; Olejniczak, Zbigniew; Bystrzejewski, Michał; Łabędź, Olga; Huczko, Andrzej

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Make-up of the SiC-based nanopowders is a function of the C:Si:O ratio in precursor. • Two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis offers conditions close to equilibrium. • DC thermal plasma synthesis yields kinetically controlled SiC products. - Abstract: Nanosized SiC-based powders were prepared from selected liquid-phase organosilicon precursors by the aerosol-assisted synthesis, the DC thermal plasma synthesis, and a combination of the two methods. The two-stage aerosol-assisted synthesis method provides at the end conditions close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The single-stage thermal plasma method is characterized by short particle residence times in the reaction zone, which can lead to kinetically controlled products. The by-products and final nanopowders were characterized by powder XRD, infrared spectroscopy FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy SEM, and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy. BET specific surface areas of the products were determined by standard physical adsorption of nitrogen at 77 K. The major component in all synthesis routes was found to be cubic silicon carbide β-SiC with average crystallite sizes ranging from a few to tens of nanometers. In some cases, it was accompanied by free carbon, elemental silicon or silica nanoparticles. The final mesoporous β-SiC-based nanopowders have a potential as affordable catalyst supports.

  18. A New Application for Radioimmunoassay: Measurement of Thermodynamic Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angstadt, Carol N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which an equilibrium radioimmunoassay (RIA) is used to estimate thermodynamic parameters such as equilibrium constants. The experiment is simple and inexpensive, and it introduces a technique that is important in the clinical chemistry and research laboratory. Background information, procedures, and results are…

  19. Advances in thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sieniutycz, S. ); Salamon, P. )

    1990-01-01

    This book covers: nonequilibrium thermodynamics for solar energy applications; finite-time thermodynamics as applied to solar power conversion; thermodynamics and economics; exergy analysis; and an analysis of cumulative exergy consumption and exergy losses.

  20. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  1. CET89 - CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH TRANSPORT PROPERTIES, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B.

    1994-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need chemical equilibrium composition data to calculate the theoretical thermodynamic properties of a chemical system. This information is essential in the design and analysis of equipment such as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical processing equipment. The substantial amount of numerical computation required to obtain equilibrium compositions and transport properties for complex chemical systems led scientists at NASA's Lewis Research Center to develop CET89, a program designed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of these systems. CET89 is a general program which will calculate chemical equilibrium compositions and mixture properties for any chemical system with available thermodynamic data. Generally, mixtures may include condensed and gaseous products. CET89 performs the following operations: it 1) obtains chemical equilibrium compositions for assigned thermodynamic states, 2) calculates dilute-gas transport properties of complex chemical mixtures, 3) obtains Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties for gaseous species, 4) calculates incident and reflected shock properties in terms of assigned velocities, and 5) calculates theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion. The rocket performance function allows the option of assuming either a finite area or an infinite area combustor. CET89 accommodates problems involving up to 24 reactants, 20 elements, and 600 products (400 of which may be condensed). The program includes a library of thermodynamic and transport properties in the form of least squares coefficients for possible reaction products. It includes thermodynamic data for over 1300 gaseous and condensed species and transport data for 151 gases. The subroutines UTHERM and UTRAN convert thermodynamic and transport data to unformatted form for faster processing. The program conforms to the FORTRAN 77 standard, except for

  2. Anthropogenic Aerosol Effects on Sea Surface Temperatures: Mixed-Layer Ocean Experiments with Explicit Aerosol Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Knutti, Reto

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols affect the Earth's radiative balance both through direct and indirect effects. These effects can lead to a reduction of the incoming solar radiation at the surface, i.e. dimming, which may lead to a change in sea surface temperatures (SST) or SST pattern. This, in turn, may affect precipitation patterns. The goal of the present work is to achieve an estimate of the equilibrium SST changes under anthropogenic aerosol forcing since industrialisation. We show preliminary results from mixed-layer ocean (MLO) experiments with explicit aerosol representation performed with ECHAM6-HAM. The (fixed) MLO heat flux into the deep ocean was derived from atmosphere only runs with fixed climatological SSTs (1961-1990 average) and present day (year 2000) aerosols and GHG burdens. Some experiments we repeated with an alternative MLO deep ocean heat flux (based on pre-industrial conditions) to test the robustness of our results with regard to this boundary condition. The maximum surface temperature responses towards anthropogenic aerosol and GHG forcing (separately and combined) were derived on a global and regional scale. The same set of experiments was performed with aerosol and GHG forcings representative of different decades over the past one and a half centuries. This allows to assess how SST patterns at equilibrium changed with changing aerosol (and GHG) forcing. Correlating SST responses with the change in downward clear-sky and all-sky shortwave radiation provides a first estimate of the response to anthropogenic aerosols. Our results show a clear contrast in hemispheric surface temperature response, as expected from the inter-hemispheric asymmetry of aerosol forcing The presented work is part of a project aiming at quantifying the effect of anthropogenic aerosol forcing on SSTs and the consequences for global precipitation patterns. Results from this study will serve as a starting point for further experiments involving a dynamic ocean model, which

  3. Exploring Equilibrium Chemistry for Hot Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Challener, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Young 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime of 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets (Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an updated thermodynamic library) is validated with the thermochemical model presented in Venot et al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis has then been extended to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated from both models’ abundances using the open source code transit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  4. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium in Hot Jovians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Yung 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets(Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an up-dated thermodynamic library) is compared with the thermochemical model presented in Venotet al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis is then applied to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated and we compare both models' outputs using the open source codetransit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. Thiswork was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  5. Simulating Metabolism with Statistical Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, William R.

    2014-01-01

    New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed. PMID:25089525

  6. Simulating metabolism with statistical thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cannon, William R

    2014-01-01

    New methods are needed for large scale modeling of metabolism that predict metabolite levels and characterize the thermodynamics of individual reactions and pathways. Current approaches use either kinetic simulations, which are difficult to extend to large networks of reactions because of the need for rate constants, or flux-based methods, which have a large number of feasible solutions because they are unconstrained by the law of mass action. This report presents an alternative modeling approach based on statistical thermodynamics. The principles of this approach are demonstrated using a simple set of coupled reactions, and then the system is characterized with respect to the changes in energy, entropy, free energy, and entropy production. Finally, the physical and biochemical insights that this approach can provide for metabolism are demonstrated by application to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of Escherichia coli. The reaction and pathway thermodynamics are evaluated and predictions are made regarding changes in concentration of TCA cycle intermediates due to 10- and 100-fold changes in the ratio of NAD+:NADH concentrations. Finally, the assumptions and caveats regarding the use of statistical thermodynamics to model non-equilibrium reactions are discussed.

  7. Approaches to the Treatment of Equilibrium Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2003-10-01

    Perturbations from equilibrium are treated in the textbooks by a combination of Le Châtelier's principle, the comparison of the equilibrium constant K with the reaction quotient Q,and the kinetic approach. Each of these methods is briefly reviewed. This is followed by derivations of the variation of the equilibrium value of the extent of reaction, ξeq, with various parameters on which it depends. Near equilibrium this relationship can be represented by a straight line. The equilibrium system can be regarded as moving on this line as the parameter is varied. The slope of the line depends on quantities like enthalpy of reaction, volume of reaction and so forth. The derivation shows that these quantities pertain to the equilibrium system, not the standard state. Also, the derivation makes clear what kind of assumptions underlie our conclusions. The derivation of these relations involves knowledge of thermodynamics that is well within the grasp of junior level physical chemistry students. The conclusions that follow from the derived relations are given as subsidiary rules in the form of the slope of ξeq, with T, p, et cetera. The rules are used to develop a visual way of predicting the direction of shift of a perturbed system. This method can be used to supplement one of the other methods even at the introductory level.

  8. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-12-31

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed [111] Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  9. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed (111) Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  10. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-11-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound.

  11. Learning thermodynamics with Boltzmann machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torlai, Giacomo; Melko, Roger G.

    2016-10-01

    A Boltzmann machine is a stochastic neural network that has been extensively used in the layers of deep architectures for modern machine learning applications. In this paper, we develop a Boltzmann machine that is capable of modeling thermodynamic observables for physical systems in thermal equilibrium. Through unsupervised learning, we train the Boltzmann machine on data sets constructed with spin configurations importance sampled from the partition function of an Ising Hamiltonian at different temperatures using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. The trained Boltzmann machine is then used to generate spin states, for which we compare thermodynamic observables to those computed by direct MC sampling. We demonstrate that the Boltzmann machine can faithfully reproduce the observables of the physical system. Further, we observe that the number of neurons required to obtain accurate results increases as the system is brought close to criticality.

  12. Chemical reactions in endoreversible thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Katharina; Hoffmann, Karl Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Endoreversible thermodynamics is a theory for the (approximate) description of thermodynamic non-equilibrium systems, which allows us to capture the ever present irreversibilities of real processes. For instance in heat engines the dissipation due to finite heat transport capabilities, as well as the resulting limitations in the energy fluxes, can be incorporated into the theory. It has thus been very successful in closing the gap between observed and theoretically predicted efficiencies. Here an extension of the theory is provided, with which chemical reactions can be included in the formalism. This opens up a wide field of applications for endoreversible modeling and the investigation of dissipative processes, for instance in fuel cells or batteries.

  13. Measuring the Thermodynamics of the Alloy/Scale Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan

    2004-01-01

    A method is proposed for the direct measurement of the thermodynamic properties of the alloy and oxide compound at the alloy/scale interface observed during steady-state oxidation. The thermodynamic properties of the alloy/scale interface define the driving force for solid-state transport in the alloy and oxide compound. Accurate knowledge of thermodynamic properties of the interface will advance our understanding of oxidation behavior. The method is based on the concept of local equilibrium and assumes that an alloy+scale equilibrium very closely approximates the alloy/scale interface observed during steady-state oxidation. The thermodynamics activities of this alloy+scale equilibrium are measured directly by Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometer (KEMS) using the vapor pressure technique. The theory and some practical considerations of this method are discussed in terms of beta-NiAl oxidation.

  14. Thermodynamical Study on Production of Acetylene from Coal Pyrolysis in Hydrogen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Guo, Wenkang; Yuan, Xingqiu; Zhao, Taize

    2006-05-01

    The chemical thermodynamic equilibrium of acetylene production by coal pyrolysis in hydrogen plasma was studied. The thermodynamic equilibrium is obtained by using the method of free energy. Calculated results show that the hydrogen concentration in the equilibrium system is very important for the acetylene production by coal conversion and the energy consumption for the production of acetylene per-kilogram strongly depends on the hydrogen concentration and the temperature.

  15. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics. II. Application to inhomogeneous systems.

    PubMed

    Gujrati, P D

    2012-04-01

    We provide an extension of a recent approach to study nonequilibrium thermodynamics [Gujrati, Phys. Rev. E 81, 051130 (2010), to be denoted by I in this work] to inhomogeneous systems by considering the latter to be composed of quasi-independent subsystems. The system Σ along with the (macroscopically extremely large) medium Σ[over ̃] form an isolated system Σ0. The fields (temperature, pressure, etc.) of Σ and Σ[over ̃] differ unless at equilibrium. We show that the additivity of entropy requires quasi-independence of the subsystems, which results from the interaction energies between different subsystems being negligible so the energy also becomes additive. The thermodynamic potentials such as the Gibbs free energy that continuously decrease during approach to equilibrium are determined by the fields of the medium and exist no matter how far the subsystems are out of equilibrium, so their fields may not even exist. This and the requirement of quasi-independence make our approach differ from the conventional approach used by de Groot and others, as discussed in the text. We find it useful to introduce the time-dependent Gibbs statistical entropy for Σ0, from which we derive the Gibbs entropy of Σ; in equilibrium this entropy reduces to the equilibrium thermodynamic entropy. As the energy depends on the frame of reference, the thermodynamic potentials and the Gibbs fundamental relation, but not the entropy, depend on the frame of reference. The possibility of relative motion between subsystems described by their net linear and angular momenta gives rise to viscous dissipation. The concept of internal equilibrium introduced in I is developed further here and its important consequences are discussed for inhomogeneous systems. The concept of internal variables (various examples are given in the text) as variables that cannot be controlled by the observer for nonequilibrium evolution is also discussed. They are important because the concept of internal

  16. Thermodynamics in f(R,T) theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M.; Zubair, M. E-mail: mzubairkk@gmail.com

    2012-03-01

    A non-equilibrium picture of thermodynamics is discussed at the apparent horizon of FRW universe in f(R,T) gravity, where R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We take two forms of the energy-momentum tensor of dark components and demonstrate that equilibrium description of thermodynamics is not achievable in both cases. We check the validity of the first and second law of thermodynamics in this scenario. It is shown that the Friedmann equations can be expressed in the form of first law of thermodynamics T{sub h}dS'{sub h}+T{sub h}d{sub jmath}S' = −dE'+W'dV, where d{sub jmath}S' is the entropy production term. Finally, we conclude that the second law of thermodynamics holds both in phantom and non-phantom phases.

  17. Stochastic thermodynamics for active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The theoretical understanding of active matter, which is driven out of equilibrium by directed motion, is still fragmental and model oriented. Stochastic thermodynamics, on the other hand, is a comprehensive theoretical framework for driven systems that allows to define fluctuating work and heat. We apply these definitions to active matter, assuming that dissipation can be modelled by effective non-conservative forces. We show that, through the work, conjugate extensive and intensive observables can be defined even in non-equilibrium steady states lacking a free energy. As an illustration, we derive the expressions for the pressure and interfacial tension of active Brownian particles. The latter becomes negative despite the observed stable phase separation. We discuss this apparent contradiction, highlighting the role of fluctuations, and we offer a tentative explanation.

  18. Influence of particle phase state on the hygroscopic behavior of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Mui, W.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that organic and mixed organic-inorganic particles can exhibit multiple phase states depending on their chemical composition and on ambient conditions such as relative humidity (RH). To explore the extent to which water uptake varies with particle phase behavior, hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs) of nine laboratory-generated, organic and organic-inorganic aerosol systems with physical states ranging from well-mixed liquids, to phase-separated particles, to viscous liquids or semi-solids were measured with the Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe at RH values ranging from 40-90%. Water-uptake measurements were accompanied by HGF and RH-dependent thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. In addition, AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are compared to several simplified HGF modeling approaches: (1) representing particles as ideal, well-mixed liquids, (2) forcing a single phase, but accounting for non-ideal interactions through activity coefficient calculations, and (3) a Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson-like calculation in which complete separation between the inorganic and organic components is assumed at all RH values, with water-uptake treated separately in each of the individual phases. We observed variability in the characteristics of measured hygroscopic growth curves across aerosol systems with differing phase behaviors, with growth curves approaching smoother, more continuous water uptake with decreasing prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation and increasing oxygen : carbon ratios of the organic aerosol components. We also observed indirect evidence for the dehydration-induced formation of highly viscous semi-solid phases and for kinetic limitations to the crystallization of ammonium sulfate at low RH for sucrose-containing particles. AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are generally in good agreement with the HGF

  19. Influence of particle-phase state on the hygroscopic behavior of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Mui, W.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that organic and mixed organic-inorganic particles can exhibit multiple phase states depending on their chemical composition and on ambient conditions such as relative humidity (RH). To explore the extent to which water uptake varies with particle-phase behavior, hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs) of nine laboratory-generated, organic and organic-inorganic aerosol systems with physical states ranging from well-mixed liquids to phase-separated particles to viscous liquids or semi-solids were measured with the Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe at RH values ranging from 40 to 90%. Water-uptake measurements were accompanied by HGF and RH-dependent thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. In addition, AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are compared to several simplified HGF modeling approaches: (1) representing particles as ideal, well-mixed liquids; (2) forcing a single phase but accounting for non-ideal interactions through activity coefficient calculations; and (3) a Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson-like calculation in which complete separation of the inorganic and organic components is assumed at all RH values, with water uptake treated separately in each of the individual phases. We observed variability in the characteristics of measured hygroscopic growth curves across aerosol systems with differing phase behaviors, with growth curves approaching smoother, more continuous water uptake with decreasing prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation and increasing oxygen : carbon ratios of the organic aerosol components. We also observed indirect evidence for the dehydration-induced formation of highly viscous semi-solid phases and for kinetic limitations to the crystallization of ammonium sulfate at low RH for sucrose-containing particles. AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are generally in good agreement with the HGF

  20. A modelling methodology to predict the range of organic components expected to condense to atmospheric aerosol: Sensitivities to fundamental properties and routes for reduced complexity parameterisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G. B.; Barley, M.; Jenkin, M.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are an important yet uncertain component of climate change and air quality. Influencing climate directly by the scattering and absorption of solar radiation and indirectly through their role as cloud condensation nuclei, their radiatively important properties are determined by the chemical composition, mass loading, mixing state and size distribution, as are their impacts on human health. Mechanistic understanding and knowledge of individual compounds involved in the chemical evolution of aerosol particles is far from complete. A full chemical analysis of the organic component of atmospheric aerosols is not available. Whilst explicit hydrocarbon oxidation mechanisms that track many thousands of degradation products of volatile organic compounds (VOC) have been developed, aerosol schemes in large-scale models neglect the majority of chemical components predicted to occur in the organic mixture and will continue to do so in the future. This is a result of prohibitive computational expense of explicit mechanisms which must be avoided via a reduction in complexity (numerical, chemical or both). Reduction mechanisms that neglect compositional information are widely used to derive those parameters deemed important for climatic and health impacts. However, it is possible to make detailed predictions of the range of organic components expected to condense to atmospheric aerosol by combining a gas/particle partitioning model with a detailed gas phase chemical mechanism. Provided they are of sufficient skill, these predictions can be used as the basis for process and composition complexity reduction whilst retaining mechanistic understanding. Here we present development of compound selection methodologies that combine detailed gas phase mechanisms, pure component vapour pressure calculations, thermodynamic properties and a gas/aerosol partition model. As an example, we combine the methodology with the master chemical mechanism (MCM) to simulate

  1. Experimental studies of gas-aerosol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-05-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is believed to the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO2 by H2O2 in the atmosphere. Growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO2 and H2O2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMA's) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charter capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 microns was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 particles with SO2 and H2O2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets greater than or equal to 0.3 microns, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets less than or equal to 0.2 microns, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH4)2SO4 particles exposed to SO2, H2O2, NH3, and H2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH4)2SO4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than

  2. Experimental Studies of Gas-Aerosol Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-02-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO_2 by H_2O_2 is believed to be the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective of this thesis is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO_2 by H_2O_2 in the atmosphere. In this thesis growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO_2 and H_2 O_2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charger capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 μm was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH_4)_2SO _4 particles with SO_2 and H_2O_2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets >=0.3 mum, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets <=0.2 mum, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH_3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH_4) _2SO_4 particles exposed to SO_2, H_2O _2, NH_3 and H_2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH_4) _2SO_4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe^{2+} , Fe^{3+}, Mn ^{2+}, Cu^{2+ }) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew

  3. Asian Aerosols: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosol heats the atmosphere while simultaneously cooling the surface and reducing latent and sensible heat fluxes from the land. Recent studies have shown that absorbing BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates, including modification of the hydrological cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain with regards to (a) the total amount of all aerosol species and (b) the amount of aerosol absorption. Here we present a GCM sensitivity study focusing on the influences due to total aerosol amount and aerosol absorption in the south and east Asian regions. Six experiments are conducted to test the equilibrium response of the GFDL AM2 GCM (under conditions of prescribed, observed sea surface temperatures) to (i) changes in aerosol absorption caused by changes in BC aerosol amount, and (ii) aerosol extinction optical depth increases corresponding to the year 1990 relative to a control case of 1950. In order to systematically explore the uncertainties in aerosol loading and absorption, the sensitivity experiments are classified into four regimes: low extinction optical depth, low absorption; low extinction optical depth, high absorption; high extinction optical depth, low absorption; and high extinction optical depth, high absorption. Changes in surface temperature and changes in the hydrological cycle are generally insignificant when lower aerosol extinction optical depths are considered. For higher extinction optical depths, the change in the modeled regional circulation relative to the control circulation over south and east Asia is affected by the amount of aerosol absorption and contrasts sharply to the regional circulation change associated with increasing only scattering aerosols. When increasing absorbing aerosols over the region, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of the absorbing aerosol and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation rate

  4. Irreversible thermodynamics of reversible dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Thomas M. M.

    This thesis is devoted to a study of the statistical physics of non-equilibrium systems. An entropy for systems driven out of equilibrium is introduced in the form of a coarse grained Gibbs entropy. It is shown how to consistently derive an entropy production formula for model systems with strong chaotic properties. A general formalism is presented and applied to two different classes of systems. The first one is concerned with diffusive volume-preserving systems driven out of equilibrium by boundary conditions. The second is a class of dissipative systems driven away from equilibrium by an external field and maintained in a stationary state by the action of a fictitious thermostat. Simple examples of systems of both these classes are extensively studied. It is shown that non-equilibrium stationary states are characterized by singular distributions. In our model systems, the stationary states are studied analytically and, for systems close to equilibrium, we are able to show that the definition of the entropy we propose yields a rate of entropy production that is consistent with the phenomenological approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In the course of this study of entropy production, we develop methods for calculating Sinai- Ruelle-Bowen (SRB) measures for a class of systems which are generalizations of baker maps to include diffusion, phase-space contraction, and/or non-equilibrium boundary conditions.

  5. Off-equilibrium thermodynamics of classical spin systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borlenghi Garoia, Simone

    2016-10-01

    I will present the results of a systematic micromagnetic study of the spin dynamics in magnetic multilayers in the presence of a temperature gradient. In particular, I will describe the flow of magnetisation and energy currents between the layers by means of a general oscillator model, the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLS). Two new effects are predicted: 1) the rectification of spin-wave (SW) and energy currents: controlling the synchronisation between the spin-oscillators allows to propagate those currents only in one direction. 2) The spin-josepson effect: SW currents is proportional to the sine for the phase differences between spins, in strong analogy will the well known effect of superconductivity. The DNLS model is very general and those properties are expected to emerge in a large class of systems. In this respect, i will elucidate the strong connection with lattice gauge theories, suggesting possible experiments in system with antisymmetric exchange coupling. References: S. Borlenghi et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 040703 (2014); Phys. Rev. E 91, 040102(R) (2015)

  6. Some applications of equilibrium thermodynamic properties to continuum gasdynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The speed of sound for the propagation of isentropic disturbances in a gas is developed, including corrections for chemical reaction. The term zero frequency is used to describe this isentropic limit sound speed; the term signifies that change in the gasdynamic variables are all very slow compared with the chemical rate changes in the gas. A faster, nonisentropic speed of propagation occurs for disturbances where the changes in gasdynamic variables are fast compared with the chemical rate changes. In the limit, this is known as the infinite frequency or frozen sound speed - the former term calling attention to the very high frequency of the disturbance, the latter term calling attention to the frozen character of the chemical reactions under such rapid changes of state. The true sound speed for a disturbance of finite frequency is shown to be between these two limits and is expressed in terms of the chemical relaxation time. The Riemann invariants that are useful in determining the changes in flow speed along characteristic directions in supersonic flow are derived in terms of integrations of acoustic impedance, and example results are given for air.

  7. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Piecewise Deterministic Markov Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggionato, A.; Gabrielli, D.; Ribezzi Crivellari, M.

    2009-10-01

    We consider a class of stochastic dynamical systems, called piecewise deterministic Markov processes, with states ( x, σ)∈Ω×Γ, Ω being a region in ℝ d or the d-dimensional torus, Γ being a finite set. The continuous variable x follows a piecewise deterministic dynamics, the discrete variable σ evolves by a stochastic jump dynamics and the two resulting evolutions are fully-coupled. We study stationarity, reversibility and time-reversal symmetries of the process. Increasing the frequency of the σ-jumps, the system behaves asymptotically as deterministic and we investigate the structure of its fluctuations (i.e. deviations from the asymptotic behavior), recovering in a non Markovian frame results obtained by Bertini et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 87(4):040601, 2001; J. Stat. Phys. 107(3-4):635-675, 2002; J. Stat. Mech. P07014, 2007; Preprint available online at http://www.arxiv.org/abs/0807.4457, 2008), in the context of Markovian stochastic interacting particle systems. Finally, we discuss a Gallavotti-Cohen-type symmetry relation with involution map different from time-reversal.

  8. The thermodynamics of simple biomembrane mimetic systems

    PubMed Central

    Raudino, Antonio; Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Pannuzzo, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Insight into the forces governing a system is essential for understanding its behavior and function. Thermodynamic investigations provide a wealth of information that is not, or is hardly, available from other methods. This article reviews thermodynamic approaches and assays to measure collective properties such as heat adsorption / emission and volume variations. These methods can be successfully applied to the study of lipid vesicles (liposomes) and biological membranes. With respect to instrumentation, differential scanning calorimetry, pressure perturbation calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry, dilatometry, and acoustic techniques aimed at measuring the isothermal and adiabatic processes, two- and three-dimensional compressibilities are considered. Applications of these techniques to lipid systems include the measurement of different thermodynamic parameters and a detailed characterization of thermotropic, barotropic, and lyotropic phase behavior. The membrane binding and / or partitioning of solutes (proteins, peptides, drugs, surfactants, ions, etc.) can also be quantified and modeled. Many thermodynamic assays are available for studying the effect of proteins and other additives on membranes, characterizing non-ideal mixing, domain formation, bilayer stability, curvature strain, permeability, solubilization, and fusion. Studies of membrane proteins in lipid environments elucidate lipid–protein interactions in membranes. Finally, a plethora of relaxation phenomena toward e