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Sample records for aerosol total carbon

  1. Gas-phase photoacoustic determination of the total carbon content of aerosol deposits.

    PubMed

    Pleil, J D; Russwurm, G M; McClenny, W A

    1982-01-01

    A prototype system was constructed to determine the total carbon content of ambient aerosols trapped on quartz fiber filters. The measurement technique is based on carbon combustion to CO(2), cryogenic precon-centration, and subsequent photoacoustic monitoring of produced CO(2). A common sample set was independently analyzed by two established combustion method instruments and the photoacoustic system. Statistical comparison of data showed good agreement with accepted carbon values indicating feasibility for photoacoustic application to routine carbon analysis. PMID:20372416

  2. Contribution of Black Carbon, Brown Carbon and Lensing Effect to Total Aerosol Absorption in Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamjad, Pm; Tripathi, Sachchida; Bergin, Mike; Vreeland, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    This study reports the optical and physical properties of atmospheric and denuded (heated at 300°C) aerosols from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) during 20 December 2014 to 28 February 2015. A Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) and High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) were used to measure black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) in real time respectively. During experiments large scale carbonaceous aerosol loading is observed in IGP. Multiple biomass burning events are observed with varying intensity and duration. Refractive index of brown carbon (BrC) is derived from filter extracts using Liquid Core Wave Capillary Cell (LWCC). Refractive index of BrC at 405 is 4 times higher in IGP when compared to studies conducted in USA. Through Mie modelling we identified the percentage contribution of black carbon, BrC and lensing effect to total aerosol absorption. On average 75% of absorption is from black carbon alone, while rest is contributed from volatile components. Within the volatile component contribution, at 405 nm BrC contributes around 20% and rest from lensing effect. But at 781 nm lensing contributed more than BrC. Overall results indicate the special characteristics on BrC aerosols in IGP and the importance of considering spectral absorption in global aerosol modelling studies.

  3. Dual carbon isotope characterization of total organic carbon in wintertime carbonaceous aerosols from northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Andersson, August; Sarin, M. M.; Sheesley, R. J.; Kirillova, E.; Rengarajan, R.; Sudheer, A. K.; Ram, K.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-05-01

    Large-scale emissions of carbonaceous aerosols (CA) from South Asia impact both regional climate and air quality, yet their sources are not well constrained. Here we use source-diagnostic stable and radiocarbon isotopes (δ13C and Δ14C) to characterize CA sources at a semiurban site (Hisar: 29.2°N, 75.2°E) in the NW Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and a remote high-altitude location in the Himalayan foothills (Manora Peak: 29.4°N, 79.5°E, 1950 m above sea level) in northern India during winter. The Δ14C of total aerosol organic carbon (TOC) varied from -178‰ to -63‰ at Hisar and from -198‰ to -1‰ at Manora Peak. The absence of significant differences in the 14C-based fraction biomass of TOC between Hisar (0.81 ± 0.03) and Manora Peak (0.82 ± 0.07) reveals that biomass burning/biogenic emissions (BBEs) are the dominant sources of CA at both sites. Combining this information with δ13C, other chemical tracers (K+/OC and SO42-/EC) and air mass back trajectory analyses indicate similar source regions in the IGP (e.g., Punjab and Haryana). These results highlight that CA from BBEs in the IGP are not only confined to the atmospheric boundary layer but also extend to higher elevations of the troposphere, where the synoptic-scale circulations could substantially influence their abundances both to the Himalayas and over the downwind oceanic regions such as the Indian Ocean. Given the vast emissions of CA from postharvest crop residue combustion practices in the IGP during early Northeast Monsoon, this information is important for both improved process and model understanding of climate and health effects, as well as in guiding policy decision aiming at reducing emissions.

  4. Radiocarbon Analysis of Elemental Carbon and Total Organic Carbon in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakaki, T.; Handa, D.; Nakajima, H.; Kumata, H.; Suzuki, M.; Shibata, Y.; Uchida, M.

    2008-12-01

    A study was initiated to understand the sources and behaviors of carbon-containing compounds in the atmospheric aerosols in East Asian region. As an initial attempt, we collected airborne particulate matter (APM) with diameter <10 micrometer (PM10) in Okinawa, Japan and analyzed 14C/12C ratio in EC and total organic carbon (TOC) to apportion source of biomass and fossil fuel combustion in PM10 aerosols. Okinawa is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location in Asia is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia. Aerosol particles were collected at the Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) in Okinawa, Japan. Each sample was collected for two weeks with a high-volume air sampler at a rate of 1000 L min-1 to collect aerosol particles on a quartz filter, which was pre-combusted before use to eliminate residual organic compounds. Radiocarbon is measured in AMS facility (NIES-TERRA) at National Institute for Environmental Studies after preparing graphite. The results showed that during Asian dust events in March and April, both APM and EC in PM10 aerosols collected in Okinawa, Japan were much higher than those of non-Asian dust event. The percent modern carbon (pMC) of EC and TOC was much smaller for the PM10 aerosols collected during Asian dust events than those of non-dust event. When maritime air mass prevailed, biomass originated organic compounds were the major TOC in the aerosols. We will report data on 14C/12C ratio of EC and TOC in PM10 aerosols collected at CHAAMS during March to October, 2008

  5. Contribution of Brown Carbon to Total Aerosol Absorption in Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. N.; Moosakutty, S. P.; Bergin, M.; Vreeland, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in earth's radiative balance by absorbing and scattering light. We report physical and optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) for 60 days during 2014-15 winter season. Mass concentration and size distribution of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) were measured in real time using Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) and High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) respectively. Optical properties of aerosols at atmospheric and denuded (heated at 300 ˚C) conditions were also measured using 3 wavelength Photo Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS 3). Analysis shows large scale carbonaceous aerosol loading during winter season in IGP. Multiple biomass burning events combined with trash burning contributed to this high loading along with very low boundary layer height. An inter-comparison shows that Aethalometer over estimates BC by a factor of 3 when compared with that of SP 2 measurement. Enhancement in absorption (Eabs) defined as the ratio of atmospheric absorption to denuded absorption shows presence of absorbing organics known as brown carbon (BrC). Optical closure performed between denuded aerosol absorption measured by PASS 3 and Mie theory derived absorption using SP 2 BC size distribution showed a difference of only 30 % at 781 nm. This difference might be due to the non-spherical shape and presence of residual coating on BC. Refractive index of BrC at 405 and 532 nm were derived using optical closure method for the entire sampling period. Overall results indicates that the impact of BrC on optical absorption is significant in areas dominated by biomass burning such as IGP and such effects needs to be considered in global aerosol modelling studies.

  6. Contribution of methane to aerosol carbon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, F.; Barmet, P.; Stirnweis, L.; El Haddad, I.; Platt, S. M.; Saurer, M.; Lötscher, C.; Siegwolf, R.; Bigi, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Slowik, J. G.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.

    2016-09-01

    Small volatile organic compounds (VOC) such as methane (CH4) have long been considered non-relevant to aerosol formation due to the high volatility of their oxidation products. However, even low aerosol yields from CH4, the most abundant VOC in the atmosphere, would contribute significantly to the total particulate carbon budget. In this study, organic aerosol (OA) mass yields from CH4 oxidation were evaluated at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) smog chamber in the presence of inorganic and organic seed aerosols. Using labeled 13C methane, we could detect its oxidation products in the aerosol phase, with yields up to 0.09

  7. Stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.

    I use a general circulation model of Earth's climate to simulate stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols, varying the altitude of injection, initial particle size, and whether the deposited black carbon modifies ground albedo. 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols injected into the stratosphere each year will cause significant enough surface cooling to negate anthropogenic warming if the aerosols are small (r=0.03 mum) or if the aerosols are injected into the middle stratosphere, although using small aerosols causes large regional cooling effects that would be catastrophic to agriculture. The aerosols cause significant stratospheric heating, resulting in stratospheric ozone destruction and circulation changes, most notably an increase in the Northern Hemisphere polar jet, which forms an Arctic ozone hole and forces a positive mode of the Arctic Oscillation. The hydrologic cycle is perturbed, specifically the summer monsoon system of India, Africa, and East Asia, resulting in monsoon precipitation collapse. Global primary productivity is decreased by 35.5% for the small particle case. Surface cooling causes some sea ice regrowth, but not at statistically significant levels. All of these climate impacts are exacerbated for small particle geoengineering, with high altitude geoengineering with the default particle size (r=0.08 mum) causing a reasonable amount of cooling, and large particle (r=0.15 mum) geoengineering or particle injection into the lower stratosphere causing few of these effects. The modification of ground albedo by the soot particles slightly perturbs the radiative budget but does not cause any distinguishable climate effects. The cheapest means we investigated for placing 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols into the stratosphere by diesel fuel combustion would cost 1.4 trillion initially and 541 billion annual, or 2.0% and 0.8% of GDP, respectively. The additional carbon dioxide released from combusting diesel to produce these aerosols is about 1

  8. Characterization of Ambient Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Levy, M. E.; Zheng, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the strong absorption over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectra, black carbon (BC) is a key short-lived climate forcer, which contributes significantly to climate change by direct radiative forcing and is the second most important component causing global warming after carbon dioxide. The impact of BC on the radiative forcing of the Earth-Atmosphere system is highly dependent of the particle properties. In this presentation, emphasis will be placed on characterizing BC containing aerosols in at the California-Mexico border to obtain a greater understanding of the atmospheric aging and properties of ambient BC aerosols. A comprehensive set of directly measured aerosol properties, including the particle size distribution, effective density, hygroscopicity, volatility, and several optical properties, will be discussed to quantify the mixing state and composition of ambient particles. In Tijuana, Mexico, submicron aerosols are strongly influenced by vehicle emissions; subsequently, the BC concentration in Tijuana is considerably higher than most US cities with an average BC concentration of 2.71 × 2.65 g cm-3. BC accounts for 24.75 % × 9.44 of the total submicron concentration on average, but periodically accounts for over 50%. This high concentration of BC strongly influences many observed aerosol properties such as single scattering albedo, hygroscopicity, effective density, and volatility.

  9. Total organic carbon analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  10. A contribution of brown carbon aerosol to the aerosol light absorption and its radiative forcing in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Rokjin J.; Kim, Minjoong J.; Jeong, Jaein I.; Youn, Daeok; Kim, Sangwoo

    2010-04-01

    Brown carbon aerosols were recently found to be ubiquitous and effectively absorb solar radiation. We use a 3-D global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) together with aircraft and ground based observations from the TRACE-P and the ACE-Asia campaigns to examine the contribution of brown carbon aerosol to the aerosol light absorption and its climatic implication over East Asia in spring 2001. We estimated brown carbon aerosol concentrations in the model using the mass ratio of brown carbon to black carbon (BC) aerosols based on measurements in China and Europe. The comparison of simulated versus observed aerosol light absorption showed that the model accounting for brown carbon aerosol resulted in a better agreement with the observations in East Asian-Pacific outflow. We then used the model results to compute the radiative forcing of brown carbon, which amounts up to -2.4 W m -2 and 0.24 W m -2 at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), respectively, over East Asia. Mean radiative forcing of brown carbon aerosol is -0.43 W m -2 and 0.05 W m -2 at the surface and at the TOA, accounting for about 15% of total radiative forcing (-2.2 W m -2 and 0.33 W m -2) by absorbing aerosols (BC + brown carbon aerosol), having a significant climatic implication in East Asia.

  11. Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

    2009-09-25

    Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

  12. Carbonaceous aerosols influencing atmospheric radiation: Black and organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere may both scatter and absorb solar radiation. The fraction associated with the absorbing component is generally referred to as black carbon (BC) and is mainly produced from incomplete combustion processes. The fraction associated with condensed organic compounds is generally referred to as organic carbon (OC) or organic matter and is mainly scattering. Absorption of solar radiation by carbonaceous aerosols may heat the atmosphere, thereby altering the vertical temperature profile, while scattering of solar radiation may lead to a net cooling of the atmosphere/ocean system. Carbonaceous aerosols may also enhance the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the fine particle (D < 2.5 {mu}m) source rates of both OC and BC. The source rates for anthropogenic organic aerosols may be as large as the source rates for anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, suggesting a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The role of BC in decreasing the amount of reflected solar radiation by OC and sulfates is discussed. The total estimated forcing depends on the source estimates for organic and black carbon aerosols which are highly uncertain. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is also described.

  13. Relative Contributions of Fossil and Contemporary Carbon sources to PM 2.5 Aerosols at Nine IMPROVE Network Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G; Fallon, S; Schichtel, B; Malm, W; McDade, C

    2006-06-26

    Particulate matter aerosols contribute to haze diminishing vistas and scenery at National Parks and Wilderness Areas within the United States. To increase understanding of the sources of carbonaceous aerosols at these settings, the total carbon loading and {sup 14}C/C ratio of PM 2.5 aerosols at nine IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring for Protection Of Visual Environments) network sites were measured. Aerosols were collected weekly in the summer and winter at one rural site, two urban sites, five sites located in National Parks and one site located in a Wildlife Preserve. The carbon measurements together with the absence of {sup 14}C in fossil carbon materials and the known {sup 14}C/C levels in contemporary carbon materials were used to derive contemporary and fossil carbon contents of the particulate matter. Contemporary and fossil carbon aerosol loadings varied across the sites and suggest different percentages of carbon source inputs. The urban sites had the highest fossil carbon loadings that comprised around 50% of the total carbon aerosol loading. The Wildlife Preserve and National Park sites together with the rural site had much lower fossil carbon loading components. At these sites, variations in the total carbon aerosol loading were dominated by non-fossil carbon sources. This suggests that reduction of anthroprogenic sources of fossil carbon aerosols may result in little decrease in carbonaceous aerosol loading at many National Parks and rural areas.

  14. Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    2002-05-10

    Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

  15. Total CMB analysis of streaker aerosol samples by PIXE, PIGE, beta- and optical-absorption analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annegarn, H. J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.

    1993-04-01

    Multielemental analyses of aerosol samples are widely used in air pollution receptor modelling. Specifically, the chemical mass balance (CMB) model has become a powerful tool in urban air quality studies. Input data required for the CMB includes not only the traditional X-ray fluorescence (and hence PIXE) detected elements, but also total mass, organic and inorganic carbon, and other light elements including Mg, Na and F. The circular streaker sampler, in combination with PIXE analysis, has developed into a powerful tool for obtaining time-resolved, multielemental aerosol data. However, application in CMB modelling has been limited by the absence of total mass and complementary light element data. This study reports on progress in using techniques complementary to PIXE to obtain additional data from circular streaker samples, maintaining the nondestructive, instrumental approach inherent in PIXE: beta-gauging using a 147Pm source for total mass; optical absorption for inorganic carbon; and PIGE to measure the lighter elements.

  16. On the contribution of black carbon to the composite aerosol radiative forcing over an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicker, A. S.; Pandithurai, G.; Safai, P. D.; Dipu, S.; Lee, Dong-In

    2010-08-01

    This paper discusses the extent of Black Carbon (BC) radiative forcing in the total aerosol atmospheric radiative forcing over Pune, an urban site in India. Collocated measurements of aerosol optical properties, chemical composition and BC were carried out for a period of six months (during October 2004 to May 2005) over the site. Observed aerosol chemical composition in terms of water soluble, insoluble and BC components were used in Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) to derive aerosol optical properties of composite aerosols. The BC fraction alone was used in OPAC to derive optical properties of BC aerosols. The aerosol optical properties for composite and BC aerosols were separately used in SBDART model to derive direct aerosol radiative forcing due to composite and BC aerosols. The atmospheric radiative forcing for composite aerosols were found to be +35.5, +32.9 and +47.6 Wm -2 during post-monsoon, winter and pre-monsoon seasons, respectively. The average BC mass fraction found to be 4.83, 6.33 and 4 μg m -3 during the above seasons contributing around 2.2 to 5.8% to the total aerosol load. The atmospheric radiative forcing estimated due to BC aerosols was +18.8, +23.4 and +17.2 Wm -2, respectively during the above seasons. The study suggests that even though BC contributes only 2.2-6% to the total aerosol load; it is contributing an average of around 55% to the total lower atmospheric aerosol forcing due to strong radiative absorption, and thus enhancing greenhouse warming.

  17. Black carbon aerosols in urban central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Rao, Ruizhong; Huang, Yinbo; Mao, Mao; Berg, Matthew J.; Sun, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    The first ever (to our knowledge), year-round measurements of Black Carbon (BC) aerosols in Hefei, an urban site of central China, from June 2012 to May 2013 are performed. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the black carbon in Hefei in terms of seasonal, monthly and diurnal variations, including their source identification. The annual mean BC mass concentration MBC is found to be 3.5±2.5 μg m-3 in Hefei, while the aerosol optical depth shows a yearly average value of ~0.6. The seasonality of MBC depicts minimum values in the summer, moderate levels in the spring and fall, and maximum in the winter. The monthly average values of MBC vary threefold, ranging from the lowest average value of 2.0±1.0 μg m-3 in July to the highest 6.0±2.6 μg m-3 during January. Diurnal variations exhibit two BC peaks, corresponding to the morning and evening rush hours. Higher median BC concentrations are observed during haze episodes compared with non-haze periods, although low MBC is sometimes observed for high visibility, which is probably indicative of the aerosol scattering dominating diminished visibility. Based on trajectory analyses, the haze BC pollutions are mostly classified into three types from local areas, long-range transport from the Yangtze Delta, and transport from the North China Plain. The median MBC values for haze groups attributed to biomass burning from MODIS wildfire maps are higher than related groups that are not, which is indicative of the significant enhancement of BC aerosols due to agricultural biomass burning. The study suggests that aerosol absorption contributes more to the observed haze episodes in fall compared to other seasons.

  18. Detailed Carbon Isotopic Characterization of Aerosol-Derived Organic Carbon Deposited to two Temperate Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, A. S.; Bauer, J. E.; Keesee, E. E.; McNichol, A. P.; Xu, L.; Dickhut, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of carbonaceous aerosols can be a quantitatively significant flux in the carbon budgets of temperate watersheds. Characterizing the sources and fates of this material is therefore critical for assessing its role in carbon and organic matter cycling in these systems. Aerosol samples were collected in the Hudson and York River watersheds throughout 2006-2007 and analyzed for quantities and isotopic signatures (δ13C, Δ14C) of total and water-soluble organic carbon (TOC, WSOC, respectively). On average ~2.4 and 2.1 mg m-2 d-1 of aerosol TOC were deposited to the Hudson and York River watersheds, respectively, and nearly half of this material was water-soluble. δ13C analyses indicated that both the TOC and the WSOC were primarily terrestrial in nature. TOC Δ14C signatures covered a broad range for both watersheds, with calculated contributions from fossil sources (e.g., anthropogenic combustion of petroleum, coal, etc.) ranging from 0% for samples collected during the summer of 2007 to approximately 50% for samples collected in the winter of 2007. Aerosol-derived WSOC Δ14C values were less variable and were nearly always enriched in 14C with respect to the corresponding TOC, indicating that contemporary aerosol material tends to partition into the aqueous phase, while fossil-derived aerosol OC is more likely to remain insoluble. However, WSOC still often showed considerable contributions from fossil OC (up to 20%). Thus, some portion of the anthropogenic fossil-derived aerosol OC is relatively soluble and may be transported hydrologically through watersheds and aquatic systems. A subset of aerosol samples from each watershed was selected for more thorough isotopic analysis of operationally-defined components of the carbonaceous material. Isotopic signatures were obtained for TOC, WSOC, total solvent-extract, and the aliphatic, aromatic, and polar components. Isotopic information on these fractions allows us to determine which components

  19. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes: sampling criteria and aerosol characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Stone, Samuel; Cumpston, Jared L.; Friend, Sherri; Porter, Dale W.; Castranova, Vincent; Frazer, David G.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to develop protocols for sampling and characterizing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) aerosols in workplaces or during inhalation studies. Manufactured dry powder containing MWCNT’s, combined with soot and metal catalysts, form complex morphologies and diverse shapes. The aerosols, examined in this study, were produced using an acoustical generator. Representative samples were collected from an exposure chamber using filters and a cascade impactor for microscopic and gravimetric analyses. Results from filters showed that a density of 0.008–0.10 particles per µm2 filter surface provided adequate samples for particle counting and sizing. Microscopic counting indicated that MWCNT’s, resuspended at a concentration of 10 mg/m3, contained 2.7 × 104 particles/cm3. Each particle structure contained an average of 18 nanotubes, resulting in a total of 4.9 × 105 nanotubes/cm3. In addition, fibrous particles within the aerosol had a count median length of 3.04 µm and a width of 100.3 nm, while the isometric particles had a count median diameter of 0.90 µm. A combination of impactor and microscopic measurements established that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the mixture was 1.5 µm. It was also determined that the mean effective density of well-defined isometric particles was between 0.71 and 0.88 g/cm3, and the mean shape factor of individual nanotubes was between 1.94 and 2.71. The information obtained from this study can be used for designing animal inhalation exposure studies and adopted as guidance for sampling and characterizing MWCNT aerosols in workplaces. The measurement scheme should be relevant for any carbon nanotube aerosol. PMID:23033994

  20. Inorganic markers, carbonaceous components and stable carbon isotope from biomass burning aerosols in northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F.; Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-12-01

    To better characterize the sources of fine particulate matter (i.e. PM2.5) in Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China, aerosol chemical composition such total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and inorganic ions were studied as well as stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. Intensively open biomass burning episodes were identified from late September to early October by satellite fire and aerosol optical depth maps. During the biomass burning episodes, concentrations of PM2.5, OC, EC, and WSOC increased by a factor of 4-12 compared to non-biomass-burning periods. Non-sea-salt potassium is strongly correlated with PM2.5, OC, EC and WSOC, suggesting an important contribution of biomass burning emission. The enrichment in both the non-sea-salt potassium and chlorine is significantly larger than other inorganic species, indicating that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly fresh and less aged. In addition, WSOC to OC ratio is relatively lower compared to that reported in biomass burning aerosols in tropical regions, supporting that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly primary and secondary organic aerosols is not significant. A lower average δ13C value (-26.2‰) is found for the biomass-burning aerosols, suggesting a dominant contribution from combustion of C3 plants in the studied region.

  1. Carbon isotope based aerosol source apportionment in Eastern European city Vilnius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Sapolaite, Justina; Garbariene, Inga; Ezerinskis, Zilvinas; Pocevicius, Matas; Krikscikas, Laurynas; Jacevicius, Sarunas; Plukis, Arturas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2016-04-01

    We present carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment results in Eastern European city Vilnius (capital of Lithuania) using stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) and radiocarbon (14C) methods. The aerosol sampling campaigns were performed in 2014-2016 winter seasons in Vilnius. PM1 particles were collected on quartz fiber filters using high volume sampler, while PM10 and size segregated aerosol particles were collected using low volume and MOUDI 128 cascade impactor respectively. δ13C values were measured with EA-IRMS system while radiocarbon analysis was performed using Single Stage Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (SSAMS). For the AMS analysis, filters (or aluminium foils from cascade impactor) were graphitized using Automated Graphitization Equipment. It was estimated that dominant carbonaceous aerosol source in Vilnius was of biogenic/biomass origin (60-90 %). Fossil fuel sources accounted for up to 23 % of total carbon fraction. Combining stable carbon and radiocarbon isotope analysis we were able to quantify the amount of coal derived aerosol particles. The contribution of coal burning emissions were up to 14 %. We will present the applicability of dual carbon (13C and 14C) isotope ratio method for the aerosol source apportionment in different regions of Europe, also the perspectives of using MOUDI cascade impactors to make source apportionment in size segregated aerosol particles.

  2. Black Carbon, Aerosols, and the Tooth Fairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Adachi, K.; Posfai, M.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is widely cited in the atmospheric literature as a major aerosol particle type with significant effects on climate warming. Several analytical techniques are used for its determination, primarily through optical absorption measurements. A recently developed and widely used method is single particle soot photometry (SP2). During attempts to obtain reliable BC samples for study using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it became apparent that no such samples exist. Instead, surrogate materials such as graphite, fullerene, Aquadag, and perhaps other things are used as calibration standards. It became rapidly evident that BC is an inferred rather than actual, identifiable substance with distinct material properties other than its absorption spectrum and refractory character (accounting for the subset of refractory black carbon, or rBC). Since climate effects depend on optical properties, and these are estimated for BC, it may not be critical at this time whether or not it is a discrete material. However, the same term is also used by other environmental communities for things that are distinctly different. Such imprecision in terms can lead to unnecessary confusion. The situation is summarized in the Table. We propose that 1) the term BC should be restricted to light-absorbing refractory carbonaceous matter of uncertain character and 2) the uncertainty be stated explicitly. We also propose a more precise definition for soot as a specific material, which we call ns-soot, where "ns" refers to carbon nanospheres. We define ns-soot as particles that consist of nanospheres, typically with diameters <100 nm, that possess distinct structures of concentrically wrapped, graphene-like layers of carbon and with grape-like (acinoform) morphologies.;

  3. In-situ measurements of total carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, W.; Boryta, M.; Nelson, R.

    2009-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of the equilibration of biotic and pre-biotic materials and of the mechanisms leading to their presence in a planetary context requires knowledge of the relative concentrations of the organic species within a sample. The measurement of these relative concentrations is not practical for many remote sensing and in-situ techniques because of the large number of potential compounds having high variance in (for example) volatility, spectral response and/or molecular weight. One approach is to compare the concentration of identified materials to the total carbon and total organic carbon in a sample. The traditional two-stage approach for this measurement is acidification to convert "inorganic" carbon to CO2 and pyrolysis to convert the remaining "organic" carbon and carbon-based compounds the CO2. Measurement of the evolved CO2 provides a measure of organic and total carbon in the sample. These measurements are relatively successful in a laboratory context, but are difficult to implement robotically, particularly in challenging environments. A variety of alternative approaches for achieving total carbon measurements with acceptable accuracy are examined for feasibility of use in a field or robotic environment, with particular emphasis on soils on Mars.

  4. Atmospheric Aerosol Investigation In Vilnius using Stable Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, Agne; Garbaras, Andrius; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2013-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on the atmosphere, climate, and public health are among the central topics in current environmental research. Spatially urban air pollution is a major public concern world-wide.In this study the results of experimental research are presented, the basis of which is the investigation of 13C/12C variations δ13C of stable carbon isotopes in total carbonaceous aerosols in Vilnius city, Lithuania. The main aim of the work is to identify the origin of carbonaceous aerosols. Two autumns and one spring sampling campaign were designed with the aim to determine the changes in the air caused by the beginning/end of the heating season. The experiment was performed during several sampling periods. The first period lasted from 26 November to 06 December 2010. The second was from 04 April to 16 May 2011. The third was from 12 to 29 October 2012. Atmospheric aerosols, according to their aerodynamic diameters, were collected with an eleven-stage impactor "MOUDI". The stages have 50% aerodynamic diameter cut-offs of 18.0, 10.0, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.18, 0.1 and 0.056 μm, for stages 1-11, respectively. The analysis proceeds essentially in two stages. In the first, MOUDI foils were analyzed with EA-IRMS (FlashEA 1112 coupled to ThermoFinnigan Delta Plus Advantage). Half of the foil was measured directly (TC δ13C values). The rest was heated in the oven (400 °C) to remove organic part and measured EC+CC δ13C values (carbonates were not removed with acid). During the second stage of the analysis, corrections are made and OC δ13C values were calculated using isotopic balance equation: . As the main aim of the study was to identify the origin of incoming carbonaceous aerosols, air mass back trajectories were calculated using the HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model.

  5. Determination of primary and secondary sources of organic acids and carbonaceous aerosols using stable carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisseha, Rebeka; Saurer, Matthias; Jäggi, Maya; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Dommen, Josef; Szidat, Sönke; Samburova, Vera; Baltensperger, Urs

    Stable carbon isotope ratio ( δ13C) data can provide important information regarding the sources and the processing of atmospheric organic carbon species. Formic, acetic and oxalic acid were collected from Zurich city in August-September 2002 and March 2003 in the gas and aerosol phase, and the corresponding δ13C analysis was performed using a wet oxidation method followed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. In August, the δ13C values of gas phase formic acid showed a significant correlation with ozone (coefficient of determination ( r2) = 0.63) due to the kinetic isotope effect (KIE). This indicates the presence of secondary sources (i.e. production of organic acids in the atmosphere) in addition to direct emission. In March, both gaseous formic and acetic acid exhibited similar δ13C values and did not show any correlation with ozone, indicating a predominantly primary origin. Even though oxalic acid is mainly produced by secondary processes, the δ13C value of particulate oxalic acid was not depleted and did not show any correlation with ozone, which may be due to the enrichment of 13C during the gas - aerosol partitioning. The concentrations and δ13C values of the different aerosol fractions (water soluble organic carbon, water insoluble organic carbon, carbonate and black carbon) collected during the same period were also determined. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) contributed about 60% to the total carbon and was enriched in 13C compared to other fractions indicating a possible effect of gas - aerosol partitioning on δ13C of carbonaceous aerosols. The carbonate fraction in general was very low (3% of the total carbon).

  6. Measurement of contemporary and fossil carbon contents of PM 2.5 aerosols: results from Turtleback Dome, Yosemite National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G

    2003-10-17

    The impact of aerosol particulate matter of mean mass aerodynamic diameter {le} 2.5 {proportional_to}m (PM 2.5 aerosols), on health, visibility, and compliance with EPA's regional haze regulations is a growing concern. Techniques that can help better characterize particulate matter are required to better understand the constituents, causes and sources of PM 2.5 aerosols. Measurement of the {sup 14}C/C ratio of the PM 2.5 aerosols, the absence of {sup 14}C in fossil carbon materials and the known {sup 14}C/C levels in contemporary carbon materials allows use of a two-component model to derive contemporary and fossil carbon contents of the particulate matter. Such data can be used to estimate the relative contributions of fossil fuels and biogenic aerosols to the total aerosol loading. Here, the methodology for performing such an assessment using total suspended particulate Hi-vol aerosol samplers to collect PM 2.5 aerosols on quartz fiber filters and the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry to measure {sup 14}C/C ratios is presented and illustrated using PM 2.5 aerosols collected at Yosemite National Park.

  7. Light Absorption of Brown Carbon Aerosol in the Pearl River Delta Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    X.F. Huang, J.F. Yuan, L.M. Cao, J. Cui, C.N. Huang, Z.J. Lan and L.Y. He Key Laboratory for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055, ChinaCorresponding author. Tel.: +86 755 26032532; fax: +86 755 26035332. E-mail address: huangxf@pku.edu.cn (X. F. Huang). Abstract: The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol has been recognized in recent decades. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) of ambient aerosol was widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of brown carbon at shorter wavelengths, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to unit. In this study, the AAE method was improved by statistical extrapolation based on ambient measurements in the polluted seasons in typical urban and rural areas in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. A three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the ambient measured AAE and the ratio of organic aerosol to BC aerosol, in order to extract the more realistic AAE by pure BC aerosol, which were found to be 0.86, 0.82 and 1.02 at 405nm and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 at 532nm in the campaigns of urban-winter, urban-fall, and rural-fall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiment results further supported the effectiveness of the obtained AAE for pure BC aerosol. In addition, biomass burning experiments proved higher spectral dependence of more-BrC environment and further verified the reliability of the instruments' response. Then, the average light absorption contribution of BrC aerosol was calculated to be 11.7, 6.3 and 12.1% (with total relative uncertainty of 7.5, 6.9 and 10.0%) at 405nm and 10.0, 4.1 and 5.5% (with total relative uncertainty of 6.5, 8.6 and 15.4%) at 532nm of the three campaigns, respectively. These results indicate that the

  8. A study on the temporal and spatial variability of absorbing aerosols using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2009-05-01

    Absorbing aerosols, especially mineral dust and black carbon, play key roles in climate change by absorbing solar radiation, heating the atmosphere, and contributing to global warming. In this paper, we first examine the consistency of the Aerosol Index (AI) product as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) instruments and then analyze these AI data sets to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of UV absorbing aerosols. In contrast to the trend in aerosol optical depth found in the advanced very high-resolution radiometer data, no obvious long-term trend in absorbing aerosols is observed from the time series of AI records. The comparison between the mean annual cycle in the two data sets shows that the cycles agree very well both globally and regionally, indicating a consistency between the AI products from TOMS and OMI. Varimax rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of detrended, deseasonalized AI data proves to be successful in isolating major dust and biomass burning source regions, as well as dust transport. Finally, we find that large, individual events, such as the Kuwait oil fire and Australian smoke plum, are isolated in individual higher-order principal components.

  9. Occupational exposure to inhalable and total aerosol in the primary nickel production industry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, P J; Vincent, J H; Wahl, G; Maldonado, G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--This paper describes a study that was carried out in the primary nickel production industry to investigate the levels of personal exposure to aerosols containing nickel and the impact on exposure assessment of introducing new personal sampling techniques with performance consistent with the latest particle size-selective criteria. METHODS--Experiments were carried out at workplaces in mining, milling, smelting, and refining works to investigate the effect of changing from the current method of total aerosol (with the widely used 37 mm filter holder) to the new method of measuring inhalable aerosol (with the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable aerosol sampler). RESULTS--The results show that inhalable aerosol exposure concentrations--for both overall aerosol and for total nickel--were consistently and significantly higher than the corresponding total aerosol concentrations. Weighted least squares linear regression yielded IOM/37 mm factors ranging from about 1.2 to 4.0. The exposure data for each company process were found to be log-normally distributed. CONCLUSIONS--The results suggest the possibility of generating a single pragmatic factor for each company process for converting current total aerosol exposures to new exposures based on the inhalability concept contained in the latest particle size-selective criteria for aerosol exposure assessment. Such data may be important in determining new occupational exposure limits for nickel. PMID:8563841

  10. Characterization of the Sunset Semi-Continuous Carbon Aerosol Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Jace J.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cary, R.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2009-07-01

    Accurate quantification of carbonaceous aerosols is essential for reducing uncertainty in climate change models and is important for long-term air quality monitoring by government agencies. The field-deployable Sunset Semi-Continuous Organic Carbon/Elemental Carbon Aerosol Analyzer (Sunset OCEC) utilizes a modified National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health thermal-optical method to determine total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) at near real-time; however, its performance is not yet fully characterized. Two collocated Sunset OCEC Analyzers, Unit A and Unit B, were used to determine the relative standard deviation (RSD) and limit of detection (LOD) between June 23 and July 9, 2007, in Richland, Washington, USA. A high-efficiency particulate air filter was utilized to determine the LODs of both instruments. The RSDs between the two Sunset OCECs were 9.12% for TC, 13.0% for Optical OC, and 8.97% for Thermal OC, indicating good precision between the instruments, although the RSDs for Thermal and Optical EC were higher, 29.0% and 48.3%, respectively. The LOD of Unit A was approximately 0.21 µgC/m3 for TC, Optical OC, and Thermal OC, and ~0.004 µgC/m3 for Optical and Thermal EC. Similarly, Unit B had an LOD of ~0.29 µgC/m3 for TC, Optical OC, and Thermal OC, 0.018 µgC/m3 for Optical EC, and 0.004 µgC/m3 for Thermal EC. Factors that may have contributed to the poor RSDs of Thermal and Optical EC include the low EC mass loading in Richland, minor leakage in the oxygen valve of Unit B, and excessive noise from the non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) laser in Unit B, resulting in scattered Optical EC measurements. Improved RSDs of all OC and EC parameters are expected after the Unit B NDIR is tuned up. Future work should reevaluate the precision of the Sunset OCECs and investigate the differences in various thermal-optical protocols on OCEC quantification.

  11. Remote sensing of soot carbon - Part 1: Distinguishing different absorbing aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a method of using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) size distributions and complex refractive indices to retrieve the relative proportion of carbonaceous aerosols and free iron minerals (hematite and goethite). We assume that soot carbon has a spectrally flat refractive index and enhanced imaginary indices at the 440 nm wavelength are caused by brown carbon or hematite. Carbonaceous aerosols can be separated from dust in imaginary refractive index space because 95 % of biomass burning aerosols have imaginary indices greater than 0.0042 at the 675-1020 nm wavelengths, and 95 % of dust has imaginary refractive indices of less than 0.0042 at those wavelengths. However, mixtures of these two types of particles can not be unambiguously partitioned on the basis of optical properties alone, so we also separate these particles by size. Regional and seasonal results are consistent with expectations. Monthly climatologies of fine mode soot carbon are less than 1.0 % by volume for West Africa and the Middle East, but the southern African and South American biomass burning sites have peak values of 3.0 and 1.7 %. Monthly averaged fine mode brown carbon volume fractions have a peak value of 5.8 % for West Africa, 2.1 % for the Middle East, 3.7 % for southern Africa, and 5.7 % for South America. Monthly climatologies of free iron volume fractions show little seasonal variability, and range from about 1.1 to 1.7 % for coarse mode aerosols in all four study regions. Finally, our sensitivity study indicates that the soot carbon retrieval is not sensitive to the component refractive indices or densities assumed for carbonaceous and free iron aerosols, and the retrieval differs by only 15.4 % when these parameters are altered from our chosen baseline values. The total uncertainty of retrieving soot carbon mass is ˜ 50 % (when uncertainty in the AERONET product and mixing state is included in the analysis).

  12. Studying the pollution of Moscow and Beijing atmospheres with carbon monoxide and aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golitsyn, G. S.; Grechko, E. I.; Wang, Gengchen; Wang, Pucai; Dzhola, A. V.; Emilenko, A. S.; Kopeikin, V. M.; Rakitin, V. S.; Safronov, A. N.; Fokeeva, E. V.

    2015-01-01

    The measurements of submicron aerosol and black carbon (BC) surface concentrations, and carbon monoxide (CO) total column in 1992-2012 in Beijing and Moscow are illustrated. The specific features in the long-term variations in the studied impurities in these megacities are discussed. The level of pollution with all three impurities in Beijing is substantially higher than in Moscow. From 1992 to 1999, the monthly means of black carbon and aerosol increased in Beijing. These concentrations substantially decreased beginning from 2000. From 2007 to 2011, black carbon decreased and submicron aerosol increased. In 1996-2003 the urban part of CO total column (TC) in Beijing was on average higher than in 2006-2012 by a factor of 1.4. The anthropogenic part of CO in Moscow decreased in 2006-2012. High aerosol and CO concentrations, comparable with concentrations rather typical of Beijing, were observed in Moscow only during wildfires in 2010. Using the cluster analysis statistical methods, it has been indicated that the main sources of the air pollution in Beijing are located 100-500 km southward.

  13. Radiative absorption enhancement from coatings on black carbon aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinjuan; Wang, Xinfeng; Yang, Lingxiao; Chen, Bing; Chen, Jianmin; Andersson, August; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-05-01

    The radiative absorption enhancement of ambient black carbon (BC), by light-refractive coatings of atmospheric aerosols, constitutes a large uncertainty in estimates of climate forcing. The direct measurements of radiative absorption enhancement require the experimentally-removing the coating materials in ambient BC-containing aerosols, which remains a challenge. Here, the absorption enhancement of the BC core by non-absorbing aerosol coatings was quantified using a two-step removal of both inorganic and organic matter coatings of ambient aerosols. The mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of decoated/pure atmospheric BC aerosols of 4.4±0.8m(2)g(-1) was enhanced to 9.6±1.8m(2)g(-1) at 678-nm wavelength for ambiently-coated BC aerosols at a rural Northern China site. The enhancement of MAC (EMAC) rises from 1.4±0.3 in fresh combustion emissions to ~3 for aged ambient China aerosols. The three-week high-intensity campaign observed an average EMAC of 2.25±0.55, and sulfates were primary drivers of the enhanced BC absorption. PMID:26874760

  14. Carbon content of common airborne fungal species and fungal contribution to aerosol organic carbon in a subtropical city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jessica Y. W.; Chan, Chak K.; Lee, C.-T.; Lau, Arthur P. S.

    Interest in the role and contribution of fungi to atmospheric aerosols and processes grows in the past decade. Substantial data or information such as fungal mass or carbon loading to ambient aerosols is however still lacking. This study aimed to quantify the specific organic carbon content (OC per spore) of eleven fungal species commonly found airborne in the subtropics, and estimated their contribution to organic carbon in aerosols. The specific OC contents showed a size-dependent relationship ( r = 0.64, p < 0.05) and ranged from 3.6 to 201.0 pg carbon per spore or yeast cell, giving an average of 6.0 pg carbon per spore (RSD 51%) for spore or cell size less than 10 μm. In accounting for natural variations in the composition and abundance of fungal population, weighted-average carbon content for field samples was adopted using the laboratory determined specific OC values. An average of 5.97 pg carbon per spore (RSD 3.8%) was enumerated from 28 field samples collected at the university campus. The mean fungal OC concentration was 3.7, 6.0 and 9.7 ng m -3 in PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10 and PM 10, respectively. These corresponded to 0.1%, 1.2% and 0.2% of the total OC in PM 2.5, PM 2.5-10 and PM 10, respectively. In the study period, rain provided periods with low total OC but high fungal prevalence and fungi contributed 7-32% OC in PM 2.5-10 or 2.4-7.1% OC in PM 10. More extensive studies are deserved to better understand the spatial-, temporal- and episodic dependency on the fungal OC contribution to the atmospheric aerosols.

  15. Quantification and radiocarbon source apportionment of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols using the CTO-375 method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zencak, Zdenek; Elmquist, Marie; Gustafsson, Örjan

    To make progress towards linking the atmosphere and biogeosphere parts of the black carbon (BC) cycle, a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO-375), commonly applied for isolating BC from complex geomatrices such as soils, sediments and aquatic particles, was applied to investigate the BC also in atmospheric particles. Concentrations and 14C-based source apportionment of CTO-375 based BC was established for a reference aerosol (NIST RM-8785) and for wintertime aerosols collected in Stockholm and in a Swedish background area. The results were compared with thermal-optical (OC/EC) measurements. For NIST RM-8785, a good agreement was found between the BC CTO-375 concentration and the reported elemental carbon (EC) concentration measured by the "Speciation Trends Network—National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health" method (EC NIOSH) with BC CTO-375 of 0.054±0.002 g g -1 and EC NIOSH of 0.067±0.008 g g -1. In contrast, there was an average factor of ca. 20 difference between BC CTO-375 and EC NIOSH for the ambient Scandinavian wintertime aerosols, presumably reflecting a combination of BC CTO-375 isolating only the recalcitrant soot-BC portion of the BC continuum and the EC NIOSH metric inadvertently including some intrinsically non-pyrogenic organic matter. Isolation of BC CTO-375 with subsequent off-line radiocarbon analysis yielded fraction modern values (fM) for total organic carbon (TOC) of 0.93 (aerosols from a Swedish background area), and 0.58 (aerosols collected in Stockholm); whereas the fM for BC CTO-375 isolates were 1.08 (aerosols from a Swedish background area), and 0.87 (aerosols collected in Stockholm). This radiocarbon-based source apportionment suggests that contribution from biomass combustion to cold-season atmospheric BC CTO-375 in Stockholm was 70% and in the background area 88%.

  16. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Salil; Evans, Katherine J.; Hack, James J.; Truesdale, John

    2013-04-19

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $W^{-1}m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $ PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  17. Springtime carbon emission episodes at the Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-11-01

    In order to investigate the emission of carbonaceous aerosols at the Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected during spring of 2007 and 2008 and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during pollen emission episodes (range: -26.2‰ to -23.5‰, avg. -25.2 ± 0.9‰), approaching those of the airborne pollen (-28.0‰) collected at the Gosan site. Based on a carbon isotope mass balance equation, we found that ~42% of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollen from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. A negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC was obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollen and then transported to the Gosan site. Thermal evolution patterns of organic carbon during the pollen episodes were characterized by high OC evolution in the OC2 temperature step (450 °C). Since thermal evolution patterns of organic aerosols are highly influenced by their molecular weight, they can be used as additional information on the formation of secondary organic aerosols and the effect of aging of organic aerosols during the long-range atmospheric transport and sources of organic aerosols.

  18. Methods development for total organic carbon accountability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Brian L.; Kilgore, Melvin V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the efforts completed during the contract period beginning November 1, 1990 and ending April 30, 1991. Samples of product hygiene and potable water from WRT 3A were supplied by NASA/MSFC prior to contract award on July 24, 1990. Humidity condensate samples were supplied on August 3, 1990. During the course of this contract chemical analyses were performed on these samples to qualitatively determine specific components comprising, the measured organic carbon concentration. In addition, these samples and known standard solutions were used to identify and develop methodology useful to future comprehensive characterization of similar samples. Standard analyses including pH, conductivity, and total organic carbon (TOC) were conducted. Colorimetric and enzyme linked assays for total protein, bile acid, B-hydroxybutyric acid, methylene blue active substances (MBAS), urea nitrogen, ammonia, and glucose were also performed. Gas chromatographic procedures for non-volatile fatty acids and EPA priority pollutants were also performed. Liquid chromatography was used to screen for non-volatile, water soluble compounds not amenable to GC techniques. Methods development efforts were initiated to separate and quantitate certain chemical classes not classically analyzed in water and wastewater samples. These included carbohydrates, organic acids, and amino acids. Finally, efforts were initiated to identify useful concentration techniques to enhance detection limits and recovery of non-volatile, water soluble compounds.

  19. Gas and aerosol fluxes. [emphasizing sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques to address the global need for accurate distribution and flux determinations of both man made and natural materials which affect the chemical composition of the atmosphere, the heat budget of the Earth, and the depletion, of stratospheric ozone is considered. Specifically, trace gas fluxes, sea salt aerosol production, and the effect of sea surface microlayer on gas and aerosol fluxes are examined. Volatile sulfur, carbon, nitrogen, and halocarbon compounds are discussed including a statement of the problem associated with each compound or group of compounds, a brief summary of current understanding, and suggestions for needed research.

  20. Exposures to inhalable and "total" oil mist aerosol by metal machining shop workers.

    PubMed

    Wilsey, P W; Vincent, J H; Bishop, M J; Brosseau, L M; Greaves, I A

    1996-12-01

    Several recent studies have compared worker personal aerosol exposures as measured by the current method with those obtained by a new approach based on collecting the inhalable fraction, intended to represent all the particles that are capable of entering through the nose and/or mouth during breathing. The present study investigated this relationship for a metal machining facility where aerosols were generated from severely refined, nonaqueous ("straight") cutting oils used during the lathe working of metal rod stock. Workers (n = 23) wore two personal aerosol samplers simulataneously, one of the 37-mm type (for "total" aerosol exposure, E37) and the other of the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) type (for inhalable aerosol exposure, EIOM). The data were analyzed by weighted least squares linear regression to determine the coefficient S in the relation EIOM = S.E37. It was found that S = 2.96 +/- 0.60. This ratio-in which exposure to inhalable aerosol was greater than to "total" aerosol-is consistent with previous observations in other industries. The relative coarsenss of the oil mist aerosol, as estimated by cascade impactor measurements, probably explains the difference between the sampling methods. The collection of large "splash" droplets, may also contribute. Future occupational aerosol standards for metalworking fluids will be based on the new, health-related criteria, and exposures will be assessed on the basis of the inhalable fraction. Results of studies like that described here will enable assessment of the impact on future workplace aerosol exposure assessments of introducing new standards. PMID:8976589

  1. Oxygen Isotope Anomaly in the Carbonate Fractions of Aerosols and its Potential to Assess Urban Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abramian, A.; Dominguez, G.; Jackson, T.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    Mineral dust is emitted into the atmosphere from arid regions in Asia yearly, accounting for ~36% of global aerosol emissions, 5900 Tg yr-1 [IPCC 2007]. Increasing anthropogenic emissions and persistent dust emissions not only have reduced the air quality in Asia itself, but are also affecting the pollutant deposition into the Pacific Ocean and air quality in downwind areas. The carbonate component of mineral dust (calcite (CaCO3) and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2) is particularly reactive and can comprise as much as 30% of the total mineral dust aerosol, depending on the source region [Claquin et al., 1999]. Carbonate can affect atmospheric chemical processes and aerosol characteristics because the acid neutralizing capacity of this species facilitates the heterogeneous conversion of sulphate and nitrate. Understanding heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surface of aerosol particles will lead to a better understanding of the fate and transport of molecules in the troposphere as well as to resolve their role in air quality and pollution. The primary goal of this work is to develop an isotope methodology for carbonates that can be used as a chemical marker for the origin of polluted air plumes and chemical transformation during the long range transport of air masses. We will discuss the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the CO2 released from the fine (< 1 μm) and coarse (> 1 μm) particles collected at two different sites [Mt. Soledad (800 ft) and Scripps Pier, La Jolla, California] and its possible utility as a tracer to identify the long-range transport of aerosol from local pollution events. The degree of urban influence of sampled air parcels at each site was quantified through back-trajectory analysis of NOAA HYSPLIT output data. Interestingly, the isotopes of oxygen did not follow standard mass dependent relationship (δ17O ~ 0.52 δ18O) rather have excess 17O (Δ17O = δ17O- 0.52δ18O) ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 per mil. A highly significant correlation (r2

  2. Black carbon (soot) aerosol in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Blake, D. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Hansen, A. D. A.; Verma, S.; Kato, K.

    1992-01-01

    As determined by impactor samplers flown on ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, black carbon aerosol (BCA) mass loadings in the stratosphere average 0.6 nanograms per standard cubic meter, or 0.01 percent of the total aerosol. Upper tropospheric BCA increases to 0.3 percent. Low stratospheric concentration is commensurate with present commercial air traffic fuel consumption, given the following assumptions: the BCA emissions are 0.1 grams per kilogram of fuel consumed, 10 percent of route mileage is above the tropopause, and average BCA stratospheric residence time is about one year. Taking BCA into account, the stratospheric single scatter albedo is about 0.99. Using parameters for planned supersonic commercial aircraft, whose emissions will be predominantly in the stratosphere, it is shown that such traffic will double stratospheric BCA concentration. This would reduce the aerosol single scattering albedo by one percent, and double the BCA surface area that is available for heterogeneous chemistry.

  3. Measurements of total column ozone, precipitable water content and aerosol optical depth at Sofia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleyna, P.; Kolev, N.; Savov, P.; Evgenieva, Ts.; Danchovski, V.; Muhtarov, P.

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the results of a study related to variations in total ozone content, aerosol optical depth, water vapor content and Ångström coefficients from summer campaign carried out in June-July 2014, at two sites in the city of Sofia (Astronomical Observatory in the Borisova Gradina Park and National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography (NIGGG)). The results of data analysis indicate the following: Spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth (AOD); Greater AOD values due to greater portion of aerosols; Inverse relationship between the time variations of AOD or water vapor and ozone.

  4. Stable Carbon Fractionation In Size Segregated Aerosol Particles Produced By Controlled Biomass Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, Agne; Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Ceburnis, Darius; Martuzevicius, Dainius; Puida, Egidijus; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning is the largest source of primary fine fraction carbonaceous particles and the second largest source of trace gases in the global atmosphere with a strong effect not only on the regional scale but also in areas distant from the source . Many studies have often assumed no significant carbon isotope fractionation occurring between black carbon and the original vegetation during combustion. However, other studies suggested that stable carbon isotope ratios of char or BC may not reliably reflect carbon isotopic signatures of the source vegetation. Overall, the apparently conflicting results throughout the literature regarding the observed fractionation suggest that combustion conditions may be responsible for the observed effects. The purpose of the present study was to gather more quantitative information on carbonaceous aerosols produced in controlled biomass burning, thereby having a potential impact on interpreting ambient atmospheric observations. Seven different biomass fuel types were burned under controlled conditions to determine the effect of the biomass type on the emitted particulate matter mass and stable carbon isotope composition of bulk and size segregated particles. Size segregated aerosol particles were collected using the total suspended particle (TSP) sampler and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). The results demonstrated that particle emissions were dominated by the submicron particles in all biomass types. However, significant differences in emissions of submicron particles and their dominant sizes were found between different biomass fuels. The largest negative fractionation was obtained for the wood pellet fuel type while the largest positive isotopic fractionation was observed during the buckwheat shells combustion. The carbon isotope composition of MOUDI samples compared very well with isotope composition of TSP samples indicating consistency of the results. The measurements of the stable carbon isotope ratio in

  5. Observation of hydration of single, modified carbon aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyslouzil, B. E.; Carleton, K. L.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Rawlins, W. T.; Arnold, S.

    1994-01-01

    We have compared the hydration behavior of single carbon particles that have been treated by exposure to gaseous H2SO4 with that of untreated particles. Untreated carbon particles did not hydrate as the relative humidity varied from 0 to 80% at 23 C. In contrast, treated particles hydrated under subsaturation conditions; mass increases of up to 30% were observed. The mass increase is consistent with sulfuric acid equilibration with the ambient relative humidity in the presence of inert carbon. For the samples studied, the average amount of absorbed acid was 14% +/- 6% by weight, which corresponds to a surface coverage of approximately 0.1 monolayer. The mass fraction of surface-absorbed acid is comparable to the soluble mass fraction observed by Whitefield et al. (1993) in jet aircraft engine aerosols. Estimates indicate this mass fraction corresponds to 0.1% of the available SO2 exiting an aircraft engine ending up as H2SO4 on the carbon aerosol. If this heterogeneous process occurs early enough in the exhaust plume, it may compete with homogeneous nucleation as a mechanism for producing sulfuric acid rich aerosols.

  6. Observation of hydration of single, modified carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyslouzil, B. E.; Carleton, K. L.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Rawlins, W. T.; Arnold, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have compared the hydration behavior of single carbon particles that have been treated by exposure to gaseous H2SO4 with that of untreated particles. Untreated carbon particles did not hydrate as the relative humidity varied from 0 to 80% at 23°C. In contrast, treated particles hydrated under subsaturation conditions; mass increases of up to 30% were observed. The mass increase is consistent with sulfuric acid equilibration with the ambient relative humidity in the presence of inert carbon. For the samples studied, the average amount of adsorbed acid was 14% ± 6% by weight, which corresponds to a surface coverage of ˜0.1 monolayer. The mass fraction of surface-adsorbed acid is comparable to the soluble mass fraction observed by Whitefield et al. (1993) in jet aircraft engine aerosols. Estimates indicate this mass fraction corresponds to 0.1% of the available SO2 exiting an aircraft engine ending up as H2SO4 on the carbon aerosol. If this heterogeneous process occurs early enough in the exhaust plume, it may compete with homogeneous nucleation as a mechanism for producing sulfuric acid rich aerosols.

  7. Sensitivity of global-scale climate change attribution results to inclusion of fossil fuel black carbon aerosol - article no. L14701

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.S.; Jones, A.; Roberts, D.L.; Stott, P.A.; Williams, K.D.

    2005-07-16

    It is likely that greenhouse gas emissions caused most of the global mean warming observed during the 20th century, and that sulphate aerosols counteracted this warming to some extent, by reflecting solar radiation to space and thereby cooling the planet. However, the importance of another aerosol, namely black carbon, could be underestimated. Here we include fossil fuel black carbon aerosol in a detection and attribution analysis with greenhouse gas and sulphate aerosols. We find that most of the warming of the 20th Century is attributable to changes in greenhouse gases offset by net aerosol cooling. However the pattern of temperature change due to black carbon is currently indistinguishable from the sulphate aerosol pattern of temperature change. The attribution of temperature change due to greenhouse gases is not sensitive to the inclusion of black carbon. We can be confident about the overall attribution of total aerosols, but less so about the contributions of black carbon emissions to 20th century climate change. This work presents no evidence that black carbon aerosol forcing outweighed the cooling due to sulphate aerosol.

  8. TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF AEROSOL CARBON CONTENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes two different techniques for total and elemental carbon analysis developed under this grant. Both methods are totally instrumental, automated, and non-destructive. Total carbon is determined using the gamma ray analysis of light elements (GRALE) technique. Th...

  9. SAMPLING DURATION DEPENDENCE OF SEMI-CONTINUOUS ORGANIC CARBON MEASUREMENTS ON STEADY STATE SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semi-continuous organic carbon concentrations were measured through several experiments of statically generated secondary organic aerosol formed by hydrocarbon + NOx irradiations. Repeated, randomized measurements of these steady state aerosols reveal decreases in the observed c...

  10. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Aerosols: Effects of Large Increases on Global Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Mathematical models indicate increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide causes an increase in surface temperature at a decreasing rate, and the rate of temperature decrease caused by increasing aerosols increases with aerosol concentration. (AL)

  11. Semicontinuous automated measurement of organic carbon in atmospheric aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Rashinkar, Shilpa M; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2010-02-15

    A fully automated measurement system for ambient aerosol organic carbon, capable of unattended operation over extended periods, is described. Particles are collected in a cyclone with water as the collection medium. The collected sample is periodically aspirated by a syringe pump into a holding loop and then delivered to a wet oxidation reactor (WOR). Acid is added, and the WOR is purged to measure dissolved CO(2) or inorganic carbonates (IC) as evolved CO(2). The IC background can often be small and sufficiently constant to be corrected for, without separate measurement, by a blank subtraction. The organic material is now oxidized stepwise or in one step to CO(2). The one-step oxidation involves UV-persulfate treatment in the presence of ozone. This treatment converts organic carbon (OC) to CO(2), but elemental carbon is not oxidized. The CO(2) is continuously purged from solution and collected by two sequential miniature diffusion scrubbers (DSs), a short DS preceding a longer one. Each DS consists of a LiOH-filled porous hydrophobic membrane tube with terminal stainless steel tubes that function as conductance-sensing electrodes. As CO(2) is collected by the LiOH-filled DSs, hydroxide is converted into carbonate and the resulting decrease in conductivity is monitored. The simultaneous use of the dual short and long DS units bearing different concentrations of LiOH permits both good sensitivity and a large dynamic range. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) is approximately 140 ng of C. With a typical sampling period of 30 min at a sampling rate of 30 L/min, this corresponds to an LOD of 160 ng/m(3). The approach also provides information on the ease of oxidation of the carbonaceous aerosol and hence the nature of the carbon contained therein. Ambient aerosol organic carbon data are presented. PMID:20092351

  12. Springtime carbon episodes at Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-05-01

    In order to investigate the carbon episodes at Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia during spring of 2007 and 2008, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The carbon episodes at the Gosan site were categorized as long-range transported anthropogenic pollutant (LTP) from Asian continent, Asian dust (AD) accompanying with LTP, and local pollen episodes. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during the pollen episodes (range: -26.2 ‰ to -23.5 ‰, avg.: -25.2 ± 0.9 ‰), followed by the LTP episodes (range: -23.5 ‰ to -23.0 ‰, avg.: -23.3 ± 0.3 ‰) and the AD episodes (range: -23.3 to -20.4 %, avg.: -21.8 ± 2.0 ‰). The δ13CTC of the airborne pollens (-28.0 ‰) collected at the Gosan site showed value similar to that of tangerine fruit (-28.1 ‰) produced from Jeju Island. Based on the carbon isotope mass balance equation and the TN and TC regression approach, we found that ∼40-45 % of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollens from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. The δ13C of citric acid in the airborne pollens (-26.3 ‰) collected at the Gosan site was similar to that in tangerine fruit (-27.4 ‰). The negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC were obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollens and then transported to the Gosan site. Based on the thermal evolution pattern of organic aerosols during the carbon episodes, we found that organic aerosols originated from East China are more volatile on heating and are more likely to form pyrolized organic carbon than the pollen-enriched organic aerosols and organic

  13. Evaluation of atmospheric aerosol and tropospheric ozone effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min

    The increasing human activities have produced large amounts of air pollutants ejected into the atmosphere, in which atmospheric aerosols and tropospheric ozone are considered to be especially important because of their negative impacts on human health and their impacts on global climate through either their direct radiative effect or indirect effect on land-atmosphere CO2 exchange. This dissertation dedicates to quantifying and evaluating the aerosol and tropospheric ozone effects on global terrestrial ecosystem dynamics using a modeling approach. An ecosystem model, the integrated Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (iTem), is developed to simulate biophysical and biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystems. A two-broad-band atmospheric radiative transfer model together with the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measured atmospheric parameters are used to well estimate global downward solar radiation and the direct and diffuse components in comparison with observations. The atmospheric radiative transfer modeling framework were used to quantify the aerosol direct radiative effect, showing that aerosol loadings cause 18.7 and 12.8 W m -2 decrease of direct-beam Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR) and Near Infrared Radiation (NIR) respectively, and 5.2 and 4.4 W m -2 increase of diffuse PAR and NIR, respectively, leading to a total 21.9 W m-2 decrease of total downward solar radiation over the global land surface during the period of 2003-2010. The results also suggested that the aerosol effect may be overwhelmed by clouds because of the stronger extinction and scattering ability of clouds. Applications of the iTem with solar radiation data and with or without considering the aerosol loadings shows that aerosol loading enhances the terrestrial productions [Gross Primary Production (GPP), Net Primary Production (NPP) and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP)] and carbon emissions through plant respiration (RA) in global terrestrial ecosystems over the

  14. Influence of Brown Carbon Aerosols on Absorption Enhancement and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamjad, Puthukkadan; Nand Tripathi, Sachchida; Kant Pathak, Ravi; Hallquist, Mattias

    2015-04-01

    This study presents aerosol mass and optical properties measured during winter-spring months (February-March) of two consecutive years (2013-2014) from Kanpur, India located inside Gangetic Plain. Spectral absorption and scattering coefficients (405, 532 and 781 nm) of both atmospheric and denuded (at 300° C) is measured using a 3 wavelength Photo Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS 3). Ratio between the atmospheric and denuded absorption is reported as enhancement in absorption (Eabs). Eabs values shows presence of large quantities of Brown Carbon (BrC) aerosols in the location. Diurnal trend of Eabs shows similar patterns at 405 and 532 nm. But at 781 nm Eabs values increased during day time (10:00 to 18:00) while that 405 and 532 nm decreased. Positive Matrix Analysis (PMF) of organic aerosols measured using HR-ToF-AMS shows factors with different trends with total absorption. Semi-volatile factor (SV-OOA) show no correlation with absorption but other factors such as Low-volatile (LV-OOA), Hydrocarbon (HOA) and Biomass burning (BBOA) organic aerosols shows a positive trend. All factors shows good correlation with scattering coefficient. Also a strong dependence of absorption is observed at 405 and 532 nm and a weak dependence at 781 nm is observed during regression analysis with factors and mass loading. We also present direct radiative forcing (DRF) calculated from measured optical properties due to total aerosol loading and only due to BrC. Total and BrC aerosol DRF shows cooling trends at top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface and warming trend in atmosphere. Days with biomass burning events shows increase in magnitude of DRF at atmosphere and surface up to 30 % corresponding to clear days. TOA forcing during biomass burning days shows increase in magnitude indicating change from negative to less negative.

  15. Black carbon reduction will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in a short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate coupled model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with present-day conditions if the BC emission is reduced exclusively to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial for the mitigation of global warming. However, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 relative to present-day conditions if emissions of BC and co-emitted sulfur dioxide and organic carbon are simultaneously reduced as the most close conditions to the actual situation to the level projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  16. The characteristics of brown carbon aerosol during winter in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan; He, Ke-bin; Du, Zhen-yu; Engling, Guenter; Liu, Jiu-meng; Ma, Yong-liang; Zheng, Mei; Weber, Rodney J.

    2016-02-01

    Brown carbon (i.e., light-absorbing organic carbon, or BrC) exerts important effects on the environment and on climate in particular. Based on spectrophotometric absorption measurements on extracts of bulk aerosol samples, this study investigated the characteristics of BrC during winter in Beijing, China. Organic compounds extractable by methanol contributed approximately 85% to the organic carbon (OC) mass. Light absorption by the methanol extracts exhibited a strong wavelength dependence, with an average absorption Ångström exponent of 7.10 (fitted between 310 and 450 nm). Normalizing the absorption coefficient (babs) measured at 365 nm to the extractable OC mass yielded an average mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of 1.45 m2/g for the methanol extracts. This study suggests that light absorption by BrC could be comparable with black carbon in the spectral range of near-ultraviolet light. Our results also indicate that BrC absorption and thus BrC radiative forcing could be largely underestimated when using water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a surrogate for BrC. Compared to previous work relying only on WSOC, this study provides a more comprehensive understanding of BrC aerosol based on methanol extraction.

  17. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Greg; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Clothiaux, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output. This requires long-term measurements in many regions, as model success in one region or season does not apply to all regions and seasons. AERONET is an automated network of more than 180 surface radiometers located throughout the world. The sky radiance measurements obtained by AERONET are inverted to provide column-averaged aerosol refractive indices and size distributions for the AERONET database, which we use to derive column-averaged black carbon concentrations and specific absorptions that are constrained by the measured radiation field. This provides a link between AERONET sky radiance measurements and the elemental carbon concentration of transport models without the need for an optics module in the transport model. Knowledge of both the black carbon concentration and aerosol absorption optical depth (i.e., input and output of the optics module) will enable improvements to the transport model optics module.

  18. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine biologically influenced aerosols over the western North Pacific in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Jung, J.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen (ON) and organic carbon (OC) as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN) and total carbon (TC) were measured in marine aerosols collected in the western North Pacific in summer 2008. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and diethylammonium (DEA+) at 40-44N and subtropical regions (10-20N), together with averaged satellite chlorophyll a data and five-day back trajectory, suggest significant influences of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. In the marine biologically influenced aerosols, ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m-3. We found that water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION) was the most abundant N in the marine aerosols, which accounted for 67±15% of total aerosol N. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93±0.07 at 40-44N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. The stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C) showed higher values (from -22‰ to -20‰) when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35. The results clearly show an enrichment of nitrogen in organic aerosols originated from the oceanic region with high biological productivity and indicate preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing compounds from the sea surface to marine atmosphere. Furthermore, both WION concentrations and WION/WIOC ratios showed positive correlations with local wind speeds, suggesting that ON contributes significantly as a nutrient-affiliated element to primary marine organic aerosols over the study region. We will discuss possible chemical properties of WION including proteins and gel-like particles, and potential processes for primary and secondary production of aerosol ON.

  19. Organic Mass to Organic Carbon ratio in Atmospheric Aerosols: Observations and Global Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridis, K.; Kanakidou, M.; Daskalakis, N.

    2012-12-01

    Organic compounds play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and affect Earth's climate through their impact on oxidants and aerosol formation (e.g. O3 and organic aerosols (OA)). Due to the complexity of the mixture of organics in the atmosphere, the organic-mass-to-organic-carbon ratio (OM/OC) is often used to characterize the organic component in atmospheric aerosols. This ratio varies dependant on the aerosol origin and the chemical processing in the atmosphere. Atmospheric observations have shown that as OA and its precursor gases age in the atmosphere, it leads to the formation of more oxidized (O:C atomic ratio 0.6 to 0.8), less volatile and less hydrophobic compounds (particle growth factor at 95% relative humidity of 0.16 to 0.20) that have more similar properties than fresh aerosols. While reported OM:OC ratios observed over USA range between 1.29 and 1.95, indicating significant contribution of local pollution sources to the OC in that region, high O/C ratio associated with a high OM/OC ratio of 2.2 has been also observed for the summertime East Mediterranean aged aerosol. In global models, the OM/OC ratio is either calculated for specific compounds or estimated for compound groups. In the present study, we review OM/OC observations and compare them with simulations from a variety of models that contributed to the AEROCOM exercise. We evaluate the chemical processing level of atmospheric aerosols simulated by the models. A total of 32 global chemistry transport models are considered in this study with variable complexity of the representation of OM/OC ratio in the OA. The analysis provides an integrated view of the OM/OC ratio in the global atmosphere and of the accuracy of its representation in the global models. Implications for atmospheric chemistry and climate simulations are discussed.

  20. Chemical characterization of Brown Carbon from biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Andreae, M. O.; Andreae, T. W.; Artaxo, P.; Gelencser, A.; Graham, B.; Guyon, P.; Maenhaut, W.

    2003-04-01

    The term "elemental carbon" (EC) is used to describe the most polymerized and refractory fraction of combustion-produced atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols, having chemical properties similar to graphitic carbon (disordered graphite lattice, mostly with carbon, but also with some oxygen and hydrogen atoms, and highly resistant to thermal degradation and oxidation). This species is insoluble either in water or organic solvents. In evolved gas analysis (EGA), it is usually represented by the peak evolving above ca. 400 ^oC in the thermograms. EGA analyses before and after water extraction have shown that in samples from biomass burning aerosols ca. 50% of the material evolving above 400 ^oC was removed by extraction with water and therefore was not true EC. These results suggest that this apparent EC (EC_a) is high-molecular weight organic material with thermal and oxidative properties similar to EC. This EC_a material also absorbs light, therefore, we have adopted the term of "brown carbon" (Cbrown) to refer to it. Here we will present a detailed chemical characterization of EC_a and Cbrown using EGA, optical transmission, thermo-optical analysis and pyrolysis GC/MS. This last technique will provide, for the first time, molecular characterization of Cbrown. The results of these analytical techniques will improve our understanding of the chemical, thermal and oxidative properties of true EC, EC_a and Cbrown from biomass burning aerosols. Brown carbon can be formed both during thermal decomposition of organic matter (charring) and through low-temperature microbial and abiotic reactions (humic/fulvic acids).

  1. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  2. Impact of tropospheric sulphate aerosols on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSAs) may oxidise the photosynthesising tissues if they are taken up by plants. A parameterisation of this impact of tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSAs) on the terrestrial gross primary production is suggested. This parameterisation is implemented into the global Earth system model developed at the A.M. Obukhov Institute of the Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM). With this coupled model, the simulations are performed which are forced by common anthropogenic and natural climate forcings based on historical reconstructions followed by the RCP 8.5 scenario. The model response to sulphate aerosol loading is subdivided into the climatic (related to the influence of TSA on the radiative transport in the atmosphere) and ecological (related to the toxic influence of sulphate aerosol on terrestrial plants) impacts. We found that the former basically dominates over the latter on a global scale and modifies the responses of the global vegetation and soil carbon stocks to external forcings by 10%. At a regional scale, however, ecological impact may be as much important as the climatic one.

  3. Total ozone and aerosol optical depths inferred from radiometric measurements in the Chappuis absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Flittner, D.E.; Herman, B.M.; Thome, K.J.; Simpson, J.M.; Reagan, J.A. )

    1993-04-15

    A second-derivative smoothing technique, commonly used in inversion work, is applied to the problem of inferring total columnar ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths. The application is unique in that the unknowns (i.e., total columnar ozone and aerosol optical depth) may be solved for directly without employing standard inversion methods. It is shown, however, that by employing inversion constraints, better solutions are normally obtained. The current method requires radiometric measurements of total optical depth through the Chappuis ozone band. It assumes no a priori shape for the aerosol optical depth versus wavelength profile and makes no assumptions about the ozone amount. Thus, the method is quite versatile and able to deal with varying total ozone and various aerosol size distributions. The technique is applied first in simulation, then to 119 days of measurements taken in Tucson, Arizona, that are compared to TOMS values for the same dates. The technique is also applied to two measurements taken at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, for which Dobson ozone values are available in addition to the TOMS values, and the results agree to within 15%. It is also shown through simulations that additional information can be obtained from measurements outside the Chappuis band. This approach reduces the bias and spread of the estimates total ozone and is unique in that it uses measurements from both the Chappuis and Huggins absorption bands. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Sizing of individual aerosol particles using TAOS (Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) pattern total intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zallie, J. T.; Aptowicz, K. B.; Martin, S.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The morphology of single aerosol particles has been explored previously using the TAOS (Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) technique, which captures angularly resolved scattering patterns. Particle size is known to strongly influence the light scattering properties of aerosols and therefore is a critical parameter to discern from the TAOS patterns. In this work, T-matrix simulation of light scattering from spherical and spheroidal particles is used to explore the possibility of sizing particles from the total light scattering signal detected using the TAOS technique. Scattering patterns were calculated for particles that span various particle sizes, spheroidal shapes, complex refractive indices and particles orientations representative of atmospheric aerosol distributions. A power law relationship between particle size and total scattering intensity was found that could crudely size particles but with significant error.

  5. Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2001-02-01

    Aerosols affect the Earth's temperature and climate by altering the radiative properties of the atmosphere. A large positive component of this radiative forcing from aerosols is due to black carbon-soot-that is released from the burning of fossil fuel and biomass, and, to a lesser extent, natural fires, but the exact forcing is affected by how black carbon is mixed with other aerosol constituents. From studies of aerosol radiative forcing, it is known that black carbon can exist in one of several possible mixing states; distinct from other aerosol particles (externally mixed) or incorporated within them (internally mixed), or a black-carbon core could be surrounded by a well mixed shell. But so far it has been assumed that aerosols exist predominantly as an external mixture. Here I simulate the evolution of the chemical composition of aerosols, finding that the mixing state and direct forcing of the black-carbon component approach those of an internal mixture, largely due to coagulation and growth of aerosol particles. This finding implies a higher positive forcing from black carbon than previously thought, suggesting that the warming effect from black carbon may nearly balance the net cooling effect of other anthropogenic aerosol constituents. The magnitude of the direct radiative forcing from black carbon itself exceeds that due to CH4, suggesting that black carbon may be the second most important component of global warming after CO2 in terms of direct forcing.

  6. Comparison of Toxicity and Deposition of Nano-Sized Carbon Black Aerosol Prepared With or Without Dispersing Sonication

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mingu; Han, Jeong-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Nanotoxicological research has shown toxicity of nanomaterials to be inversely related to particle size. However, the contribution of agglomeration to the toxicity of nanomaterials has not been sufficiently studied, although it is known that agglomeration is associated with increased nanomaterial size. In this study, we prepared aerosols of nano-sized carbon black by 2 different ways to verify the effects of agglomeration on the toxicity and deposition of nano-sized carbon black. The 2 methods of preparation included the carbon black dispersion method that facilitated clustering without sonication and the carbon black dispersion method involving sonication to achieve scattering and deagglomeration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to carbon black aerosols 6 hr a day for 3 days or for 2 weeks. The median mass aerodynamic diameter of carbon black aerosols averaged 2.08 μm (for aerosol prepared without sonication; group N) and 1.79 μm (for aerosol prepared without sonication; group S). The average concentration of carbon black during the exposure period for group N and group S was 13.08 ± 3.18 mg/m3 and 13.67 ± 3.54 mg/ m3, respectively, in the 3-day experiment. The average concentration during the 2-week experiment was 9.83 ± 3.42 mg/m3 and 9.08 ± 4.49 mg/m3 for group N and group S, respectively. The amount of carbon black deposition in the lungs was significantly higher in group S than in group N in both 3-day and 2-week experiments. The number of total cells, macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and the number of total white blood cells and neutrophils in the blood in the 2- week experiment were significantly higher in group S than in normal control. However, differences were not found in the inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, etc.) and protein indicators of cell damage (albumin and lactate dehydrogenase) in the BAL fluid of both group N and group S as compared to the normal control. In

  7. Results of the "carbon conference" international aerosol carbon round robin test stage I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Heidrun; Laskus, Lothar; Jürgen Abraham, Hans; Baltensperger, Urs; Lavanchy, Vincent; Bizjak, Mirko; Burba, Peter; Cachier, Helene; Crow, Dale; Chow, Judith; Gnauk, Thomas; Even, Arja; ten Brink, H. M.; Giesen, Klaus-Peter; Hitzenberger, Regina; Hueglin, Christoph; Maenhaut, Willy; Pio, Casimiro; Carvalho, Abel; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Toom-Sauntry, Desiree; Puxbaum, Hans

    An international round robin test on the analysis of carbonaceous aerosols on quartz fiber filters sampled at an urban site was organized by the Vienna University of Technology. Seventeen laboratories participated using nine different thermal and optical methods. For the analysis of total carbon (TC), a good agreement of the values obtained by all laboratories was found (7 and 9% r.s.d.) with only two outliers in the complete data set. In contrast the results of the determination of elemental carbon (EC) in two not pre-extracted samples were highly variable ranging over more than one order of magnitude and the relative standard deviations (r.s.d.) of the means were 36.6 and 45.5%. The laboratories that obtained similar results by using methods which reduce the charring artifact were put together to a new data set in order to approach a "real EC" value. The new data set consisting of the results of 10 laboratories using seven different methods showed 16 and 24% lower averages and r.s.d. of 14 and 24% for the two not pre-extracted samples. Taking the current filters as "equivalents" for urban aerosol samples we conclude that the following methods can be used for the analysis of EC in carbonaceous aerosols: thermal methods with an optical feature to correct for charring during pyrolysis, two-step thermal procedures reducing charring during pyrolysis, the VDI 2465/1 method (removal of OC by solvent extraction and thermodesorption in nitrogen) and the VDI 2465/2 method (combustion of OC and EC at different temperatures) with an additional pre-extraction with a dimethyl formamide (DMF)/toluene mixture. Only thermal methods without any correction for charring during pyrolysis and the VDI 2465/2 method were outside the range of twice the standard deviation of the new data set. For a filter sample pre-extracted with the DMF/toluene mixture the average and r.s.d. from all laboratories (20.7 μgC; 24.4% r.s.d.) was very similar as for the laboratory set reduced to 10

  8. Airborne Aerosol In situ Measurements during TCAP: A Closure Study of Total Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Chand, Duli; Shilling, John E.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Barnard, James C.; Sedlacek, Art; Schmid, Beat

    2015-07-31

    We present here a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. The synergistically employed aircraft data involve aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical components and ambient relative humidity measurements. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of the complementary chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total aerosol scattering is demonstrated for different ambient conditions with a wide range of relative humidities (from 5 to 80%) using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft during the recent Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these three types of data employed are: (1) size distributions measured by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS; 0.06-1 µm), a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP; 0.1-3 µm) and a Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS; 0.6- >10 µm), (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS; 0.06-0.6 µm) and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2; 0.06-0.6 µm), and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a TSI integrating nephelometer at three wavelengths (0.45, 0.55, 0.7 µm) and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system at three RHs (near 45%, 65% and 90%) at a single wavelength (0.525 µm). We demonstrate that good agreement (~10% on average) between the observed and calculated scattering at these three wavelengths can be obtained using the best available chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction and using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40

  9. Light absorption of brown carbon aerosol in the PRD region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.-F.; Huang, X.-F.; Cao, L.-M.; Cui, J.; Zhu, Q.; Huang, C.-N.; Lan, Z.-J.; He, L.-Y.

    2016-02-01

    The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol is regarded to influence aerosol's radiative forcing significantly. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) method has been widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of BrC at shorter wavelengths for ambient aerosols, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of "pure" black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to 1.0. In this study, the AAE method was applied to both urban and rural environments in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China, with an improvement of constraining the realistic AAE of "pure" BC through statistical analysis of on-line measurement data. A three-wavelength photo-acoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the measured AAE and the relative abundance of organic aerosol to BC. The regression and extrapolation analysis revealed that more realistic AAE values for "pure" BC aerosol (AAEBC) were 0.86, 0.82, and 1.02 between 405 and 781 nm, and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 between 532 and 781 nm, in the campaigns of urbanwinter, urbanfall, and ruralfall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiments were conducted and the results further confirmed the representativeness of the obtained AAEBC values for the urban environment. Finally, the average light absorption contributions of BrC (± relative uncertainties) at 405 nm were quantified to be 11.7 % (±5 %), 6.3 % (±4 %), and 12.1 % (±7 %) in the campaigns of urbanwinter, urbanfall, and ruralfall, respectively, and those at 532 nm were 10.0 % (±2 %), 4.1 % (±3 %), and 5.5 % (±5 %), respectively. The relatively higher BrC absorption contribution at 405 nm in the ruralfall campaign could be reasonably attributed to the biomass burning events nearby, which was then directly supported by the biomass burning simulation experiments performed in this study. This paper indicates that the BrC contribution to total aerosol light absorption at shorter

  10. Tropical intercontinental optical measurement network of aerosol, precipitable water and total column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tanre, D.; Reagan, J. A.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Vermote, E.; Vassiliou, G. D.; Lavenu, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new generation of automatic sunphotometers is used to systematically monitor clear sky total column aerosol concentration and optical properties, precipitable water and total column ozone diurnally and annually in West Africa and South America. The instruments are designed to measure direct beam sun, solar aureole and sky radiances in nine narrow spectral bands from the UV to the near infrared on an hourly basis. The instrumentation and the algorithms required to reduce the data for subsequent analysis are described.

  11. Stable carbon isotope composition of secondary organic aerosol from β-pinene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisseha, Rebeka; Spahn, Holger; Wegener, Robert; Hohaus, Thorsten; Brasse, Gregor; Wissel, Holger; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas; Koppmann, Ralf; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    A chamber study was carried out to investigate the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from ozonolysis of β-pinene. β-Pinene (600 ppb) with a known δ13C value (-30.1‰) and 500 ppb ozone were injected into the chamber in the absence of light and the resulting SOA was collected on preheated quartz fiber filters. Furthermore, δ13C values of the gas-phase β-pinene and one of its oxidation products, nopinone, were measured using a gas chromatograph coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-IRMS). β-Pinene was progressively enriched with the heavy carbon isotope due to the kinetic isotope effect (KIE). The KIE of the reaction of β-pinene with ozone was measured to be 1.0026 ? 2.6 ± 1.5‰). The δ13C value of total secondary organic aerosol was very similar to that of its precursor (average = -29.6 ± 0.2‰) independent of experiment time. Nopinone, one of the major oxidation products of β-pinene, was found in both the gas and aerosol phases. The gas-phase nopinone was heavier than the initial β-pinene by 1.3‰ but lighter than the corresponding aerosol-phase nopinone. On average, the gas-phase nopinone was lighter by 2.3‰ than the corresponding aerosol-phase nopinone. The second product found in the SOA was detected as acetone, but it desorbed from the filter at a higher temperature than nopinone, which indicates that it is a pyrolysis product. The acetone showed a much lower δ13C (-36.6‰) compared to the initial β-pinene δ13C.

  12. Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

    2002-09-26

    Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

  13. Total Volcanic Stratospheric Aerosol Optical Depths and Implications for Global Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, D. A.; Solomon, S.; Barnes, J. E.; Burlakov, V. D.; Deshler, T.; Dolgii, S. I.; Herber, A. B.; Nagai, T.; Neely, R. R., III; Nevzorov, A. V.; Ritter, C.; Sakai, T.; Santer, B. D.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, A.; Uchino, O.; Vernier, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cooling effect of recent volcanoes is of particular interest in the context of the post-2000 slowing of the rate of global warming. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth above 15 km have demonstrated that small-magnitude volcanic eruptions substantially perturb incoming solar radiation. Here we use lidar, Aerosol Robotic Network, and balloon-borne observations to provide evidence that currently available satellite databases neglect substantial amounts of volcanic aerosol between the tropopause and 15 km at middle to high latitudes and therefore underestimate total radiative forcing resulting from the recent eruptions. Incorporating these estimates into a simple climate model, we determine the global volcanic aerosol forcing since 2000 to be 0.19 +/- 0.09W/sq m. This translates into an estimated global cooling of 0.05 to 0.12 C. We conclude that recent volcanic events are responsible for more post-2000 cooling than is implied by satellite databases that neglect volcanic aerosol effects below 15 km.

  14. Common summertime total cloud cover and aerosol optical depth weekly variabilities over Europe: Sign of the aerosol indirect effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulias, A. K.; Kourtidis, K. A.; Alexandri, G.; Rapsomanikis, S.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the summer total cloud cover (TCC) weekly cycle over Europe is investigated using MODIS and ISCCP satellite data in conjunction with aerosol optical depth (AOD) MODIS data. Spatial weekly patterns are examined at a 1° × 1° (MODIS) and 250 × 250 km2 (ISCCP) resolution. Despite the noise in the TCC weekly cycle patterns, their large-scale features show similarities with the AOD550 patterns. Regions with a positive (higher values during midweek) weekly cycle appear over Central Europe, while a strong negative (higher values during weekend) weekly plume appears over the Iberian Peninsula and the North-Eastern Europe. The TCC weekly variability exhibits a very good agreement with the AOD550 weekly variability over Central, South-Western Europe and North-Eastern Europe and a moderate agreement for Central Mediterranean. The MODIS derived TCC weekly variability shows reasonable agreement with the independent ISCCP observations, thus supporting the credibility of the results. TCC and AOD550 correlations exhibit a strong slope for the total of the 6 regions investigated in this work with the slopes being higher for regions with common TCC-AOD550 weekly variabilities. The slope is much stronger for AOD550 values less than 0.2 for Central and South-Western Europe, in line with previous studies around the world. Possible scenarios that could explain the common weekly variability of aerosols and cloud cover through the aerosol indirect effects are discussed here also taking into account the weekly variability appearing in ECA&D E-OBS rainfall data.

  15. Carbon in southeastern U.S. aerosol particles: Empirical estimates of secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Charles L.; Hidy, George M.; Tanenbaum, Shelley; Edgerton, Eric; Hartsell, Benjamin; Jansen, John

    Fine particles in the southeastern United States are rich in carbon: Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network measurements from 2001 through 2004 indicate that fine particles less than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter (PM 2.5) at two inland urban sites, Atlanta, GA and Birmingham, AL, contain 9 and 11% black carbon (BC) by mass, respectively, on average. For neighboring rural or urban Gulf Coast sites, the range is 4-7% BC. Organic carbon (OC) ranges from 25 to 27% in the inland cities, and 19-24% at the rural or Gulf Coast locations. Evidence in the literature suggests that a substantial fraction of the OC found in the Southeast is produced by atmospheric chemical reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Estimation of the fraction of OC from primary and secondary sources is difficult from first principles, because the chemistry is complex and incompletely understood, and the emission sources are both anthropogenic and natural. As an alternative, measurement-based models can be used to estimate empirically the primary and secondary source contributions. Three complementary empirical models are described and applied using the SEARCH database. The methods include (a) a multiple regression model employing markers for primary and secondary carbon using gas and particle data, (b) a carbon mass balance using carbon and CO data, along with certain assumptions about the OC/CO ratios in primary emissions for different urban and rural conditions, and (c) exploitation of isotopic measurements of carbon along with the BC and OC data. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) represents ˜20-60% of mean OC, depending upon location and season. The results are sensitive to estimates of emissions of primary OC and BC.

  16. Atmospheric aerosol brown carbon in the high Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, Elena; Decesari, Stefano; Marinoni, Angela; Bonasoni, Paolo; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Facchini, M. Cristina; Fuzzi, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol can reach very high concentrations in the planetary boundary layer in South-East Asia ("brown clouds"), affecting atmospheric transparency and generating spatial gradients of temperature over land with a possible impact on atmospheric dynamics and monsoon circulation. Besides black carbon (BC), an important light-absorbing component of anthropogenic aerosols is the organic carbon component known as 'brown carbon' (BrC). In this research, we provided first measurements of atmospheric aerosol BrC in the high Himalayas during different seasons. Aerosol sampling was conducted at the GAW-WMO Global station "Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid" (NCO-P) located in the high Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. in the foothills of Mt. Everest. PM10 aerosol samples were collected from July 2013 to November 2014. The sampling strategy was set up in order to discriminate the daytime valley breeze bringing polluted air masses up to the observatory and free tropospheric air during nighttime. Water-soluble BrC (WS-BrC) and methanol-soluble BrC (MeS-BrC) were extracted and analyzed using a UV/VIS spectrophotometer equipped with a 50 cm liquid waveguide capillary cell. In the polluted air masses, the highest levels of the BrC light absorption coefficient at 365 nm (babs365) were observed during the pre-monsoon season (1.83±1.46 Mm‑1 for WS-BrC and 2.86±2.49 Mm‑1 for MeS-BrC) and the lowest during the monsoon season (0.21±0.22 Mm‑1 for WS-BrC and 0.32±0.29 Mm‑1 for MeS-BrC). The pre-monsoon season is the most frequently influenced by a strong atmospheric brown cloud (ABC) transport to NCO-P due to increased convection and mixing layer height over South Asia combined with the highest up-valley wind speed and the increase of the emissions from open fires due to the agricultural practice along the Himalayas foothills and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. In contrast, the monsoon season is characterized by a weakened valley wind regime and an

  17. Use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in size segregated aerosol particles for the O/I penetration evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Masalaite, Agne; Ceburnis, Darius; Krugly, Edvinas; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio are successfully used in the atmospheric aerosol particle source identification [1, 2], transformation, pollution [3] research. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the penetration of atmospheric aerosol particles from outdoor to indoor using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Six houses in Kaunas (Lithuania) were investigated during February and March 2013. Electrical low pressure impactor was used to measure in real time concentration and size distribution of outdoor aerosol particles. ELPI+ includes 15 channels covering the size range from 0.017 to 10.0 µm. The 25 mm diameter aluminium foils were used to collect aerosol particles. Gravimetric analysis of samples was made using microbalance. In parallel, indoor aerosol samples were collected with a micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI model 110), where the aerosol particles were separated with the nominal D50 cut-off sizes of 0.056, 0.1, 0.18,0.32,0.56, 1.0, 1.8, 3.2, 5.6, 10, 18 μm for impactor stages 1-11, respectively. The impactor was run at a flow rate of 30 L/min. Air quality meters were used to record meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity) during the investigated period. All aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents and their isotopic compositions using elemental analyzer (EA) connected to the stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). TC concentration in indoors ranged from 1.5 to 247.5 µg/m3. During the sampling period outdoors TN levels ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 µg/m3. The obtained outdoor δ13C(PM2.5) values varied from -24.21 to -26.3‰, while the δ15N values varied from 2.4 to 11.1 ‰ (average 7.2±2.5 ‰). Indoors carbonaceous aerosol particles were depleted in 13C compared to outdoors in all sampling sites. This depletion in δ13C varied from 0.1 to 3.2 ‰. We think that this depletion occurs due ongoing chemical reactions (oxidation) when aerosol

  18. The Effects of Black Carbon and Sulfate Aerosols in ChinaRegions on East Asia Monsoons

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bai; Liu, Yu; Sun, Jiaren

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China on East Asia monsoons and its precipitation processes by using the CAM3.0 model. It is demonstrated that sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China both have the effects to weaken East Asia monsoons in both summer and winter seasons. However, they certainly differ from each other in affecting vertical structures of temperature and atmospheric circulations. Their differences are expected because of their distinct optical properties, i.e., scattering vs. absorbing. Even for a single type of aerosol, its effects on temperature structures and atmospheric circulations are largely season-dependent. Applications of T-test on our results indicate that forcing from black carbon aerosols over China is relatively weak and limited. It is also evident from our results that the effects of synthetic aerosols (sulfate and black carbon together) on monsoons are not simply a linear summation between these two types of aerosols. Instead, they are determined by their integrated optical properties. Synthetic aerosols to a large degree resemble effects of sulfate aerosols. This implies a likely scattering property for the integration of black carbon and sulfate aerosols in China.

  19. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail; Barnard, James; Chand, Duli; Flynn, Connor; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John; et al

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by amore » suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.« less

  20. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail; Barnard, James; Chand, Duli; Flynn, Connor; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John; Tomlinson, Jason; Fast, Jerome

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by a suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.

  1. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) for direct analysis of aerosol particle samples.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Zacco, A; Benedetti, D; Borgese, L; Colombi, P; Stosnach, H; Finzi, G; Apostoli, P; Buttini, P; Depero, L E

    2010-04-14

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have a great impact on the environment and on human health. Routine analysis of the particles usually involves only the mass determination. However, chemical composition and phases provide fundamental information about the particles' origins and can help to prevent health risks. For example, these particles may contain heavy metals such as Pb, Ni and Cd, which can adversely affect human health. In this work, filter samples were collected in Brescia, an industrial town located in Northern Italy. In order to identify the chemical composition and the phases of the atmospheric aerosols, the samples were analysed by means of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry with a laboratory instrument and X-ray microdiffraction at Synchrotron Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington (Cheshire, UK). The results are discussed and correlated to identify possible pollution sources. The novelty of this analytical approach is that filter samples for TXRF were analysed directly and did not require chemical pretreatment to leach elements from the aerosol particulates. The results of this study clearly show that TXRF is a powerful technique for the analysis of atmospheric aerosols on 'as-received' filters, thereby leaving samples intact and unaltered for possible subsequent analyses by other methods. In addition, the low detection limits for many elements (low ng/cm2) indicate that this method may hold promise in various application fields, such as nanotechnology. PMID:20480822

  2. Aerosol black carbon over Svalbard regions of Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Thakur, Roseline C.; Chaubey, Jai Prakash; Nair, Vijayakumar S.

    2016-03-01

    In view of the climate impact of aerosol Black Carbon (BC) over snow covered regions (through enhanced absorption of radiation as well as snow-albedo forcing), and in view of the increasing anthropogenic presence and influence in the northern polar regions, continuous long term measurements of airborne BC have been undertaken from the Svalbard region of Norwegian Arctic (Ny-Ålesund, 79°N, 12°E, 8 m a.s.l.). This study, employing data over a period of 4-years (2010-2013) have shown a consistent spring-time enhancement in BC concentrations, having a (climatological) seasonal mean value of ∼50.3 ± 19.5 ng m-3, nearly 3-times higher than the lowest BC concentrations in summer (∼19.5 ± 6.5 ng m-3). Spectral variation of absorbance indicates that long-range transported biomass burning aerosols contribute as high as 25% to the high BC concentrations in the Arctic atmosphere in spring. Concurrent estimates of BC concentrations in the Arctic snow (for an ensemble of snow samples collected over a period of time during spring) showed values ranging from 0.6 ppb to 4.1 ppb. These values have been used to estimate the BC scavenging ratio (SR). Our studies revealed a mean value of SR ∼98 ± 46, which varied over wide range from 40 to 184 for individual samples. In a broader perspective, the seasonal variations of atmospheric BC concentrations at the Arctic are similar to those seen at the high altitude Himalayas; even though the concentrations are much lower at Arctic. It is found that synoptic conditions mainly influence the high altitude Himalayas, while the influences of local anthropogenic influences are not negligible at the Arctic in modulating the seasonal variations of absorbing aerosols.

  3. Total sugars in atmospheric aerosols: An alternative tracer for biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaramboni, C.; Urban, R. C.; Lima-Souza, M.; Nogueira, R. F. P.; Cardoso, A. A.; Allen, A. G.; Campos, M. L. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ambient aerosols were collected in an agro-industrial region of São Paulo State (Brazil) between May 2010 and February 2012 (n = 87). The atmosphere of the study region is highly affected by the emissions of gases and particles from sugar and fuel ethanol production, because part of the area planted with sugarcane is still burned before manual harvesting. This work proposes the quantification of total sugars as an alternative chemical tracer of biomass burning, instead of levoglucosan. The quantification of total sugars requires a small area of a filter sample and a simple spectrophotometer, in contrast to the determination of levoglucosan, which is much more complex and time-consuming. Total sugars concentrations in the aerosol ranged from 0.28 to 12.5 μg m-3, and (similarly to levoglucosan) the emissions were significantly higher at night and during the sugarcane harvest period, when most agricultural fires occur. The linear correlation between levoglucosan and total sugars (r = 0.612) was stronger than between levoglucosan and potassium (r = 0.379), which has previously been used as a biomass burning tracer. In the study region, potassium is used in fertilizers, and this, together with substantial soil dust resuspension, makes potassium unsuitable for use as a tracer. On average, ca. 40% of the total sugars was found in particles smaller than 0.49 μm. By including data from previous work, it was possible to identify from 35 to 42% of the total sugars, with biomass burning making the largest contribution. The high solubility in water of these sugars means that determination of their concentrations could also provide important information concerning the hydrophilic properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  4. Aerosol Size, CCN, and Black Carbon Properties at a Coastal Site in the Eastern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royalty, T. M.; Petters, M. D.; Grieshop, A. P.; Meskhidze, N.; Reed, R. E.; Phillips, B.; Dawson, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in regulating the global radiative budget through direct and indirect effects. To date, the role of sea spray aerosols in modulating climate remains poorly understood. Here we present results from measurements performed at the United States Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility in Duck, North Carolina, USA. Aerosol mobility size distributions (10-600 nm), refractory black carbon (rBC) and scattering particle size distributions (200-620 nm), and size resolved cloud condensation nuclei distributions (.07% - .6% supersaturation) were collected at the end of a 560m pier. Aerosol characteristics associated with northerly, high wind speed (15+ m s-1) flow originating from an oceanic trajectory are contrasted with aerosol properties observed during a weak to moderate westerly flow originating from a continental trajectory. Both marine and continental air masses had aerosol with bi-modal number size distributions with modes centered at 30nm and 140nm. In the marine air-mass, the CCN concentration at supersaturation of 0.4%, total aerosol number, surface, and volume concentration were low. rBC number concentration (D > 200 nm) associated with the marine air-mass was an order of magnitude less than continental number concentration and indicative of relatively unpolluted air. These measurements are consistent with measurements from other coastal sites under marine influence. The relative proportion of Aitken mode size particles increased from 1:2 to 2:1 while aerosol surface area was < 25 μm2 cm-3, suggesting that conditions upwind were potentially conducive to new particle formation. Overall, these results will contribute a better understanding to composition and size variation of marine aerosols.

  5. Total Observed Organic Carbon (TOOC): A Synthesis of North American Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heald, C. L.; Goldstein, A. H.; Allan, J. D.; Aiken, A. C.; Apel, E.; Atlas, E. L.; Baker, A. K.; Bates, T. S.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.; Campos, T.; Coe, H.; Crounse, J. D.; DeCarlo, P. F.; de Gouw, J. A.; Dunlea, E. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Goldan, P.; Griffin, R. J.; Herndon, S. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Holzinger, R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Junkermann, W.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of organic carbon compounds in both the gas and particle phases made upwind, over and downwind of North America are synthesized to examine the total observed organic carbon (TOOC) in the atmosphere over this region. These include measurements made aboard the NOAA WP-3 and BAe-146 aircraft, the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown, and at the Thompson Farm and Chebogue Point surface sites during the summer 2004 ICARTT campaign. Both winter and summer 2002 measurements during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study are also included. Lastly, the spring 2002 observations at Trinidad Head, CA, surface measurements made in March 2006 in Mexico City and coincidentally aboard the C-130 aircraft during the MILAGRO campaign and later during the IMPEX campaign off the northwestern United States are incorporated. Concentrations of TOOC in these datasets span more than two orders of magnitude. The daytime mean TOOC ranges from 4.0 to 456 microg C/cubic m from the cleanest site (Trinidad Head) to the most polluted (Mexico City). Organic aerosol makes up 3-17% of this mean TOOC, with highest fractions reported over the northeastern United States, where organic aerosol can comprise up to 50% of TOOC. Carbon monoxide concentrations explain 46 to 86% of the variability in TOOC, with highest TOOC/CO slopes in regions with fresh anthropogenic influence, where we also expect the highest degree of mass closure for TOOC. Correlation with isoprene, formaldehyde, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein also indicates that biogenic activity contributes substantially to the variability of TOOC, yet these tracers of biogenic oxidation sources do not explain the variability in organic aerosol observed over North America. We highlight the critical need to develop measurement techniques to routinely detect total gas phase VOCs, and to deploy comprehensive suites of TOOC instruments in diverse environments to quantify the ambient evolution of organic carbon from source to sink.

  6. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. We conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. We also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  7. Aerosol optical properties and mixing state of black carbon in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Haobo; Liu, Li; Fan, Shaojia; Li, Fei; Yin, Yan; Cai, Mingfu; Chan, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols contribute the largest uncertainty to the total radiative forcing estimate, and black carbon (BC) that absorbs solar radiation plays an important role in the Earth's energy budget. This study analysed the aerosol optical properties from 22 February to 18 March 2014 at the China Meteorological Administration Atmospheric Watch Network (CAWNET) station in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. The representative values of dry-state particle scattering coefficient (σsp), hemispheric backscattering coefficient (σhbsp), absorption coefficient (σabsp), extinction coefficient (σep), hemispheric backscattering fraction (HBF), single scattering albedo (SSA), as well as scattering Ångström exponent (α) were presented. A comparison between a polluted day and a clean day shows that the aerosol optical properties depend on particle number size distribution, weather conditions and evolution of the mixing layer. To investigate the mixing state of BC at the surface, an optical closure study of HBF between measurements and calculations based on a modified Mie model was employed for dry particles. The result shows that the mixing state of BC might be between the external mixture and the core-shell mixture. The average retrieved ratio of the externally mixed BC to the total BC mass concentration (rext-BC) was 0.58 ± 0.12, and the diurnal pattern of rext-BC can be found. Furthermore, considering that non-light-absorbing particles measured by a Volatility-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (V-TDMA) exist independently with core-shell and homogenously internally mixed BC particles, the calculated optical properties were just slightly different from those based on the assumption that BC exist in each particle. This would help understand the influence of the BC mixing state on aerosol optical properties and radiation budget in the PRD.

  8. Do aerosols impact ground observation of total cloud cover over the North China Plain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Xia, Xiangao; Wang, Pucai; Fei, Ye

    2015-04-01

    Ground observation of the total cloud cover (TCC) showed a significant downward trend during the past half century over the North China Plain (NCP). The objective of this paper is to examine whether aerosols have impacted the surface observations of TCC by human observers. TCC observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua (TCCgrd) were firstly compared with ground observations (TCCsat) at 201 synoptic stations over the NCP. Results showed that both data sets were in good agreement. The correlation coefficient between TCCgrd and TCCsatranged from 0.80 in winter to 0.90 in summer. The relationship between TCCsat - TCCgrdand visibility was then analyzed, which showed no significant correlation. Finally, long-term trends of TCCgrd and visibility were not correlated. These results indicated that aerosols likely did not impact the long-term trend of TCCgrdover the NCP.

  9. Do aerosols impact ground observation of total cloud cover over the North China Plain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Xia, X.; Wang, P.; Fei, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Ground observation of the total cloud cover (TCC) showed a significant downward trend during the past half century over the North China Plain (NCP). The objective of this paper is to examine whether aerosols have impacted the surface observations of TCC by human observers. TCC observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua (TCCsat) were firstly compared with ground observations (TCCgrd) at 201 synoptic stations over the NCP. Results showed that both data sets were in good agreement. The correlation coefficient between TCCgrd and TCCsat ranged from 0.80 in winter to 0.90 in summer. The relationship between TCCsat-TCCgrd and visibility was then analyzed, which showed no significant correlation. Finally, long-term trends of TCCgrd and visibility were not correlated. These results indicated that aerosols likely did not impact the long-term trend of TCCgrd over the NCP.

  10. TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON DETERMINATIONS IN NATURAL AND CONTAMINATED AQUIFER MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantifying the total organic carbon (TOC) content of soils and aquifer materials is essential for understanding subsurface chemistry during environmental site characterization. ontaminant fate and transport, microbial ecology, and effective treatment methodology are all influenc...

  11. Optical Properties of Black and Brown Carbon Aerosols from Laboratory Combustion of Wildland Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.; Molzan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol light absorption in the solar spectral region (300 nm - 2300 nm) of the atmosphere is key for the direct aerosol radiative forcing, which is determined by aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), asymmetry parameter, and by the albedo of the underlying surface. SSA is of key importance for the sign and quantity of aerosol direct radiative forcing; that is, does the aerosol make the earth look darker (heating) or whiter (cooling)? In addition, these optical properties are needed for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth and properties. During wildland fires, aerosol optical absorption is largely determined by black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) emissions. BC is strongly absorbing throughout the solar spectrum, while BrC absorption strongly increases toward shorter wavelength and can be neglected in the red and infrared. Optical properties of BrC emitted from wildland fires are poorly understood and need to be studied as function of fuel type and moisture content and combustion conditions. While much more is known about BC optical properties, knowledge for the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region is still lacking and critically needed for satellite remote sensing (e.g., TOMS, OMI) and for modeling of tropospheric photochemistry. Here, a project to better characterize biomass burning aerosol optical properties is described. It utilizes a laboratory biomass combustion chamber to generate aerosols through combustion of different wildland fuels of global and regional importance. Combustion aerosol optics is characterized with an integrating nephelometer to measure aerosol light scattering and a photoacoustic instrument to measure aerosol light absorption. These measurements will yield optical properties that are needed to improve qualitative and quantitative understanding of aerosol radiative forcing and satellite retrievals for absorbing carbonaceous aerosols from combustion of wildland fuels.

  12. Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S E

    2012-05-30

    Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

  13. PROTON INDUCED GAMMA-RAY ANALYSIS OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS FOR CARBON, NITROGEN, AND SULFUR COMPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A technique for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur using in-beam gamma-ray spectrometry has been developed for use with atmospheric aerosol samples. Samples are collected on quartz filters, and the aerosol composition is determined by analyzing...

  14. Radiative forcing of organic aerosol in the atmosphere and on snow: incorporation of SOA and brown carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, G.; Flanner, M.; Penner, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Organic aerosols (OA) play an important role in climate change through their radiative forcing. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) contributes a large portion of total organic aerosol, especially in remote regions. Organic aerosol has been shown to be an important source of solar-light absorption. However, very few global model calculations of the radiative forcing due to organic aerosol include SOA or the light-absorbing part of OA (brown carbon). Here, we use a global chemical transport model with a detailed SOA formation mechanism to investigate the change in SOA between present day and pre-industrial conditions. We employ a radiative transfer model to assess the radiative forcing associated with the change in SOA. We also reassess the radiative forcing of total OA by considering previously neglected brown carbon. In addition to the OA in the atmosphere, we examine for the first time the radiative forcing of OA deposited in snow and sea-ice by using the NCAR Community Land Model 4 (CLM4) for the land snow simulation and the Community Ice CodE 4 (CICE) for the sea-ice simulation. Anthropogenic emissions of NOx, CO, sulfate, biomass burning and fossil fuel organic aerosol are shown to influence the formation rate of SOA substantially, causing it to increase by 35 Tg/yr (41%) since pre-industrial times. The increase of SOA results in a direct forcing ranging from -0.12 to -0.34 Wm-2 and a first indirect forcing in warm phase clouds ranging from -0.24 to -0.32 Wm-2, with the range due to different assumed size distributions for SOA and different refractive indices. The global burden of primary organic aerosol (POA) is estimated to increase by 0.53 Tg since pre-industrial times. Based on different refractive indices assumed for brown carbon, the increase of POA leads to a direct forcing varying from -0.07 to -0.12 Wm-2. The change in total OA exerts a direct radiative forcing ranging from -0.17 to -0.46 Wm-2. Atmospheric absorption from brown carbon ranges from +0.13 to

  15. Light Absorption Properties of Brown Carbon from Fresh and Aged Biomass Burning Aerosols Characterized in a Smog Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, R.; Chuang, W.; Hennigan, C.; McMeeking, G. R.; Coe, H.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Black carbon is an important particulate phase light absorber in the atmosphere. Recent studies have shown that some organic matter also absorb visible light, especially at short wavelengths. These organic compounds are referred to as "brown carbon". Biomass burning is a major contributor to brown carbon in atmospheric particulate matter; however, its optical properties are poorly characterized. We have conducted smog chamber experiments to investigate light absorption properties of brown carbon in primary and aged biomass burning emissions, namely the imaginary refractive index. The aging was performed in a smog chamber, where dilute emissions were exposed to UV lights to initiate photo-oxidation, which often produced substantial secondary organic aerosol. The experiments took place at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and at the US Fire Science Laboratory in Missoula, MT as part of the Fire Lab at Missoula field campaign (FLAME 2009). The CMU experiments simulated household wood burning (oak), and the FLAME experiments simulated wildland fires with fuels including gallberry, lodgepole pine, black spruce and ponderosa pine. Absorption coefficients were measured using an Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) at 7 different wavelengths ranging between 370 nm and 950 nm. The black carbon size distributions were measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2, DMT), and total aerosol size distributions were measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, TSI). The absorption coefficients of both the fresh and aged aerosol were significantly larger, and had stronger wavelength dependence than what would be expected for black carbon alone, and for a black carbon core with a non-absorbing shell. This indicates that biomass burning organic aerosol should be classified as brown carbon. A (black carbon) core - (brown carbon) shell absorption model based on Mie theory was optimized to determine the shell imaginary refractive index which produces model outputs that

  16. Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis ofpublished data and implications for climate forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

    2005-07-11

    Measurements of organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC)concentrations over a variety of locations worldwide, have been analyzed to infer the spatial distributions of the ratios of OC to BC. Since these ratios determine the relative amounts of scattering and absorption, they are often used to estimate the radiative forcing due to aerosols. An artifact in the protocol for filter measurements of OC has led to widespread overestimates of the ratio of OC to BC in atmospheric aerosols. We developed a criterion to correct for this artifact and analyze corrected OC to BC ratios. The OC to BC ratios, ranging from 1.3to 2.4, appear relatively constant and are generally unaffected by seasonality, sources or technology changes, at the locations considered here. The ratios compare well with emission inventories over Europe and China but are a factor of two lower in other regions. The reduced estimate for OC/BC in aerosols strengthens the argument that reduction of soot emissions maybe a useful approach to slow global warming.

  17. Multi-wavelength optical determination of black and brown carbon in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, D.; Caponi, L.; Bernardoni, V.; Bove, M. C.; Brotto, P.; Calzolai, G.; Cassola, F.; Chiari, M.; Fedi, M. E.; Fermo, P.; Giannoni, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Piazzalunga, A.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.; Prati, P.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a new way to apportion the absorption coefficient (babs) of carbonaceous atmospheric aerosols starting from a multi-wavelength optical analysis is shown. This methodology can disentangle and quantify the contribution to total absorption of equivalent black carbon (EBC) emitted by wood burning (EBCWB) and fossil fuel (EBCFF) as well as brown carbon (BrC) due to incomplete combustion. The method uses the information gathered at five different wavelengths in a renewed and upgraded version of the approach usually referred to as Aethalometer model. Moreover, we present the results of an apportionment study of carbonaceous aerosol sources performed in a rural area and in a coastal city, both located in the North-West of Italy. Results obtained by the proposed approach are validated against independent measurements of levoglucosan and radiocarbon. At the rural site the EBCWB and EBCFF relative contributions are about 40% and 60% in winter and 15% and 85% in summer, respectively. At the coastal urban site, EBCWB and EBCFF are about 15% and 85% during fall. The OC contribution to the wood burning source at the rural site results approximately 50% in winter and 10% in summer and about 15% at the coastal urban site in fall. The new methodology also provides a direct measurement of the absorption Ångström exponent of BrC (αBrC) which resulted αBrC = 3.95 ± 0.20.

  18. Comparison of Bulk Carbon Concentrations and Optical Properties of Carbonaceous Aerosols in the North Slope Alaska from Summer 2012 and Summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, R. J.; Barrett, T. E.; Moffett, C.; Gunsch, M.; Pratt, K.

    2015-12-01

    With recent drilling permits being issued for exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea, there is a need for characterization of carbonaceous aerosols in the Arctic both prior to and during the exploratory drilling phase. A month-long field sampling campaign will be conducted in Barrow, AK, at the confluence of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas, from August to September 2015. Total suspended particulate (TSP) aerosol samples will be collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) climate research facility in Barrow, AK, USA. Samples will be analyzed for organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) on a Sunset carbon analyzer utilizing the NIOSH 5040 method. Samples will also be analyzed for water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) using a water extraction method and subsequent analysis on a Shimadzu Total Carbon Analyzer. Optical properties of the aqueous extracts will also be measured using an Agilent ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometer. OC, EC and WSOC concentrations will then be compared to aerosol samples collected at the same location in summer 2012, prior to the onset of exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea. Back trajectory (BT) analysis will be performed for each sampling campaign to help assess the impact of source region on the carbonaceous aerosol budget and to identify any changes in source region between the two campaigns. A comparison of samples from the same location and season both prior to and post drilling will allow for a more accurate characterization and tracking of the potential impacts of new aerosol emission sources in the region.

  19. Aerosol Absorption by Black Carbon and Dust: Implications of Climate Change and Air Quality in Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol distributions from 2000 to 2007 are simulated with the global model GOCART to attribute light absorption by aerosol to its composition and sources. We show the seasonal and interannual variations of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere over Asia, mainly black carbon and dust. and their linkage to the changes of anthropogenic and dust emissions in the region. We compare our results with observations from satellite and ground-based networks, and estimate the importance of black carbon and dust on regional climate forcing and air quality.

  20. The impact of biogenic carbon emissions on aerosol absorption inMexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, N; Gaffney, J; Tackett, M J; Sturchio, N; Hearty, L; Martinez, N; Hardy, K D; Machany-Rivera, A; Guilderson, T P; MacMillan, A; Steelman, K

    2009-02-24

    In order to determine the wavelength dependence of atmospheric aerosol absorption in the Mexico City area, the absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs) were calculated from aerosol absorption measurements at seven wavelengths obtained with a seven-channel aethalometer during two field campaigns, the Mexico City Metropolitan Area study in April 2003 (MCMA 2003) and the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The AAEs varied from 0.76 to 1.56 in 2003 and from 0.54 to 1.52 in 2006. The AAE values determined in the afternoon were consistently higher than the corresponding morning values, suggesting the photochemical formation of absorbing secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the afternoon. The AAE values were compared to stable and radiocarbon isotopic measurements of aerosol samples collected at the same time to determine the sources of the aerosol carbon. The fraction of modern carbon (fM) in the aerosol samples, as determined from {sup 14}C analysis, showed that 70% of the carbonaceous aerosols in Mexico City were from modern sources, indicating a significant impact from biomass burning during both field campaigns. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of the aerosol samples illustrate the significant impact of Yucatan forest fires (C-3 plants) in 2003 and local grass fires (C-4 plants) at site T1 in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and calculated aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

  1. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) observations of increases in Asian aerosol in winter from 1979 to 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, Steven T.; Torres, O.; Smith, Steven J.

    2004-12-01

    Emission inventories indicate that the largest increases in SO{sub 2} emissions have occurred in Asia during the last 20 years. By inference, largest increases in aerosol, produced primarily by the conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate, should have occurred in Asia during the same time period. Decadal changes in regional aerosol optical depths are calculated by analyzing Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) vertical aerosol optical depths (converted to 550 nm) from 1979 to 2000 on a 1{sup o} by 1{sup o} global grid. The anthropogenic component of the TOMS aerosol record is maximized by examining the seasonal cycles of desert dust and Boreal fire smoke, and identifying the months of the year for which the desert dust and Boreal fire smoke are least conspicuous. Gobi and Taklimakan desert dust in Asia is prevalent in the TOMS record during spring, and eastern Siberian smoke from Boreal forest fires is prevalent during summer. Aerosol trends are calculated on a regional basis during winter (November-February) to maximize the anthropogenic component of the aerosol record. Large increases in aerosol optical depths between 1979 and 2000 are present over the China coastal plain and the Ganges river basin in India. Aerosol increased by 17% per decade during winter over the China coastal plain, while SO{sub 2} emissions over the same geographical region increased by 33% per decade.

  2. Characteristics of black carbon aerosol from a surface oil burn during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Bahreini, R.; de Gouw, J. A.; Gao, R. S.; Holloway, J. S.; Lack, D. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Peischl, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol mass mixing ratio and microphysical properties were measured from the NOAA P-3 aircraft during active surface oil burning subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in April 2010. Approximately 4% of the combusted material was released into the atmosphere as BC. The total amount of BC introduced to the atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico via surface burning of oil during the 9-week spill is estimated to be (1.35 ± 0.72) × 106 kg. The median mass diameter of BC particles observed in the burning plume was much larger than that of the non-plume Gulf background air and previously sampled from a variety of sources. The plume BC particles were internally mixed with very little non-refractory material, a feature typical of fresh emissions from fairly efficient fossil-fuel burning sources and atypical of BC in biomass burning plumes. BC dominated the total accumulation-mode aerosol in both mass and number. The BC mass-specific extinction cross-section was 10.2 ± 4.1 and 7.1 ± 2.8 m2/g at 405 and 532 nm respectively. These results help constrain the properties of BC emissions associated with DWH and other large spills.

  3. Size distributions of organic nitrogen and carbon in remote marine aerosols: Evidence of marine biological origin based on their isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yuzo; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Sawano, Maki

    2010-03-01

    Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific in summer 2008 for the measurements of organic nitrogen (ON) and organic carbon (OC). ON and OC showed bimodal size distributions. Their concentrations showed positive correlation with those of biogenic tracers, methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and azelaic acid (C9). We found that average ON and OC concentrations were twice greater in aerosols collected in the oceanic region with higher biological productivity than in the regions with lower productivity. The average ON/OC ratios are higher (0.49 ± 0.11) in more biologically influenced aerosols than those (0.35 ± 0.10) in less influenced aerosols. Stable carbon isotopic analysis indicates that marine-derived carbon accounted for ˜46-72% of total carbon in more biologically influenced aerosols. These results provide evidence that organic aerosols in this region are enriched in ON that is linked to oceanic biological activity and the subsequent emissions to the atmosphere.

  4. [Composition and seasonal variations of carbon isotopes in aerosols of Lhasa, Tibet].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shi-chang; Shen, Cheng-de; Cong, Zhi-yuan; Liu, Ke-xin; Liu, Li-chao

    2010-05-01

    A total of 30 samples of total suspended particles were collected at an urban site in western of Lhasa city, Tibet from August 2006 to July 2007 for investigating carbonaceous aerosol features. 14C was taken as a reference to quantitatively distinguish the fossil and biogenic-derived origins along with the characteristics of seasonal variations of all carbonaceous materials in Lhasa are discussed. The results showed that the f(c) values in Lhasa ranged from 0.357 to 0.702, with an average of 0.493, which is higher than Beijing and Tokyo, but are far lower than that of remote/rural regions such as Launceston, indicating a major biogenic influence in Lhasa. Values of f(c) displayed clear seasonal variations with higher mean value in winter, a decreasing trend in spring, while relatively lower values in summer and autumn. Higher f(C) values in winter demonstrate that carbonaceous aerosol is mainly dominated by wood burning and incineration of agricultural wastes during the winter. The lower f(c) values in summer and autumn might be caused by increased diesel engines, motor vehicles emissions, which are related to the tourism in Lhasa. delta13C values ranged from -26.40% per hundred to approximately -25.10% per hundred, with an average of -25.8% per hundred, and showed no clear seasonal variation. The relative higher values in summer reflected the increment of fossil carbon emissions. 13C(TC) values are relatively homogeneous at -25.8% per hundred, considering the characteristics of seasonal variations of f(c) values, it can be concluded that carbonaceous aerosol of Lhasa was mainly influenced by a constant mixing of several pollution sources such as motor vehicles and wood burning emissions. PMID:20623843

  5. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-23

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. In this paper, we conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. Finally, we also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  6. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-23

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. In this paper, we conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCMmore » biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. Finally, we also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.« less

  7. Total carbon accumulation in a tropical forest landscape

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Regrowing tropical forests worldwide sequester important amounts of carbon and restore part of the C emissions emitted by deforestation. However, there are large uncertainties concerning the rates of carbon accumulation after the abandonment of agricultural and pasture land. We report here accumulation of total carbon stocks (TCS) in a chronosequence of secondary forests at a mid-elevation landscape (900-1200 m asl) in the Andean mountains of Colombia. Results We found positive accumulation rates for all ecosystem pools except soil carbon, which showed no significant trend of recovery after 36 years of secondary succession. We used these data to develop a simple model to predict accumulation of TCS over time. This model performed remarkably well predicting TCS at other chronosequences in the Americas (Root Mean Square Error < 40 Mg C ha-1), which provided an opportunity to explore different assumptions in the calculation of large-scale carbon budgets. Simulations of TCS with our empirical model were used to test three assumptions often made in carbon budgets: 1) the use of carbon accumulation in tree aboveground biomass as a surrogate for accumulation of TCS, 2) the implicit consideration of carbon legacies from previous land-use, and 3) the omission of landscape age in calculating accumulation rates of TCS. Conclusions Our simulations showed that in many situations carbon can be released from regrowing secondary forests depending on the amount of carbon legacies and the average age of the landscape. In most cases, the rates used to predict carbon accumulation in the Americas were above the rates predicted in our simulations. These biome level rates seemed to be realistic only in landscapes not affected by carbon legacies from previous land-use and mean ages of around 10 years. PMID:23249727

  8. Estimation of black carbon content for biomass burning aerosols from multi-channel Raman lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Marmureanu, Luminita; Nicolae, Doina

    2015-04-01

    Biomass burning due to natural processes (forest fires) or anthropical activities (agriculture, thermal power stations, domestic heating) is an important source of aerosols with a high content of carbon components (black carbon and organic carbon). Multi-channel Raman lidars provide information on the spectral dependence of the backscatter and extinction coefficients, embedding information on the black carbon content. Aerosols with a high content of black carbon have large extinction coefficients and small backscatter coefficients (strong absorption), while aerosols with high content of organic carbon have large backscatter coefficients (weak absorption). This paper presents a method based on radiative calculations to estimate the black carbon content of biomass burning aerosols from 3b+2a+1d lidar signals. Data is collected at Magurele, Romania, at the cross-road of air masses coming from Ukraine, Russia and Greece, where burning events are frequent during both cold and hot seasons. Aerosols are transported in the free troposphere, generally in the 2-4 km altitude range, and reaches the lidar location after 2-3 days. Optical data are collected between 2011-2012 by a multi-channel Raman lidar and follows the quality assurance program of EARLINET. Radiative calculations are made with libRadTran, an open source radiative model developed by ESA. Validation of the retrievals is made by comparison to a co-located C-ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, biomass burning, radiative model, black carbon Acknowledgment: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project no. 39/2012 - SIAFIM, and by Romanian Partnerships in priority areas PNII implemented with MEN-UEFISCDI support, project no. 309/2014 - MOBBE

  9. Effect of variable power levels on the yield of total aerosol mass and formation of aldehydes in e-cigarette aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gillman, I G; Kistler, K A; Stewart, E W; Paolantonio, A R

    2016-03-01

    The study objective was to determine the effect of variable power applied to the atomizer of refillable tank based e-cigarette (EC) devices. Five different devices were evaluated, each at four power levels. Aerosol yield results are reported for each set of 25 EC puffs, as mass/puff, and normalized for the power applied to the coil, in mass/watt. The range of aerosol produced on a per puff basis ranged from 1.5 to 28 mg, and, normalized for power applied to the coil, ranged from 0.27 to 1.1 mg/watt. Aerosol samples were also analyzed for the production of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein, as DNPH derivatives, at each power level. When reported on mass basis, three of the devices showed an increase in total aldehyde yield with increasing power applied to the coil, while two of the devices showed the opposite trend. The mass of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein produced per gram of total aerosol produced ranged from 0.01 to 7.3 mg/g, 0.006 to 5.8 mg/g, and <0.003 to 0.78 mg/g, respectively. These results were used to estimate daily exposure to formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein from EC aerosols from specific devices, and were compared to estimated exposure from consumption of cigarettes, to occupational and workplace limits, and to previously reported results from other researchers. PMID:26743740

  10. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Healy, R. M.; Riemer, N.; West, M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C.-H.; Wenger, J. C.; Evans, G. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particles was 0.02-0.08 and 0.72-0.93, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  11. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol -Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inmore » two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.« less

  12. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  13. It's a Sooty Problem: Black Carbon and Aerosols from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols (smoke, pollution, dust or sea salt particles, small enough to be suspended in the air), their evolution, composition, variability in space and time and interaction with solar radiation, clouds and precipitation is lacking despite decades of research. Just recently we recognized that understanding the global aerosol system is fundamental for progress in climate change and hydrological cycle research. While a single instrument was used to demonstrate 50 yrs ago that the global CO2 levels are rising, posing thread to our climate, we need an may of satellites, surface networks of radiometers, elaborated laboratory and field experiments coupled with chemical transport models to understand the global aerosol system. This complexity of the aerosol problem results from their short lifetime (1 week), variability of the chemical composition and complex chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere. The result is a heterogeneous distribution of aerosol and their properties. The new generation of satellites and surface networks of radiometers provides exciting opportunities to measure the aerosol properties and their interaction with clouds and climate. However farther development in the satellite capability, aerosol chemical models and climate models is needed to fully decipher the aerosol secrets with accuracy required to predict future climates.

  14. Total ozone column, aerosol optical depth and precipitable water effects on solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation recorded in Malta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    The Universities of Malta and Valladolid (Spain) developed a measurement campaign, which took place in the Institute for Energy Technology in Marsaxlokk (Southern Malta) between May and October 2012, and it was supported by the Spanish government through the Project titled "Measurement campaign about Solar Radiation, Ozone, and Aerosol in the Mediterranean area" (with reference CGL2010-12140-E). This campaign provided the first ground-based measurements in Malta of erythemal radiation and UV index, which indicate the effectiveness of the sun exposure to produce sunburn on human skin. A wide variety of instruments was involved in the campaign, providing a complete atmospheric characterization. Data of erythemal radiation and UV index (from UVB-1 pyranometer), total shortwave radiaton (global and diffuse components from CM-6B pyranometers), and total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness, and precitable water column (from a Microtops-II sunphotometer) were available in the campaign. Ground-based and satellite instruments were used in the analysis, and several intercomparisons were carried out to validate remote sensing data. OMI, GOME, GOME-2, and MODIS instruments, which provide data of ozone, aerosol load and optical properties, were used to this end. The effects on solar radiation, ultraviolet and total shortwave ranges, of total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water column were obtained using radiation measurements at different fixed solar zenith angles. The empirical results shown a determinant role of the solar position, a negligible effect of ozone on total shortwave radiation, and a stronger attenuation provided by aerosol particles in the erythemal radiation. A variety of aerosol types from different sources (desert dust, biomass burning, continental, and maritime) reach Malta, in this campaign several dust events from the Sahara desert occurred and were analyzed establishing the air mass back-trajectories ending at Malta at

  15. Empirical correlations between black carbon aerosol and carbon monoxide in the lower and middle troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Schwarz, J. P.; Gao, R. S.; Watts, L. A.; Thomson, D. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Holloway, J. S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2008-10-01

    Single-particle measurements of black carbon (BC) aerosol and simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) were acquired aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS). Observed average BC mass loadings, estimated to account for ~90% of the ambient BC mass, decreased by more than 2 orders of magnitude from the polluted boundary layer to the clean middle troposphere (6 km). A strong positive, but non-linear, correlation was observed between simultaneous measurements of BC and CO. Based on an analysis of all the data below 1 km, we report a compact relationship between BC and CO with a slope of 5.8 +/- 1.0 ng BC (kg dry air)-1 (ppb CO)-1 that is representative of regional urban and industrial emissions from Houston and Dallas. The BC/CO emission ratio for a fresh biomass-burning plume was estimated at 9 +/- 2 ng kg-1 ppb-1.

  16. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurements of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 micron. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the effects of other interfering constituents, such as water vapor, aerosols and cirrus clouds, on the radiance are significant but the overall effects of the modification of light path length on total back-to-space radiance sensitivity to CO2 change are minor for general cases, which means that generally the total column CO2 can be derived in high precision from the ratio of the on-line center to off-line radiances; (c) together with CO2 gas absorption aerosol/cirrus cloud layer has differential scattering which may result in the modification of on-line to off-line radiance ratio which could lead a large bias in the total column CO2 retrieval. Approaches to correct such bias need further investigation. (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature, which is achievable from new atmospheric sounders in the near future; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, should be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  17. Total carbon and sulfur abundances in Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Yanai, K.

    1979-01-01

    Total carbon and sulfur abundances have been measured in five Antarctic meteorites. Two C2 carbonaceous chondrites Yamato 74662 and Allan Hills 77306 have sulfur abundances (3.490 plus or minus .040% and 3.863 plus or minus 0.050% respectively) similar to other C2 chondrites but their carbon abundances (1.514 plus or minus 0.050% and 1.324 plus or minus .040% respectively) are lower than previously measured C2 chondrites. The decreased carbon abundances may reflect the effects of weathering in cold environments. Carbon and sulfur abundances for one C4 carbonaceous chondrite, one E4 enstatite chondrite and one ureilite are similar to values reported previously for meteorites of the same petrologic grades.

  18. Formation of secondary organic carbon and cloud impact on carbonaceous aerosols at Mount Tai, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Tao; Guo, Jia; Gao, Rui; Xue, Likun; Zhang, Jiamin; Zhou, Yang; Zhou, Xuehua; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols measured at Mount Tai in north China in 2007 were further examined to study the formation of secondary organic carbon (SOC) and the impact of clouds on carbonaceous species. A constrained EC-tracer method and a multiple regression model showed excellent agreement in estimating SOC concentration. The average concentrations of non-volatile and semi-volatile SOC (SOC NV and SOC SV) were 2.61, 5.58 μg m -3 in spring and 2.81, 10.44 μg m -3 in summer. The total SOC accounted for 57.3% and 71.2% of total organic carbon in spring and summer, respectively, indicating the presence of high loading of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the North China Plain. The fraction of SOC NV increased with photochemical age (as indicated by NO x/NO y ratios) of air mass, whereas SOC SV was also influenced by the dynamic equilibrium between formation and sink. Significant scavenging by clouds of non-volatile organic carbon (OC NV) and elemental carbon (EC) was observed, whereas semi-volatile organic carbon (OC SV) concentrations increased during clouds, suggesting substantial SOA formation through aqueous-phase reactions in clouds. A mass balance model was proposed to quantify the scavenging coefficients for OC NV, EC and formation rates of OC SV in clouds. The scavenging coefficient constant of EC ( KEC) varied from 0.11 to 0.90 h -1, and was higher than that of OC NV ( KNV-OC: 0.07-0.55 h -1), implying internal mixing of EC with more hygroscopic species. The formation rate constant ( JSV-OC) and sink constant ( SSV-OC) of OC SV ranged from 0.09 to 1.39 h -1 and 0.001 to 1.07 h -1, respectively. These field derived parameters could be incorporated into atmospheric models to help close the gap between predicted and observed SOA loadings in the atmosphere.

  19. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of ambient aerosols collected from Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim, an outflow region of Asian dusts and pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Bhagawati; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Zhu, Chunmao

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios were measured for total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN), respectively, in aerosol (TSP) samples collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, an outflow region of Asian pollutants, during 2009-2010. The averaged δ13C and δ15N ratios are -22.2‰ and +12.5‰, respectively. The δ13C values are similar in both spring (-22.5‰) and winter (-22.5‰), suggesting the similar sources and/or source regions. We found that δ13C from Okinawa aerosols are ca. 2‰ higher than those reported from Chinese megacities probably due to photochemical aging of organic aerosols. A strong correlation (r = 0.81) was found between nss-Ca and TSP, suggesting that springtime aerosols are influenced from Asian dusts. However, carbonates in the Asian dusts were titrated with acidic species such as sulfuric acid and oxalic acid during atmospheric transport although two samples suggested the presence of remaining carbonate. No correlations were found between δ13C and tracer compounds (levoglucosan, elemental carbon, oxalic acid, and Na+). During winter and spring, coal burning is significant source in China. Based on isotopic mass balance, contribution of coal burning origin particles to total aerosol carbon was estimated as ca. 97% in winter, which is probably associated with the high emissions in China. Contribution of NO3- to TN was on average 45% whereas that of NH4+ was 18%. These results suggest that vehicular exhaust is an important source of TN in Okinawa aerosols. Concentration of water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is higher in summer, suggesting that WSON is more emitted from the ocean in warmer season whereas inorganic nitrogen is more emitted in winter and spring from pollution sources in the Asian continent.

  20. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurement of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 microns. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the radiance signal or sensitivity to CO2 change near the surface is not significantly diminished even in the presence of aerosols and/or thin cirrus clouds in the atmosphere; (c) the modification of sunlight path length by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could lead to large systematic errors in the retrieval; therefore, ancillary aerosol/cirrus cloud data are important to reduce retrieval errors; (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, must be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  1. Concentrations and sources of organic carbon aerosols in the free troposphere over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, Colette L.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Turquety, SolèNe; Hudman, Rynda C.; Weber, Rodney J.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Peltier, Richard E.; Atlas, Eliot L.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Warneke, Carsten; Holloway, John S.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Flocke, Frank M.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-12-01

    Aircraft measurements of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) aerosol over NE North America during summer 2004 (ITCT-2K4) are simulated with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to test our understanding of the sources of organic carbon (OC) aerosol in the free troposphere (FT). Elevated concentrations were observed in plumes from boreal fires in Alaska and Canada. WSOC aerosol concentrations outside of these plumes average 0.9 ± 0.9 μg C m-3 in the FT (2-6 km). The corresponding model value is 0.7 ± 0.6 μg C m-3, including 42% from biomass burning, 36% from biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and 22% from anthropogenic emissions. Previous OC aerosol observations over the NW Pacific in spring 2001 (ACE-Asia) averaged 3.3 ± 2.8 μg C m-3 in the FT, compared to a model value of 0.3 ± 0.3 μg C m-3. WSOC aerosol concentrations in the boundary layer (BL) during ITCT-2K4 are consistent with OC aerosol observed at the IMPROVE surface network. The model is low in the boundary layer by 30%, which we attribute to secondary formation at a rate comparable to primary anthropogenic emission. Observed WSOC aerosol concentrations decrease by a factor of 2 from the BL to the FT, as compared to a factor of 10 decrease for sulfate, indicating that most of the WSOC aerosol in the FT originates in situ. Despite reproducing mean observed WSOC concentrations in the FT to within 25%, the model cannot account for the variance in the observations (R = 0.21). Covariance analysis of FT WSOC aerosol with other measured chemical variables suggests an aqueous-phase mechanism for SOA generation involving biogenic precursors.

  2. Detection and characterization of biological and other organic-carbon aerosol particles in atmosphere using fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-Le

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a brief review on the detection and characterization of biological and other organic-carbon (OC) aerosol particles in atmosphere using laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) signatures. It focuses on single individual particles or aggregates in the micron and super-micron size range when they are successively drawn through the interrogation volume of a point detection system. Related technologies for these systems that have been developed in last two decades are also discussed. These results should provide a complementary view for studying atmospheric aerosol particles, particularly bioaerosol and OC aerosol particles from other analytical technologies.

  3. Extremely large anthropogenic-aerosol contribution to total aerosol load over the Bay of Bengal during winter season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kharol, S. Kumar; Sinha, P. R.; Singh, R. P.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Rani Sharma, A.; Badarinath, K. V. S.

    2011-07-01

    Ship-borne observations of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been carried out over the entire Bay of Bengal (BoB) as part of the W-ICARB cruise campaign during the period 27 December 2008-30 January 2009. The results reveal a pronounced temporal and spatial variability in the optical characteristics of aerosols mainly due to anthropogenic emissions and their dispersion controlled by local meteorology. The highest aerosol amount, with mean AOD500>0.4, being even above 1.0 on specific days, is found close to the coastal regions in the western and northern parts of BoB. In these regions the Ångström exponent is also found to be high (~1.2-1.25) indicating transport of strong anthropogenic emissions from continental regions, while very high AOD500 (0.39±0.07) and α380-870 values (1.27±0.09) are found over the eastern BoB. Except from the large α380-870 values, an indication of strong fine-mode dominance is also observed from the AOD curvature, which is negative in the vast majority of the cases, suggesting dominance of an anthropogenic-pollution aerosol type. On the other hand, clean maritime conditions are rather rare over the region, while the aerosol types are further examined through a classification scheme based on the relationship between α and dα. It was found that even for the same α values the fine-mode dominance is larger for higher AODs showing the strong continental influence over the marine environment of BoB. Furthermore, there is also an evidence of aerosol-size growth under more turbid conditions indicative of coagulation and/or humidification over specific BoB regions. The results obtained using OPAC model show significant fraction of soot aerosols (~6 %-8 %) over the eastern and northwestern BoB, while coarse-mode sea salt particles are found to dominate in the southern parts of BoB.

  4. Organic and inorganic components of aerosols over the central Himalayas: winter and summer variations in stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Prashant; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Joshi, H; Naja, M

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol samples were collected from a high elevation mountain site, Nainital, in India (1958 m asl) during September 2006 to June 2007 and were analyzed for water-soluble inorganic species, total carbon, nitrogen, and their isotopic composition (δ(13)C and δ(15)N, respectively). The chemical and isotopic composition of aerosols revealed significant anthropogenic influence over this remote free-troposphere site. The amount of total carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic composition suggest a considerable contribution of biomass burning to the aerosols during winter. On the other hand, fossil fuel combustion sources are found to be dominant during summer. The carbon aerosol in winter is characterized by greater isotope ratios (av. -24.0 ‰), mostly originated from biomass burning of C4 plants. On the contrary, the aerosols in summer showed smaller δ(13)C values (-26.0 ‰), indicating that they are originated from vascular plants (mostly of C3 plants). The secondary ions (i.e., SO4 (2-), NH4 (+), and NO3 (-)) were abundant due to the atmospheric reactions during long-range transport in both seasons. The water-soluble organic and inorganic compositions revealed that they are aged in winter but comparatively fresh in summer. This study validates that the pollutants generated from far distant sources could reach high altitudes over the Himalayan region under favorable meteorological conditions. PMID:26490923

  5. Insights Into Water-Soluble Organic Aerosol Sources From Carbon-13 Ratios of Size Exclusion Chromatography Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, C. R.; Chuang, P. Y.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    Many sources of organic aerosols have been identified and quantified, and much of this work has used individual (mosty water-insoluble) compounds as tracers of primary sources. However, most organic aerosol cannot be molecularly characterized, and the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in many aerosols is thought to originate from gaseous precursors (i.e., it is secondary in nature). It can therefore be difficult to infer aerosol sources, particularly of background (i.e., aged) aerosols, and of the relatively high-MW component of aerosols. The stable isotope ratios (δ13C) of organic aerosols have been used to distinguish between sources, with lighter values (-30‰ to -25‰) interpreted as having originated from fossil fuel combustion and C4 biogenic emission, and heavier values (-25‰ to - 20‰) indicating a marine or C3 biogenic source. Most published measurements were of either total suspended particulates or PM2.5, however, and it is unknown to what extent these fractions differ from submicron WSOC. We report δ13C for submicron WSOC collected at a variety of sites, ranging from marine to polluted to background continental. Bulk marine organic δ13C ranged from -30.4 to - 27.6‰, slightly lighter than previously published results. This could be due to the elimination of supermicron cellular material or other biogenic primary emissions from the sample. Continental WSOC δ13C ranged from -19.1 to -29.8‰, with heavier values (-19.8 ± 1.0‰) in Oklahoma and lighter values at Great Smoky Mountain National Park in Tennessee (-25.8 ± 2.6‰) and Illinois (-24.5 ± 1.0‰). This likely results from the greater proportional of C3 plant material in the Oklahoma samples. In addition to bulk samples, we used size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to report δ13C of organic aerosols as a function of hydrodynamic diameter. Variability and magnitude of hydrodynamic diameter was greatest at low SEC pH, indicative of the acidic character of submicron WSOC. Tennessee

  6. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-11-05

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

  7. Changes in radiative forcing in Amazonia: the influence of clouds and aerosols controlling carbon budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    Surface radiation fluxes are critically important in photosynthetic processes that controls carbon assimilation and losses in tropical forests. Clouds and aerosols control the surface radiation fluxes in Amazonia, and the ratio of diffuse and direct radiation directly affects photosynthetic plant processes. Biomass burning emissions changes the atmosphere aerosol loading. The background aerosol optical thickness in wet season Amazonia is about 0.1 at 550 nm, while during the dry season AOT can reach values as high as 3-4 over large areas. The increase in diffuse radiation significantly enhance photosynthesis. Remote sensing measurements using MODIS and AERONET were used to measure the large scale aerosol distribution over Amazonia, and LBA flux towers provided the carbon balance over several sites. The enhancement in carbon uptake for AOD between 0.1 and 1 can reach 45%. For AOD above 1, the reduction in the direct flux starts to dominate and a strong reduction in carbon uptake is observed. Cloud cover also has a huge impact on carbon balance in Amazonia, but it is more difficult to quantify. These effects controls carbon balance in Amazonia.

  8. Radiative effects of lower stratospheric volcanic and carbon aerosol as simulated by the CCM EMAC for 2002 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brühl, Christoph; Lelieveld, Jos; Höpfner, Michael

    2015-04-01

    A 10-year simulation with the chemistry climate model EMAC with interactive aerosol module shows that medium and smaller volcanic eruptions contribute significantly to radiative forcing and also radiative heating of the lower stratosphere. This simulation includes about 140 eruptions mostly derived from SO2 observed by MIPAS on ENVISAT. Organic and black carbon from biomass burning contributes considerably to radiative heating of the lower stratosphere, notably in monsoon regions, even if its contribution to total aerosol optical depth of the stratosphere is small. We also show that the simulated stratospheric optical depth and radiative forcing at the tropopause is consistent with the corresponding values derived from SAGE and OSIRIS satellite observations, and that the inclusion of smaller eruptions is necessary.

  9. Single-Particle Measurements of Midlatitude Black Carbon and Light-Scattering Aerosols from the Boundary Layer to the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, J. P.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Thomson, D. S.; Watts, L. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Reeves, J. M.; Darbeheshti, M.; Baumgardner, D. G.; Kok, G. L.; Chung, S. H.; Schulz, M.; Hendricks, J.; Lauer, A.; Kaercher, B.; Slowik, J. G.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Thompson, T. L.; Langford, A. O.; Loewenstein, M.; Aikin, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    A single-particle soot photometer (SP2) was flown on a NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft in November 2004 from Houston, Texas. The SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence to detect individual black carbon (BC) particles in an air sample in the mass range of approx.3-300 fg (approx.0.15-0.7 microns volume equivalent diameter). Scattered light is used to size the remaining non-BC aerosols in the range of approx.0.17-0.7 microns diameter. We present profiles of both aerosol types from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere from two midlatitude flights. Results for total aerosol amounts in the size range detected by the SP2 are in good agreement with typical particle spectrometer measurements in the same region. All ambient incandescing particles were identified as BC because their incandescence properties matched those of laboratory-generated BC aerosol. Approximately 40% of these BC particles showed evidence of internal mixing (e.g., coating). Throughout profiles between 5 and 18.7 km, BC particles were less than a few percent of total aerosol number, and black carbon aerosol (BCA) mass mixing ratio showed a constant gradient with altitude above 5 km. SP2 data was compared to results from the ECHAM4/MADE and LmDzT-INCA global aerosol models. The comparison will help resolve the important systematic differences in model aerosol processes that determine BCA loadings. Further intercomparisons of models and measurements as presented here will improve the accuracy of the radiative forcing contribution from BCA.

  10. Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

    2009-11-27

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the

  11. Spectral dependence on the correction factor of erythemal UV for cloud, aerosol, total ozone, and surface properties: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Jung, Yeonjin; Lee, Yun Gon

    2016-07-01

    Radiative transfer model simulations were used to investigate the erythemal ultraviolet (EUV) correction factors by separating the UV-A and UV-B spectral ranges. The correction factor was defined as the ratio of EUV caused by changing the amounts and characteristics of the extinction and scattering materials. The EUV correction factors (CFEUV) for UV-A [CFEUV(A)] and UV-B [CFEUV(B)] were affected by changes in the total ozone, optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and the solar zenith angle. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) were also estimated as a function of solar zenith angle, the optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and total ozone. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) ranged from -5.0% to 25.0% for aerosols, and from -9.5% to 2.0% for clouds in all simulations for different solar zenith angles and optical depths of aerosol and cloud. The rate of decline of CFEUV per unit optical depth between UV-A and UV-B differed by up to 20% for the same aerosol and cloud conditions. For total ozone, the variation in CFEUV(A) was negligible compared with that in CFEUV(B) because of the effective spectral range of the ozone absorption band. In addition, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs due to changes in surface conditions (i.e., surface albedo and surface altitude) was also estimated by using the model in this study. For changes in surface albedo, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs was 2.9%-4.1% per 0.1 albedo change, depending on the amount of aerosols or clouds. For changes in surface altitude, the sensitivity of CFEUV(B) was twice that of CFEUV(A), because the Rayleigh optical depth increased significantly at shorter wavelengths.

  12. Size-resolved parameterization of primary organic carbon in fresh marine aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Michael S; Keene, William C; Erickson III, David J

    2009-12-01

    Marine aerosols produced by the bursting of artificially generated bubbles in natural seawater are highly enriched (2 to 3 orders of magnitude based on bulk composition) in marine-derived organic carbon (OC). Production of size-resolved particulate OC was parameterized based on a Langmuir kinetics-type association of OC to bubble plumes in seawater and resulting aerosol as constrained by measurements of aerosol produced from highly productive and oligotrophic seawater. This novel approach is the first to account for the influence of adsorption on the size-resolved association between marine aerosols and OC. Production fluxes were simulated globally with an eight aerosol-size-bin version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.5.07). Simulated number and inorganic sea-salt mass production fell within the range of published estimates based on observationally constrained parameterizations. Because the parameterization does not consider contributions from spume drops, the simulated global mass flux (1.5 x 10{sup 3} Tg y{sup -1}) is near the lower limit of published estimates. The simulated production of aerosol number (2.1 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and OC (49 Tg C y{sup -1}) fall near the upper limits of published estimates and suggest that primary marine aerosols may have greater influences on the physiochemical evolution of the troposphere, radiative transfer and climate, and associated feedbacks on the surface ocean than suggested by previous model studies.

  13. Effects of Carbon Dioxide Aerosols on the Viability of Escherichia coli during Biofilm Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Renu; Monnappa, Ajay K.; Hong, Seongkyeol; Mitchell, Robert J.; Jang, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    A periodic jet of carbon dioxide (CO2) aerosols is a very quick and effective mechanical technique to remove biofilms from various substrate surfaces. However, the impact of the aerosols on the viability of bacteria during treatment has never been evaluated. In this study, the effects of high-speed CO2 aerosols, a mixture of solid and gaseous CO2, on bacteria viability was studied. It was found that when CO2 aerosols were used to disperse biofilms of Escherichia coli, they led to a significant loss of viability, with approximately 50% of the dispersed bacteria killed in the process. By comparison, 75.6% of the biofilm-associated bacteria were viable when gently dispersed using Proteinase K and DNase I. Indirect proof that the aerosols are damaging the bacteria was found using a recombinant E. coli expressing the cyan fluorescent protein, as nearly half of the fluorescence was found in the supernatant after CO2 aerosol treatment, while the rest was associated with the bacterial pellet. In comparison, the supernatant fluorescence was only 9% when the enzymes were used to disperse the biofilm. As such, these CO2 aerosols not only remove biofilm-associated bacteria effectively but also significantly impact their viability by disrupting membrane integrity. PMID:26345492

  14. Aerosol Types using Passive Remote Sensing: Global Distribution, Consistency Check, Total-Column Investigation and Translation into Composition Derived from Climate and Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Dawson, K. W.; Johnson, M. S.; Burton, S. P.; Redemann, J.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Butler, C. F.; Holben, B. N.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Froyd, K. D.; Dibb, J. E.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    To improve the predictions of aerosol composition in chemical transport models (CTMs) and global climate models (GCMs), we have developed an aerosol classification algorithm (called Specified Clustering and Mahalanobis Classification, SCMC) that assigns an aerosol type to multi-parameter retrievals by spaceborne, airborne or ground based passive remote sensing instruments [Russell et al., 2014]. The aerosol types identified by our scheme are pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke and pure marine. We apply the SCMC method to two different total-column datasets of aerosol optical properties: inversions from the ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and retrievals from the space-borne POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances) instrument. The POLDER retrievals that we use differ from the standard POLDER retrievals [Deuzé et al., 2001] as they make full use of multi-angle, multispectral polarimetric data [Hasekamp et al., 2011]. We analyze agreement in the aerosol types inferred from both AERONET and POLDER globally. Then, we investigate how our total-column "effective" SCMC aerosol types relate to different aerosol types within the column (i.e. either a mixture of different types within one layer in the vertical or the stacking of different aerosol types within the vertical column). For that, we compare AERONET-SCMC aerosol types to collocated NASA LaRC HSRL vertically resolved aerosol types [Burton et al., 2012] during the SEAC4RS and DISCOVER-AQ airborne field experiments, mostly over Texas in Aug-Sept 2013. Finally, in order to evaluate the GEOS-Chem CTM aerosol types, we translate each of our SCMC aerosol type into a unique distribution of GEOS-Chem aerosol composition (e.g. biomass burning, dust, sulfate, sea salt). We bridge the gap between remote sensing and model-inferred aerosol types by using multiple years of collocated AERONET

  15. Long-Term Measurements of Carbon Monoxide and Aerosols at the ZOTTO tall tower, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Birmili, W.; Chi, X.; Heimann, M.; Heintzenberg, J.; Mikhailov, E.; Panov, A.

    2012-04-01

    coefficients with SSA values reaching 0.97. These aerosols were present in airmasses from northern Siberia with low CO mixing ratios, which suggests that they are predominantly of biogenic origin. The lowest particle number concentrations (averaging ~430 cm-3) were present in northern Siberian and Arctic airmasses, with similar values in summer and winter. Chemical analysis shows that sulfates and "black" carbon are elevated in the winter aerosol, while organic carbon from biomass burning and terpenoid oxidation dominate in summer. The measurements at ZOTTO are being continued, in the expectation that long-term variations in the continental background signal could give new insights into the feedback of ecosystems on a continental scale to changing climatic conditions.

  16. Scattering directionality parameters of fractal black carbon aerosols and comparison with the Henyey-Greenstein approximation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Apoorva; Chakrabarty, Rajan K

    2016-07-15

    Current radiation transfer schemes employ the Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function to connect three single parameter representations of aerosol scattering directionality-the hemispherical upscatter fraction (β), the backscatter fraction (b), and the asymmetry parameter (g). The HG phase function does not account for particle morphology, which could lead to significant errors. In this Letter, we compute these single parameters for fractal black carbon (BC) aerosols using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. The variations in β, g, and b as a function of aerosol morphology are examined. Corrected empirical relationships connecting these parameters are proposed. We find that the HG phase function could introduce up to a 35% error in β and g estimates. Interestingly, these errors are suppressed by the large mass absorption cross-sections of BC aerosols in radiative transfer calculations and contribute to ≤8% error in direct forcing efficiencies. PMID:27420533

  17. Elucidating secondary organic aerosol from diesel and gasoline vehicles through detailed characterization of organic carbon emissions

    PubMed Central

    Gentner, Drew R.; Isaacman, Gabriel; Worton, David R.; Chan, Arthur W. H.; Dallmann, Timothy R.; Davis, Laura; Liu, Shang; Day, Douglas A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Weber, Robin; Guha, Abhinav; Harley, Robert A.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles are predominant anthropogenic sources of reactive gas-phase organic carbon and key precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in urban areas. Their relative importance for aerosol formation is a controversial issue with implications for air quality control policy and public health. We characterize the chemical composition, mass distribution, and organic aerosol formation potential of emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles, and find diesel exhaust is seven times more efficient at forming aerosol than gasoline exhaust. However, both sources are important for air quality; depending on a region’s fuel use, diesel is responsible for 65% to 90% of vehicular-derived SOA, with substantial contributions from aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Including these insights on source characterization and SOA formation will improve regional pollution control policies, fuel regulations, and methodologies for future measurement, laboratory, and modeling studies. PMID:23091031

  18. Analytical determination of the aerosol organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio.

    PubMed

    El-Zanan, Hazem S; Zielinska, Barbara; Mazzoleni, Lynn R; Hansen, D Alan

    2009-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 microm (PM2.5) was collected daily (mid-July 1998 to the end of December 1999) over a 24-hr sampling period in a mixed light industrial-residential area in Atlanta, GA, to provide a subset of data for the Aerosol Research and Inhalation Epidemiology Study (ARIES). This study included the measurement of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and individual organic compounds. OC and EC average mean concentrations were 4.50 +/- 0.33 and 2.08 +/- 0.19 microg/m3, respectively. The ratio of organic matter mass (OM) to OC in PM2.5 aerosols in Atlanta was measured using three different approaches: (1) solvent extract residue gravimetric masses to individual OC concentrations of sequential apolar to polar solvent extracts (dichloromethane, acetone, and water); (2) mass balance of the PM2.5 measured gravimetric mass minus the mass concentrations of the inorganic/elemental constituents to the total OC concentration; and (3) polar organic compound speciation with the concentration weighted ratio to the total OC concentration. We found very good agreement between approach 1 and 2. The average OM/OC ratio calculated from the extract residue mass was 2.14 +/- 0.17. The average OM/OC ratio determined by mass balance was 2.16 +/- 0.43 for the whole period. The concentration weighted ratio calculated from the concentrations of polar organic compounds ranged between 1.55 and 1.72, which was likely a lower limit for the ratio because of the limited number of the polar organic compounds that can be quantified using gas chromatographic methods. We found seasonal differences with an OM/OC range of 1.77 in December 1999 to 2.39 in July 1999. These results suggest that the previously accepted value of 1.4 for the OM/OC ratio was too low even for urban locations during the winter months. Molecular-level speciation of the PM2.5-associated organic compounds showed that the concentrations of the molecular markers for wood

  19. Elucidating carbonaceous aerosol sources by the stable carbon δ13CTC ratio in size-segregated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, A.; Remeikis, V.; Garbaras, A.; Dudoitis, V.; Ulevicius, V.; Ceburnis, D.

    2015-05-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol sources were investigated by measuring the stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13CTC) in size-segregated aerosol particles. The samples were collected with a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) in 11 size intervals ranging from 0.056 μm to 18 μm. The aerosol particle size distribution obtained from combined measurements with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS; TSI 3936) and an aerosol particle sizer (APS; TSI 3321) is presented for comparison with MOUDI data. The analysis of δ13CTC values revealed that the total carbonaceous matter in size-segregated aerosol particles significantly varied from - 23.4 ± 0.1‰ in a coarse mode to - 30.1 ± 0.5‰ in a fine mode. A wide range of the δ13CTC values of size-segregated aerosol particles suggested various sources of aerosol particles contributing to carbonaceous particulate matter. Therefore, the source mixing equation was applied to verify the idea of mixing of two sources: continental non-fossil and fossil fuel combustion. The obtained δ13CTC value of aerosol particles originating from fossil fuel combustion was - 28.0 to - 28.1‰, while the non-fossil source δ13CTC value was in the range of - 25.0 to - 25.5‰. The two source mixing model applied to the size-segregated samples revealed that the fossil fuel combustion source contributed from 100% to 60% to the carbonaceous particulate matter in the fine mode range (Dp < 1 μm). Meanwhile, the second source, continental non-fossil, was the main contributor in the coarse fraction (Dp > 2 μm). The particle range from 0.5 to 2.0 μm was identified as a transition region where two sources almost equally contributed to carbonaceous particulate matter. The proposed mixing model offers an alternative method for determining major carbonaceous matter sources where radiocarbon analysis may lack the sensitivity (as in size-segregated samples).

  20. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ELEMENTAL CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental problems caused by atmospheric aerosols are well documented in the specialized literature. Studies reporting on the role of dense clouds of soil particles in past mass extinctions of life on Earth and, more recently (Turco et al., 1983), on calculations of potential...

  1. Water-soluble organic carbon, dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, and α-dicarbonyls in the tropical Indian aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Swaminathan, T.

    2010-06-01

    Tropical aerosol (PM10) samples (n = 49) collected from southeast coast of India were studied for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12), ketocarboxylic acids (C2-C9), and α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal), together with analyses of total carbon (TC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Their distributions were characterized by a predominance of oxalic acid followed by terephthalic (t-Ph), malonic, and succinic acids. Total concentrations of diacids (227-1030 ng m-3), ketoacids (16-105 ng m-3), and dicarbonyls (4-23 ng m-3) are comparative to those from other Asian megacities such as Tokyo and Hong Kong. t-Ph acid was found as the second most abundant diacid in the Chennai aerosols. This feature has not been reported previously in atmospheric aerosols. t-Ph acid is most likely derived from the field burning of plastics. Water-soluble diacids were found to contribute 0.4%-3% of TC and 4%-11% of WSOC. Based on molecular distributions and backward air mass trajectories, we found that diacids and related compounds in coastal South Indian aerosols are influenced by South Asian and Indian Ocean monsoons. Organic aerosols are also suggested to be significantly transported long distances from North India and the Middle East in early winter and from Southeast Asia in late winter, but some originate from photochemical reactions over the Bay of Bengal. In contrast, the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean, and South Indian continent are suggested as major source regions in summer. We also found daytime maxima of most diacids, except for C9 and t-Ph acids, which showed nighttime maxima in summer. Emissions from marine and terrestrial plants, combined with land/sea breezes and in situ photochemical oxidation, are suggested especially in summer as an important factor that controls the composition of water-soluble organic aerosols over the southeast coast of India. Regional emissions from anthropogenic sources are also important in megacity Chennai, but their influence is

  2. Measurement and analysis of aerosol and black carbon in the southwestern United States and Panama and their dependence on air mass origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, C.; Sheahan, J. N.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Brien, P.; Hinds, B. D.; Martinez-Twary, E.; Hansen, A. D. A.; White, C.; Garvey, D. M.; Pinnick, R. G.

    2004-07-01

    Total aerosol mass loading, aerosol absorption, and black carbon (BC) content were determined from aerosol collected on 598 quartz fiber filters at a remote, semiarid site near Orogrande, New Mexico from December 1989 to October 1995. Aerosol mass was determined by weighing filters before and after exposure, and aerosol absorption was determined by measuring the visible light transmitted through loaded filter samples and converting these measurements to aerosol absorption. BC content was determined by measuring visible light transmitted through filter samples before and after firing and converting the absorption to BC mass, assuming a BC absorption cross section of 19 m2/g in the fiber filter medium. Two analyses were then performed on each of the logged variables: an autoregressive integrating moving average (ARIMA) analysis and a decomposition analysis using an autoregressive model to accommodate first-order autocorrelation. The two analyses reveal that BC mass has no statistically significant seasonal dependence at the 5% level of significance but only random fluctuations varying around an average annual value that has a long-term decreasing trend (from 0.16 to 0.11 μg/m3 during 1990-1995). Aerosol absorption, which is dominated by BC, also displays random fluctuations about an average value, and decreases from 1.9 Mm-1 to 1.3 Mm-1 during the same period. Unlike BC, aerosol mass at the Orogrande site displays distinctly different character. The analyses reveal a pronounced seasonal dependence, but no long-term trend for aerosol mass. The seasonal indices resulting from the autoregression analysis have a minimum in January (-0.78) and maximum in June (+0.58). The geometric mean value over the 1990-1995 period for aerosol mass is 16.0 μg/m3. Since BC aerosol at the Orogrande site is a product of long-range atmospheric transport, a back trajectory analysis of air masses was conducted. Back trajectory analyses indicate that air masses traversing high population

  3. Light absorption of brown carbon aerosol in the PRD region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.-F.; Huang, X.-F.; Cao, L.-M.; Cui, J.; Zhu, Q.; Huang, C.-N.; Lan, Z.-J.; He, L.-Y.

    2015-10-01

    The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol is regarded to influence aerosol's radiative forcing significantly. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) method was widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of BrC at shorter wavelengths for ambient aerosol, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of "pure" black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to 1.0. In this study, the previous AAE method was improved by statistical analysis and applied in both urban and rural environments in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. A three-wavelength photo-acoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the measured AAE and the relative abundance of organic aerosol to BC. The regression and extrapolation analysis revealed that the more realistic AAE values for "pure" BC aerosol were 0.86, 0.82, and 1.02 at 405 nm, and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 at 532 nm, in the campaigns of urban_winter, urban_fall, and rural_fall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiments were also conducted, and the results further supported the representativeness of the obtained AAE values for "pure" BC aerosol in the urban environments. Finally, the average aerosol light absorption contribution of BrC was quantified to be 11.7, 6.3, and 12.1 % (with relative uncertainties of 4, 4, and 7 %) at 405 nm, and 10.0, 4.1, and 5.5 % (with relative uncertainties of 2, 2, and 5 %) at 532 nm, in the campaigns of urban_winter, urban_fall, and rural_fall, respectively. The relatively higher BrC absorption contribution at 405 nm in the rural_fall campaign was likely a result of the biomass burning events nearby, which was supported by the biomass burning simulation experiments performed in this study. The results of this paper indicate that the brown carbon contribution to aerosol light absorption at shorter wavelengths is not negligible in the highly urbanized and industrialized PRD region.

  4. Seasonal Variability of the Black Carbon Size Distribution in the Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V. S.; Shmargunov, V. P.; Panchenko, M. V.; Chernov, D. G.; Kozlov, A. S.; Malyshkin, S. B.

    2016-04-01

    Round-the-clock measurements of the black carbon size distribution in the submicron near-ground aerosol of Western Siberia performed in 2014 by the diffusion method developed by the authors are analyzed. It is revealed that the tendency for decreasing the volume median diameter and the amplitude of distribution of the black carbon is traced in the seasonal dynamics of the average monthly black carbon particle size distribution (approximated by a single-mode lognormal function) during winter-to-summer season transition. The shape of the black carbon size distributions is in agreement with measurements by other well-known methods in different geographic regions.

  5. Relative Content of Black Carbon in Submicron Aerosol as a Sign of the Effect of Forest Fire Smokes

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Yauscheva, E.P.

    2005-03-18

    Biomass burning occurs often in regions containing vast forest tracts and peat-bogs. These processes are accompanied by the emission of a large amount of aerosol particles and crystal carbon (black carbon [BC], soot). BC is the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, which impacts climate. (Jacobson 2001; Rozenberg 1982). In this paper, we analyze the results of laboratory and field investigations that focused on the relative content of BC in aerosol particles. Main attention is given to the study of possibility using this parameter as an informative sign for estimating the effect of remote forest fire smokes on the near-ground aerosol composition.

  6. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON): overview and update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, David; Wennberg, Paul; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) is a network of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometers that record direct solar absorption spectra of the atmosphere in the near-infrared. From these spectra, accurate and precise column-averaged abundances of atmospheric constituents including CO2, CH4, N2O, HF, CO, H2O, and HDO, are retrieved. TCCON measurements are linked to WMO calibration scales by comparisons with co-incident in situ profiles measured from aircraft. For CO2, TCCON achieves 1-sigma precision of typically 0.2 ppm for single measurements, and a network wide comparability of better than 0.1 In this paper we present an overview and the current status of the network, ongoing efforts to improve network coverage, precision and accuracy, and examples of TCCON data and their application. Further information about TCCON and a full list of sites and TCCON partners is available from the TCCON wiki, https://tccon-wiki.caltech.edu/ and Wunch et al. (2011). Wunch, D., G.C. Toon, J.-F. Blavier, R. Washenfelder, J. Notholt, B. Connor, D.W.T. Griffith and P.O. Wennberg, The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A 2011. 369: p. 2087-2112.

  7. Sensitivity of Stratospheric Geoengineering with Black Carbon to Aerosol Size and Altitude of Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan; Shindell, Drew T.; Miller, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon (BC) aerosols using a general circulation model with fixed sea surface temperatures show that the climate effects strongly depend on aerosol size and altitude of injection. 1 Tg BC/a injected into the lower stratosphere would cause little surface cooling for large radii but a large amount of surface cooling for small radii and stratospheric warming of over 60 C. With the exception of small particles, increasing the altitude of injection increases surface cooling and stratospheric warming. Stratospheric warming causes global ozone loss by up to 50% in the small radius case. The Antarctic shows less ozone loss due to reduction of polar stratospheric clouds, but strong circumpolar winds would enhance the Arctic ozone hole. Using diesel fuel to produce the aerosols is likely prohibitively expensive and infeasible. Although studying an absorbing aerosol is a useful counterpart to previous studies involving sulfate aerosols, black carbon geoengineering likely carries too many risks to make it a viable option for deployment.

  8. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    A great deal of attention has been paid to brown carbon aerosol in the troposphere because it can both scatter and absorb solar radiation, thus affecting the Earth's climate. However, knowledge of the optical and chemical properties of brown carbon aerosol is still limited. In this study, we have investigated different aspects of the optical properties of brown carbon aerosol that have not been previously explored. These properties include extinction spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region and light scattering at two different visible wavelengths, 532 and 402 nm. A proxy for atmospheric brown carbon aerosol was formed from the aqueous reaction of ammonium sulfate with methylglyoxal. The different optical properties were measured as a function of reaction time for a period of up to 19 days. UV/vis absorption experiments of bulk solutions showed that the optical absorption of aqueous brown carbon solution significantly increases as a function of reaction time in the spectral range from 200 to 700 nm. The analysis of the light scattering data, however, showed no significant differences between ammonium sulfate and brown carbon aerosol particles in the measured scattering phase functions, linear polarization profiles, or the derived real parts of the refractive indices at either 532 or 402 nm, even for the longest reaction times with greatest visible extinction. The light scattering experiments are relatively insensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index, and it was only possible to place an upper limit of k ≤ 0.01 on the imaginary index values. These results suggest that after the reaction with methylglyoxal the single scattering albedo of ammonium sulfate aerosol is significantly reduced but that the light scattering properties including the scattering asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the relative amount of forward-to-backward scattering, remain essentially unchanged from that of unprocessed ammonium sulfate. The optical extinction properties

  9. Is the radiative forcing due to black carbon aerosols as large as some recent studies suggest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, O.; Wang, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Tao, S.; Myhre, G.; Valari, M.; Huneeus, N.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic black carbon aerosols is responsible for a radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions (RFari), aerosol-cloud interactions (RFaci) and aerosol-snow interactions (RFasi). All estimates are very uncertain but some recent studies (e.g. Chung et al., 2012; Bond et al., 2013) have suggested that global models significantly underestimate aerosol absorption and have applied scaling factors to correct for this underestimation. As a result Bond et al. estimate RFari to be +0.5 (+0.1 to +0.9) Wm-2 for fossil fuel and biofuel only. The fifth assessment report adopted an estimate of +0.4 (+0.05 to +0.8) Wm-2. In this presentation we will show that a number of factors are likely to lead to overestimate the discrepancy in aerosol absorption between observations and models, which questions the need for very large scaling factors to reconcile models with observations. Issues with past methodological include a too small correction for NO2 absorption in AERONET retrievals of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) at 440 nm, representativity errors when comparing outputs from global models with AERONET retrievals, and model biases in aerosol vertical profiles. We will show in particular how a new emission inventory and high-resolution aerosol modelling over Asia can resolve a significant fraction of the discrepancy with observations. Bond, T. C., et al., 2013: Bounding the role of black carbon in the climate system: A scientific assessment. Journal of Geophysical Research, 118, 5380-5552, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50171. Chung, C. E., V. Ramanathan, and D. Decremer, 2012: Observationally constrained estimates of carbonaceous aerosol radiative forcing. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109, 11624-11629 Geographic distributions of BC emission density (A, MACCity; B, PKU-BC), modeled surface BC concentrations (C, by MACCity/INCA; D, by PKU-BC/INCA-zA), and modeled BC AAOD (E, by MACCity/INCA; F, by PKU-BC/INCA-zA). The

  10. Certain Results of Measurements of Characteristics of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer and Total Ozone Content at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey; Bazhenov, Oleg; Burlakov, Vladimir; Dolgii, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5°N, 85.0°E). The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO) content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data for the period 1979-1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk aftera series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, we record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  11. Application and further development of an analytical method for the determination of biogenic total-non methane organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnery, Julia; Dindorf, Tamara; Kesselmeier, Juergen

    2010-05-01

    Most of the organic carbon which is present in the atmosphere is found as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A known dominant source for these volatile organic compounds is the biosphere. Approximately 1.1 Gt of carbon is emitted from biogenic sources every year on a global scale. In comparison only app. 0.15 Gt are emitted from anthropogenic sources. The emission of VOCs has a high influence on the chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere as they contribute to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA). One major limitation in advancing the understanding of this ozone and aerosol generation is the technical ability to accurately measure these volatile organics. Previous studies focused on the detection of a defined set of NMOC (non-methane organic carbon) compounds. However, the integration of these single compound measurements to the sum of organic carbon might only represent a lower limit of atmospheric carbon concentrations, since none of these methods is able to analyze all organic compounds present in the atmosphere as a whole. A few studies are known that report on total NMOC concentration measurements in ambient air but measurements of the total NMOC exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere are missing. The analysis of the total NMOC concentrations is realized by collecting these compounds on a solid adsorbent material. Due to the special characteristics of the utilized adsorbents a separation of the stable gases CO, CO2 and CH4 from the volatile NMOC fraction is achieved. By subsequent heating of the NMOC adsorbent trap the volatiles are desorbed and converted to CO2 in an oxidation unit. The CO2 is collected on a second preconcentration unit followed by thermal desorption and is detected by an infrared gas analyzer. The system was tested with a set of single calibrated VOC species from permeation devices and compared with a data set obtained under field conditions.

  12. Lung retention and binding of (/sup 14/C)-1-nitropyrene when inhaled by F344 rats as a pure aerosol or adsorbed to carbon black particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, R.K.; Sun, J.D.; Barr, E.B.; Rothenberg, S.J.; Yeh, H.C.

    1989-01-01

    1-Nitropyrene (NP), as found in the environment, is more typically associated with carbonaceous particles than found as an aerosol of the pure compound. To determine whether (and why) an association with particles resulted in prolonged lung retention of NP, rats were exposed to 14C-NP as a pure aerosol or adsorbed on carbon black particles. Total 14C retained in the lung was greater at all times from 0.5 h to 30 d after exposure to 14C-NP adsorbed to carbon black particles than after exposure to pure 14C-NP (p less than .05). The fraction of total 14C in lung bound to carbon black particles decreased steadily with time after exposure, indicating in vivo removal of NP from the particles. At 0.5 h after exposure, the fraction of the estimated deposited 14C that was covalently bound to lung macromolecules was twofold greater for NP adsorbed on carbon black than for pure NP. Covalently bound 14C in lungs increased with time after exposure to 14C-NP adsorbed to carbon black, reaching levels of approximately 1% of the deposited radioactivity at 7-30 d after exposure, whereas levels of covalently bound 14C declined with time after exposure to pure NP. Thus, at 30 d after exposure, the amount of 14C covalently bound to lung macromolecules was approximately 10-fold greater (p less than .05) in rats that inhaled 14C-NP adsorbed on carbon black particles than in rats that inhaled pure 14C-NP aerosols. These results suggest that association of NP with carbon black particles augments the interaction of reactive metabolites of NP with target macromolecules. This phenomenon is thought to be related to the slow release of NP from carbon black particles, and may augment the biological effects of inhaled NP when adsorbed on carbon black or similar particles in the environment.

  13. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  14. Functional characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon of size-fractionated aerosol in the southern Mississippi Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalbot, M.-C. G.; Brown, J.; Chitranshi, P.; Gamboa da Costa, G.; Pollock, E. D.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2014-06-01

    The chemical content of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a function of particle size was characterized in Little Rock, Arkansas in winter and spring 2013. The objectives of this study were to (i) compare the functional characteristics of coarse, fine and ultrafine WSOC and (ii) reconcile the sources of WSOC for periods when carbonaceous aerosol was the most abundant particulate component. The WSOC accounted for 5% of particle mass for particles with dp > 0.96 μm and 10% of particle mass for particles with dp < 0.96 μm. Non-exchangeable aliphatic (H-C), unsaturated aliphatic (H-C-C=), oxygenated saturated aliphatic (H-C-O), acetalic (O-CH-O) and aromatic (Ar-H) protons were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations varied from 4.1 ± 0.1 nmol m-3 for particles with 1.5 < dp < 3.0 μm to 73.9 ± 12.3 nmol m-3 for particles with dp < 0.49 μm. The molar H / C ratios varied from 0.48 ± 0.05 to 0.92 ± 0.09, which were comparable to those observed for combustion-related organic aerosol. The R-H was the most abundant group, representing about 45% of measured total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations, followed by H-C-O (27%) and H-C-C= (26%). Levoglucosan, amines, ammonium and methanesulfonate were identified in NMR fingerprints of fine particles. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, formate and acetate were associated with coarse particles. These qualitative differences of 1H-NMR profiles for different particle sizes indicated the possible contribution of biological aerosols and a mixture of aliphatic and oxygenated compounds from biomass burning and traffic exhausts. The concurrent presence of ammonium and amines also suggested the presence of ammonium/aminium nitrate and sulfate secondary aerosol. The size-dependent origin of WSOC was further corroborated by the increasing δ13C abundance from -26.81 ± 0.18‰ for the smallest particles to -25.93 ± 0.31‰ for the largest

  15. Functional characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon of size fractionated aerosol in the Southern Mississippi Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalbot, M.-C. G.; Brown, J.; Chitranshi, P.; Gamboa da Costa, G.; Pollock, E. D.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2014-02-01

    The chemical content of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a function of particle size was characterized in Little Rock, Arkansas in winter and spring 2013. The objectives of this study were to: (i) compare the functional characteristics of coarse, fine and ultrafine WSOC and (ii) reconcile the sources of WSOC for the period when carbonaceous aerosol was the most abundant particulate component. The WSOC accounted for 5% of particle mass for particles with dp > 0.96 μm and 10% of particle mass for particles with dp < 0.96 μm. Non-exchangeable aliphatic (H-C), unsaturated aliphatic (H-C-C=), oxygenated saturated aliphatic (H-C-O), acetalic (O-CH-O) and aromatic (Ar-H) protons were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations varied from 4.1 ± 0.1 nmol m-3 for particles with 0.96 < dp < 1.5 μm to 73.9 ± 12.3 nmol m-3 for particles with dp < 0.49 μm, resulting in molar H / C ratios of 0.48 ± 0.05 to 0.92 ± 0.09 observed in combustion-related organic aerosol. The R-H was the most abundant group representing about 45% of measured total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentration followed by H-C-O (27%) and H-C-C= (26%). Levoglucosan, amines, ammonium and methanosulfonate were tentatively identified in NMR fingerprints of fine particles. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, formate and acetate were associated with coarse particles. These qualitative differences of 1H-NMR profiles for different particle sizes indicated the possible contribution of biological aerosol and a mixture of aliphatic and oxygenated compounds from biomass burning and traffic exhausts. The concurrent presence of ammonium and amines also suggested the presence of ammonium/aminium nitrate and sulfate secondary aerosol. The size-dependent origin of WSOC was further corroborated by the increasing δ13C abundance from -26.81 ± 0.18‰ for the smallest particles to -25.93 ± 0.31‰ for the largest particles and the relative

  16. Ambient aerosol and its carbon content in Gainesville, a mid-scale city in Florida.

    PubMed

    Chuaybamroong, Paradee; Cayse, Kimberleigh; Wu, Chang-Yu; Lundgren, Dale A

    2007-05-01

    Ambient aerosols were collected during 2000-2001 in Gainesville, Florida, using a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to study mass size distribution and carbon composition. A bimodal mass distribution was found in every sample with major peaks for aerosols ranging from 0.32 to 0.56 microm, and 3.2 to 5.6 microm in diameter. The two distributions represent the fine mode (<2.5 microm) and the coarse mode (>2.5 microm) of particle size. Averaged over all sites and seasons, coarse particles consisted of 15% carbon while fine particles consisted of 22% carbon. Considerable variation was noted between winter and summer seasons. Smoke from fireplaces in winter appeared to be an important factor for the carbon, especially the elemental carbon contribution. In summer, organic carbon was more abundant. The maximum secondary organic carbon was also found in this season (7.0 microg m(-3)), and the concentration is between those observed in urban areas (15-20 microg m(-3)) and in rural areas (4-5 microg m(-3)). However, unlike in large cities where photochemical activity of anthropogenic emissions are determinants of carbon composition, biogenic sources were likely the key factor in Gainesville. Other critical factors that affect the distribution, shape and concentration were precipitation, brushfire and wind. PMID:17160439

  17. Space Station Freedom Water Recovery test total organic carbon accountability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Michael W.; Slivon, Laurence; Sheldon, Linda; Traweek, Mary

    1991-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Water Recovery Test (WRT) addresses the concept of integrated hygiene and potable reuse water recovery systems baselined for Space Station Freedom (SSF). To assess the adequacy of water recovery system designs and the conformance of reclaimed water quality to established specifications, MSFC has initiated an extensive water characterization program. MSFC's goal is to quantitatively account for a large percentage of organic compounds present in waste and reclaimed hygiene and potable waters from the WRT and in humidity condensate from Spacelab missions. The program is coordinated into Phase A and B. Phase A's focus is qualitative and semi-quantitative. Precise quantitative analyses are not emphasized. Phase B's focus centers on a near complete quantitative characterization of all water types. Technical approaches along with Phase A and partial Phase B investigations on the compositional analysis of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Accountability are presented.

  18. Maximum total organic carbon limit for DWPF melter feed

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.

    1995-03-13

    DWPF recently decided to control the potential flammability of melter off-gas by limiting the total carbon content in the melter feed and maintaining adequate conditions for combustion in the melter plenum. With this new strategy, all the LFL analyzers and associated interlocks and alarms were removed from both the primary and backup melter off-gas systems. Subsequently, D. Iverson of DWPF- T{ampersand}E requested that SRTC determine the maximum allowable total organic carbon (TOC) content in the melter feed which can be implemented as part of the Process Requirements for melter feed preparation (PR-S04). The maximum TOC limit thus determined in this study was about 24,000 ppm on an aqueous slurry basis. At the TOC levels below this, the peak concentration of combustible components in the quenched off-gas will not exceed 60 percent of the LFL during off-gas surges of magnitudes up to three times nominal, provided that the melter plenum temperature and the air purge rate to the BUFC are monitored and controlled above 650 degrees C and 220 lb/hr, respectively. Appropriate interlocks should discontinue the feeding when one or both of these conditions are not met. Both the magnitude and duration of an off-gas surge have a major impact on the maximum TOC limit, since they directly affect the melter plenum temperature and combustion. Although the data obtained during recent DWPF melter startup tests showed that the peak magnitude of a surge can be greater than three times nominal, the observed duration was considerably shorter, on the order of several seconds. The long surge duration assumed in this study has a greater impact on the plenum temperature than the peak magnitude, thus making the maximum TOC estimate conservative. Two models were used to make the necessary calculations to determine the TOC limit.

  19. Diurnal variations of carbonaceous components, major ions, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in suburban aerosols from northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nannan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    We report diurnal variations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and major ions as well as stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in ambient aerosols at a suburban site (Mangshan), 40 km north of Beijing, China. We found that aerosol chemical compositions were largely controlled by the air mass transport from Beijing in daytime with southerly winds and by relatively fresh air mass in nighttime from the northern forest areas with northerly winds. Higher concentrations of aerosol mass and total carbon were obtained in daytime. Further, higher OC/EC ratios were recorded in daytime (4.0 ± 1.7) than nighttime (3.2 ± 0.7), suggesting that OC is formed by photochemical oxidation of gaseous precursors in daytime. Contributions of WSOC to OC were slightly higher in daytime (38%) than nighttime (34%), possibly due to secondary formation of WSOC in daytime. We also found higher concentrations of Ca2+ in daytime, which was originated from the construction dust in Beijing area and transported to the sampling site. δ13C ranged from -25.3 to -21.2‰ (ave. -23.5 ± 0.9‰) in daytime and -29.0 to -21.4‰ (-24.0 ± 1.5‰) in nighttime, suggesting that Mangshan aerosols were more influenced by fossil fuel combustion products in daytime and by terrestrial C3 plants in nighttime. This study suggests that daytime air mass delivery from megacity Beijing largely influence the air quality at the receptor site in the north together with photochemical processing of organic aerosols during the atmospheric transport, whereas the Mangshan site is covered with relatively clean air masses at night.

  20. Diurnal variations of carbonaceous components, major ions, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in suburban aerosols from northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nannan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    We report diurnal variations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and major ions as well as stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in ambient aerosols at a suburban site (Mangshan), 40 km north of Beijing, China. We found that aerosol chemical compositions were largely controlled by the air mass transport from Beijing in daytime with southerly winds and by relatively fresh air mass in nighttime from the northern forest areas with northerly winds. Higher concentrations of aerosol mass and total carbon were obtained in daytime. Further, higher OC/EC ratios were recorded in daytime (4.0 ± 1.7) than nighttime (3.2 ± 0.7), suggesting that OC is formed by photochemical oxidation of gaseous precursors in daytime. Contributions of WSOC to OC were slightly higher in daytime (38%) than nighttime (34%), possibly due to secondary formation of WSOC in daytime. We also found higher concentrations of Ca2+ in daytime, which was originated from the construction dust in Beijing area and transported to the sampling site. δ13C ranged from -25.3 to -21.2‰ (ave. -23.5 ± 0.9‰) in daytime and -29.0 to -21.4‰ (-24.0 ± 1.5‰) in nighttime, suggesting that Mangshan aerosols were more influenced by fossil fuel combustion products in daytime and by terrestrial C3 plants in nighttime. This study suggests that daytime air mass delivery from megacity Beijing largely influence the air quality at the receptor site in the north together with photochemical processing of organic aerosols during the atmospheric transport, whereas the Mangshan site is covered with relatively clean air masses at night.

  1. Long-term trends of aerosol carbon and nitrogen, their stable isotopic compositions, and water-soluble organic carbon in the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, K.; Tachibana, E.; Umomoto, N.

    2009-12-01

    The western North Pacific is an outflow region of Asian dusts and pollutants. A rapid industrial development in China and East Asian countries for last two decades may have seriously altered the air quality of the North Pacific. However, long-term changes of atmospheric composition have not been studied in this region. To better understand long-term atmospheric changes in the western North Pacific, we collected marine aerosols on weekly basis in 2001-2009 at a remote island, Chichijima (27°04'E; 142°13'N) using high volume air sampler and pre-combusted quartz filter. The island is located in the boundary of westerly (winter and spring) and trade wind (summer and autumn) regimes. Here, the aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN) and their stable isotopic compositions as well as water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Concentrations of aerosol TC and TN were in a range of 0.21-4.58 (average 1.07) ug/m3 and 0.01-3.43 (av. 0.29) ng/m3. These values are ca. 20 times lower than the concentrations in urban Tokyo. C/N weight ratios ranged from 0.50 to 41 (av. 6.6) with summer maxima. Both TC and TN showed a gradual increase with winter/spring maxima probably due to the enhanced anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer usage in East Asia. On the other hand, stable carbon isotopic ratios (d13C) of TC ranged from -27.3 to -15.1‰; however, no systematic trend was detected. Nitrogen isotopic ratios of TN (d15N) ranged from +1.56 to +25.2‰ with lower values in winter and higher values in summer. Interestingly, d15N values showed a long-term trend of increase by 4‰ from 2001 to 2009. This may be caused by an increased emission of nitrogen species (NH3, NOx) from biomass burning sources in East Asia and other regions. WSOC (0.05-2.46 ug/m3, av. 0.40 ug/m3) also showed a long-term increase probably due to the increased emissions of organic aerosols and their precursors and subsequent oxidations in the atmosphere

  2. Titan Aerosol Formation as a Sink for Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Sebree, Joshua A.; Gautier, Thomas J.; Fuentes, Javier A.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Mandt, Kathleen E.

    2015-11-01

    Stable isotope ratios of major elements can be used to infer much about local- and global-scale processes on a planet. On Titan, aerosol production is a significant sink of carbon and nitrogen in the atmosphere, and isotopic fractionation of these elements may be introduced during the advanced organic chemistry that leads to the condensed phase products. Several stable isotope pairs, including 12C/13C and 14N/15N, have been measured in situ or probed spectroscopically by Cassini-borne instruments, space telescopes, or through ground-based observations. However, the effect of a potentially critical pathway for isotopic fractionation - organic aerosol formation and subsequent deposition onto the surface of Titan - has not been considered due to insufficient data regarding fractionation during aerosol formation. To better understand the nature of this process, we have measured the isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of Titan aerosol analogs via far-UV irradiation of several methane (CH4) and nitrogen (N2) mixtures.Our initial results probed the fractionation of the aerosol product, relative to the reactant gases, as a function of CH4 abundance [1]. Our results show that the direction of carbon isotope fractionation during aerosol formation is in contrast to the expected result if the source of the fractionation is a kinetic isotope effect. The resultant fractionation in nitrogen favored the light (14N) isotope in the aerosol, with N/C ratios varying from 0.13 - 0.31. Ongoing work includes probing the effects of pressure and temperature on the direction and magnitude of the stable isotope fractionation. We will present results alongside interpretation of the driving processes, as well as implications for Titan if similar fractionation occurred during aerosol formation in the atmosphere.[1] Sebree, J.A., Stern, J.C., Mandt, K.E., Domagal-Goldman, S.D., and Trainer, M.G.: 13C and 15N Fractionation of CH4/N2 Mixtures during Photochemical Aerosol Formation

  3. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy for Total Carbon Analysis of Hawaiian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, M. L.; Bruland, G. L.; Deenik, J. L.; Grunwald, S.; Uchida, R.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate assessment of total carbon (Ct) content is important for fertility and nutrient management of soils, as well as for carbon sequestration studies. The non-destructive analysis of soils by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a potential supplement or alternative to the traditional time-consuming and costly combustion method of Ct analysis, especially in spatial or temporal studies where sample numbers are large. We investigate the use of the visible to near-infrared (VNIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of soils coupled with chemometric analysis to determine their Ct content. Our specific focus is on Hawaiian soils of agricultural importance. Though this technique has been introduced to the soil community, it has yet to be fully tested and used in practical applications for all soil types, and this is especially true for Hawaii. In short, DRS characterizes and differentiates materials based on the variation of the light reflected by a material at certain wavelengths. This spectrum is dependent on the material’s composition, structure, and physical state. Multivariate chemometric analysis unravels the information in a set of spectra that can help predict a property such as Ct. This study benefits from the remarkably diverse soils of Hawaii. Our sample set includes 216 soil samples from 145 pedons from the main Hawaiian Islands archived at the National Soil Survey Center in Lincoln, NE, along with more than 50 newly-collected samples from Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, and Maui. In total, over 90 series from 10 of the 12 soil orders are represented. The Ct values of these samples range from < 1% - 55%. We anticipate that the diverse nature of our sample set will ensure a model with applicability to a wide variety of soils, both in Hawaii and globally. We have measured the VNIR and MIR spectra of these samples and obtained their Ct values by dry combustion. Our initial analyses are conducted using only samples obtained from the Lincoln archive. In this

  4. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent N.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-01-01

    The carbon emissions inventories used to initialize transport models and general circulation models are highly parameterized, and created on the basis of multiple sparse datasets (such as fuel use inventories and emission factors). The resulting inventories are uncertain by at least a factor of 2, and this uncertainty is carried forward to the model output. [Bond et al., 1998, Bond et al., 2004, Cooke et al., 1999, Streets et al., 2001] Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output on a continuous basis.

  5. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of black carbon (BC) in PM 10 aerosols from residential area of suburban Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Masao; Kumata, Hidetoshi; Koike, Yasuyo; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Uchida, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Kitao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    The AMS technique was applied to analyse black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), and previously reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 aerosols from a residential area, suburban Tokyo, to determine natural abundance of radiocarbon ( 14C), an ideal tracer to distinguish fossil fuel ( 14C-free) from modern biomass combustion sources of pyrolytic products. The 14C concentrations in BC, isolated using the CTO-375 method, were 42% and 30% pMC (in terms of percent Modern Carbon: pMC) in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C concentrations in BC were also compared with those of compound-class specific 14C content of PAHs previously reported for the same samples: they were 45% and 33% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C signals of BC were identical to those of high molecular weight (MW ⩾ 226, 5-6 rings) PAHs. The resemblance between 14C signals of BC and PAHs can be referred as a 'certificate' for the validity of the BC isolation method employed in this study. Also, it suggests that 14C-BC approach can be a surrogate for PAHs specific 14C analyses to monitor seasonal source variation of combustion-derived pyrolytic products. On the other hand, 14C contents of total organic carbon in 2004 were 61% and 42% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. This is likely attributed to higher contribution of plant activity in summer.

  6. Carbon and Aerosol Emissions from Biomass Fires in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, W. M.; Flores Garnica, G.; Baker, S. P.; Urbanski, S. P.

    2009-12-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of many atmospheric greenhouse gases and photochemically reactive trace gases. There are limited data available on the spatial and temporal extent of biomass fires and associated trace gas and aerosol emissions in Mexico. Biomass burning is a unique source of these gases and aerosols, in comparison to industrial and biogenic sources, because the locations of fires vary considerably both daily and seasonally and depend on human activities and meteorological conditions. In Mexico, the fire season starts in January and about two-thirds of the fires occur in April and May. The amount of trace gases and aerosols emitted by fires spatially and temporally is a major uncertainty in quantifying the impact of fire emissions on regional atmospheric chemical composition. To quantify emissions, it is necessary to know the type of vegetation, the burned area, the amount of biomass burned, and the emission factor of each compound for each ecosystem. In this study biomass burning experiments were conducted in Mexico to measure trace gas emissions from 24 experimental fires and wildfires in semiarid, temperate, and tropical ecosystems from 2005 to 2007. A range of representative vegetation types were selected for ground-based experimental burns to characterize fire emissions from representative Mexico fuels. A third of the country was surveyed each year, beginning in the north. The fire experiments in the first year were conducted in Chihuahua, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas states in pine forest, oak forest, grass, and chaparral. The second-year fire experiments were conducted on pine forest, oak forest, shrub, agricultural, grass, and herbaceous fuels in Jalisco, Puebla, and Oaxaca states in central Mexico. The third-year experiments were conducted in pine-oak forests of Chiapas, coastal grass, and low subtropical forest on the Yucatan peninsula. FASS (Fire Atmosphere Sampling System) towers were deployed for the experimental fires. Each FASS

  7. Development and application of a dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler for HDI-derived total reactive isocyanate group.

    PubMed

    Rando, R J; Poovey, H G

    1999-01-01

    A dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler was developed for measurement of HDI (1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate)-derived total reactive isocyanate group (TRIG). The sampler consisted of an impactor or cyclone inlet, followed by an annular diffusional denuder, and a glass-fiber filter backup. The denuder walls and backup filter were each coated with 20 mg tributylphosphate and 1 mg MAMA reagent (9-N-methylamino-methylanthracene). After collection, MAMA-derivatized isocyanates were desorbed from the sampler and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with dual-wavelength ultraviolet absorbance and fluorescence detection. Test atmospheres of HDI vapor and of HDI/HDI-biuret aerosols were generated in the laboratory and sampled with the optimized dichotomous sampler. Vapor phase HDI was completely collected by the diffusional denuder. When a mixture of HDI-biuret and HDI (approximately 30 ppb) was nebulized and collected with the dichotomous sampler, approximately 78% of the HDI was in the vapor phase, whereas about 22% was associated with the aerosol fraction. The dichotomous sampler was then used to measure vapor and condensed phase TRIG in a paint spray booth during application of a polyurethane paint. Measured levels of TRIG during the spraying operation averaged 391 +/- 154 micrograms/m3. Concentrations of HDI monomer averaged only 14 +/- 6.5 micrograms/m3. HDI-biuret was the largest component of TRIG found in these samples and was completely in the condensed aerosol phase. In contrast, the majority of the HDI was in the vapor phase, but significant (15-26%) amounts were measured in the aerosol fraction of the paint overspray. Thus, significant partitioning of HDI between vapor and condensed phases was demonstrated in both the laboratory and field, even when its concentration was well below the vapor saturation point. PMID:10635539

  8. Fossil and Nonfossil Sources of Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosols in the Outflow from Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Agrios, Konstantinos; Lee, Meehye; Salazar, Gary; Szidat, Sönke

    2016-06-21

    Source quantification of carbonaceous aerosols in the Chinese outflow regions still remains uncertain despite their high mass concentrations. Here, we unambiguously quantified fossil and nonfossil contributions to elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) of total suspended particles (TSP) from a regional receptor site in the outflow of Northeast China using radiocarbon measurement. OC and EC concentrations were lower in summer, representing mainly marine air, than in other seasons, when air masses mostly traveled over continental regions in Mongolia and northeast China. The annual-mean contribution from fossil-fuel combustion to EC was 76 ± 11% (0.1-1.3 μg m(-3)). The remaining 24 ± 11% (0.03-0.42 μg m(-3)) was attributed to biomass burning, with slightly higher contribution in the cold period (∼31%) compared to the warm period (∼21%) because of enhanced emissions from regional biomass combustion sources in China. OC was generally dominated by nonfossil sources, with an annual average of 66 ± 11% (0.5-2.8 μg m(-3)), approximately half of which was apportioned to primary biomass-burning sources (34 ± 6%). In winter, OC almost equally originated from primary OC (POC) emissions and secondary OC (SOC) formation from fossil fuel and biomass-burning sources. In contrast, summertime OC was dominated by primary biogenic emissions as well as secondary production from biogenic and biomass-burning sources, but fossil-derived SOC was the smallest contributor. Distinction of POC and SOC was performed using primary POC-to-EC emission ratios separated for fossil and nonfossil emissions. PMID:27203471

  9. Brown carbon aerosol in the North American continental troposphere: sources, abundance, and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Scheuer, E.; Dibb, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Ziemba, L. D.; Thornhill, K. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Devi, J. J.; Bergin, M.; Perring, A. E.; Markovic, M. Z.; Schwarz, J. P.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    Chemical components of organic aerosol (OA) selectively absorb light at short wavelengths. In this study, the prevalence, sources, and optical importance of this so-called brown carbon (BrC) aerosol component are investigated throughout the North American continental tropospheric column during a summer of extensive biomass burning. Spectrophotometric absorption measurements on extracts of bulk aerosol samples collected from an aircraft over the central USA were analyzed to directly quantify BrC abundance. BrC was found to be prevalent throughout the 1 to 12 km altitude measurement range, with dramatic enhancements in biomass-burning plumes. BrC to black carbon (BC) ratios, under background tropospheric conditions, increased with altitude, consistent with a corresponding increase in the absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) determined from a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP). The sum of inferred BC absorption and measured BrC absorption at 365 nm was within 3 % of the measured PSAP absorption for background conditions and 22 % for biomass burning. A radiative transfer model showed that BrC absorption reduced top-of-atmosphere (TOA) aerosol forcing by ~ 20 % in the background troposphere. Extensive radiative model simulations applying this study background tropospheric conditions provided a look-up chart for determining radiative forcing efficiencies of BrC as a function of a surface-measured BrC : BC ratio and single scattering albedo (SSA). The chart is a first attempt to provide a tool for better assessment of brown carbon's forcing effect when one is limited to only surface data. These results indicate that BrC is an important contributor to direct aerosol radiative forcing.

  10. Atmospheric abundances of black carbon aerosols and their radiative impact over an urban and a rural site in SW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, M. P.; Safai, P. D.; Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Naidu, C. V.; Rao, P. S. P.; Pandithurai, G.

    2016-01-01

    Observations on black carbon (BC) aerosols over an urban site (Pune) and a rural, high altitude site (Sinhagad) during summer and winter seasons over the period of 2009-2013 are reported. Apart from the temporal variation of BC over both the sites, its mass fraction to total suspended particulates (TSP) is studied. Finally, using the chemical composition of TSP and BC in the OPAC model, season-wise optical properties of aerosols are obtained which are further used in the SBDART model to derive the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) at surface and top of the atmosphere and thereby the atmospheric forcing and heating rates in each season over both the sites. BC mass concentration and its mass fraction to TSP (Mf BC) were higher at Pune than at Sinhagad, indicating impact of more anthropogenic sources. At both the sites winter season witnessed higher BC concentrations than summer as well as higher Mf BC which is due to the prevailing favorable meteorological conditions in winter. Diurnal variation of BC showed different patterns at Pune and Sinhagad in terms of strength and occurrence of high and low values that could be attributed to varying local boundary layer conditions and source activities at both the sites. Negative ARF indicated cooling at top of the atmosphere and at surface leading to warming of the atmosphere at both the sites. However, surface cooling and atmospheric warming was more dominant at Pune leading to higher atmospheric heating rates, underlining the impact of absorbing BC aerosols which were about three times more at Pune than Sinhagad.

  11. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and its temperature-resolved carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosols in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Zhangwei; Ci, Zhijia

    2016-11-01

    Investigation of temperature-resolved carbon fractions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) can improve our understanding of the chemical properties, formation processes and sources of WSOC in aerosols. We developed a method that can examine different temperature-resolved carbon fractions of WSOC and used this method to characterize aerosol samples (n = 102) collected from an urban site in Beijing in 2010-2011. The aerosol composition data including inorganic ions, elements and temperature-resolved carbon fractions of WSOC were used as input of positive matrix factorization (PMF) model to investigate the sources of WSOC. The results showed that the mean concentrations of WSOC were 10.2 μg m- 3 with increased values in winter and decreased values in summer, while WSOC/OC ratios (mean: 51.7%) were higher in spring and summer than in fall and winter. The sampling artifacts of WSOC (18.2%) were higher than those of OC (13.4%). Though WSOC was significantly influenced by biomass burning in spring and winter, the strong correlations between WSOC and other secondary components suggested that WSOC was secondary in nature. Results of temperature-resolved carbon fractions of OC and WSOC showed that WSOC/OC ratios for different carbon fractions had the highest value of 0.92 and lowest value of 0.30. PMF analysis identified four factors, three of which were associated with three organic polar compounds groups (low, medium, and high molecular weight compounds) based on their thermal evolution features, and one of which was attributed to inorganic secondary formation processes. Annually, the contributions of four factors were 20.5%, 46.2%, 12.4% and 20.9%, respectively.

  12. Effect of aerosols on the estimation of total ozone in an atmospheric column from the measurements of its ultraviolet radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dave, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of estimating the total ozone amount of an atmospheric column in the presence of stratospheric and tropospheric aerosols is studied by means of simulated spectral measurements for the five-wavelength Nimbus 4 BUV configuration and the six-wavelength Nimbus G TOMS configuration, and by analyzing such measurements with appropriate total ozone estimation procedures. The simulated spectral measurements were generated for forty different atmospheric models arrived at by varying the total ozone content and various aerosol parameters. A total of ten different values of the solar zenith angle and eight different values of the Lambert reflectivity of the underlying surface were used. It was found that the values of total ozone in an atmospheric column estimated by the five-wavelength procedure can be in error by about + or -2% as a result of particulate contamination encountered in the terrestrial atmosphere under average conditions. Errors due to tropospheric particulate contamination can be reduced significantly by taking appropriate advantage of the additional spectral measurement offered by the Nimbus G TOMS instrument.

  13. Measuring the characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer and total ozone concentration at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey; Bazhenov, Oleg; Burlakov, Vladimir; Dolgii, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5 °N, 85.0 °E). The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO) content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of TOMS satellite data for the period 1979- 1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk after a series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, researchers record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  14. Size distribution, mixing state and source apportionments of black carbon aerosols in London during winter time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Coe, H.; Beddows, D.; Fleming, Z. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Harrison, R. M.; Lee, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Taylor, J. W.; Yin, J.; Williams, P. I.; Zotter, P.

    2014-06-01

    Black carbon aerosols (BC) at a London urban site were characterized in both winter and summer time 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) factors of organic aerosol mass spectra measured by a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) showed traffic-dominant sources in summer but in winter the influence of additional non-traffic sources became more important, mainly from solid fuel sources (SF). Measurements using a single particle soot photometer (SP2, DMT), showed the traffic-dominant BC exhibited an almost uniform BC core size (Dc) distribution with very thin coating thickness throughout the detectable range of Dc. However the size distribution of Dc (project average mass median Dc = 149 ± 22 nm in winter, and 120 ± 6 nm in summer) and BC coating thickness varied significantly in winter. A novel methodology was developed to attribute the BC number concentrations and mass abundances from traffic (BCtr) and from SF (BCsf), by using a 2-D histogram of the particle optical properties as a function of BC core size, as measured by the SP2. The BCtr and BCsf showed distinctly different Dc distributions and coating thicknesses, with BCsf displaying larger Dc and larger coating thickness compared to BCtr. BC particles from different sources were also apportioned by applying a multiple linear regression between the total BC mass and each AMS-PMF factor (BC-AMS-PMF method), and also attributed by applying the absorption spectral dependence of carbonaceous aerosols to 7-wavelength Aethalometer measurements (Aethalometer method). Air masses that originated from westerly (W), southeasterly (SE), or easterly (E) sectors showed BCsf fractions that ranged from low to high, and whose mass median Dc values were 137 ± 10 nm, 143 ± 11 nm, and 169 ± 29 nm respectively. The corresponding bulk relative coating thickness of BC (coated particle size / BC core - Dp / Dc) for these same sectors was 1.28 ± 0.07, 1.45 ± 0

  15. Size distribution, mixing state and source apportionment of black carbon aerosol in London during wintertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Coe, H.; Beddows, D.; Fleming, Z. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Harrison, R. M.; Lee, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Taylor, J. W.; Yin, J.; Williams, P. I.; Zotter, P.

    2014-09-01

    Black carbon aerosols (BC) at a London urban site were characterised in both winter- and summertime 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project. Positive matrix factorisation (PMF) factors of organic aerosol mass spectra measured by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) showed traffic-dominant sources in summer but in winter the influence of additional non-traffic sources became more important, mainly from solid fuel sources (SF). Measurements using a single particle soot photometer (SP2, DMT), showed the traffic-dominant BC exhibited an almost uniform BC core size (Dc) distribution with very thin coating thickness throughout the detectable range of Dc. However, the size distribution of sf (project average mass median Dc = 149 ± 22 nm in winter, and 120 ± 6 nm in summer) and BC coating thickness varied significantly in winter. A novel methodology was developed to attribute the BC number concentrations and mass abundances from traffic (BCtr) and from SF (BCsf), by using a 2-D histogram of the particle optical properties as a function of BC core size, as measured by the SP2. The BCtr and BCsf showed distinctly different sf distributions and coating thicknesses, with BCsf displaying larger Dc and larger coating thickness compared to BCtr. BC particles from different sources were also apportioned by applying a multiple linear regression between the total BC mass and each AMS-PMF factor (BC-AMS-PMF method), and also attributed by applying the absorption spectral dependence of carbonaceous aerosols to 7-wavelength Aethalometer measurements (Aethalometer method). Air masses that originated from westerly (W), southeasterly (SE), and easterly (E) sectors showed BCsf fractions that ranged from low to high, and whose mass median Dc values were 137 ± 10 nm, 143 ± 11 nm and 169 ± 29 nm, respectively. The corresponding bulk relative coating thickness of BC (coated particle size/BC core - Dp/Dc) for these same sectors was 1.28 ± 0.07, 1.45 ± 0

  16. Measurements of Black Carbon and aerosol absorption during global circumnavigation and Arctic campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Močnik, Griša; Drinovec, Luka; Vidmar, Primož; Lenarčič, Matevž

    2015-04-01

    During two flight campaigns: around the world (2012) and over the Arctic (2013) we demonstrated the feasibility of scientific research and aerial measurements of aerosolized Black Carbon with ultra-light aircraft. Conducted measurements provided first ever information on Black Carbon concentrations and sources over such a large area at altitude. Ground-level measurements of atmospheric aerosols are routinely performed around the world, but there exists very little data on their vertical and geographical distribution in the global atmosphere. These data is a crucial requirement for our understanding of the dispersion of pollutant species of anthropogenic origin, and their possible effects on radiative forcing, cloud condensation, and other phenomena which can contribute to adverse outcomes. Light absorbing carbonaceous aerosols and black carbon (BC) in particular are a unique tracer for combustion emissions, and can be detected rapidly and with great sensitivity by filter-based optical methods. A single-seat ultra-light aircraft flew around the world and on a Arctic expedition. The flights covered all seven continents; crossed all major oceans; and operated at altitudes around 3000 m ASL and up to 8900 m ASL. The aircraft carried a specially-developed high-sensitivity miniaturized dual-wavelength Aethalometer, which recorded BC concentrations with very high temporal resolution and sensitivity [1, 2]. We present examples of data from flight tracks over remote oceans, uninhabited land masses, and densely populated areas. Measuring the dependence of the aerosol absorption on the wavelength, we show that aerosols produced during biomass combustion can be transported to high altitude in high concentrations and we estimate the underestimation of the direct forcing by models assuming a simple linear relationship between BC concentration and forcing in comparison to observations [3,4]. 1. , Carbon Sampling Takes Flight, Science 2012, 335, 1286. 2. G. Močnik, L. Drinovec, M

  17. Total ozone column, water vapour and aerosol effects on erythemal and global solar irradiance in Marsaxlokk, Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; de Miguel, Argimiro

    2014-12-01

    Observations of erythemal (UVER; 280-400 nm) and total solar shortwave irradiance (SW; 305-2800 nm), total ozone column (TOC), water vapour column (w), aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (α) were carried out at Marsaxlokk, in south-east Malta. These measurements were recorded during a measurement campaign between May and October 2012, aimed at studying the influence of atmospheric compounds on solar radiation transfer through the atmosphere. The effects of TOC, AOD and w on UVER and SW (global, diffuse and direct) irradiance were quantified using irradiance values under cloud-free conditions at different fixed solar zenith angles (SZA). Results show that UVER (but not SW) irradiance correlates well with TOC. UVER variations ranged between -0.24% DU-1 and -0.32% DU-1 with all changes being statistically significant. Global SW irradiance varies with water vapour column between -2.44% cm-1 and -4.53% cm-1, these results proving statistically significant and diminishing when SZA increases. The irradiance variations range between 42.15% cm-1 and 20.30% cm-1 for diffuse SW when SZA varies between 20° and 70°. The effect of aerosols on global UVER is stronger than on global SW. Aerosols cause a UVER reduction of between 28.12% and 52.41% and a global SW reduction between 13.46% and 41.41% per AOD550 unit. Empirical results show that solar position plays a determinant role, that there is a negligible effect of ozone on SW radiation, and stronger attenuation by aerosol particles in UVER radiation.

  18. [Observational study of black carbon aerosol during straw-burning period].

    PubMed

    Wu, De-xia; Wei, Qing-nong; Wei, Jian-li; Liu, Shi-sheng; Feng, Wei-wei

    2008-12-01

    Black carbon aerosol (BC) has been measured at three sites in Hefei City during May and June, 2007. Analyzing these real-time BC data, the concentration characters and the sources of black carbon aerosol can be found. The average concentrations of BC in normal period and straw-burning period are 4.85 microg/m3 and 8.38 microg/m3, respectively. The significant difference shows that the straw-burning is one of the main sources. The correlation coefficients between daily average concentration of BC and PM10 is 0.74, while the values of BC/PM10 in normal period and straw-burning period are 4.7% and 7.9%, respectively. Through comparing to the BC concentration during straw-burning period in 2004, the results indicated that pollution of BC has reduced after straw-burning was forbidden by the government. PMID:19256359

  19. Development and application of an analytical method for the determination of total atmospheric biogenic non-methane organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnery, J.; Dindorf, T.; Hacker, L.; Andres, S.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the organic carbon which is present in the atmosphere is found as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dominantly emitted by the biosphere. This biogenic emission has a major impact on the chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere by contributing to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). One major limitation in advancing the understanding of this ozone and aerosol generation is the technical ability to accurately measure the sum of these volatile organics. Frequently used methods focus on the detection of a defined set of non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). However, adding these single compound concentrations might only represent a lower limit of atmospheric carbon concentrations, since no available method is able to analyze all organic compounds present in the atmosphere. A few studies are known that report on total NMOC concentration measurements in ambient air but measurements of the total NMOC exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere are missing. Therefore, we investigated the analysis of the total NMOC concentration by collecting these compounds on a solid adsorbent material for subsequent total carbon analysis. This first step is necessary to separate the stable gases CO, CO2 and CH4 from the volatile NMOC fraction. NMOC was desorbed and converted to CO2 by passing an oxidation unit. The CO2 is collected on a second preconcentration unit followed by thermal desorption and detection by an infrared gas analyzer. As major difficulties we identified the separation of CO2 from the NMOC compounds on the solid adsorbent unit and the choice of the catalytic material. The measurements were accompanied by GC analysis of single calibrated VOC species from permeation devices and measurements by a PTR-MS. Plant chamber measurements with Quercus ilex showed an expected diurnal course which was confirmed by the NMOC analyzer though with a discrepancy during the day of up to 40 %.

  20. In-situ measurements of total reactive nitrogen, total water vapor, and aerosols in polar stratospheric clouds in the Antarctic stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Poole, L. R.; Wilson, J. C.; Murphy, D. M.; Chan, K. Roland

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of total reactive nitrogen, NOy, total water vapor, and aerosols were made as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The measurements were made using instruments located onboard the NASA ER-2 aircrafts which conducted twelve flights over the Antarctic continent reaching altitudes of 18 km at 72 S latitude. Each instrument utilized an ambient air sample and provided a measurement up to 1 Hz or every 200 m of flight path. The data presented focus on the flights of Aug. 17th and 18th during which Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were encountered containing concentrations of 0.5 to 1.0 micron diameter aerosols greater than 1 cm/cu. The temperature pressure during these events ranged as low as 184 K near 75 mb pressure, with water values near 3.5 ppm by volume (ppmv). With the exception of two short periods, the PSC activity was observed at temperatures above the frost point of water over ice. The data gathered during these flights are analyzed and presented.

  1. Source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosols over South and East Asia using dual carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, O.; Kirillova, E. N.; Andersson, A.-; Kruså, M.; Sheesley, R. J.; Tiwari, S.-; Lee, M.; Chen, B.; Du, K.

    2012-12-01

    Emissions of black carbon (BC) and other components of carbonaceous aerosols affect both climate and health in South and East Asia, yet substantial uncertainties exist regarding their sources. The relative contribution to atmospheric BC from fossil fuel versus biomass combustion is important to constrain both to direct mitigation and as their different properties make their effects on climate forcing and respiratory health different. This study approached the sourcing challenge by applying microscale radiocarbon measurements to aerosol particles collected in both source regions and at regional receptor observatories of both S Asia (New Delhi and the Maldives Climate Observatory) and of E Asia (Beijing, Shanghai, South China Coastal Observatory and the Korea Climate Observatory - Gosan, KCO-G, Jeju Island). The radiocarbon approach is ideally suited to this task as fossil sources are void of 14C whereas biomass combustion products hold a contemporary 14C signal. For S Asia, the 14C-based observations suggest that biomass combustion contributes half to two-thirds of the BC loading. In contrast, for E Asia, fossil fuel combustion account for four-fifths of the BC emitted from China. This source-diagnostic radiocarbon signal in the ambient aerosol over East Asia establishes a much larger role for fossil fuel combustion than suggested by all fifteen BC emission inventory models. There are also poor constraints on the sources of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), a large hydrophilic component of carbonaceous aerosols that enhances the propensity of aerosols to form clouds. In a 15-mo continuous campaign in S Asia, radiocarbon-based source apportionment of WSOC shows the dominance of biogenic/biomass combustion sources but also a substantial anthropogenic fossil-fuel contribution (about 20%). WSOC in E Asia reaching KCO-G were 50% from fossil sources. Aerosols reaching the Maldives after long-range over-ocean transport were enriched by 3-4‰ in δ13C-WSOC. This is

  2. Differences in the OC/EC Ratios that Characterize Ambient and Source Aerosols due to Thermal-Optical Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is typically used to measure the OC/EC (organic carbon/elemental carbon) and EC/TC (elemental carbon/total carbon) ratios in source and atmospheric aerosols. The present study utilizes a dual-optical carbon aerosol analyzer to examine the effects of...

  3. Climatological variations of total alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemayel, E.; Hassoun, A. E. R.; Benallal, M. A.; Goyet, C.; Rivaro, P.; Abboud-Abi Saab, M.; Krasakopoulou, E.; Touratier, F.; Ziveri, P.

    2015-12-01

    A compilation of data from several cruises between 1998 and 2013 was used to derive polynomial fits that estimate total alkalinity (AT) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) from measurements of salinity and temperature in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters. The optimal equations were chosen based on the 10-fold cross-validation results and revealed that second- and third-order polynomials fit the AT and CT data respectively. The AT surface fit yielded a root mean square error (RMSE) of ± 10.6 μmol kg-1, and salinity and temperature contribute to 96 % of the variability. Furthermore, we present the first annual mean CT parameterization for the Mediterranean Sea surface waters with a RMSE of ± 14.3 μmol kg-1. Excluding the marginal seas of the Adriatic and the Aegean, these equations can be used to estimate AT and CT in case of the lack of measurements. The identified empirical equations were applied on the 0.25° climatologies of temperature and salinity, available from the World Ocean Atlas 2013. The 7-year averages (2005-2012) showed that AT and CT have similar patterns with an increasing eastward gradient. The variability is influenced by the inflow of cold Atlantic waters through the Strait of Gibraltar and by the oligotrophic and thermohaline gradient that characterize the Mediterranean Sea. The summer-winter seasonality was also mapped and showed different patterns for AT and CT. During the winter, the AT and CT concentrations were higher in the western than in the eastern basin. The opposite was observed in the summer where the eastern basin was marked by higher AT and CT concentrations than in winter. The strong evaporation that takes place in this season along with the ultra-oligotrophy of the eastern basin determines the increase of both AT and CT concentrations.

  4. Climatological variations of total alkalinity and total inorganic carbon in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemayel, E.; Hassoun, A. E. R.; Benallal, M. A.; Goyet, C.; Rivaro, P.; Abboud-Abi Saab, M.; Krasakopoulou, E.; Touratier, F.; Ziveri, P.

    2015-08-01

    A compilation of several cruises data from 1998 to 2013 was used to derive polynomial fits that estimate total alkalinity (AT) and total inorganic carbon (CT) from measurements of salinity and temperature in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters. The optimal equations were chosen based on the 10-fold cross validation results and revealed that a second and third order polynomials fit the AT and CT data respectively. The AT surface fit showed an improved root mean square error (RMSE) of ±10.6 μmol kg-1. Furthermore we present the first annual mean CT parameterization for the Mediterranean Sea surface waters with a RMSE of ±14.3 μmol kg-1. Excluding the marginal seas of the Adriatic and the Aegean, these equations can be used to estimate AT and CT in case of the lack of measurements. The seven years averages (2005-2012) mapped using the quarter degree climatologies of the World Ocean Atlas 2013 showed that in surface waters AT and CT have similar patterns with an increasing eastward gradient. The surface variability is influenced by the inflow of cold Atlantic waters through the Strait of Gibraltar and by the oligotrophic and thermohaline gradient that characterize the Mediterranean Sea. The summer-winter seasonality was also mapped and showed different patterns for AT and CT. During the winter, the AT and CT concentrations were higher in the western than in the eastern basin, primarily due to the deepening of the mixed layer and upwelling of dense waters. The opposite was observed in the summer where the eastern basin was marked by higher AT and CT concentrations than in winter. The strong evaporation that takes place in this season along with the ultra-oligotrophy of the eastern basin determines the increase of both AT and CT concentrations.

  5. Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the Deepest Winter Mixed Layer Depths

    SciTech Connect

    Goyet, C.; Healy, R.; Ryan, J.; Kozyr, A.

    2000-05-01

    Modeling the global ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide system is becoming increasingly important to greenhouse gas policy. These models require initialization with realistic three-dimensional (3-D) oceanic carbon fields. This report presents an approach to establishing these initial conditions from an extensive global database of ocean carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) system measurements and well-developed interpolation methods.

  6. Measurement of the seasonal and annual variability of total column aerosol in a northeastern U.S. network

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Schlemmer, J.A.; Harrison, L.C.; Berkheiser, W.E. III; Larson, N.R.; Laulainen, N.S.

    1994-09-01

    A network of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers has operated since late 1991 in the northeastern US. The data acquired are simultaneous measurements of total and diffuse horizontal irradiances in six narrowband filtered detectors and one broadband shortwave detector. The direct normal irradiances are calculated from these measurements. These direct data are corrected for cosine response and used to calculate extraterrestrial irradiance (I{sub o}) using the Langley method of regressing the natural logarithm of direct irradiance versus air mass. With frequent determinations of I{sub o}, changes in I{sub o} caused by soiling and filter degradation, for example, can be tracked. Using these I{sub o}`s, total optical depth is calculated for every clear 30-minute period in the record. Consequently, total optical depth may be obtained on a fair number of days throughout the year. Using daily average total optical depth the authors have calculated aerosol optical depths for five wavelengths by subtracting Rayleigh scattering optical depths and Chappuis ozone absorption optical depths at each wavelength. The aerosol pattern at nearly every site is an annual cycle superimposed on a decaying stratospheric loading associated with the Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption. An attempt is made to remove the volcanic signal using data from another site.

  7. Controlled exposures of volunteers to respirable carbon and sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.R.; Avol, E.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Ruchuan Peng; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    Respirable carbon or fly ash particles are suspected to increase the respiratory toxicity of coexisting acidic air pollutants, by concentrating acid on their surfaces and so delivering it efficiently to the lower respiratory tract. To investigate this issue, the authors exposed 15 healthy and 15 asthmatic volunteers in a controlled-environment chamber to four test atmospheres: (1) clean air; (2) 0.5-{mu}m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol at {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from water solution; (3) 0.5-{mu}m carbon aerosol at {approx}250 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from highly pure carbon black with specific surface area comparable to ambient pollution particles; and (4) carbon as in (3) plus {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of ultrafine H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol generated from fuming sulfuric acid. Electron microscopy showed that nearly all acid in (4) became attached to carbon particle surfaces, and that most particles remained in the sub-{mu}m size range. Exposures were performed double-blind, 1 week apart. They lasted 1 hr each, with alternate 10-min periods of heavy exercise (ventilation {approx}50 L/min) and rest. Subjects gargled citrus juice before exposure to suppress airway ammonia. Lung function and symptoms were measured pre-exposure, after initial exercise, and at end-exposure. Bronchial reactivity to methacholine was measured after exposure. Statistical analyses tested for effects of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or carbon, separate or interactive, on health measures.

  8. The scavenging processes controlling the seasonal cycle in Arctic sulphate and black carbon aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Arnold, S. R.; Pringle, K.; Boucher, O.

    2012-08-01

    The seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is typified by high concentrations of large aged anthropogenic particles transported from lower latitudes in the late Arctic winter and early spring followed by a sharp transition to low concentrations of locally sourced smaller particles in the summer. However, multi-model assessments show that many models fail to simulate a realistic cycle. Here, we use a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP) and surface-level aerosol observations to understand how wet scavenging processes control the seasonal variation in Arctic black carbon (BC) and sulphate aerosol. We show that the transition from high wintertime concentrations to low concentrations in the summer is controlled by the transition from ice-phase cloud scavenging to the much more efficient warm cloud scavenging in the late spring troposphere. This seasonal cycle is amplified further by the appearance of warm drizzling cloud in the late spring and summer boundary layer. Implementing these processes in GLOMAP greatly improves the agreement between the model and observations at the three Arctic ground-stations Alert, Barrow and Zeppelin Mountain on Svalbard. The SO4 model-observation correlation coefficient (R) increases from: -0.33 to 0.71 at Alert (82.5° N), from -0.16 to 0.70 at Point Barrow (71.0° N) and from -0.42 to 0.40 at Zeppelin Mountain (78° N). The BC model-observation correlation coefficient increases from -0.68 to 0.72 at Alert and from -0.42 to 0.44 at Barrow. Observations at three marginal Arctic sites (Janiskoski, Oulanka and Karasjok) indicate a far weaker aerosol seasonal cycle, which we show is consistent with the much smaller seasonal change in the frequency of ice clouds compared to higher latitude sites. Our results suggest that the seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is driven by temperature-dependent scavenging processes that may be susceptible to modification in a future climate.

  9. The scavenging processes controlling the seasonal cycle in Arctic sulphate and black carbon aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, K.; Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Arnold, S.; Boucher, O.

    2013-12-01

    The seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is typified by high concentrations of large aged anthropogenic particles transported from lower latitudes in the late Arctic winter and early spring followed by a sharp transition to low concentrations of locally sourced smaller particles in the summer. However, multi-model assessments show that many models fail to simulate a realistic cycle. Here, we use a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP) and surface-level aerosol observations to understand how wet scavenging processes control the seasonal variation in Arctic black carbon (BC) and sulphate aerosol. We show that the transition from high wintertime concentrations to low concentrations in the summer is controlled by the transition from ice-phase cloud scavenging to the much more efficient warm cloud scavenging in the late spring troposphere. This seasonal cycle is amplified further by the appearance of warm drizzling cloud in the late spring and summer boundary layer. Implementing these processes in GLOMAP greatly improves the agreement between the model and observations at the three Arctic ground-stations Alert, Barrow and Zeppelin Mountain on Svalbard. The SO4 model-observation correlation coefficient (R) increases from: -0.33 to 0.71 at Alert (82.5N), from -0.16 to 0.70 at Point Barrow (71.0N) and from -0.42 to 0.40 at Zeppelin Mountain (78N). The BC model-observation correlation coefficient increases from -0.68 to 0.72 at Alert and from -0.42 to 0.44 at Barrow. Observations at three marginal Arctic sites (Janiskoski, Oulanka and Karasjok) indicate a far weaker aerosol seasonal cycle, which we show is consistent with the much smaller seasonal change in the frequency of ice clouds compared to higher latitude sites. Our results suggest that the seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is driven by temperature-dependent scavenging processes that may be susceptible to modification in a future climate.

  10. Mechanical desorption of immobilized proteins using carbon dioxide aerosols for reusable biosensors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Renu; Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Reusability of a biosensor has recently received considerable attention, and it is closely related with the effective desorption of probe molecules. We present a novel mechanical desorption technique to reuse biosensors by using periodic jets of carbon dioxide (CO2) aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO2), and demonstrate its feasibility by removing physically adsorbed and covalently bonded fluorescent proteins i.e., Escherichia coli fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody and bovine serum albumin (E. coli FITC-Ab and FITC-BSA) from silicon chips. The proteins on the chip surfaces were measured by fluorescent images before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured for various concentrations (1-20 μg mL(-1)) of E. coli FITC-Ab and FITC-BSA with two different removal cycles (5 and 11 cycles; each cycle: 8s). We observed high removal efficiencies (>93.5% for physically adsorbed Ab and >84.6% for covalently bonded Ab) at 11 cycle aerosol treatment. This CO2 aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization, which was confirmed by the fluorescent images of FITC-Abs for fresh and reused chips. Desorption of the immobilized layers was validated by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses. We also conducted an experiment on the regeneration of E. coli sensing chips using this aerosol treatment, and the chips were re-used 5 times successfully. This mechanical desorption technique is a highly effective and novel strategy for reusable biosensors. PMID:25467507

  11. Dust transport over the eastern Mediterranean derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Aerosol Robotic Network, and surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Kubilay, N.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Vardavas, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-02-01

    Multiyear surface PM10 measurements performed on Crete Island, Greece, have been used in conjunction with satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) and ground-based remote sensing measurements (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)) to enhance our understanding of the evolution of mineral dust events over the eastern Mediterranean. An analysis of southerly air masses at altitudes of 1000 and 3000 m over a 5 year period (2000-2005), showed that dust can potentially arrive over Crete, either simultaneously in the lower free troposphere and inside the boundary layer (vertical extended transport (VET)) or initially into the free troposphere with the heavier particles gradually being scavenged inside the boundary layer (free troposphere transport (FTT)). Both pathways present significant seasonal variations but on an annual basis contribute almost equally to the dust transport in the area. During VET the aerosol index (AI) derived from TOMS was significantly correlated with surface PM10, and in general AI was found to be adequate for the characterization of dust loadings over the eastern Mediterranean on a climatological basis. A significant covariance between PM10 and AOT was observed during VET as well, indicating that AOT levels from AERONET may be estimated by PM10 levels at the surface. Surface measurements are thus crucial for the validation of remote sensing measurements and hence are a powerful tool for the investigation of the impact of aerosols on climate.

  12. Ambient spark generation to synthesize carbon-encapsulated metal nanoparticles in continuous aerosol manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Park, Jae Hong; Yoon, Ki Young; Hwang, Jungho

    2009-11-01

    We report the use of spark generation in an inert gas atmosphere to synthesize carbon-encapsulated metal nanoparticles (CEMNs) in a continuous aerosol manner using a metal (nickel, cobalt, iron)-graphite carbon electrode configuration without the use of a vacuum. The spark-generated particles consisted of CEMNs and carbonaceous aggregated debris. The outer layer of the CEMNs showed parallel fringes (ordered graphitic nanostructures) while the debris consisted of disordered nanostructures. Electron and X-ray diffraction showed that both metal and graphite in the CEMNs were the pure elements except for iron-carbon, which contained a carbide phase. Based on the order of the activation energies for carbon diffusion into a metal: iron-carbon (10.5-16.5 kcal mol-1) < cobalt-carbon (34.7 kcal mol-1) ~ nickel-carbon (33.0-34.8 kcal mol-1), it was concluded that carbide particles form more easily from elemental iron than nickel or cobalt. The metal-to-carbon mass fractions of the spark-generated particles from nickel (anode)-carbon (cathode), cobalt-carbon, and iron-carbon spark configurations were 18.7, 28.3, and 11.2%, respectively, while the mass fractions for the configurations of metal (cathode)-carbon (anode) were 6.4, 9.1, and 4.3%, respectively. Similarly, the yield of CEMNs from the metal (anode)-carbon (cathode) electrodes was higher (54, 61, and 53%) than that of metal (cathode)-carbon (anode) electrodes (18, 30, and 18%).

  13. Characteristics of atmospheric organic and elemental carbon aerosols in urban Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Dongsheng; Zhang, Junke; He, Jun; Wang, Xiaoju; Pang, Bo; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Lili; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in PM2.5 were measured hourly with a semicontinuous thermal-optical analyzer in urban Beijing, China, from Mar 1, 2013 to Feb 28, 2014. The annual mean concentrations of OC and EC in Beijing were 14.0 ± 11.7 and 4.1 ± 3.2 μg/m3, respectively. The concentrations observed in this study were lower than those of other reports over the past ten years; however, the concentrations were higher than those reported from most of the megacities in North America and Europe. These findings suggest that OC and EC remained at high levels despite the implementation of strict control measures to improve air quality. The OC and EC concentrations exhibited strong seasonality, with high values in the autumn and winter but low values in the spring and summer in Beijing. The diurnal OC and EC cycles were characterized by higher values at night and in the morning because of primary emissions, accumulations and low boundary-layer heights. Due to increasing photochemical activity, a well-defined OC peak was observed at approximately noon. The OC and EC concentrations followed typical lognormal patterns in which more than 75% of the OC samples had concentrations between 0.9 and 18.0 μg/m3 and 75% of the EC samples had concentrations between 0.4 and 5.6 μg/m3. An EC tracer method and combined EC tracer and K+ mass balance methods were used to estimate the contributions from secondary formation and biomass burning, respectively. High secondary organic carbon (SOC) concentrations were found in the autumn and winter due to low temperatures, which are favorable for the absorption and condensation of semi-volatile organic compounds on existing particles. High correlations were found between the estimated SOC in PM2.5 and the observed OOA (oxidized organic aerosol) in PM1; thus, the method proved to be effective and reliable. The annual average OCBiomass burning (OCbb) contribution to the total OC concentration was 18.4%, suggesting that biomass

  14. Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, T.C.; Bhardwaj, E.; Dong, R.; Jogani, R.; Jung, S.K.; Roden, C.; Streets, D.G.; Trautmann, N.M.

    2007-05-15

    We present an emission inventory of primary black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We reconstruct fossil fuel consumption and represent changes in technology on a national and sectoral basis. Our estimates rely on new estimates of biofuel consumption, and updated emission factors for old technologies. Emissions of black carbon increase almost linearly, totaling about 1000 Gg in 1850, 2200 Gg in 1900, 3000 Gg in 1950, and 4400 Gg in 2000. Primary organic carbon shows a similar pattern, with emissions of 4100 Gg, 5800 Gg, 6700 Gg, and 8700 Gg in 1850, 1900, 1950, and 2000, respectively. Biofuel is responsible for over half of BC emission until about 1890, and dominates energy-related primary OC emission throughout the entire period. Coal contributes the greatest fraction of BC emission between 1880 and 1975, and is overtaken by emissions from biofuel around 1975, and by diesel engines around 1990. Previous work suggests a rapid rise in BC emissions between 1950 and 2000. This work supports a more gradual increase between 1950 and 2000, similar to the increase between 1850 and 1925; implementation of clean technology is a primary reason.

  15. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inland sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model-observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average +/- standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 +/- 2353 ng m(-3)) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61 %) and industrial (23 %) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.

  16. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inland sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.

  17. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inlandmore » sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.« less

  18. Aerosol measurements from plasma torch cuts on stainless steel, carbon steel, and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Brodrick, C.J.; Crawford, S.; Nasiatka, J.; Pierucci, K.; Reyes, V.; Sambrook, J.; Wrobel, S.; Yeary, J.

    1996-01-01

    The main purpose of this project is to quantify aerosol particle size and generation rates produced by a plasma torch whencutting stainless steel, carbon steel and aluminum. the plasma torch is a common cutting tool used in the dismantling of nuclear facilities. Eventually, other cutting tools will be characterized and the information will be compiled in a user guide to aid in theplanning of both D&D and other cutting operations. The data will be taken from controlled laboratory experiments on uncontaminated metals and field samples taken during D&D operations at ANL nuclear facilities. The plasma torch data was collected from laboratory cutting tests conducted inside of a closed, filtered chamber. The particle size distributions were determined by isokinetically sampling the exhaust duct using a cascade impactor. Cuts on different thicknesses showed there was no observable dependence of the aerosol quantity produced as a function of material thickness for carbon steel. However, data for both stainless steel and aluminum revealed that the aerosol mass produced for these materials appear to have some dependance on thickness, with thinner materials producing tmore aerosols. The results of the laboratory cutting tests show that most measured particle size distributions are bimodal with one mode at about 0.2 {mu}m and the other at about 10 {mu}m. The average Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameters (MMAD`s) for these tests are 0.36 {+-}0.08 {mu}m for stainless steel, 0.48 {+-}0.17{mu}m for aluminum and 0.52{+-}0.12 {mu}m for carbon steel.

  19. Aerosol and black carbon properties during different seasons in eastern part of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Lipi

    Abstract Continuous and near-real-time measurements of the mass concentration of Aerosol Black Carbon (BC) were carried out July-2010 March-2011 using an Aethalometer (model AE-31 of Magee Scientific, USA). The principle of the Aethalometer is to measure the attenuation of a beam of light transmitted through a filter, while the filter is continuously collecting an aerosol sample. This measurement is made at successive regular intervals of a time base period. The BC mass concentration is estimated by measuring the change in the transmittance of a quartz filter tape, on to which the particles impinge. The instrument was operated at a time base of 5 min, round the clock with a flow rate of 4-liter min­¹, to study the impact of rainy season on black carbon concentrations over a typical urban environment namely Ranchi, India.BC concentrations were high during morning (0600 to 0900 h) and evening hours (1900 to 2300 h) compared to afternoon hours. During early morning hours, high values of BC are attributed to the turbulence set-in by the solar heating which breaks the night-time stable layer and aerosols in the nocturnal residual layer are mixed up with those near the surface. In a very clean air location it may be as low as 500 ng/m³ and in a very polluted location it may be as high as 20000 ng/m³. During the period from July-2010 to March 2011 the average monthly BC concentration varied between 1.1 to 8.1 µg/m³ and daily average value were found in the range of 1.0to 18 µg/m³. KEYWORDS: Black Carbon (BC), Aethalometer, Aerosol

  20. Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2°N, 76.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.67±0.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (∼30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1∼1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2∼2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.9±0.2 and 1.8±0.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. PMID:24331033

  1. Simulated responses of terrestrial aridity to black carbon and sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Gettelman, A.; Xu, Y.; Fu, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Aridity index (AI), defined as the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (PET), is a measure of the dryness of terrestrial climate. Global climate models generally project future decreases of AI (drying) associated with global warming scenarios driven by increasing greenhouse gas and declining aerosols. Given their different effects in the climate system, scattering and absorbing aerosols may affect AI differently. Here we explore the terrestrial aridity responses to anthropogenic black carbon (BC) and sulfate (SO4) aerosols with Community Earth System Model simulations. Positive BC radiative forcing decreases precipitation averaged over global land at a rate of 0.9%/°C of global mean surface temperature increase (moderate drying), while BC radiative forcing increases PET by 1.0%/°C (also drying). BC leads to a global decrease of 1.9%/°C in AI (drying). SO4 forcing is negative and causes precipitation a decrease at a rate of 6.7%/°C cooling (strong drying). PET also decreases in response to SO4 aerosol cooling by 6.3%/°C cooling (contributing to moistening). Thus, SO4 cooling leads to a small decrease in AI (drying) by 0.4%/°C cooling. Despite the opposite effects on global mean temperature, BC and SO4 both contribute to the twentieth century drying (AI decrease). Sensitivity test indicates that surface temperature and surface available energy changes dominate BC- and SO4-induced PET changes.

  2. Climatic and ecological impacts of tropospheric sulphate aerosols on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Alexey V.

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSA) may oxidise the photosynthesising tissues if they are taken up by plants. A parametrisation of this impact of tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSA) on the terrestrial gross primary production is suggested. This parametrisation is implemented into the global Earth system model developed at the A.M. Obukhov Institute of the Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM). With this coupled model, the simulations are performed which are forced by common anthropogenic and natural climate forcings based on historical reconstructions followed by the RCP 8.5 scenario. The model response to sulphate aerosol loading is subdivided into the climatic (related to the influence of TSA on the radiative transport in the atmosphere) and ecological (related to the toxic influence of sulphate aerosol on terrestrial plants) impacts. We found that the former basically dominates over the latter on the global scale and modifies the responses of the global vegetation and soil carbon stocks to external forcings by 10%. At regional scale, however, ecological impact may be as much important as the climatic one.

  3. Total organic carbon in aggregates as a soil recovery indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciene Maltoni, Katia; Rodrigues Cassiolato, Ana Maria; Amorim Faria, Glaucia; Dubbin, William

    2015-04-01

    The soil aggregation promotes physical protection of organic matter, preservation of which is crucial to improve soil structure, fertility and ensure the agro-ecosystems sustainability. The no-tillage cultivation system has been considered as one of the strategies to increase total soil organic carbono (TOC) contents and soil aggregation, both are closely related and influenced by soil management systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of soil aggregates and the total organic carbon inside aggregates, with regard to soil recovery, under 3 different soil management systems, i.e. 10 and 20 years of no-tillage cultivation as compared with soil under natural vegetation (Cerrado). Undisturbed soils (0-5; 5-10; and 10-20 cm depth) were collected from Brazil, Central Region. The soils, Oxisols from Cerrado, were collected from a field under Natural Vegetation-Cerrado (NV), and from fields that were under conventional tillage since 1970s, and 10 and 20 years ago were changed to no-tillage cultivation system (NT-10; NT-20 respectively). The undisturbed samples were sieved (4mm) and the aggregates retained were further fractionated by wet sieving through five sieves (2000, 1000, 500, 250, and 50 μm) with the aggregates distribution expressed as percentage retained by each sieve. The TOC was determined, for each aggregate size, by combustion (Thermo-Finnigan). A predominance of aggregates >2000 μm was observed under NV treatment (92, 91, 82 %), NT-10 (64, 73, 61 %), and NT-20 (71, 79, 63 %) for all three depths (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm). In addition greater quantities of aggregates in sizes 1000, 500, 250 and 50 μm under NT-10 and NT-20 treatments, explain the lower aggregate stability under these treatments compared to the soil under NV. The organic C concentration for NV in aggregates >2000 μm was 24,4; 14,2; 8,7 mg/g for each depth (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm, respectively), higher than in aggregates sized 250-50 μm (7,2; 5,5; 4,4 mg/g) for all depths

  4. Stratospheric Sulfuric Acid and Black Carbon Aerosol Measured During POLARIS and its Role in Ozone Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Pueschel, R. F.; Drdla, K.; Verma, S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol can affect the environment in three ways. Sulfuric acid aerosol have been shown to act as sites for the reduction of reactive nitrogen and chlorine and as condensation sites to form Polar Stratospheric Clouds, under very cold conditions, which facilitate ozone depletion. Recently, modeling studies have suggested a link between BCA (Black Carbon Aerosol) and ozone chemistry. These studies suggest that HNO3, NO2, and O3 may be reduced heterogeneously on BCA particles. The ozone reaction converts ozone to oxygen molecules, while HNO3 and NO2 react to form NOx. Finally, a buildup of BCA could reduce the single-scatter albedo of aerosol below a value of 0.98, a critical value that has been postulated to change the effect of stratospheric aerosol from cooling to warming. Correlations between measured BCA amounts and aircraft usage have been reported. Attempts to link BCA to ozone chemistry and other stratospheric processes have been hindered by questions concerning the amount of BCA that exists in the stratosphere, the magnitude of reaction probabilities, and the scarcity of BCA measurements. The Ames Wire Impactors (AWI) participated in POLARIS as part of the complement of experiments on the NASA ER-2. One of our main objectives was to determine the amount of aerosol surface area, particularly BCA, available for reaction with stratospheric constituents and assess if possible, the importance of these reactions. The AWI collects aerosol and BCA particles on thin Palladium wires that are exposed to the ambient air in a controlled manner. The samples are returned to the laboratory for subsequent analysis. The product of the AWI analysis is the size, surface area, and volume distributions, morphology and elemental composition of aerosol and BCA. This paper presents results from our experiments during POLARIS and puts these measurements in the context of POLARIS and other missions in which we have participated. It describes modifications to the AWI data

  5. The scavenging processes controlling the seasonal cycle in Arctic sulphate and black carbon aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Arnold, S. R.; Pringle, K.; Boucher, O.

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is typified by high concentrations of large aged anthropogenic particles transported from lower latitudes in the late Arctic winter and early spring followed by a sharp transition to low concentrations of locally sourced smaller particles in the summer. However, multi-model assessments show that many models fail to simulate a realistic cycle. Here, we use a global aerosol microphysics model and surface-level aerosol observations to understand how wet scavenging processes control the seasonal variation in Arctic black carbon (BC) and sulphate aerosol concentrations. We show that the transition from high wintertime to low summertime Arctic aerosol concentrations is caused by the change from inefficient scavenging in ice clouds to the much more efficient scavenging in warm liquid clouds. This seasonal cycle is amplified further by the appearance of warm drizzling cloud in late spring and summer at a time when aerosol transport shifts mainly to low levels. Implementing these processes in a model greatly improves the agreement between the model and observations at the three Arctic ground-stations Alert, Barrow and Zeppelin Mountain on Svalbard. The SO4 model-observation correlation coefficient (R) increases from: -0.33 to 0.71 at Alert (82.5° N), from -0.16 to 0.70 at Point Barrow (71.0° N) and from -0.42 to 0.40 at Zeppelin Mountain (78° N) while, the BC model-observation correlation coefficient increases from -0.68 to 0.72 at Alert and from -0.42 to 0.44 at Barrow. Observations at three marginal Arctic sites (Janiskoski, Oulanka and Karasjok) indicate a far weaker aerosol seasonal cycle, which we show is consistent with the much smaller seasonal changes in ice clouds compared to the higher latitude sites. Our results suggest that the seasonal cycle in Arctic aerosol is driven by temperature-dependent scavenging processes that may be susceptible to modification in a future climate.

  6. Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2011-06-03

    Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and

  7. Estimating Black Carbon Aging Time-Scales with a Particle-Resolved Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Nicole; West, Matt; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-01-13

    Understanding the aging process of aerosol particles is important for assessing their chemical reactivity, cloud condensation nuclei activity, radiative properties and health impacts. In this study we investigate the aging of black carbon containing particles in an idealized urban plume using a new approach, the particleresolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC. We present a method to estimate aging time-scales using an aging criterion based on cloud condensation nuclei activation. The results show a separation into a daytime regime where condensation dominates and a nighttime regime where coagulation dominates. For the chosen urban plume scenario, depending on the supersaturation threshold, the values for the aging timescales vary between 0.06 hours and 10 hours during the day, and between 6 hours and 20 hours during the night.

  8. Balloon-Borne Measurements of Total Reactive Nitrogen, Nitric Acid, and Aerosol in the Cold Arctic Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Aimedieu, P.; Matthews, W. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Murcray, D. G.; Hofmann, D. J.; Johnston, P. V.; Iwasaka, Y.; Iwata, A.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Total reactive nitrogen (NO(Y)) between 15 and 29 km was measured for the first time on board a balloon within the Arctic cold vortex. Observations of HNO3, aerosol, and ozone were made by instruments on the same balloon gondola which was launched from Esrange, Sweden (68 deg N, 20 deg E) on January 23, 1989. The NO(y) mixing ratio was observed to increase very rapidly from 6 ppbv at 18 km altitude to a maximum of 21 ppbv at 21 km, forming a sharp layer with a thickness of about 2 km. A minimum in the NO(y) mixing ratio of 5 ppbv was found at 27 km. The measured HNO3 profile shows broad similarities to that of NO(y). This observation, together with the observed very low column amount of NO2, shows that NO(x) had been almost totally converted to HNO3, and that NO(y) was composed mainly of HNO3. The enhanced aerosol concentration between 19 and 22 km suggests that the maximum abundance of HNO3 trapped in the form of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was about 6 ppbv at 21 km. The sampled air parcels were highly supersaturated with respect to NAT. Although extensive denitrification throughout the stratosphere did not prevail, an indication of denitrification was found at altitudes of 27 and 22 km, and between 18 and 15 km.

  9. Case study of absorption aerosol optical depth closure of black carbon over the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Moteki, N.; Khatri, P.; Takamura, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Hashioka, H.; Matsui, H.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.

    2014-01-01

    aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements made by sun-sky photometers are currently the only constraint available for estimates of the global radiative forcing of black carbon (BC), but their validation studies are limited. In this paper, we report the first attempt to compare AAODs derived from single-particle soot photometer (SP2) and ground-based sun-sky photometer (sky radiometer, SKYNET) measurements. During the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) experiments, BC size distribution and mixing state vertical profiles were measured using an SP2 on board a research aircraft near the Fukue Observatory (32.8°N, 128.7°E) over the East China Sea in spring 2009 and late winter 2013. The aerosol extinction coefficients (bext) and single scattering albedo (SSA) at 500 nm were calculated based on aerosol size distribution and detailed BC mixing state information. The calculated aerosol optical depth (AOD) agreed well with the sky radiometer measurements (2 ± 6%) when dust loadings were low (lidar-derived nonspherical particle contribution to AOD less than 20%). However, under these low-dust conditions, the AAODs obtained from sky radiometer measurements were only half of the in situ estimates. When dust loadings were high, the sky radiometer measurements showed systematically higher AAODs even when all coarse particles were assumed to be dust for in situ measurements. These results indicate that there are considerable uncertainties in AAOD measurements. Uncertainties in the BC refractive index, optical calculations from in situ data, and sky radiometer retrieval analyses are discussed.

  10. Vegetation fires in the himalayan region - Aerosol load, black carbon emissions and smoke plume heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadrevu, Krishna Prasad; Ellicott, Evan; Giglio, Louis; Badarinath, K. V. S.; Vermote, Eric; Justice, Chris; Lau, William K. M.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the potential of multi-satellite datasets for quantifying the biomass burning emissions from the Himalayan region. A variety of satellite products were used for characterizing fire events including active fire counts, burnt areas, aerosol optical depth (AOD) variations, aerosol index and smoke plume heights. Results from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire product suggest March-June as the major fire season with the peak during the April. An average of 3908 fire counts per year were recorded with sixty four percent of the fires occurring in the low elevation areas in the Himalayan Region. We estimate average burnt areas of 1129 sq. km, with the black carbon emissions of 431 Mg, per year. The mean AOD (2005-2010) was 0.287 ± 0.105 (one sigma) with peak values in May. Correlation analysis between the fire counts and AOD resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.553; the correlation between the FRP and AOD is relatively weaker ( r = 0.499). Planetary boundary layer height retrieved from the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis For Research And Applications (MERRA) product suggests typical PBL height of 1000-1200 m during the April-May peak biomass burning season. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) retrievals show the extent of smoke plume heights beyond the planetary boundary layer during the peak biomass burning month of April. However, comparison of fires in the Himalayan region with other regions and comparisons to aerosol index data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) suggest smoke plumes reaching less than 3 km. Our results on fires and smoke plume height relationships provide valuable information for addressing aerosol transport in the region.

  11. Black Carbon (Soot) Aerosol in the Lower Stratosphere and Upper Troposphere. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Black, D. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Hansen, A. D. A.; Verna, S.; Kato, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have used two approaches to measure BCA in the stratosphere. The first method consists of collecting aerosols by impaction on quartz rods, upon which are mounted strips of polystyrene filter material. Each 25 mm by 0.5 mm filter strip is alternately masked and exposed in 5 mm long sections. After sampling, the optical density of the exposed sections is measured and compared with the optical density of the masked (unexposed) sections. The filter strip is a Lambertian collector, the scattering property of which is not affected by the deposition of liquid sulfuric acid droplets which dominate the stratospheric aerosol. Hence, all attenuation greater in the exposed than in the non-exposed sections is due to absorption by BCA or rare opaque materials such as meteoritic iron. In a second approach we expose carbon-coated gold or palladium wires to air outside the aircraft boundary layer [Farlow et al., 1979; Pueschel et al., 1989]. With a field emission scanning electron microscope we are able to characterize BCA particles in addition to the dominant sulfuric acid droplets. Typically, soot is comprised of 20 nm diameter spheres linked together as branching chains or loosely packed aggregates (Figure 1a). The microscope has a lateral image resolution of 1.5 nm and can clearly resolve individual spheres making up BCA aggregates. Their morphology is uniquely different from that of the liquid sulfuric acid-water aerosol (Figure 1b). We approximate the size of each BCA particle by that of a sphere of equivalent volume and fit a lognormal size distribution to both the BCA and H2SO4/H2O aerosols. Both sampler types have been mounted on NASA's ER-2 high-altitude research aircraft (altitude ceiling of 70,000 feet), and on NASA's DC-8 (40,000 feet ceiling) aircraft to sample aerosols from a significant portion of the atmosphere.

  12. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  13. Effects of cloud, aerosol, and ozone on surface spectral Ultraviolet and total irradiance observed in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hana; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Woogyung; Lee, Yun Gon; Cho, Hi Ku

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there have been substantial attempts to model the radiative transfer for climatological and biological purposes. However, the incorporation of clouds, aerosols and ozone into the modeling process is one of the difficult tasks due to their variable transmission in both temporal and space domains. In this study we quantify the atmospheric transmissions by clouds, aerosol optical depth (AOD at 320 nm) and total ozone (Ozone) together with all skies in three solar radiation components of the global solar (GS 305-2800nm), total ultraviolet (TUV 290-363nm) and the erythemal weighted ultraviolet (EUV 290-325nm) irradiances with statistical methods using the data at Seoul. The purpose of this study also is to clarify the different characteristics between cloud, AOD and Ozone in the wavelength-dependent solar radiation components. The ozone, EUV and TUV used in this study (March 2003 - February 2014) have been measured with Dobson Spectrophotometer (Beck #124) and Brewer Spectrophotometer (SCI-TEC#148) at Yonsei University, respectively. GS, Cloud Cover (CC) are available from the Korean Meteorological Agency. The measured total (effect of cloud, aerosol, and ozone) transmissions on annual average showed 74%, 76% and 80% of GS, TUV and EUV irradiance, respectively. For the comparison of the measured values with modeled, we have also constructed a multiple linear regression model for the total transmission. The average ratio of measured to modeled total transmission were 0.94, 0.96 and 0.96 with higher measured than modeled value in the three components, respectively, The individual transmission by clouds under the constant AOD and Ozone atmosphere on average showed 68%, 71% and 76% and further the overcast clouds reduced the transmissions to the 45%, 54% and 59% of the clear sky irradiance in the GS, TUV and EUV, respectively. The annual transmissions by AOD showed on average 67%, 70% and 74% and further the high loadings 2.5-4.0 AOD reduced the

  14. Heterogeneous processing of {sup 13}NO{sub 2} at zero concentration by monodisperse carbon aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tabor, K.; Kalberer, M.; Parrat, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The heterogeneous chemical processing of atmospheric cases by both natural and anthropogenic aerosols plays a key role in the regional as well as global environment. The oxides of nitrogen in the presence of soot present a particularly interesting and relevant topic covering a wide range of such diverse phenomena as acid rain and stratospheric ozone depletion. Detailed investigations of such systems is difficult due to low aerosol and gas species concentrations and, to date, most studies have investigated the chemistry using bulk samples. Nitrogen dioxide is known to be the most important reactive species in this system proceeding as, NO{sub 2} + (C) {r_arrow} (NO{sub 2}{lg_bullet} C){r_arrow} NO + (O {lg_bullet} C). In our current study, we have used {sup 13}N(T{sub 1/2} = 9.96 min) radioisotope labeling techniques to investigate the uptake and chemical conversion of NO{sub 2} in the presence of monodisperse carbon aerosols under real atmospheric conditions, which represents a significant improvement over earlier studies in our lab. {sup 13}N was produced using 14 MeV protons from the PSI Philips cyclotron and a gas target of 2% O{sub 2} in He for the reaction {sup 16}O(p,{alpha}) {sup 13}N. The resulting {sup 13}NO{sub y} were reduced to {sup 13}NO over molybdenum and subsequently oxidized to {sup 13}NO{sub 2} over CrO{sub 3}. Carbon aerosol was generated by spark discharge between graphite rods in argon. Mono-disperse size cuts were selected with a differential mobility analyzer operated with synthetic air. The NO{sub 2} and aerosol streams were admixed and passed through a reaction volume for a reaction time of 10s. A series of selective traps and one filter were used to separate products and reactants: (1) triethanolamine (TEA) denuder to remove unreacted gas phase NO{sub 2}, (2) TEA impregnated class fiber filter to remove aerosol fraction and NO{sub 2} released after uptake, and (3) Co{sub x}O{sub y} trap to remove all residual NO{sub x}.

  15. Sensitivity studies for space-based measurement of atmospheric total column carbon dioxide by reflected sunlight.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S Randolph

    2004-02-01

    The feasibility of making space-based carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon-cycle studies is explored. With the proposed detection method, we use absorption of reflected sunlight near 1.58 microm. The results indicate that the small (degrees 1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable provided that an adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable. Modification of the sunlight path by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could, however, lead to systematic errors in the CO2 column retrieval; therefore ancillary aerosol and cloud data are important to reduce errors. Precise measurement of surface pressure and good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile are also required. PMID:14960086

  16. A modeling study on the climate impacts of black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien

    2004-02-01

    A three-dimensional interactive aerosol-climate model has been developed and used to study the climatic impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols. When compared with the model's natural variability, significant global-scale changes caused by BC aerosols occurred in surface latent and sensible heat flux, surface net long-wave radiative flux, planetary boundary layer height, convective precipitation (all negative), and low-cloud coverage (positive), all closely related to the hydrological cycle. The most significant regional change caused by BC revealed in this study is in precipitation that occurs in the tropics (shift of precipitation center in the ITCZ) and in the middle and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (change in snow depth). Influenced by BC caused changes in cloud cover and surface albedo, the interactive model provides smaller positive all-sky forcing at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and larger negative forcing at the surface than the offline diagnostics (the direct forcings). The actual solar radiative forcings by BC derived from the interactive model also exhibit significant interannual variations that are up to 4 times as large as their means. Based on the revealed changes in cloud radiative forcing by BC, a non-Twomey-Albrecht indirect forcing by BC that alters radiative budgets by changing cloud cover via thermodynamics rather than microphysics is also defined. It has been demonstrated that with an absolute amount more than 2 times higher than that of the TOA forcing, the surface forcing by BC is a very important factor in analyzing the climatic impact of BC. The result of this study suggests that with a constant annual emission of 14 TgC, BC aerosols do not cause a significant change in global-mean surface temperature. The calculated surface temperature change is determined by a subtle balance among changes in surface energy budget as well as in the hydrological cycle, all caused by BC forcing and often compensate each other. The result of this

  17. Inferring brown carbon content from UV aerosol absorption measurements during biomass burning season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Arola, A. T.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Andrade, M.; Labow, G. J.; Eck, T. F.; Li, Z.; Dickerson, R. R.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Osipov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring spectral dependence of light absorption by colored organic or "brown" carbon (BrC) is important, because of its effects on photolysis rates of ozone and surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Enhanced UV spectral absorption by BrC can in turn be exploited for simultaneous retrievals of BrC and black carbon (BC) column amounts in field campaigns. We present an innovative ground-based retrieval of BC and BrC volume fractions and their mass absorption efficiencies during the biomass burning season in Santa Cruz, Bolivia in September-October 2007. Our method combines retrieval of BC volume fraction using AERONET inversion in visible wavelengths with the inversion of total BC+BrC absorption (i.e., column effective imaginary refractive index, kmeas) using Diffuse/Direct irradiance measurements in UV wavelengths. First, we retrieve BrC volume fraction by fitting kmeas at 368nm using Maxwell-Garnett (MG) mixing rules assuming: (1) flat spectral dependence of kBC, (2) known value of kBrC at 368nm from laboratory absorption measurements or smoke chamber experiments, and (3) known BC volume fraction from AERONET inversion. Next, we derive kBrC in short UVB wavelengths by fitting kmeas at 305nm, 311nm, 317nm, 325nm, and 332nm using MG mixing rules and fixed volume fractions of BC and BrC. Our retrievals show larger than expected spectral dependence of kBrC in UVB wavelengths, implying reduced surface UVB irradiance and inhibited photolysis rates of surface ozone destruction. We use a one-dimensional chemical box model to show that the observed strong wavelength dependence of BrC absorption leads to inhibited photolysis of ozone to O(1D), a loss mechanism, while having little impact or even accelerating photolysis of NO2, an ozone production mechanism. Although BC only absorption in biomass burning aerosols is important for climate radiative forcing in the visible wavelengths, additional absorption by BrC is important because of its impact on surface UVB radiation

  18. Brown carbon and thermal-optical analysis: A correction based on optical multi-wavelength apportionment of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, D.; Caponi, L.; Bove, M. C.; Prati, P.

    2016-01-01

    Thermo-optical analysis is widely adopted for the quantitative determination of total, TC, organic, OC and elemental, EC, Carbon in aerosol samples collected on quartz fibre filters. Nevertheless, the methodology presents several issues in particular about the artefacts related to the formation of pyrolytic carbon. It is usually neglected the uncertainty due to the possible presence of brown carbon (BrC) in the sample under analysis, i.e. the optically active fraction of OC produced by biomass burning and with characteristics intermediate between OC and EC. We introduce here a novel correction to the standard thermo-optical protocol based on the determination of the fraction of the sample absorbance due to the (possible) presence of BrC. This is achievable thanks to the coupled use of the Multi Wavelength Absorbance Analyser (MWAA) of the University of Genoa and a standard Sunset Inc. EC/OC analyser. Our correction provides a firmer OC/EC separation as well as an operative quantification of the BrC mass. The methodology has been validated against independent determination of the levoglucosan content in the same filters sent to the Sunset analysis. Corrections up to 23% in the OC and EC values, determined via the standard and new thermo-optical analysis, have been found in a set of PM10 (i.e. Particulate Matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) samples collected wintertime at a mountain site in Northern Italy.

  19. Black carbon aerosols in urban air in South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Vincent A.; Alvi, Sofia; Ghauri, Badar M.; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Husain, Liaquat

    We report data from a yearlong (2006-2007) study of black carbon concentrations ([BC]) measured at 5-min intervals with an Aethalometer in Karachi, Pakistan. Daily mean [BC] varied from about 1 to 15 μg m -3. However, short-term spikes exceeding 40 μg m -3 were common, occurring primarily during the morning and evening rush-hour periods. The [BC] values were highest during November through February, ˜10 μg m -3, and lowest during June through September, ˜2 μg m -3. Diurnal, seasonal, and day-of-the-week trends are discussed. It is demonstrated that these trends are strongly affected by meteorological patterns. A simple expression is applied to the concentration profiles to separate the effects of meteorological conditions and elucidate the underlying emissions patterns. Daily emissions varied from 14,000 to 22,000 kg of BC per day. When integrated over the year emissions for Karachi Proper were estimated at 6.7 kilometric tons per year and emissions for greater Karachi were 17.5 kilometric tons per year. Folding in the populations of each area yields BC emissions of 0.74 and 1.1 kg per person per year, respectively. Applying the model to previously collected data at Lahore, Pakistan yields emissions during November-January that are around a factor of two higher than those in Karachi, but because the BC measurements in Lahore covered only three months, no estimates of annual emissions were attempted. Given the large populations of these cities the local health impact from PM alone is expected to be severe but because of the high [BC] emissions the impact on the global climate may be equally significant.

  20. Comparative Climate Responses of Anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases, All Major Aerosol Components, Black Carbon, and Methane, Accounting for the Evolution of the Aerosol Mixing State and of Clouds/Precipitation from Multiple Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2005-12-01

    Several modeling studies to date have simulated the global climate response of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and bulk (non-size-resolved) sulfate or generic aerosol particles together, but no study has examined the climate response of greenhouse gases simultaneously with all major size- and composition resolved aerosol particle components. Such a study is important for improving our understanding of the effects of anthropogenic pollutants on climate. Here, the GATOR-GCMOM model is used to study the global climate response of (a) all major greenhouse gases and size-resolved aerosol components, (b) all major greenhouse gases alone, (c) fossil-fuel soot (black carbon, primary organic matter, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate), and (d) methane. Aerosol components treated in all simulations included water, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, hydrogen ion, soil dust, and pollen/spores. Fossil-fuel soot (FFS) was emitted into its own size distribution. All other components, including biofuel and biomass soot, sea-spray, soil dust, etc., were emitted into a second distribution (MIX). The FFS distribution grew by condensation of secondary organic matter and sulfuric acid, hydration of water, and dissolution of nitric acid, ammonia, and hydrochloric acid. It self-coagulated and heterocoagulated with the MIX distribution, which also grew by condensation, hydration, and dissolution. Treatment of separate distributions for FFS allowed FFS to evolve from an external mixture to an internal mixture. In both distributions, black carbon was treated as a core component for optical calculations. Both aerosol distributions served as CCN during explicit size-resolved cloud formation. The resulting clouds grew by coagulation and condensation, coagulated with interstitial aerosol particles, and fell to the surface as rain and snow, carrying aerosol constituents with them. Thus, cloud

  1. Evaluation of 1047-nm photoacoustic instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs from gasoline and diesel powered vehicles.

    PubMed

    Arnott, W P; Zielinska, B; Rogers, C F; Sagebiel, J; Park, Kihong; Chow, Judith; Moosmüller, Hans; Watson, John G; Kelly, K; Wagner, D; Sarofim, A; Lighty, J; Palmer, G

    2005-07-15

    A series of measurements have been performed at Hill Air Force Base to evaluate real-time instruments for measurements of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs emitted from spark and ignition compression vehicles. Vehicles were operated at idle or fast idle in one set of measurements and were placed under load on a dynamometer during the second series. Photoacoustic instruments were developed that operated at a wavelength of 1047 nm where gaseous interference is negligible, although sensitivity to black carbon is good. Compact, efficient, solid-state lasers with direct electronic modulation capabilities are used in these instruments. Black carbon measurements are compared with samples collected on quartz fiber filters that were evaluated using the thermal optical reflectance method. A measure of total particle-bound PAH was provided by photoelectric aerosol sensors (PAS) and is evaluated against a sum of PAH mass concentrations obtained with a filter-denuder combination. The PAS had to be operated with a dilution system held at approximately 150 degrees C for most of the source sampling to prevent spurious behavior, thus perhaps compromising detection of lighter PAHs. PA and PAS measurements were found to have a high degree of correlation, perhaps suggesting that the PAS can respond to the polycyclic nature of the black carbon aerosol. The PAS to PA ratio for ambient air in Fresno, CA is 3.7 times as large in winter than in summer months, suggesting that the PAS clearly does respond to compounds other than BC when the instrument is used without the heated inlet. PMID:16082972

  2. Aerosol generation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Polk, William W; Sharma, Monita; Sayes, Christie M; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol generation and characterization are critical components in the assessment of the inhalation hazards of engineered nanomaterials (NMs). An extensive review was conducted on aerosol generation and exposure apparatus as part of an international expert workshop convened to discuss the design of an in vitro testing strategy to assess pulmonary toxicity following exposure to aerosolized particles. More specifically, this workshop focused on the design of an in vitro method to predict the development of pulmonary fibrosis in humans following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Aerosol generators, for dry or liquid particle suspension aerosolization, and exposure chambers, including both commercially available systems and those developed by independent researchers, were evaluated. Additionally, characterization methods that can be used and the time points at which characterization can be conducted in order to interpret in vitro exposure results were assessed. Summarized below is the information presented and discussed regarding the relevance of various aerosol generation and characterization techniques specific to aerosolized MWCNTs exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The generation of MWCNT aerosols relevant to human exposures and their characterization throughout exposure in an ALI system is critical for extrapolation of in vitro results to toxicological outcomes in humans. PMID:27108236

  3. Biomass burning dominates brown carbon absorption in the rural southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Brock, C. A.; Guo, H.; Xu, L.; Weber, R. J.; Ng, N. L.; Allen, H. M.; Ayres, B. R.; Baumann, K.; Cohen, R. C.; Draper, D. C.; Duffey, K. C.; Edgerton, E.; Fry, J. L.; Hu, W. W.; Jimenez, J. L.; Palm, B. B.; Romer, P.; Stone, E. A.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    carbon aerosol consists of light-absorbing organic particulate matter with wavelength-dependent absorption. Aerosol optical extinction, absorption, size distributions, and chemical composition were measured in rural Alabama during summer 2013. The field site was well located to examine sources of brown carbon aerosol, with influence by high biogenic organic aerosol concentrations, pollution from two nearby cities, and biomass burning aerosol. We report the optical closure between measured dry aerosol extinction at 365 nm and calculated extinction from composition and size distribution, showing agreement within experiment uncertainties. We find that aerosol optical extinction is dominated by scattering, with single-scattering albedo values of 0.94 ± 0.02. Black carbon aerosol accounts for 91 ± 9% of the total carbonaceous aerosol absorption at 365 nm, while organic aerosol accounts for 9 ± 9%. The majority of brown carbon aerosol mass is associated with biomass burning, with smaller contributions from biogenically derived secondary organic aerosol.

  4. The Pagami Creek smoke plume after long-range transport to the upper troposphere over Europe - aerosol properties and black carbon mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlkötter, F.; Gysel, M.; Sauer, D.; Minikin, A.; Baumann, R.; Seifert, P.; Ansmann, A.; Fromm, M.; Voigt, C.; Weinzierl, B.

    2013-11-01

    During the CONCERT~2011 field experiment with the DLR research aircraft Falcon an enhanced aerosol layer with particle linear depolarization ratios of 6-8% at 532 nm has been observed at altitudes above 10 km over northeast Germany on 16 September 2011. Dispersion simulations with HYSPLIT suggest that the elevated aerosol layer originated from the pyro-convective Pagami Creek forest fire in Minnesota, USA. The 3-4 days old smoke plume has high total refractory black carbon (rBC) mass concentrations of 0.03-0.35 μg m-3 at standard temperature and pressure (stp) with rBC mass equivalent diameters predominantly smaller than 130 nm. Assuming a~core-shell particle structure, the BC cores exhibit very thick (median: 105-136 nm) BC-free coatings, which modify the radiative transfer through this layer. A large fraction of the BC-containing particles disintegrate while passing the laser beam of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). This is shown for the first time for high-altitude aerosol layers in this study, giving evidence for heterogeneous mixing structures and possibly modified light-scattering and light-absorbing properties of the particles. This case study estimates the rBC mass import from the Pagami Creek forest fire into the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) region (best estimate: 25 Mg BC). A comparison to black carbon emission rates from aviation underlines the relevance of the import of forest fire aerosol on the BC load in the UTLS region. Our detailed information on the microphysics and the mixing state of the BC forest fire aerosol layer will help to better understand and investigate its radiative impact.

  5. Effect of photochemical self-action of carbon-containing aerosol: Wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, I. B.; Berezin, E. V.; Beekmann, M.

    2016-05-01

    It has been shown by numerical simulation that the rate of formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) in smoke plumes caused by vegetation and peat fires under real conditions can significantly depend on the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). The AOT determines the photodissociation rate and hydroxyl radical concentration, which in turn determines the rate of SOA generation as a result of oxidation of semivolatile organic compounds. Quantitative analysis has been carried out for the situation that took place in European Russia during the 2010 Russian wildfires. The state-of-the-art 3D chemical transport model is used in this study; the simulations are optimized and validated using the data of monitoring of the particulate matter in the Moscow region and Finland. The findings indicate that it is important to allow for this effect in studies focused on the analysis and prediction of air pollution due to wildfires, as well as climate and weather studies, whose results may depend on the assumptions about the content and properties of atmospheric carbon-containing aerosol.

  6. Long-Term Observations on Aerosol Elemental Carbon and Mass Concentrations in Winter-Time in New Delhi: Implications for Local Source Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, S. G.; Singh, K.; Singh, N.; Gupta, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    Fossil-fuel and bio-fuel burning are the two major sources identified for high carbonaceous aerosol loadings in several mega cities in India. In the last decade, according to a report from the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB, 1999), the vehicular emission (mostly diesel-powered engines) was contributed to ~67% of the total air pollution load in New Delhi. Therefore, a policy decision was taken by the government, and most of the diesel-powered engines were converted to compressed natural gas (CNG) -powered engines by 2003. To better understand the effect of these changes on air quality, we collected high volume aerosol samples (total suspended particles, TSP) mostly for a day basis at our institute building in New Delhi almost everyday during winter season (November to January) from 2002 to 2008. We found very high mean aerosol loading, i.e., 488±47 μg m-3 in 2002 winter, which dropped significantly to 280±73 μg m-3 in 2003 winter. Thereafter, a steadily increased trend of aerosol mass loadings was observed, i.e., 339±112, 339±120, 412±107 and 444±55 μg m-3 in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 winters, respectively. Similar trend was also observed for elemental carbon (EC) concentration in TSP, which was peaked in 2002 (47±11 μg m-3) and minimized in 2003 (32±6 μg m-3), and then gradually increased to 41±8 μg m-3 in 2007 winter. These decline trends of aerosol mass and EC concentrations in 2003 can be explained well, because of the conversion of diesel engine to CNG engines of public transport facilities. However, again increase in aerosol mass and EC concentrations possibly because of a high increase in road traffic in recent years. According to the economic survey of New Delhi 2008-09, the number of vehicles (which includes all types of engines, i.e., petrol, diesel and CNG) has grown from ~3.3 millions in 1997-98 to ~5.6 millions in 2007-08. The influence of engine types and vehicle population on aerosol loading can also be explained well by SO2 and

  7. Carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation during possible organic aerosol formation in Titan and the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, H.

    2012-12-01

    Abiotic formation of complex organic macromolecule aerosols is important not only for the potential for prebiotic chemical evolution, but also in the global elemental cycle. The direct clues of the habitable environment and biosphere on the early Earth are mostly obtained from geological records, such as isotope signatures and biomarkers in the ancient organic sediments. The recent Cassini-Huygens mission revealed the generation of complex organic aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere, and similar processes could have lead to the formation of organic aerosols in the early Earth atmosphere. Understanding the formation reaction network and accompanying isotope fractionation processes of the organic aerosols is necessary to constrain the active organic environment on the early Earth from the available geological evidence. We have investigated the abiotic formation of organic aerosols in simulated atmospheres of Titan and the early, with particular focus on carbon and nitrogen isotope fractionation. Laboratory aerosol analogues, termed tholins, are generated with cold plasma irradiation of reduced gas mixtures, such as N2/CH4 and N2/H2/CO. Stable isotopic ratios of 15N/14N and 13C/12C for the generated tholins are measured with an elemental analysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (EA-IR-MS). Our preliminary data for tholins generated from an equivalent N2/CH4 (=90/10) gas mixture at various pressures suggests the 15N isotopic fractionation up to δ15N = -20~25 permil during tholin formation, while 13C isotopic fractionation seems almost negligible. This negative δ15N is even lighter than those observed in kerogens in the Archean sediments (Beaumont and Robert, 1999; Pinti et al., 2001), and the organic haze could have contributed to the source of 15N-depleted kerogens. Furthermore, the δ15N vary with deposition pressure. Previous works demonstrated that the resulted two types of tholin are very different in chemical structure and optical properties (Imanaka et al

  8. Determination of concentration and size distribution of black carbon in submicron aerosol from data of nephelometric measurements of angular scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valerii S.; Rakhimov, Rustam F.; Shmargunov, Vladimir P.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of determining the Black Carbon (BC) concentration and its size distribution in submicron aerosol from data of polarization spectronephelometric measurements of angular aerosol scattering is demonstrated for the first time. The data of simultaneous nephelometric and aethalometric measurements of BC concentration in wood smoke are compared. The inverse problem is solved from measurements of 40 polarization components of spectral coefficients of angular scattering, and aerosol filling factors and the imaginary part of the complex refractive indexes are determined for subfractions of ultrafine- (radii of 30-100 nm), fine- (100-430 nm), and coarse-disperse (430-770 nm) particles. Then the total BC concentration, its size distribution, and BC fraction are estimated in the approximation of homogeneous volume internal mixture of BC and nonabsorbing matter. The analysis shows that at the long evolution of smoke aerosol, nephelometric and aethalometric estimates of the BC concentrations are in a good agreement. The discrepancy averages about 16% for concentrations varying in a range 30-1000 μg/m3.

  9. Functional characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon of size-fractionated aerosol in the southern Mississippi Valley

    PubMed Central

    Chalbot, M.-C. G.; Brown, J.; Chitranshi, P.; da Costa, G. Gamboa; Pollock, E. D.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical content of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a function of particle size was characterized in Little Rock, Arkansas in winter and spring 2013. The objectives of this study were to (i) compare the functional characteristics of coarse, fine and ultrafine WSOC and (ii) reconcile the sources of WSOC for periods when carbonaceous aerosol was the most abundant particulate component. The WSOC accounted for 5 % of particle mass for particles with δp > 0.96 μm and 10 % of particle mass for particles with δp < 0.96 μm. Non-exchangeable aliphatic (H–C), unsaturated aliphatic (H–C–C=), oxygenated saturated aliphatic (H–C–O), acetalic (O–CH–O) and aromatic (Ar–H) protons were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations varied from 4.1 ± 0.1 nmol m−3 for particles with 1.5 < δp < 3.0 μm to 73.9 ± 12.3 nmol m−3 for particles with δp < 0.49 μm. The molar H/C ratios varied from 0.48 ± 0.05 to 0.92 ± 0.09, which were comparable to those observed for combustion-related organic aerosol. The R–H was the most abundant group, representing about 45 % of measured total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations, followed by H–C–O (27 %) and H–C–C= (26 %). Levoglucosan, amines, ammonium and methanesulfonate were identified in NMR fingerprints of fine particles. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, formate and acetate were associated with coarse particles. These qualitative differences of 1H-NMR profiles for different particle sizes indicated the possible contribution of biological aerosols and a mixture of aliphatic and oxygenated compounds from biomass burning and traffic exhausts. The concurrent presence of ammonium and amines also suggested the presence of ammonium/aminium nitrate and sulfate secondary aerosol. The size-dependent origin of WSOC was further corroborated by the increasing δ13C abundance from −26.81 ± 0.18 ‰ for the smallest particles to

  10. Discrete dipole approximation for black carbon-containing aerosols in arbitrary mixing state: A hybrid discretization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteki, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-01

    An accurate and efficient simulation of light scattering by an atmospheric black carbon (BC)-containing aerosol-a fractal-like cluster of hundreds of carbon monomers that is internally mixed with other aerosol compounds such as sulfates, organics, and water-remains challenging owing to the enormous diversities of such aerosols' size, shape, and mixing state. Although the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) is theoretically an exact numerical method that is applicable to arbitrary non-spherical inhomogeneous targets, in practice, it suffers from severe granularity-induced error and degradation of computational efficiency for such extremely complex targets. To solve this drawback, we propose herein a hybrid DDA method designed for arbitrary BC-containing aerosols: the monomer-dipole assumption is applied to a cluster of carbon monomers, whereas the efficient cubic-lattice discretization is applied to the remaining particle volume consisting of other materials. The hybrid DDA is free from the error induced by the surface granularity of carbon monomers that occurs in conventional cubic-lattice DDA. In the hybrid DDA, we successfully mitigate the artifact of neglecting the higher-order multipoles in the monomer-dipole assumption by incorporating the magnetic dipole in addition to the electric dipole into our DDA formulations. Our numerical experiments show that the hybrid DDA method is an efficient light-scattering solver for BC-containing aerosols in arbitrary mixing states. The hybrid DDA could be also useful for a cluster of metallic nanospheres associated with other dielectric materials.

  11. Triple Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Carbonates: A Novel Technique to Identify Heterogeneous Chemistry on Aerosol Surfaces in Polluted Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Horn, J.; Dominguez, G.; Masterson, A.; Ivanov, A. V.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2009-12-01

    In the ambient atmosphere, the physical and chemical properties of aerosol vary greatly between location and time due to various heterogeneous and photochemical reactions in the atmosphere. In polluted urban environments, the aerosol and gaseous mixtures interact to produce new compounds and particulates; consequently humans are exposed to many as yet undetected species. Studies of actual chemically-active, airborne particulates can better address the interaction of complex particulate and gaseous pollutant mixtures, however, it is notoriously difficult to measure chemical transformations of aerosols. Here we describe a new technique that can be used to understand the chemical transformation occurring on the surface of aerosols and thus to quantify the interaction of gaseous species and aerosol in the atmosphere. Fine and coarse aerosol samples were collected on filter papers in La Jolla, CA, USA for one week. The aerosol samples were digested with phosphoric acid and CO2 released was purified chromatographically and analyzed for 13 C. To obtain independent measurements of oxygen isotopes, the CO2 was fluorinated and oxygen gas obtained was analyzed using Mat253 Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. The data indicated an excess 17O (0.6 to 4‰) in atmospheric carbonates. The oxygen isotope anomaly in atmospheric carbonates has been observed for the first time and it showed a highly significant correlation (r2 = 0.90) with urban index; an indirect measure of ozone chemistry. The δ13C in atmospheric carbonates was found to vary from -18 to -40‰. Controlled laboratory experiments to understand the origin and variation in the C and O isotopic composition of atmospheric carbonates were conducted using various mineral surfaces. Isotopic measurements of in-situ formed carbonated on CaOH, CaO, MgO, SiO2,Cu, CuO, Ni and Fe2O3 due to chemisorbed CO2 in the presence of thin water films were performed and we found that the δ13C in these carbonates ranged from -12 to -24

  12. Sources and light absorption of water-soluble organic carbon aerosols in the outflow from northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, E. N.; Andersson, A.; Han, J.; Lee, M.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2014-02-01

    High loadings of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosols in Chinese air influence the air quality for over one billion people and impact the regional climate. A large fraction (17-80%) of this aerosol carbon is water-soluble, promoting cloud formation and thus climate cooling. Recent findings, however, suggest that water-soluble carbonaceous aerosols also absorb sunlight, bringing additional direct and indirect climate warming effects, yet the extent and nature of light absorption by this water-soluble "brown carbon" and its relation to sources is poorly understood. Here, we combine source estimates constrained by dual carbon isotopes with light-absorption measurements of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) for a March 2011 campaign at the Korea Climate Observatory at Gosan (KCOG), a receptor station in SE Yellow Sea for the outflow from northern China. The mass absorption cross section at 365 nm (MAC365) of WSOC for air masses from N. China were in general higher (0.8-1.1 m2 g-1), than from other source regions (0.3-0.8 m2 g-1). However, this effect corresponds to only 2-10% of the radiative forcing caused by light absorption by elemental carbon. Radiocarbon constraints show that the WSOC in Chinese outflow had significantly higher fraction fossil sources (30-50%) compared to previous findings in S. Asia, N. America and Europe. Stable carbon (δ13C) measurements were consistent with aging during long-range air mass transport for this large fraction of carbonaceous aerosols.

  13. The Antarctic environment and its effect upon the total carbon and sulfur abundances in recovered meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Andrawes, F. F.

    1980-01-01

    Total carbon and sulfur abundances have been measured for 25 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills area of Antarctica. The majority (greater than 67%) of the meteorites analyzed do not contain enriched carbon abundances resulting from weathering processes. The presence of secondary carbonates in samples which give no apparent evidence of weathering was noted during pyrolysis experiments, despite the 'normal' total carbon abundances. In selected cases, the surfaces of weathered samples may contain up to a factor of two greater carbon content than the interior. Variations in carbon abundances may reflect the degree of weathering and the amount of secondary minerals present. One of the surprises of this study is that the majority of the Antarctic meteorites studied do not exhibit total carbon and sulfur abundances outside the ranges previously observed for falls.

  14. The Carbon Aerosol / Particles Nucleation with a Lidar: Numerical Simulations and Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Francis, Mirvatte; David, Gregory; Rairoux, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution, we present the results of two recent papers [1,2] published in Optics Express, dedicated to the development of two new lidar methodologies. In [1], while the carbon aerosol (for example, soot particles) is recognized as a major uncertainty on climate and public health, we couple lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII) to allow retrieving the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by the carbon aerosol, in agreement with Planck's law, in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. In paper [2], awarded as June 2014 OSA Spotlight, we identify the optical requirements ensuring an elastic lidar to be sensitive to new particles formation events (NPF-events) in the atmosphere, while, in the literature, all the ingredients initiating nucleation are still being unrevealed [3]. Both papers proceed with the same methodology by identifying the optical requirements from numerical simulation (Planck and Kirchhoff's laws in [1], Mie and T-matrix numerical codes in [2]), then presenting lidar field application case studies. We believe these new lidar methodologies may be useful for climate, geophysical, as well as fundamental purposes.

  15. Constraining Black Carbon Aerosol over Asia using OMI Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth and the Adjoint of GEOS-Chem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Li; Henze, David K.; Grell, Georg A.; Carmichael. Gregory R.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Zhang, Qiang; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo; Lu, Zifeng; Cao, Junji; Mao, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the emissions and distribution of black carbon (BC) in the region referred to here as Southeastern Asia (70degE-l50degE, 11degS-55degN) are critical to studies of the atmospheric environment and climate change. Analysis of modeled BC concentrations compared to in situ observations indicates levels are underestimated over most of Southeast Asia when using any of four different emission inventories. We thus attempt to reduce uncertainties in BC emissions and improve BC model simulations by developing top-down, spatially resolved, estimates of BC emissions through assimilation of OMI observations of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) with the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint for April and October of 2006. Overwhelming enhancements, up to 500%, in anthropogenic BC emissions are shown after optimization over broad areas of Southeast Asia in April. In October, the optimization of anthropogenic emissions yields a slight reduction (1-5%) over India and parts of southern China, while emissions increase by 10-50% over eastern China. Observational data from in situ measurements and AERONET observations are used to evaluate the BC inversions and assess the bias between OMI and AERONET AAOD. Low biases in BC concentrations are improved or corrected in most eastern and central sites over China after optimization, while the constrained model still underestimates concentrations in Indian sites in both April and October, possibly as a. consequence of low prior emissions. Model resolution errors may contribute up to a factor of 2.5 to the underestimate of surface BC concentrations over northern India. We also compare the optimized results using different anthropogenic emission inventories and discuss the sensitivity of top-down constraints on anthropogenic emissions with respect to biomass burning emissions. In addition, the impacts of brown carbon, the formulation of the observation operator, and different a priori constraints on the optimization are

  16. Ground-based assessment of retrieved aerosol properties from GOSAT observations in multiple carbon dioxide retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R.; O'Dell, C. W.; Frankenberg, C.; Oshchepkov, S.; Bril, A.; Yokota, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Butz, A.; Guerlet, S.; Boesch, H.; Parker, R.

    2012-12-01

    Spaced-based near-infrared measurements of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane are now routinely made from the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) via an assortment of retrieval algorithms. The measurements are based on assumed knowledge of the light paths followed by the measured solar photons, paths which can be altered in the presence of clouds and aerosols. Most algorithms therefore attempt to simultaneously retrieval aerosol information alongside the desired gas concentrations, in an attempt to mitigate errors caused by atmospheric scattering. However, recent studies have hinted that most algorithms tend to retrieve biased aerosol information over certain surface types (such as bright surfaces), leading in particular to biased estimates of the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2). In this work, we compare GOSAT-retrieved AEROSOL properties from multiple XCO2 retrieval algorithms with those of the well-validated AERONET sun photometer network. We present a correlation analysis of retrieved aerosol errors and their effect on retrieved XCO2, as a function of multiple variables such as surface type and viewing geometry, with the goal of providing critical information on how best to deal with aerosols in the context of these challenging greenhouse gas retrievals.

  17. Total Storage and Landscape Partitioning of Soil Organic Carbon and Phytomass Carbon in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, M. B.; Hanisch, J.; Weiss, N.; Kuhry, P.; Hugelius, G.

    2014-12-01

    We present results of detailed partitioning of soil organic carbon (SOC) and phytomass carbon (PC) from two study sites in Siberia. The study sites in the Tundra (Kytalyk) and the Taiga (Spasskaya Pad) reflect two contrasting environments in the continuous permafrost zone. In total 57 individual field sites (24 and 33 per study site respectively) have have been sampled for SOC and PC along transects cutting across different land covers. In Kytalyk the sampling depth for the soil pedons was 1 m depth. In Spasskaya Pad where the active layer was significantly deeper, we aimed for 2 m depth or tried to include at least the top of the permafrost. Here the average depth of soil profiles was 152 cm. PC was sampled from 1x1 m ground coverage plots. In Spasskaya Pad tree phytomass was also estimated on a 5x5 m plot. The SOC storage was calculated separately for the intervals 0-30 cm, 30-100 cm and 100-200 cm (the latter only for Spasskaya Pad), as well as for organic layer vs. mineral soil, active layer vs. permafrost and for cryoturbated soil horizons. Landscape partitioning was performed by thematic up-scaling using a vegetation based land cover classification of very high resolution (2x2 m) satellite imagery. Non-Metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) was used to explore the relationship of SOC with PC and different soil and permafrost related variables. The results show that the different land cover classes can be considered distinct storages of SOC, but that PC is not significantly related to total SOC storage. At both study sites the 30-100 cm SOC storage is more important for the total SOC storage than the 0-30 cm interval, and large portions of the total SOC are stored in the permafrost. The largest contribution comes from wetland pedons, but highly cryoturbated individual non-wetland pedons can match these. In Kytalyk the landscape partitioning of SOC mostly follows large scale geomorphological features, while in Spasskaya pad forest type also has a large

  18. Assessment of bacterial growth and total organic carbon removal on granular activated carbon contactors.

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, K; Maloney, S W; McElhaney, J; Suffet, I H; Pipes, W O

    1983-01-01

    The overall growth rate of bacteria on granular activated carbon (GAC) contactors at the Philadelphia Torresdale Water Treatment Pilot Plant facility was found to decrease until steady state was reached. The growth rate was found to fluctuate between 6.94 X 10(-3) and 8.68 X 10(-4) doublings per h. The microbiological removal of total organic carbon (TOC) was calculated by considering the GAC contactors as semiclosed continuous culture systems and using growth yield factors determined in laboratory experiments. After ozonation, the average TOC entering the contactors was 1,488 micrograms/liter, and the average effluent TOC was 497 micrograms/liter. Microbiological TOC removal was found to average 240 micrograms/liter on GAC contactors, which was not significantly different from microbiological TOC (220 micrograms/liter) removal across a parallel sand contactor where no adsorption took place. Thus, GAC did not appear to enhance biological TOC removal. Bacterial growth and maintenance was responsible for approximately 24% of the TOC removal on GAC under the conditions of this study. PMID:6639023

  19. Formation of brown carbon via reactions of ammonia with secondary organic aerosols from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Updyke, Katelyn M.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2012-12-01

    Filter samples of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the ozone (O3)- and hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of various biogenic (isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, α-cedrene, α-humulene, farnesene, pine leaf essential oils, cedar leaf essential oils) and anthropogenic (tetradecane, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, naphthalene) precursors were exposed to humid air containing approximately 100 ppb of gaseous ammonia (NH3). Reactions of SOA compounds with NH3 resulted in production of light-absorbing "brown carbon" compounds, with the extent of browning ranging from no observable change (isoprene SOA) to visible change in color (limonene SOA). The aqueous phase reactions with dissolved ammonium (NH4+) salts, such as ammonium sulfate, were equally efficient in producing brown carbon. Wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients (MAC) of the aged SOA were quantified by extracting known amounts of SOA material in methanol and recording its UV/Vis absorption spectra. For a given precursor, the OH-generated SOA had systematically lower MAC compared to the O3-generated SOA. The highest MAC values, for brown carbon from SOA resulting from O3 oxidation of limonene and sesquiterpenes, were comparable to MAC values for biomass burning particles but considerably smaller than MAC values for black carbon aerosols. The NH3/NH4+ + SOA brown carbon aerosol may contribute to aerosol optical density in regions with elevated concentrations of NH3 or ammonium sulfate and high photochemical activity.

  20. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature. PMID:25272147

  1. Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, Natalie; Rothenberg, D.; Lindsay, Keith; Doney, Scott C.; Moore, Jefferson Keith; Randerson, James T.; Thornton, Peter E; Jones, C. D.

    2011-02-01

    Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

  2. The water-soluble fraction of carbon, sulfur, and crustal elements in Asian aerosols and Asian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, R. M.; Majestic, B. J.; Shafer, M. M.; Chuang, P. Y.; Simoneit, B. R. T.; Schauer, J. J.

    We quantified the water-soluble species in 24 h average TSP (Dunhuang and Gosan) and PM1.0 (Gosan only) samples associated with the Spring 2001 Asian Dust season. Samples were analyzed for water-soluble organic carbon, water-soluble sulfur, and water-soluble crustal elements, as well as their bulk chemical composition. Water-soluble organic carbon in Gosan accounted for 28-83% (average=63%) of the particle-phase TSP total organic carbon, and 1-69% (average=23%) of the particle-phase PM1.0 organic carbon. Water-soluble sulfur, primarily in the form of sulfate, accounted for 2-22% of the TSP mass in Gosan, and 0.9-11% of the TSP mass in Dunhuang. The absolute concentrations and the soluble fraction of crustal elements in TSP samples collected at Gosan were found to correlate with the air mass source region as determined by back-trajectory analysis. For example, elevated levels of water-soluble sodium, potassium, and calcium were observed during dust events. These observations are likely the result of differences in anthropogenic sources, mineralogical composition of resuspended crustal materials, and atmospheric processing of the aerosols. Experiments were conducted using Asian soil samples to study the impact of acidification by nitric acid vapor on the solubility of crustal elements present in Asian desert and non-desert dusts. These experiments demonstrated that gaseous nitric acid attack leads to significant increases (>100% increase) in water-soluble calcium, magnesium, aluminum, manganese, and iron, while little or no increases in water-soluble sodium and potassium were observed in the soils.

  3. Exposure and Emissions Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production—Part I: Elemental Carbon and Iron–Soot Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Birch, M. Eileen; Ku, Bon-Ki; Evans, Douglas E.; Ruda-Eberenz, Toni A.

    2015-01-01

    Production of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes (CNFs/CNTs) and their composite products is increasing globally. High volume production may increase the exposure risks for workers who handle these materials. Though health effects data for CNFs/CNTs are limited, some studies raise serious health concerns. Given the uncertainty about their potential hazards, there is an immediate need for toxicity data and field studies to assess exposure to CNFs/CNTs. An extensive study was conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes CNFs. Filter, sorbent, cascade impactor, bulk, and microscopy samples, combined with direct-reading instruments, provided complementary information on air contaminants. Samples were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with EC as a measure of CNFs. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy also was applied. Fine/ultrafine iron-rich soot, PAHs, and carbon monoxide were production byproducts. Direct-reading instrument results were reported previously [Evans DE et al. (Aerosol monitoring during carbon nanofiber production: mobile direct-reading sampling. Ann Occup Hyg 2010;54:514–31.)] Results for time-integrated samples are reported as companion papers in this Issue. OC and EC, metals, and microscopy results are reported here, in Part I, while results for PAHs are reported in Part II [Birch ME. (Exposure and Emissions Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production—Part II: Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Ann. Occup. Hyg 2011; 55: 1037–47.)]. Respirable EC area concentrations inside the facility were about 6–68 times higher than outdoors, while personal breathing zone samples were up to 170 times higher. PMID:21965464

  4. Enhanced light absorption and scattering by carbon soot aerosol internally mixed with sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Khalizov, Alexei F; Xue, Huaxin; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jun; Zhang, Renyi

    2009-02-12

    Light absorption by carbon soot increases when the particles are internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials, leading to increased radiative forcing, but the magnitude of this enhancement is a subject of great uncertainty. We have performed laboratory experiments of the optical properties of fresh and internally mixed carbon soot aerosols with a known particle size, morphology, and the mixing state. Flame-generated soot aerosol is size-selected with a double-differential mobility analyzer (DMA) setup to eliminate multiply charged particle modes and then exposed to gaseous sulfuric acid (10(9)-10(10) molecule cm(-3)) and water vapor (5-80% relative humidity, RH). Light extinction and scattering by fresh and internally mixed soot aerosol are measured at 532 nm wavelength using a cavity ring-down spectrometer and an integrating nephelometer, respectively, and the absorption is derived as the difference between extinction and scattering. The optical properties of fresh soot are independent of RH, whereas soot internally mixed with sulfuric acid exhibits significant enhancement in light absorption and scattering, increasing with the mass fraction of sulfuric acid coating and relative humidity. For soot particles with an initial mobility diameter of 320 nm and a 40% H(2)SO(4) mass coating fraction, absorption and scattering are increased by 1.4- and 13-fold at 80% RH, respectively. Also, the single scattering albedo of soot aerosol increases from 0.1 to 0.5 after coating and humidification. Additional measurements with soot particles that are first coated with sulfuric acid and then heated to remove the coating show that both scattering and absorption are enhanced by irreversible restructuring of soot aggregates to more compact globules. Depending on the initial size and density of soot aggregates, restructuring acts to increase or decrease the absorption cross-section, but the combination of restructuring and encapsulation always results in an increased absorption for

  5. Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption and Single-Scattering Albedo On Ambient Relative Humidity for Sulfate Aerosols with Black Carbon Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Hamill, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols frequently contain hygroscopic sulfate species and black carbon (soot) inclusions. In this paper we report results of a modeling study to determine the change in aerosol absorption due to increases in ambient relative humidity (RH), for three common sulfate species, assuming that the soot mass fraction is present as a single concentric core within each particle. Because of the lack of detailed knowledge about various input parameters to models describing internally mixed aerosol particle optics, we focus on results that were aimed at determining the maximum effect that particle humidification may have on aerosol light absorption. In the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm, maximum absorption humidification factors (ratio of wet to 'dry=30% RH' absorption) for single aerosol particles are found to be as large as 1.75 when the RH changes from 30 to 99.5%. Upon lesser humidification from 30 to 80% RH, absorption humidification for single particles is only as much as 1.2, even for the most favorable combination of initial ('dry') soot mass fraction and particle size. Integrated over monomodal lognormal particle size distributions, maximum absorption humidification factors range between 1.07 and 1.15 for humidification from 30 to 80% and between 1.1 and 1.35 for humidification from 30 to 95% RH for all species considered. The largest humidification factors at a wavelength of 450 nm are obtained for 'dry' particle size distributions that peak at a radius of 0.05 microns, while the absorption humidification factors at 700 nm are largest for 'dry' size distributions that are dominated by particles in the radius range of 0.06 to 0.08 microns. Single-scattering albedo estimates at ambient conditions are often based on absorption measurements at low RH (approx. 30%) and the assumption that aerosol absorption does not change upon humidification (i.e., absorption humidification equal to unity). Our modeling study suggests that this assumption alone can

  6. TOCCATA: a customized carbon total correlation spectroscopy NMR metabolomics database.

    PubMed

    Bingol, Kerem; Zhang, Fengli; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2012-11-01

    A customized metabolomics NMR database, TOCCATA, is introduced, which uses (13)C chemical shift information for the reliable identification of metabolites, their spin systems, and isomeric states. TOCCATA, whose information was derived from the BMRB and HMDB databases and the literature, currently contains 463 compounds and 801 spin systems, and it can be used through a publicly accessible web server. TOCCATA allows the identification of metabolites in the submillimolar concentration range from (13)C-(13)C total correlation spectroscopy experiments of complex mixtures, which is demonstrated for an Escherichia coli cell lysate, a carbohydrate mixture, and an amino acid mixture, all of which were uniformly (13)C-labeled. PMID:23016498

  7. Methane and carbon dioxide total column retrievals from cloudy GOSAT soundings over the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, D.; Butz, A.; Hu, H.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Arnold, S. G.; Schneider, M.; Feist, D. G.; Morino, I.; Pollard, D.; Aben, I.; Landgraf, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel physics-based retrieval method to infer total column mixing ratios of methane (XCH4) and carbon dioxide (XCO2) from space-borne short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) Earth radiance observations over the cloud-covered ocean. In nadir observing geometry in the SWIR spectral range, backscattering at the ocean surface is negligible. Hence, space-borne radiance measurements of ocean scenes generally do not provide sufficient level to retrieve XCO2 and XCH4. Our approach specifically targets cloudy GOSAT ocean soundings to provide sufficient radiance signal in nadir soundings in ocean areas. Currently, exploiting space-borne SWIR soundings over oceans relies on soundings in Sun glint geometry, observing the specular solar reflection at the ocean surface. The glint observation mode requires cloud-free conditions and a suitable observation geometry, severely limiting their number and geographical coverage. The proposed method is based on the existing RemoTeC algorithm that is extensively used to retrieve CH4 and CO2 columns from GOSAT SWIR measurements over land. For ocean pixels, we describe light scattering by clouds and aerosols by a single-layer water cloud with Gaussian height distribution. We infer the height and the geometrical thickness of the cloud layer jointly with the droplet size and the number density and the column abundances of CO2, CH4, and H2O. The CO2 and CH4 column product is validated with ground-based total column measurements performed at eight stations from the TCCON network that are geographically close to an ocean coastline. For the TCCON site with the most robust statistics (Lauder, New Zealand), we find a retrieval bias of 0.36% for XCH4 combined with a standard deviation of retrieval errors of 1.12%. For XCO2, the bias is 0.51% combined with a standard deviation of 1.03%. Averaged over all TCCON sites, our retrievals are biased -0.01% for XCO2 and -0.32% for XCH4. The standard deviation of station biases amounts to 0.45% for XCO2

  8. Aerosol Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production: Mobile Direct-Reading Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Douglas E.; Ku, Bon Ki; Birch, M. Eileen; Dunn, Kevin H.

    2010-01-01

    Detailed investigations were conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Presented research summarizes the direct-reading monitoring aspects of the study. A mobile aerosol sampling platform, equipped with an aerosol instrument array, was used to characterize emissions at different locations within the facility. Particle number, respirable mass, active surface area, and photoelectric response were monitored with a condensation particle counter (CPC), a photometer, a diffusion charger, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, respectively. CO and CO2 were additionally monitored. Combined simultaneous monitoring of these metrics can be utilized to determine source and relative contribution of airborne particles (CNFs and others) within a workplace. Elevated particle number concentrations, up to 1.15 × 106 cm−3, were found within the facility but were not due to CNFs. Ultrafine particle emissions, released during thermal treatment of CNFs, were primarily responsible. In contrast, transient increases in respirable particle mass concentration, with a maximum of 1.1 mg m−3, were due to CNF release through uncontrolled transfer and bagging. Of the applied metrics, our findings suggest that particle mass was probably the most useful and practical metric for monitoring CNF emissions in this facility. Through chemical means, CNFs may be selectively distinguished from other workplace contaminants (Birch et al., in preparation), and for direct-reading monitoring applications, the photometer was found to provide a reasonable estimate of respirable CNF mass concentration. Particle size distribution measurements were conducted with an electrical low-pressure impactor and a fast particle size spectrometer. Results suggest that the dominant CNF mode by particle number lies between 200 and 250 nm for both aerodynamic and mobility equivalent diameters. Significant emissions of CO were also evident in this facility. Exposure control recommendations

  9. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y.-L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to a vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average, 91 % of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our setup, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our setup were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  10. Light absorption of black carbon aerosol and its enhancement by mixing state in an urban atmosphere in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zi-Juan; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Yu, Kuang-You; Sun, Tian-Le; Zeng, Li-Wu; Hu, Min

    2013-04-01

    The effects of black carbon (BC) aerosol on climate warming have been the study focus in the recent decade, and the reduction of BC is now expected to have significant near-term climate change mitigation. Large uncertainties of BC optical properties, however, still exist and seriously restrict the ability to quantify BC's climate effects. In this study, advanced instrumentation (a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and a single particle soot photometer (SP2)) were used to measure black carbon aerosol and analyze its optical properties in a mega-city in South China, Shenzhen, during the summer of 2011. The results indicated that the average BC mass concentration was 4.0 ± 3.1 μg m-3 during the campaign, accounting for ˜11% of the total PM2.5 mass concentration. The PM2.5 light absorption at 405, 532 and 781 nm was 37.1 ± 28.1, 25.4 ± 19.0 and 17.6 ± 12.9 Mm-1, respectively. The average absorption Angstrom exponent of PM2.5 in visual spectrum (AAE405-781 nm) was 1.1 ± 0.1 during the campaign, indicating that the light absorbing carbon mainly came from vehicular emissions, with little contributions from biomass burning emissions. The mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of BC at 532 nm ranged from 5.0 to 8.5 m2 g-1 during the campaign, with an average of 6.5 ± 0.5 m2 g-1, and showed an obvious diurnal pattern with high values in the daytime. The average percentage of internally mixed BC was 24.3 ± 7.9% during the campaign, showing significant positive correlation relationship with the MAE of BC. More quantitative data analysis indicated that the internally mixed BC would amplify MAE by about 7% during the campaign, which stands in accordance with the new finding of a very recent Science magazine paper (Cappa et al., 2012) that the BC absorption enhancement due to internal mixing in the real atmosphere is relatively low, in apparent contrast to theoretical model predictions.

  11. What controls the seasonal cycle of black carbon aerosols in India?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Barth, M. C.; Pfister, G. G.; Nair, V. S.; Ghude, Sachin D.; Ojha, N.

    2015-08-01

    The seasonal variability of black carbon (BC) aerosols in India is studied using high resolution (10 km) BC simulations conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry. The model reproduces the observed seasonality of surface BC fairly well over most parts of India but fails to capture the seasonality in the Himalayas and deviates from the observed BC magnitude at several sites. The errors in modeled BC are attributed to uncertainties in BC emissions and their diurnal cycle, planetary boundary layer height underestimation, and aerosol processes. Model results show distinct but opposite seasonality of BC in the lower (LT) and free troposphere (FT) with BC showing winter maximum and summer minimum in the LT and vice versa in the FT. Our analysis shows that BC seasonality is not driven by seasonality of the anthropogenic emissions but by changes in the regional meteorology through weakening of the horizontal transport and strengthening of the vertical transport of BC during summertime compared to winter. BC in both the LT and FT comes mostly from anthropogenic emissions followed by biomass burning emissions except during winter when long-distant sources become more important in the FT. BC in the FT is significantly affected by anthropogenic emissions from all parts of India. The source-receptor relationship changes seasonally, but the regional transport remains a significant contributor to BC loadings in the LT of India, highlighting the necessity of considering nonlocal sources along with local emissions when designing strategies for mitigating BC impacts on air quality.

  12. Emission factors of carbon monoxide and size-resolved aerosols from biofuel combustion.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, C; Rao, G U

    2001-05-15

    This study reports emission factors of carbon monoxide and size-resolved aerosols from combustion of wood, dung cake, and biofuel briquette in traditional and improved stoves in India. Wood was the cleanest burning fuel, with higher emissions of CO from dung cake and particulate matter from both dung cake and briquette fuels. Combustion of dung cake, especially in an improved metal stove, resulted in extremely high pollutant emissions. Instead, biogas from anaerobic dung digestion should be promoted as a cooking fuel for public health protection. Pollutant emissions increased with increasing stove thermal efficiency, implying that thermal efficiency enhancement in the improved stoves was mainly from design features leading to increased heat transfer but not combustion efficiency. Compared to the traditional stove, the improved stoves resulted in the lower pollutant emissions on a kW h-1 basis from wood combustion but in similar emissions from briquette and dung cake. Stove designs are needed with good emissions performance across multiple fuels. Unimodal aerosol size distributions were measured from biofuel combustion with mass median aerodynamic diameters of 0.5-0.8 micron, about a factor of 10 larger than those from fossil fuel combustion (e.g. diesel), with potential implications for lung deposition and health risk. PMID:11393993

  13. Redistribution of black carbon in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunamonti, S.; Krieger, U. K.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a major anthropogenic greenhouse agent, yet substantial uncertainties obstruct understanding its radiative forcing. Particularly debated is the extent of the absorption enhancement by internally compared to externally mixed BC, which critically depends on the interior morphology of the BC-containing particles. Here we suggest that a currently unaccounted morphology, optically very different from the customary core-shell and volume-mixing assumptions, likely occurs in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Using Raman spectroscopy on micrometer-sized droplets, we show that LLPS of an organic/inorganic model system drives redistribution of BC into the outer (organic) phase of the host particle. This results in an inverted core-shell structure, in which a transparent aqueous core is surrounded by a BC-containing absorbing shell. Based on Mie theory calculations, we estimate that such a redistribution can increase the absorption efficiency of internally mixed BC aerosols by up to 25% compared to the core-shell approximation.

  14. Amorphous Carbon Deposited by a Novel Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition for Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nurfadzilah; Kamaruzzaman, Dayana; Rusop, Mohamad

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) solar cells were successfully prepared using a novel and self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using camphor oil as a precursor. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved an efficiency of 0.008% with a fill factor of 0.15 for the device deposited at 0.5 h. The current-voltage (I-V) graph emphasized on the linear graph (ohmic) for the a-C thin films, whereas for the p-n device structure, a rectifying curve was obtained. The rectifying curves signify the heterojunction between the p-type a-C film and the n-Si substrate and designate the generation of electron-hole pair of the samples under illumination. Photoresponse characteristics of the deposited a-C was highlighted when being illuminated (AM 1.5 illumination: 100 mW/cm2, 25 °C). Transmittance spectrum exhibit a large transmittance value (>85%) and absorption coefficient value of 103-104 cm-1 at the visible range of 390 to 790 nm. The atomization of a liquid precursor solution into fine sub-micrometre-sized aerosol droplets in AACVD induced the smooth surface of a-C films. To the best of our knowledge, fabrication of a-C solar cell using this AACVD method has not yet been reported.

  15. Emission of submicron aerosol particles in cement kilns: Total concentration and size distribution.

    PubMed

    Rotatori, Mauro; Mosca, Silvia; Guerriero, Ettore; Febo, Antonio; Giusto, Marco; Montagnoli, Mauro; Bianchini, Massimo; Ferrero, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Cement plants are responsible for particle and gaseous emissions into the atmosphere. With respect to particle emission, the greater part of is in the range from 0.05 to 5.0 µm in diameter. In the last years attention was paid to submicron particles, but there is a lack of available data on the emission from stationary sources. In this paper, concentration and size distribution of particles emitted from four cement kilns, in relationship to operational conditions (especially the use of alternative fuel to coal) of the clinker process are reported. Experimental campaigns were carried out by measuring particles concentration and size distribution at the stack of four cement plants through condensation particle counter (CPC) and scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer (SMPS). Average total particle number concentrations were between 2000 and 4000 particles/cm³, about 8-10 times lower that those found in the corresponding surrounding areas. As for size distribution, for all the investigated plants it is stable with a unimodal distribution (120-150 nm), independent from the fuel used. PMID:25946956

  16. Insitu measurements of laser-induced-fluorescence spectra of single atmospheric organic carbon aerosol particles for their partial classification. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Pan, Y.; Hill, S.; Rosen, J. M.; Chang, R. K.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosols are ubiquitous in the earth’s atmosphere. Within the last two decades, the importance of organic carbon aerosols (OCAs) has been widely recognized. OCAs have both natural and anthropogenic sources and have effects ranging from atmospheric radiative forcing to human health. Improved methods for measuring and classifying OCAs are needed for better understanding their sources, transformation, and fate. In this talk we focus on the use of a relatively new technique for characterization of single OCA particles in atmospheric aerosol: ultraviolet laser-induced-fluorescence (UV-LIF). UV-LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosols measured at multiple sites with different regional climate (Adelphi, MD, New Haven, CT, and Las Cruces, NM) are reported. A hierarchical clustering method was used to cluster (approximately 90%) of the single-particle UV-LIF spectra into 8-10 groups (clusters). Some of these clusters have spectra that are similar to spectra of some important classes of atmospheric aerosol, such as humic/fulvic acids and humic-like substances, bacteria, cellulose, marine aerosol, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The most highly populated clusters, and some of the less populated ones, appear at all sites. On average, spectra characteristic of humic/fulvic acids and humic-like-substances (HULIS) comprise 28-43% of fluorescent particles at all three sites; whereas cellulose-like spectra contribute only 1-3%.

  17. Total carbon measurement in soils using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy : Results from the field and implications for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Ebinger, M. H.; Breshears, D. D.; Unkefer, P. J.; Cremers, D. A.; Kammerdiener, S. A.; Ferris, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Rapid measurement of total carbon in soils is an important factor in modeling the effects of global change and carbon sequestration in soils. Conventional methods of carbon analysis such as dry combustion are relatively slow, and reliable estimation of carbon concentrations at the landscape scale is practically impossible because of the need for many replicate measurements. A new spectroscopic method, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), provides rapid carbon analysis with little or no sample preparation time. LIBS is portable and can be used for carbon analysis in the field or even in situ, such as inside a soil borehole. Data from LIBS analyses can be used to monitor small changes in soil carbon at different times, a critical component in many global climate models and terrestrial carbon sequestration strategies. We present a comparison of dry combustion measurements with LIBS analyses using several agricultural and woodland soils. The LIBS data are highly reproducible, are not affected by differences in soil types, and there is a strong correlation with dry combustion measurements. We further show the results of carbon measurements in different parts of a pinon-juniper woodland in semiarid New Mexico. Our results highlight soil carbon concentrations under tree canopies, in intercanopy spaces, and in small-scale catchments within the woodland. The latter measurements show an important, but until use of LIBS, overlooked store of carbon in semiarid areas. The use of LIBS data shows many benefits including reducing the uncertainty inherent in measurements of soil carbon in different environments, the speed with which LIBS analyses can be obtained (minutes) compared to dry combustion (days), and in modeling the global cycling of carbon in terrestrial settings. LIBS analyses make possible the estimation of landscape-scale carbon inventories that require large sample numbers as well as detailed quantification of carbon concentrations in soils under canopies or

  18. SEDIMENT TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON: IS IT TIME TO PULL THE PLUG ON THIS INDICATOR?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) content of sediments has been used as an indicator of benthic community condition during multiple cycles of the EPA National Coastal Assessment (NCA). Because percent TOC is generally positively correlated with sediment percent fines, previous analyses...

  19. SEDIMENT TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON: IS THIS A USEFUL INDICATOR OF SEDIMENT CONDITION FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARIES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) content of sediments has been used as an indicator of benthic community condition during multiple cycles of the EPA National Coastal Assessment (NCA). Because percent TOC is generally positively correlated with sediment percent fines, previous analyses...

  20. Airborne measurements of black carbon aerosol over the Southeastern U.S. during the Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.; Watts, L.; Holloway, J.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Welti, A.; Liao, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) field campaign was a large-scale, collaborative project, which took place in the Southeastern U.S. in June and July of 2013. The goal of the campaign was to investigate the impacts of biogenic and anthropogenic gases and aerosols on the formation of haze and anomalous climate cooling in the region. During SAS, a NOAA Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument was utilized onboard NOAA WP-3D research aircraft for measurements of black carbon (BC) aerosol mass and microphysical properties. BC aerosol is emitted into the atmosphere from biomass burning (BB) and incomplete combustion of fossil and biofuel. Hence, BC sources are strongly linked to anthropogenic activity. BC aerosol is currently the second largest anthropogenic climate forcing agent after CO2(g), and its climate impacts, which depend on vertical burden and internal mixing, are not fully understood. In the Southeast, BC aerosol is expected to provide surface area for the condensation of semi-volatile products of VOC oxidation and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Hence, BC is expected to impact the haze formation and regional climate. In this work we present an overview of BC measurements during Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study, the NOAA contribution to SAS. Geographical variations in mass mixing ratios, mass size distributions, and mixing state of BC over the Southeast U.S. are discussed. Relationships of BC with carbon monoxide (CO), acetonitrile (ACN) and other trace gases are used to investigate the impacts of urban, BB, natural gas development, and power plant emissions on the distribution and properties of BC aerosol in the region. Among studied urban centers, St. Louis and Atlanta were determined to be the largest source regions of BC. A clear weekend effect in BC mass mixing ratios and microphysical properties was observed in the metropolitan Atlanta region. Compared to BB and urban centers, power plants and natural gas developments

  1. Determination of total dissolved inorganic carbon in freshwaters by reagent-free ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Polesello, Stefano; Tartari, Gabriele; Giacomotti, Paola; Mosello, Rosario; Cavalli, Silvano

    2006-06-16

    Studies of inorganic carbon cycle in natural waters provide important information on the biological productivity and buffer capacity. Determination of total inorganic carbon, alkalinity and dissolved carbon dioxide gives an indication of the balance between photosynthesis and respiration by biota, both within the water column and sediments, and carbon dioxide transfers from the water column to the atmosphere. There are few methods to measure and distinguish the different forms of inorganic carbon, but all require a measure or an indirect quantification of total inorganic carbon. A direct measurement of TIC in water is made possible by the introduction of electrolytic generated hydroxide eluent in ion chromatography which allows to detect a chromatographic peak for carbonate. The advantage of this method is that all the inorganic forms of carbon are converted in carbonate at eluent pH and can be detected as a single peak by conductivity detection. Repeatability of carbonate peak was evaluated at different levels from 0.02 to 6 mequiv.l(-1) both in high purity water and in real samples and ranged from 1 to 9%. The calibration curve was not linear and has to be fitted by a quadratic curve. Limit of detection was estimated to be 0.02 mequiv.l(-1). Accuracy has been estimated by comparing ion chromatography method with total inorganic carbon calculated from alkalinity and pH. The correlation between the two methods was good (R(2)=0.978, n=141). The IC method has been applied to different typologies of surface waters (alpine and subalpine lakes and rivers) characterised by different chemical characteristics (alkalinity from 0.05 to 2 mequiv.l(-1) and pH from 6.7 to 8.5) and low total organic carbon concentrations. This analytical method allowed to describe the distribution of TIC along the water column of two Italian deep lakes. PMID:16620857

  2. Sources of black carbon in aerosols: fossil fuel burning vs. biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The uncertainty in black carbon (BC) analysis and our inability to directly quantify the BC sources in the atmosphere has led to the uncertainty in compiling a regional or global BC emission inventory attributed to biomass burnings. We initiate this study to demonstrate a new approach, which quantifies the source of BC in the atmosphere between biomass and fossil fuel burnings. We applied the newly developed multi-element scanning thermal analysis (MESTA) technology to quantify BC and organic carbon (OC), respectively, in aerosol samples. MESTA can also separate BC from OC for subsequent radiocarbon analyses. Because fossil fuel has been depleted of radiocarbon and biomass has radiocarbon of the modern atmospheric level, we can quantify the sources of BC between fossil fuel and biomass burnings. We sampled the PM2.5 in the ambient air of central Tallahassee and its rural areas during the May-June (prescribed burning) and Nov-Dec (non-burning) periods. The results indicate that biomass burning contributed 89×1% and 67×2% of BC, respectively, during May-June and Nov.-Dec. periods. The rest of PM2.5 BC was contributed from fossil fuel burning. The radiocarbon contents of the OC was 103.42×0.55 percent modern carbon (pmC), which is consistent with the current atmospheric level with a trace of the bomb radiocarbon remained from the open atmosphere nuclear testing.

  3. Use of levoglucosan, potassium, and water-soluble organic carbon to characterize the origins of biomass-burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Roberta Cerasi; Lima-Souza, Michele; Caetano-Silva, Letícia; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C.; Nogueira, Raquel F. P.; Allen, Andrew G.; Cardoso, Arnaldo A.; Held, Gerhard; Campos, Maria Lucia A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Three chemical species related to biomass burning, levoglucosan, potassium and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), were measured in aerosol samples collected in a rural area on the outskirts of the municipality of Ourinhos (São Paulo State, Brazil). This region is representative of the rural interior of the State, where the economy is based on agro-industrial production, and the most important crop is sugar cane. The manual harvesting process requires that the cane be first burned to remove excess foliage, leading to large emissions of particulate materials to the atmosphere. Most of the levoglucosan (68-89%) was present in small particles (<1.5 μm), and its concentration in total aerosol ranged from 25 to 1186 ng m-3. The highest values were found at night, when most of the biomass burning occurs. In contrast, WSOC showed no diurnal pattern, with an average concentration of 5.38 ± 2.97 μg m-3 (n = 27). A significant linear correlation between levoglucosan and WSOC (r = 0.54; n = 26; p < 0.0001) confirmed that biomass burning was in fact an important source of WSOC in the study region. A moderate (but significant) linear correlation between levoglucosan and potassium concentrations (r = 0.62; n = 40; p < 0.0001) was indicative of the influence of other sources of potassium in the study region, such as soil resuspension and fertilizers. When only the fine particles (<1.5 μm; typical of biomass burning) were considered, the linear coefficient increased to 0.91 (n = 9). In this case, the average levoglucosan/K+ ratio was 0.24, which may be typical of biomass burning in the study region. This ratio is about 5 times lower than that previously found for Amazon aerosol collected during the day, when flaming combustion prevails. This suggests that the levoglucosan/K+ ratio may be especially helpful for characterization of the type of vegetation burned (such as crops or forest), when biomass-burning is the dominant source of potassium. The relatively high

  4. INVESTIGATION OF RESPONSE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN DIFFERENT TYPES OF TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON (TOC) ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have long been used to estimate the amount of natural organic matter (NOM) found in raw and finished drinking water. In recent years, computer automation and improved instrumental analysis technologies have created a ...

  5. The composition and flux of water-soluble organic nitrogen and carbon in the marine aerosol of a remote island over the southern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wang, B.; Wang, W.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed 194 aerosol samples, collected coarse and fine particles by using a dichotomous sampler from September 2009 to September 2010 at a remote island (Pengchiayu) on the southern East China Sea, for water-soluble major ions, inorganic nitrogen, and high/low organic nitrogen and carbon. To investigate the possible sources of WSON and WSOC, an Ultrafiltration method was used to separate WSON and WSOC into high (HMW; >1kDa) and low (LMW; <1kDa) molecular weight categories. In addition, 4-d back trajectories of air masses arriving daily at the sampling site were calculated to determine the potential aerosol source regions. In this study, the sources of WSON and WSOC were identified by indicator ions (Na+, nss-SO42-, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+), and the fluxes of nitrogen and carbon were calculated by a dual mode model. The obtained concentrations of major ions indicate that a continental source was dominant from January to May and from November to December, a local source derived from Taiwan Island from June and July, and an oceanic source during August. The measured atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen and carbon species show clear seasonal variations and correspond to the different sources and weather conditions. The results indicate that HMW/ LMW of organic nitrogen and carbon contributed 63%/37% and 29%/71%, respectively, to the total dissolved organic species concentration. The results of a factor analysis of combined major ions and organic nitrogen and carbon indicate that biomass burning, crustal sources, and marine sources are the three major controlling factors. The annual fluxes of HMW/ LMW organic nitrogen and carbon were estimated to be 7.61/12.0 and 29.6/12.7 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively.

  6. Apparatus for hydrogen and carbon production via carbon aerosol-catalyzed dissociation of hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor); Smith, Franklyn (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A novel process and apparatus is disclosed for sustainable, continuous production of hydrogen and carbon by catalytic dissociation or decomposition of hydrocarbons at elevated temperatures using in-situ generated carbon particles. Carbon particles are produced by decomposition of carbonaceous materials in response to an energy input. The energy input can be provided by at least one of a non-oxidative and oxidative means. The non-oxidative means of the energy input includes a high temperature source, or different types of plasma, such as, thermal, non-thermal, microwave, corona discharge, glow discharge, dielectric barrier discharge, or radiation sources, such as, electron beam, gamma, ultraviolet (UV). The oxidative means of the energy input includes oxygen, air, ozone, nitrous oxide (NO.sub.2) and other oxidizing agents. The method, apparatus and process of the present invention is applicable to any gaseous or liquid hydrocarbon fuel and it produces no or significantly less CO.sub.2 emissions compared to conventional processes.

  7. Aerosol volatility in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, S. A. K.; ńijälä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; Junninen, H.; Virkkula, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-04-01

    Climate and health effects of atmospheric aerosols are determined by their properties such as their chemical composition. Aerosol chemical composition can be studied indirectly by measuring volatility of aerosol particles. The volatility of submicron aerosol particles (20-500 nm) was studied in a boreal forest site at SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station (Vesala et al., 1998) in Hyytiälä, Finland, during 01/2008-05/2010. The instrument used for the measurements was VDMPS (Volatility Differential Mobility Particle Sizer), which consists of two separate instruments: DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, Aalto et al., 2001) and TD (Thermodenuder, Wehner et al., 2002). Aerosol evaporation was examined by heating the aerosol and comparing the total aerosol mass before and after heating. In the VDMPS system ambient aerosol sample was heated up to temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 280 °C. The higher the heating temperature was the more aerosol material was evaporated. There was a non-volatile residual present in aerosol particles when heated up to 280 °C. This residual explained (20±8)% of the total aerosol mass. Aerosol non-volatile mass fraction was highest during winter and smallest during summer months. The role of black carbon in the observed non-volatile residual was determined. Black carbon explained 40 to 90% of the non-volatile mass. Especially during colder seasons noticeable amount of non-volatile material, something else than black carbon, was observed. According to Kalberer et al. (2004) some atmospheric organic species can form polymers that have high evaporation temperatures. Also low-volatile organic salts may contribute to the non-volatile aerosol (Smith et al., 2010). Aerosol mass composition measured directly with AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, Jayne et al., 2000) was analyzed in order to examine the properties of the non-volatile material (other than black carbon). The AMS measurements were performed

  8. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies Among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Chu, Allen; Levy, Robert; Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yoram; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Eck, Tom; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, .biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERON" at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  9. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Kaufman, Yoram; chu, Allen; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  10. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average 91% of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our set-up, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our set-up were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  11. Fluxes, source and transport of organic matter in the western Sea of Okhotsk: Stable carbon isotopic ratios of n-alkanes and total organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Chisato; Nakatsuka, Takeshi; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Wakatsuchi, Masaaki

    2006-02-01

    Settling particles and surface sediments collected from the western region of the Sea of Okhotsk were analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), long-chain n-alkanes and their stable carbon isotope ratio ( δ13C) to investigate sources and transport of total and terrestrial organic matter in the western region of the sea. The δ13C measurements of TOC in time-series sediment traps indicate lateral transport of resuspended organic matter from the northwestern continental shelf to the area off Sakhalin via the dense shelf water (DSW) flow at intermediate depth. The n-alkanes in the surface sediments showed strong odd carbon number predominance with relatively lighter δ13C values (from -33‰ to -30‰). They fall within the typical values of C3-angiosperms, which is the main vegetation in east Russia, including the Amur River basin. On the other hand, the molecular distributions and δ13C values of n-alkanes in the settling particles clearly showed two different sources: terrestrial plant and petroleum in the Sea of Okhotsk. We reconstructed seasonal change in the fluxes of terrestrial n-alkanes in settling particles using the mixing model proposed by Lichtfouse and Eglinton [1995. 13C and 14C evidence of a soil by fossil fuel and reconstruction of the composition of the pollutant. Organic Geochemistry 23, 969-973]. Results of the terrestrial n-alkane fluxes indicate that there are two transport pathways of terrestrial plant n-alkanes to sediments off Sakhalin, the Sea of Okhotsk. One is lateral transport of resuspended particles with lithogenic material from the northwestern continental shelf by the DSW flow. Another is the vertical transport of terrestrial plant n-alkanes, which is independent of transport of lithogenic material. The latter may include dry/wet deposition of aerosol particles derived from terrestrial higher plants possibly associated with forest fires in Siberia.

  12. Application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for total carbon quantification in soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.; Ayyalasomayajula, K.; Yu-Yueh, F.; Singh, J.; Jain, J.

    2012-01-01

    The increase of greenhouse gas (i.e., CO{sub 2}) levels in the atmosphere has caused noticeable climate change. Many nations are currently looking into methods of permanent underground storage for CO{sub 2} in an attempt to mitigate this problem. The goal of this work is to develop a process for studying the total carbon content in soils before, during, and after CO{sub 2} injection to ensure that no leakage is occurring or to determine how much is leaking if it is occurring and what effect it will have on the ecosystem between the injection formation and the atmosphere. In this study, we quantitatively determine the total carbon concentration in soil using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A soil sample from Starkville, Mississippi, USA was mixed with different amounts of carbon powder, which was used as a calibration for additional carbon in soil. Test samples were prepared by adding different but known amounts of carbon powder to a soil sample and then mixing with polyvinyl alcohol binder before being pressed into pellets. LIBS spectra of the test samples were collected and analyzed to obtain optimized conditions for the measurement of total carbon in soil with LIBS. The total carbon content in the samples was also measured by a carbon analyzer, and the data (average of triplicates) were used as a reference in developing calibration curves for a modified version of the single linear regression model and the multiple linear regression model. The calibration data were then used to determine the total carbon concentration of an unknown sample. This work is intended to be used in the initial development of a miniaturized, field-portable LIBS analyzer for CO{sub 2} leak detection.

  13. Integrated Data Fusion and Mining Techniques for Monitoring Total Organic Carbon Concentrations in a Lake

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) in surface waters, markedly of seasonal variations, is a known precursor of disinfection byproducts such as Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) in drinking water treatment. Real-time knowledge of TOC distribution in source water can help treatment operation to...

  14. THE NIST-EPA INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT ON MEASUREMENTS AND STANDARDS IN AEROSOL CARBON: SAMPLING REGIONAL PM 2.5 FOR THE CHEMOMETRIC OPTIMIZATION OF THERMAL-OPTICAL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the NIST-EPA Interagency Agreement on Measurements and Standards in Aerosol Carbon: Sampling Regional PM2.5 for the Chemometric Optimization of Thermal-Optical Analysis Study will be presented at the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) 24th Annual Confer...

  15. CV-Dust: Atmospheric aerosol in the Cape Verde region: carbon and soluble fractions of PM10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio, C.; Nunes, T.; Cardoso, J.; Caseiro, A.; Custódio, D.; Cerqueira, M.; Patoilo, D.; Almeida, S. M.; Freitas, M. C.

    2012-04-01

    than 100 PM10 samples, addressing mainly their mass concentrations and the chemical composition of water soluble ions and carbon species (carbonates and organic and elemental carbon). Different PM10 samplers worked simultaneously in order to collect enough mass to make the aerosol characterization through the different methodologies and to collect aerosols in different filter matrixes, which have to be appropriated to the chemical and mineralogical analysis. The sampling site was located at Santiago Island, in the surroundings of Praia City (14° 55' N e 23° 29' W, 98 m at sea level). High concentrations, up to more than 400 μg m-3, are connected to north-east and north-northeast winds, and it was identified several dust events characteristic of "bruma seca", whose duration is on average of two to four days. Backward trajectories analysis confirms that the high concentrations in Cape Verde are associated with air masses passing over the Sahara. During dust events the percentage of inorganic water soluble ions for the total PM10 mass concentration decreased significantly to values lower than 10% in comparison with remainder data that range around 45±10%. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the Portuguese Science Foundation (FCT) through the project PTDD/AAC-CLI/100331/2008 and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-008646 (CV-Dust). J. Cardoso acknowledges the PhD grant SFRH-BD-6105-2009 from FCT.

  16. 101-SY Hydrogen Safety Project chemical analysis support: Window C'' total organic carbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, B.M.; Stromatt, R.W.; Baldwin, D.L.; Hoopes, F.V.

    1992-01-01

    Core samples taken from Hanford double-shell waste tank 101-SY during Window C'' (after the May 1991 gas release event) were analyzed for total organic carbon by the staff of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The procedure uses the oxidation/extraction method of hot acid persulfate oxidation. Evolved CO{sub 2} is measured by a UIC Coulometric Carbon Analyzer coulometry detector. Samples are acidified with heated sulfuric acid to drive off all inorganic carbonate carbon as CO{sub 2}. Excess potassium persulfate oxidant, along with a silver catalyst, is then added to the heated sulfuric acid solution. All organic carbon is oxidized to CO{sub 2}, swept away by the carrier gas to the Coulometrics Analyzer, and the results calculated and displayed directly as {mu}g carbon titrated.

  17. 101-SY Hydrogen Safety Project chemical analysis support: Window ``C`` total organic carbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, B.M.; Stromatt, R.W.; Baldwin, D.L.; Hoopes, F.V.

    1992-01-01

    Core samples taken from Hanford double-shell waste tank 101-SY during Window ``C`` (after the May 1991 gas release event) were analyzed for total organic carbon by the staff of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The procedure uses the oxidation/extraction method of hot acid persulfate oxidation. Evolved CO{sub 2} is measured by a UIC Coulometric Carbon Analyzer coulometry detector. Samples are acidified with heated sulfuric acid to drive off all inorganic carbonate carbon as CO{sub 2}. Excess potassium persulfate oxidant, along with a silver catalyst, is then added to the heated sulfuric acid solution. All organic carbon is oxidized to CO{sub 2}, swept away by the carrier gas to the Coulometrics Analyzer, and the results calculated and displayed directly as {mu}g carbon titrated.

  18. XPS analysis of combustion aerosols for chemical composition, surface chemistry, and carbon chemical state.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Randy L; Bryg, Vicky M; Hays, Michael D

    2011-03-15

    Carbonaceous aerosols can vary in elemental content, surface chemistry, and carbon nano-structure. Each of these properties is related to the details of soot formation. Fuel source, combustion process (affecting formation and growth conditions), and postcombustion exhaust where oxidation occurs all contribute to the physical structure and surface chemistry of soot. Traditionally such physical and chemical parameters have been measured separately by various techniques. Presented here is the unified measurement of these characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In the present study, XPS is applied to combustion soot collected from a diesel engine (running biodiesel and pump-grade fuels); jet engine; and institutional, plant, and residential oil-fired boilers. Elemental composition is mapped by a survey scan over a broad energy range. Surface chemistry and carbon nanostructure are quantified by deconvolution of high-resolution scans over the C1s region. This combination of parameters forms a distinct matrix of identifiers for the soots from these sources. PMID:21322576

  19. Total organic carbon and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy methods to determine total carbon and hydrocarbons in mercuric iodide single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, S.; Kaplan, I.; Schieber, M.; Ortale, C.; Skinner, N.; van den Berg, L.

    1989-11-01

    Total organic carbon was determined by measuring the CO2 produced by combustion in a sealed quartz vessel. The CO2 was quantified by nondispersive IR and by titration using commercial detectors. The total organic carbon was found to be around 10-100 μg/g in both starting materials and in single crystals. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) measurements were made on hexane extracts of mercuric iodide (HgI2) dissolved in potassium iodide solution. Hydrocarbons starting with C10 (DIENE) and up to C26 were found. In addition, phthalates, such as diethyl and dioctyl phthalate were also found. Some of the organic compounds, for example, such hydrocarbons as branched nC16, nC20, nC21, nC22, nC23, and nC24, were present in some HgI2 materials in quantities of the order of weight ppm, but were eliminated in the purification process and were not found in the single crystals. Other organic compounds such as the phthalates were not always eliminated and were identified in the single crystals. In general, the GC/MS could identify only hydrocarbons of C10 and higher which account for only a few percent of the total organic carbon determined by oxidation.

  20. Adopting a modified pressure calcimeter with temperature compensation for testing total carbonates in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barouchas, Pantelis; Koulos, Vasilios

    2016-04-01

    The total carbonates content of the soil is an important soil quality indicator highly related with soil carbon sequestration and a tool for understanding biogeochemical processes or liming practices. A portable digital pressure calcimeter with multisensory technology was used in order to test total carbonates in soil samples. The concept of the measurement is based on the simultaneous measurement of pressure and temperature after the sample reaction with hydrochloric acid in a closed vessel and a built-in module for automatic temperature compensation, so that performs measurements with higher accuracy. For these purposes two stages of analysis followed in order to document the precision of the methodology: (i) Total carbonates testing in Sand/CaCO3 mixtures and (ii) Total carbonates testing in soil samples. The instrument has a typical mean error of ± 0.3% calcium carbonates content of the soil sample and a recovery more than 98% comparing to certified inter-laboratory soil samples (proficiency tests) for quality assurance. The methodology adopts portable capabilities with soil moisture correction in situ, providing to the end-user the advantages of automatic analysis, fast testing operation, fast re-samples for analysis and productivity.

  1. Transport Simulations of Carbon Monoxide and Aerosols from Boreal Wildfires during ARCTAS using WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, W.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Winker, D. M.; Chu, A. D.; Kahn, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) was developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research as the next generation of mesoscale meteorology model. The inclusion of a chemistry module (WRF-Chem) allows transport simulations of chemical and aerosol species such as those observed during NASA’s Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) during 2008. The ARCTAS summer deployment phase during June and July coincided with large boreal wildfires in Saskatchewan and Eastern Russia. We identified fires using the GOES Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) and thermal hotspot detections from MODIS sensors onboard the Aqua and Terra satellites. The fires on both continents produced plumes large enough to affect the atmospheric chemical composition of downwind population centers as well as the Arctic. Atmospheric steering currents vary greatly with altitude, making plume injection height one of the most important aspects of accurately modeling the transport of burning emissions. WRF-Chem integrates a one-dimensional plume model at grid cells containing fires to explicitly resolve the upper and lower limits of injection height. The early July fires provide multiple cases to satellite remotely sense the horizontal and vertical evolution of carbon monoxide (AIRS/MISR) and aerosols (CALIPSO) downwind of the fires. Lidar and in situ measurements from the NASA DC-8 and B-200 aircraft permit further validation of results from WRF-Chem. Using these various data sources, this paper will evaluate the ability of WRF-Chem to properly model the biomass injection heights and the downwind transport of fire plumes. Model-derived plume characteristics also will be compared with those observed by the satellites and in situ data. Finally, forecast sensitivities to varying WRF-Chem grid resolutions and plume rise mechanics will be presented.

  2. Reactivity of liquid and semisolid secondary organic carbon with chloride and nitrate in atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; O'Brien, Rachel E.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Shilling, John E.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-05-14

    Constituents of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in atmospheric aerosols are often mixed with inorganic components and compose a significant mass fraction of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere. Interactions between SOC and other condensed-phase species are not well understood. Here, we investigate the reactions of liquid-like and semi-solid SOC from ozonolysis of limonene (LSOC) and α-pinene (PSOC) with NaCl using a set of complementary micro-spectroscopic analyses. These reactions result in chloride depletion in the condensed phase, release of gaseous HCl, and formation of organic salts. The reactions attributed to acid displacement by SOC acidic components are driven by the high volatility of HCl. Similar reactions can take place in SOC/NaNO₃ particles. The results show that an increase in SOC mass fraction in the internally mixed SOC/NaCl particles leads to higher chloride depletion. Glass transition temperatures and viscosity of PSOC were estimated for atmospherically relevant conditions. Data show that the reaction extent depends on SOC composition, particle phase state and viscosity, mixing state, temperature, relative humidity (RH), and reaction time. LSOC shows slightly higher potential to deplete chloride than PSOC. Higher particle viscosity at low temperatures and RH can hinder these acid displacement reactions. Formation of organic salts from these overlooked reactions can alter particle physiochemical properties and may affect their reactivity and ability to act as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The release and potential recycling of HCl and HNO₃ from reacted aerosol particles may have important implications for atmospheric chemistry.

  3. Reactivity of liquid and semisolid secondary organic carbon with chloride and nitrate in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingbing; O'Brien, Rachel E; Kelly, Stephen T; Shilling, John E; Moffet, Ryan C; Gilles, Mary K; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-05-14

    Constituents of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in atmospheric aerosols are often mixed with inorganic components and compose a significant mass fraction of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere. Interactions between SOC and other condensed-phase species are not well understood. Here, we investigate the reactions of liquid-like and semisolid SOC from ozonolysis of limonene (LSOC) and α-pinene (PSOC) with NaCl using a set of complementary microspectroscopic analyses. These reactions result in chloride depletion in the condensed phase, release of gaseous HCl, and formation of organic salts. The reactions attributed to acid displacement by SOC acidic components are driven by the high volatility of HCl. Similar reactions can take place in SOC/NaNO3 particles. The results show that an increase in SOC mass fraction in the internally mixed SOC/NaCl particles leads to higher chloride depletion. Glass transition temperatures and viscosity of PSOC were estimated for atmospherically relevant conditions. Data show that the reaction extent depends on SOC composition, particle phase state and viscosity, mixing state, temperature, relative humidity (RH), and reaction time. LSOC shows slightly higher potential to deplete chloride than PSOC. Higher particle viscosity at low temperatures and RH can hinder these acid displacement reactions. Formation of organic salts from these overlooked reactions can alter particle physiochemical properties and may affect their reactivity and ability to act as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The release and potential recycling of HCl and HNO3 from reacted aerosol particles may have important implications for atmospheric chemistry. PMID:25386912

  4. Temporal variability and radiative impact of black carbon aerosol over tropical urban station Hyderabad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumka, U. C.; Manchanda, R. K.; Sinha, P. R.; Sreenivasan, S.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Suresh Babu, S.

    2013-12-01

    Time variability of black carbon (BC) aerosols over different timescales (daily, weekly and annual) is studied over a tropical urban location Hyderabad in India using seven channel portable Aethalometer. The results for the 2-year period (January 2009-December 2010) show a daily-mean BC variability from ~1.00±0.12 μg m-3 to 12.50±3.06 μg m-3, with a remarkable annual pattern of winter high and monsoon low. The BC values maximize during winter (December-January), ~6.67±0.22 μg m-3, and drop during summer (June-August), ~2.36±0.09 μg m-3, which establishes a large seasonal variation. Furthermore, the BC mass concentration exhibits a well-defined diurnal variation, with a morning peak and early afternoon minimum. The magnitude of the diurnal variations is seasonal dependent, which maximizes during the winter months. Air mass back trajectories indicated several different transport pathways, while the concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) analysis reveals that the most important potential sources for BC aerosols are the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP), central India and some hot spots in Pakistan, Arabian Peninsula and Persian Gulf. The absorbing Ångström exponent (αabs) estimated from the spectral values of absorption coefficient (σabs) ranges from 0.9 to 1.1 indicating high BC/OC ratio typical of fossil fuel origin. The annual average BC mass fraction to composite aerosols is found to be (10±3) % contributing to the atmospheric forcing by (55±10) %. The BC radiative forcing at the atmosphere shows strong seasonal dependency with higher values in winter (33.49±7.01) and spring (31.78±12.89) and moderate in autumn (18.94±6.71) and summer (13.15±1.66). The BC radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is positive in all months, suggesting an overall heating of the regional climate over Hyderabad.

  5. Spatial distribution of aerosol black carbon over India during pre-monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum, S. Naseema; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Badarinath, K. V. S.; Safai, P. D.; Devara, P. C. S.; Singh, Sacchidanand; Vinod; Dumka, U. C.; Pant, P.

    Aerosol black carbon (BC) mass concentrations ([BC]), measured continuously during a mutli-platform field experiment, Integrated Campaign for Aerosols gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB, March-May 2006), from a network of eight observatories spread over geographically distinct environments of India, (which included five mainland stations, one highland station, and two island stations (one each in Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal)) are examined for their spatio-temporal characteristics. During the period of study, [BC] showed large variations across the country, with values ranging from 27 μg m -3 over industrial/urban locations to as low as 0.065 μg m -3 over the Arabian Sea. For all mainland stations, [BC] remained high compared to highland as well as island stations. Among the island stations, Port Blair (PBR) had higher concentration of BC, compared to Minicoy (MCY), implying more absorbing nature of Bay of Bengal aerosols than Arabian Sea. The highland station Nainital (NTL), in the central Himalayas, showed low values of [BC], comparable or even lower than that of the island station PBR, indicating the prevalence of cleaner environment over there. An examination of the changes in the mean temporal features, as the season advances from winter (December-February) to pre-monsoon (March-May), revealed that: (a) Diurnal variations were pronounced over all the mainland stations, with an afternoon low and a nighttime high; (b) At the islands, the diurnal variations, though resembled those over the mainlands, were less pronounced; and (c) In contrast to this, highland station showed an opposite pattern with an afternoon high and a late night or early morning low. The diurnal variations at all stations are mainly caused by the dynamics of local Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL). At the entire mainland as well as island stations (except HYD and DEL), [BC] showed a decreasing trend from January to May. This is attributed to the increased convective mixing and to the

  6. Synthesis of Spherical Carbon Nitride-Based Polymer Composites by Continuous Aerosol-Photopolymerization with Efficient Light Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Poostforooshan, Jalal; Badiei, Alireza; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Weber, Alfred P

    2016-08-24

    Here we report a novel, facile, and sustainable approach for the preparation of spherical submicrometer carbon nitride-based polymer composites by a continuous aerosol-photopolymerization process. In this regard, spherical mesoporous carbon nitride (SMCN) nanoparticles were initially prepared via a nanocasting approach using spray-drying synthesized spherical mesoporous silica (SMS) nanoparticles as hard templates. In addition to experimental characterization, the effect of porosity on the light absorption enhancement and consequently the generation rate of electron-hole pairs inside the SMCN was simulated using a three-dimensional finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. To produce the carbon nitride-based polymer composite, SMCN nanoparticles exhibit excellent performance in photopolymerization of butyl acrylate (PBuA) monomer in the presence of n-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) as a co-initiator in a continuous aerosol-based process. In this one-pot synthesis, SMCN nanoparticles act not only as photoinitiators but at the same time as fillers and templates. The average aerosol residence time in the photoreactor is about 90 s. The presented aerosol-photopolymerization process avoids the need for solvent and surfactant, operates at room temperature, and, more importantly, is suitable to produce the spherical composite with hydrophobic polymers. Furthermore, we simulated the condition of SMCN nanoparticles during illumination in the gas phase process, which can freely rotate. The results demonstrated that the hole (h(+)) density is almost equally distributed in the whole part of the SMCN nanoparticles due to their rotation, leading to efficient light harvesting and more homogeneous photoreaction. The combination of the outstanding features of environmentally friendly SMCN, photopolymerization, and aerosol processing might open new avenues, especially in green chemistry, to produce novel polymer composites with multifunctional properties. PMID:27483090

  7. Identification of haze-creating sources from fine particulate matter in Dhaka aerosol using carbon fractions.

    PubMed

    Begum, Bilkis A; Hopke, Philip K

    2013-09-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) samples were simultaneously collected on Teflon and quartz filters between February 2010 and February 2011 at an urban monitoring site (CAMS2) in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The samples were collected using AirMetrics MiniVol samplers. The samples on Teflon filters were analyzed for their elemental composition by PIXE and PESA. Particulate carbon on quartz filters was analyzed using the IMPROVE thermal optical reflectance (TOR) method that divides carbon into four organic carbons (OC), pyrolized organic carbon (OP), and three elemental carbon (EC) fractions. The data were analyzed by positive matrix factorization using the PMF2 program. Initially, only total OC and total EC were included in the analysis and five sources, including road dust, sea salt and Zn, soil dust, motor vehicles, and brick kilns, were obtained. In the second analysis, the eight carbon fractions (OC1, OC2, OC3, OC4, OP, EC1, EC2, EC3) were included in order to ascertain whether additional source information could be extracted from the data. In this case, it is possible to identify more sources than with only total OC and EC. The motor vehicle source was separated into gasoline and diesel emissions and a fugitive Pb source was identified. Brick kilns contribute 7.9 microg/m3 and 6.0 microg/m3 of OC and EC, respectively, to the fine particulate matter based on the two results. From the estimated mass extinction coefficients and the apportioned source contributions, soil dust, brick kiln, diesel, gasoline, and the Pb sources were found to contribute most strongly to visibility degradation, particularly in the winter. PMID:24151680

  8. Measurements and Analysis of Black Carbon Aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, A.; Ozdemir, H.; Kindap, T.; Demir, G.; Karaca, M.; Khan, M. N.

    2010-12-01

    In a world where at least 50 percent of the population is living in urban environments, air pollution and specifically particulate matter became one of the most critical issues. There have been many studies that focused on mass concentration measurements of PM10 and PM2.5. Recent studies suggest that chemical composition is critical in understanding the effects of PM on health as well as climate. For example, public health studies reveal that, components of the atmospheric aerosols have different impacts on human health. Smith et al. (2009) stated that; on the basis of the 1μg/m3 contrast, the percentage increase in all-cause mortality for PM2.5 was 0.58; sulfate effects were about twice those of PM2.5, and effects of elemental carbon (an indicator of black carbon mass) about ten times greater. To date, many studies and national inventories have been based on particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5), and the major greenhouse pollutants, but not speciated emissions, especially in the developing world (Smith et al., 2009; Chow et al., 2010). But air quality standards will soon need to include particulate black carbon (BC), as it directly afffects climate, visibility, and human health. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing dramatically worldwide and recent estimates of global BC emissions range from 8 to 24 Tg (1012 g) per year. In this study, we investigated BC pollution for the first time in Istanbul, Turkey. Istanbul is a megacity of over 15 million inhabitants (OECD, 2008). On-road traffic is also increasing rapidly in the city (over 3 million vehicles on the road). Hence, the city has a potential to be an important source for both local and regional pollution in the Eastern Mediterranean. In our study, an Aethalometer (<0.1μg/m3 sensitivity) was used for continuous and real-time measurements of BC concentration. Measurements were carried out at the selected five different locations throughout the city. 1st and 2nd sites were near high-traffic streets; in the city

  9. Organic carbon, total nitrogen, and water-soluble ions in clouds from a tropical montane cloud forest in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Rodríguez, Gabriel J.; Gioda, Adriana; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Collett, Jeff

    Chemical characterization to determine the organic and nitrogen fractions was performed on cloud water samples collected in a mountaintop site in Puerto Rico. Cloud water samples showed average concentrations of 1.09 mg L -1 of total organic carbon (TOC), of 0.85 mg L -1 for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and of and 1.25 mg L -1 for total nitrogen (TN). Concentrations of organic nitrogen (ON) changed with the origin of the air mass. Changes in their concentrations were observed during periods under the influence of African dust (AD). The ON/TN ratios were 0.26 for the clean and 0.35 for the AD periods. Average concentrations of all these species were similar to those found in remote environments with no anthropogenic contribution. In the AD period, for cloud water the concentrations of TOC were 4 times higher and TN were 3 times higher than during periods of clean air masses associated with the trade winds. These results suggest that a significant fraction of TOC and TN in cloud and rainwater is associated to airborne particulate matter present in dust. Functional groups were identified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) spectroscopy. This characterization led to the conclusion that water-soluble organic compounds in these samples are mainly aliphatic oxygenated compounds, with a small amount of aromatics. The ion chromatography results showed that the ionic species were predominantly of marine origin, for air masses with and without African dust influence, with cloud water concentrations of NO 3- and NH 4+ much lower than from polluted areas in the US. An increase of such species as SO 42-, Cl -, Mg 2+, K + and Ca 2+ was seen when air masses originated from northwest Africa. The changes in the chemical composition and physical properties of clouds associated with these different types of aerosol particles could affect on cloud formation and processes.

  10. Modifying metal nanoparticle placement on carbon supports using an aerosol-based process, with application to the environmental remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Bhanukiran; Zhan, Jingjing; Kolesnichenko, Igor; Wang, Yingqing; He, Jibao; Holland, Jennifer E; McPherson, Gary L; John, Vijay T

    2011-06-21

    A facile aerosol-based process (ABP) is developed to vary the placement of iron nanoparticles on the external surface of carbon microspheres or within the interior. This is accomplished through the competitive mechanisms of sucrose carbonization and the precipitation of soluble iron salts, in an aerosol droplet passing through a high temperature heating zone. At lower aerosolization temperatures, carbonization occurs first leading to iron salt precipitation on the external surface, while at higher temperatures interior placement occurs through concurrent iron salt precipitation and sucrose carbonization. The resulting composites are highly conducive to the reductive dechlorination of compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE) as the carbon support is a strong adsorbent, and zerovalent iron effectively reduces TCE to innocuous gases such as ethane. Since both iron and carbon are widely used catalysts and catalyst supports, the simple process of modifying iron placement has significant potential applications in heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:21612244

  11. Emission sources and atmospheric processing of carbonaceous aerosols in India and China: Insights from dual carbon isotope techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, A.; Kirillova, E. N.; Bosch, C.; Suresh, T.; Lee, M.; Du, K.; Sheesley, R. J.; Budhavant, K.; Gustafsson, O. M.

    2013-12-01

    The large emissions of carbonaceous aerosols, e.g., black carbon (BC), in India and China have detrimental effects on both human health and the regional climate. However, mitigation efforts as well as accurate modeling of these effects are currently hampered by large uncertainties regarding the contributions from different emission sources, including both primary and secondary processes. Here, we present dual carbon isotope constraints on emissions sources and atmospheric processing from multiple sites capturing the outflow from India and China. Radiocarbon (14C) studies of elemental carbon (EC) - a tracer for BC - show larger relative fossil contributions than expected from bottom-up emission inventories, for both India (49+-5) and China (80 +-6%). Similarly to EC, radiocarbon constraints of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) shows substantially larger relative fossil contributions in Chinese outflow (30-50%) as compared with India, but also compared to Europe and USA (10-20%). In contrast to the radiocarbon data, stable carbon (d13C) analysis of WSOC shows substantial variability for different sites capturing the Indian outflow. Strong enrichment of heavy isotopes in WSOC is coupled to expected transport time from sources, indicating the influence of photochemical aging during transport. Such trends in the d13C signature are not observed for the EC fraction. Taken together this work show that carbon isotope techniques provide firm constraints on emission sources of different fractions of carbonaceous aerosols, and may also offer insights into atmospheric processing of these constituents during air mass transport.

  12. Investigating the impacts of aviation NOX, SO2 and black carbon emissions on ozone, aerosol and climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapadia, Zarashpe; Borman, Duncan; Spracklen, Dominick; Arnold, Stephen; Mann, Graham; Williams, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Aviation is currently responsible for 3% of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions, but 2-14% of anthropogenic induced warming due to the co-emission of NOX, SO2 and black carbon and formation of contrails. The impact of aviation emissions on ozone and aerosol is uncertain with recent research demonstrating the need to include atmospheric nitrate chemistry. The inclusion of nitrate chemistry may lead to a 20% reduction in aviation induced ozone forcing estimates due to the competition for atmospheric oxidants such as OH . Compounding this, uncertainties relating to the effects of NOx on ozone and methane illustrate the need for refining the understanding of aviation induced impacts. Furthermore the role of aerosol microphysics in controlling the climate impacts of aviation has not yet been explored. Here we use the TOMCAT 3-D chemical transport model coupled to the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics model to quantify the impacts of aviation NOX, SO2 and BC emissions on ozone, aerosol and climate. GLOMAP-mode treats size resolved aerosol using a two-moment modal approach. We evaluate the effects of nitrate processing on the diagnosed impacts of aviation emissions on atmospheric composition including the first assessment of the impact on the global concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. We investigate interactions between gas-phase oxidant photochemistry and aerosol microphysics in regions influenced by aircraft emissions, using fully-coupled tropospheric chemistry and multi-component aerosol treatment (BC, sulphate, nitrate). Finally, we use a 3-D radiative transfer model to quantify the ozone and aerosol direct and indirect radiative effects of aviation emissions. The work presented here is part of a wider research project which will be the first study to combine aviation NOX, SO2 and black carbon emission in a global size-resolved model which considers atmospheric nitrate chemistry, which will aim to add to the science surrounding present day aviation impacts by

  13. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-06-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all primarily formed from the photo-oxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC), in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and PM alone was conducted. Since all of the target compounds are secondary products, their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and consequently a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance calculations. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9‰, and approximately 20% of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban centre with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in

  14. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-09-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all with substantial secondary formation from the photooxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), was conducted in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and in PM alone. Their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and, consequently, a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33 ‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9 ‰ and approximately 20 % of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban center with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This

  15. Carbon pool densities and a first estimate of the total carbon pool in the Mongolian forest-steppe.

    PubMed

    Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Klinge, Michael; Degener, Jan; Khishigjargal, Mookhor; Chenlemuge, Tselmeg; Bat-Enerel, Banzragch; Yeruult, Yolk; Saindovdon, Davaadorj; Ganbaatar, Kherlenchimeg; Tsogtbaatar, Jamsran; Leuschner, Christoph; Hauck, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The boreal forest biome represents one of the most important terrestrial carbon stores, which gave reason to intensive research on carbon stock densities. However, such an analysis does not yet exist for the southernmost Eurosiberian boreal forests in Inner Asia. Most of these forests are located in the Mongolian forest-steppe, which is largely dominated by Larix sibirica. We quantified the carbon stock density and total carbon pool of Mongolia's boreal forests and adjacent grasslands and draw conclusions on possible future change. Mean aboveground carbon stock density in the interior of L. sibirica forests was 66 Mg C ha(-1) , which is in the upper range of values reported from boreal forests and probably due to the comparably long growing season. The density of soil organic carbon (SOC, 108 Mg C ha(-1) ) and total belowground carbon density (149 Mg C ha(-1) ) are at the lower end of the range known from boreal forests, which might be the result of higher soil temperatures and a thinner permafrost layer than in the central and northern boreal forest belt. Land use effects are especially relevant at forest edges, where mean carbon stock density was 188 Mg C ha(-1) , compared with 215 Mg C ha(-1) in the forest interior. Carbon stock density in grasslands was 144 Mg C ha(-1) . Analysis of satellite imagery of the highly fragmented forest area in the forest-steppe zone showed that Mongolia's total boreal forest area is currently 73 818 km(2) , and 22% of this area refers to forest edges (defined as the first 30 m from the edge). The total forest carbon pool of Mongolia was estimated at ~ 1.5-1.7 Pg C, a value which is likely to decrease in future with increasing deforestation and fire frequency, and global warming. PMID:26463754

  16. Automated determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aqueous samples: RSIL lab codes 1851 and 1852

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, Kinga M.; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab codes 1851 and 1852 are to determine the total carbon mass and the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) for total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, lab code 1851) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC, lab code 1852) in aqueous samples. The analysis procedure is automated according to a method that utilizes a total carbon analyzer as a peripheral sample preparation device for analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas by a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The carbon analyzer produces CO2 and determines the carbon mass in parts per million (ppm) of DIC and DOC in each sample separately, and the CF-IRMS determines the carbon isotope ratio of the produced CO2. This configuration provides a fully automated analysis of total carbon mass and δ13C with no operator intervention, additional sample preparation, or other manual analysis. To determine the DIC, the carbon analyzer transfers a specified sample volume to a heated (70 °C) reaction vessel with a preprogrammed volume of 10% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which allows the carbonate and bicarbonate species in the sample to dissociate to CO2. The CO2 from the reacted sample is subsequently purged with a flow of helium gas that sweeps the CO2 through an infrared CO2 detector and quantifies the CO2. The CO2 is then carried through a high-temperature (650 °C) scrubber reactor, a series of water traps, and ultimately to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. For the analysis of total dissolved organic carbon, the carbon analyzer performs a second step on the sample in the heated reaction vessel during which a preprogrammed volume of sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) is added, and the hydroxyl radicals oxidize the organics to CO2. Samples containing 2 ppm to 30,000 ppm of carbon are analyzed. The precision of the carbon isotope analysis is within 0.3 per mill for DIC, and within 0.5 per mill for DOC.

  17. Aerosols in the arid southwestern United States - Measurements of mass loading, volatility, size distribution, absorption characteristics, black carbon content, and vertical structure to 7 km above sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Fernandez, G.; Martinez-Andazola, E.; Hinds, B. D.; Hansen, A. D. A.; Fuller, K.

    1993-02-01

    A variety of methods and sensors including quartz fiber filter samplers, hi-vol samplers, ground-based and aircraft-mounted light-scattering aerosol counters, an aerosol counter equipped with a heated inlet, and an aethalometer are used to determine near-surface and lower tropospheric aerosol characteristics at several remote sites near Orogrande, New Mexico. The results of these measurements, which were taken sporadically over the last 15 yr, suggest that regardless of season, aerosol consists of two modes - a submicron fraction composed primarily of ammonium/acid sulfates and elemental black carbon and a supermicron fraction composed mainly of quartz and clay minerals of soil origin. Limited aircraft measurements in the lowest few kilometers of the troposphere reveal a well-mixed aerosol for a neutral atmospheric condition, and a significant decrease in aerosol concentration with altitude for a stable atmospheric condition.

  18. Absorption and scattering properties of organic carbon vs. sulfate dominant aerosols at Gosan climate observatory in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Lee, M.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Lee, G.; Lee, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Carbonaceous and soluble ionic species of PM1.0 and PM10 were measured along with the absorption and scattering properties and aerosol number size distributions at Gosan climate observatory (GCO) from January to September 2008. The daily averaged equivalent black carbon (EBC) measured as aerosol absorption exhibited two types of spectral dependence with a distinct maximum (peak) at either 370 nm or 880 nm, by which two subsets were extracted and classified into the respective groups (370 nm and 880 nm). The 370 nm group was distinguished by high organic carbon (OC) concentrations relative to elemental carbon (EC) and sulfate, but sulfate was predominant for the 880 nm group. The PM1.0 OC of the 370 nm group was mainly composed of refractory and pyrolized components that correlated well with PM1.0 EC1, referred to as char EC, which suggests biofuel and biomass combustion as the source of these OC fractions, particularly during winter. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and the number size distributions implied that aerosols of the 370 nm group were externally mixed upon transport in fast-moving air masses that passed through the Beijing area in about one day. In contrast, the aerosols of the 880 nm group were characterized by high sulfate concentrations, and seemed to be internally mixed during slow transport over the Yellow Sea region over approximately two to four days. The absorption and scattering coefficients of the 880 nm group were noticeably higher compared to those of the 370 nm group. The average absorption ångström exponent (AAE) was estimated to be 1.29 and 1.0 for the 370 nm and 880 nm groups, respectively, in the range 370-950 nm. These results demonstrated that the optical properties of aerosols were intimately linked to chemical composition and mixing state, characteristics determined both by source and atmospheric aging processes. In OC dominant aerosols, absorption was enhanced in the UV region, which was possibly due to refractory and

  19. Absorption and scattering properties of organic carbon versus sulfate dominant aerosols at Gosan climate observatory in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Lee, M.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Lee, G.; Lee, Y. J.

    2014-08-01

    Carbonaceous and soluble ionic species of PM1.0 and PM10 were measured along with the absorption and scattering properties and aerosol number size distributions at Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO) from January to September 2008. The daily averaged equivalent black carbon (EBC) measured as aerosol absorption exhibited two types of spectral dependence with a distinct maximum (peak) at either 370 nm or 880 nm, by which two subsets were extracted and classified into the respective groups (370 and 880 nm). The 370 nm group was distinguished by high organic carbon (OC) concentrations relative to elemental carbon (EC) and sulfate, but sulfate was predominant for the 880 nm group. The PM1.0 OC of the 370 nm group was mainly composed of refractory and pyrolized components that correlated well with PM1.0 EC1, referred to as char EC, which suggests biofuel and biomass combustion as the source of these OC fractions, particularly during winter. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and the number size distributions implied that aerosols of the 370 nm group were externally mixed upon transport in fast-moving air masses that passed through the Beijing area in about one day. In contrast, the aerosols of the 880 nm group were characterized by high sulfate concentrations, and seemed to be internally mixed during slow transport over the Yellow Sea region over approximately 2 to 4 days. The absorption and scattering coefficients of the 880 nm group were noticeably higher compared to those of the 370 nm group. The average absorption ångström exponent (AAE) was estimated to be 1.29 and 1.0 for the 370 and 880 nm groups, respectively, in the range 370-950 nm. These results demonstrated that the optical properties of aerosols were intimately linked to chemical composition and mixing state, characteristics determined both by source and atmospheric aging processes. In OC dominant aerosols, absorption was enhanced in the UV region, which was possibly due to refractory and pyrolized

  20. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index Observed with the OMI Satellite Instrument to Understand Absorption by Organic Carbon Aerosols and Implications for Atmospheric Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, M. S.; Martin, R.; van Donkelaar, A.; Buchard, V.; Torres, O.; Ridley, D. A.; Spurr, R. J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Absorption of solar radiation by aerosols plays a major role in radiative forcing and atmospheric photochemistry. Many atmospheric chemistry models tend to overestimate tropospheric OH concentrations compared to observations. Accurately representing aerosol absorption in the UV could help rectify the discrepancies between simulated and observed OH concentrations. We develop a simulation of the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index (UVAI), using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.4 to -1.0) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We implement optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), into GEOS-Chem and evaluate the simulation with observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The spectral dependence of absorption after adding BrC to the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with Absorbing Angstrom Exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.7 in the UV to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. The addition of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.60 to -0.08 over North Africa in January, from -0.40 to -0.003 over South Asia in April, from -1.0 to -0.24 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.34 over South America in September. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining ozone photolysis frequencies (J(O(1D))) and tropospheric OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases J(O(1D)) and OH by up to 35% over biomass burning regions, and reduces the global bias in OH.

  1. Intercomparison of thermal-optical methods for the determination of organic and elemental carbon: influences of aerosol composition and implications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Duan, Feng-kui; He, Ke-bin; Zheng, Mei; Du, Zhen-yu; Ma, Yong-liang; Tan, Ji-hua

    2011-12-01

    An intercomparison of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) measurements was conducted based on ambient aerosol samples collected during four seasons in Beijing, China. Dependence of OC and EC values on the temperature protocol and the charring correction method is presented and influences of aerosol composition are investigated. EC was found to decrease with the peak inert mode temperature (T(peak)) such that EC determined by the IMPROVE (the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments)-A protocol (T(peak) was 580 °C) was 2.85 ± 1.31 and 3.83 ± 2.58 times that measured by an alternative protocol with a T(peak) of 850 °C when using the transmittance and reflectance correction, respectively. It was also found that reflectance correction tends to classify more carbon as EC compared with transmittance; results from the IMPROVE-A protocol showed that the ratio of EC defined by reflectance correction (EC(R)) to that based on transmittance (EC(T)) averaged 1.50 ± 0.42. Moreover, it was demonstrated that emissions from biomass burning would increase the discrepancy between EC values determined by different temperature protocols. On the other hand, the discrepancy between EC(R) and EC(T) was strongly associated with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) which was shown to be an important source of the organics that pyrolyze during the inert mode of thermal-optical analysis. PMID:22044188

  2. Aerosol-CFD modelling of ultrafine and black carbon particle emission, dilution, and growth near roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Gong, S. L.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Stroud, C. A.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J. R.; Jia, C. Q.

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have shown that on-road vehicle emissions are the dominant source of ultrafine particles (UFP; diameter < 100 nm) in urban areas and near-roadway environments. In order to advance our knowledge on the complex interactions and competition among atmospheric dilution, dispersion and dynamics of UFPs, an aerosol dynamics-CFD coupled model is developed and validated against field measurements. A unique approach of applying periodic boundary conditions is proposed to model pollutant dispersion and dynamics in one unified domain from the tailpipe level to the ambient near-road environment. This approach significantly reduces the size of the computational domain, and therefore, allows fast simulation of multiple scenarios. The model is validated against measured turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and pollution gradients near a major highway. Through a model sensitivity analysis, the relative importance of individual aerosol dynamical processes on the total particle number concentration (N) and particle number-size distribution (PSD) near a highway is investigated. The results demonstrate that (1) coagulation has a negligible effect on N and particle growth, (2) binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) of H2SO4-H2O is likely responsible for elevated N closest to the road, (3) N and particle growth are very sensitive to the condensation of semi-volatile organics (SVOCs), particle dry deposition, and the interaction between these processes. The results also indicate that, without the proper treatment of atmospheric boundary layer (i.e. its wind profile and turbulence quantities), the nucleation rate would be underestimated by a factor of 5 in the vehicle wake region due to overestimated mixing. Therefore, introducing ABL conditions to activity-based emission models may potentially improve their performance in estimating UFP traffic emissions.

  3. Total Optical Depth Analysis for NO2, O3 and Aerosols by a Multi-Filter Shadowband Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Lorenzo; Mebane, Lloyd; Brathwaite, Kevin; Craig, R.

    2000-01-01

    The main focus of this research is the retrieval of tropospheric aerosol information using a Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer, Model MFR-7, placed on the roof of the Science Building at Medgar Evers College. This instrument makes precise measurements of atmospheric extinction of the direct solar beam simultaneously at six wavelengths (475, 500, 615, 670, 840 and 940 nm) at one minute intervals throughout the day. We are interested in measuring the changes in the optical depth of ambient aerosols, mass, effective particle size, aerosol size distribution, and chemical composition of ambient particulate matter in the Greater New York City Area. Results will be compared with data obtained by A. Lacis, B. Carlson and B. Cairns at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

  4. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  5. Decadal trend of black carbon and refractory carbonaceous aerosol in the western rim of the North Pacific Ocean: atmospheric concentration and the retrieved record of deposition flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyasu, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Noguchi, Izumi; Akiyama, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2013-04-01

    The long-term trend of light absorbing carbonaceous aerosols (or black carbon: BC) or refractory carbonaceous aerosol (or elemental carbon: EC) concentration is reported at European background sites such as Mace Head, and that of aerosol absorption coefficient are monitored in many GAW sites. On the contrary, such long-term data are relatively scarce at around the western part of the North Pacific Ocean. Thus, to understand the long-term variation of in the area, BC in fine aerosol fraction has been measured at Chichi-jima Islands, Japan. Chichi-jima Island is located 1000 km south of the Japanese mainland, and 1800 km west of the coast line of the Asian continent. BC has been measured with an Aethalometer (Magee, AE-16 and AE-30) since December, 1998 with 1 hr time resolution. Mass flowmeter embedded inside the Aethalometer is calibrated with a rotational dry gas-meter once a year. Monthly averaged BC concentration shows an obvious seasonal variation, i.e. high concentration during late autumn-winter-spring period resulting from the transport from East Asia, with maximum daily concentration above 500 ng m-3. In summer, daily concentration was usually less than 20 ng m-3, due to the clean background airmass originating from the North Pacific Anticyclone. Decadal trend of the annual averaged BC concentration showed a increasing trend from 2000 to 2007 and started to decrease after 2008, which roughly coincides with the reported emission trend of SO2 in China (Lu et al., 2010). In addition, total (i.e., wet + dry) deposition record of refractory carbon at two sites in the northern Japan (Rishiri Island: a remote island site, and Sapporo City: an urban site) are retrieved. At these sites, the local government have been measuring the chemical components in precipitation water collected by deposition gauges. In the deposition gauge, a membrane filter made of cellulose-acetate is fixed at the bottom of the funnel to remove water-insoluble particles from the precipitated

  6. Application of the integrating sphere method to separate the contributions of brown and black carbon in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Hitzenberger, Regina; Bauer, Heidi; Pouresmaeil, Parissa; Klatzer, Barbara; Caseiro, Alexandre; Puxbaum, Hans

    2009-02-15

    Until about a decade ago, black carbon (BC) was thought to be the only light absorbing substance in the atmospheric aerosol except for soil or desert dust In more recent years, light absorbing polymeric carbonaceous material was found in atmospheric aerosols. Absorption increases appreciably toward short wavelengths, so this fraction was called brown carbon. Because brown carbon is thermally rather refractory, it influences the split between organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in thermal methods and, through its light absorption characteristics, leads to overestimations of BC concentrations. The goal of the present study was to extend the integrating sphere method to correct the BC signal for the contribution of brown carbon and to obtain an estimate of brown carbon concentrations. Humic acid sodium salt was used as proxy for brown carbon. The extended method is first tested on mixtures of test substances and then applied to atmospheric samples collected during biomass smoke episodes (Easter bonfires) in Austria. The resulting concentrations of black and brown carbon are compared to EC obtained with a widely used thermal method, the Cachier method (Cachier et al. Tellus 1989, 41B, 379-390) and a thermal-optical method (Schmid et al. Atmos. Environ. 2001, 35, 2111-2121), as well as to concentrations of humic like substances (HULIS) and to biomass smoke POM (particulate organic matter). Both the thermal methods were found to overestimate BC on days with large contributions of woodsmoke, which agrees with the findings of the method intercomparison study by Reisinger et at. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42, 884-889). During the days of the bonfires, the Cachier method gave EC concentrations that were higher by a factor of 3.8 than the BC concentrations, while the concentrations obtained with the thermal-optical method were higher by a factor of 2.6. PMID:19320171

  7. Molecular Characterization of Brown Carbon (BrC) Chromophores in Secondary Organic Aerosol Generated From Photo-Oxidation of Toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric Brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365nm = 0.78 m2 g-1) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene < 1/300). Fifteen compounds, most of which are nitrophenols, are identified as major BrC chromophores responsible for the enhanced light absorption of Tol-SOA material produced in the presence of NOx. The integrated absorbance of these fifteen chromophores accounts for 40-60% of the total light absorbance by Tol-SOA at wavelengths between 300 nm and 500 nm. The combination of tandem LC-UV/Vis-ESI/HRMS measurements provides an analytical platform for predictive understanding of light absorption properties by BrC and their relationship to the structure of individual chromophores. General trends in the UV/vis absorption by plausible isomers of the BrC chromophores were evaluated using theoretical chemistry calculations. The molecular-level understanding of BrC chemistry is helpful for better understanding the evolution and behavior of light absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere.

  8. Molecular characterization of brown carbon (BrC) chromophores in secondary organic aerosol generated from photo-oxidation of toluene.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E; Kathmann, Shawn M; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365 nm = 0.78 m(2) g(-1)) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene < 1/300). Fifteen compounds, most of which are nitrophenols, are identified as major BrC chromophores responsible for the enhanced light absorption of Tol-SOA material produced in the presence of NOx. The integrated absorbance of these fifteen chromophores accounts for 40-60% of the total light absorbance by Tol-SOA at wavelengths between 300 nm and 500 nm. The combination of tandem LC-UV/Vis-ESI/HRMS measurements provides an analytical platform for predictive understanding of light absorption properties by BrC and their relationship to the structure of individual chromophores. General trends in the UV/Vis absorption by plausible isomers of the BrC chromophores were evaluated using theoretical chemistry calculations. The molecular-level understanding of BrC chemistry is helpful for better understanding the evolution and behavior of light absorbing aerosols in the

  9. Remote Sensing of Global Fire Patterns, Aerosol Optical Thickness, and Carbon Monoxide During April 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Wang, Min; Klich, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.; Nolf, Scott; Connors, Vickie S.

    1997-01-01

    Fires play a crucial role in several ecosystems. They are routinely used to burn forests in order to accommodate the needs of the expanding population, clear land for agricultural purposes, eliminate weeds and pests, regenerate nutrients in grazing and crop lands and produce energy for cooking and heating purposes. Most of the fires on earth are related to biomass burning in the tropics, although they are not confined to these latitudes. The boreal and tundra regions also experience fires on a yearly basis. The current study examines global fire patterns, Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) and carbon monoxide concentrations during April 9-19, 1994. Recently, global Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data at nadir ground spatial resolution of 1 km are made available through the NASA/NOAA Pathfinder project. These data from April 9-19, 1994 are used to map fires over the earth. In summary, our analysis shows that fires from biomass burning appear to be the dominant factor for increased tropospheric CO concentrations as measured by the MAPS. The vertical transport of CO by convective activities, along with horizontal transport due to the prevailing winds, are responsible for the observed spatial distribution of CO.

  10. Determination of the organic aerosol mass to organic carbon ratio in IMPROVE samples.

    PubMed

    El-Zanan, Hazem S; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Zielinska, Barbara; Chow, Judith C; Kumar, Naresh

    2005-07-01

    The ratio of organic mass (OM) to organic carbon (OC) in PM(2.5) aerosols at US national parks in the IMPROVE network was estimated experimentally from solvent extraction of sample filters and from the difference between PM(2.5) mass and chemical constituents other than OC (mass balance) in IMPROVE samples from 1988 to 2003. Archived IMPROVE filters from five IMPROVE sites were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), acetone and water. The extract residues were weighed to determine OM and analyzed for OC by thermal optical reflectance (TOR). On average, successive extracts of DCM, acetone, and water contained 64%, 21%, and 15%, respectively, of the extractable OC, respectively. On average, the non-blank-corrected recovery of the OC initially measured in these samples by TOR was 115+/-42%. OM/OC ratios from the combined DCM and acetone extracts averaged 1.92 and ranged from 1.58 at Indian Gardens, AZ in the Grand Canyon to 2.58 at Mount Rainier, WA. The average OM/OC ratio determined by mass balance was 2.07 across the IMPROVE network. The sensitivity of this ratio to assumptions concerning sulfate neutralization, water uptake by hygroscopic species, soil mass, and nitrate volatilization were evaluated. These results suggest that the value of 1.4 for the OM/OC ratio commonly used for mass and light extinction reconstruction in IMPROVE is too low. PMID:15950041

  11. Characteristics and relevant remote sources of black carbon aerosol in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Shuping; Cheng, Tiantao; Tao, Jun; Zhang, Renjian; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Yunwei; Leng, Chunpeng; Zhang, Deqin; Du, Jianfei

    2014-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol was measured continuously at an urban site in Shanghai (31°18‧N, 121°30‧E) from January 2011 to January 2012, and the characteristics and relevant remote sources of BC were examined. Daily BC concentrations varied within the range of 0.3-11.4 μg m- 3 with an annual average of 2.3 μg m- 3. Comparably, monthly BC concentrations were usually high in the dry season (November-April) but low in the wet season (May-October). Hourly BC showed a similar diurnal pattern with two peaks, one at 7:00-9:00 LT and another at 19:00-21:00 LT, in the four seasons. BC level was always relatively higher during daytime than nighttime. There also existed a workday/weekend difference of BC due to anthropogenic activities. The correlation analyses between BC and meteorological factors indicated that (1) wind speed was an important contributor to BC diffusion in the boundary atmosphere, (2) atmospheric visibility was not highly sensitive to BC, and (3) northwesterly, westerly and southwesterly wind directions related closely to BC. The increase of BC is likely associated with fossil fuel combustion during the winter heating period and agricultural waste burning over the surrounding areas during the summer harvest period, as well as the air masses originating from and/or transiting through these regions.

  12. Relations between erythemal UV dose, global solar radiation, total ozone column and aerosol optical depth at Uccle, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, V.; De Backer, H.; Van Malderen, R.; Mangold, A.; Delcloo, A.

    2014-11-01

    At Uccle, Belgium, a long time series (1991-2013) of simultaneous measurements of erythemal ultraviolet (UV) dose (Sery), global solar radiation (Sg), total ozone column (QO3) and aerosol optical depth (τaer) (at 320.1 nm) is available, which allows for an extensive study of the changes in the variables over time. Linear trends were determined for the different monthly anomalies time series. Sery, Sg and QO3 all increase by respectively 7, 4 and 3% per decade. τaer shows an insignificant negative trend of -8% per decade. These trends agree with results found in the literature for sites with comparable latitudes. A change-point analysis, which determines whether there is a significant change in the mean of the time series, is applied to the monthly anomalies time series of the variables. Only for Sery and QO3, was a significant change point present in the time series around February 1998 and March 1998, respectively. The change point in QO3 corresponds with results found in the literature, where the change in ozone levels around 1997 is attributed to the recovery of ozone. A multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis is applied to the data in order to study the influence of Sg, QO3 and τaer on Sery. Together these parameters are able to explain 94% of the variation in Sery. Most of the variation (56%) in Sery is explained by Sg. The regression model performs well, with a slight tendency to underestimate the measured Sery values and with a mean absolute bias error (MABE) of 18%. However, in winter, negative Sery are modeled. Applying the MLR to the individual seasons solves this issue. The seasonal models have an adjusted R2 value higher than 0.8 and the correlation between modeled and measured Sery values is higher than 0.9 for each season. The summer model gives the best performance, with an absolute mean error of only 6%. However, the seasonal regression models do not always represent reality, where an increase in Sery is accompanied with an increase in QO3 and

  13. Relations between erythemal UV dose, global solar radiation, total ozone column and aerosol optical depth at Uccle, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bock, V.; De Backer, H.; Van Malderen, R.; Mangold, A.; Delcloo, A.

    2014-06-01

    At Uccle, a long time series (1991-2013) of simultaneous measurements of erythemal ultraviolet (UV) dose, global solar radiation, total ozone column (TOC) and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) (at 320.1 nm) is available which allows for an extensive study of the changes in the variables over time. A change-point analysis, which determines whether there is a significant change in the mean of the time series, is applied to the monthly anomalies time series of the variables. Only for erythemal UV dose and TOC, a significant change point (without any known instrumental cause) was present in the time series around February 1998 and March 1998 respectively. The change point in TOC corresponds with results found in literature, where the change in ozone levels (around 1997) is attributed to the recovery of ozone. Linear trends were determined for the different (monthly anomalies) time series. Erythemal UV dose, global solar radiation and TOC all increase with respectively 7, 4 and 3% per decade. AOD shows an (insignificant) negative trend of -8% per decade. These trends agree with results found in literature for sites with comparable latitudes. A multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis is applied to the data in order to study the influence of global solar radiation, TOC and AOD on the erythemal UV dose. Together these parameters are able to explain 94% of the variation in erythemal UV dose. Most of the variation (56%) in erythemal UV dose is explained by global solar radiation. The regression model performs well with a slight tendency to underestimate the measured erythemal UV doses and with a Mean Absolute Bias Error (MABE) of 18%. However, in winter, negative erythemal UV dose values are modeled. Applying the MLR to the individual seasons solves this issue. The seasonal models have an adjusted R2 value higher than 0.8 and the correlation between modeled and measured erythemal UV dose values is higher than 0.9 for each season. The summer model gives the best performance, with

  14. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  15. Simultaneous retrieval of total ozone column amounts and cloud/aerosol optical depths from multi-channel, moderate bandwidth filter instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamnes, Knut; Fan, Lingling; Li, Wei; Dahlback, Arne; Stamnes, Jakob; Stamnes, Snorre

    2015-04-01

    A new method is presented based on using neural networks (NN) to analyze ultraviolet (UV) irradiance data recorded by multi-channel, moderate bandwidth filter instruments. Application of the NN method to three years of data obtained by a NILU-UV multi-channel, moderate bandwidth filter instrument, revealed that compared to a traditional look-up table (LUT) method, the NN method yielded better agreement against the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with a 1% decrease in relative difference and a significant increase in the correlation of total ozone column (TOC) values. Furthermore, this new method resulted in larger number of valid retrievals (daily average values within a meaningful range of 200-500 DU) than the LUT method. Compared with NN retrievals based on NILU-UV irradiance measurements, TOC values obtained from OMI were underestimated under cloudy conditions. Cloud optical depth (COD) values derived by the NN method were more reliable than corresponding results derived by the LUT method, the latter results were less accurate for heavy cloud cover, broken cloud situations or snow-covered ground. The potential for retrieving aerosol optical depth (AOD) values under cloud-free conditions will be discussed. The cloud-aerosol information obtained by irradiance instruments such as the NILU-UV can be used in conjunction with a radiative transfer model to estimate cloud/aerosol radiative forcing and hence the impact of clouds and aerosols on the radiative energy balance. Deployment of multi-channel, moderate bandwidth filter instruments at AERONET sites and analysis of such data in conjunction with AERONET and satellite remote sensing data can provide crucial information needed for the assessment of the influence of ozone, clouds, and aerosols on climate.

  16. Simultaneous reductions in emissions of black carbon and co-emitted species will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in the short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate atmosphere-only model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero with prescribed sea surface temperature and sea ice cover, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with recent past year 2000 levels if the emissions of only BC are reduced to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial~for the mitigation of global warming. However, both aerosol negative direct and indirect radiative effects are weakened when BC and its co-emitted species (sulfur dioxide and organic carbon) are simultaneously reduced. Relative to year 2000 levels, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 if the emissions of all these aerosols are decreased to the levels projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  17. Brown carbon aerosols from burning of boreal peatlands: microphysical properties, emission factors, and implications for direct radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Gyawali, Madhu; Yatavelli, Reddy L. N.; Pandey, Apoorva; Watts, Adam C.; Knue, Joseph; Chen, Lung-Wen A.; Pattison, Robert R.; Tsibart, Anna; Samburova, Vera; Moosmüller, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The surface air warming over the Arctic has been almost twice as much as the global average in recent decades. In this region, unprecedented amounts of smoldering peat fires have been identified as a major emission source of climate-warming agents. While much is known about greenhouse gas emissions from these fires, there is a knowledge gap on the nature of particulate emissions and their potential role in atmospheric warming. Here, we show that aerosols emitted from burning of Alaskan and Siberian peatlands are predominantly brown carbon (BrC) - a class of visible light-absorbing organic carbon (OC) - with a negligible amount of black carbon content. The mean fuel-based emission factors for OC aerosols ranged from 3.8 to 16.6 g kg-1. Their mass absorption efficiencies were in the range of 0.2-0.8 m2 g-1 at 405 nm (violet) and dropped sharply to 0.03-0.07 m2 g-1 at 532 nm (green), characterized by a mean Ångström exponent of ≈ 9. Electron microscopy images of the particles revealed their morphologies to be either single sphere or agglomerated "tar balls". The shortwave top-of-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing per unit optical depth under clear-sky conditions was estimated as a function of surface albedo. Only over bright surfaces with albedo greater than 0.6, such as snow cover and low-level clouds, the emitted aerosols could result in a net warming (positive forcing) of the atmosphere.

  18. Estimation of the Mass Absorption Cross Section of the Organic Carbon Component of Aerosols in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, James C.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.

    2008-11-19

    Data taken from the MCMA-2003 and the 2006 MILAGRO field campaigns are used to examine the absorption of solar radiation by the organic component of aerosols. Using irradiance data from an Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and an actinic flux spectroradiometer, we find aerosol single scattering albedo, ω-0,λ, as a function of wavelength, λ. We find that in near-UV spectral range (defined here as 250 nm to 400 nm) ω-0,λ is much lower compared to ω-0,λ at 500 nm suggesting enhanced absorption in the near-UV range. Absorption by elemental carbon, dust, or gas cannot account for this enhanced absorption leaving only the organic part of the aerosol to account for it. We use data from a surface deployed Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) along with the inferred ω-0,λ to estimate the Mass Absorption Cross-section (MAC) for the organic carbon. We find that the MAC is about 10.5 m2/g at 300 nm and falls close to zero at about 500 nm; values that are roughly consistent with other estimates of organic carbon MAC. These MAC values can be considered as “radiatively correct” because when used in radiative transfer calculations the calculated irradiances match the measured irradiances at the wavelengths considered here. The uncertainties of individual estimates are quite large, ±30% at 300 nm for the random error, and even larger for a worst-case estimate of the systematic error, ±80%. The error represents the unusual circumstance where no error cancellation is permitted, and is unlikely ever to be realized.

  19. INTERLABORATORY METHODS COMPARISON FOR THE TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON ANALYSIS OF AQUIFER MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The total organic carbon (TOC) content of aquifer materials has been found to have significant effects on the movement of pollutants in the subsurface environment. Accurate quantification of TOC is therefore of great importance to research in groundwater contamination. owever, la...

  20. TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON ANALYZERS AS TOOLS FOR MEASURING CARBONACEOUS MATTER IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For some utilities, new US drinking water regulations may require removal of disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursor material as a means of mimnimizing DBP formation. The EPa's Stage 1 DBP Rule relies on total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations as a measure of the effectiveness o...

  1. INTERLABORATORY METHODS COMPARISON FOR THE TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON ANALYSIS OF AQUIFER MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The total organic carbon (TOC) content of aquifer materials has been found to have significant effects on the movement of pollutants in the subsurface environment. Accurate quantification of TOC is therefore of great im- portance to research in groundwater contamination. However,...

  2. Soil total carbon content, aggregation, bulk density, and penetration resistance of croplands and nearby grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Converting native grassland (NGL) to cropland (CL) decreases soil organic matter contents (components of soil total carbon contents, STCCs), which often leads to soil degradation. Reestablishing grass on CL generally increases soil organic matter, which improves soil conditions. This study was condu...

  3. DEVELOP NEW TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON/SPECIFIC UV ABSORBANCE METHOD WITH EXPANDED QUALITY CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to provide a total organic carbon (TOC)/specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) method that will be used by the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (OGWDW) to support monitoring requirements of the Stage 2 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-products ...

  4. Soil organic carbon and total nitrogen responses after 34 years of tillage of a sandy ultisol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage and crop management strategies are available to increase soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents, but long-term (> 30 yrs) field results quantifying these increases are sparse. Our objectives were to quantity above ground biomass inputs and changes in vertica...

  5. Catalysis of CuSO4 for total organic carbon detection based on supercritical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hui, Zhang; Dongdong, Han; Yi, Chen; Chunmian, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic effects of CuSO4 in total organic carbon (TOC) detecting processes based on supercritical water oxidation have been investigated. Using benzoic acid as a model pollutant, the presence of a CuSO4 catalyst can significantly decrease the reaction temperature and H2O2 multiple during the TOC detection processes. A better TOC conversion efficiency was obtained at a much lower temperature in the catalytic system compared with the non-catalytic condition. The use of the catalyst effectively lowered the necessary H2O2 multiple from 20.0 without catalyst to 3.0 in the catalytic system. The established device could detect the TOC concentration precisely in model wastewater without inorganic carbon (IC). Moreover, the detection of the practical wastewater was studied. Detection results were total carbon of wastewater rather than TOC of practical wastewater. A detection or removal unit of IC is necessary before it can be practically utilized. PMID:27438232

  6. Black-carbon-surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    Soot particles are the most strongly light-absorbing particles commonly found in the atmosphere. They are major contributors to the radiative budget of the Earth and to the toxicity of atmospheric pollution. Atmospheric aging of soot may change its health- and climate-relevant properties by oxidizing the primary black carbon (BC) or organic particulate matter (OM) which, together with ash, comprise soot. This atmospheric aging, which entails the condensation of secondary particulate matter as well as the oxidation of the primary OM and BC emissions, is currently poorly understood. In this study, atmospheric aging of wood-stove soot aerosols was simulated in a continuous-flow reactor. The composition of fresh and aged soot particles was measured in real time by a dual-vaporizer aerosol-particle mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS provided information on the OM, BC, and surface composition of the soot. The OM appeared to be generated largely by cellulose and/or hemicellulose pyrolysis, and was only present in large amounts when new wood was added to the stove. BC signals otherwise dominated the mass spectrum. These signals consisted of ions related to refractory BC (rBC, C+1-5), oxygenated surface groups (CO+1-2), potassium (K+) and water (H+2O and related fragments). The C+4 : C+3 ratio, but not the C+1 : C+3 ratio, was consistent with the BC-structure trends of Corbin et al. (2015c). The CO+1-2 signals likely originated from BC surface groups: upon aging, both CO+ and CO+2 increased relative to C+1-3 while CO+2 simultaneously increased relative to CO+. Factor analysis (PMF) of SP-AMS and AMS data, using a new error model to account for peak-integration uncertainties, indicated that the surface composition of the BC was approximately constant across all stages of combustion for both fresh and aged samples. These results represent the first time-resolved measurements of in-situ BC-surface aging and suggest that the surface of beech-wood BC may be modelled as a

  7. Black carbon surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Soot particles are the most strongly light-absorbing particles commonly found in the atmosphere. They are major contributors to the radiative budget of the Earth and to the toxicity of atmospheric pollution. Atmospheric aging of soot may change its health- and climate-relevant properties by oxidizing the primary black carbon (BC) or organic particulate matter (OM) which, together with ash, comprise soot. This atmospheric aging, which entails the condensation of secondary particulate matter as well as the oxidation of the primary OM and BC emissions, is currently poorly understood. In this study, atmospheric aging of wood-stove soot aerosols was simulated in a continuous-flow reactor. The composition of fresh and aged soot particles was measured in real time by a dual-vaporizer aerosol-particle mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The dual-vaporizer SP-AMS provided information on the OM and BC components of the soot as well as on refractory components internally mixed with BC. By switching the SP-AMS laser vaporizer off and using only the AMS thermal vaporizer (at 600 °C), information on the OM component only was obtained. In both modes, OM appeared to be generated largely by cellulose and/or hemicellulose pyrolysis and was only present in large amounts when new wood was added to the stove. In SP-AMS mode, BC signals otherwise dominated the mass spectrum. These signals consisted of ions related to refractory BC (rBC, C1-5+), oxygenated carbonaceous ions (CO1-2+), potassium (K+), and water (H2O+ and related fragments). The C4+ : C3+ ratio, but not the C1+ : C3+ ratio, was consistent with the BC-structure trends of Corbin et al. (2015c). The CO1-2+ signals likely originated from BC surface groups: upon aging, both CO+ and CO2+ increased relative to C1-3+ while CO2+ simultaneously increased relative to CO+. Factor analysis (positive matrix factorization) of SP-AMS and AMS data, using a modified error model to address peak-integration uncertainties, indicated that the surface

  8. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ(13)C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19-C36), fatty acids (C8-C32) and n-alcohols (C16-C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ(13)C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from -34.1 to -24.7% and -26.9 to -24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  9. Quality assurance and quality control for thermal/optical analysis of aerosol samples for organic and elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Robles, Jerome; Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, L-W Antony; Trimble, Dana L; Kohl, Steven D; Tropp, Richard J; Fung, Kochy K

    2011-12-01

    Accurate, precise, and valid organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC, respectively) measurements require more effort than the routine analysis of ambient aerosol and source samples. This paper documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures that should be implemented to ensure consistency of OC and EC measurements. Prior to field sampling, the appropriate filter substrate must be selected and tested for sampling effectiveness. Unexposed filters are pre-fired to remove contaminants and acceptance tested. After sampling, filters must be stored in the laboratory in clean, labeled containers under refrigeration (<4 °C) to minimize loss of semi-volatile OC. QA activities include participation in laboratory accreditation programs, external system audits, and interlaboratory comparisons. For thermal/optical carbon analyses, periodic QC tests include calibration of the flame ionization detector with different types of carbon standards, thermogram inspection, replicate analyses, quantification of trace oxygen concentrations (<100 ppmv) in the helium atmosphere, and calibration of the sample temperature sensor. These established QA/QC procedures are applicable to aerosol sampling and analysis for carbon and other chemical components. PMID:21626190

  10. Impact of idealized future stratospheric aerosol injection on the large-scale ocean and land carbon cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjiputra, J. F.; Grini, A.; Lee, H.

    2016-01-01

    Using an Earth system model, we simulate stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI) on top of the Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 future scenario. Our idealized method prescribes aerosol concentration, linearly increasing from 2020 to 2100, and thereafter remaining constant until 2200. In the aggressive scenario, the model projects a cooling trend toward 2100 despite warming that persists in the high latitudes. Following SAI termination in 2100, a rapid global warming of 0.35 K yr-1 is simulated in the subsequent 10 years, and the global mean temperature returns to levels close to the reference state, though roughly 0.5 K cooler. In contrast to earlier findings, we show a weak response in the terrestrial carbon sink during SAI implementation in the 21st century, which we attribute to nitrogen limitation. The SAI increases the land carbon uptake in the temperate forest-, grassland-, and shrub-dominated regions. The resultant lower temperatures lead to a reduction in the heterotrophic respiration rate and increase soil carbon retention. Changes in precipitation patterns are key drivers for variability in vegetation carbon. Upon SAI termination, the level of vegetation carbon storage returns to the reference case, whereas the soil carbon remains high. The ocean absorbs nearly 10% more carbon in the geoengineered simulation than in the reference simulation, leading to a ˜15 ppm lower atmospheric CO2 concentration in 2100. The largest enhancement in uptake occurs in the North Atlantic. In both hemispheres' polar regions, SAI delays the sea ice melting and, consequently, export production remains low. In the deep water of North Atlantic, SAI-induced circulation changes accelerate the ocean acidification rate and broaden the affected area.

  11. Reviews and syntheses: Calculating the global contribution of coralline algae to total carbon burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, L. H.; Kamenos, N. A.

    2015-11-01

    The ongoing increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is changing the global marine environment and is causing warming and acidification of the oceans. Reduction of CO2 to a sustainable level is required to avoid further marine change. Many studies investigate the potential of marine carbon sinks (e.g. seagrass) to mitigate anthropogenic emissions, however, information on storage by coralline algae and the beds they create is scant. Calcifying photosynthetic organisms, including coralline algae, can act as a CO2 sink via photosynthesis and CaCO3 dissolution and act as a CO2 source during respiration and CaCO3 production on short-term timescales. Long-term carbon storage potential might come from the accumulation of coralline algae deposits over geological timescales. Here, the carbon storage potential of coralline algae is assessed using meta-analysis of their global organic and inorganic carbon production and the processes involved in this metabolism. Net organic and inorganic production were estimated at 330 g C m-2 yr-1 and 900 g CaCO3 m-2 yr-1 respectively giving global organic/inorganic C production of 0.7/1.8 × 109 t C yr-1. Calcium carbonate production by free-living/crustose coralline algae (CCA) corresponded to a sediment accretion of 70/450 mm kyr-1. Using this potential carbon storage for coralline algae, the global production of free-living algae/CCA was 0.4/1.2 × 109 t C yr-1 suggesting a total potential carbon sink of 1.6 × 109 tonnes per year. Coralline algae therefore have production rates similar to mangroves, salt marshes and seagrasses representing an as yet unquantified but significant carbon store, however, further empirical investigations are needed to determine the dynamics and stability of that store.

  12. Separation of root respiration from total soil respiration using carbon-13 labelling during free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE)

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.A.; Harrison, K.G.; Matamala, R.; Schlesinger, W.H.

    1999-10-01

    Soil respiration constitutes a major component of the global carbon cycle and is likely to be altered by climate change. However, there is an incomplete understanding of the extent to which various processes contribute to total soil respiration, especially the contributions of root and rhizosphere respiration. Here, using a stable carbon isotope tracer, the authors separate the relative contributions of root and soil heterotrophic respiration to total soil respiration in situ. The Free-Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) facility in the Duke University Forest (NC) fumigates plots of an undisturbed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest with CO{sub 2} that is strongly depleted in {sup 13}C. This labeled CO{sub 2} is found in the soil pore space through live root and mycorrhizal respiration and soil heterotroph respiration of labile root exudates. By measuring the depletion of {sup 13}CO{sub 2} in the soil system, the authors found that the rhizosphere contribution to soil CO{sub 2} reflected the distribution of fine roots in the soil and that late in the growing season roots contributed 55% of total soil respiration at the surface. This estimate may represent an upper limit on the contribution of roots to soil respiration because high atmospheric CO{sub 2} often increases in root density and/or root activity in the soil.

  13. Tracking Transport and Transformation of Aerosols using C and O-triple Isotopic Composition of Carbonates: CSI La Jolla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Shaheen, R.; Chong, K.; Hill, A.; Wong, J.; Zhang, Z.; Dominguez, G.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols affect climate in numerous ways, including change in the earth's energy balance by absorbing and scattering solar radiations, alteration of the hydrological cycle by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, change in biogeochemical cycles by providing nutrients. Another significant process is the effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere by providing surfaces for heterogeneous chemical reactions. Fine particles of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5μm (PM2.5) also impinge upon human health by admission to the respiratory system causing a range of cardiopulmonary diseases. Both climate and public health aspects depend on their physical and chemical properties, therefore, understanding physico-chemical and photochemical transformations on aerosol surfaces is important for predicting their effects on climate change, atmospheric chemistry and human health. Here we present initial findings on the processes occurring on aerosol surfaces using isotopes to delineate day and night time chemistry, thus resolving photochemistry effects, and to identify their sources by way of the carbon isotopes. Aerosols were collected on filter papers for 12h during the day and at night time from June-Dec. 2011in La Jolla, CA., using high volume, multi stage cascade impactors. CO2 released after treating these filter papers with 100% phosphoric acid at 27oC was collected, purified chromatographically and analyzed for both C and O isotopes. Our data indicate that both C and O isotopes can be used to distinguish between heterogeneous and photochemical transformations. Aerosol carbonates collected during the day time were depleted in δ13Cday = -23 to -28‰ and δ18Oday = +3 to +10‰ and were isotopically distinct from the carbonates collected at night time δ13Cnight = 0 to -12‰, δ18Onightnight = +23 to +32‰. Higher chloride concentration in the samples collected at night time indicated the transport of marine air masses whereas higher nitrate and sulfate concentration

  14. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  15. Properties of light-absorbing aerosols in the Nagoya urban area, Japan, in August 2011 and January 2012: Contributions of brown carbon and lensing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kawana, Kaori; Mochida, Michihiro; Ikemori, Fumikazu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    The optical properties of aerosols at 405 and 781 nm were measured in an urban site in Nagoya, Japan, in August 2011 and in January 2012 using a photoacoustic spectrometer. Comparison of the absorption coefficient at 781 nm of aerosols that did and did not pass through a thermo-denuder showed that an increase in black carbon (BC) light absorption due to the coating of non-refractory materials (i.e., the lensing effect) was small (on average, 10%) in August and negligible in January. The effective density distributions for the particles that did and did not pass through the thermo-denuder, which were measured simultaneously in August, suggested that the majority of BC particles sampled had a minimal coating. The small lensing effect observed can be explained partly by assuming that a large portion of non-refractory materials was mixed externally with BC. The contribution of direct light absorption by organic matter (OM) that vaporized at temperatures below 300°C to the total light absorption at 405 nm was negligible in August, but those by OM that vaporized below 300 and 400°C averaged 11 and 17%, respectively, in January. The larger contribution of light-absorbing OM in January is likely due to the greater contribution of OM originating from the burning of biomass, including biofuel and agricultural residue, in Japan, northern China, or Siberia, during the winter.

  16. Evaluation of Cloud and Aerosol Screening of Early Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Observations with Collocated MODIS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, T.; O'Dell, C.; Cronk, H. Q.; Partain, P.; Frankenberg, C.; Eldering, A.; Pollock, H. R.; Crisp, D.

    2014-12-01

    Effective cloud and aerosol screening is critically important to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission, which can accurately determine column averaged dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2) only when the scenes are sufficiently clear of scattering material. Two primary algorithms are used to calculate the degree of contamination within OCO-2 soundings, both of which evaluate the light path modification induced by clouds and aerosols. The first algorithm compares the measured spectra of the Oxygen-A band near 0.76 microns (mm), to synthetic spectra generated for clear scenes with only Rayleigh scattering. Large, spectrally dependent residuals indicate the presence of large path length modifications. The second cloud screening algorithm compares ratios of retrieved CO2 (and H2O) in the 1.6mm (weak CO2) and 2.0mm (strong CO2) spectral bands estimated with a radiative transfer code that neglects scattering. Soundings with significant cloud or aerosol scattering produce ratios that differ from unity because scattering modifies the optical path lengths differently in these two spectral regions. These two cloud screening algorithms have been used successfully for the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) mission. Here they are evaluated for the first time as applied to early OCO-2 data by comparing their results to cloud and aerosol parameters retrieved from collocated observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. In addition, we also evaluate the hypothesis that an individual OCO-2 sounding is twice as likely to be cloud-free as compared to a GOSAT TANSO-FTS sounding, due to a surface footprint that is more than 30 times smaller.

  17. Pole-to-Pole Distribution of Stratospheric Black Carbon (Soot) Aerosol from Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Verma, S.; Howard, S. D.; Strawa, Anthony W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of black carbon (soot) aerosol (BCA) in the atmosphere is of interest for several reasons: (1) Because BCA has the highest absorption cross section of any compound known, it can absorb solar radiation to cause atmospheric warming. (2) Because it is a strong adsorber of gases, it can catalyze heterogeneous reactions to change the chemical composition of the atmosphere.(3) If aircraft are a major source of BCA, it is an important tracer of aircraft emissions. Analysis for BCA of impactor samples from Arctic and Antarctic deployments, utilizing particle morphology of scanning electron microscopy images, permits the following conclusions: (1) The BCA concentration in the northern stratosphere varies between 0 and 2.6 ng m-3 averaging 0.6 ng/cu m. (2) This BCA loading is commensurate with estimated fuel consumptions in the stratosphere by the current commercial fleet and an emission index E=0.03 g BCA per kg fuel burnt which was measured in jet exhaust at al titude.Thus, most stratospheric BCA in the northern stratosphere results from aircraft emissions. The background BCA concentration in the southern stratosphere varies between 0 and 0.6 ng cu m averaging 0.1 ng/cu m. This strong meridional gradient implies that stratospheric BCA residence time- is shorter than are mixing times between hemispheres. Projected annual fuel consumption of a future supersonic commercial fleet is 7E13 g. This fleet would increase stratospheric BCA loadings by a factor of 2-3, because almost all fuel would be burnt above the tropopause. An improved EI(BCA) by a factor of ten would result in an increase of stratospheric BCA loadings by approximately 50 %.

  18. The ``Micro'' Aethalometer - an enabling technology for new applications in the measurement of Aerosol Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. D.; Močnik, G.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosol Black Carbon (BC) is a tracer for combustion emissions; a primary indicator of adverse health effects; and the second leading contributor to Global Climate Change. The “Micro” Aethalometer is a recently-developed miniature instrument that makes a real-time measurement of BC on a very short timebase in a self-contained, battery-powered package that is lightweight and pocket sized. This technological development critically enables new areas of research: Measurements of the vertical profile of BC, by carrying the sampler aloft on a balloon (tethered or released) or aircraft (piloted or UAV); Estimates of the concentration of BC in the troposphere and lower stratosphere in the 8 - 12 km. altitude range, by measurements in the passenger cabin during commercial air travel; Epidemiological studies of personal exposure to BC, by carrying the sampler on a subject person in health studies; Measurements of the concentration of BC in rural and remote regions, by means of a small, battery-powered instrument that is convenient to deploy; measurements of high concentrations of “smoke” in indoor and outdoor environments in developing countries; Unobtrusive monitoring of BC infiltration into indoor environments, by means of a small, quiet instrument that can be placed in publicly-used spaces, school classrooms, museums, and other potentially-impacted locations; Adaptation of the technology to the direct source measurement of BC concentrations in emissions from diesel exhausts, combustion plumes, and other sources. We will show examples of data from various recent projects to illustrate the capabilities and applications of this new instrument.

  19. Numerical investigation on the Ångström exponent of black carbon aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Liu, Chao; Yin, Yan; Kumar, K. Raghavendra

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) plays an important role on the global and regional climate, whereas there are significant uncertainties on its optical properties. Among various optical properties, the Ångström exponent (AE) indicates the spectral variation of the particle-optic interaction and is widely used to understand the aerosol properties. We consider the influence of BC geometry on its optical properties and assess the sensitivity of the AE to particle geometry and size distribution. The fractal aggregates with different fractal dimensions are used to represent realistic BC particles, and popular equivalent volume spherical and spheroidal models are also considered for comparison. Even if the fractal aggregates become highly compact and spherical, their optical properties are still significantly different from those of equivalent volume spheres or spheroids. Meanwhile, the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation can hardly provide accurate results for all optical quantities of aggregates with different dimensions. The extinction Ångström exponent (EAE) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) are sensitive to both particle geometry and size distribution. With BC becoming more compact (from fractal aggregate to spheroid and to sphere), the AE becomes more sensitive to particle size distribution. The EAE and AAE of aggregates with different size distributions vary between 1.10-1.63 and 0.87-1.50, respectively, whereas those of the spheres or spheroids have wider ranges. Furthermore, the AE at smaller wavelengths (between 0.35 µm and 0.55 µm) is more sensitive to geometry and size distribution than that given by optical properties at larger wavelengths (between 0.55 µm and 0.88 µm).

  20. Aerosol black carbon characteristics over Central India: Temporal variation and its dependence on mixed layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Manoj, M. R.; Kumar, N. V. P. Kiran; Shaeb, K. Hareef Baba; Joshi, Ashok Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In a first of its kind study over the Indian region, concurrent and extensive measurements of black carbon (BC) concentration and atmospheric boundary layer parameters are used to quantify the role of atmospheric boundary layer in producing temporal changes in BC. During this study, 18 months (2011-12) data of continuous measurements of BC aerosols, made over a semi-urban location, Nagpur, in Central India are used along with concurrent measurements of vertical profiles of atmospheric thermodynamics, made using weekly ascents of GPS aided Radiosonde for a period of 1 year. From the balloon data, mixed layer heights and ventilation coefficients are estimated, and the monthly and seasonal changes in BC mass concentration are examined in the light of the boundary layer changes. Seasonally, the BC mass concentration was highest (~ 4573 ± 1293 ng m- 3) in winter (December-February), and lowest (~ 1588 ± 897 ng m- 3) in monsoon (June-September), while remained moderate (~ 3137 ± 1446 ng m- 3) in pre-monsoon (March-May), and post-monsoon (~ 3634 ± 813 ng m- 3) (October-November) seasons. During the dry seasons, when the rainfall is scanty or insignificantly small, the seasonal variations in BC concentrations have a strong inverse relationship with mixed layer height and ventilation coefficient. However, the lowest BC concentrations do not occur during the season when the mixed layer height (MLH) is highest or the ventilation coefficient is the highest; rather it occurs when the rainfall is strong (during summer monsoon season) and airmass changes to primarily of marine origin.

  1. The impact of aerosol optical depth assimilation on aerosol forecasts and radiative effects during a wild fire event over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H.-C.; Cetola, J. D.; Gu, Y.; Xue, L.

    2014-11-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation three-dimensional variational data assimilation (DA) system coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model was utilized to improve aerosol forecasts and study aerosol direct and semi-direct radiative feedbacks during a US wild fire event. Assimilation of MODIS total 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals clearly improved WRF/Chem forecasts of surface PM2.5 and organic carbon (OC) compared to the corresponding forecasts without aerosol data assimilation. The scattering aerosols in the fire downwind region typically cooled layers both above and below the aerosol layer and suppressed convection and clouds, which led to an average of 2% precipitation decrease during the fire week. This study demonstrated that, even with no input of fire emissions, AOD DA improved the aerosol forecasts and allowed a more realistic model simulation of aerosol radiative effects.

  2. The impact of aerosol optical depth assimilation on aerosol forecasts and radiative effects during a wild fire event over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H.-C.; Cetola, J. D.; Gu, Y.; Xue, L.

    2014-06-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation three-dimensional variational data assimilation (DA) system coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model was utilized to improve aerosol forecasts and study aerosol direct and semi-direct radiative feedbacks during a US wild fire event. Assimilation of MODIS total 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals clearly improved WRF/Chem forecasts of surface PM2.5 and organic carbon (OC) compared to the corresponding forecasts without aerosol data assimilation. The scattering aerosols in the fire downwind region typically cooled layers both above and below the aerosol layer and suppressed convection and clouds, which led to an average 2% precipitation decease during the fire week. This study demonstrated that even with no input of fire emissions, AOD DA improved the aerosol forecasts and allowed a more realistic model simulation of aerosol radiative effects.

  3. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, the organic carbon concentration is measured using thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) from quartz fiber filters. Here, methods are presented whereby Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters are used to accurately predict TOR OC. Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filters. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites sampled during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to artifact-corrected TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date which leads to precise and accurate OC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, all μg m-3 values based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; this division also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass indicating that the

  4. Short- and long-term variability of spectral solar UV irradiance at Thessaloniki, Greece: effects of changes in aerosols, total ozone and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoulakis, Ilias; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Meleti, Charickleia; Tourpali, Kleareti; Zempila, Melina Maria

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we discuss the short- and the long-term variability of spectral UV irradiance at Thessaloniki, Greece, using a long, quality-controlled data set from two Brewer spectrophotometers. Long-term changes in spectral UV irradiance at 307.5, 324 and 350 nm for the period 1994-2014 are presented for different solar zenith angles and discussed in association with changes in total ozone column (TOC), aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloudiness observed in the same period. Positive changes in annual mean anomalies of UV irradiance, ranging from 2 to 6 % per decade, have been detected both for clear- and all-sky conditions. The changes are generally greater for larger solar zenith angles and for shorter wavelengths. For clear-skies, these changes are, in most cases, statistically significant at the 95 % confidence limit. Decreases in the aerosol load and weakening of the attenuation by clouds lead to increases in UV irradiance in the summer, of 7-9 % per decade for 64° solar zenith angle. The increasing TOC in winter counteracts the effect of decreasing AOD for this particular season, leading to small, statistically insignificant, negative long-term changes in irradiance at 307.5 nm. Annual mean UV irradiance levels are increasing from 1994 to 2006 and remain relatively stable thereafter, possibly due to the combined changes in the amount and optical properties of aerosols. However, no statistically significant corresponding turning point has been detected in the long-term changes of AOD. The absence of signatures of changes in AOD in the short-term variability of irradiance in the UV-A may have been caused by changes in the single scattering albedo of aerosols, which may counteract the effects of changes in AOD on irradiance. The anti-correlation between the year-to-year variability of the irradiance at 307.5 nm and TOC is clear and becomes clearer as the AOD decreases.

  5. In vivo determination of body fat by measuring total body carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kehayias, J.J.; Heymsfield, S.B.; LoMonte, A.F.; Wang, J.; Pierson, R.N. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    Total body carbon (TBC) is measured in vivo by neutron inelastic scattering. The fast neutrons needed for the irradiation are produced by a miniature deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generator. Body fat and protein are the main contributors to TBC. Bone ash and carbohydrates contribute less than 3%. Fat is calculated from TBC after the subtraction of the carbon contributions from protein, bone, and glycogen. The technique was applied to 14 normal volunteers (8 females, 6 males) aged 24-94 y who underwent neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation measurements for body carbon, nitrogen, and calcium. The initial results agree with other techniques. Unlike models that evaluate body fat by subtracting lean body mass from body weight, the TBC technique is not sensitive to assumptions on the composition of lean body; therefore, it is appropriate for studies of adults of any age and health condition.

  6. Photosynthetic light reactions increase total lipid accumulation in carbon-supplemented batch cultures of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Benjamin D; Mead, Rebecca L; Nichols, Courtney N; Kolling, Derrick R J

    2015-03-01

    Microalgae are an attractive biofuel feedstock because of their high lipid to biomass ratios, lipid compositions that are suitable for biodiesel production, and the ability to grow on varied carbon sources. While algae can grow autotrophically, supplying an exogenous carbon source can increase growth rates and allow heterotrophic growth in the absence of light. Time course analyses of dextrose-supplemented Chlorella vulgaris batch cultures demonstrate that light availability directly influences growth rate, chlorophyll production, and total lipid accumulation. Parallel photomixotrophic and heterotrophic cultures grown to stationary phase reached the same amount of biomass, but total lipid content was higher for algae grown in the presence of light (an average of 1.90 mg/mL vs. 0.77 mg/mL over 5 days of stationary phase growth). PMID:25543540

  7. Biophysical Properties as Determinants for Soil Organic Carbon and Total Nitrogen in Grassland Salinization

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chengchen; Zhao, Halin; Zhao, Xueyong; Han, Huibang; Wang, Yan; Li, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Grassland salinization causes considerable changes to soil and vegetation, which can lead to changes in soil organic carbon (C) and total nitrogen (N). These changes have complex causal relationships. A significant correlation between soil organic C and total N and any soil or vegetation property does not necessarily imply a significant direct effect of the property on soil organic C and total N. In this study, a field survey was conducted to investigate the changes in soil organic C and total N in grassland along a salinity gradient in Hexi corridor, China, and the direct and indirect effects of soil and vegetation properties on both stocks were quantified using a path analysis approach. Significant decrease in soil organic C and total N contents were observed with increasing salinity. Both had significant positive correlations with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), soil water, and fine particles (silt+clay) content (p<0.01) and significant negative correlations with soil EC, and sand content (p<0.01). NDVI, fine particles content and soil water content had positive direct effects on soil organic C and total N stocks. Soil EC affected soil organic C and total N stocks mainly through its indirect negative effect on NDVI, soil texture, and water content. NDVI, soil texture, and moisture also indirectly affected soil organic C and total N stocks via changes in each other. These indirect effects augmented each other, although in some cases indirect effects worked in opposing directions. PMID:23372776

  8. Development of a preparation system for the radiocarbon analysis of organic carbon in carbonaceous aerosols in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. L.; Liu, D.; Shen, C. D.; Ding, P.; Zhang, G.

    2010-09-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols comprising a large fraction of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) are considered to affect both global climate and human health. Radiocarbon measurements have been proved to be a useful isotopic tracer for distinguishing contemporary and fossil emissions. An optimized system of a two-step thermal preparation system for radiocarbon ( 14C) measurement of OC/TC is firstly established in China. In this system, OC/TC are converted into carbon dioxide under a pure oxygen flow at 340 °C/650 °C and then reduced to graphite for AMS target using the method of zinc reduction. Afterwards, radiocarbon measurements of the targets performed by the NEC Compact AMS System at the Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The measured results for estimated reference martial including HOx I, HOx II and IAEA-C6 are consistent with internationally accepted values. The radiocarbon-based source appointment of carbonaceous aerosols in China would be much more convenient and faster with the preparation system developed in this work.

  9. Neurotoxicity following acute inhalation of aerosols generated during resistance spot weld-bonding of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Jefferson, Amy M; Lin, Gary X; Afshari, Aliakbar; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Meighan, Terence G; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Leonard, Howard D; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2014-10-01

    Welding generates complex metal aerosols, inhalation of which is linked to adverse health effects among welders. An important health concern of welding fume (WF) exposure is neurological dysfunction akin to Parkinson's disease (PD). Some applications in manufacturing industry employ a variant welding technology known as "weld-bonding" that utilizes resistance spot welding, in combination with adhesives, for metal-to-metal welding. The presence of adhesives raises additional concerns about worker exposure to potentially toxic components like Methyl Methacrylate, Bisphenol A and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Here, we investigated the potential neurotoxicological effects of exposure to welding aerosols generated during weld-bonding. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed (25 mg/m³ targeted concentration; 4 h/day × 13 days) by whole-body inhalation to filtered air or aerosols generated by either weld-bonding with sparking (high metal, low VOCs; HM) or without sparking (low metal; high VOCs; LM). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited complex aerosols that contained both metal oxide particulates and VOCs. LM aerosols contained a greater fraction of VOCs than HM, which comprised largely metal particulates of ultrafine morphology. Short-term exposure to LM aerosols caused distinct changes in the levels of the neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), in various brain areas examined. LM aerosols also specifically decreased the mRNA expression of the olfactory marker protein (Omp) and tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) in the olfactory bulb. Consistent with the decrease in Th, LM also reduced the expression of dopamine transporter (Slc6a3; Dat), as well as, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2) in the olfactory bulb. In contrast, HM aerosols induced the expression of Th and dopamine D5 receptor (Drd5) mRNAs, elicited neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier-related changes in the olfactory bulb, but did not alter the expression of Omp. Our findings

  10. Neurotoxicity following acute inhalation of aerosols generated during resistance spot weld-bonding of carbon steel

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Krishnan; Jefferson, Amy M.; Lin, Gary X.; Afshari, Aliakbar; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Meighan, Terence G.; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L.; Leonard, Howard D.; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Welding generates complex metal aerosols, inhalation of which is linked to adverse health effects among welders. An important health concern of welding fume (WF) exposure is neurological dysfunction akin to Parkinson’s disease (PD). Some applications in manufacturing industry employ a variant welding technology known as “weld-bonding” that utilizes resistance spot welding, in combination with adhesives, for metal-to-metal welding. The presence of adhesives raises additional concerns about worker exposure to potentially toxic components like Methyl Methacrylate, Bisphenol A and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Here, we investigated the potential neurotoxicological effects of exposure to welding aerosols generated during weld-bonding. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed (25 mg/m3 targeted concentration; 4 h/day × 13 days) by whole-body inhalation to filtered air or aerosols generated by either weld-bonding with sparking (high metal, low VOCs; HM) or without sparking (low metal; high VOCs; LM). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited complex aerosols that contained both metal oxide particulates and VOCs. LM aerosols contained a greater fraction of VOCs than HM, which comprised largely metal particulates of ultrafine morphology. Short-term exposure to LM aerosols caused distinct changes in the levels of the neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), in various brain areas examined. LM aerosols also specifically decreased the mRNA expression of the olfactory marker protein (Omp) and tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) in the olfactory bulb. Consistent with the decrease in Th, LM also reduced the expression of dopamine transporter (Slc6a3; Dat), as well as, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2) in the olfactory bulb. In contrast, HM aerosols induced the expression of Th and dopamine D5 receptor (Drd5) mRNAs, elicited neuroinflammation and blood–brain barrier-related changes in the olfactory bulb, but did not alter the expression of Omp. Our findings

  11. Wavelength Dependence of the Absorption of Black Carbon Particles: Predictions and Results from the TARFOX Experiment and Implications for the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Hignett, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption coefficient taken during the Tropical Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) over the northern Atlantic. The data show an approximate lamda(exp -1) variation between 0.40 and 1.0 micrometers. The theoretical basis of the wavelength variation of the absorption of solar radiation by elemental carbon [or black carbon (BC)] is explored. For a wavelength independent refractive index the small particle absorption limit simplifies to a lambda(exp -1) variation in relatively good agreement with the data. This result implies that the refractive indices of BC were relatively constant in this wavelength region, in agreement with much of the data on refractive indices of BC. However, the result does not indicate the magnitude of the refractive indices. The implications of the wavelength dependence of BC absorption for the spectral behavior of the aerosol single scattering albedo are discussed. It is shown that the single scattering albedo for a mixture of BC and nonabsorbing material decreases with wavelength in the solar spectrum (i.e., the percentage amount of absorption increases). This decease in the single scattering albedo with wavelength for black carbon mixtures is different from the increase in single scattering allied for most mineral aerosols (dusts). This indicates that, if generally true, the spectral variation of the single- scattering albedo can be used to distinguish aerosol types. It also highlights the importance of measurements of the spectral variation of the aerosol absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo.

  12. Fine Mode Aerosol over the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Reid, J. S.; Reid, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol loading of the atmosphere over the Arabian Gulf region is extremely diverse and is composed not only of dust, but also of pollution that is derived largely from oil-related activities. Fine mode pollution particles are most efficient at scattering incoming solar radiation and have the potential to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and may therefore have implications for climate change. The smaller aerosols may also pose a health hazard if present in high concentrations. The United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2) was designed to investigate aerosol and meteorological characteristics over the region using ground-based, aircraft and satellite measurements, and was conducted in August and September 2004. Aerosol chemical composition has been obtained from filters that were collected at the site of the Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Characterization Observatory (MAARCO) on the coast of the UAE between Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Filter samples were also collected on an airborne platform in order to assess how aerosol chemical composition varies across the region and throughout the depth of the boundary layer. Results of the analysis of the PM2.5 coastal samples show that ammonium sulphate is the most prevalent constituent of the fine mode aerosol in the region (>50% of the mass), followed by organic matter, alumino-silicates, calcium carbonate and black carbon. Source apportionment indicates that most of the fine aerosol mass is derived from fossil fuel combustion, while mineral dust and local vehicle emissions also contribute to the fine aerosol loading. The organic carbon-to-total carbon ratio of the aerosol is 0.65, which is typical of fossil fuel combustion. The dominance of sulphates means that the fine mode aerosol in the region is probably responsible for a negative radiative forcing, and that the polluting emissions significantly elevate the concentration of CCN.

  13. Total Organic Carbon prediction in shale gas reservoirs using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Aliouane, Leila

    2015-04-01

    Here, we suggest the use the fuzzy logic approach for the prediction of the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) from well-logs data in shale gas reservoirs, two models are used for the estimation of the TOC from well-logs data; the first one is called the Schmoker's model while the second one is called the Passey's model. Scmocker's model requires the continuous measurement of the Bulk density, in case of absence of the bulk density measurement the Schmoker's model is not able to predict the TOC. In this case we suggest the use fuzzy logic system able to predict the total organic carbon in shale gas formations. The input of the fuzzy system is the four raw well-logs data measurements corresponding to the natural gamma ray, the neutron porosity, the slowness of the primary and shear waves. The desired output is the calculated TOC using the Schmoker's model. Application to well-logs data of two horizontal wells drilled in the lower Barnett shale clearly shows the ability of the fuzzy logic approach to suggest values of the total organic carbon in case of no bulk density measurement. Keywords TOC, Schmoker's model, Fuzzy logic, shale gas, Barnett shale, prediction.

  14. Intra-seasonal variability of black carbon aerosols over a coal field area at Dhanbad, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Tiwari, S.; Gond, D. P.; Dumka, U. C.; Bisht, D. S.; Tiwari, Shani; Pandithurai, G.; Sinha, A.

    2015-07-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are optically absorbing parts of carbonaceous aerosols and have significantly different optical and radiative properties were continuously measured at a coal field area in Dhanbad (23° 47‧ N, 86° 30‧ E: 222 m amsl), India for the first time from 1st January to 31st December, 2012. Daily BC mass concentrations varied within the range of 0.84-17.0 μg m- 3 with an annual average of 6.3 ± 2.7 μg m- 3. About 45% of samples of the measured days exceeded the mean level of BC indicating the high loading of soot particles over the study region. Intra-seasonal variation in BC concentrations exhibited a strong seasonal cycle with the highest concentrations during winter (8.2 ± 2.8 μg m- 3), followed by post-monsoon (6.4 ± 2.6 μg m- 3), pre-monsoon (5.5 ± 1.9 μg m- 3) and monsoon (4.6 ± 1.7 μg m- 3). In diurnal analysis, BC showed a significant peak from 06:00 to 10:00 local time (LT) during all the seasons whereas the lowest concentrations were found during 14:00 to 17:00 LT in the late afternoon. The difference between maximum and minimum concentrations of BC was found to be higher during winter (8.3 μg m- 3) followed by post-monsoon (4.7 μg m- 3), pre-monsoon (4.3 μg m- 3) and monsoon (1.7 μg m- 3). An interesting feature was seen in the difference between morning and evening peaks, it was maximum during winter (4.8 μg m- 3) followed by pre-monsoon (1.5 μg m- 3) and post-monsoon (1.3 μg m- 3), however, during monsoon, it was opposite i.e. ~ 23% lower during morning time. During day-time and night-time variability analyses, it fluctuated largely, varying from 1% (December) to 35% (June) higher during night-time as compared to day-time as whole mean was ~ 19%. Data of BC were separated as stable (< 1 m s- 1) and unstable weather conditions (> 1 m s- 1), the corresponding values of BC were 6.06 and 3.75 μg m- 3 respectively which is ~ 38% higher during stable weather condition indicating that the major portion of BC

  15. Organic aerosols and inorganic species from post-harvest agricultural-waste burning emissions over northern India: impact on mass absorption efficiency of elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Darshan

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 2.5 μm), collected from a source region [Patiala: 30.2 °N; 76.3 °E; 250 m above mean sea level] of emissions from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy-residue) burning in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), North India, has been studied for its chemical composition and impact on regional atmospheric radiative forcing. On average, organic aerosol mass accounts for 63% of PM2.5, whereas the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) is ∼3.5%. Sulphate, nitrate and ammonium contribute up to ∼85% of the total water-soluble inorganic species (WSIS), which constitutes ∼23% of PM2.5. The potassium-to-organic carbon ratio from paddy-residue burning emissions (KBB(+)/OC: 0.05 ± 0.01) is quite similar to that reported from Amazonian and Savanna forest-fires; whereas non-sea-salt-sulphate-to-OC ratio (nss-SO4(2-)/OC: 0.21) and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratio of 2.6 are significantly higher (by factor of 5 to 8). The mass absorption efficiency of EC (3.8 ± 1.3 m(2) g(-1)) shows significant decrease with a parallel increase in the concentrations of organic aerosols and scattering species (sulphate and nitrate). A cross plot of OC/EC and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratios show distinct differences for post-harvest burning emissions from paddy-residue as compared to those from fossil-fuel combustion sources in south-east Asia. PMID:25124269

  16. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  17. Watershed scale spatial variability in dissolved and total organic and inorganic carbon in contrasting UK catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumberland, S.; Baker, A.; Hudson, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    ) Recent investigations into carbon fluxes in British rivers have focused on long term increases in DOC in rural and predominantly upland catchments. Our results suggest that research is needed into understanding long term variations in inorganic carbon concentration, as well as total (organic and inorganic) carbon fluxes from British rivers, to obtain total carbon loads. In particular, we provide evidence that DIC concentrations may be greater in urbanized catchments compared to equivalent non-urban catchments, with the implication that increasing urbanization in the future will see increases in riverine DIC and a decrease in the strength of any DOC DIC anti correlation. Further studies of urban catchment DIC sources, within stream processing, long term trends, and potential ecological impacts, are required.

  18. Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations Amplify Alternaria alternata Sporulation and Total Antigen Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Julie; O’Neill, Nichole R.; Rogers, Christine A.; Muilenberg, Michael L.; Ziska, Lewis H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the effect of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on pollen production has been established in some plant species, impacts on fungal sporulation and antigen production have not been elucidated. Objective Our purpose was to examine the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the quantity and quality of fungal spores produced on timothy (Phleum pratense) leaves. Methods Timothy plants were grown at four CO2 concentrations (300, 400, 500, and 600 μmol/mol). Leaves were used as growth substrate for Alternaria alternata and Cladosporium phlei. The spore abundance produced by both fungi, as well as the size (microscopy) and antigenic protein content (ELISA) of A. alternata, were quantified. Results Leaf carbon-to-nitrogen ratio was greater at 500 and 600 μmol/mol, and leaf biomass was greater at 600 μmol/mol than at the lower CO2 concentrations. Leaf carbon-to-nitrogen ratio was positively correlated with A. alternata spore production per gram of leaf but negatively correlated with antigenic protein content per spore. At 500 and 600 μmol/mol CO2 concentrations, A. alternata produced nearly three times the number of spores and more than twice the total antigenic protein per plant than at lower concentrations. C. phlei spore production was positively correlated with leaf carbon-to-nitrogen ratio, but overall spore production was much lower than in A. alternata, and total per-plant production did not vary among CO2 concentrations. Conclusions Elevated CO2 concentrations often increase plant leaf biomass and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Here we demonstrate for the first time that these leaf changes are associated with increased spore production by A. alternata, a ubiquitous allergenic fungus. This response may contribute to the increasing prevalence of allergies and asthma. PMID:20462828

  19. Correlating benzene, total hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions from wood-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, A.J.; Grande, D.E.; Berens, J.R.; Piotrowski, J.

    1997-12-31

    Hazardous air pollutants, including benzene, are generated by the incomplete combustion of fuels. Organic compound emissions, which are generally products of incomplete combustion, are reduced by promoting high quality combustion, for example by controlling furnace exit temperatures and establishing minimum residence times. Monitoring carbon monoxide (CO) emissions is important since the amount of carbon monoxide emitted represents the quality of combustion which in turn represents the amount of hazardous air pollutants being generated. Total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions are also related to the quality of combustion. Recently the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) measured the benzene and total hydrocarbon emissions from two large industrial wood fired boilers. These boilers are located at Tenneco Packaging, a container board manufacturing facility in northern Wisconsin. Temperature, oxygen and carbon monoxide concentrations were sampled continuously by Tenneco Packaging`s emission monitoring system. The Department`s team used an organic vapor analyzer to continuously measure concentrations of total hydrocarbons (THC). The Department`s team also used a modified USEPA Method 18 sampling train to capture organic vapors for subsequent analysis by gas chromatography. The data show correlations between benzene and carbon monoxide, and between benzene and THC concentrations. The emissions sampling occurred both upstream of the particulate emissions control system as well as at the stack. The CO variations during actual boiler operation appeared to be well correlated with changes in boiler steam load. That is, increases in CO generally accompanied a change, either up or down, in boiler load. Lower concentrations of CO were associated with stable combustion, as indicated by periods of constant or nearly constant boiler load.

  20. Black carbon aerosol characterization in a coastal city in South China using a single particle soot photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Tian-Le; Zeng, Li-Wu; Yu, Guang-He; Luan, Sheng-Ji

    2012-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the dominant light-absorbing aerosol component in the atmosphere and plays an important role in atmospheric pollution and climate change. The light-absorbing properties of BC rely on particle size, shape, composition, as well as the BC mixing state with other aerosol components, thus more thorough exploration of BC aerosol characteristics is critical in understanding its atmospheric sources and effects. In this study, a newly-developed Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was deployed in Shenzhen, China, for continuous BC measurements to obtain the important information about size distribution and mixing state of BC under severe air pollution conditions of China. The mean BC mass concentrations were found to be 6.0 and 4.1 μg m-3 at an urban site (UT) in the fall and winter, respectively, while it is much lower (2.6 μg m-3) at a rural site (BG) in the fall. The mass size distributions of BC in volume equivalent diameter (VED) at the three sites showed a similar lognormal pattern, with the peak diameter at BG (222 nm) slightly larger than at the UT (210 nm) site. As to mixing state, the average percentage of internally mixed BC at the UT site was detected to be 40% and 46% in the fall and winter, respectively, while that at the BG site in the fall was only a slightly higher (47%), which implies that fresh local fossil fuel combustions were still significant at this rural site. The analysis of extremely high BC concentrations (>20 μg m-3) at UT indicates that they were a complex of comparable contributions from both local fresh emissions and regional transport under unfavorable meteorology. Other characteristics of BC aerosol and their influencing factors in Shenzhen were also discussed.

  1. Emissions of black carbon, organic, and inorganic aerosols from biomass burning in North America and Asia in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.; Matsui, H.; Moteki, N.; Sahu, L.; Takegawa, N.; Kajino, M.; Zhao, Y.; Cubison, M. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Vay, S.; Diskin, G. S.; Anderson, B.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Blake, D. R.; Huey, G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Brune, W. H.

    2011-04-01

    Reliable assessment of the impact of aerosols emitted from boreal forest fires on the Arctic climate necessitates improved understanding of emissions and the microphysical properties of carbonaceous (black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA)) and inorganic aerosols. The size distributions of BC were measured by an SP2 based on the laser-induced incandescence technique on board the DC-8 aircraft during the NASA ARCTAS campaign. Aircraft sampling was made in fresh plumes strongly impacted by wildfires in North America (Canada and California) in summer 2008 and in those transported from Asia (Siberia in Russia and Kazakhstan) in spring 2008. We extracted biomass burning plumes using particle and tracer (CO, CH3CN, and CH2Cl2) data. OA constituted the dominant fraction of aerosols mass in the submicron range. The large majority of the emitted particles did not contain BC. We related the combustion phase of the fire as represented by the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) to the emission ratios between BC and other species. In particular, we derived the average emission ratios of BC/CO = 2.3 ± 2.2 and 8.5 ± 5.4 ng m-3/ppbv for BB in North America and Asia, respectively. The difference in the BC/CO emission ratios is likely due to the difference in MCE. The count median diameters and geometric standard deviations of the lognormal size distribution of BC in the BB plumes were 136-141 nm and 1.32-1.36, respectively, and depended little on MCE. These BC particles were thickly coated, with shell/core ratios of 1.3-1.6. These parameters can be used directly for improving model estimates of the impact of BB in the Arctic.

  2. Emissions of Black Carbon, Organic, and Inorganic Aerosols From Biomass Burning in North America and Asia in 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Matsui, H.; Moteki, N.; Sahu, L.; Takegawa, N.; Kajino, M.; Zhao, Y.; Cubison, M. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Vay, S.; Diskin, G. S.; Anderson, B.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Blake, D. R.; Huey, G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Brune, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable assessment of the impact of aerosols emitted from boreal forest fires on the Arctic climate necessitates improved understanding of emissions and the microphysical properties of carbonaceous (black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA)) and inorganic aerosols. The size distributions of BC were measured by an SP2 based on the laser-induced incandescence technique on board the DC-8 aircraft during the NASA ARCTAS campaign. Aircraft sampling was made in fresh plumes strongly impacted by wildfires in North America (Canada and California) in summer 2008 and in those transported from Asia (Siberia in Russia and Kazakhstan) in spring 2008. We extracted biomass burning plumes using particle and tracer (CO, CH3CN, and CH2Cl2) data. OA constituted the dominant fraction of aerosols mass in the submicron range. The large majority of the emitted particles did not contain BC. We related the combustion phase of the fire as represented by the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) to the emission ratios between BC and other species. In particular, we derived the average emission ratios of BC/CO = 2.3 +/- 2.2 and 8.5 +/- 5.4 ng/cu m/ppbv for BB in North America and Asia, respectively. The difference in the BC/CO emission ratios is likely due to the difference in MCE. The count median diameters and geometric standard deviations of the lognormal size distribution of BC in the BB plumes were 136-141 nm and 1.32-1.36, respectively, and depended little on MCE. These BC particles were thickly coated, with shell/core ratios of 1.3-1.6. These parameters can be used directly for improving model estimates of the impact of BB in the Arctic.

  3. An Examination of Carbon Monoxide and Organic Aerosol Mass Sources in the Southeastern United States during the SENEX Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Angevine, W. M.; Brioude, J. F.; Brock, C. A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Holloway, J. S.; Horowitz, L. W.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Lerner, B. M.; Liao, J.; Mao, J.; Trainer, M.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wolfe, G. M., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The NOAA Southeast Nexus (SENEX) project occurred during the summer of 2013 over the southeastern United States and involved studying the interactions between natural and anthropogenic emissions at the nexus of climate change and air quality. As part of the project, a suite of instruments for aerosol and gas-phase species was deployed on the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and models were used to calculate trace gas and aerosol species in the region and along the aircraft flight tracks. Throughout the study, the measured non-refractory submicron aerosol mass was dominated by organic material (58% +/- 9%) with smaller contributions from sulfate (27% +/- 8%), ammonium (10% +/- 3%), nitrate (3% +/- 1%), and chloride (0.1% +/- 0.1%). Here we examine the influence of urban emissions on the organic aerosol (OA) mass in regions characterized by higher and lower biogenic emissions. For the air around and downwind of urban areas, OA mass is highly correlated with carbon monoxide (CO), a tracer of anthropogenic emissions as well as an oxidation product of isoprene, a biogenic species. The slope of this correlation is roughly 0.15 micrograms per standard cubic meter per ppbv, which is significantly higher than observed in prior studies downwind of urban areas. The enhancement in OA mass relative to the enhancement in CO is independent of the concentration of biogenic species. In contrast, formaldehyde enhancements are clearly higher in the presence of biogenic species in agreement with the NOAA GFDL AM3 model. Downwind from the urban areas, CO and OA mass were not strongly enhanced relatively to a region-wide enhancement in these species that can only be explained from the accumulation of emissions in the eastern U.S. for several days. Back-trajectories of air parcels with emissions from biogenic and anthropogenic sources will be examined to elucidate the impact of both sources on CO and OA mass.

  4. On the diurnal cycle of urban aerosols, black carbon and the occurrence of new particle formation events in springtime São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Hakala, J.; Nieminen, T.; Manninen, H. E.; Morais, F.; Aalto, P. P.; Siivola, E.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Artaxo, P.; Virkkula, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.

    2012-12-01

    Large conurbations are a significant source of the anthropogenic pollution and demographic differences between cities that result in a different pollution burden. The metropolitan area of São Paulo (MASP, population 20 million) accounts for one fifth of the Brazilian vehicular fleet. A feature of MASP is the amount of ethanol used by the vehicular fleet, known to exacerbate air quality. The study describes the diurnal behaviour of the submicron aerosol and relies on total particle number concentration, particle number size distribution, light scattering and light absorption measurements. Modelled planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth and air mass movement data were used to aid the interpretation. During morning rush-hour, stagnant air and a shallow PBL height favour the accumulation of aerosol pollution. During clear-sky conditions, there was a wind shift towards the edge of the city indicating a heat island effect with implications on particulate pollution levels at the site. The median total particle number concentration for the submicron aerosol typically varied in the range 1.6 × 104-3.2 × 104 cm-3 frequently exceeding 4 × 104 cm-3 during the day. During weekdays, nucleation-mode particles are responsible for most of the particles by numbers. The highest concentrations of total particle number concentrations and black carbon (BC) were observed on Fridays. Median diurnal values for light absorption and light scattering (at 637 nm wavelength) varied in the range 12-33 Mm-1 and 21-64 Mm-1, respectively. The former one is equal to 1.8-5.0 μg m-3 of BC. The growth of the PBL, from the morning rush-hour until noon, is consistent with the diurnal cycle of BC mass concentrations. Weekday hourly median single-scattering albedo (ω0) varied in the range 0.59-0.76. Overall, this suggests a top of atmosphere (TOA) warming effect. However, considering the low surface reflectance of urban areas, for the given range of ω0, the TOA radiative forcing can be either positive

  5. Whole-ecosystem exposure to elevated carbon dioxide increases total ecosystem carbon and nitrogen in the Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. D.; Koyama, A.; Sonderegger, D.; Charlet, D.; Newingham, B. A.; Fenstermaker, L.; Ogle, K.; Smith, S. D.; Nowak, R.

    2011-12-01

    Arid ecosystems are predicted to be among the most responsive to global change and their response is globally significant considering their extensive spatial coverage. Although carbon cycling in arid lands is an important component of the global carbon budget, there is substantial uncertainty about the potential impacts of global change drivers, such as elevated CO2, on arid land carbon budgets. Studies suggest that productivity may be stimulated by elevated CO2 directly due to enhanced plant water-use efficiency. The indirect impacts of elevated CO2 on ecosystem productivity may also be constrained by available nitrogen, but little is known about how the importance of the nitrogen constraint or how the nitrogen cycle may be affected by global change drivers. Here we present the carbon and nitrogen mass budgets of a Mojave Desert ecosystem after ten years of exposure to elevated CO2. The Nevada Desert Free-Air Carbon Enrichment Facility (FACE) was established in 1997 to evaluate the response of an intact Mojave Desert ecosystem to elevated CO2. The CO2 concentration of the atmosphere in the elevated treatment was maintained at 513 uL/L until harvest in 2007. At harvest time, all aboveground biomass for 2/3 of each plot was harvested and soils and roots were removed down to 1 m depth and analyzed for total carbon and nitrogen. We observed significantly greater carbon (10,800 versus 9,200 kg C/ha, P=0.004) and nitrogen (1,400 versus 1,100 kg N/ha, P=0.002) in elevated compared to ambient CO2 treatments. Differences between treatments were due solely to greater C and N in soils across all cover types, and no differences were observed in above and belowground plant biomass. Companion research shows that increased soil C was from increased root exudation, microbial residues, and episodic increased litter input under elevated CO2, and these increased C inputs in turn stimulated production of inorganic nitrogen. Results from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility demonstrate

  6. Continuous measurement of black carbon aerosol in urban Nanjing of Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, B. L.; Wang, T. J.; Liu, J.; Li, S.; Xie, M.; Yang, X. Q.; Fu, C. B.; Sun, J. N.; Yin, C. Q.; Liao, J. B.; Zhu, J. L.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-06-01

    As a short-lived climate forcing agent, black carbon (BC) aerosol plays an important role in climate change, atmospheric environment, and human health. In this study, continuous measurements of BC and trace gases were made at an urban site in Nanjing, Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of China in 2012. The annual mean BC concentration in Nanjing was found to be 4157 ± 2626 ng/m3, with a range of 221-24,686 ng/m3. The value was much lower than that in most megacities of China and also lower than that in LinAn, a rural site in YRD. BC concentrations in Nanjing showed strong seasonality, high in spring and autumn and low in summer. The concentrations also varied diurnally, high at rush hours and low in the afternoon. The diurnal cycles of BC loadings in winter to spring 2012 were similar to those in 2011 in magnitude and shape. BC concentrations followed a typical lognormal pattern, with over 75% of data samples between 1000 and 6000 ng/m3. The maximum frequency occurred in low BC concentrations in summer and high BC concentrations in other seasons. In Nanjing, high levels of BC were mainly caused by local and regional emissions. Low levels of BC were mostly associated with winds from northern and eastern directions of Nanjing. BC and CO varied similarly with season, having a correlation coefficient over 0.7 in most seasons. Annual mean ΔBC/ΔCO was about 7 ng/m3/ppb, implying that the sources of the BC likely came from combustions of bio-fuel, industry-coal, and vehicle-gasoline. Serious pollution episodes with high levels of BC were detected in early June at the site. Analysis suggested that the episodes were due to biomass burning in northwestern region of Nanjing. During this period, ΔBC/ΔCO reached about 9.7 ng/m3/ppb and much higher BC levels were found at mid-night.

  7. Satellite Retrieval of Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, G.; Robles Gonzalez, C.; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Decae, R.

    SATELLITE RETRIEVAL of AEROSOL PROPERTIES G. de Leeuw, C. Robles Gonzalez, J. Kusmierczyk-Michulec and R. Decae TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory, The Hague, The Netherlands; deleeuw@fel.tno.nl Methods to retrieve aerosol properties over land and over sea were explored. The dual view offered by the ATSR-2 aboard ERS-2 was used by Veefkind et al., 1998. The retrieved AOD (aerosol optical depth) values compare favourably with collocated sun photometer measurements, with an accuracy of 0.06 +/- 0.05 in AOD. An algorithm developed for GOME on ERS-2 takes advantage of the low surface reflection in the UV (Veefkind et al., 2000). AOD values retrieved from ATSR-2 and GOME data over western Europe are consistent. The results were used to produce a map of mean AOD values over Europe for one month (Robles-Gonzalez et al., 2000). The ATSR-2 is al- gorithm is now extended with other aerosol types with the aim to apply it over the In- dian Ocean. A new algorithm is being developed for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to be launched in 2003 on the NASA EOS-AURA satellite. It is expected that, based on the different scattering and absorption properties of various aerosol types, five major aerosol classes can be distinguished. The experience with the retrieval of aerosol properties by using several wavelength bands is used to develop an algorithm for Sciamachy to retrieve aerosol properties both over land and over the ocean which takes advantage of the wavelengths from the UV to the IR. The variation of the AOD with wavelength is described by the Angstrom parameter. The AOD and the Angstrom parameter together yield information on the aerosol size distribution, integrated over the column. Analysis of sunphotometer data indicates a relation between the Angstrom parameter and the mass ratio of certain aerosols (black carbon, organic carbon and sea salt) to the total particulate matter. This relation has been further explored and was applied to satellite data over land to

  8. Variations of the total content of carbon monoxide over Moscow megapolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitin, V. S.; Fokeeva, E. V.; Grechko, E. I.; Dzhola, A. V.; Kuznetsov, R. D.

    2011-02-01

    The results of the carbon monoxide total content measurements over Moscow and Zvenigorod for 2005-2008 are compared with the same data sets for Moscow 1986-2005 and Beijing, 1992-2007. Two identical medium resolution diffraction spectrometers (resolution 0.2 cm-1) with solar tracking system were used. The CO total content measured simultaneously over the city and over Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS) of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (60 km west from Moscow). This method allows to isolate an urban part of CO content. The acoustic locator SODAR LATAN-3 measurements permitted us to study the influence of the carbon monoxide ventilation conditions upon level of pollution. Correlation coefficients between the urban part of CO content and average wind speed for cold and warm seasons were obtained. The data sets analysis showed a preeminent effect of the wind within boundary layer (up to 300 m) over the CO ventilation. The urban part of the CO content hasn't increased in spite of more than quintuple increase of the motor-vehicles number in Moscow. An increase of the rural CO total column for the 1970-1985 has transformed into its virtually stable amount in between of 1986 to 2000, changed then to a decrease for 2001-2008. We noted the 2008 as "the year of the CO total column minimum" over the past decade. The effect of urban CO sources influence on the CO total column in rural area is small, i.e. on a level of 3% of the total number of measurements. The number of extremal daily values for Moscow is estimated as 5%, and 20% for Beijing.

  9. Variation of total organic carbon content along the stream Harsit, Eastern Black Sea Basin, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Adem; Önsoy, Hizir; Akinci, Görkem; Bulut, Volkan Numan

    2011-11-01

    The TOC in surface waters and wastewater is an important analytical parameter describing the total content of all organic substances containing carbon. In practice, the TOC originated from natural and anthropogenic sources, and even if it is not directly responsible for dangers on human health, its determination is important for any kind of water that is used by public. The aim of this study was to determine variation of total organic carbon (TOC) and total carbon (TC) content in the stream Harsit, which courses in Eastern Black Sea Region, Turkey. Sampling was fortnightly conducted in each of the four seasons between March 2009 and February 2010. A total of 230 water samples were collected from ten sampling stations along the main branch of the stream Harsit with 143 km of length. Obtained TOC values were evaluated and used to classify the water quality of stream Harsit, according to the Turkish Water Pollution Control Regulation (TWPCR). The annual average TOC content values for the stations were found between 2.33 and 6.97 mg/L. It was seen that the TOC content have increased along the streamcourse of Harsit until the fourth station, where reaches its maximum value. The TOC content, then, has decreased and the minimum value was observed in the eighth station. The results showed that, except in winter season, maximum TOC content observed in many of the water samples were above Class I water standard indicated in TWPCR, which classifies the water resources according to the different area of uses. It was also found that TOC has a small contribution to TC and the highest TOC content in stream waters were measured in Gumushane station where direct discharge of city wastewaters and solid waste dumping to the stream were observed. PMID:21229304

  10. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS OVER THE UNITED STATES: ESTIMATES ON THE BASIS OF OBSERVED ORGANIC CARBON (OC) AND ELEMENTAL CARBON (EC), AND AIR QUALITY MODELED PRIMARY (OC/EC) RATIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The temporal and spatial distributions of primary and secondary organic carbon aerosols (OC) over the continental US during June 15 to August 31, 1999, were estimated by using observational OC and elemental carbon (EC) data from Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environm...

  11. Removal of total organic carbon from sewage wastewater using poly(ethylenimine)-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Ramnath; Sanchez-Dominguez, Margarita; Matutes-Aquino, Jose A; Wennmalm, Stefan; Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna

    2014-02-01

    The increased levels of organic carbon in sewage wastewater during recent years impose a great challenge to the existing wastewater treatment process (WWTP). Technological innovations are therefore sought that can reduce the release of organic carbon into lakes and seas. In the present study, magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized, functionalized with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), and characterized using TEM (transmission electron microscopy), X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), CCS (confocal correlation spectroscopy), SICS (scattering interference correlation spectroscopy), magnetism studies, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and other contaminants using PEI-coated magnetic nanoparticles (PEI-NPs) was tested in wastewater obtained from the Hammarby Sjöstadsverk sewage plant, Sweden. The synthesized NPs were about 12 nm in diameter and showed a homogeneous particle size distribution in dispersion by TEM and CCS analyses, respectively. The magnetization curve reveals superparamagnetic behavior, and the NPs do not reach saturation because of surface anisotropy effects. A 50% reduction in TOC was obtained in 60 min when using 20 mg/L PEI-NPs in 0.5 L of wastewater. Along with TOC, other contaminants such as turbidity (89%), color (86%), total nitrogen (24%), and microbial content (90%) were also removed without significant changes in the mineral ion composition of wastewater. We conclude that the application of PEI-NPs has the potential to reduce the processing time, complexity, sludge production, and use of additional chemicals in the WWTP. PMID:24428551

  12. Emissions of organic aerosol mass, black carbon, particle number, and regulated and unregulated gases from scooters and light and heavy duty vehicles with different fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Clairotte, M.; Adam, T. W.; Giechaskiel, B.; Heringa, M. F.; Elsasser, M.; Martini, G.; Manfredi, U.; Streibel, T.; Sklorz, M.; Zimmermann, R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Astorga, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Prevot, A. S. H.

    2014-06-01

    A sampling campaign with seven different types of vehicles was conducted in 2009 at the vehicle test facilities of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra (Italy). The vehicles chosen were representative of some categories circulating in Europe and were fueled either with standard gasoline or diesel and some with blends of rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel. The aim of this work was to improve the knowledge about the emission factors of gas phase and particle-associated regulated and unregulated species from vehicle exhaust. Unregulated species such as black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosol (OA) content, particle number (PN), monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and a~selection of unregulated gaseous compounds, including nitrous acid (N2O), ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and methane (CH4), were measured in real time with a suite of instruments including a high-resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer, a resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Diesel vehicles, without particle filters, featured the highest values for particle number, followed by gasoline vehicles and scooters. The particles from diesel and gasoline vehicles were mostly made of BC with a low fraction of OA, while the particles from the scooters were mainly composed of OA. Scooters were characterized by super high emissions factors for OA, which were orders of magnitude higher than for the other vehicles. The heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) featured the highest nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, while the scooters had the highest emissions for total hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds due to the unburned and partially burned gasoline and lubricant oil mixture. Generally, vehicles fuelled with biodiesel blends showed lower emission factors of OA and total aromatics than those from the standard fuels

  13. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to −24.7% and −26.9 to −24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  14. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-06-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to ‑24.7% and ‑26.9 to ‑24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China.

  15. Relationship between elemental carbon, total carbon, and diesel particulate matter in several underground metal/non-metal mines.

    PubMed

    Noll, J D; Bugarski, A D; Patts, L D; Mischler, S E; McWilliams, L

    2007-02-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is currently used as a surrogate for diesel particulate matter (DPM) in underground mines since it can be accurately measured at low concentrations and diesels are the only source of submicrometer EC in underground mines. A disadvantage of using EC as a surrogate for DPM is that the fraction of EC in DPM is a function of various engine parameters and fuel formulations, etc. In order to evaluate how EC predicts DPM in the underground mining atmosphere, measurements of total carbon (TC; representing over 80% of the DPM) and EC were taken away from potential interferences in four underground metal/non-metal mines during actual production. In a controlled atmosphere, DPM mass, TC, and EC measurements were also collected while several different types of vehicles simulated production with and without different types of control technologies. When diesel particulate filters (DPFs) were not used, both studies showed that EC could be used to predict DPM mass or TC. The variability of the data started to increase at TC concentrations below 230 microg/m3 and was high (> +/- 20%) at TC concentrations below 160 microg/m3, probably due to the problem with sampling organic carbon (OC) at these concentrations. It was also discovered that when certain DPFs were used, the relationship between DPM and EC changed at lower DPM concentrations. PMID:17333567

  16. Constraints on total fire carbon emissions over maritime southeast Asia in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijnen, Vincent; Wooster, Martin; Kaiser, Johannes; Gaveau, David; Flemming, Johannes; Parrington, Mark; Inness, Antje; Murdiyarso, Daniel; Main, Bruce; van Weele, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    In September and October 2015 widespread forest and peatland fires burned over large parts of maritime southeast Asia, releasing large amounts of terrestrially-stored carbon into the atmosphere, primarily in the form of CO2, CO and CH4. Although seasonal fires are a frequent occurrence in the human modified landscapes in the south of Kalimantan, the southeastern provinces of Sumatra, and West Papua, the extent of the fires was greatly inflated by an extended period of drought associated with a particularly strong El Niño. In this contribution we provide an estimate of the total carbon released in these fires, making use of satellite observations of the fire's radiative power output as processed with GFAS, applied in the modelling and assimilation framework of the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS: http://atmosphere.copernicus.eu/). The carbon emissions are further constrained with MOPITT atmospheric CO column measurements as well as unique on-site plume measurements on Kalimantan. We estimate the carbon emissions from the 2015 fires to be the largest over the maritime southeast Asian region since those associated with the record breaking El Niño of 1997.

  17. Isotope analyses of molecular and total organic carbon from Miocene sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, Mark; Freeman, Katherine H.; Arthur, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon-isotope compositions of n-alkanes, pristane and phytane, and total organic carbon were measured and compared against isotopic trends of coeval alkadienones from Miocene sediments containing very low organic-carbon contents. Compound-specific isotope analysis of n-alkanes and isoprenoid lipids, in conjunction with abundance distributions of n-alkanes reveal the influence of terrestrially derived organic carbon at all sites analyzed. In general, n-alkanes are derived from allochthonous sources with the exception of n-C 37 from site 516, which appears genetically related to coeval alkadienones. Further, pristane and phytane from pelagic sites 608 and 516 apparently derive from terrestrial sources as well, although a marine origin cannot be excluded. δ TOC values lack a coherent relationship to %TOC and δ 13C 37:2. Differential alteration and mixing of diverse isotopic signals most likely contribute to temporal variation and spatial differences in δ TOC. Therefore, when working with sediments from oligotrophic settings, we do not recommend δ TOC as an indicator of phytoplankton δ 13C values.

  18. An electrochemically based total organic carbon analyzer for planetary and terrestrial on-site applications.

    PubMed

    Stroble, Shannon T; Kounaves, Samuel P

    2012-07-17

    The search for organics on Mars began over 30 years ago. Neither the Viking GC/MS nor the more recent thermal and evolved gas analyzer (TEGA) aboard Phoenix were successful in detecting organics in the Martian soil. The most recent hypothesis for the "missing" Martian organics is thermal decomposition of organic material to CO(2) during the pyrolysis step of these analyses caused by the recently discovered ~1 wt % perchlorate in the Martian soil. To avoid this problem, an entirely different approach for the analysis of organics on Mars has been developed using an electrochemically based total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer, designated the Mars Organic Carbon Analyzer (MOCA). MOCA is designed as a small, lightweight, low-power instrument that electrochemically oxidizes organics to CO(2). The CO(2) is subsequently detected and quantified to determine the amount of TOC in the soil. MOCA can use the perchlorate present in the Martian soil to its advantage as an electrolyte, thus requiring only a buffered solution. Through a series of proof-of-concept tests, MOCA is shown to oxidize a variety of low-molecular-weight 1-5-carbon-containing molecules, including those containing carbon-13 using platinum and boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes at concentrations as low as 10 mg/kg. MOCA can also be used in terrestrial settings for on-site analysis of dissolved TOC. PMID:22725848

  19. Black carbon concentration and deposition estimations in Finland by the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Pietikäinen, J.-P.; Jacob, D.; Pozdun, R.; Petäjä, T.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.

    2012-09-01

    The prediction skill of the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM was assessed against the black carbon (BC) concentration measurements from five locations in Finland, with focus on Hyytiälä station for the year 2005. We examined to what extent the model is able to reproduce the measurements using several statistical tools: median comparison, overlap coefficient OVL (the common area under two probability distributions curves) and Z-score (a measure of standard deviation, shape and spread of the distributions). The results of the statistics showed that the model is biased low, suggesting either an excessive loss of black carbon in the model, or missing emissions. A further examination of the precipitation data from both measurements and model showed that there is no correlation between REMO's excessive precipitation and BC underestimation. This suggests that the excessive wet removal is not the main cause for the low black carbon concentration output. In addition, a comparison of wind directions in relation with high black carbon concentrations shows that REMO-HAM is able to predict the BC source directions relatively well. Cumulative black carbon deposition fluxes over Finland were estimated, including the deposition on snow.

  20. Double blanket effect caused by two layers of black carbon aerosols escalates warming in the Brahmaputra River Valley

    PubMed Central

    Rahul, P. R. C.; Bhawar, R. L.; Ayantika, D. C.; Panicker, A. S.; Safai, P. D.; Tharaprabhakaran, V.; Padmakumari, B.; Raju, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    First ever 3-day aircraft observations of vertical profiles of Black Carbon (BC) were obtained during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) conducted on 30th August, 4th and 6th September 2009 over Guwahati (26°11′N, 91°44′E), the largest metropolitan city in the Brahmaputra River Valley (BRV) region. The results revealed that apart from the surface/near surface loading of BC due to anthropogenic processes causing a heating of 2 K/day, the large-scale Walker and Hadley atmospheric circulations associated with the Indian summer monsoon help in the formation of a second layer of black carbon in the upper atmosphere, which generates an upper atmospheric heating of ~2 K/day. Lofting of BC aerosols by these large-scale circulating atmospheric cells to the upper atmosphere (4–6 Km) could also be the reason for extreme climate change scenarios that are being witnessed in the BRV region. PMID:24419075

  1. Investigation of organic aerosol sources using fractionated water-soluble organic carbon measured at an urban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung Shik; Cho, Sung Yong; Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Jung, Kweon

    2012-08-01

    Concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in PM2.5, including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), bulk water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), fractionated WSOCs, and water-soluble inorganic species were measured between December 27, 2010 and January 20, 2011, at an urban site of Seoul, Korea. PM2.5 samples were collected twice a day, e.g., for the daytime (10:00-16:00) and nighttime (16:00-10:00), respectively. A macro-porous XAD7HP resin was used to separately group the liquid extracts into hydrophilic and hydrophobic WSOC (WSOCHPI and WSOCHPO). To better understand the contributions of primary and secondary OC (SOC) to WSOC, estimates of SOC were derived using the EC-tracer method and compared with the WSOC fractions. Good correlations among the WSOC, SO42-, and oxalate suggest that some of the observed WSOC originated from similar formation processes as those of SO42- and oxalate, i.e., formed by an in-cloud or aerosol droplet process. Primary OC was more highly correlated with the WSOCHPO (R2 = 0.56) than the WSOCHPI (R2 = 0.33), while a better correlation between predicted SOC and WSOCHPI (R2 = 0.63) was found than between the predicted SOC and WSOCHPO (R2 = 0.47). These results suggest that WSOCHPI at the site during the winter could be formed by a similar production pathway such as the secondary organic carbon, while primary combustion emissions were a dominant source for the WSOCHPO during the study period. Sources of WSOC, WSOCHPI and WSOCHPO inferred based on the correlations were also clearly demonstrated by source categories identified by principle component analysis. Measurement results suggest that group separation of bulk WSOC extracts could provide important clues for better understanding the sources of OC (or WSOC).

  2. Leaching behavior of total organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from banana peel.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruixue; Sun, Shujuan; Xu, Yan; Qiu, Xiudong; Yang, Jili; Li, Xiaochen

    2015-01-01

    The leaching behavior of organic carbon and nutrient compounds from banana peel (BP) was investigated in batch assays with respect to particle size, contact time, pH value, and temperature. The granularity, contact time, pH, and temperature caused no significant effects on the leaching of total phosphorus (TP) from the BP. The maximum leached total nitrogen (TN) content was found at pH 5.0 and 90 minutes, while no significant effects were caused by the granularity and temperature. The maximum leached total organic carbon (TOC) content was found by using a powder of 40 mesh, 150 minutes and at pH 6.0, while the temperature had no effect on the TOC leaching. The proportions of the TN, TP, and TOC contents leached from the dried BP ranged from 33.6% to 40.9%, 60.4% to 72.7%, and 8.2% to 9.9%, respectively, indicating that BP could be a potential pollution source for surface and ground water if discharged as domestic waste or reutilized without pretreatment. PMID:26442486

  3. Characterization of Speciated Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Over California

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Easter, Richard C.; Hand, Jenny; Avise, J.

    2013-03-16

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem) with added capability of diagnosing the spatial and seasonal distribution of radiative forcings for individual aerosol species over California is used to characterize the radiative forcing of speciated aerosols in California. Model simulations for the year of 2005 are evaluated with various observations including meteorological data from California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), aerosol mass concentrations from US EPA Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE), and aerosol optical depth from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and satellites. The model well captures the observed seasonal meteorological conditions over California. Overall, the simulation is able to reproduce the observed spatial and seasonal distribution of mass concentration of total PM2.5 and the relative contribution from individual aerosol species, except the model significantly underestimates the surface concentrations of organic matter (OM) and elemental carbon (EC), potentially due to uncertainty in the anthropogenic emissions of OM and EC and the outdated secondary organic aerosol mechanism used in the model. A sensitivity simulation with anthropogenic EC emission doubled significantly reduces the model low bias of EC. The simulation reveals high anthropogenic aerosol loading over the Central Valley and the Los Angeles metropolitan regions and high natural aerosol (dust) loading over southeastern California. The seasonality of aerosol surface concentration is mainly determined by vertical turbulent mixing, ventilation, and photochemical activity, with distinct characteristics for individual aerosol species and between urban and rural areas. The simulations show that anthropogenic aerosols dominate the aerosol optical depth (AOD). The ratio of AOD to AAOD (aerosol absorption optical depth) shows distinct seasonality with a winter maximum and a summer minimum

  4. Aerosol cloud processing with the global model ECHAM5-HAM-SALSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Korhonen, H.; Zubair, M.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Lehtinen, K.; Kokkola, H.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their interactions with clouds constitute the largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of the Earth's atmosphere. Increasing aerosol number concentrations increases the cloud droplet concentration and droplet surface and hence the cloud albedo. This mechanism is called the aerosol indirect effect on climate. Understanding the changes in cloud droplet number concentrations and size by anthropogenic aerosols are the key factors in the study of future climate change. Therefore the aerosols' formation and growth from nanoparticles to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) must be described accurately. The formation and growth of aerosols are shown to be described more accurately with sectional representations than with bulk (total aerosol mass only), modal (lognormal modes describing mass and number size distribution) or moment (processes tied to different moments of particle number size distribution) approaches. Recently the sectional aerosol models have been implemented to global climate models. However, the resolution of sectional models must be optimised to reduce the computational cost. We have implemented the sectional aerosol model SALSA in ECHAM5-HAM. SALSA describes the aerosol population with 20 size sections. The dynamics are optimised for large scale applications and the model includes an improved moving center sectional method. The particulate mass consists of five compounds: sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon, sea salt and dust. The aerosol processing has been studied extensively and there are many numerical models used to predict CCN number concentrations. However, due to computational limitations many of them are not suitable for utilisation in global climate models. Therefore in most global climate studies on aerosol activation to CCN is examined using cloud activation parameterisations. We study the aerosol cloud processing and its affect on transport of aerosols using Abdul-Razzak-Ghan aerosol cloud activation

  5. The impact of carbonate texture on the quantification of total porosity by image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Thomas J.; Neilson, Joyce E.; Healy, David; Michie, Emma A. H.; Aplin, Andrew C.

    2015-12-01

    Image analysis is widely used to quantify porosity because, in addition to porosity, it can provide quantitative pore system information, such as pore sizes and shapes. Despite its wide use, no standard image analysis workflow exists. When employing image analysis, a workflow must be developed and evaluated to understand the methodological pitfalls and assumptions to enable accurate quantification of total porosity. This study presents an image analysis workflow that is used to quantify total porosity in a range of carbonate lithofacies. This study uses stitched BSE-SEM photomicrographs to construct greyscale pore system images, which are systematically thresholded to produce binary images composed of a pore phase and a rock phase. The ratio of the area of the pore phase to the total area of the pore system image defines the total porosity. Image analysis total porosity is compared with total porosity quantified by standard porosimetry techniques (He-porosimetry and mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) porosimetry) to understand the systematics of the workflow. The impact of carbonate textures on image analysis porosity quantification is also assessed. A comparison between image analysis, He-porosimetry and MICP total porosity indicates that the image analysis workflow used in this study can accurately quantify or underestimate total porosity depending on the lithofacies textures and pore systems. The porosity of wackestone lithofacies tends to be significantly underestimated (i.e. greater than 10%) by image analysis, whereas packstone, grainstone, rudstone and floatstone lithofacies tend to be accurately estimated or slightly underestimated (i.e. 5% or less) by image analysis. The underestimation of image analysis porosity in the wackestone lithofacies is correlated to the quantity of matrix pore types and is thought to be caused by incomplete imaging of microporosity and by unrepresentative fields of view. Image analysis porosity, which is calculated from

  6. Maceral, total organic carbon, and palynological analyses of ross ice shelf project site j9 cores.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, J H; Beckman, S W

    1982-04-01

    Analyses of macerals and total organic carbon indicate that the low organic content of core sediments from Ross Ice Shelf Project site J9 has been selectively reduced further, probably by postdepositional submarine oxidation. Palynological analysis revealed a reworked Paleogene dinocyst flora of low diversity (the transantarctic flora). This constitutes the most southerly dinocyst flora reported thus far. The antarctic distribution of the transantarctic flora supports the existence of a transantarctic strait during the Paleogene. The J9 sporomorph assemblage also is reworked and Paleogene in age. PMID:17736253

  7. Mexico city aerosol analysis during MILAGRO using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry at the urban supersite (T0) - Part 2: Analysis of the biomass burning contribution and the non-fossil carbon fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, A.C.; Wang, J.; de Foy, B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Wehrli, M. N.; Szidat, S.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Noda, J.; Wacker, L.; Volkamer, R.; Fortner, E.; Laskin, A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Molina, L. T.; Sosa, G.; Querol, X.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-16

    periods or a correlation with fire counts, FLEXPART-predicted FIFs or fire tracers, indicating that it is dominated by urban and/or regional sources and not by the fires near the MCMA. A new 14C aerosol dataset is presented. Both this new and a previously published dataset of 14C analysis suggest a similar BBOA contribution as the AMS and chemical mass balance (CMB), resulting in 13% higher non-fossil carbon during the high vs. low regional fire periods. The new dataset has {approx}15% more fossil carbon on average than the previously published one, and possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. During the low regional fire period, 38% of organic carbon (OC) and 28% total carbon (TC) are from non-fossil sources, suggesting the importance of urban and regional non-fossil carbon sources other than the fires, such as food cooking and regional biogenic SOA. The ambient BBOA/CH3CN ratio is much higher in the afternoon when the wildfires are most intense than during the rest of the day. Also, there are large differences in the contributions of the different OA components to the surface concentrations vs. the integrated column amounts. Both facts may explain some apparent disagreements between BB impacts estimated from afternoon aircraft flights vs. those from 24-h ground measurements. We show that by properly accounting for the non-BB sources of K, all of the BB PM estimates from MILAGRO can be reconciled. Overall, the fires from the region near the MCMA are estimated to contribute 15-23% of the OA and 7-9% of the fine PM at T0 during MILAGRO, and 2-3% of the fine PM as an annual average. The 2006 MCMA emissions inventory contains a substantially lower impact of the forest fire emissions, although a fraction of these emissions occur just outside of the MCMA inventory area.

  8. Mexico city aerosol analysis during MILAGRO using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry at the urban supersite (T0) - Part 2: Analysis of the biomass burning contribution and the non-fossil carbon fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, A. C.; de Foy, B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Wehrli, M. N.; Szidat, S.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Noda, J.; Wacker, L.; Volkamer, R.; Fortner, E.; Wang, J.; Laskin, A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Molina, L. T.; Sosa, G.; Querol, X.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    correlation with fire counts, FLEXPART-predicted FIFs or fire tracers, indicating that it is dominated by urban and/or regional sources and not by the fires near the MCMA. A new 14C aerosol dataset is presented. Both this new and a previously published dataset of 14C analysis suggest a similar BBOA contribution as the AMS and chemical mass balance (CMB), resulting in 13% higher non-fossil carbon during the high vs. low regional fire periods. The new dataset has ~15% more fossil carbon on average than the previously published one, and possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. During the low regional fire period, 38% of organic carbon (OC) and 28% total carbon (TC) are from non-fossil sources, suggesting the importance of urban and regional non-fossil carbon sources other than the fires, such as food cooking and regional biogenic SOA. The ambient BBOA/ΔCH3CN ratio is much higher in the afternoon when the wildfires are most intense than during the rest of the day. Also, there are large differences in the contributions of the different OA components to the surface concentrations vs. the integrated column amounts. Both facts may explain some apparent disagreements between BB impacts estimated from afternoon aircraft flights vs. those from 24-h ground measurements. We show that by properly accounting for the non-BB sources of K, all of the BB PM estimates from MILAGRO can be reconciled. Overall, the fires from the region near the MCMA are estimated to contribute 15-23% of the OA and 7-9% of the fine PM at T0 during MILAGRO, and 2-3% of the fine PM as an annual average. The 2006 MCMA emissions inventory contains a substantially lower impact of the forest fire emissions, although a fraction of these emissions occur just outside of the MCMA inventory area.

  9. CARBON CONTAINING COMPONENT OF THE LOS ANGELES AEROSOL: SOURCE APPORTIONMENT AND CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE VISIBILITY BUDGET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source resolution of the organic component of the fine fraction of the ambient aerosol (d(sub p) < 3.5 micrometers) has been carried out by combining source information from the organic component with thermal analysis and local emission inventories. The primary and secondary carb...

  10. RT-MATRIX: Measuring Total Organic Carbon by Photocatalytic Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inevitably accumulate in enclosed habitats such as the International Space Station and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as a result of human metabolism, material off-gassing, and leaking equipment. Some VOCs can negatively affect the quality of the crew's life, health, and performance; and consequently, the success of the mission. Air quality must be closely monitored to ensure a safe living and working environment. Currently, there is no reliable air quality monitoring system that meets NASA's stringent requirements for power, mass, volume, or performance. The ultimate objective of the project -- the development of a Real-Time, Miniaturized, Autonomous Total Risk Indicator System (RT.MATRIX).is to provide a portable, dual-function sensing system that simultaneously determines total organic carbon (TOC) and individual contaminants in air streams.

  11. Black carbon concentration and deposition estimations in Finland by the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Pietikäinen, J.-P.; Jacob, D.; Pozdun, R.; Petäjä, T.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Sogacheva, L.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.

    2013-04-01

    The prediction skill of the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM was assessed against the black carbon (BC) concentration measurements from five locations in Finland, with focus on Hyytiälä station for the year 2005. We examined to what extent the model is able to reproduce the measurements using several statistical tools: median comparison, overlap coefficient (OVL; the common area under two probability distributions curves) and Z score (a measure of standard deviation, shape and spread of the distributions). The results of the statistics showed that the model is biased low. The local and regional emissions of BC have a significant contribution, and the model tendency to flatten the observed BC is most likely dominated by the lack of domestic burning of biofuel in the emission inventories. A further examination of the precipitation data from both measurements and model showed that there is no correlation between REMO's excessive precipitation and BC underestimation. This suggests that the excessive wet removal is not the main cause of the low black carbon concentration output. In addition, a comparison of wind directions in relation with high black carbon concentrations shows that REMO-HAM is able to predict the BC source directions relatively well. Cumulative black carbon deposition fluxes over Finland were estimated, including the deposition on snow.

  12. Observation of low single scattering albedo of aerosols in the downwind of the East Asian desert and urban areas during the inflow of dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Pradeep; Takamura, Tamio; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed data observed at Fukue-jima (32.752°N, 128.682°E), the downwind of the East Asian desert and urban areas, during the spring season (March-April) of 2008-2011 aiming to understand the light-absorption capacity of Asian dust aerosols, which is a topic of controversy. We observed the decreasing tendency of single-scattering albedo (SSA) with the decrease of Ångström exponent and the increase of the ratio of dust aerosol optical thickness to total aerosol optical thickness, suggesting the important role of coarse-mode dust aerosols on observed low SSAs. The observational data further indicated that the low SSAs during strong dust events were less likely due to the effect of only strong light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, such as black carbon (BC), indicating the association of aerosol size distribution on modulating SSA. Such observational results are justified by numerical calculations showing that aerosol size distribution can be the key factor on modulating SSA even without any change in relative amount of light-absorbing aerosol as well as total aerosol optical thickness. Therefore, the observed low SSAs in the downwind regions during dust events could be partially due to the dominance of coarse-mode aerosols over fine-mode aerosols, which are usual in dust events, along with the effect of mixed light-absorbing aerosols. The study further suggests that such effect of aerosol size distribution on SSA can be one of the important reasons for the low SSAs of dust aerosols in the source region as reported by some studies, if coarse-mode aerosols dominate fine-mode aerosols.

  13. Variability of Total Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in Abyssal Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, F. J.; Escobar Briones, E.

    2007-05-01

    Marine sediments represent the largest reservoir of carbon on Earth and an important factor in climate change and allow us to understand the role of the deep sea sediments as a reservoir for the organic carbon and the chemical balance of nitrogen in the basin. This study determined the precision (CV < 3%) and accuracy (CV < 3%) of the elemental analysis carried out that described the variability of total organic carbon (TOC) and nitrogen from samples collected at 115 locations during several cruises in a depth interval of 1025 and 3725 m. The average values recorded for abyssal sediment samples in the SW Gulf of Mexico were 0.95% +/- 0.135% for TOC and 0.12% +/- 0.025% for N with a C/N ratio of 7.96 +/- 1.406. Only samples from chemosynthetic locations (i.e. Chapopote asphalt volcano) recorded S in 3.35% +/- 1.503%. The elemental composition of TOC and N is controlled by depth and follows a polynomial pattern; the C/N followed a sigmoid pattern and together with TOC varies with the distance to the coast and depth. The presence of topographic features in the seafloor influence the distribution of TOC and N.

  14. Enhanced source identification of southeast aerosols using temperature-resolved carbon fractions and gas phase components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Yuhang; Russell, Armistead; Edgerton, Eric S.

    Four gas components (CO, SO 2, HNO 3 and NO y) and PM 2.5 (particulate matter ⩽2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) composition data including eight individual carbon fractions collected at four sites in Georgia and Alabama were analyzed with the positive matrix factorization (PMF) method. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was applied to regress the total PM mass against the estimated source contributions. The regression coefficients were used to scale the factor profiles. Nine factors were resolved at two urban sites (Atlanta, GA (JST) and Birmingham, AL (BHM)) and one rural site (Centerville, AL (CTR)). Eight factors were resolved at the other rural site (Yorkville, GA (YRK)). Six factors we refer to as soil, coal combustion/other, diesel emission, secondary sulfate, secondary nitrate, and wood smoke are common among the four sites. Two industry-related factors are similar at the two sites in the same state, but differ between states. Contrary to previous results using only PM 2.5 data with non-speciated EC and OC data, diesel and gasoline emission factors were resolved at the two urban sites instead of only one single motor vehicle factor; diesel and gasoline factors were also resolved at the CTR site and a diesel factor was found at YRK instead of no motor vehicle factors at the two rural sites. The inclusion of gas components also improved the identification of the coal combustion/other factor among the four sites. This study shows that inclusion of gas phase data and temperature-resolved fractional carbon data can enhance the resolving power of source apportionment studies, especially for the factors we refer to as gas, diesel, and coal combustion/other.

  15. Development of the Second Generation International Space Station (ISS) Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Anna L.; Stinson, Richard G.; VanWie, Michael; Warren, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The second generation International Space Station (ISS) Total Organic Carbon Analyzer s (TOCA) function is to monitor concentrations of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) in ISS water samples. TOC is one measurement that provides a general indication of overall water quality by indicating the potential presence of hazardous chemicals. The data generated from the TOCA is used as a hazard control to assess the quality of the reclaimed and stored water supplies on-orbit and their suitability for crew consumption. This paper details the unique ISS Program requirements, the design of the ISS TOCA, and a brief description of the on-orbit concept-of-operations. The TOCA schematic will be discussed in detail along with specific information regarding key components. The ISS TOCA was designed as a non-toxic TOC analyzer that could be deployed in a flight ready package. This basic concept was developed through laboratory component level testing, two moderate fidelity integrated system breadboard prototypes, a flight-like full scale prototype, as well as lessons learned from the inadequacies of the first unit. The result: a new TOCA unit that is robust in design and includes special considerations to microgravity and the on-orbit ISS environment. TOCA meets the accuracy needs of the ISS Program with a 1,000 to 25,000 g/L range, accurate to within +/-25%.

  16. SECONDARY ORGANIC CARBON AND AEROSOL YIELDS FROM THE IRRADIATIONS OF ISOPRENE AND á-PINENE IN THE PRESENCE OF NO X AND SO 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was carried out to investigate the secondary organic carbon (SOC) yields of a-pinene and isoprene in the presence of SO2, which produces acidic aerosol in the system. Experiments were based on irradiating each hydrocarbon (HC) with NOx in ...

  17. Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized by Aerosol CVD-Method Using Ferrocene and CuNi Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomakin, M. V.; Rybakov, M. S.; Kosobutsky, A. V.; Sevostyanov, O. G.; Shandakov, S. D.

    2015-09-01

    Properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) obtained by aerosol method of chemical deposition from the gas phase using ethanol, ferrocene, and CuNi nanoparticles are studied. The structural and vibrational characteristics of synthesis products are determined by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of the catalyst nanoparticles introduced into the reaction mixture on the properties of the synthesized SWCNTs is discussed.

  18. Characterization of amorphous carbon films as total-reflection mirrors for XUV free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Sandra; Steeg, Barbara; Wiesmann, Jorg; Stormer, Michael; Feldhaus, Josef; Bormann, R.'diger; Michaelsen, Carsten

    2002-12-01

    As part of the TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) project a free electron laser (FEL) in the XUV (Extreme Ultra-Violet, (6-200 eV)) and X-ray (0.5-15 keV) range is being developed at DESY (Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, Hamburg). At the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) a prototype FEL has recently demonstrated maximum light amplification in the range of 80 nm to 120 nm. It is expected that the FEL will provide intense, sub-picosecond radiation pulses with photon energies up to 200 eV in the next development stage. In a joint project between DESY and GKSS, thin film optical elements with very high radiation stability, as required for FEL applications, are currently being developed. Sputter-deposited amorphous carbon coatings have been prepared for use as total reflection X-ray mirrors. The optical characterization of the mirrors has been carried out using the soft X-ray reflectometer at HASYLAB (Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor) beamline G1. The reflectivity of the carbon films at 2 deg incidence angle is close to the theoretical reflectivity of 95.6 %, demonstrating the high quality of the coatings. For comparison, layers produced by different methods (e.g. Chemical vapor deposition, Pulsed laser deposition) have been characterized as well. Annealing experiments have been performed to evaluate the thermal stability of the amorphous carbon films. Further investigations concerning the radiation stability of the X-ray mirrors have also been conducted. The mirrors were irradiated in the FELIS (Free Electron Laser-Interaction with Solids) experiment at the TTF-FEL. Microscopic investigations demonstrate that the carbon mirrors are fairly stable.

  19. Measurement and analysis of black carbon aerosols over a tropical semi-arid station in Kadapa, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begam, G. Reshma; Vachaspati, C. Viswanath; Ahammed, Y. Nazeer; Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Babu, S. Suresh; Reddy, R. R.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents aerosol light absorption measurements using a seven channel Aethalometer (AE-42), recorded during September 2011-November 2012 over a tropical semi-arid site in Kadapa, India. The annual average black carbon (BC) mass concentration ([BC]) during the studied period was 2.20 ± 0.78 μg m- 3 which is in agreement when compared to other sites of similar environment. Strong seasonal variation was observed with high values during winter (2.87 ± 0.81 μg m- 3) and low in monsoon (1.30 ± 0.31 μg m- 3) season, which could be attributed to regional synoptic meteorology and long range transport. The two peaks in diurnal variations of [BC] were observed during morning between 06:00 and 08:00 h local time (LT) and in the evening around 19:00-21:00 h LT, with a minimum peak in the afternoon (~ 16:00 h LT) which is strongly correlated with the boundary layer dynamics, local and regional sources, and associated meteorology. The relationships between measured [BC] and the corresponding meteorological parameters for the studied region were also analysed. The estimated monthly mean spectral absorption coefficient values range from 0.56 to 1.15 with an average of 0.90, which suggests high BC/OC ratio and possible source of emission of aerosols is fossil fuel burning. Trajectory cluster analysis showed significant impact of long range transport of BC aerosols towards the observational site during the period of study.

  20. Effects of Aerosols over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Aerosols that contain black carbon both absorb and reflect incoming sunlight. Even as these atmospheric particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface, they increase the amount of solar energy absorbed in the atmosphere, thus making it possible to both cool the surface and warm the atmosphere. The images above show satellite measurements of the region studied during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)a vast region spanning the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (west to east), and from the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, across the Indian subcontinent to the southern Indian Ocean (north to south). The Aerosol images show aerosol pollution (brownish pixels) in the lower atmosphere over the INDOEX study area, as measured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra. These were composited from March 14-21, 2001. The Albedo images show the total solar energy reflected back to space, as measured by Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) aboard Terra. White pixels show high values, greens are intermediate values, and blues are low. Note how the aerosols, particularly over the ocean, increase the amount of energy reflected back to space. The Atmospheric Warming images show the absorption of the black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere. Where the aerosols are most dense, the absorption is highest. Red pixels indicate the highest levels of absorption, blues are low. The Surface Cooling images show that the aerosol particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface. Dark pixels show where the aerosols exert their cooling influence on the surface (or a high magnitude of negative radiative forcing). The bright pixels show where there is much less aerosol pollution and the incoming sunlight is relatively unaffected.

  1. CMAQ model performance enhanced when in-cloud secondary organic aerosol is included: comparisons of organic carbon predictions with measurements.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Annmarie G; Turpin, Barbara I; Altieri, Katye E; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Mathur, Rohit; Roselle, Shawn J; Weber, Rodney J

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that low-volatility (particle-phase) organic compounds form in the atmosphere through aqueous phase reactions in clouds and aerosols. Although some models have begun including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through cloud processing, validation studies that compare predictions and measurements are needed. In this work, agreement between modeled organic carbon (OC) and aircraft measurements of water soluble OC improved for all 5 of the compared ICARTT NOAA-P3 flights during August when an in-cloud SOA (SOAcld) formation mechanism was added to CMAQ (a regional-scale atmospheric model). The improvement was most dramatic for the August 14th flight, a flight designed specifically to investigate clouds. During this flight the normalized mean bias for layer-averaged OC was reduced from -64 to -15% and correlation (r) improved from 0.5 to 0.6. Underpredictions of OC aloft by atmospheric models may be explained, in part, by this formation mechanism (SOAcld). OC formation aloft contributes to long-range pollution transport and has implications to radiative forcing, regional air quality and climate. PMID:19192800

  2. Observed high-altitude warming and snow cover retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas enhanced by black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau provide the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In situ observations of snow cover extent since the 1960s suggest that the snowpack in the region have retreated significantly, accompanied by a surface warming of 2-2.5 °C observed over the peak altitudes (5000 m). Using a high-resolution ocean-atmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) aerosol forcing, we attribute the observed altitude dependence of the warming trends as well as the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover extent to various anthropogenic factors. At the Tibetan Plateau altitudes, the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration exerted a warming of 1.7 °C, BC 1.3 °C where as cooling aerosols cause about 0.7 °C cooling, bringing the net simulated warming consistent with the anomalously large observed warming. We therefore conclude that BC together with CO2 has contributed to the snow retreat trends. In particular, BC increase is the major factor in the strong elevation dependence of the observed surface warming. The atmospheric warming by BC as well as its surface darkening of snow is coupled with the positive snow albedo feedbacks to account for the disproportionately large role of BC in high-elevation regions. These findings reveal that BC impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections, in particular on high-altitude cryosphere.

  3. Aerosol palladium activation for electroless copper deposition and heat treatment with NO injection to fabricate Cu oxide/carbon fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Ryang Hwa; Hwang, Jungho

    2009-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel method for fabricating copper (Cu) oxide/activated carbon fibre (ACF) through the aerosol palladium (Pd) activation for use in electroless Cu deposition and heat treatment of Cu deposited ACF with nitric monoxide (NO) gas injection. Electroless Cu deposition was initiated by catalytically activating the ACF surface with spark generated Pd aerosol nanoparticles. The catalytically activated ACF was placed into a solution used for the electroless Cu deposition. Subjecting the Cu deposited ACF to a heat treatment in a NO/nitrogen (N2) gas injection (1000 ppm NO) resulted in changes to the morphology of the Cu particles. As the temperature increased from 100 to 500 °C, the relative mass fraction of oxygen in the Cu particles increased from 3.6% to 14.2% and the fraction of Cu decreased from 41.2% to 34.1%, which was caused by the formation of Cu oxides (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding surface area and pore volume of the ACF decreased from 1019 m2 g-1 to 401 m2 g-1 and from 0.40 cm3 g-1 to 0.18 cm3 g-1, respectively. The morphological evolution and decrease in porosity were attributed to volume expansion of Cu particles during oxidation.

  4. Soil, vegetation and total organic carbon stock development in self-restoring abandoned vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    József Novák, Tibor; Incze, József; Spohn, Marie; Giani, Luise

    2016-04-01

    Abandoned vineyard's soil and vegetation development was studied on Tokaj Nagy-Hill, which is one of the traditional wine-producing regions of Hungary, it is declared as UNESCO World Heritage site as cultural landscape. Spatial distribution and pattern of vineyards were changing during the last several hundreds of years, therefore significant part of abandoned vineyards were subjected to long-term spontaneous secondary succession of vegetation and self-restoration of soils in absence of later cultivation. Two chronosequences of spontaneously regenerating vineyard abandonments, one on south (S-sequence) and one on southwest (SW-sequence) slope with differing times since their abandonment (193, 142, 101, 63, 39 and 14 years), were compiled and studied. The S-sequence was 25-35% sloped and strongly eroded, and the SW-sequence was 17-25% sloped and moderately eroded. The sites were investigated in respect of vegetation characteristics, soil physico-chemical characteristics, total organic carbon stocks (TOC stocks), accumulation rates of total organic carbon (TOC accumulation rates), and soil profiles, which were classified according to the World Reference Base (WRB) 2014. Vegetation development resulted in shrub-grassland mosaics, supplemented frequently by protected forb species and forest development at the earliest abandonment in S-sequence, and predominantly to forest vegetation in SW-sequence, where trees were only absent at the 63 and 14 years old abandonment sites. In all sites soils on level of reference groups according to WRB were classified, and Cambisols, Regosols, Calcisols, Leptosols, Chernozems and Phaeozems were found. Soils of the S-sequence show shallow remnants of loess cover with colluvic and redeposited soil materials containing 15-65% skeletal volcanic rock of weathering products coated by secondary calcium carbonates. The SW-sequence profiles are developed on deep loess or loess derivatives. The calcium-carbonate content was higher in profiles of

  5. Black and Brown Carbon in Biogenic Settings with Different Levels of Anthropogenic Influence, and The Effect of Semivolatile Compounds on Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglou, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Khlystov, A.; Saha, P.; Grieshop, A. P.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a major contributor to the global aerosol burden. Black carbon (BC) is a significant climate warming agent, while light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon, BrC), also impacts the atmospheric radiative balance. The optical properties of ambient aerosols can be affected by biogenic SOA through the lensing effect (coating of BC cores by semivolatile SOA), and by the potential formation of BrC from biogenic sources influenced by anthropogenic sources. To evaluate these effects, measurements of ambient aerosol optical properties and BC concentrations were made in rural Centreville, AL (a remote site with little anthropogenic influence) in summer 2013 and at Duke Forest in Chapel Hill, NC (a site close to high density vehicular traffic and industrial sources), during summer 2015. Photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX, 405 nm and 532 nm) measured particulate light absorption and a single particle soot photometer (SP2) measured BC mass at both locations. A seven-wavelength Aethalometer and a three-wavelength nephelometer were also deployed at Duke Forest. A third PAX (870 nm) was deployed at Centreville. For absorption and BC measurements, the sample was cycled between a dry line and a dry/thermally-denuded line. Hourly samples were collected with a steam jet aerosol collector (SJAC) for online (2013) and offline (2015) chemical composition analysis. BC concentrations were generally higher at Duke Forest compared to the rural Centreville site. The Aethalometer readings at Duke Forest show greater absorption at the shorter wavelengths (370 nm and 470 nm) than expected from the absorption at 880 nm coupled with an inverse wavelength dependence, suggesting the presence of brown carbon. This presentation will examine the evidence for brown carbon at the two sites, as well as the effect of non-BC coatings on BC light absorption (the lensing effect.)

  6. Calibration of the total carbon column observing network using aircraft profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunch, D.; Toon, G. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.; Stephens, B. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Uchino, O.; Abshire, J. B.; Bernath, P.; Biraud, S. C.; Blavier, J.-F. L.; Boone, C.; Bowman, K. P.; Browell, E. V.; Campos, T.; Connor, B. J.; Daube, B. C.; Deutscher, N. M.; Diao, M.; Elkins, J. W.; Gerbig, C.; Gottlieb, E.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hurst, D. F.; Jiménez, R.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Kort, E.; Macatangay, R.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Moore, F.; Morino, I.; Park, S.; Robinson, J.; Roehl, C. M.; Sawa, Y.; Sherlock, V.; Sweeney, C.; Tanaka, T.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2010-06-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO2, CO, CH4, N2O and H2O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measurements. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. The aircraft campaigns are the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 (START-08), which included a profile over the Park Falls site, the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO-1) campaign, which included profiles over the Lamont and Lauder sites, a series of Learjet profiles over the Lamont site, and a Beechcraft King Air profile over the Tsukuba site. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made during the INTEX-NA (2004), COBRA-ME (2004) and TWP-ICE (2006) campaigns. A single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

  7. Calibration of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network using Aircraft Profile Data

    SciTech Connect

    Wunch, Debra; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Stephens, Britton B.; Fischer, Marc L.; Uchino, Osamu; Abshire, James B.; Bernath, Peter; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.; Boone, Chris; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Browell, Edward V.; Campos, Teresa; Connor, Brian J.; Daube, Bruce C.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Diao, Minghui; Elkins, James W.; Gerbig, Christoph; Gottlieb, Elaine; Griffith, David W. T.; Hurst, Dale F.; Jimenez, Rodrigo; Keppel-Aleks, Gretchen; Kort, Eric; Macatangay, Ronald; Machida, Toshinobu; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Moore, Fred; Morino, Isamu; Park, Sunyoung; Robinson, John; Roehl, Coleen M.; Sawa, Yusuke; Sherlock, Vanessa; Sweeney, Colm; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2010-03-26

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measure ments. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. The aircraft campaigns are the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 (START-08), which included a profile over the Park Falls site, the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO-1) campaign, which included profiles over the Lamont and Lauder sites, a series of Learjet profiles over the Lamont site, and a Beechcraft King Air profile over the Tsukuba site. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made during the INTEX-NA (2004), COBRA-ME (2004) and TWP-ICE (2006) campaigns. A single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

  8. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Babu, S. S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. K.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    The dominant sources of black carbon (BC) in South Asia and surrounding regions are inferred during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period by introducing BC tracers in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry. The model reproduced the magnitude, temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed during the ICARB ship-cruise. Average and SD (representing the spatial and temporal variability) in observed and modeled BC mass concentrations along the ship-track are estimated as 755 ± 734 and 732 ± 913 ng m-3 respectively. Average modeled values at most of the inland stations were also found to fall within the range of observed values. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal during the pre-monsoon season. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 70 and 28 % of the average ± SD BC mass concentration (1480 ± 5920 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (49 %) and industrial (37 %) sectors appear to be the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominated. We find that, while all parts of continental India contributed to anthropogenic BC over the Bay of Bengal, contribution over the Arabian Sea came mostly from southern Peninsula. We also show that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contribute up to 30 % of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that it is important to consider non-local sources along with the local emissions while designing strategies for mitigating BC emissions.

  9. Sources of Black Carbon Aerosols in South Asia and Surrounding Regions During the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G.; Babu, S. S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Krishnamoorthy, K.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    The dominant sources of black carbon (BC) in South Asia and surrounding regions are inferred during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)) by introducing BC tracers in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal during the pre-monsoon season. The model reproduced well the magnitude, temporal and spatial variability of BC concentrations observed during the ICARB ship-cruise. Average and standard deviation (representing the spatial and temporal variability) in observed and modeled BC mass concentrations along the ship-track are estimated as 755±734 ng m-3 and 732±913 ng m-3 respectively, where the standard deviation represents the spatial and temporal variability in the region. Average modeled values at most of the inland stations were also found to fall within the range of observed values. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 70% and 28% of the BC mass concentration in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (49%) and industrial (37%) sectors appear to be the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that, while all parts of continental India contributed to anthropogenic BC over Bay of Bengal, contribution over the Arabian Sea came mostly from southern Peninsula. We also show that long-range transport of anthropogenic emissions contribute up to 30% of BC concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that it is important to consider non-local sources along with the local emissions while designing strategies for mitigating BC emissions.

  10. Nanostructured Graphene-Titanium Dioxide Composites Synthesized by a Single-Step Aerosol Process for Photoreduction of Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Jiang, Yi; Fortner, John D.; Biswas, Pratim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to hydrocarbons by using nanostructured materials activated by solar energy is a promising approach to recycling CO2 as a fuel feedstock. CO2 photoreduction, however, suffers from low efficiency mainly due to the inherent drawback of fast electron-hole recombination in photocatalysts. This work reports the synthesis of nanostructured composites of titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets via an aerosol approach. The role of synthesis temperature and TiO2/GO ratio in CO2 photoreduction was investigated. As-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated enhanced CO2 conversion performance as compared with that of pristine TiO2 NPs due to the strong electron trapping capability of the rGO nanosheets. PMID:25053879

  11. Variability of Total Below Ground Carbon Allocation amongst Common Agricultural Land Management Practices: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacha, K. M.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wilson, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    Field measurements and numerical models are currently being used to estimate quantities of Total Belowground Carbon Allocation (TBCA) for three representative land uses, viz. corn, soybeans, and prairie bromegrass for CRP (Conservation Reserve Program) of an agricultural Iowa sub-watershed, located within the Clear Creek Watershed (CCW). Since it is difficult to measure TBCA directly, a mass balance approach has been implemented to estimate TBCA as follows: TBCA = FS + FE+ Δ(CS + CR + CL) - FA , where the term Fs denotes soil respiration; FE is the carbon content of the eroded/deposited soil; ΔCS, ΔCR, ΔCL denote the changes in carbon content of the mineral soil, plant roots, and litter layer, respectively; and FA is the above ground litter fall of dead plant material to the soil. The terms are hypothesized to have a huge impact on TBCA within agricultural settings due to intensive tillage practices, water-driven soil erosion/deposition, and high usage of fertilizer. To test our hypothesis, field measurements are being performed at the plot scale, replicating common agricultural land management practices. Soil respiration (FS) is being measured with an EGM-4 CO2 Gas Analyzer and SRC-1 Soil Respiration Chamber (PP Systems), soil moisture and temperature are recorded in the top 20 cm for each respective soil respiration measurement, and litter fall rates (FA) are acquired by collecting the residue in a calibrated pan. The change in carbon content of the soil (ΔCS), roots (ΔCR) and litter layer (ΔCL) are being analyzed by collecting soil samples throughout the life cycle of the plant. To determine the term FE for the three representative land management practices, a funnel collection system located at the plot outlet was used for collecting the eroded material after natural rainfall events. Field measurements of TBCA at the plot scale via the mass balance approach are used to calibrate the numerical agronomic process model DAYCENT, which simulates the daily

  12. Have tropospheric aerosol emissions contributed to the recent climate hiatus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Thomas; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Laakso, Anton; Lu, Zifeng; Bergman, Tommi; Mikkonen, Santtu; Kokkola, Harri; Korhonen, Hannele; Räisänen, Petri; Streets, David G.; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Laaksonen, Ari

    2014-05-01

    During the last 15 years global warming has slowed considerably, with the resulting plateau in global temperature records being dubbed the climate hiatus. Apart from variations in solar irradiance and ocean temperature, increased anthropogenic aerosol emissions in South and East Asia have been suggested as possible causes for this hiatus. While European and and North American aerosol emissions have constantly decreased since the 1980's, emissions in China and India have started increasing at the same time and, although total global aerosol emissions have decreased, aerosol effects on the global energy budget are expected to enhance towards the equator due to stronger irradiance there. In this study we used the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM2 to assess the effect that this re-distribution of anthropogenic aerosol emissions towards the equator may have on climate. To this end, we computed radiative forcing and equilibrium temperature response due to the change in global aerosol emissions (black carbon (BC), organic carbon and sulphur dioxide) between 1996 and 2010, keeping all other anthropogenic influences fixed. Surprisingly we found that the cooling due the increased aerosol emissions in China and India is almost negligible compared to the warming caused by the decreasing aerosol emissions in Europe and North America. The radiative flux perturbation (RFP; includes aerosol indirect effects) was 0.42 W/m2 and the change in global equilibrium 2 m temperature increased by 0.25 °C. The lack of cooling in China and India stems from a cancellation of sulfate cooling and BC warming, especially over China. There, the strong cloud cover leads to both attenuation of sulphate aerosol light scattering and saturation tendency of indirect aerosol effects on clouds. BC levels on the other hand increase also above the clouds (relative increase of BC levels is almost uniform with height), leading to warming through light absorption.

  13. Continuous flame aerosol synthesis of carbon-coated nano-LiFePO4 for Li-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Waser, Oliver; Büchel, Robert; Hintennach, Andreas; Novák, Petr; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell, nanosized LiFePO4-carbon particles were made in one step by scalable flame aerosol technology at 7 g/h. Core LiFePO4 particles were made in an enclosed flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) unit and were coated in-situ downstream by auto thermal carbonization (pyrolysis) of swirl-fed C2H2 in an O2-controlled atmosphere. The formation of acetylene carbon black (ACB) shell was investigated as a function of the process fuel-oxidant equivalence ratio (EQR). The core-shell morphology was obtained at slightly fuel-rich conditions (1.0 < EQR < 1.07) whereas segregated ACB and LiFePO4 particles were formed at fuel-lean conditions (0.8 < EQR < 1). Post-annealing of core-shell particles in reducing environment (5 vol% H2 in argon) at 700 °C for up to 4 hours established phase pure, monocrystalline LiFePO4 with a crystal size of 65 nm and 30 wt% ACB content. Uncoated LiFePO4 or segregated LiFePO4-ACB grew to 250 nm at these conditions. Annealing at 800 °C induced carbothermal reduction of LiFePO4 to Fe2P by ACB shell consumption that resulted in cavities between carbon shell and core LiFePO4 and even slight LiFePO4 crystal growth but better electrochemical performance. The present carbon-coated LiFePO4 showed superior cycle stability and higher rate capability than the benchmark, commercially available LiFePO4. PMID:23407817

  14. Long-term measurements of aerosols and carbon monoxide at the ZOTTO tall tower to characterize polluted and pristine air in the Siberian Taiga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, X.; Winderlich, J.; Mayer, J.-C.; Panov, A. V.; Heimann, M.; Birmili, W.; Heintzenberg, J.; Cheng, Y.; Andreae, M. O.

    2013-07-01

    Siberia is one of few background regions in the Northern Hemisphere where the atmosphere may sometimes approach pristine conditions. We present the time series of aerosol and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements between September~2006 and December 2010 at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 90° E). We investigate the seasonal, weekly and diurnal variations of aerosol properties (including absorption and scattering coefficients and derived parameters, like equivalent black carbon (BCe), Ångström exponent, single scattering albedo, and backscattering ratio) and the CO mixing ratios. Criteria were established to distinguish polluted and near-pristine air masses and characterize them separately. Depending on the season, 15-47% of the sampling time at ZOTTO was representative of a clean atmosphere. The summer pristine data indicates that primary biogenic and/or secondary organic aerosol formation are quite strong particle sources in the Siberian Taiga. The summer seasons 2007-2008 are dominated by an Aitken mode of 80 nm size, whereas the summer 2009 with prevailing easterly winds produced aerosols in the accumulation mode around 200 nm size. We found these differences mainly related to air temperature, in parallel with production rates of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC). In winter, the footprint and aerosol size distribution (with a peak at 160 nm) of the clean background air are characteristic for aged aerosols from anthropogenic sources at great distances from ZOTTO and diluted biofuel burning emissions from heating. The wintertime polluted air originates from the large cities to the south and southwest of the site; these aerosols have a dominant mode around 100 nm, and the Δ BCe/Δ CO ratio of 7-11 ng m-3 ppb-1 suggests dominant contributions from coal and biofuel burning for heating. During summer, anthropogenic emissions are the dominant contributor to the pollution aerosols at ZOTTO, while only 12% of the polluted

  15. Precision cleaning verification of fluid components by air/water impingement and total carbon analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 sq m. Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging/diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg/sq ft of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVRs impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 sq m.

  16. Precision Cleaning Verification of Fluid Components by Air/Water Impingement and Total Carbon Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1995-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 m(exp 2). Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging-diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC-113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg-ft(exp 2) of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVR's impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 m(exp 2).

  17. Total and pyrogenic carbon stocks in black spruce forest floors from eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, Laure; Quideau, Sylvie; MacKenzie, M. Derek; Munson, Alison; Boiffin, Juliette; Bernard, Guy; Wasylishen, Roderick

    2016-04-01

    In boreal forests, pyrogenic carbon (PyC), a by-product of recurrent wildfires, is an important component of the global soil C pool, although precise assessment of boreal PyC stock is scarce. In this study including 14 fire sites spreading over 600 km in the Quebec province, our aim was to better estimate total C stock and PyC stock in forest floors of Eastern Canada boreal forests. We also investigated the environmental conditions controlling the stocks and characterized the composition of the various forest floor layers. We analyzed the forest floor samples that were collected from mesic black spruce sites recently affected by fire (3-5 years) using elemental analysis and solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. PyC content was further estimated using a molecular mixing model on the 13C NMR data. Total C stock in forest floors averaged 5.7 ± 2.9 kg C/m2 and PyC stock 0.6 ± 0.3 kg C/m2. Total C stock was under control of the position in the landscape, with a greater accumulation of organic material on northern aspects and lower slope positions. In addition, total stock was significantly higher in spruce-dominated forest floors than in stands where jack pine was dominant. The PyC stock was significantly related to the atomic H/C ratio (R2 = 0.84) of the different organic layers. 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed a large increase in aromatic carbon in the deepest forest floor layer (humified H horizon) at the organic-mineral soil interface. The majority of the PyC stock was located in this horizon and had been formed during past high severity fires rather than during the most recent fire event. Conversely, the superficial "fresh" PyC layer, produced by early-season wildfires in 2005-2007, had NMR spectra fairly similar to unburned forest floors and comparatively low PyC stocks.

  18. Can sediment total organic carbon and grain size be used to diagnose organic