Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol total carbon

  1. Gas-phase photoacoustic determination of the total carbon content of aerosol deposits.

    PubMed

    Pleil, J D; Russwurm, G M; McClenny, W A

    1982-01-01

    A prototype system was constructed to determine the total carbon content of ambient aerosols trapped on quartz fiber filters. The measurement technique is based on carbon combustion to CO(2), cryogenic precon-centration, and subsequent photoacoustic monitoring of produced CO(2). A common sample set was independently analyzed by two established combustion method instruments and the photoacoustic system. Statistical comparison of data showed good agreement with accepted carbon values indicating feasibility for photoacoustic application to routine carbon analysis. PMID:20372416

  2. Contribution of Black Carbon, Brown Carbon and Lensing Effect to Total Aerosol Absorption in Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamjad, Pm; Tripathi, Sachchida; Bergin, Mike; Vreeland, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    This study reports the optical and physical properties of atmospheric and denuded (heated at 300°C) aerosols from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) during 20 December 2014 to 28 February 2015. A Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) and High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) were used to measure black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) in real time respectively. During experiments large scale carbonaceous aerosol loading is observed in IGP. Multiple biomass burning events are observed with varying intensity and duration. Refractive index of brown carbon (BrC) is derived from filter extracts using Liquid Core Wave Capillary Cell (LWCC). Refractive index of BrC at 405 is 4 times higher in IGP when compared to studies conducted in USA. Through Mie modelling we identified the percentage contribution of black carbon, BrC and lensing effect to total aerosol absorption. On average 75% of absorption is from black carbon alone, while rest is contributed from volatile components. Within the volatile component contribution, at 405 nm BrC contributes around 20% and rest from lensing effect. But at 781 nm lensing contributed more than BrC. Overall results indicate the special characteristics on BrC aerosols in IGP and the importance of considering spectral absorption in global aerosol modelling studies.

  3. Dual carbon isotope characterization of total organic carbon in wintertime carbonaceous aerosols from northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Andersson, August; Sarin, M. M.; Sheesley, R. J.; Kirillova, E.; Rengarajan, R.; Sudheer, A. K.; Ram, K.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-05-01

    Large-scale emissions of carbonaceous aerosols (CA) from South Asia impact both regional climate and air quality, yet their sources are not well constrained. Here we use source-diagnostic stable and radiocarbon isotopes (δ13C and Δ14C) to characterize CA sources at a semiurban site (Hisar: 29.2°N, 75.2°E) in the NW Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and a remote high-altitude location in the Himalayan foothills (Manora Peak: 29.4°N, 79.5°E, 1950 m above sea level) in northern India during winter. The Δ14C of total aerosol organic carbon (TOC) varied from -178‰ to -63‰ at Hisar and from -198‰ to -1‰ at Manora Peak. The absence of significant differences in the 14C-based fraction biomass of TOC between Hisar (0.81 ± 0.03) and Manora Peak (0.82 ± 0.07) reveals that biomass burning/biogenic emissions (BBEs) are the dominant sources of CA at both sites. Combining this information with δ13C, other chemical tracers (K+/OC and SO42-/EC) and air mass back trajectory analyses indicate similar source regions in the IGP (e.g., Punjab and Haryana). These results highlight that CA from BBEs in the IGP are not only confined to the atmospheric boundary layer but also extend to higher elevations of the troposphere, where the synoptic-scale circulations could substantially influence their abundances both to the Himalayas and over the downwind oceanic regions such as the Indian Ocean. Given the vast emissions of CA from postharvest crop residue combustion practices in the IGP during early Northeast Monsoon, this information is important for both improved process and model understanding of climate and health effects, as well as in guiding policy decision aiming at reducing emissions.

  4. Anthropogenic Influence on Secondary Aerosol Formation and Total Water-Soluble Carbon on Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioda, Adriana; Mateus, Vinicius; Monteiro, Isabela; Taira, Fabio; Esteves, Veronica; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    On a global scale, the atmosphere is an important source of nutrients, as well as pollutants, because of its interfaces with soil and water. Important compounds in the gaseous phase are in both organic and inorganic forms, such as organic acids, nitrogen, sulfur and chloride. In spite of the species in gas form, a huge number of process, anthropogenic and natural, are able to form aerosols, which may be transported over long distances. Sulfates e nitrates are responsible for rain acidity; they may also increase the solubility of organic compounds and metals making them more bioavailable, and also can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aerosol samples (PM2.5) were collected in a rural and industrial area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in order to quantify chemical species and evaluate anthropogenic influences in secondary aerosol formation and organic compounds. Samples were collected during 24 h every six days using a high-volume sampler from August 2010 to July 2011. The aerosol mass was determined by Gravimetry. The water-soluble ionic composition (WSIC) was obtained by Ion Chromatography in order to determine the major anions (NO3-, SO4= and Cl-); total water-soluble carbon (TWSC) was determined by a TOC analyzer. The average aerosol (PM2.5) concentrations ranged from 1 to 43 ug/m3 in the industrial site and from 4 to 35 ug/m3 in the rural area. Regarding anions, the highest concentrations were measured for SO42- (10.6 μg/m3-12.6 μg/m3); where the lowest value was found in the rural site and the highest in the industrial. The concentrations for NO3- and Cl- ranged from 4.2 μg/m3 to 9.3 μg/m3 and 3.1 μg/m3 to 6.4 μg /m3, respectively. Sulfate was the major species and, like nitrate, it is related to photooxidation in the atmosphere. Interestingly sulfate concentrations were higher during the dry period and could be related to photochemistry activity. The correlations between nitrate and non-sea-salt sulfate were weak, suggesting different sources for these

  5. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of total carbon, dicarboxylic acids and glyoxylic acid in the tropical Indian aerosols: Implications for sources and photochemical processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Swaminathan, T.; Tachibana, Eri

    2011-09-01

    The tropical Indian aerosols (PM10) collected on day- and nighttime bases in winter and summer, 2007 from Chennai (13.04°N; 80.17°E) were studied for stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of total carbon (TC), individual dicarboxylic acids (C2-C9) and glyoxylic acid (ωC2). δ13C values of TC ranged from -23.9‰ to -25.9‰ (-25.0 ± 0.6‰; n = 49). Oxalic (C2) (-17.1 ± 2.5‰), malonic (C3) (-20.8 ± 1.8‰), succinic (C4) (-22.5 ± 1.5‰) and adipic (C6) (-20.6 ± 4.1‰) acids and ωC2 acid (-22.4 ± 5.5‰) were found to be more enriched with 13C compared to TC. In contrast, suberic (C8) (-29.4 ± 1.8‰), phthalic (Ph) (-30.1 ± 3.5‰) and azelaic (C9) (-28.4 ± 5.8‰) acids showed smaller δ13C values than TC. Based on comparisons of δ13C values of TC in Chennai aerosols to those (-24.7 ± 2.2‰) found in unburned cow-dung samples collected from Chennai and isotopic signatures of the particles emitted from point sources, we found that biofuel/biomass burning are the major sources of carbonaceous aerosols in South and Southeast Asia. The decrease in δ13C values of C9 diacid by about 5‰ from winter to summer suggests that tropical plant emissions also significantly contribute to organic aerosol in this region. Significant increase in δ13C values from C4 to C2 diacids in Chennai aerosols could be attributed for their photochemical processing in the tropical atmosphere during long-range transport from source regions.

  6. Contribution of Brown Carbon to Total Aerosol Absorption in Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. N.; Moosakutty, S. P.; Bergin, M.; Vreeland, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in earth's radiative balance by absorbing and scattering light. We report physical and optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) for 60 days during 2014-15 winter season. Mass concentration and size distribution of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) were measured in real time using Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) and High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) respectively. Optical properties of aerosols at atmospheric and denuded (heated at 300 ˚C) conditions were also measured using 3 wavelength Photo Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS 3). Analysis shows large scale carbonaceous aerosol loading during winter season in IGP. Multiple biomass burning events combined with trash burning contributed to this high loading along with very low boundary layer height. An inter-comparison shows that Aethalometer over estimates BC by a factor of 3 when compared with that of SP 2 measurement. Enhancement in absorption (Eabs) defined as the ratio of atmospheric absorption to denuded absorption shows presence of absorbing organics known as brown carbon (BrC). Optical closure performed between denuded aerosol absorption measured by PASS 3 and Mie theory derived absorption using SP 2 BC size distribution showed a difference of only 30 % at 781 nm. This difference might be due to the non-spherical shape and presence of residual coating on BC. Refractive index of BrC at 405 and 532 nm were derived using optical closure method for the entire sampling period. Overall results indicates that the impact of BrC on optical absorption is significant in areas dominated by biomass burning such as IGP and such effects needs to be considered in global aerosol modelling studies.

  7. Diurnal variations of total carbon, dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids and α-dicarbonyls in aerosols in the northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, N.; Kawamura, K.; Okuzawa, K.; Kanaya, Y.; Wang, Z. F.

    2013-06-01

    Aerosol samples (TSP, n=58) were collected on day- and night-time basis at Mangshan in the north of Beijing, China in autumn 2007 to better understand the status of air quality and the influence of urban pollutants in the northern vicinity of Beijing. The samples were analyzed for aerosol mass, total carbon (TC), low molecular weight α, ω-dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12), ketoacids (ωC2-ωC9, pyruvic acid), α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal), as well as aromatic (phthalic, iso- and tere-phthalic) diacids. Aerosol mass and TC concentrations are higher in daytime than in nighttime. TC/aerosol mass ratios in this study are lower than those reported in megacities in East Asia, but higher than those reported in marine aerosols. Molecular distributions of diacids demonstrated that oxalic (C2) acid was the most abundant species, comprising 38-77% of total diacids, followed by succinic (C4) and malonic (C3) acids. For most compounds, the concentrations were higher in daytime than nighttime, indicating that diacids are produced in daytime by photochemical oxidation of organic precursors emitted from anthropogenic sources in Beijing during the transport to Mangshan area by the northward wind. However, we found that C2 concentrations are higher in nighttime than in daytime. A positive correlation of C2 to glyoxylic acid (ωC2) was obtained at night when relative humidity increased up to 100%, suggesting that aqueous phase production of C2 occurs in nighttime via the oxidation of ωC2. Depletion of C2 by photolysis of Fe-oxalato complexes might be another reason for the lower concentrations of C2 in daytime samples. High phthalic acid/C4 ratios in the aerosol samples suggest that automobile combustion and coal burning products are important sources, which are subjected to photochemical oxidation during the atmospheric transport of urban aerosols from Beijing. In contrast, higher concentrations of methylglyoxal in nighttime than daytime may suggest that isoprene emitted

  8. Contribution of methane to aerosol carbon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, F.; Barmet, P.; Stirnweis, L.; El Haddad, I.; Platt, S. M.; Saurer, M.; Lötscher, C.; Siegwolf, R.; Bigi, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Slowik, J. G.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.

    2016-09-01

    Small volatile organic compounds (VOC) such as methane (CH4) have long been considered non-relevant to aerosol formation due to the high volatility of their oxidation products. However, even low aerosol yields from CH4, the most abundant VOC in the atmosphere, would contribute significantly to the total particulate carbon budget. In this study, organic aerosol (OA) mass yields from CH4 oxidation were evaluated at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) smog chamber in the presence of inorganic and organic seed aerosols. Using labeled 13C methane, we could detect its oxidation products in the aerosol phase, with yields up to 0.09

  9. Black carbon in aerosol during BIBLE B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liley, J. Ben; Baumgardner, D.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Blake, D. R.; Koike, M.; Machida, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kawakami, S.; Shirai, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2002-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment (BIBLE) A and B campaigns over the tropical western Pacific during springtime deployed a Gulfstream-II aircraft with systems to measure ozone and numerous precursor species. Aerosol measuring systems included a MASP optical particle counter, a condensation nucleus (CN) counter, and an absorption spectrometer for black carbon. Aerosol volume was very low in the middle and upper troposphere during both campaigns, and during BIBLE A, there was little aerosol enhancement in the boundary layer away from urban areas. In BIBLE B, there was marked aerosol enhancement in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere. Mixing ratios of CN in cloud-free conditions in the upper troposphere were in general higher than in the boundary layer, indicating new particle formation from gaseous precursors. High concentrations of black carbon were observed during BIBLE B, with mass loadings up to 40 μg m-3 representing as much as one quarter of total aerosol mass. Strong correlations with hydrocarbon enhancement allow the determination of a black carbon emission ratio for the fires at that time. Expressed as elemental carbon, it is about 0.5% of carbon dioxide and 6% of carbon monoxide emissions from the same fires, comparable to methane production, and greater than that of other hydrocarbons.

  10. Black carbon in aerosol during BIBLE B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liley, J. Ben; Baumgardner, D.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Blake, D. R.; Koike, M.; Machida, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kawakami, S.; Shirai, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2003-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment (BIBLE) A and B campaigns over the tropical western Pacific during springtime deployed a Gulfstream-II aircraft with systems to measure ozone and numerous precursor species. Aerosol measuring systems included a MASP optical particle counter, a condensation nucleus (CN) counter, and an absorption spectrometer for black carbon. Aerosol volume was very low in the middle and upper troposphere during both campaigns, and during BIBLE A, there was little aerosol enhancement in the boundary layer away from urban areas. In BIBLE B, there was marked aerosol enhancement in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere. Mixing ratios of CN in cloud-free conditions in the upper troposphere were in general higher than in the boundary layer, indicating new particle formation from gaseous precursors. High concentrations of black carbon were observed during BIBLE B, with mass loadings up to 40 μg m-3 representing as much as one quarter of total aerosol mass. Strong correlations with hydrocarbon enhancement allow the determination of a black carbon emission ratio for the fires at that time. Expressed as elemental carbon, it is about 0.5% of carbon dioxide and 6% of carbon monoxide emissions from the same fires, comparable to methane production, and greater than that of other hydrocarbons.

  11. Stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.

    I use a general circulation model of Earth's climate to simulate stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols, varying the altitude of injection, initial particle size, and whether the deposited black carbon modifies ground albedo. 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols injected into the stratosphere each year will cause significant enough surface cooling to negate anthropogenic warming if the aerosols are small (r=0.03 mum) or if the aerosols are injected into the middle stratosphere, although using small aerosols causes large regional cooling effects that would be catastrophic to agriculture. The aerosols cause significant stratospheric heating, resulting in stratospheric ozone destruction and circulation changes, most notably an increase in the Northern Hemisphere polar jet, which forms an Arctic ozone hole and forces a positive mode of the Arctic Oscillation. The hydrologic cycle is perturbed, specifically the summer monsoon system of India, Africa, and East Asia, resulting in monsoon precipitation collapse. Global primary productivity is decreased by 35.5% for the small particle case. Surface cooling causes some sea ice regrowth, but not at statistically significant levels. All of these climate impacts are exacerbated for small particle geoengineering, with high altitude geoengineering with the default particle size (r=0.08 mum) causing a reasonable amount of cooling, and large particle (r=0.15 mum) geoengineering or particle injection into the lower stratosphere causing few of these effects. The modification of ground albedo by the soot particles slightly perturbs the radiative budget but does not cause any distinguishable climate effects. The cheapest means we investigated for placing 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols into the stratosphere by diesel fuel combustion would cost 1.4 trillion initially and 541 billion annual, or 2.0% and 0.8% of GDP, respectively. The additional carbon dioxide released from combusting diesel to produce these aerosols is about 1

  12. Total organic carbon analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  13. Black carbon aerosol mixing state, organic aerosols and aerosol optical properties over the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Morgan, W. T.; Flynn, M.; Highwood, E. J.; Turnbull, K.; Haywood, J.; Coe, H.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb sunlight thereby leading to a positive radiative forcing and a warming of climate and can also impact human health through their impact on the respiratory system. The state of mixing of BC with other aerosol species, particularly the degree of internal/external mixing, has been highlighted as a major uncertainty in assessing its radiative forcing and hence its climate impact, but few in situ observations of mixing state exist. We present airborne single particle soot photometer (SP2) measurements of refractory BC (rBC) mass concentrations and mixing state coupled with aerosol composition and optical properties measured in urban plumes and regional pollution over the United Kingdom. All data were obtained using instrumentation flown on the UK's BAe-146-301 large Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA) operated by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM). We measured sub-micron aerosol composition using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and used positive matrix factorization to separate hydrocarbon-like (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). We found a higher number fraction of thickly coated rBC particles in air masses with large OOA relative to HOA, higher ozone-to-nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratios and large concentrations of total sub-micron aerosol mass relative to rBC mass concentrations. The more ozone- and OOA-rich air masses were associated with transport from continental Europe, while plumes from UK cities had higher HOA and NOx and fewer thickly coated rBC particles. We did not observe any significant change in the rBC mass absorption efficiency calculated from rBC mass and light absorption coefficients measured by a particle soot absorption photometer despite observing significant changes in aerosol composition and rBC mixing state. The contributions of light scattering and absorption to total extinction (quantified by the single scattering albedo; SSA) did change for different air masses, with lower SSA

  14. Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

    2009-09-25

    Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

  15. Carbonaceous aerosols influencing atmospheric radiation: Black and organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Carbonaceous particles in the atmosphere may both scatter and absorb solar radiation. The fraction associated with the absorbing component is generally referred to as black carbon (BC) and is mainly produced from incomplete combustion processes. The fraction associated with condensed organic compounds is generally referred to as organic carbon (OC) or organic matter and is mainly scattering. Absorption of solar radiation by carbonaceous aerosols may heat the atmosphere, thereby altering the vertical temperature profile, while scattering of solar radiation may lead to a net cooling of the atmosphere/ocean system. Carbonaceous aerosols may also enhance the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the fine particle (D < 2.5 {mu}m) source rates of both OC and BC. The source rates for anthropogenic organic aerosols may be as large as the source rates for anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, suggesting a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The role of BC in decreasing the amount of reflected solar radiation by OC and sulfates is discussed. The total estimated forcing depends on the source estimates for organic and black carbon aerosols which are highly uncertain. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is also described.

  16. Relative Contributions of Fossil and Contemporary Carbon sources to PM 2.5 Aerosols at Nine IMPROVE Network Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G; Fallon, S; Schichtel, B; Malm, W; McDade, C

    2006-06-26

    Particulate matter aerosols contribute to haze diminishing vistas and scenery at National Parks and Wilderness Areas within the United States. To increase understanding of the sources of carbonaceous aerosols at these settings, the total carbon loading and {sup 14}C/C ratio of PM 2.5 aerosols at nine IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring for Protection Of Visual Environments) network sites were measured. Aerosols were collected weekly in the summer and winter at one rural site, two urban sites, five sites located in National Parks and one site located in a Wildlife Preserve. The carbon measurements together with the absence of {sup 14}C in fossil carbon materials and the known {sup 14}C/C levels in contemporary carbon materials were used to derive contemporary and fossil carbon contents of the particulate matter. Contemporary and fossil carbon aerosol loadings varied across the sites and suggest different percentages of carbon source inputs. The urban sites had the highest fossil carbon loadings that comprised around 50% of the total carbon aerosol loading. The Wildlife Preserve and National Park sites together with the rural site had much lower fossil carbon loading components. At these sites, variations in the total carbon aerosol loading were dominated by non-fossil carbon sources. This suggests that reduction of anthroprogenic sources of fossil carbon aerosols may result in little decrease in carbonaceous aerosol loading at many National Parks and rural areas.

  17. Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    2002-05-10

    Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

  18. Black carbon aerosol size in snow.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, J P; Gao, R S; Perring, A E; Spackman, J R; Fahey, D W

    2013-01-01

    The effect of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) aerosol on snow is of enduring interest due to its consequences for climate forcing. Until now, too little attention has been focused on BC's size in snow, an important parameter affecting BC light absorption in snow. Here we present first observations of this parameter, revealing that BC can be shifted to larger sizes in snow than are typically seen in the atmosphere, in part due to the processes associated with BC removal from the atmosphere. Mie theory analysis indicates a corresponding reduction in BC absorption in snow of 40%, making BC size in snow the dominant source of uncertainty in BC's absorption properties for calculations of BC's snow albedo climate forcing. The shift reduces estimated BC global mean snow forcing by 30%, and has scientific implications for our understanding of snow albedo and the processing of atmospheric BC aerosol in snowfall.

  19. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes: sampling criteria and aerosol characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Stone, Samuel; Cumpston, Jared L.; Friend, Sherri; Porter, Dale W.; Castranova, Vincent; Frazer, David G.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to develop protocols for sampling and characterizing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) aerosols in workplaces or during inhalation studies. Manufactured dry powder containing MWCNT’s, combined with soot and metal catalysts, form complex morphologies and diverse shapes. The aerosols, examined in this study, were produced using an acoustical generator. Representative samples were collected from an exposure chamber using filters and a cascade impactor for microscopic and gravimetric analyses. Results from filters showed that a density of 0.008–0.10 particles per µm2 filter surface provided adequate samples for particle counting and sizing. Microscopic counting indicated that MWCNT’s, resuspended at a concentration of 10 mg/m3, contained 2.7 × 104 particles/cm3. Each particle structure contained an average of 18 nanotubes, resulting in a total of 4.9 × 105 nanotubes/cm3. In addition, fibrous particles within the aerosol had a count median length of 3.04 µm and a width of 100.3 nm, while the isometric particles had a count median diameter of 0.90 µm. A combination of impactor and microscopic measurements established that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the mixture was 1.5 µm. It was also determined that the mean effective density of well-defined isometric particles was between 0.71 and 0.88 g/cm3, and the mean shape factor of individual nanotubes was between 1.94 and 2.71. The information obtained from this study can be used for designing animal inhalation exposure studies and adopted as guidance for sampling and characterizing MWCNT aerosols in workplaces. The measurement scheme should be relevant for any carbon nanotube aerosol. PMID:23033994

  20. Determining total carbon in hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Procedure incorporates modified pyrolysis train. Samples are vaporized before entering furnace to be pyrolyzed at 850 C + or - 25 C. Direct collection of pyrolyzed gas reduces loss of carbon dioxide. Infrared spectroscopy can be used to analyze samples for carbon dioxide content.

  1. Wet Removal of Organic and Black Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, A.; Bond, T. C.; Lehmann, C.

    2012-12-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) aerosols derived from the combustion of fossil fuels and biomass are significant atmospheric pollutants that alter the Earth's radiation balance and affect human health. Carbonaceous aerosol lifetime and extent of its effects are mainly controlled by its wet removal, especially by rain. Limited work has been done to measure both BC and OC from rain events even though these aerosols are co-emitted and exist together in the atmosphere. The choices of analytical techniques for measuring OC and BC in water are limited, and researchers often employ the same techniques used for measuring atmospheric carbon particles. There is no agreement in the methods employed for monitoring carbon concentration in precipitation. As part of the method development, the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Thermal-Optical Analysis (TOA), Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/VIS) Spectrophotometer, and the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzer were evaluated for measuring BC suspended in water, water insoluble OC (WIOC) and dissolved OC (DOC). The study also monitored the concentration of BC, WIOC, and DOC in rainwater collected at Bondville (Illinois) for 18 months. Results indicated that 34% (±3%) of the BC mass was lost in the SP2 analysis, most probably during the nebulization process. Filtration required for TOA also had large losses (>75%) because quartz fiber filters were ineffective for capturing BC particles from water. Addition of NH4H2PO4 as a coagulant improved (>95%) the capture efficiency of the filters. UV/VIS spectrophotometry had good linearity, but the sensitivity for detecting BC particles (±20 μg/L) suspended in water was inadequate. TOC analysis was a robust technique for measuring both DOC and total carbon (BC + OC). The chosen techniques were TOC analysis for DOC, and TOA with an optimized filtration procedure for BC and WIOC. The mean concentrations in rainwater were 8.72 (±9.84) μg/L of BC, 88.97 (±62.64) μg/L of WIOC, and 1

  2. Error in total ozone measurements arising from aerosol attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. W. L.; Basher, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A generalized least squares method for deducing both total ozone and aerosol extinction spectrum parameters from Dobson spectrophotometer measurements was developed. An error analysis applied to this system indicates that there is little advantage to additional measurements once a sufficient number of line pairs have been employed to solve for the selected detail in the attenuation model. It is shown that when there is a predominance of small particles (less than about 0.35 microns in diameter) the total ozone from the standard AD system is too high by about one percent. When larger particles are present the derived total ozone may be an overestimate or an underestimate but serious errors occur only for narrow polydispersions.

  3. Inorganic markers, carbonaceous components and stable carbon isotope from biomass burning aerosols in northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F.; Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-12-01

    To better characterize the sources of fine particulate matter (i.e. PM2.5) in Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China, aerosol chemical composition such total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and inorganic ions were studied as well as stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. Intensively open biomass burning episodes were identified from late September to early October by satellite fire and aerosol optical depth maps. During the biomass burning episodes, concentrations of PM2.5, OC, EC, and WSOC increased by a factor of 4-12 compared to non-biomass-burning periods. Non-sea-salt potassium is strongly correlated with PM2.5, OC, EC and WSOC, suggesting an important contribution of biomass burning emission. The enrichment in both the non-sea-salt potassium and chlorine is significantly larger than other inorganic species, indicating that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly fresh and less aged. In addition, WSOC to OC ratio is relatively lower compared to that reported in biomass burning aerosols in tropical regions, supporting that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly primary and secondary organic aerosols is not significant. A lower average δ13C value (-26.2‰) is found for the biomass-burning aerosols, suggesting a dominant contribution from combustion of C3 plants in the studied region.

  4. Carbon isotope based aerosol source apportionment in Eastern European city Vilnius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Sapolaite, Justina; Garbariene, Inga; Ezerinskis, Zilvinas; Pocevicius, Matas; Krikscikas, Laurynas; Jacevicius, Sarunas; Plukis, Arturas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2016-04-01

    We present carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment results in Eastern European city Vilnius (capital of Lithuania) using stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) and radiocarbon (14C) methods. The aerosol sampling campaigns were performed in 2014-2016 winter seasons in Vilnius. PM1 particles were collected on quartz fiber filters using high volume sampler, while PM10 and size segregated aerosol particles were collected using low volume and MOUDI 128 cascade impactor respectively. δ13C values were measured with EA-IRMS system while radiocarbon analysis was performed using Single Stage Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (SSAMS). For the AMS analysis, filters (or aluminium foils from cascade impactor) were graphitized using Automated Graphitization Equipment. It was estimated that dominant carbonaceous aerosol source in Vilnius was of biogenic/biomass origin (60-90 %). Fossil fuel sources accounted for up to 23 % of total carbon fraction. Combining stable carbon and radiocarbon isotope analysis we were able to quantify the amount of coal derived aerosol particles. The contribution of coal burning emissions were up to 14 %. We will present the applicability of dual carbon (13C and 14C) isotope ratio method for the aerosol source apportionment in different regions of Europe, also the perspectives of using MOUDI cascade impactors to make source apportionment in size segregated aerosol particles.

  5. Emissions of Black Carbon Aerosols from Alaskan Boreal Forest Wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Fahrni, S. M.; Rogers, B. M.; Wiggins, E. B.; Santos, G.; Czimczik, C. I.; Randerson, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    Boreal wildfires are a major source of carbonaceous aerosols. Emissions from wildfires in Alaska represent ~ 33% of all open biomass combustion emissions of black carbon (BC) in the United States. BC contributes to atmospheric warming and accelerates melting of ice and snow. With fire frequency and burned area projected to increase in boreal regions, BC has the potential to become an important positive feedback to climate change. Quantifying the emissions, constraining the sources and better understanding the transportation patterns of BC to the polar regions are therefore critical for constraining the strength of this feedback. We present results from direct measurements of BC from wildfires in Alaska during the summer of 2013 collected as a part of NASA's Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) campaign. Fine aerosol particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected at two locations: Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed and Delta Junction Agricultural and Forestry Experimental Site. Using a Sunset OCEC analyzer, we separated BC from organic carbon aerosols, measured concentrations and analyzed the radiocarbon (14C) content with accelerator mass spectrometry. We also analyzed the total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) elemental and stable isotope composition of the bulk PM2.5 with EA-IRMS. We compared the temporal dynamics of BC concentrations and isotopic composition with active fire/thermal anomaly information from MODIS. Our results show that boreal forest fire emissions in interior Alaska increased BC concentrations by up to an order of magnitude above background levels. The mean Δ14C value of fire-emitted BC was 120‰ with a range of +99‰ to +149‰ after correcting for contributions from background BC. This range was in good agreement with measurements of the depth of burn in soil organic carbon layers from interior wildland fires, and Δ14C profiles. High fire periods also corresponded to elevated C:N ratios. The δ15N of the aerosols was

  6. Impact of Black Carbon Aerosols on Regional Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, S.; Hansen, J.; Nazarenko, L.; Luo, Y.

    2002-12-01

    We have evaluated the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on the regional climates of China and India: regions where aerosol emissions have been increasing at an alarming rate. We use the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model to perform simulations that investigate recent trends in summer precipitation observed over China - North drought, South flooding - considered to be the largest observed in several decades. We perform several simulations to differentiate between the climate effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols and use realistic aerosol distributions obtained from measurements over China, India and the Indian Ocean. The trends in precipitation as well as the summer time surface cooling over China and India have been captured by using aerosols that have a low single scatter albedo (0.85), i.e., by assuming that the aerosols are mostly absorbing. Since black carbon aerosols are absorbing aerosols and cause surface cooling with heating at the top of the atmosphere and in the lower troposphere, the change in the vertical temperature profile causes changes in the large-scale vertical velocity fields, latent heating, convective activity and cloud cover. This change in the large-scale circulation may explain some of the changes in the precipitation and temperature trends observed over China and India in recent decades. Our results suggest that black carbon aerosols can have a significant influence on regional climate through changes in the hydrological cycle and large-scale circulation.

  7. Atmospheric Aerosol Investigation In Vilnius using Stable Carbon Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, Agne; Garbaras, Andrius; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2013-04-01

    The effects of aerosols on the atmosphere, climate, and public health are among the central topics in current environmental research. Spatially urban air pollution is a major public concern world-wide.In this study the results of experimental research are presented, the basis of which is the investigation of 13C/12C variations δ13C of stable carbon isotopes in total carbonaceous aerosols in Vilnius city, Lithuania. The main aim of the work is to identify the origin of carbonaceous aerosols. Two autumns and one spring sampling campaign were designed with the aim to determine the changes in the air caused by the beginning/end of the heating season. The experiment was performed during several sampling periods. The first period lasted from 26 November to 06 December 2010. The second was from 04 April to 16 May 2011. The third was from 12 to 29 October 2012. Atmospheric aerosols, according to their aerodynamic diameters, were collected with an eleven-stage impactor "MOUDI". The stages have 50% aerodynamic diameter cut-offs of 18.0, 10.0, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.18, 0.1 and 0.056 μm, for stages 1-11, respectively. The analysis proceeds essentially in two stages. In the first, MOUDI foils were analyzed with EA-IRMS (FlashEA 1112 coupled to ThermoFinnigan Delta Plus Advantage). Half of the foil was measured directly (TC δ13C values). The rest was heated in the oven (400 °C) to remove organic part and measured EC+CC δ13C values (carbonates were not removed with acid). During the second stage of the analysis, corrections are made and OC δ13C values were calculated using isotopic balance equation: . As the main aim of the study was to identify the origin of incoming carbonaceous aerosols, air mass back trajectories were calculated using the HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model.

  8. Measurement of contemporary and fossil carbon contents of PM 2.5 aerosols: results from Turtleback Dome, Yosemite National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G

    2003-10-17

    The impact of aerosol particulate matter of mean mass aerodynamic diameter {le} 2.5 {proportional_to}m (PM 2.5 aerosols), on health, visibility, and compliance with EPA's regional haze regulations is a growing concern. Techniques that can help better characterize particulate matter are required to better understand the constituents, causes and sources of PM 2.5 aerosols. Measurement of the {sup 14}C/C ratio of the PM 2.5 aerosols, the absence of {sup 14}C in fossil carbon materials and the known {sup 14}C/C levels in contemporary carbon materials allows use of a two-component model to derive contemporary and fossil carbon contents of the particulate matter. Such data can be used to estimate the relative contributions of fossil fuels and biogenic aerosols to the total aerosol loading. Here, the methodology for performing such an assessment using total suspended particulate Hi-vol aerosol samplers to collect PM 2.5 aerosols on quartz fiber filters and the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry to measure {sup 14}C/C ratios is presented and illustrated using PM 2.5 aerosols collected at Yosemite National Park.

  9. Bioactive and total endotoxins in atmospheric aerosols in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jessica Y. W.; Hui, Esther L. C.; Lau, Arthur P. S.

    2012-02-01

    Endotoxin, a toxic and pyrogenic substance in gram-negative bacteria in atmospheric aerosols was measured over a period of one year at Nansha, Guangzhou and Hong Kong in the Pearl River Delta region, China. Atmospheric aerosols were collected by high-volume samplers. The bioactive endotoxin levels in the samples were determined using the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay after extraction with pyrogen-free water while the total endotoxin levels were measured by quantifying the biomarker, 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OHFAs) with GC-MS. Results showed that there was no significant difference (0.19 < p < 0.81) in the bioactive endotoxin level in PM 10 among sites (average concentrations ranged from 0.34 to 0.39 EU m -3). However, Hong Kong showed a significantly lower ( p < 0.05) total endotoxin level in PM 10 (average of 17.4 ng m -3) compared with Nansha's 29.4 ng m -3 and Guangzhou's 32.7 ng m -3. The bioactive endotoxins were found to be associated with the coarse mode (PM 2.5-10) of the particulates of natural origins while the total endotoxins were associated more with the fine mode (PM 2.5) of the particulates of anthropogenic origins. When normalized with particulate mass, the endotoxin loading is much higher in summer as a result of the increased growth of the bacteria when climatic conditions are favorable. The chemically determined total endotoxins were 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than the bioactive endotoxins quantified using the LAL assay. Correlation analyses between the bioactive endotoxins and 3-OHFAs with different carbon length were analyzed. Results showed that the correlations detected vary among sites and particulate sizes. Although no generalization between the total and bioactive endotoxins can be drawn from the study, the levels reported in this study suggests that the discrepancies between the two measurement approaches, and the bioactive potential of 3-OHFAs with individual carbon chains deserve further investigation.

  10. Light Absorption of Brown Carbon Aerosol in the Pearl River Delta Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    X.F. Huang, J.F. Yuan, L.M. Cao, J. Cui, C.N. Huang, Z.J. Lan and L.Y. He Key Laboratory for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055, ChinaCorresponding author. Tel.: +86 755 26032532; fax: +86 755 26035332. E-mail address: huangxf@pku.edu.cn (X. F. Huang). Abstract: The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol has been recognized in recent decades. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) of ambient aerosol was widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of brown carbon at shorter wavelengths, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to unit. In this study, the AAE method was improved by statistical extrapolation based on ambient measurements in the polluted seasons in typical urban and rural areas in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. A three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the ambient measured AAE and the ratio of organic aerosol to BC aerosol, in order to extract the more realistic AAE by pure BC aerosol, which were found to be 0.86, 0.82 and 1.02 at 405nm and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 at 532nm in the campaigns of urban-winter, urban-fall, and rural-fall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiment results further supported the effectiveness of the obtained AAE for pure BC aerosol. In addition, biomass burning experiments proved higher spectral dependence of more-BrC environment and further verified the reliability of the instruments' response. Then, the average light absorption contribution of BrC aerosol was calculated to be 11.7, 6.3 and 12.1% (with total relative uncertainty of 7.5, 6.9 and 10.0%) at 405nm and 10.0, 4.1 and 5.5% (with total relative uncertainty of 6.5, 8.6 and 15.4%) at 532nm of the three campaigns, respectively. These results indicate that the

  11. Simulation of the radiative effect of black carbon aerosols and the regional climate responses over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Jiang, Weimei; Fu, Congbin; Su, Bingkai; Liu, Hongnian; Tang, Jianping

    2004-08-01

    As part of the development work of the Chinese new regional climate model (RIEMS), the radiative process of black carbon (BC) aerosols has been introduced into the original radiative procedures of RIEMS, and the transport model of BC aerosols has also been established and combined with the RIEMS model. Using the new model system, the distribution of black carbon aerosols and their radiative effect over the China region are investigated. The influences of BC aerosole on the atmospheric radiative transfer and on the air temperature, land surface temperature, and total rainfall are analyzed. It is found that BC aerosols induce a positive radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), which is dominated by shortwave radiative forcing. The maximum radiative forcing occurs in North China in July and in South China in April. At the same time, negative radiative forcing is observed on the surface. Based on the radiative forcing comparison between clear sky and cloudy sky, it is found that cloud can enforce the TOA positive radiative forcing and decrease the negative surface radiative forcing. The responses of the climate system in July to the radiative forcing due to BC aerosols are the decrease in the air temperature in the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River and Huaihe area and most areas of South China, and the weak increase or decrease in air temperature over North China. The total rainfall in the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River area is increased, but it decreased in North China in July.

  12. Climate Effects of Black Carbon Aerosols in China and India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Surabi; Hansen, James; Nazarenko, Larissa; Luo, Yunfeng

    2002-09-01

    In recent decades, there has been a tendency toward increased summer floods in south China, increased drought in north China, and moderate cooling in China and India while most of the world has been warming. We used a global climate model to investigate possible aerosol contributions to these trends. We found precipitation and temperature changes in the model that were comparable to those observed if the aerosols included a large proportion of absorbing black carbon (``soot''), similar to observed amounts. Absorbing aerosols heat the air, alter regional atmospheric stability and vertical motions, and affect the large-scale circulation and hydrologic cycle with significant regional climate effects.

  13. A study on the temporal and spatial variability of absorbing aerosols using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2009-05-01

    Absorbing aerosols, especially mineral dust and black carbon, play key roles in climate change by absorbing solar radiation, heating the atmosphere, and contributing to global warming. In this paper, we first examine the consistency of the Aerosol Index (AI) product as measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) instruments and then analyze these AI data sets to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of UV absorbing aerosols. In contrast to the trend in aerosol optical depth found in the advanced very high-resolution radiometer data, no obvious long-term trend in absorbing aerosols is observed from the time series of AI records. The comparison between the mean annual cycle in the two data sets shows that the cycles agree very well both globally and regionally, indicating a consistency between the AI products from TOMS and OMI. Varimax rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of detrended, deseasonalized AI data proves to be successful in isolating major dust and biomass burning source regions, as well as dust transport. Finally, we find that large, individual events, such as the Kuwait oil fire and Australian smoke plum, are isolated in individual higher-order principal components.

  14. Comparison of methods for the quantification of carbonate carbon in atmospheric PM10 aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Nicole; Schmidl, Christoph; Marr, Iain L.; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    Carbonate carbon (CC) represents an important fraction of atmospheric PM10 along with organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), if specific sources (e.g. street abrasion, construction sites, desert dust) contribute to its composition. However, analytical methods for an easy and unambiguous determination of CC in atmospheric aerosols collected on filter matrices are scarce. We propose here a method for the determination of CC based on a heating pretreatment of the sample to remove OC and EC, followed by a total carbon determination to measure CC. This procedure is used for the correction of EC also determined by a heating pretreatment (Cachier, H., Bremond, M.P., Buat-Ménard, P., 1989. Determination of atmospheric soot carbon with a simple thermal method. Tellus 41B, 379-390) but without previous HCl fumigation, as proposed. Comparison of the carbon remaining after the proposed thermal treatment at 460 °C for 60 min in an oxygen stream showed good correlation for the carbonate carbon derived by calculation from the ionic balance for ambient air and street dust samples. Using the "three step" combustion technique it is now possible to determine OC, EC and CC by the use of a TC analyser in the concentration range of 2-200 μg carbon per sample aliquot, with good precision (3-5% RSD for TC and 5-10% for CC) and accuracy. In ambient air samples from a sampling site in Vienna with elevated PM10 levels ("Liesing") CC values as high as 25% of TC and 27% CO 32-; for street dust samples 32% of TC and 25% CO 32- of total PM10 mass were observed.

  15. Characterization of the Sunset Semi-Continuous Carbon Aerosol Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Jace J.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cary, R.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2009-07-01

    Accurate quantification of carbonaceous aerosols is essential for reducing uncertainty in climate change models and is important for long-term air quality monitoring by government agencies. The field-deployable Sunset Semi-Continuous Organic Carbon/Elemental Carbon Aerosol Analyzer (Sunset OCEC) utilizes a modified National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health thermal-optical method to determine total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) at near real-time; however, its performance is not yet fully characterized. Two collocated Sunset OCEC Analyzers, Unit A and Unit B, were used to determine the relative standard deviation (RSD) and limit of detection (LOD) between June 23 and July 9, 2007, in Richland, Washington, USA. A high-efficiency particulate air filter was utilized to determine the LODs of both instruments. The RSDs between the two Sunset OCECs were 9.12% for TC, 13.0% for Optical OC, and 8.97% for Thermal OC, indicating good precision between the instruments, although the RSDs for Thermal and Optical EC were higher, 29.0% and 48.3%, respectively. The LOD of Unit A was approximately 0.21 µgC/m3 for TC, Optical OC, and Thermal OC, and ~0.004 µgC/m3 for Optical and Thermal EC. Similarly, Unit B had an LOD of ~0.29 µgC/m3 for TC, Optical OC, and Thermal OC, 0.018 µgC/m3 for Optical EC, and 0.004 µgC/m3 for Thermal EC. Factors that may have contributed to the poor RSDs of Thermal and Optical EC include the low EC mass loading in Richland, minor leakage in the oxygen valve of Unit B, and excessive noise from the non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) laser in Unit B, resulting in scattered Optical EC measurements. Improved RSDs of all OC and EC parameters are expected after the Unit B NDIR is tuned up. Future work should reevaluate the precision of the Sunset OCECs and investigate the differences in various thermal-optical protocols on OCEC quantification.

  16. Fossil and modern sources of aerosol carbon in the Netherlands - A year-long radiocarbon study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Ulrike; Monaco, Mattia; Kappetijn, Arthur; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Szidat, Sönke; Röckmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of the radioactive carbon isotope 14C in aerosols can provide a direct estimate of the contribution of fossil fuel sources to aerosol carbon. In aerosol science, measurements of 14C/12C ratios are usually reported as fraction modern (fm). The radiocarbon signature gives a clear distinction between 'modern' carbon sources (fm around 1.1-1.2 for biomass burning and around 1.05 for biogenic secondary organic aerosol) and 'fossil' carbon sources (fm =0 for primary and secondary formation from fossil fuel combustion). Due to the high cost of 14C analyses very few long-term studies have been conducted to date. The data that will be presented offer a unique insight into the seasonal variation of source contributions to the carbonaceous aerosol in a highly industrialized region. High volume filter samples have been collected roughly twice per month from February 2011 - July 2012 at Cabauw, a rural location in the Netherlands surrounded by major urban centers and highways. This site provides a regional background aerosol contamination in the Netherlands. We report measurements of fm for total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), water insoluble OC (WIOC) and thermally refractory carbon (RC) as a proxy for elemental carbon. The fraction modern of OC lies between 0.65 - 1 and shows only a moderate seasonal variation with highest values in the spring and lowest values in the summer. Elemental carbon is generally dominated by fossil fuel emissions, but shows a distinct seasonal variation with higher contribution of modern sources from November - Mai. This contribution is attributed to wood combustion. It is low when air masses arrive from the ocean and high for air masses with European continental origin, pointing to a main source outside the Netherlands. Water soluble organic carbon is dominated by modern sources throughout the year. For TC concentrations between 1.2 and 8 μg/m3, fm(TC) increases with TC concentration. A Keeling plot implies that synoptic scale

  17. Remote sensing of soot carbon - Part 1: Distinguishing different absorbing aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a method of using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) size distributions and complex refractive indices to retrieve the relative proportion of carbonaceous aerosols and free iron minerals (hematite and goethite). We assume that soot carbon has a spectrally flat refractive index and enhanced imaginary indices at the 440 nm wavelength are caused by brown carbon or hematite. Carbonaceous aerosols can be separated from dust in imaginary refractive index space because 95 % of biomass burning aerosols have imaginary indices greater than 0.0042 at the 675-1020 nm wavelengths, and 95 % of dust has imaginary refractive indices of less than 0.0042 at those wavelengths. However, mixtures of these two types of particles can not be unambiguously partitioned on the basis of optical properties alone, so we also separate these particles by size. Regional and seasonal results are consistent with expectations. Monthly climatologies of fine mode soot carbon are less than 1.0 % by volume for West Africa and the Middle East, but the southern African and South American biomass burning sites have peak values of 3.0 and 1.7 %. Monthly averaged fine mode brown carbon volume fractions have a peak value of 5.8 % for West Africa, 2.1 % for the Middle East, 3.7 % for southern Africa, and 5.7 % for South America. Monthly climatologies of free iron volume fractions show little seasonal variability, and range from about 1.1 to 1.7 % for coarse mode aerosols in all four study regions. Finally, our sensitivity study indicates that the soot carbon retrieval is not sensitive to the component refractive indices or densities assumed for carbonaceous and free iron aerosols, and the retrieval differs by only 15.4 % when these parameters are altered from our chosen baseline values. The total uncertainty of retrieving soot carbon mass is ˜ 50 % (when uncertainty in the AERONET product and mixing state is included in the analysis).

  18. Studies of the aerosol indirect effect from sulfate and black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristjánsson, Jón Egill

    2002-08-01

    The indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosols is investigated using the global climate model National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model Version 3 (NCAR CCM3). Two types of anthropogenic aerosols are considered, i.e., sulfate and black carbon aerosols. The concentrations and horizontal distributions of these aerosols were obtained from simulations with a life-cycle model incorporated into the global climate model. They are then combined with size-segregated background aerosols. The aerosol size distributions are subjected to condensation, coagulation, and humidity swelling. By making assumptions on supersaturation, we determine cloud droplet number concentrations in water clouds. Cloud droplet sizes and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes are in good agreement with satellite observations. Both components of the indirect effect, i.e., the radius and lifetime effects, are computed as pure forcing terms. Using aerosol data for 2000 from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), we find, globally averaged, a 5% decrease in cloud droplet radius and a 5% increase in cloud water path due to anthropogenic aerosols. The largest changes are found over SE Asia, followed by the North Atlantic, Europe, and the eastern United States. This is also the case for the radiative forcing (``indirect effect''), which has a global average of -1.8 W m-2. When the experiment is repeated using data for 2100 from the IPCC A2 scenario, an unchanged globally averaged radiative forcing is found, but the horizontal distribution has been shifted toward the tropics. Sensitivity experiments show that the radius effect is ~3 times as important as the lifetime effect and that black carbon only contributes marginally to the overall indirect effect.

  19. Aerosol water soluble organic nitrogen and carbon over the remote Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Liam; Baker, Alex; Jickels, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting or co-limiting nutrient in large parts of the world's oceans particularly in oligotrophic regions such as gyres. In the open ocean there are two pathways by which new nutrient nitrogen can enter the oligotrophic system: biological nitrogen fixation and atmospheric deposition. Aerosol matter contributes to the latter route via dry and wet deposition, therefore it is important to understand and quantify the nitrogen containing material in aerosols and establish its major sources. Until recently, the organic nitrogen component of aerosol nitrogen was largely ignored, however, it is now known to contribute between 25-30 % of total water soluble nitrogen in aerosols, globally. This organic nitrogen is known to be chemically complex, shows high spatial and temporal variability and a large proportion of it has been shown to be bioavailable. It is important that this material is further quantified and characterised (including its carbon component) to determine its biogeochemical impact. Data gathered from fine and coarse mode aerosol samples collected on three Atlantic cruises (AMT21, AMT22 and ANT26-4) will be presented. Bulk and water soluble organic carbon and nitrogen data will be shown alongside major ion and inorganic nitrogen data. Potential sources of organic nitrogen and carbon material will be evaluated using a combination of inter-component correlations with known tracers and air-parcel back trajectories, allowing estimates of the anthropogenic impact on nutrient deposition to the remote Atlantic Ocean to be made.

  20. Spectroscopic characteristics and organic carbon contents in the aerosols collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, H. J.; Kasaba, T.

    2015-12-01

    Organics in the atmospheric aerosols occupy 20 to 70% of the total mass. Since the proportion of organics is so large that it's important to understand their detailed characteristics. Polymeric compounds called HUmic-Like Substance (HULIS) are known to be present in the atmospheric aerosols. Biomass burning can be a source of HULIS. In this study, atmospheric aerosols were collected at Cape Hedo, a northern tip of Okinawa Island, and we characterized overall features of the organics collected in different seasons. In Okinawa, continental air mass prevails in spring, fall and winter, while maritime air mass from Pacific Ocean prevails in summer. Thus, it is relatively straightforward to identify sources of organics in different seasons. We measured total organic carbon (TOC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) concentrations, and absorbance and fluorescence intensity for the aerosol samples collected during Nov 2012 and July 2014 (n=90). As a result, TOC and WSOC showed almost the same trend, higher concentrations when continental air mass prevailed in fall and winter, while lower concentrations in summer. Percentages of WSOC in TOC accounted for 33-44%. Absorption efficiency, absorbance per 1 ppm organic carbon concentration, of the samples showed higher values in winter and fall, and lower values in summer. Fluorescence efficiency, normalized fluorescence with quinine sulfate per 1 ppm organic carbon concentration, were also different, it is likely that different types of organics were present in the aerosols from different seasons. We are also planning to measure HULIS in the aerosols and will be discussed a link between their contribution and trans-boundary air pollution in Asia.

  1. Attribution of aerosol light absorption to black carbon and volatile aerosols.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rijana; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Ji-Hyoung

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the contribution of volatile aerosols in light-absorption measurement by three filter-based optical instruments [aethalometer, continuous light-absorption photometer (CLAP), and continuous soot monitoring system (COSMOS)] at Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO) from February to June 2012. The aerosol absorption coefficient (σ abs) and the equivalent black carbon (BC) mass concentration (M BC) measured by the aethalometer and CLAP showed good agreement with a difference of 9 %, which is likely due to the instrumental uncertainty. However, σ abs and M BC measured by the COSMOS with a heated inlet were found to be approximately 44 and 49 % lower than those measured by the aethalometer and CLAP under ambient conditions, respectively. This difference can be attributed to the light absorption by the volatile aerosols coexisting with the BC. Even considering inherent observational uncertainty, it suggests that approximately 35-40 % difference in the σ abs and M BC can be contributed by volatile aerosols. Increase in the difference of M BC measured by the aethalometer and COSMOS with the increasing thermal organic carbon (OC) measured by Sunset OC/EC analyzer further suggests that the filter-based optical instruments without the use of a heater are likely to enhance the value of σ abs and M BC, because this sample air may contain both BC and volatile aerosols.

  2. Quantification and radiocarbon source apportionment of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols using the CTO-375 method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zencak, Zdenek; Elmquist, Marie; Gustafsson, Örjan

    To make progress towards linking the atmosphere and biogeosphere parts of the black carbon (BC) cycle, a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO-375), commonly applied for isolating BC from complex geomatrices such as soils, sediments and aquatic particles, was applied to investigate the BC also in atmospheric particles. Concentrations and 14C-based source apportionment of CTO-375 based BC was established for a reference aerosol (NIST RM-8785) and for wintertime aerosols collected in Stockholm and in a Swedish background area. The results were compared with thermal-optical (OC/EC) measurements. For NIST RM-8785, a good agreement was found between the BC CTO-375 concentration and the reported elemental carbon (EC) concentration measured by the "Speciation Trends Network—National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health" method (EC NIOSH) with BC CTO-375 of 0.054±0.002 g g -1 and EC NIOSH of 0.067±0.008 g g -1. In contrast, there was an average factor of ca. 20 difference between BC CTO-375 and EC NIOSH for the ambient Scandinavian wintertime aerosols, presumably reflecting a combination of BC CTO-375 isolating only the recalcitrant soot-BC portion of the BC continuum and the EC NIOSH metric inadvertently including some intrinsically non-pyrogenic organic matter. Isolation of BC CTO-375 with subsequent off-line radiocarbon analysis yielded fraction modern values (fM) for total organic carbon (TOC) of 0.93 (aerosols from a Swedish background area), and 0.58 (aerosols collected in Stockholm); whereas the fM for BC CTO-375 isolates were 1.08 (aerosols from a Swedish background area), and 0.87 (aerosols collected in Stockholm). This radiocarbon-based source apportionment suggests that contribution from biomass combustion to cold-season atmospheric BC CTO-375 in Stockholm was 70% and in the background area 88%.

  3. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Salil; Evans, Katherine J.; Hack, James J.; Truesdale, John

    2013-04-19

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $ W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $W^{-1}m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $ PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  4. Gas and aerosol fluxes. [emphasizing sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques to address the global need for accurate distribution and flux determinations of both man made and natural materials which affect the chemical composition of the atmosphere, the heat budget of the Earth, and the depletion, of stratospheric ozone is considered. Specifically, trace gas fluxes, sea salt aerosol production, and the effect of sea surface microlayer on gas and aerosol fluxes are examined. Volatile sulfur, carbon, nitrogen, and halocarbon compounds are discussed including a statement of the problem associated with each compound or group of compounds, a brief summary of current understanding, and suggestions for needed research.

  5. Springtime carbon emission episodes at the Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-11-01

    In order to investigate the emission of carbonaceous aerosols at the Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected during spring of 2007 and 2008 and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during pollen emission episodes (range: -26.2‰ to -23.5‰, avg. -25.2 ± 0.9‰), approaching those of the airborne pollen (-28.0‰) collected at the Gosan site. Based on a carbon isotope mass balance equation, we found that ~42% of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollen from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. A negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC was obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollen and then transported to the Gosan site. Thermal evolution patterns of organic carbon during the pollen episodes were characterized by high OC evolution in the OC2 temperature step (450 °C). Since thermal evolution patterns of organic aerosols are highly influenced by their molecular weight, they can be used as additional information on the formation of secondary organic aerosols and the effect of aging of organic aerosols during the long-range atmospheric transport and sources of organic aerosols.

  6. Oxygen Isotope Anomaly in the Carbonate Fractions of Aerosols and its Potential to Assess Urban Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abramian, A.; Dominguez, G.; Jackson, T.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    Mineral dust is emitted into the atmosphere from arid regions in Asia yearly, accounting for ~36% of global aerosol emissions, 5900 Tg yr-1 [IPCC 2007]. Increasing anthropogenic emissions and persistent dust emissions not only have reduced the air quality in Asia itself, but are also affecting the pollutant deposition into the Pacific Ocean and air quality in downwind areas. The carbonate component of mineral dust (calcite (CaCO3) and dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2) is particularly reactive and can comprise as much as 30% of the total mineral dust aerosol, depending on the source region [Claquin et al., 1999]. Carbonate can affect atmospheric chemical processes and aerosol characteristics because the acid neutralizing capacity of this species facilitates the heterogeneous conversion of sulphate and nitrate. Understanding heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surface of aerosol particles will lead to a better understanding of the fate and transport of molecules in the troposphere as well as to resolve their role in air quality and pollution. The primary goal of this work is to develop an isotope methodology for carbonates that can be used as a chemical marker for the origin of polluted air plumes and chemical transformation during the long range transport of air masses. We will discuss the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the CO2 released from the fine (< 1 μm) and coarse (> 1 μm) particles collected at two different sites [Mt. Soledad (800 ft) and Scripps Pier, La Jolla, California] and its possible utility as a tracer to identify the long-range transport of aerosol from local pollution events. The degree of urban influence of sampled air parcels at each site was quantified through back-trajectory analysis of NOAA HYSPLIT output data. Interestingly, the isotopes of oxygen did not follow standard mass dependent relationship (δ17O ~ 0.52 δ18O) rather have excess 17O (Δ17O = δ17O- 0.52δ18O) ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 per mil. A highly significant correlation (r2

  7. Black carbon (soot) aerosol in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Blake, D. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Hansen, A. D. A.; Verma, S.; Kato, K.

    1992-01-01

    As determined by impactor samplers flown on ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, black carbon aerosol (BCA) mass loadings in the stratosphere average 0.6 nanograms per standard cubic meter, or 0.01 percent of the total aerosol. Upper tropospheric BCA increases to 0.3 percent. Low stratospheric concentration is commensurate with present commercial air traffic fuel consumption, given the following assumptions: the BCA emissions are 0.1 grams per kilogram of fuel consumed, 10 percent of route mileage is above the tropopause, and average BCA stratospheric residence time is about one year. Taking BCA into account, the stratospheric single scatter albedo is about 0.99. Using parameters for planned supersonic commercial aircraft, whose emissions will be predominantly in the stratosphere, it is shown that such traffic will double stratospheric BCA concentration. This would reduce the aerosol single scattering albedo by one percent, and double the BCA surface area that is available for heterogeneous chemistry.

  8. Stable Carbon Fractionation In Size Segregated Aerosol Particles Produced By Controlled Biomass Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, Agne; Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Ceburnis, Darius; Martuzevicius, Dainius; Puida, Egidijus; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning is the largest source of primary fine fraction carbonaceous particles and the second largest source of trace gases in the global atmosphere with a strong effect not only on the regional scale but also in areas distant from the source . Many studies have often assumed no significant carbon isotope fractionation occurring between black carbon and the original vegetation during combustion. However, other studies suggested that stable carbon isotope ratios of char or BC may not reliably reflect carbon isotopic signatures of the source vegetation. Overall, the apparently conflicting results throughout the literature regarding the observed fractionation suggest that combustion conditions may be responsible for the observed effects. The purpose of the present study was to gather more quantitative information on carbonaceous aerosols produced in controlled biomass burning, thereby having a potential impact on interpreting ambient atmospheric observations. Seven different biomass fuel types were burned under controlled conditions to determine the effect of the biomass type on the emitted particulate matter mass and stable carbon isotope composition of bulk and size segregated particles. Size segregated aerosol particles were collected using the total suspended particle (TSP) sampler and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). The results demonstrated that particle emissions were dominated by the submicron particles in all biomass types. However, significant differences in emissions of submicron particles and their dominant sizes were found between different biomass fuels. The largest negative fractionation was obtained for the wood pellet fuel type while the largest positive isotopic fractionation was observed during the buckwheat shells combustion. The carbon isotope composition of MOUDI samples compared very well with isotope composition of TSP samples indicating consistency of the results. The measurements of the stable carbon isotope ratio in

  9. Observation of hydration of single, modified carbon aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyslouzil, B. E.; Carleton, K. L.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Rawlins, W. T.; Arnold, S.

    1994-01-01

    We have compared the hydration behavior of single carbon particles that have been treated by exposure to gaseous H2SO4 with that of untreated particles. Untreated carbon particles did not hydrate as the relative humidity varied from 0 to 80% at 23 C. In contrast, treated particles hydrated under subsaturation conditions; mass increases of up to 30% were observed. The mass increase is consistent with sulfuric acid equilibration with the ambient relative humidity in the presence of inert carbon. For the samples studied, the average amount of absorbed acid was 14% +/- 6% by weight, which corresponds to a surface coverage of approximately 0.1 monolayer. The mass fraction of surface-absorbed acid is comparable to the soluble mass fraction observed by Whitefield et al. (1993) in jet aircraft engine aerosols. Estimates indicate this mass fraction corresponds to 0.1% of the available SO2 exiting an aircraft engine ending up as H2SO4 on the carbon aerosol. If this heterogeneous process occurs early enough in the exhaust plume, it may compete with homogeneous nucleation as a mechanism for producing sulfuric acid rich aerosols.

  10. Correlation of urinary nickel excretion with observed 'total' and inhalable aerosol exposures of nickel refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Werner, M A; Thomassen, Y; Hetland, S; Norseth, T; Berge, S R; Vincent, J H

    1999-12-01

    An investigation of the relationship between observed nickel aerosol exposures and urinary nickel excretion was undertaken at a Scandinavian nickel refinery. The goal of the study was to assess the impact of nickel aerosol speciation, the use of particle size-selective sampling instrumentation and adjustment of urinary levels for creatinine excretion on the usefulness of urinary nickel excretion as a marker for exposure. Urinary nickel measurements and paired 'total' and inhalable aerosol exposure measurements were collected each day for one week from refinery workers in four process areas. The mean observed urinary nickel concentration was 12 micrograms L-1 (11 micrograms of Ni per g of creatinine). The strongest relationships between urinary excretion and aerosol exposure were found when urinary nickel levels were adjusted for creatinine excretion and when exposure to only soluble forms of nickel aerosol was considered. No significant difference was observed between measures of 'total' and inhalable aerosol in the ability to predict urinary excretion patterns. In the light of these results, it is recommended that consideration be given to the chemical species distribution of nickel aerosol in the use of urinary nickel measurements as a screening tool for cancer risk in occupationally-exposed populations. PMID:11529189

  11. Methods development for total organic carbon accountability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Brian L.; Kilgore, Melvin V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the efforts completed during the contract period beginning November 1, 1990 and ending April 30, 1991. Samples of product hygiene and potable water from WRT 3A were supplied by NASA/MSFC prior to contract award on July 24, 1990. Humidity condensate samples were supplied on August 3, 1990. During the course of this contract chemical analyses were performed on these samples to qualitatively determine specific components comprising, the measured organic carbon concentration. In addition, these samples and known standard solutions were used to identify and develop methodology useful to future comprehensive characterization of similar samples. Standard analyses including pH, conductivity, and total organic carbon (TOC) were conducted. Colorimetric and enzyme linked assays for total protein, bile acid, B-hydroxybutyric acid, methylene blue active substances (MBAS), urea nitrogen, ammonia, and glucose were also performed. Gas chromatographic procedures for non-volatile fatty acids and EPA priority pollutants were also performed. Liquid chromatography was used to screen for non-volatile, water soluble compounds not amenable to GC techniques. Methods development efforts were initiated to separate and quantitate certain chemical classes not classically analyzed in water and wastewater samples. These included carbohydrates, organic acids, and amino acids. Finally, efforts were initiated to identify useful concentration techniques to enhance detection limits and recovery of non-volatile, water soluble compounds.

  12. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Aerosols: Effects of Large Increases on Global Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Mathematical models indicate increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide causes an increase in surface temperature at a decreasing rate, and the rate of temperature decrease caused by increasing aerosols increases with aerosol concentration. (AL)

  13. Sensitivity of global-scale climate change attribution results to inclusion of fossil fuel black carbon aerosol - article no. L14701

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.S.; Jones, A.; Roberts, D.L.; Stott, P.A.; Williams, K.D.

    2005-07-16

    It is likely that greenhouse gas emissions caused most of the global mean warming observed during the 20th century, and that sulphate aerosols counteracted this warming to some extent, by reflecting solar radiation to space and thereby cooling the planet. However, the importance of another aerosol, namely black carbon, could be underestimated. Here we include fossil fuel black carbon aerosol in a detection and attribution analysis with greenhouse gas and sulphate aerosols. We find that most of the warming of the 20th Century is attributable to changes in greenhouse gases offset by net aerosol cooling. However the pattern of temperature change due to black carbon is currently indistinguishable from the sulphate aerosol pattern of temperature change. The attribution of temperature change due to greenhouse gases is not sensitive to the inclusion of black carbon. We can be confident about the overall attribution of total aerosols, but less so about the contributions of black carbon emissions to 20th century climate change. This work presents no evidence that black carbon aerosol forcing outweighed the cooling due to sulphate aerosol.

  14. Influence of Brown Carbon Aerosols on Absorption Enhancement and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamjad, Puthukkadan; Nand Tripathi, Sachchida; Kant Pathak, Ravi; Hallquist, Mattias

    2015-04-01

    This study presents aerosol mass and optical properties measured during winter-spring months (February-March) of two consecutive years (2013-2014) from Kanpur, India located inside Gangetic Plain. Spectral absorption and scattering coefficients (405, 532 and 781 nm) of both atmospheric and denuded (at 300° C) is measured using a 3 wavelength Photo Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS 3). Ratio between the atmospheric and denuded absorption is reported as enhancement in absorption (Eabs). Eabs values shows presence of large quantities of Brown Carbon (BrC) aerosols in the location. Diurnal trend of Eabs shows similar patterns at 405 and 532 nm. But at 781 nm Eabs values increased during day time (10:00 to 18:00) while that 405 and 532 nm decreased. Positive Matrix Analysis (PMF) of organic aerosols measured using HR-ToF-AMS shows factors with different trends with total absorption. Semi-volatile factor (SV-OOA) show no correlation with absorption but other factors such as Low-volatile (LV-OOA), Hydrocarbon (HOA) and Biomass burning (BBOA) organic aerosols shows a positive trend. All factors shows good correlation with scattering coefficient. Also a strong dependence of absorption is observed at 405 and 532 nm and a weak dependence at 781 nm is observed during regression analysis with factors and mass loading. We also present direct radiative forcing (DRF) calculated from measured optical properties due to total aerosol loading and only due to BrC. Total and BrC aerosol DRF shows cooling trends at top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface and warming trend in atmosphere. Days with biomass burning events shows increase in magnitude of DRF at atmosphere and surface up to 30 % corresponding to clear days. TOA forcing during biomass burning days shows increase in magnitude indicating change from negative to less negative.

  15. Black carbon reduction will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in a short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate coupled model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with present-day conditions if the BC emission is reduced exclusively to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial for the mitigation of global warming. However, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 relative to present-day conditions if emissions of BC and co-emitted sulfur dioxide and organic carbon are simultaneously reduced as the most close conditions to the actual situation to the level projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  16. Springtime carbon episodes at Gosan background site revealed by total carbon, stable carbon isotopic composition, and thermal characteristics of carbonaceous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Kawamura, K.

    2011-05-01

    In order to investigate the carbon episodes at Gosan background super-site (33.17° N, 126.10° E) in East Asia during spring of 2007 and 2008, total suspended particles (TSP) were collected and analyzed for particulate organic carbon, elemental carbon, total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. The carbon episodes at the Gosan site were categorized as long-range transported anthropogenic pollutant (LTP) from Asian continent, Asian dust (AD) accompanying with LTP, and local pollen episodes. The stable carbon isotopic composition of TC (δ13CTC) was found to be lowest during the pollen episodes (range: -26.2 ‰ to -23.5 ‰, avg.: -25.2 ± 0.9 ‰), followed by the LTP episodes (range: -23.5 ‰ to -23.0 ‰, avg.: -23.3 ± 0.3 ‰) and the AD episodes (range: -23.3 to -20.4 %, avg.: -21.8 ± 2.0 ‰). The δ13CTC of the airborne pollens (-28.0 ‰) collected at the Gosan site showed value similar to that of tangerine fruit (-28.1 ‰) produced from Jeju Island. Based on the carbon isotope mass balance equation and the TN and TC regression approach, we found that ∼40-45 % of TC in the TSP samples during the pollen episodes was attributed to airborne pollens from Japanese cedar trees planted around tangerine farms in Jeju Island. The δ13C of citric acid in the airborne pollens (-26.3 ‰) collected at the Gosan site was similar to that in tangerine fruit (-27.4 ‰). The negative correlation between the citric acid-carbon/TC ratios and δ13CTC were obtained during the pollen episodes. These results suggest that citric acid emitted from tangerine fruit may be adsorbed on the airborne pollens and then transported to the Gosan site. Based on the thermal evolution pattern of organic aerosols during the carbon episodes, we found that organic aerosols originated from East China are more volatile on heating and are more likely to form pyrolized organic carbon than the pollen-enriched organic aerosols and organic

  17. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Greg; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Clothiaux, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output. This requires long-term measurements in many regions, as model success in one region or season does not apply to all regions and seasons. AERONET is an automated network of more than 180 surface radiometers located throughout the world. The sky radiance measurements obtained by AERONET are inverted to provide column-averaged aerosol refractive indices and size distributions for the AERONET database, which we use to derive column-averaged black carbon concentrations and specific absorptions that are constrained by the measured radiation field. This provides a link between AERONET sky radiance measurements and the elemental carbon concentration of transport models without the need for an optics module in the transport model. Knowledge of both the black carbon concentration and aerosol absorption optical depth (i.e., input and output of the optics module) will enable improvements to the transport model optics module.

  18. The characteristics of brown carbon aerosol during winter in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan; He, Ke-bin; Du, Zhen-yu; Engling, Guenter; Liu, Jiu-meng; Ma, Yong-liang; Zheng, Mei; Weber, Rodney J.

    2016-02-01

    Brown carbon (i.e., light-absorbing organic carbon, or BrC) exerts important effects on the environment and on climate in particular. Based on spectrophotometric absorption measurements on extracts of bulk aerosol samples, this study investigated the characteristics of BrC during winter in Beijing, China. Organic compounds extractable by methanol contributed approximately 85% to the organic carbon (OC) mass. Light absorption by the methanol extracts exhibited a strong wavelength dependence, with an average absorption Ångström exponent of 7.10 (fitted between 310 and 450 nm). Normalizing the absorption coefficient (babs) measured at 365 nm to the extractable OC mass yielded an average mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of 1.45 m2/g for the methanol extracts. This study suggests that light absorption by BrC could be comparable with black carbon in the spectral range of near-ultraviolet light. Our results also indicate that BrC absorption and thus BrC radiative forcing could be largely underestimated when using water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a surrogate for BrC. Compared to previous work relying only on WSOC, this study provides a more comprehensive understanding of BrC aerosol based on methanol extraction.

  19. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Beig, G.; Sahu, S.; Fasullo, J.; Orlikowski, D.

    2009-12-01

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by ~0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is ~30%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  20. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Beig, G.; Sahu, S.; Fasullo, J.; Orlikowski, D.

    2010-05-01

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by ~0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is ~36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  1. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  2. Impact of tropospheric sulphate aerosols on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSAs) may oxidise the photosynthesising tissues if they are taken up by plants. A parameterisation of this impact of tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSAs) on the terrestrial gross primary production is suggested. This parameterisation is implemented into the global Earth system model developed at the A.M. Obukhov Institute of the Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM). With this coupled model, the simulations are performed which are forced by common anthropogenic and natural climate forcings based on historical reconstructions followed by the RCP 8.5 scenario. The model response to sulphate aerosol loading is subdivided into the climatic (related to the influence of TSA on the radiative transport in the atmosphere) and ecological (related to the toxic influence of sulphate aerosol on terrestrial plants) impacts. We found that the former basically dominates over the latter on a global scale and modifies the responses of the global vegetation and soil carbon stocks to external forcings by 10%. At a regional scale, however, ecological impact may be as much important as the climatic one.

  3. Significant contributions of fungal spores to the organic carbon and to the aerosol mass balance of the urban atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Heidi; Schueller, Elisabeth; Weinke, Gert; Berger, Anna; Hitzenberger, Regina; Marr, Iain L.; Puxbaum, Hans

    Fungal spores are ubiquitous components of atmospheric aerosols and are therefore also contributors to the organic carbon (OC) component and to the mass of PM 10 (PM—particulate matter) aerosols. In this study we use spore counts and an experimentally derived factor of 13 pg C and of 33 pg fresh weight per spore for assessing quantitatively the contribution to OC and PM 10. The concentrations of airborne fungal spores were determined at a suburban (Schafberg) and a traffic-dominated urban site (Rinnböckstrasse) in Vienna, Austria, during spring and summer. Fungal spores OC ranged from 22 to 677 ng m -3 with a summer mean value of around 350 ng m -3 at the suburban site and 300 ng m -3 at the urban traffic site. At the suburban site fungal spores contributed on average 6% in spring and 14% in summer to aerosol OC mass concentration. At the traffic-dominated site fungal spores accounted for 2% of OC in spring and for 8% in summer. The fungal contribution to PM 10 was also notable and amounted to 3% and 7% at the suburban and to 1% and 4% at the urban site in spring and summer, respectively. Impactor measurements of OC at the suburban site showed that in summer fungal spores were predominant contributors to the coarse aerosol OC, and accounted on average for 60% of the OC in the PM 2-10 fraction. Fungal spores thus can be regarded as main components to PM 10, total OC and, most importantly, coarse OC even in urban areas.

  4. Organic Mass to Organic Carbon ratio in Atmospheric Aerosols: Observations and Global Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridis, K.; Kanakidou, M.; Daskalakis, N.

    2012-12-01

    Organic compounds play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and affect Earth's climate through their impact on oxidants and aerosol formation (e.g. O3 and organic aerosols (OA)). Due to the complexity of the mixture of organics in the atmosphere, the organic-mass-to-organic-carbon ratio (OM/OC) is often used to characterize the organic component in atmospheric aerosols. This ratio varies dependant on the aerosol origin and the chemical processing in the atmosphere. Atmospheric observations have shown that as OA and its precursor gases age in the atmosphere, it leads to the formation of more oxidized (O:C atomic ratio 0.6 to 0.8), less volatile and less hydrophobic compounds (particle growth factor at 95% relative humidity of 0.16 to 0.20) that have more similar properties than fresh aerosols. While reported OM:OC ratios observed over USA range between 1.29 and 1.95, indicating significant contribution of local pollution sources to the OC in that region, high O/C ratio associated with a high OM/OC ratio of 2.2 has been also observed for the summertime East Mediterranean aged aerosol. In global models, the OM/OC ratio is either calculated for specific compounds or estimated for compound groups. In the present study, we review OM/OC observations and compare them with simulations from a variety of models that contributed to the AEROCOM exercise. We evaluate the chemical processing level of atmospheric aerosols simulated by the models. A total of 32 global chemistry transport models are considered in this study with variable complexity of the representation of OM/OC ratio in the OA. The analysis provides an integrated view of the OM/OC ratio in the global atmosphere and of the accuracy of its representation in the global models. Implications for atmospheric chemistry and climate simulations are discussed.

  5. Results of the "carbon conference" international aerosol carbon round robin test stage I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Heidrun; Laskus, Lothar; Jürgen Abraham, Hans; Baltensperger, Urs; Lavanchy, Vincent; Bizjak, Mirko; Burba, Peter; Cachier, Helene; Crow, Dale; Chow, Judith; Gnauk, Thomas; Even, Arja; ten Brink, H. M.; Giesen, Klaus-Peter; Hitzenberger, Regina; Hueglin, Christoph; Maenhaut, Willy; Pio, Casimiro; Carvalho, Abel; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Toom-Sauntry, Desiree; Puxbaum, Hans

    An international round robin test on the analysis of carbonaceous aerosols on quartz fiber filters sampled at an urban site was organized by the Vienna University of Technology. Seventeen laboratories participated using nine different thermal and optical methods. For the analysis of total carbon (TC), a good agreement of the values obtained by all laboratories was found (7 and 9% r.s.d.) with only two outliers in the complete data set. In contrast the results of the determination of elemental carbon (EC) in two not pre-extracted samples were highly variable ranging over more than one order of magnitude and the relative standard deviations (r.s.d.) of the means were 36.6 and 45.5%. The laboratories that obtained similar results by using methods which reduce the charring artifact were put together to a new data set in order to approach a "real EC" value. The new data set consisting of the results of 10 laboratories using seven different methods showed 16 and 24% lower averages and r.s.d. of 14 and 24% for the two not pre-extracted samples. Taking the current filters as "equivalents" for urban aerosol samples we conclude that the following methods can be used for the analysis of EC in carbonaceous aerosols: thermal methods with an optical feature to correct for charring during pyrolysis, two-step thermal procedures reducing charring during pyrolysis, the VDI 2465/1 method (removal of OC by solvent extraction and thermodesorption in nitrogen) and the VDI 2465/2 method (combustion of OC and EC at different temperatures) with an additional pre-extraction with a dimethyl formamide (DMF)/toluene mixture. Only thermal methods without any correction for charring during pyrolysis and the VDI 2465/2 method were outside the range of twice the standard deviation of the new data set. For a filter sample pre-extracted with the DMF/toluene mixture the average and r.s.d. from all laboratories (20.7 μgC; 24.4% r.s.d.) was very similar as for the laboratory set reduced to 10

  6. New Forms of Black Carbon Aerosols Detected in Antarctic Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols are a significant but relatively short-lived source of climate forcing. Distinct to other climate forcers like carbon dioxide and methane, BC particles have optical and chemical properties that evolve while aging in the atmosphere. Little is known with regards to the physical and chemical characteristics of these particles in the remote atmosphere, or how BC properties may have evolved with human activities. Antarctic ice cores provide a historical record of BC particles in the atmosphere. Using a new method of tangential flow filtration and transmission electron microscopy, we have isolated and characterized black carbon in century-old Antarctic ice. Our findings revealed unexpected diversity in particle morphology, insoluble coatings, and association with metals, with properties that could have significant atmospheric effects. Given that these new forms of BC may exist in significant proportions, we propose the need to incorporate these forms into future models of atmospheric and climate variability.

  7. Aerosol light absorption, black carbon, and elemental carbon at the Fresno Supersite, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Doraiswamy, Prakash; Chen, Lung-Wen Antony; Sodeman, David A.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Park, Kihong; Arnott, W. Patrick; Motallebi, Nehzat

    2009-08-01

    Particle light absorption ( bap), black carbon (BC), and elemental carbon (EC) measurements at the Fresno Supersite during the summer of 2005 were compared to examine the equivalency of current techniques, evaluate filter-based bap correction methods, and determine the EC mass absorption efficiency (σ ap) and the spectral dependence of bap. The photoacoustic analyzer (PA) was used as a benchmark for in-situ bap. Most bap measurement techniques were well correlated ( r ≥ 0.95). Unadjusted Aethalometer (AE) and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) bap were up to seven times higher than PA bap at similar wavelengths because of absorption enhancement by backscattering and multiple scattering. Applying published algorithms to correct for these effects reduced the differences to 24 and 17% for the AE and PSAP, respectively, at 532 nm. The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP), which accounts for backscattering effects, overestimated bap relative to the PA by 51%. BC concentrations determined by the AE, MAAP, and Sunset Laboratory semi-continuous carbon analyzer were also highly correlated ( r ≥ 0.93) but differed by up to 57%. EC measured with the IMPROVE/STN thermal/optical protocols, and the French two-step thermal protocol agreed to within 29%. Absorption efficiencies determined from PA bap and EC measured with different analytical protocols averaged 7.9 ± 1.5, 5.4 ± 1.1, and 2.8 ± 0.6 m 2/g at 532, 670, and 1047 nm, respectively. The Angström exponent (α) determined from adjusted AE and PA bap ranged from 1.19 to 1.46. The largest values of α occurred during the afternoon hours when the organic fraction of total carbon was highest. Significant biases associated with filter-based measurements of bap, BC, and EC are method-specific. Correcting for these biases must take into account differences in aerosol concentration, composition, and sources.

  8. Organic Carbon and Light Absorption Analysis of Los Angeles Aerosols through an Online Sampling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, M. K.; Hawkins, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    Brown carbon is a comprehensive term for organic compounds with wavelength dependent light absorption. Common sources of brown carbon include fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and aqueous reactions in cloud and fog water. Nitrophenols have been proposed as one source of brown carbon in the Los Angeles area. In this work, we are interested in the relative strengths of each of these sources within Los Angeles. We have implemented a continuous online system of collection and analysis within our lab. The system consists of a particle into liquid sampler (PILS), a liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) and a total organic carbon analyzer (TOC). Online analysis of organic carbon content and UV-Vis absorption has allowed us to study the ratio of the two as an intrinsic property of the aerosol particles, called the 'absorption coefficient.' Using a rearrangement of Beer's Law, we have analyzed the relationship: ɛ = A / C (where ɛ is the absorption coefficient, A is the light absorption of the sample and C is the concentration of organic carbon in the sample). Using our continuous online system, we have collected absorption spectra and total organic carbon measurements over several weeks and in varying environmental conditions. Our work has shown that different weather conditions, along with fog or cloud formation, can affect the absorption coefficient of the brown carbon compounds in the air.

  9. Light absorption of brown carbon aerosol in the PRD region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.-F.; Huang, X.-F.; Cao, L.-M.; Cui, J.; Zhu, Q.; Huang, C.-N.; Lan, Z.-J.; He, L.-Y.

    2016-02-01

    The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol is regarded to influence aerosol's radiative forcing significantly. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) method has been widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of BrC at shorter wavelengths for ambient aerosols, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of "pure" black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to 1.0. In this study, the AAE method was applied to both urban and rural environments in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China, with an improvement of constraining the realistic AAE of "pure" BC through statistical analysis of on-line measurement data. A three-wavelength photo-acoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the measured AAE and the relative abundance of organic aerosol to BC. The regression and extrapolation analysis revealed that more realistic AAE values for "pure" BC aerosol (AAEBC) were 0.86, 0.82, and 1.02 between 405 and 781 nm, and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 between 532 and 781 nm, in the campaigns of urbanwinter, urbanfall, and ruralfall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiments were conducted and the results further confirmed the representativeness of the obtained AAEBC values for the urban environment. Finally, the average light absorption contributions of BrC (± relative uncertainties) at 405 nm were quantified to be 11.7 % (±5 %), 6.3 % (±4 %), and 12.1 % (±7 %) in the campaigns of urbanwinter, urbanfall, and ruralfall, respectively, and those at 532 nm were 10.0 % (±2 %), 4.1 % (±3 %), and 5.5 % (±5 %), respectively. The relatively higher BrC absorption contribution at 405 nm in the ruralfall campaign could be reasonably attributed to the biomass burning events nearby, which was then directly supported by the biomass burning simulation experiments performed in this study. This paper indicates that the BrC contribution to total aerosol light absorption at shorter

  10. Attribution of aerosol light absorption to black carbon, brown carbon, and dust in China - interpretations of atmospheric measurements during EAST-AIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Howell, S. G.; Zhuang, J.; Huebert, B. J.

    2009-03-01

    Black carbon, brown carbon, and mineral dust are three of the most important light absorbing aerosols. Their optical properties differ greatly and are distinctive functions of the wavelength of light. Most optical instruments that quantify light absorption, however, are unable to distinguish one type of absorbing aerosol from another. It is thus instructive to separate total absorption from these different light absorbers to gain a better understanding of the optical characteristics of each aerosol type. During the EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment) campaign near Beijing, we measured light scattering using a nephelometer, and light absorption using an aethalometer and a particulate soot absorption photometer. We also measured the total mass concentrations of carbonaceous (elemental and organic carbon) and inorganic particulates, as well as aerosol number and mass distributions. We were able to identify periods during the campaign that were dominated by dust, biomass burning, fresh (industrial) chimney plumes, other coal burning pollution, and relatively clean (background) air for Northern China. Each of these air masses possessed distinct intensive optical properties, including the single scatter albedo and Ångstrom exponents. Based on the wavelength-dependence and particle size distribution, we apportioned total light absorption to black carbon, brown carbon, and dust; their mass absorption efficiencies at 550 nm were estimated to be 9.5, 0.5 (a lower limit value), and 0.03 m2/g, respectively. While agreeing with the common consensus that black carbon is the most important light absorber in the mid-visible, we demonstrated that brown carbon and dust could also cause significant absorption, especially at shorter wavelengths.

  11. Airborne Aerosol In situ Measurements during TCAP: A Closure Study of Total Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Chand, Duli; Shilling, John E.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Barnard, James C.; Sedlacek, Art; Schmid, Beat

    2015-07-31

    We present here a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. The synergistically employed aircraft data involve aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical components and ambient relative humidity measurements. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of the complementary chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total aerosol scattering is demonstrated for different ambient conditions with a wide range of relative humidities (from 5 to 80%) using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft during the recent Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these three types of data employed are: (1) size distributions measured by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS; 0.06-1 µm), a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP; 0.1-3 µm) and a Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS; 0.6- >10 µm), (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS; 0.06-0.6 µm) and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2; 0.06-0.6 µm), and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a TSI integrating nephelometer at three wavelengths (0.45, 0.55, 0.7 µm) and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system at three RHs (near 45%, 65% and 90%) at a single wavelength (0.525 µm). We demonstrate that good agreement (~10% on average) between the observed and calculated scattering at these three wavelengths can be obtained using the best available chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction and using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40

  12. Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J. E.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J. E.; Sathaye, J. A.

    2003-03-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

  13. Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

    2002-09-26

    Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

  14. Tropical intercontinental optical measurement network of aerosol, precipitable water and total column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tanre, D.; Reagan, J. A.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Vermote, E.; Vassiliou, G. D.; Lavenu, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new generation of automatic sunphotometers is used to systematically monitor clear sky total column aerosol concentration and optical properties, precipitable water and total column ozone diurnally and annually in West Africa and South America. The instruments are designed to measure direct beam sun, solar aureole and sky radiances in nine narrow spectral bands from the UV to the near infrared on an hourly basis. The instrumentation and the algorithms required to reduce the data for subsequent analysis are described.

  15. Total Volcanic Stratospheric Aerosol Optical Depths and Implications for Global Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridley, D. A.; Solomon, S.; Barnes, J. E.; Burlakov, V. D.; Deshler, T.; Dolgii, S. I.; Herber, A. B.; Nagai, T.; Neely, R. R., III; Nevzorov, A. V.; Ritter, C.; Sakai, T.; Santer, B. D.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, A.; Uchino, O.; Vernier, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cooling effect of recent volcanoes is of particular interest in the context of the post-2000 slowing of the rate of global warming. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth above 15 km have demonstrated that small-magnitude volcanic eruptions substantially perturb incoming solar radiation. Here we use lidar, Aerosol Robotic Network, and balloon-borne observations to provide evidence that currently available satellite databases neglect substantial amounts of volcanic aerosol between the tropopause and 15 km at middle to high latitudes and therefore underestimate total radiative forcing resulting from the recent eruptions. Incorporating these estimates into a simple climate model, we determine the global volcanic aerosol forcing since 2000 to be 0.19 +/- 0.09W/sq m. This translates into an estimated global cooling of 0.05 to 0.12 C. We conclude that recent volcanic events are responsible for more post-2000 cooling than is implied by satellite databases that neglect volcanic aerosol effects below 15 km.

  16. Total volcanic stratospheric aerosol optical depths and implications for global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, D. A.; Solomon, S.; Barnes, J. E.; Burlakov, V. D.; Deshler, T.; Dolgii, S. I.; Herber, A. B.; Nagai, T.; Neely, R. R.; Nevzorov, A. V.; Ritter, C.; Sakai, T.; Santer, B. D.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, A.; Uchino, O.; Vernier, J. P.

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the cooling effect of recent volcanoes is of particular interest in the context of the post-2000 slowing of the rate of global warming. Satellite observations of aerosol optical depth above 15 km have demonstrated that small-magnitude volcanic eruptions substantially perturb incoming solar radiation. Here we use lidar, Aerosol Robotic Network, and balloon-borne observations to provide evidence that currently available satellite databases neglect substantial amounts of volcanic aerosol between the tropopause and 15 km at middle to high latitudes and therefore underestimate total radiative forcing resulting from the recent eruptions. Incorporating these estimates into a simple climate model, we determine the global volcanic aerosol forcing since 2000 to be -0.19 ± 0.09 Wm-2. This translates into an estimated global cooling of 0.05 to 0.12°C. We conclude that recent volcanic events are responsible for more post-2000 cooling than is implied by satellite databases that neglect volcanic aerosol effects below 15 km.

  17. Common summertime total cloud cover and aerosol optical depth weekly variabilities over Europe: Sign of the aerosol indirect effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulias, A. K.; Kourtidis, K. A.; Alexandri, G.; Rapsomanikis, S.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the summer total cloud cover (TCC) weekly cycle over Europe is investigated using MODIS and ISCCP satellite data in conjunction with aerosol optical depth (AOD) MODIS data. Spatial weekly patterns are examined at a 1° × 1° (MODIS) and 250 × 250 km2 (ISCCP) resolution. Despite the noise in the TCC weekly cycle patterns, their large-scale features show similarities with the AOD550 patterns. Regions with a positive (higher values during midweek) weekly cycle appear over Central Europe, while a strong negative (higher values during weekend) weekly plume appears over the Iberian Peninsula and the North-Eastern Europe. The TCC weekly variability exhibits a very good agreement with the AOD550 weekly variability over Central, South-Western Europe and North-Eastern Europe and a moderate agreement for Central Mediterranean. The MODIS derived TCC weekly variability shows reasonable agreement with the independent ISCCP observations, thus supporting the credibility of the results. TCC and AOD550 correlations exhibit a strong slope for the total of the 6 regions investigated in this work with the slopes being higher for regions with common TCC-AOD550 weekly variabilities. The slope is much stronger for AOD550 values less than 0.2 for Central and South-Western Europe, in line with previous studies around the world. Possible scenarios that could explain the common weekly variability of aerosols and cloud cover through the aerosol indirect effects are discussed here also taking into account the weekly variability appearing in ECA&D E-OBS rainfall data.

  18. Atmospheric aerosol brown carbon in the high Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, Elena; Decesari, Stefano; Marinoni, Angela; Bonasoni, Paolo; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Facchini, M. Cristina; Fuzzi, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol can reach very high concentrations in the planetary boundary layer in South-East Asia ("brown clouds"), affecting atmospheric transparency and generating spatial gradients of temperature over land with a possible impact on atmospheric dynamics and monsoon circulation. Besides black carbon (BC), an important light-absorbing component of anthropogenic aerosols is the organic carbon component known as 'brown carbon' (BrC). In this research, we provided first measurements of atmospheric aerosol BrC in the high Himalayas during different seasons. Aerosol sampling was conducted at the GAW-WMO Global station "Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid" (NCO-P) located in the high Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. in the foothills of Mt. Everest. PM10 aerosol samples were collected from July 2013 to November 2014. The sampling strategy was set up in order to discriminate the daytime valley breeze bringing polluted air masses up to the observatory and free tropospheric air during nighttime. Water-soluble BrC (WS-BrC) and methanol-soluble BrC (MeS-BrC) were extracted and analyzed using a UV/VIS spectrophotometer equipped with a 50 cm liquid waveguide capillary cell. In the polluted air masses, the highest levels of the BrC light absorption coefficient at 365 nm (babs365) were observed during the pre-monsoon season (1.83±1.46 Mm‑1 for WS-BrC and 2.86±2.49 Mm‑1 for MeS-BrC) and the lowest during the monsoon season (0.21±0.22 Mm‑1 for WS-BrC and 0.32±0.29 Mm‑1 for MeS-BrC). The pre-monsoon season is the most frequently influenced by a strong atmospheric brown cloud (ABC) transport to NCO-P due to increased convection and mixing layer height over South Asia combined with the highest up-valley wind speed and the increase of the emissions from open fires due to the agricultural practice along the Himalayas foothills and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. In contrast, the monsoon season is characterized by a weakened valley wind regime and an

  19. Atmospheric aerosol brown carbon in the high Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillova, Elena; Decesari, Stefano; Marinoni, Angela; Bonasoni, Paolo; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Facchini, M. Cristina; Fuzzi, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol can reach very high concentrations in the planetary boundary layer in South-East Asia ("brown clouds"), affecting atmospheric transparency and generating spatial gradients of temperature over land with a possible impact on atmospheric dynamics and monsoon circulation. Besides black carbon (BC), an important light-absorbing component of anthropogenic aerosols is the organic carbon component known as 'brown carbon' (BrC). In this research, we provided first measurements of atmospheric aerosol BrC in the high Himalayas during different seasons. Aerosol sampling was conducted at the GAW-WMO Global station "Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid" (NCO-P) located in the high Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. in the foothills of Mt. Everest. PM10 aerosol samples were collected from July 2013 to November 2014. The sampling strategy was set up in order to discriminate the daytime valley breeze bringing polluted air masses up to the observatory and free tropospheric air during nighttime. Water-soluble BrC (WS-BrC) and methanol-soluble BrC (MeS-BrC) were extracted and analyzed using a UV/VIS spectrophotometer equipped with a 50 cm liquid waveguide capillary cell. In the polluted air masses, the highest levels of the BrC light absorption coefficient at 365 nm (babs365) were observed during the pre-monsoon season (1.83±1.46 Mm-1 for WS-BrC and 2.86±2.49 Mm-1 for MeS-BrC) and the lowest during the monsoon season (0.21±0.22 Mm-1 for WS-BrC and 0.32±0.29 Mm-1 for MeS-BrC). The pre-monsoon season is the most frequently influenced by a strong atmospheric brown cloud (ABC) transport to NCO-P due to increased convection and mixing layer height over South Asia combined with the highest up-valley wind speed and the increase of the emissions from open fires due to the agricultural practice along the Himalayas foothills and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. In contrast, the monsoon season is characterized by a weakened valley wind regime and an

  20. Attribution of aerosol light absorption to black carbon, brown carbon, and dust in China - interpretations of atmospheric measurements during EAST-AIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Howell, S. G.; Zhuang, J.; Huebert, B. J.

    2008-06-01

    Black carbon, brown carbon, and mineral dust are three of the most important light absorbing aerosols. Their optical properties differ greatly and are distinctive functions of the wavelength of light. Most optical instruments that quantify light absorption, however, are unable to distinguish one type of absorbing aerosol from another. It is thus instructive to separate total absorption from these different light absorbers to gain a better understanding of the optical characteristics of each aerosol type. During the EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment) campaign near Beijing, we measured light scattering using a nephelometer, and light absorption using an aethalometer and a particulate soot absorption photometer. We also measured the total mass concentrations of carbonaceous (elemental and organic carbon) and inorganic particulates, as well as aerosol number and mass distributions. We were able to identify periods during the campaign that were dominated by dust, biomass burning, fresh (industrial) chimney plumes, other coal burning pollution, and relatively clean (background) air for Northern China. Each of these air masses possessed distinct intensive optical properties, including the single scatter albedo and Ångstrom exponents. Based on the wavelength-dependence and particle size distribution, we apportioned total light absorption to black carbon, brown carbon, and dust; their mass absorption efficiencies at 550 nm were estimated to be 9.5, 0.5, and 0.03 m2/g, respectively. While agreeing with the common consensus that BC is the most important light absorber in the mid-visible, we demonstrated that brown carbon and dust could also cause significant absorption, especially at shorter wavelengths.

  1. Use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in size segregated aerosol particles for the O/I penetration evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Masalaite, Agne; Ceburnis, Darius; Krugly, Edvinas; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio are successfully used in the atmospheric aerosol particle source identification [1, 2], transformation, pollution [3] research. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the penetration of atmospheric aerosol particles from outdoor to indoor using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Six houses in Kaunas (Lithuania) were investigated during February and March 2013. Electrical low pressure impactor was used to measure in real time concentration and size distribution of outdoor aerosol particles. ELPI+ includes 15 channels covering the size range from 0.017 to 10.0 µm. The 25 mm diameter aluminium foils were used to collect aerosol particles. Gravimetric analysis of samples was made using microbalance. In parallel, indoor aerosol samples were collected with a micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI model 110), where the aerosol particles were separated with the nominal D50 cut-off sizes of 0.056, 0.1, 0.18,0.32,0.56, 1.0, 1.8, 3.2, 5.6, 10, 18 μm for impactor stages 1-11, respectively. The impactor was run at a flow rate of 30 L/min. Air quality meters were used to record meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity) during the investigated period. All aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents and their isotopic compositions using elemental analyzer (EA) connected to the stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). TC concentration in indoors ranged from 1.5 to 247.5 µg/m3. During the sampling period outdoors TN levels ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 µg/m3. The obtained outdoor δ13C(PM2.5) values varied from -24.21 to -26.3‰, while the δ15N values varied from 2.4 to 11.1 ‰ (average 7.2±2.5 ‰). Indoors carbonaceous aerosol particles were depleted in 13C compared to outdoors in all sampling sites. This depletion in δ13C varied from 0.1 to 3.2 ‰. We think that this depletion occurs due ongoing chemical reactions (oxidation) when aerosol

  2. In situ measurements of total reactive nitrogen, total water, and aerosol in a Polar Stratospheric Cloud in the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Loewenstein, M.; Chan, K. R.; Poole, L. R.; Wilson, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of total reactive nitrogen, NOy, total water vapor, and aerosols were made as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The measurements were made using instruments located onboard the NASA ER-2 aircrafts which conducted twelve flights over the Antarctic continent reaching altitudes of 18 km at 72 S latitude. Each instrument utilized an ambient air sample and provided a measurement up to 1 Hz or every 200 m of flight path. The data presented focus on the flights of Aug. 17th and 18th during which Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were encountered containing concentrations of 0.5 to 1.0 micron diameter aerosols greater than 1 cm/cu. The temperature pressure during these events ranged as low as 184 K near 75 mb pressure, with water values near 3.5 ppm by volume (ppmv). With the exception of two short periods, the PSC activity was observed at temperatures above the frost point of water over ice. The data gathered during these flights are analyzed and presented.

  3. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail; Barnard, James; Chand, Duli; Flynn, Connor; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John; et al

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by amore » suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.« less

  4. Airborne aerosol in situ measurements during TCAP: A closure study of total scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Sedlacek, Arthur; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail; Barnard, James; Chand, Duli; Flynn, Connor; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John; Tomlinson, Jason; Fast, Jerome

    2015-07-31

    We present a framework for calculating the total scattering of both non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol at ambient conditions from aircraft data. Our framework is developed emphasizing the explicit use of chemical composition data for estimating the complex refractive index (RI) of particles, and thus obtaining improved ambient size spectra derived from Optical Particle Counter (OPC) measurements. The feasibility of our framework for improved calculations of total scattering is demonstrated using three types of data collected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) aircraft during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Namely, these data types are: (1) size distributions measured by a suite of OPC’s; (2) chemical composition data measured by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer; and (3) the dry total scattering coefficient measured by a integrating nephelometer and scattering enhancement factor measured with a humidification system. We demonstrate that good agreement (~10%) between the observed and calculated scattering can be obtained under ambient conditions (RH < 80%) by applying chemical composition data for the RI-based correction of the OPC-derived size spectra. We also demonstrate that ignoring the RI-based correction or using non-representative RI values can cause a substantial underestimation (~40%) or overestimation (~35%) of the calculated scattering, respectively.

  5. Aerosol Size, CCN, and Black Carbon Properties at a Coastal Site in the Eastern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royalty, T. M.; Petters, M. D.; Grieshop, A. P.; Meskhidze, N.; Reed, R. E.; Phillips, B.; Dawson, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in regulating the global radiative budget through direct and indirect effects. To date, the role of sea spray aerosols in modulating climate remains poorly understood. Here we present results from measurements performed at the United States Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility in Duck, North Carolina, USA. Aerosol mobility size distributions (10-600 nm), refractory black carbon (rBC) and scattering particle size distributions (200-620 nm), and size resolved cloud condensation nuclei distributions (.07% - .6% supersaturation) were collected at the end of a 560m pier. Aerosol characteristics associated with northerly, high wind speed (15+ m s-1) flow originating from an oceanic trajectory are contrasted with aerosol properties observed during a weak to moderate westerly flow originating from a continental trajectory. Both marine and continental air masses had aerosol with bi-modal number size distributions with modes centered at 30nm and 140nm. In the marine air-mass, the CCN concentration at supersaturation of 0.4%, total aerosol number, surface, and volume concentration were low. rBC number concentration (D > 200 nm) associated with the marine air-mass was an order of magnitude less than continental number concentration and indicative of relatively unpolluted air. These measurements are consistent with measurements from other coastal sites under marine influence. The relative proportion of Aitken mode size particles increased from 1:2 to 2:1 while aerosol surface area was < 25 μm2 cm-3, suggesting that conditions upwind were potentially conducive to new particle formation. Overall, these results will contribute a better understanding to composition and size variation of marine aerosols.

  6. Source forensics of black carbon aerosols from China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Andersson, August; Lee, Meehye; Kirillova, Elena N; Xiao, Qianfen; Kruså, Martin; Shi, Meinan; Hu, Ke; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G; Du, Ke; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2013-08-20

    The limited understanding of black carbon (BC) aerosol emissions from incomplete combustion causes a poorly constrained anthropogenic climate warming that globally may be second only to CO2 and regionally, such as over East Asia, the dominant driver of climate change. The relative contribution to atmospheric BC from fossil fuel versus biomass combustion is important to constrain as fossil BC is a stronger climate forcer. The source apportionment is the underpinning for targeted mitigation actions. However, technology-based "bottom-up" emission inventories are inconclusive, largely due to uncertain BC emission factors from small-scale/household combustion and open burning. We use "top-down" radiocarbon measurements of atmospheric BC from five sites including three city sites and two regional sites to determine that fossil fuel combustion produces 80 ± 6% of the BC emitted from China. This source-diagnostic radiocarbon signal in the ambient aerosol over East Asia establishes a much larger role for fossil fuel combustion than suggested by all 15 BC emission inventory models, including one with monthly resolution. Our results suggest that current climate modeling should refine both BC emission strength and consider the stronger radiative absorption associated with fossil-fuel-derived BC. To mitigate near-term climate effects and improve air quality in East Asia, activities such as residential coal combustion and city traffic should be targeted. PMID:23844635

  7. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. We conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. We also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  8. Total sugars in atmospheric aerosols: An alternative tracer for biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaramboni, C.; Urban, R. C.; Lima-Souza, M.; Nogueira, R. F. P.; Cardoso, A. A.; Allen, A. G.; Campos, M. L. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ambient aerosols were collected in an agro-industrial region of São Paulo State (Brazil) between May 2010 and February 2012 (n = 87). The atmosphere of the study region is highly affected by the emissions of gases and particles from sugar and fuel ethanol production, because part of the area planted with sugarcane is still burned before manual harvesting. This work proposes the quantification of total sugars as an alternative chemical tracer of biomass burning, instead of levoglucosan. The quantification of total sugars requires a small area of a filter sample and a simple spectrophotometer, in contrast to the determination of levoglucosan, which is much more complex and time-consuming. Total sugars concentrations in the aerosol ranged from 0.28 to 12.5 μg m-3, and (similarly to levoglucosan) the emissions were significantly higher at night and during the sugarcane harvest period, when most agricultural fires occur. The linear correlation between levoglucosan and total sugars (r = 0.612) was stronger than between levoglucosan and potassium (r = 0.379), which has previously been used as a biomass burning tracer. In the study region, potassium is used in fertilizers, and this, together with substantial soil dust resuspension, makes potassium unsuitable for use as a tracer. On average, ca. 40% of the total sugars was found in particles smaller than 0.49 μm. By including data from previous work, it was possible to identify from 35 to 42% of the total sugars, with biomass burning making the largest contribution. The high solubility in water of these sugars means that determination of their concentrations could also provide important information concerning the hydrophilic properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  9. Aerosol optical properties and mixing state of black carbon in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Haobo; Liu, Li; Fan, Shaojia; Li, Fei; Yin, Yan; Cai, Mingfu; Chan, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols contribute the largest uncertainty to the total radiative forcing estimate, and black carbon (BC) that absorbs solar radiation plays an important role in the Earth's energy budget. This study analysed the aerosol optical properties from 22 February to 18 March 2014 at the China Meteorological Administration Atmospheric Watch Network (CAWNET) station in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. The representative values of dry-state particle scattering coefficient (σsp), hemispheric backscattering coefficient (σhbsp), absorption coefficient (σabsp), extinction coefficient (σep), hemispheric backscattering fraction (HBF), single scattering albedo (SSA), as well as scattering Ångström exponent (α) were presented. A comparison between a polluted day and a clean day shows that the aerosol optical properties depend on particle number size distribution, weather conditions and evolution of the mixing layer. To investigate the mixing state of BC at the surface, an optical closure study of HBF between measurements and calculations based on a modified Mie model was employed for dry particles. The result shows that the mixing state of BC might be between the external mixture and the core-shell mixture. The average retrieved ratio of the externally mixed BC to the total BC mass concentration (rext-BC) was 0.58 ± 0.12, and the diurnal pattern of rext-BC can be found. Furthermore, considering that non-light-absorbing particles measured by a Volatility-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (V-TDMA) exist independently with core-shell and homogenously internally mixed BC particles, the calculated optical properties were just slightly different from those based on the assumption that BC exist in each particle. This would help understand the influence of the BC mixing state on aerosol optical properties and radiation budget in the PRD.

  10. Optical Properties of Black and Brown Carbon Aerosols from Laboratory Combustion of Wildland Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.; Molzan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol light absorption in the solar spectral region (300 nm - 2300 nm) of the atmosphere is key for the direct aerosol radiative forcing, which is determined by aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), asymmetry parameter, and by the albedo of the underlying surface. SSA is of key importance for the sign and quantity of aerosol direct radiative forcing; that is, does the aerosol make the earth look darker (heating) or whiter (cooling)? In addition, these optical properties are needed for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth and properties. During wildland fires, aerosol optical absorption is largely determined by black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) emissions. BC is strongly absorbing throughout the solar spectrum, while BrC absorption strongly increases toward shorter wavelength and can be neglected in the red and infrared. Optical properties of BrC emitted from wildland fires are poorly understood and need to be studied as function of fuel type and moisture content and combustion conditions. While much more is known about BC optical properties, knowledge for the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region is still lacking and critically needed for satellite remote sensing (e.g., TOMS, OMI) and for modeling of tropospheric photochemistry. Here, a project to better characterize biomass burning aerosol optical properties is described. It utilizes a laboratory biomass combustion chamber to generate aerosols through combustion of different wildland fuels of global and regional importance. Combustion aerosol optics is characterized with an integrating nephelometer to measure aerosol light scattering and a photoacoustic instrument to measure aerosol light absorption. These measurements will yield optical properties that are needed to improve qualitative and quantitative understanding of aerosol radiative forcing and satellite retrievals for absorbing carbonaceous aerosols from combustion of wildland fuels.

  11. Comparison of methods for the quantification of the different carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Teresa; Mirante, Fátima; Almeida, Elza; Pio, Casimiro

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric carbon consists of: organic carbon (OC, including various organic compounds), elemental carbon (EC, or black carbon [BC]/soot, a non-volatile/light-absorbing carbon), and a small quantity of carbonate carbon. Thermal/optical methods (TOM) have been widely used for quantifying total carbon (TC), OC, and EC in ambient and source particulate samples. Unfortunately, the different thermal evolution protocols in use can result in a wide elemental carbon-to-total carbon variation. Temperature evolution in thermal carbon analysis is critical to the allocation of carbon fractions. Another critical point in OC and EC quantification by TOM is the interference of carbonate carbon (CC) that could be present in the particulate samples, mainly in the coarse fraction of atmospheric aerosol. One of the methods used to minimize this interference consists on the use of a sample pre-treatment with acid to eliminate CC prior to thermal analysis (Chow et al., 2001; Pio et al., 1994). In Europe, there is currently no standard procedure for determining the carbonaceous aerosol fraction, which implies that data from different laboratories at various sites are of unknown accuracy and cannot be considered comparable. In the framework of the EU-project EUSAAR, a comprehensive study has been carried out to identify the causes of differences in the EC measured using different thermal evolution protocols. From this study an optimised protocol, the EUSAAR-2 protocol, was defined (Cavali et al., 2009). During the last two decades thousands of aerosol samples have been taken over quartz filters at urban, industrial, rural and background sites, and also from plume forest fires and biomass burning in a domestic closed stove. These samples were analysed for OC and EC, by a TOM, similar to that in use in the IMPROVE network (Pio et al., 2007). More recently we reduced the number of steps in thermal evolution protocols, without significant repercussions in the OC/EC quantifications. In order

  12. Do aerosols impact ground observation of total cloud cover over the North China Plain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Xia, Xiangao; Wang, Pucai; Fei, Ye

    2015-04-01

    Ground observation of the total cloud cover (TCC) showed a significant downward trend during the past half century over the North China Plain (NCP). The objective of this paper is to examine whether aerosols have impacted the surface observations of TCC by human observers. TCC observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua (TCCgrd) were firstly compared with ground observations (TCCsat) at 201 synoptic stations over the NCP. Results showed that both data sets were in good agreement. The correlation coefficient between TCCgrd and TCCsatranged from 0.80 in winter to 0.90 in summer. The relationship between TCCsat - TCCgrdand visibility was then analyzed, which showed no significant correlation. Finally, long-term trends of TCCgrd and visibility were not correlated. These results indicated that aerosols likely did not impact the long-term trend of TCCgrdover the NCP.

  13. Do aerosols impact ground observation of total cloud cover over the North China Plain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Xia, X.; Wang, P.; Fei, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Ground observation of the total cloud cover (TCC) showed a significant downward trend during the past half century over the North China Plain (NCP). The objective of this paper is to examine whether aerosols have impacted the surface observations of TCC by human observers. TCC observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua (TCCsat) were firstly compared with ground observations (TCCgrd) at 201 synoptic stations over the NCP. Results showed that both data sets were in good agreement. The correlation coefficient between TCCgrd and TCCsat ranged from 0.80 in winter to 0.90 in summer. The relationship between TCCsat-TCCgrd and visibility was then analyzed, which showed no significant correlation. Finally, long-term trends of TCCgrd and visibility were not correlated. These results indicated that aerosols likely did not impact the long-term trend of TCCgrd over the NCP.

  14. Identification of absorbing organic (brown carbon) aerosols through Sun Photometry: results from AEROCAN / AERONET stations in high Arctic and urban Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, G. H.; Chaubey, J. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Hayes, P.; Atkinson, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Light absorbing organic aerosols or brown carbon (BrC) aerosols are prominent species influencing the absorbing aerosol optical depth (AAOD) of the total aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the UV wavelength region. They, along with dust, play an important role in modifying the spectral AAOD and the spectral AOD in the UV region: this property can be used to discriminate BrC aerosols from both weakly absorbing aerosols such as sulfates as well as strongly absorbing aerosols such as black carbon (BC). In this study we use available AERONET inversions (level 1.5) retrieved for the measuring period from 2009 to 2013, for the Arctic region (Eureka, Barrow and Hornsund), Urban/ Industrial regions (Kanpur, Beijing), and the forest regions (Alta Foresta and Mongu), to identify BrC aerosols. Using Dubovik's inversion algorithm results, we analyzed parameters that were sensitive to BrC presence, notably AAOD, AAODBrC estimated using the approach of Arola et al. [2011], the fine-mode-aerosol absorption derivative (αf, abs) and the fine-mode-aerosol absorption 2nd derivative (αf, abs'), all computed at a near UV wavelength (440 nm). Temporal trends of these parameters were investigated for all test stations and compared to available volume sampling surface data as a means of validating / evaluating the sensitivity of ostensible sunphotometer indicators of BrC aerosols to the presence of BrC as measured using independent indicators. Reference: Arola, A., Schuster, G., Myhre, G., Kazadzis, S., Dey, S., and Tripathi, S. N.: Inferring absorbing organic carbon content from AERONET data, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 215-225, doi:10.5194/acp-11-215-2011, 2011

  15. Speciation of Water-Soluble Organic Carbons in Aerosols from two collecting methods: PILS and filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Yoon, H.; Ahn, Y.; Shin, J.; Lee, M.; Park, M.

    2013-12-01

    Total suspended particles aerosol sampling for collection of 24 h by high volume air sampler at Campus of Korea University in metropolitan city Seoul. To measure WSOC, an aliquot (2 cm2) of quartz fiber filter ( 20.3 × 25.4 cm) was extracted 5 mL Milli-Q water with hot water (80 °C) and room temperature water (25 °C) under ultrasonication (10 min, three times). Hot water extracted method was comparison with PILS samples. WSOC was quantified using a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer. For speciation analysis of organic compounds, the extracts were concentrated to dryness using freeze dryer and then derivatized with MSTFA (N-Methyl-N-trimethy- silyltrifluoroacetamide+1% trimethylchlorosilane) and analyzed with GC-MS scan mode. In extracted with hot water, total carbon concentrations were higher than room temperature extracts. Organic compounds widely recognized to be generated from anthropogenic sources with a low solubility at ambient temperature organic were detected in both samples obtained from PILS and hot water extraction. It is demonstrating that difference between total carbon concentration and composition of sampling obtain from two different systems (i.e. PILS and filter) in analytical procedure of WSOCs. Acknowledgement This research was susported by Center for Women In Science, Engineering Technology(WISET) commissioned by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning and the National Research Foundation of korea. The authors also acknowledge the support made by a grant from the Korea Basic Science Institute.

  16. Total Observed Organic Carbon (TOOC): A Synthesis of North American Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heald, C. L.; Goldstein, A. H.; Allan, J. D.; Aiken, A. C.; Apel, E.; Atlas, E. L.; Baker, A. K.; Bates, T. S.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.; Campos, T.; Coe, H.; Crounse, J. D.; DeCarlo, P. F.; de Gouw, J. A.; Dunlea, E. J.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Goldan, P.; Griffin, R. J.; Herndon, S. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Holzinger, R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Junkermann, W.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of organic carbon compounds in both the gas and particle phases made upwind, over and downwind of North America are synthesized to examine the total observed organic carbon (TOOC) in the atmosphere over this region. These include measurements made aboard the NOAA WP-3 and BAe-146 aircraft, the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown, and at the Thompson Farm and Chebogue Point surface sites during the summer 2004 ICARTT campaign. Both winter and summer 2002 measurements during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study are also included. Lastly, the spring 2002 observations at Trinidad Head, CA, surface measurements made in March 2006 in Mexico City and coincidentally aboard the C-130 aircraft during the MILAGRO campaign and later during the IMPEX campaign off the northwestern United States are incorporated. Concentrations of TOOC in these datasets span more than two orders of magnitude. The daytime mean TOOC ranges from 4.0 to 456 microg C/cubic m from the cleanest site (Trinidad Head) to the most polluted (Mexico City). Organic aerosol makes up 3-17% of this mean TOOC, with highest fractions reported over the northeastern United States, where organic aerosol can comprise up to 50% of TOOC. Carbon monoxide concentrations explain 46 to 86% of the variability in TOOC, with highest TOOC/CO slopes in regions with fresh anthropogenic influence, where we also expect the highest degree of mass closure for TOOC. Correlation with isoprene, formaldehyde, methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein also indicates that biogenic activity contributes substantially to the variability of TOOC, yet these tracers of biogenic oxidation sources do not explain the variability in organic aerosol observed over North America. We highlight the critical need to develop measurement techniques to routinely detect total gas phase VOCs, and to deploy comprehensive suites of TOOC instruments in diverse environments to quantify the ambient evolution of organic carbon from source to sink.

  17. Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, S E

    2012-05-30

    Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

  18. Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J. E.

    2005-11-01

    Measurements of organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) concentrations over a variety of locations worldwide have been analyzed to infer the spatial distributions of the ratios of OC to BC. Since these ratios determine the relative amounts of scattering and absorption, they are often used to estimate the radiative forcing due to aerosols. An artifact in the protocol for filter measurements of OC has led to widespread overestimates of the ratio of OC to BC in atmospheric aerosols. We developed a criterion to correct for this artifact and analyze corrected OC to BC ratios. The OC to BC ratios, ranging from 1.3 to 2.4, appear relatively constant and are generally unaffected by seasonality, sources, or technology changes, at the locations considered here. The ratios compare well with emission inventories over Europe and China but are a factor of 2 lower in other regions. The reduced estimate for OC/BC in aerosols strengthens the argument that reduction of soot emissions maybe a useful approach to slow global warming.

  19. Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis ofpublished data and implications for climate forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

    2005-07-11

    Measurements of organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC)concentrations over a variety of locations worldwide, have been analyzed to infer the spatial distributions of the ratios of OC to BC. Since these ratios determine the relative amounts of scattering and absorption, they are often used to estimate the radiative forcing due to aerosols. An artifact in the protocol for filter measurements of OC has led to widespread overestimates of the ratio of OC to BC in atmospheric aerosols. We developed a criterion to correct for this artifact and analyze corrected OC to BC ratios. The OC to BC ratios, ranging from 1.3to 2.4, appear relatively constant and are generally unaffected by seasonality, sources or technology changes, at the locations considered here. The ratios compare well with emission inventories over Europe and China but are a factor of two lower in other regions. The reduced estimate for OC/BC in aerosols strengthens the argument that reduction of soot emissions maybe a useful approach to slow global warming.

  20. Measuring alveolar dimensions at total lung capacity by aerosol-derived airway morphometry.

    PubMed

    Zeman, K L; Bennett, W D

    1995-01-01

    A technique based on particle sedimentation, aerosol-derived airway morphometry (ADAM), was modified to investigate the morphometry of human lung airspaces at full inflation in 54 subjects with normal lung function, ages 18 to 69 years. The technique compares the recovered concentrations of monodisperse aerosol particles after gravitational settling during breath holds to determine effective airspace diameters (EADs) as a function of volumetric lung depth. The method is simple and non-invasive, requiring only several inhalations of aerosol to total lung capacity, breath holds at end inhalation and exhalation to residual volume (RV). The method is sensitive enough to detect differences in the smallest observed airspaces (EADmin) due to normal aging of healthy lungs when older subjects are compared to younger subjects. The average EADmin was larger (p = 0.009) for the oldest adults (293 +/- 54 um, s.d., 50-70 years, n = 13) at the deepest volumetric lung depth (near 40% of TLC into the lung) when compared to the youngest adults (250 +/- 38 um, s.d., 18-40 years, n = 22). The two groups had similar EADs at a depth of 5% of TLC. No gender difference in EADmin was found when comparing all males and females. No correlation was found between EADs and TLC implying number of alveolar airspaces rather than airspace size determines lung volume. The effects of changing the aerosol inhalation volume to TLC ratio was also investigated. Compared to the dichotomous Weibel morphometric model, the average EADs of 22 18-40 year old subjects were found to be equivalent near 1% TLC and 40% TLC, but were larger in size than the model between those extremes with a maximum difference occurring at approximately 3% TLC. This method appears to be extremely sensitive to in vivo changes in airspace dimensions and may prove useful in determining changes in these dimensions associated with normal lung development and early disease states.

  1. Carbon content of atmospheric aerosols in a residential area during the wood combustion season in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krecl, Patricia; Ström, Johan; Johansson, Christer

    Carbonaceous aerosol particles were observed in a residential area with wood combustion during wintertime in Northern Sweden. Filter samples were analyzed for elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) content by using a thermo-optical transmittance method. The light-absorbing carbon (LAC) content was determined by employing a commercial Aethalometer and a custom-built particle soot absorption photometer. Filter samples were used to convert the optical signals to LAC mass concentrations. Additional total PM 10 mass concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured. The mean and standard deviation mass concentrations were 4.4±3.6 μg m -3 for OC, and 1.4±1.2 μg m -3 for EC. On average, EC accounted for 10.7% of the total PM 10 and the contribution of OC to the total PM 10 was 35.4%. Aethalometer and custom-built PSAP measurements were highly correlated ( R2=0.92). The hourly mean value of LAC mass concentration was 1.76 μg m -3 (median 0.88 μg m -3) for the winter 2005-2006. This study shows that the custom-built PSAP is a reliable alternative for the commercial Aethalometer with the advantage of being a low-cost instrument.

  2. Multi-wavelength optical determination of black and brown carbon in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, D.; Caponi, L.; Bernardoni, V.; Bove, M. C.; Brotto, P.; Calzolai, G.; Cassola, F.; Chiari, M.; Fedi, M. E.; Fermo, P.; Giannoni, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Piazzalunga, A.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R.; Prati, P.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a new way to apportion the absorption coefficient (babs) of carbonaceous atmospheric aerosols starting from a multi-wavelength optical analysis is shown. This methodology can disentangle and quantify the contribution to total absorption of equivalent black carbon (EBC) emitted by wood burning (EBCWB) and fossil fuel (EBCFF) as well as brown carbon (BrC) due to incomplete combustion. The method uses the information gathered at five different wavelengths in a renewed and upgraded version of the approach usually referred to as Aethalometer model. Moreover, we present the results of an apportionment study of carbonaceous aerosol sources performed in a rural area and in a coastal city, both located in the North-West of Italy. Results obtained by the proposed approach are validated against independent measurements of levoglucosan and radiocarbon. At the rural site the EBCWB and EBCFF relative contributions are about 40% and 60% in winter and 15% and 85% in summer, respectively. At the coastal urban site, EBCWB and EBCFF are about 15% and 85% during fall. The OC contribution to the wood burning source at the rural site results approximately 50% in winter and 10% in summer and about 15% at the coastal urban site in fall. The new methodology also provides a direct measurement of the absorption Ångström exponent of BrC (αBrC) which resulted αBrC = 3.95 ± 0.20.

  3. Comparison of Bulk Carbon Concentrations and Optical Properties of Carbonaceous Aerosols in the North Slope Alaska from Summer 2012 and Summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, R. J.; Barrett, T. E.; Moffett, C.; Gunsch, M.; Pratt, K.

    2015-12-01

    With recent drilling permits being issued for exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea, there is a need for characterization of carbonaceous aerosols in the Arctic both prior to and during the exploratory drilling phase. A month-long field sampling campaign will be conducted in Barrow, AK, at the confluence of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas, from August to September 2015. Total suspended particulate (TSP) aerosol samples will be collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) climate research facility in Barrow, AK, USA. Samples will be analyzed for organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) on a Sunset carbon analyzer utilizing the NIOSH 5040 method. Samples will also be analyzed for water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) using a water extraction method and subsequent analysis on a Shimadzu Total Carbon Analyzer. Optical properties of the aqueous extracts will also be measured using an Agilent ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometer. OC, EC and WSOC concentrations will then be compared to aerosol samples collected at the same location in summer 2012, prior to the onset of exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea. Back trajectory (BT) analysis will be performed for each sampling campaign to help assess the impact of source region on the carbonaceous aerosol budget and to identify any changes in source region between the two campaigns. A comparison of samples from the same location and season both prior to and post drilling will allow for a more accurate characterization and tracking of the potential impacts of new aerosol emission sources in the region.

  4. Gas-phase removal of biofilms from various surfaces using carbon dioxide aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minju; Hong, Seongkyeol; Kang, Min-Yeong; Lee, Jin-Won; Jang, Jaesung

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the removal of Escherichia coli XL1-blue biofilms using periodic jets of carbon dioxide aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO(2)) with nitrogen gas. The aerosols were generated by the adiabatic expansion of high-pressure CO(2) gas through a nozzle and used to remove air-dried biofilms. The areas of the biofilms were measured from scanning electron micrographs before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured with various air-drying times of the biofilms before the treatment, surface materials, and durations of CO(2) aerosols in each 8-s aerosol-nitrogen cleaning cycle. Nearly 100% of the fresh biofilms were removed from the various surfaces very reliably within 90 s. This technique can be useful for removing unsaturated biofilms on solid surfaces and has potential applications for cleaning bio-contaminated surfaces.

  5. Aerosol Absorption by Black Carbon and Dust: Implications of Climate Change and Air Quality in Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol distributions from 2000 to 2007 are simulated with the global model GOCART to attribute light absorption by aerosol to its composition and sources. We show the seasonal and interannual variations of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere over Asia, mainly black carbon and dust. and their linkage to the changes of anthropogenic and dust emissions in the region. We compare our results with observations from satellite and ground-based networks, and estimate the importance of black carbon and dust on regional climate forcing and air quality.

  6. The impact of biogenic carbon emissions on aerosol absorption inMexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, N; Gaffney, J; Tackett, M J; Sturchio, N; Hearty, L; Martinez, N; Hardy, K D; Machany-Rivera, A; Guilderson, T P; MacMillan, A; Steelman, K

    2009-02-24

    In order to determine the wavelength dependence of atmospheric aerosol absorption in the Mexico City area, the absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs) were calculated from aerosol absorption measurements at seven wavelengths obtained with a seven-channel aethalometer during two field campaigns, the Mexico City Metropolitan Area study in April 2003 (MCMA 2003) and the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The AAEs varied from 0.76 to 1.56 in 2003 and from 0.54 to 1.52 in 2006. The AAE values determined in the afternoon were consistently higher than the corresponding morning values, suggesting the photochemical formation of absorbing secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the afternoon. The AAE values were compared to stable and radiocarbon isotopic measurements of aerosol samples collected at the same time to determine the sources of the aerosol carbon. The fraction of modern carbon (fM) in the aerosol samples, as determined from {sup 14}C analysis, showed that 70% of the carbonaceous aerosols in Mexico City were from modern sources, indicating a significant impact from biomass burning during both field campaigns. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of the aerosol samples illustrate the significant impact of Yucatan forest fires (C-3 plants) in 2003 and local grass fires (C-4 plants) at site T1 in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and calculated aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

  7. Characteristics of black carbon aerosol from a surface oil burn during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Bahreini, R.; de Gouw, J. A.; Gao, R. S.; Holloway, J. S.; Lack, D. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Peischl, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol mass mixing ratio and microphysical properties were measured from the NOAA P-3 aircraft during active surface oil burning subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in April 2010. Approximately 4% of the combusted material was released into the atmosphere as BC. The total amount of BC introduced to the atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico via surface burning of oil during the 9-week spill is estimated to be (1.35 ± 0.72) × 106 kg. The median mass diameter of BC particles observed in the burning plume was much larger than that of the non-plume Gulf background air and previously sampled from a variety of sources. The plume BC particles were internally mixed with very little non-refractory material, a feature typical of fresh emissions from fairly efficient fossil-fuel burning sources and atypical of BC in biomass burning plumes. BC dominated the total accumulation-mode aerosol in both mass and number. The BC mass-specific extinction cross-section was 10.2 ± 4.1 and 7.1 ± 2.8 m2/g at 405 and 532 nm respectively. These results help constrain the properties of BC emissions associated with DWH and other large spills.

  8. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) observations of increases in Asian aerosol in winter from 1979 to 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, Steven T.; Torres, O.; Smith, Steven J.

    2004-12-01

    Emission inventories indicate that the largest increases in SO{sub 2} emissions have occurred in Asia during the last 20 years. By inference, largest increases in aerosol, produced primarily by the conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate, should have occurred in Asia during the same time period. Decadal changes in regional aerosol optical depths are calculated by analyzing Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) vertical aerosol optical depths (converted to 550 nm) from 1979 to 2000 on a 1{sup o} by 1{sup o} global grid. The anthropogenic component of the TOMS aerosol record is maximized by examining the seasonal cycles of desert dust and Boreal fire smoke, and identifying the months of the year for which the desert dust and Boreal fire smoke are least conspicuous. Gobi and Taklimakan desert dust in Asia is prevalent in the TOMS record during spring, and eastern Siberian smoke from Boreal forest fires is prevalent during summer. Aerosol trends are calculated on a regional basis during winter (November-February) to maximize the anthropogenic component of the aerosol record. Large increases in aerosol optical depths between 1979 and 2000 are present over the China coastal plain and the Ganges river basin in India. Aerosol increased by 17% per decade during winter over the China coastal plain, while SO{sub 2} emissions over the same geographical region increased by 33% per decade.

  9. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    DOE PAGES

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-23

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. In this paper, we conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCMmore » biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. Finally, we also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.« less

  10. Black carbon aerosol-induced Northern Hemisphere tropical expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil

    2015-06-23

    Global climate models (GCMs) underestimate the observed trend in tropical expansion. Recent studies partly attribute it to black carbon (BC) aerosols, which are poorly represented in GCMs. In this paper, we conduct a suite of idealized experiments with the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 coupled to a slab ocean model forced with increasing BC concentrations covering a large swath of the estimated range of current BC radiative forcing while maintaining their spatial distribution. The Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropics expand poleward nearly linearly as BC radiative forcing increases (0.7° W-1 m2), indicating that a realistic representation of BC could reduce GCM biases. We find support for the mechanism where BC-induced midlatitude tropospheric heating shifts the maximum meridional tropospheric temperature gradient poleward resulting in tropical expansion. Finally, we also find that the NH poleward tropical edge is nearly linearly correlated with the location of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which shifts northward in response to increasing BC.

  11. [Composition and seasonal variations of carbon isotopes in aerosols of Lhasa, Tibet].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shi-chang; Shen, Cheng-de; Cong, Zhi-yuan; Liu, Ke-xin; Liu, Li-chao

    2010-05-01

    A total of 30 samples of total suspended particles were collected at an urban site in western of Lhasa city, Tibet from August 2006 to July 2007 for investigating carbonaceous aerosol features. 14C was taken as a reference to quantitatively distinguish the fossil and biogenic-derived origins along with the characteristics of seasonal variations of all carbonaceous materials in Lhasa are discussed. The results showed that the f(c) values in Lhasa ranged from 0.357 to 0.702, with an average of 0.493, which is higher than Beijing and Tokyo, but are far lower than that of remote/rural regions such as Launceston, indicating a major biogenic influence in Lhasa. Values of f(c) displayed clear seasonal variations with higher mean value in winter, a decreasing trend in spring, while relatively lower values in summer and autumn. Higher f(C) values in winter demonstrate that carbonaceous aerosol is mainly dominated by wood burning and incineration of agricultural wastes during the winter. The lower f(c) values in summer and autumn might be caused by increased diesel engines, motor vehicles emissions, which are related to the tourism in Lhasa. delta13C values ranged from -26.40% per hundred to approximately -25.10% per hundred, with an average of -25.8% per hundred, and showed no clear seasonal variation. The relative higher values in summer reflected the increment of fossil carbon emissions. 13C(TC) values are relatively homogeneous at -25.8% per hundred, considering the characteristics of seasonal variations of f(c) values, it can be concluded that carbonaceous aerosol of Lhasa was mainly influenced by a constant mixing of several pollution sources such as motor vehicles and wood burning emissions. PMID:20623843

  12. Estimation of black carbon content for biomass burning aerosols from multi-channel Raman lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Marmureanu, Luminita; Nicolae, Doina

    2015-04-01

    Biomass burning due to natural processes (forest fires) or anthropical activities (agriculture, thermal power stations, domestic heating) is an important source of aerosols with a high content of carbon components (black carbon and organic carbon). Multi-channel Raman lidars provide information on the spectral dependence of the backscatter and extinction coefficients, embedding information on the black carbon content. Aerosols with a high content of black carbon have large extinction coefficients and small backscatter coefficients (strong absorption), while aerosols with high content of organic carbon have large backscatter coefficients (weak absorption). This paper presents a method based on radiative calculations to estimate the black carbon content of biomass burning aerosols from 3b+2a+1d lidar signals. Data is collected at Magurele, Romania, at the cross-road of air masses coming from Ukraine, Russia and Greece, where burning events are frequent during both cold and hot seasons. Aerosols are transported in the free troposphere, generally in the 2-4 km altitude range, and reaches the lidar location after 2-3 days. Optical data are collected between 2011-2012 by a multi-channel Raman lidar and follows the quality assurance program of EARLINET. Radiative calculations are made with libRadTran, an open source radiative model developed by ESA. Validation of the retrievals is made by comparison to a co-located C-ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, biomass burning, radiative model, black carbon Acknowledgment: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project no. 39/2012 - SIAFIM, and by Romanian Partnerships in priority areas PNII implemented with MEN-UEFISCDI support, project no. 309/2014 - MOBBE

  13. Optimum quantification temperature for total, organic, and elemental carbon using thermal-coulombimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ospina, Harry; Peralta, Oscar; Castro, Telma; Saavedra, María I.

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of total (TC), organic (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and OC/TC, EC/TC ratios is useful to determine the original sources of carbonaceous particles, so the importance of using appropriate standards is often crucial in atmospheric sciences, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) offers good analytes. The Standard Reference Material (SRM) Urban Particulate Matter has a similar matrix as in the airborne aerosols of urban atmospheres and a well-known composition. The optimum quantification temperature analysis for carbon content of SRM 1648a and 1649b using a coulometric method (CM5300 and CM5014) is 500 °C for OC and 700 °C for TC. We also evaluated the repeatability and reproducibility provided by the instrument. It should be pointed out that SRM 1649b has no OC or TC quantification in its Certificate of Analysis, so this study may serve as a basis for future analysis of carbon content of atmospheric aerosols.

  14. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  15. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: implications for aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Healy, R. M.; Riemer, N.; West, M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C.-H.; Wenger, J. C.; Evans, G. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particles was 0.02-0.08 and 0.72-0.93, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.

  16. Quantification of black carbon mixing state from traffic: Implications for aerosol optical properties

    DOE PAGES

    Willis, Megan D.; Healy, Robert M.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew; Wang, Jon M.; Jeong, Cheol -Heon; Wenger, John C.; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Lee, Alex K. Y.

    2016-04-14

    The climatic impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosol, an important absorber of solar radiation in the atmosphere, remain poorly constrained and are intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modelling informed by quantitative measurements from a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer, we confirm that the mixing state (the distribution of co-emitted aerosol amongst fresh BC-containing particles) at the time of emission significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble aerosol mass spectrometry observations indicate that BC near the point of emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inmore » two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon in HOA-rich and BC-rich particle classes was  < 0.1 and 0.8, respectively. Notably, approximately 90 % of BC mass resides in BC-rich particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Lastly, significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection into the atmosphere.« less

  17. Harmonizing aerosol carbon measurements between two conventional thermal/optical analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Guorui; Chen, Yingjun; Sun, Junying; Chen, Laiguo; Tian, Wenjuan; Duan, Jingchun; Zhang, Gan; Chai, Fahe; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2011-04-01

    Although total carbon (TC) can be consistently quantified by various aerosol carbon measurement methods, the demarcation of TC into organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) has long been inconsistent. The NIOSH and IMPROVE protocols are most widely used for thermal/optical analysis (TOA), but current knowledge rests in the description that the NIOSH protocol usually gives lower EC values than does the IMPROVE protocol. This study seeks to explore the possibility of quantitatively linking the difference between the two TOA protocols. Residential coal-burning samples that had been collected and analyzed following the NIOSH protocol in previous studies were directly reanalyzed following the IMPROVE protocol for this study. A comparison of each pair of NIOSH and IMPROVE EC values reveals the dynamic relation between the two protocols, which can be expressed as a regression equation, y=(1-x)/(1+4.86x2) (R2=0.96), where the independent x is the EC/TC ratio R(EC/TC) for the IMPROVE protocol, and the dependent y is the difference between IMPROVE and NIOSH REC/TC relative to IMPROVE REC/TC. This regression equation may be the first effort in formulating the relationship between the two TOA protocols, and it is very helpful in harmonizing inconsistent TOA measurements, for example, source characterization, ambient monitoring, and atmospheric modeling.

  18. It's a Sooty Problem: Black Carbon and Aerosols from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols (smoke, pollution, dust or sea salt particles, small enough to be suspended in the air), their evolution, composition, variability in space and time and interaction with solar radiation, clouds and precipitation is lacking despite decades of research. Just recently we recognized that understanding the global aerosol system is fundamental for progress in climate change and hydrological cycle research. While a single instrument was used to demonstrate 50 yrs ago that the global CO2 levels are rising, posing thread to our climate, we need an may of satellites, surface networks of radiometers, elaborated laboratory and field experiments coupled with chemical transport models to understand the global aerosol system. This complexity of the aerosol problem results from their short lifetime (1 week), variability of the chemical composition and complex chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere. The result is a heterogeneous distribution of aerosol and their properties. The new generation of satellites and surface networks of radiometers provides exciting opportunities to measure the aerosol properties and their interaction with clouds and climate. However farther development in the satellite capability, aerosol chemical models and climate models is needed to fully decipher the aerosol secrets with accuracy required to predict future climates.

  19. Determination of total and non-water soluble iodine in atmospheric aerosols by thermal extraction and spectrometric detection (TESI).

    PubMed

    Gilfedder, B S; Chance, R; Dettmann, U; Lai, S C; Baker, A R

    2010-09-01

    Iodine has recently been of interest in atmospheric chemistry due to its role in tropospheric ozone depletion, modification of the HO/HO(2) ratio and aerosol nucleation. Gas-phase iodine chemistry is tightly coupled to the aerosol phase through heterogeneous reactions, which are dependent on iodine concentrations and speciation in the aerosol. To date, the only method available for total iodine determination in aerosols is collection on filters by impaction and quantification by neutron activation analysis (NAA). NAA is not widely available to all working groups and is costly to commission. Here, we present a method to determine total iodine concentrations in aerosol impact filter samples by combustion of filter sub-samples (approximately 5 cm(2)) at 1,000 degrees C, trapping in deionised water and quantification by UV/Vis spectroscopy. Both quartz and cellulose filters were analysed from four separate sampling campaigns. The method proved to be sensitive (3sigma = 6 ng absolute iodine approximately 3 pmol m(-3)) precise (RSD approximately 5%) and accurate, as determined by external and standard addition calibrations. Total iodine concentrations ranged from 10 pmol m(-3) over the Southern Ocean to 100 pmol m(-3) over the tropical Atlantic, in agreement with previous estimates. The soluble iodine concentration (extracted with water and measured by ICP-MS) was then subtracted from the total iodine to yield non-water-soluble iodine (NSI). The NSI fraction ranged from 20% to 53% of total iodine, and thus can be significant in some cases.

  20. Total ozone column, aerosol optical depth and precipitable water effects on solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation recorded in Malta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Yousif, Charles; Mateos, David; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    The Universities of Malta and Valladolid (Spain) developed a measurement campaign, which took place in the Institute for Energy Technology in Marsaxlokk (Southern Malta) between May and October 2012, and it was supported by the Spanish government through the Project titled "Measurement campaign about Solar Radiation, Ozone, and Aerosol in the Mediterranean area" (with reference CGL2010-12140-E). This campaign provided the first ground-based measurements in Malta of erythemal radiation and UV index, which indicate the effectiveness of the sun exposure to produce sunburn on human skin. A wide variety of instruments was involved in the campaign, providing a complete atmospheric characterization. Data of erythemal radiation and UV index (from UVB-1 pyranometer), total shortwave radiaton (global and diffuse components from CM-6B pyranometers), and total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness, and precitable water column (from a Microtops-II sunphotometer) were available in the campaign. Ground-based and satellite instruments were used in the analysis, and several intercomparisons were carried out to validate remote sensing data. OMI, GOME, GOME-2, and MODIS instruments, which provide data of ozone, aerosol load and optical properties, were used to this end. The effects on solar radiation, ultraviolet and total shortwave ranges, of total ozone column, aerosol optical thickness and precipitable water column were obtained using radiation measurements at different fixed solar zenith angles. The empirical results shown a determinant role of the solar position, a negligible effect of ozone on total shortwave radiation, and a stronger attenuation provided by aerosol particles in the erythemal radiation. A variety of aerosol types from different sources (desert dust, biomass burning, continental, and maritime) reach Malta, in this campaign several dust events from the Sahara desert occurred and were analyzed establishing the air mass back-trajectories ending at Malta at

  1. Total carbon accumulation in a tropical forest landscape

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Regrowing tropical forests worldwide sequester important amounts of carbon and restore part of the C emissions emitted by deforestation. However, there are large uncertainties concerning the rates of carbon accumulation after the abandonment of agricultural and pasture land. We report here accumulation of total carbon stocks (TCS) in a chronosequence of secondary forests at a mid-elevation landscape (900-1200 m asl) in the Andean mountains of Colombia. Results We found positive accumulation rates for all ecosystem pools except soil carbon, which showed no significant trend of recovery after 36 years of secondary succession. We used these data to develop a simple model to predict accumulation of TCS over time. This model performed remarkably well predicting TCS at other chronosequences in the Americas (Root Mean Square Error < 40 Mg C ha-1), which provided an opportunity to explore different assumptions in the calculation of large-scale carbon budgets. Simulations of TCS with our empirical model were used to test three assumptions often made in carbon budgets: 1) the use of carbon accumulation in tree aboveground biomass as a surrogate for accumulation of TCS, 2) the implicit consideration of carbon legacies from previous land-use, and 3) the omission of landscape age in calculating accumulation rates of TCS. Conclusions Our simulations showed that in many situations carbon can be released from regrowing secondary forests depending on the amount of carbon legacies and the average age of the landscape. In most cases, the rates used to predict carbon accumulation in the Americas were above the rates predicted in our simulations. These biome level rates seemed to be realistic only in landscapes not affected by carbon legacies from previous land-use and mean ages of around 10 years. PMID:23249727

  2. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jesse H; Donahue, Neil M; Jimenez, Jose L; Kessler, Sean H; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Wilson, Kevin R; Altieri, Katye E; Mazzoleni, Lynn R; Wozniak, Andrew S; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R; Smith, Jared D; Kolb, Charles E; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2011-02-01

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that they play in human health, biogeochemical cycles and the Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here, we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state, a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of the average carbon oxidation state, using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number.

  3. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of ambient aerosols collected from Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim, an outflow region of Asian dusts and pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Bhagawati; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Zhu, Chunmao

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios were measured for total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN), respectively, in aerosol (TSP) samples collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, an outflow region of Asian pollutants, during 2009-2010. The averaged δ13C and δ15N ratios are -22.2‰ and +12.5‰, respectively. The δ13C values are similar in both spring (-22.5‰) and winter (-22.5‰), suggesting the similar sources and/or source regions. We found that δ13C from Okinawa aerosols are ca. 2‰ higher than those reported from Chinese megacities probably due to photochemical aging of organic aerosols. A strong correlation (r = 0.81) was found between nss-Ca and TSP, suggesting that springtime aerosols are influenced from Asian dusts. However, carbonates in the Asian dusts were titrated with acidic species such as sulfuric acid and oxalic acid during atmospheric transport although two samples suggested the presence of remaining carbonate. No correlations were found between δ13C and tracer compounds (levoglucosan, elemental carbon, oxalic acid, and Na+). During winter and spring, coal burning is significant source in China. Based on isotopic mass balance, contribution of coal burning origin particles to total aerosol carbon was estimated as ca. 97% in winter, which is probably associated with the high emissions in China. Contribution of NO3- to TN was on average 45% whereas that of NH4+ was 18%. These results suggest that vehicular exhaust is an important source of TN in Okinawa aerosols. Concentration of water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is higher in summer, suggesting that WSON is more emitted from the ocean in warmer season whereas inorganic nitrogen is more emitted in winter and spring from pollution sources in the Asian continent.

  4. Concentrations and sources of organic carbon aerosols in the free troposphere over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, Colette L.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Turquety, SolèNe; Hudman, Rynda C.; Weber, Rodney J.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Peltier, Richard E.; Atlas, Eliot L.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Warneke, Carsten; Holloway, John S.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Flocke, Frank M.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-12-01

    Aircraft measurements of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) aerosol over NE North America during summer 2004 (ITCT-2K4) are simulated with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to test our understanding of the sources of organic carbon (OC) aerosol in the free troposphere (FT). Elevated concentrations were observed in plumes from boreal fires in Alaska and Canada. WSOC aerosol concentrations outside of these plumes average 0.9 ± 0.9 μg C m-3 in the FT (2-6 km). The corresponding model value is 0.7 ± 0.6 μg C m-3, including 42% from biomass burning, 36% from biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and 22% from anthropogenic emissions. Previous OC aerosol observations over the NW Pacific in spring 2001 (ACE-Asia) averaged 3.3 ± 2.8 μg C m-3 in the FT, compared to a model value of 0.3 ± 0.3 μg C m-3. WSOC aerosol concentrations in the boundary layer (BL) during ITCT-2K4 are consistent with OC aerosol observed at the IMPROVE surface network. The model is low in the boundary layer by 30%, which we attribute to secondary formation at a rate comparable to primary anthropogenic emission. Observed WSOC aerosol concentrations decrease by a factor of 2 from the BL to the FT, as compared to a factor of 10 decrease for sulfate, indicating that most of the WSOC aerosol in the FT originates in situ. Despite reproducing mean observed WSOC concentrations in the FT to within 25%, the model cannot account for the variance in the observations (R = 0.21). Covariance analysis of FT WSOC aerosol with other measured chemical variables suggests an aqueous-phase mechanism for SOA generation involving biogenic precursors.

  5. The Arctic polar stratospheric cloud aerosol - Aircraft measurements of reactive nitrogen, total water, and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, S. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Dye, J. E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.

    1992-01-01

    In situ aircraft measurements in the lower stratosphere are used to investigate the reactive nitrogen, NO(y), total water, and particle components of the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) aerosol in the Arctic. The results are compared to findings from the Antarctic derived using similar measurements and interpretive techniques. The Arctic data show that particle volume well above background values is present at temperatures above the frostpoint, confirming the result from the Antarctic that the observed PSCs are not water ice particles. NO(y) measurements inside a PSC are enhanced above ambient values consistent with anisokinetic sampling of particles containing NO(y). In the Arctic data over long segments of several flights, calculations show saturation with respect to nitric acid trihydrate without significant PSC particle growth above background.

  6. Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in aerosols from Sapporo, Japan: Implications for photochemical aging during long-range atmospheric transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Shankar G.; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2008-07-01

    Molecular and stable carbon isotopic (δ13C value) compositions of dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, and dicarbonyls in aerosol samples (i.e., total suspended particles) collected in Sapporo, northern Japan during spring and summer were determined to better understand the photochemical aging of organic aerosols during long-range transport from East Asia and Siberia. Their molecular distributions were characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic (C3) or occasionally succinic (C4) acids. Concentrations of total diacids ranged from 106-787 ng m-3 with ketoacids (13-81 ng m-3) and dicarbonyls (2.6-28 ng m-3) being less abundant. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) comprised 23-69% of aerosol organic carbon (OC). OC to elemental carbon (EC) ratios were high (3.6-19, mean: 8.7). The ratios of C3/C4 and WSOC/OC did not show significant diurnal changes, suggesting that the Sapporo aerosols were not seriously affected by local photochemical processes and instead they were already aged. δ13C values of the dominant diacids (C2 - C4) ranged from -14.0 to -25.3‰. Largest δ13C values (-14.0 to -22.4‰, mean: -18.8‰) were obtained for C2, whereas smallest values (-25.1 to -31.4‰, mean: -28.1‰) were for azelaic acid (C9). In general, δ13C values of C2 - C4 diacids became less negative with aerosol aging (i.e., WSOC/OC), presumably due to isotopic fractionation during photochemical degradation of diacids. By comparing the δ13C values of diacids in the Sapporo aerosols with different air mass source regions, we suggest that although initial δ13C values of diacids depend on their precursor sources, the enrichment in 13C can be ascribed to aerosol photochemical aging.

  7. Extremely large anthropogenic-aerosol contribution to total aerosol load over the Bay of Bengal during winter season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kharol, S. Kumar; Sinha, P. R.; Singh, R. P.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Rani Sharma, A.; Badarinath, K. V. S.

    2011-07-01

    Ship-borne observations of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been carried out over the entire Bay of Bengal (BoB) as part of the W-ICARB cruise campaign during the period 27 December 2008-30 January 2009. The results reveal a pronounced temporal and spatial variability in the optical characteristics of aerosols mainly due to anthropogenic emissions and their dispersion controlled by local meteorology. The highest aerosol amount, with mean AOD500>0.4, being even above 1.0 on specific days, is found close to the coastal regions in the western and northern parts of BoB. In these regions the Ångström exponent is also found to be high (~1.2-1.25) indicating transport of strong anthropogenic emissions from continental regions, while very high AOD500 (0.39±0.07) and α380-870 values (1.27±0.09) are found over the eastern BoB. Except from the large α380-870 values, an indication of strong fine-mode dominance is also observed from the AOD curvature, which is negative in the vast majority of the cases, suggesting dominance of an anthropogenic-pollution aerosol type. On the other hand, clean maritime conditions are rather rare over the region, while the aerosol types are further examined through a classification scheme based on the relationship between α and dα. It was found that even for the same α values the fine-mode dominance is larger for higher AODs showing the strong continental influence over the marine environment of BoB. Furthermore, there is also an evidence of aerosol-size growth under more turbid conditions indicative of coagulation and/or humidification over specific BoB regions. The results obtained using OPAC model show significant fraction of soot aerosols (~6 %-8 %) over the eastern and northwestern BoB, while coarse-mode sea salt particles are found to dominate in the southern parts of BoB.

  8. Size distribution of black (BC) and total carbon (TC) in Vienna and Ljubljana.

    PubMed

    Hitzenberger, R; Ctyroky, P; Berner, A; Tursic, J; Podkrajsek, B; Grgić, I

    2006-12-01

    During two campaigns in winter 2004, size segregated impactor samples (0.1-10 microm) and filter samples were taken in two Central European cities (Vienna, Austria and Ljubljana, Slovenia). The impactor samples were analyzed for major inorganic ions and short-chain organic acids, total carbon (TC) and black carbon (BC). Maximum concentrations of total mass were 71.6 microg m(-3) in Vienna and 73.1 microg m(-3) in Ljubljana. Minimum concentrations in Vienna were only half those in Ljubljana. The BC content of the aerosol was similar (ca. 8%), but the BC/TC ratio was higher in Vienna than in Ljubljana (0.39 vs. 0.29), reflecting the different contribution of diesel traffic emissions. The mass median diameters of the submicron size distributions of all major fractions (total mass, TC, BC and SO(4)(2-)) were smaller in Vienna (0.43 microm, 0.41 microm, 0.38 microm and 0.48 microm, respectively) than in Ljubljana (0.55 microm, 0.44 microm, 0.42 microm and 0.60 microm, respectively). Impactor/filter ratios for total mass were 0.79 in Vienna and 0.82 in Ljubljana, while the ratios for BC were 0.56 in Vienna and 0.49 in Ljubljana. An estimation of the mixing state of accumulation mode BC indicated that 33% and 37% of BC, respectively, are mixed externally to the aerosol in the accumulation size range in Vienna and Ljubljana.

  9. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurements of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 micron. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the effects of other interfering constituents, such as water vapor, aerosols and cirrus clouds, on the radiance are significant but the overall effects of the modification of light path length on total back-to-space radiance sensitivity to CO2 change are minor for general cases, which means that generally the total column CO2 can be derived in high precision from the ratio of the on-line center to off-line radiances; (c) together with CO2 gas absorption aerosol/cirrus cloud layer has differential scattering which may result in the modification of on-line to off-line radiance ratio which could lead a large bias in the total column CO2 retrieval. Approaches to correct such bias need further investigation. (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature, which is achievable from new atmospheric sounders in the near future; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, should be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  10. Organic and inorganic components of aerosols over the central Himalayas: winter and summer variations in stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Prashant; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Joshi, H; Naja, M

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol samples were collected from a high elevation mountain site, Nainital, in India (1958 m asl) during September 2006 to June 2007 and were analyzed for water-soluble inorganic species, total carbon, nitrogen, and their isotopic composition (δ(13)C and δ(15)N, respectively). The chemical and isotopic composition of aerosols revealed significant anthropogenic influence over this remote free-troposphere site. The amount of total carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic composition suggest a considerable contribution of biomass burning to the aerosols during winter. On the other hand, fossil fuel combustion sources are found to be dominant during summer. The carbon aerosol in winter is characterized by greater isotope ratios (av. -24.0‰), mostly originated from biomass burning of C4 plants. On the contrary, the aerosols in summer showed smaller δ(13)C values (-26.0‰), indicating that they are originated from vascular plants (mostly of C3 plants). The secondary ions (i.e., SO4 (2-), NH4 (+), and NO3 (-)) were abundant due to the atmospheric reactions during long-range transport in both seasons. The water-soluble organic and inorganic compositions revealed that they are aged in winter but comparatively fresh in summer. This study validates that the pollutants generated from far distant sources could reach high altitudes over the Himalayan region under favorable meteorological conditions.

  11. Attributes of aerosol bound water soluble ions and carbon, and their relationships with AOD over the Brahmaputra Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Pranamika; Barman, Nivedita; Bora, Jayanta; Daimari, Rebecca; Deka, Pratibha; Hoque, Raza Rafiqul

    2016-10-01

    The present study is a ground based investigation of chemical properties of aerosol as PM10 and its relationship with the upper air optical properties. A total of 161 aerosol samples collected during 2010-2014 were characterized for water soluble ions viz. SO42-, NO3-, Cl-, F-, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+and Na+ and water soluble carbon factions - water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and water soluble inorganic carbon (WSIC). The entire study period was subdivided into four distinct seasons -pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter to assess the characteristics of chemical species in different times of the year contributing to the particulate loading over the study site. To understand the relationship between chemical species and optical properties, aerosol optical depth (AOD) data of the study area have been retrieved from MODIS satellite data at 550 nm. Mean mass concentration of PM10 was found to be 49.3 ± 37 μg/m3 for the whole study period with an explicit seasonal variation and winter maximum of mass concentration. Also, secondary ions have strong influence on the total aerosol loading in the region. Vivid seasonal variability was found in the concentrations of ions and carbons. The winter season showed maximum loading of ionic and carbonaceous species and the presence of crustal derived ions - Ca2+ and Mg2+ - remained uniform all through the seasons. The anions were found to be dominant over the cations during the study period. Interestingly, K+, originating mostly from biomass burning emissions, also play important neutralizing role together with NH4+. Significant relationships between AOD with PM10 and attributes were observed. Strong correlation of anthropogenic (SO42-, NO3-, NH4+), biomass burning (K+) and organic carbon fraction of PM10 with AOD was observed, which indicated the influence of these fractions on the attenuation of incoming light over the study region. HYSPLIT backward trajectories of air masses, which were computed for the study area

  12. Insights Into Water-Soluble Organic Aerosol Sources From Carbon-13 Ratios of Size Exclusion Chromatography Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, C. R.; Chuang, P. Y.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    Many sources of organic aerosols have been identified and quantified, and much of this work has used individual (mosty water-insoluble) compounds as tracers of primary sources. However, most organic aerosol cannot be molecularly characterized, and the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in many aerosols is thought to originate from gaseous precursors (i.e., it is secondary in nature). It can therefore be difficult to infer aerosol sources, particularly of background (i.e., aged) aerosols, and of the relatively high-MW component of aerosols. The stable isotope ratios (δ13C) of organic aerosols have been used to distinguish between sources, with lighter values (-30‰ to -25‰) interpreted as having originated from fossil fuel combustion and C4 biogenic emission, and heavier values (-25‰ to - 20‰) indicating a marine or C3 biogenic source. Most published measurements were of either total suspended particulates or PM2.5, however, and it is unknown to what extent these fractions differ from submicron WSOC. We report δ13C for submicron WSOC collected at a variety of sites, ranging from marine to polluted to background continental. Bulk marine organic δ13C ranged from -30.4 to - 27.6‰, slightly lighter than previously published results. This could be due to the elimination of supermicron cellular material or other biogenic primary emissions from the sample. Continental WSOC δ13C ranged from -19.1 to -29.8‰, with heavier values (-19.8 ± 1.0‰) in Oklahoma and lighter values at Great Smoky Mountain National Park in Tennessee (-25.8 ± 2.6‰) and Illinois (-24.5 ± 1.0‰). This likely results from the greater proportional of C3 plant material in the Oklahoma samples. In addition to bulk samples, we used size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to report δ13C of organic aerosols as a function of hydrodynamic diameter. Variability and magnitude of hydrodynamic diameter was greatest at low SEC pH, indicative of the acidic character of submicron WSOC. Tennessee

  13. Mass balance of organic carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, CéLia; Carvalho, Abel; Pio, Casimiro

    2002-11-01

    Total suspended particulate matter was collected in two Portuguese urban areas (Lisbon and Aveiro) and in a Finnish forested site. Samples were sequentially extracted with dichloromethane and water. The solvent extract was separated by flash chromatography into aliphatics, aromatics, carbonyls, alcohols, and an acidic fraction, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. An organic/black carbon analyzer was used to evaluate the carbonaceous matter in filters, the water-soluble fraction, solvent extractable material, and the content of different organic classes. Results showed that the common simple extraction with dichloromethane is able to dissolve less than 50% of the particulate organic material. The successive extraction with water removes an important quantity of the leftover organic polar compounds. The sum of both extractions recovers between 70% and 90% of the organic carbon present. The amount of oxygenated compounds is frequently more than 70% of the extracted material, with a large predominance of organic acids and alcohols, especially for particles with diameters less than 0.49 μm. The organic compounds identified in the extractable atmospheric particulate matter are represented by primary compounds with both anthropogenic and biogenic origin, which mainly derive from vegetation waxes and from petrogenic sources. Secondary products resulting from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds were also detected. The water-soluble fraction contains essentially oxocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids, and cellulosic constituents. In accordance with the anthropogenic characteristics of the sampling sites, nonpolar fractions constitute up to 24% of the extracted organic carbon in Lisbon and present high levels of petroleum markers, while in the forested station these compounds represent 8%. The oxygenated organic compounds account for 76-92% of the extracted carbon in samples from Aveiro and Finland. Owing to favorable photochemical conditions during

  14. Estimation of aerosol single scattering albedo from solar direct spectral radiance and total broadband irradiances measured in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fengsheng; Li, Zhanqing

    2007-11-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo (ωo) is a primary factor dictating aerosol radiative effect. Ground-based remote sensing of ωo has been employed most widely using spectral sky radiance measurements made from a scanning Sun photometer. Reliable results can be achieved for high aerosol loadings and for solar zenith angle >50°. This study presents an alternative method using spectral direct radiance measurements or aerosol optical depths together with total sky irradiance to retrieve ωo. The method does not require sky radiance data that can only be acquired by the expensive scanning Sun photometer. The method is evaluated using extensive measurements by a suite of instruments deployed in northern China under the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) project. The sensitivities of the retrieval to various uncertain factors were first examined by means of radiative transfer simulations. It was found the retrieval is most sensitive to cloud screening, total irradiance and the Angstrom Exponent (AE), but only weakly depends on surface albedo and the fine structure of aerosol size distribution. Using 1 year of rigorously screened clear-sky measurements made at the Xianghe site, the retrieved ωo values were found to agree with those retrieved from the Cimel Sun photometer by the AERONET method to within ˜0.03 (RMS), and ˜0.003 (mean bias). As part of the differences originate from different sky views seen by the Sun photometers and pyranometer under comparison, a further test was conducted by using total sky irradiances simulated with the retrieved aerosol properties from the AERONET. The resulting estimates of ωo agree to within 0.01-0.02 (RMS differences) and 0.002-0.003 (mean bias). These values are better measure of the true retrieval uncertainties, as they are free from any data mismatch. The characteristics of ωo retrievals were discussed.

  15. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurement of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 microns. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the radiance signal or sensitivity to CO2 change near the surface is not significantly diminished even in the presence of aerosols and/or thin cirrus clouds in the atmosphere; (c) the modification of sunlight path length by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could lead to large systematic errors in the retrieval; therefore, ancillary aerosol/cirrus cloud data are important to reduce retrieval errors; (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, must be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  16. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-11-05

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

  17. Changes in radiative forcing in Amazonia: the influence of clouds and aerosols controlling carbon budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    Surface radiation fluxes are critically important in photosynthetic processes that controls carbon assimilation and losses in tropical forests. Clouds and aerosols control the surface radiation fluxes in Amazonia, and the ratio of diffuse and direct radiation directly affects photosynthetic plant processes. Biomass burning emissions changes the atmosphere aerosol loading. The background aerosol optical thickness in wet season Amazonia is about 0.1 at 550 nm, while during the dry season AOT can reach values as high as 3-4 over large areas. The increase in diffuse radiation significantly enhance photosynthesis. Remote sensing measurements using MODIS and AERONET were used to measure the large scale aerosol distribution over Amazonia, and LBA flux towers provided the carbon balance over several sites. The enhancement in carbon uptake for AOD between 0.1 and 1 can reach 45%. For AOD above 1, the reduction in the direct flux starts to dominate and a strong reduction in carbon uptake is observed. Cloud cover also has a huge impact on carbon balance in Amazonia, but it is more difficult to quantify. These effects controls carbon balance in Amazonia.

  18. Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

    2009-11-27

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the

  19. Single-Particle Measurements of Midlatitude Black Carbon and Light-Scattering Aerosols from the Boundary Layer to the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, J. P.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Thomson, D. S.; Watts, L. A.; Wilson, J. C.; Reeves, J. M.; Darbeheshti, M.; Baumgardner, D. G.; Kok, G. L.; Chung, S. H.; Schulz, M.; Hendricks, J.; Lauer, A.; Kaercher, B.; Slowik, J. G.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Thompson, T. L.; Langford, A. O.; Loewenstein, M.; Aikin, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    A single-particle soot photometer (SP2) was flown on a NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft in November 2004 from Houston, Texas. The SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence to detect individual black carbon (BC) particles in an air sample in the mass range of approx.3-300 fg (approx.0.15-0.7 microns volume equivalent diameter). Scattered light is used to size the remaining non-BC aerosols in the range of approx.0.17-0.7 microns diameter. We present profiles of both aerosol types from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere from two midlatitude flights. Results for total aerosol amounts in the size range detected by the SP2 are in good agreement with typical particle spectrometer measurements in the same region. All ambient incandescing particles were identified as BC because their incandescence properties matched those of laboratory-generated BC aerosol. Approximately 40% of these BC particles showed evidence of internal mixing (e.g., coating). Throughout profiles between 5 and 18.7 km, BC particles were less than a few percent of total aerosol number, and black carbon aerosol (BCA) mass mixing ratio showed a constant gradient with altitude above 5 km. SP2 data was compared to results from the ECHAM4/MADE and LmDzT-INCA global aerosol models. The comparison will help resolve the important systematic differences in model aerosol processes that determine BCA loadings. Further intercomparisons of models and measurements as presented here will improve the accuracy of the radiative forcing contribution from BCA.

  20. Measurement of fine particulate matter nonvolatile and semi-volatile organic material with the Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor.

    PubMed

    Grover, Brett D; Kleinman, Michael; Eatough, Norman L; Eatough, Delbert J; Cary, Robert A; Hopke, Philip K; Wilson, William E

    2008-01-01

    Semi-volatile organic material (SVOM) in fine particles is not reliably measured with conventional semicontinuous carbon monitors because SVOM is lost from the collection media during sample collection. We have modified a Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor to allow for the determination of SVOM. In a conventional Sunset monitor, gas-phase organic compounds are removed in the sampled airstream by a diffusion denuder employing charcoal-impregnated cellulose filter (CIF) surfaces. Subsequently, particles are collected on a quartz filter and the instrument then determines both the organic carbon and elemental carbon fractions of the aerosol using a thermal/optical method. However, some of the SVOM is lost from the filter during collection, and therefore is not determined. Because the interfering gas-phase organic compounds are removed before aerosol collection, the SVOM can be determined by filtering the particles at the instrument inlet and then replacing the quartz filter in the monitor with a charcoal-impregnated glass fiber filter (CIG), which retains the SVOM lost from particles collected on the inlet filter. The resulting collected SVOM is then determined in the analysis step by measurement of the carbonaceous material thermally evolved from the CIG filter. This concept was tested during field studies in February 2003 in Lindon, UT, and in July 2003 in Rubidoux, CA. The results obtained were validated by comparison with Particle Concentrator-Brigham Young University Organic Sampling System (PC-BOSS) results. The sum of nonvolatile organic material determined with a conventional Sunset monitor and SVOM determined with the modified Sunset monitor agree with the PC-BOSS results. Linear regression analysis of total carbon concentrations determined by the PC-BOSS and the Sunset resulted in a zero-intercept slope of 0.99 +/- 0.02 (R2 = 0.92) and a precision of sigma = +/- 1.5 microg C/m3 (8%).

  1. Does atmospheric aging of biogenic SOA increase aerosol absorption and brown carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Yinon

    2014-05-01

    The optical properties of organic aerosols are important in determining their radiative forcing and, subsequently, their impact on climate. Primary or secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from natural and anthropogenic emissions age via photochemical reactions of OH, NO3, and O3. Atmospheric aging of aerosols changes their chemical, physical, and optical properties. Of special interest is the possible formation of absorbing organic species or "brown carbon", which can lead to absorption and heating in the atmosphere, with important consequences to climate and air quality. In this talk we will discuss possible formation pathways of brown carbon by aging of SOA, and its potential effect on radiative forcing. We employed a new broadband aerosol spectrometer that retrieves aerosol optical properties between 360 and 420 nm to probe the aging of biogenic and anthropogenic SOA in a flowtube and photochemical smog chamber. We will discuss the effect of photochemical aging on the optical properties of SOA that form from the ozonolysis of biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs, and subsequent reactions with ammonia with special emphasis on the change in their absorption. Nitration reactions of polyaromatic hydrocarbons that lead to increased absorption will also be presented. Using the wavelength-dependent modified forcing equation we will provide estimates of the radiative impact of the aged biogenic SOA. Our calculation shows that the integrated radiative forcing suggest that the observed changes in refractive index due to photochemical ageing by NH3 reactions can lead to enhanced cooling by the aged aerosol.

  2. Effects of Carbon Dioxide Aerosols on the Viability of Escherichia coli during Biofilm Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Renu; Monnappa, Ajay K.; Hong, Seongkyeol; Mitchell, Robert J.; Jang, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    A periodic jet of carbon dioxide (CO2) aerosols is a very quick and effective mechanical technique to remove biofilms from various substrate surfaces. However, the impact of the aerosols on the viability of bacteria during treatment has never been evaluated. In this study, the effects of high-speed CO2 aerosols, a mixture of solid and gaseous CO2, on bacteria viability was studied. It was found that when CO2 aerosols were used to disperse biofilms of Escherichia coli, they led to a significant loss of viability, with approximately 50% of the dispersed bacteria killed in the process. By comparison, 75.6% of the biofilm-associated bacteria were viable when gently dispersed using Proteinase K and DNase I. Indirect proof that the aerosols are damaging the bacteria was found using a recombinant E. coli expressing the cyan fluorescent protein, as nearly half of the fluorescence was found in the supernatant after CO2 aerosol treatment, while the rest was associated with the bacterial pellet. In comparison, the supernatant fluorescence was only 9% when the enzymes were used to disperse the biofilm. As such, these CO2 aerosols not only remove biofilm-associated bacteria effectively but also significantly impact their viability by disrupting membrane integrity. PMID:26345492

  3. Size-resolved parameterization of primary organic carbon in fresh marine aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Michael S; Keene, William C; Erickson III, David J

    2009-12-01

    Marine aerosols produced by the bursting of artificially generated bubbles in natural seawater are highly enriched (2 to 3 orders of magnitude based on bulk composition) in marine-derived organic carbon (OC). Production of size-resolved particulate OC was parameterized based on a Langmuir kinetics-type association of OC to bubble plumes in seawater and resulting aerosol as constrained by measurements of aerosol produced from highly productive and oligotrophic seawater. This novel approach is the first to account for the influence of adsorption on the size-resolved association between marine aerosols and OC. Production fluxes were simulated globally with an eight aerosol-size-bin version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.5.07). Simulated number and inorganic sea-salt mass production fell within the range of published estimates based on observationally constrained parameterizations. Because the parameterization does not consider contributions from spume drops, the simulated global mass flux (1.5 x 10{sup 3} Tg y{sup -1}) is near the lower limit of published estimates. The simulated production of aerosol number (2.1 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and OC (49 Tg C y{sup -1}) fall near the upper limits of published estimates and suggest that primary marine aerosols may have greater influences on the physiochemical evolution of the troposphere, radiative transfer and climate, and associated feedbacks on the surface ocean than suggested by previous model studies.

  4. Scattering directionality parameters of fractal black carbon aerosols and comparison with the Henyey-Greenstein approximation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Apoorva; Chakrabarty, Rajan K

    2016-07-15

    Current radiation transfer schemes employ the Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function to connect three single parameter representations of aerosol scattering directionality-the hemispherical upscatter fraction (β), the backscatter fraction (b), and the asymmetry parameter (g). The HG phase function does not account for particle morphology, which could lead to significant errors. In this Letter, we compute these single parameters for fractal black carbon (BC) aerosols using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. The variations in β, g, and b as a function of aerosol morphology are examined. Corrected empirical relationships connecting these parameters are proposed. We find that the HG phase function could introduce up to a 35% error in β and g estimates. Interestingly, these errors are suppressed by the large mass absorption cross-sections of BC aerosols in radiative transfer calculations and contribute to ≤8% error in direct forcing efficiencies. PMID:27420533

  5. Aerosol Types using Passive Remote Sensing: Global Distribution, Consistency Check, Total-Column Investigation and Translation into Composition Derived from Climate and Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Dawson, K. W.; Johnson, M. S.; Burton, S. P.; Redemann, J.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Butler, C. F.; Holben, B. N.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Froyd, K. D.; Dibb, J. E.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    To improve the predictions of aerosol composition in chemical transport models (CTMs) and global climate models (GCMs), we have developed an aerosol classification algorithm (called Specified Clustering and Mahalanobis Classification, SCMC) that assigns an aerosol type to multi-parameter retrievals by spaceborne, airborne or ground based passive remote sensing instruments [Russell et al., 2014]. The aerosol types identified by our scheme are pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke and pure marine. We apply the SCMC method to two different total-column datasets of aerosol optical properties: inversions from the ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and retrievals from the space-borne POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances) instrument. The POLDER retrievals that we use differ from the standard POLDER retrievals [Deuzé et al., 2001] as they make full use of multi-angle, multispectral polarimetric data [Hasekamp et al., 2011]. We analyze agreement in the aerosol types inferred from both AERONET and POLDER globally. Then, we investigate how our total-column "effective" SCMC aerosol types relate to different aerosol types within the column (i.e. either a mixture of different types within one layer in the vertical or the stacking of different aerosol types within the vertical column). For that, we compare AERONET-SCMC aerosol types to collocated NASA LaRC HSRL vertically resolved aerosol types [Burton et al., 2012] during the SEAC4RS and DISCOVER-AQ airborne field experiments, mostly over Texas in Aug-Sept 2013. Finally, in order to evaluate the GEOS-Chem CTM aerosol types, we translate each of our SCMC aerosol type into a unique distribution of GEOS-Chem aerosol composition (e.g. biomass burning, dust, sulfate, sea salt). We bridge the gap between remote sensing and model-inferred aerosol types by using multiple years of collocated AERONET

  6. Spectral dependence on the correction factor of erythemal UV for cloud, aerosol, total ozone, and surface properties: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Jung, Yeonjin; Lee, Yun Gon

    2016-07-01

    Radiative transfer model simulations were used to investigate the erythemal ultraviolet (EUV) correction factors by separating the UV-A and UV-B spectral ranges. The correction factor was defined as the ratio of EUV caused by changing the amounts and characteristics of the extinction and scattering materials. The EUV correction factors (CFEUV) for UV-A [CFEUV(A)] and UV-B [CFEUV(B)] were affected by changes in the total ozone, optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and the solar zenith angle. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) were also estimated as a function of solar zenith angle, the optical depths of aerosol and cloud, and total ozone. The differences between CFEUV(A) and CFEUV(B) ranged from -5.0% to 25.0% for aerosols, and from -9.5% to 2.0% for clouds in all simulations for different solar zenith angles and optical depths of aerosol and cloud. The rate of decline of CFEUV per unit optical depth between UV-A and UV-B differed by up to 20% for the same aerosol and cloud conditions. For total ozone, the variation in CFEUV(A) was negligible compared with that in CFEUV(B) because of the effective spectral range of the ozone absorption band. In addition, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs due to changes in surface conditions (i.e., surface albedo and surface altitude) was also estimated by using the model in this study. For changes in surface albedo, the sensitivity of the CFEUVs was 2.9%-4.1% per 0.1 albedo change, depending on the amount of aerosols or clouds. For changes in surface altitude, the sensitivity of CFEUV(B) was twice that of CFEUV(A), because the Rayleigh optical depth increased significantly at shorter wavelengths.

  7. Elucidating carbonaceous aerosol sources by the stable carbon δ13CTC ratio in size-segregated particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, A.; Remeikis, V.; Garbaras, A.; Dudoitis, V.; Ulevicius, V.; Ceburnis, D.

    2015-05-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol sources were investigated by measuring the stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13CTC) in size-segregated aerosol particles. The samples were collected with a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) in 11 size intervals ranging from 0.056 μm to 18 μm. The aerosol particle size distribution obtained from combined measurements with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS; TSI 3936) and an aerosol particle sizer (APS; TSI 3321) is presented for comparison with MOUDI data. The analysis of δ13CTC values revealed that the total carbonaceous matter in size-segregated aerosol particles significantly varied from - 23.4 ± 0.1‰ in a coarse mode to - 30.1 ± 0.5‰ in a fine mode. A wide range of the δ13CTC values of size-segregated aerosol particles suggested various sources of aerosol particles contributing to carbonaceous particulate matter. Therefore, the source mixing equation was applied to verify the idea of mixing of two sources: continental non-fossil and fossil fuel combustion. The obtained δ13CTC value of aerosol particles originating from fossil fuel combustion was - 28.0 to - 28.1‰, while the non-fossil source δ13CTC value was in the range of - 25.0 to - 25.5‰. The two source mixing model applied to the size-segregated samples revealed that the fossil fuel combustion source contributed from 100% to 60% to the carbonaceous particulate matter in the fine mode range (Dp < 1 μm). Meanwhile, the second source, continental non-fossil, was the main contributor in the coarse fraction (Dp > 2 μm). The particle range from 0.5 to 2.0 μm was identified as a transition region where two sources almost equally contributed to carbonaceous particulate matter. The proposed mixing model offers an alternative method for determining major carbonaceous matter sources where radiocarbon analysis may lack the sensitivity (as in size-segregated samples).

  8. Measurement and analysis of aerosol and black carbon in the southwestern United States and Panama and their dependence on air mass origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, C.; Sheahan, J. N.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Brien, P.; Hinds, B. D.; Martinez-Twary, E.; Hansen, A. D. A.; White, C.; Garvey, D. M.; Pinnick, R. G.

    2004-07-01

    Total aerosol mass loading, aerosol absorption, and black carbon (BC) content were determined from aerosol collected on 598 quartz fiber filters at a remote, semiarid site near Orogrande, New Mexico from December 1989 to October 1995. Aerosol mass was determined by weighing filters before and after exposure, and aerosol absorption was determined by measuring the visible light transmitted through loaded filter samples and converting these measurements to aerosol absorption. BC content was determined by measuring visible light transmitted through filter samples before and after firing and converting the absorption to BC mass, assuming a BC absorption cross section of 19 m2/g in the fiber filter medium. Two analyses were then performed on each of the logged variables: an autoregressive integrating moving average (ARIMA) analysis and a decomposition analysis using an autoregressive model to accommodate first-order autocorrelation. The two analyses reveal that BC mass has no statistically significant seasonal dependence at the 5% level of significance but only random fluctuations varying around an average annual value that has a long-term decreasing trend (from 0.16 to 0.11 μg/m3 during 1990-1995). Aerosol absorption, which is dominated by BC, also displays random fluctuations about an average value, and decreases from 1.9 Mm-1 to 1.3 Mm-1 during the same period. Unlike BC, aerosol mass at the Orogrande site displays distinctly different character. The analyses reveal a pronounced seasonal dependence, but no long-term trend for aerosol mass. The seasonal indices resulting from the autoregression analysis have a minimum in January (-0.78) and maximum in June (+0.58). The geometric mean value over the 1990-1995 period for aerosol mass is 16.0 μg/m3. Since BC aerosol at the Orogrande site is a product of long-range atmospheric transport, a back trajectory analysis of air masses was conducted. Back trajectory analyses indicate that air masses traversing high population

  9. Water-soluble organic carbon, dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids, and α-dicarbonyls in the tropical Indian aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Swaminathan, T.

    2010-06-01

    Tropical aerosol (PM10) samples (n = 49) collected from southeast coast of India were studied for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12), ketocarboxylic acids (C2-C9), and α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal), together with analyses of total carbon (TC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Their distributions were characterized by a predominance of oxalic acid followed by terephthalic (t-Ph), malonic, and succinic acids. Total concentrations of diacids (227-1030 ng m-3), ketoacids (16-105 ng m-3), and dicarbonyls (4-23 ng m-3) are comparative to those from other Asian megacities such as Tokyo and Hong Kong. t-Ph acid was found as the second most abundant diacid in the Chennai aerosols. This feature has not been reported previously in atmospheric aerosols. t-Ph acid is most likely derived from the field burning of plastics. Water-soluble diacids were found to contribute 0.4%-3% of TC and 4%-11% of WSOC. Based on molecular distributions and backward air mass trajectories, we found that diacids and related compounds in coastal South Indian aerosols are influenced by South Asian and Indian Ocean monsoons. Organic aerosols are also suggested to be significantly transported long distances from North India and the Middle East in early winter and from Southeast Asia in late winter, but some originate from photochemical reactions over the Bay of Bengal. In contrast, the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean, and South Indian continent are suggested as major source regions in summer. We also found daytime maxima of most diacids, except for C9 and t-Ph acids, which showed nighttime maxima in summer. Emissions from marine and terrestrial plants, combined with land/sea breezes and in situ photochemical oxidation, are suggested especially in summer as an important factor that controls the composition of water-soluble organic aerosols over the southeast coast of India. Regional emissions from anthropogenic sources are also important in megacity Chennai, but their influence is

  10. Light absorption of brown carbon aerosol in the PRD region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, J.-F.; Huang, X.-F.; Cao, L.-M.; Cui, J.; Zhu, Q.; Huang, C.-N.; Lan, Z.-J.; He, L.-Y.

    2015-10-01

    The strong spectral dependence of light absorption of brown carbon (BrC) aerosol is regarded to influence aerosol's radiative forcing significantly. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) method was widely used in previous studies to attribute light absorption of BrC at shorter wavelengths for ambient aerosol, with a theoretical assumption that the AAE of "pure" black carbon (BC) aerosol equals to 1.0. In this study, the previous AAE method was improved by statistical analysis and applied in both urban and rural environments in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. A three-wavelength photo-acoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) were used to explore the relationship between the measured AAE and the relative abundance of organic aerosol to BC. The regression and extrapolation analysis revealed that the more realistic AAE values for "pure" BC aerosol were 0.86, 0.82, and 1.02 at 405 nm, and 0.70, 0.71, and 0.86 at 532 nm, in the campaigns of urban_winter, urban_fall, and rural_fall, respectively. Roadway tunnel experiments were also conducted, and the results further supported the representativeness of the obtained AAE values for "pure" BC aerosol in the urban environments. Finally, the average aerosol light absorption contribution of BrC was quantified to be 11.7, 6.3, and 12.1 % (with relative uncertainties of 4, 4, and 7 %) at 405 nm, and 10.0, 4.1, and 5.5 % (with relative uncertainties of 2, 2, and 5 %) at 532 nm, in the campaigns of urban_winter, urban_fall, and rural_fall, respectively. The relatively higher BrC absorption contribution at 405 nm in the rural_fall campaign was likely a result of the biomass burning events nearby, which was supported by the biomass burning simulation experiments performed in this study. The results of this paper indicate that the brown carbon contribution to aerosol light absorption at shorter wavelengths is not negligible in the highly urbanized and industrialized PRD region.

  11. Relative Content of Black Carbon in Submicron Aerosol as a Sign of the Effect of Forest Fire Smokes

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Yauscheva, E.P.

    2005-03-18

    Biomass burning occurs often in regions containing vast forest tracts and peat-bogs. These processes are accompanied by the emission of a large amount of aerosol particles and crystal carbon (black carbon [BC], soot). BC is the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, which impacts climate. (Jacobson 2001; Rozenberg 1982). In this paper, we analyze the results of laboratory and field investigations that focused on the relative content of BC in aerosol particles. Main attention is given to the study of possibility using this parameter as an informative sign for estimating the effect of remote forest fire smokes on the near-ground aerosol composition.

  12. Light absorbing organic aerosols (brown carbon) over the tropical Indian Ocean: impact of biomass burning emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Bikkina; Sarin, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The first field measurements of light absorbing water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), referred as brown carbon (BrC), have been made in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) during the continental outflow to the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (ARS). The absorption signal measured at 365 nm in aqueous extracts of aerosols shows a systematic linear increase with WSOC concentration, suggesting a significant contribution from BrC to the absorption properties of organic aerosols. The mass absorption coefficient (babs) of BrC shows an inverse hyperbolic relation with wavelength (from ˜300 to 700 nm), providing an estimate of the Angstrom exponent (αP, range: 3-19 Av: 9 ± 3). The mass absorption efficiency of brown carbon (σabs-BrC) in the MABL varies from 0.17 to 0.72 m2 g-1 (Av: 0.45 ± 0.14 m2 g-1). The αP and σabs-BrC over the BoB are quite similar to that studied from a sampling site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), suggesting the dominant impact of organic aerosols associated with the continental outflow. A comparison of the mass absorption efficiency of BrC and elemental carbon (EC) brings to focus the significant role of light absorbing organic aerosols (from biomass burning emissions) in atmospheric radiative forcing over oceanic regions located downwind of the pollution sources.

  13. Sensitivity of Stratospheric Geoengineering with Black Carbon to Aerosol Size and Altitude of Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan; Shindell, Drew T.; Miller, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon (BC) aerosols using a general circulation model with fixed sea surface temperatures show that the climate effects strongly depend on aerosol size and altitude of injection. 1 Tg BC/a injected into the lower stratosphere would cause little surface cooling for large radii but a large amount of surface cooling for small radii and stratospheric warming of over 60 C. With the exception of small particles, increasing the altitude of injection increases surface cooling and stratospheric warming. Stratospheric warming causes global ozone loss by up to 50% in the small radius case. The Antarctic shows less ozone loss due to reduction of polar stratospheric clouds, but strong circumpolar winds would enhance the Arctic ozone hole. Using diesel fuel to produce the aerosols is likely prohibitively expensive and infeasible. Although studying an absorbing aerosol is a useful counterpart to previous studies involving sulfate aerosols, black carbon geoengineering likely carries too many risks to make it a viable option for deployment.

  14. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    A great deal of attention has been paid to brown carbon aerosol in the troposphere because it can both scatter and absorb solar radiation, thus affecting the Earth's climate. However, knowledge of the optical and chemical properties of brown carbon aerosol is still limited. In this study, we have investigated different aspects of the optical properties of brown carbon aerosol that have not been previously explored. These properties include extinction spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region and light scattering at two different visible wavelengths, 532 and 402 nm. A proxy for atmospheric brown carbon aerosol was formed from the aqueous reaction of ammonium sulfate with methylglyoxal. The different optical properties were measured as a function of reaction time for a period of up to 19 days. UV/vis absorption experiments of bulk solutions showed that the optical absorption of aqueous brown carbon solution significantly increases as a function of reaction time in the spectral range from 200 to 700 nm. The analysis of the light scattering data, however, showed no significant differences between ammonium sulfate and brown carbon aerosol particles in the measured scattering phase functions, linear polarization profiles, or the derived real parts of the refractive indices at either 532 or 402 nm, even for the longest reaction times with greatest visible extinction. The light scattering experiments are relatively insensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index, and it was only possible to place an upper limit of k ≤ 0.01 on the imaginary index values. These results suggest that after the reaction with methylglyoxal the single scattering albedo of ammonium sulfate aerosol is significantly reduced but that the light scattering properties including the scattering asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the relative amount of forward-to-backward scattering, remain essentially unchanged from that of unprocessed ammonium sulfate. The optical extinction properties

  15. Optical and Physicochemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol: Light Scattering, FTIR Extinction Spectroscopy, and Hygroscopic Growth.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Alexander, Jennifer M; Kwon, Deokhyeon; Estillore, Armando D; Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A; Kleiber, Paul D; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-06-23

    A great deal of attention has been paid to brown carbon aerosol in the troposphere because it can both scatter and absorb solar radiation, thus affecting the Earth's climate. However, knowledge of the optical and chemical properties of brown carbon aerosol is still limited. In this study, we have investigated different aspects of the optical properties of brown carbon aerosol that have not been previously explored. These properties include extinction spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region and light scattering at two different visible wavelengths, 532 and 402 nm. A proxy for atmospheric brown carbon aerosol was formed from the aqueous reaction of ammonium sulfate with methylglyoxal. The different optical properties were measured as a function of reaction time for a period of up to 19 days. UV/vis absorption experiments of bulk solutions showed that the optical absorption of aqueous brown carbon solution significantly increases as a function of reaction time in the spectral range from 200 to 700 nm. The analysis of the light scattering data, however, showed no significant differences between ammonium sulfate and brown carbon aerosol particles in the measured scattering phase functions, linear polarization profiles, or the derived real parts of the refractive indices at either 532 or 402 nm, even for the longest reaction times with greatest visible extinction. The light scattering experiments are relatively insensitive to the imaginary part of the refractive index, and it was only possible to place an upper limit of k ≤ 0.01 on the imaginary index values. These results suggest that after the reaction with methylglyoxal the single scattering albedo of ammonium sulfate aerosol is significantly reduced but that the light scattering properties including the scattering asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the relative amount of forward-to-backward scattering, remain essentially unchanged from that of unprocessed ammonium sulfate. The optical extinction properties

  16. Concentration and 14C Content of Total Organic Carbon and Black Carbon in Small (<100 ug C) Samples from Low-Latitude Alpine Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrwald, N. M.; Czimczik, C. I.; Santos, G. M.; Thompson, L. G.; Ziolkowski, L.

    2008-12-01

    Many low latitude glaciers are receding with consequences for the regional energy budget and hydrology. Ice loss has been linked to climate change and the deposition of organic aerosols such as black carbon (BC) which is formed during incomplete combustion. Little is known about how the contents of BC and total organic carbon (TOC) in aerosols change over time and how anthropogenic activities (e.g. land-use change) impact this variability. Low-latitude ice cores are located closer to population centers than polar ice caps and can provide a regional synthesis of TOC and BC variability. Radiocarbon (14C) may be used to partition BC aerosols into fossil (>50 kyrs) and modern sources (e.g. fossil-fuels vs. wildfires). We quantified TOC, BC, and their 14C content in three low-latitude ice cores: Naimona'nyi (30°27'N, 81°91'E) and Dasuopu (28°23'N, 85°43'E), Tibet, and Quelccaya (13°56'S; 70°50'W), Peru. Aerosols (52-256 g ice on filters) were separated into TOC and BC using thermal oxidation (CTO- 375). 14C was measured by AMS. TOC contents were 0.11-0.87, 0.05-0.43, and 0.06-0.19 μg C (g ice) -1 for Naimona'nyi, Dasuopu, and Quelccaya, respectively. BC contents were 18±8, 27±4, and 29±12 %TOC. Procedural blanks were 0.8 ± 0.4 μg C (TOC) and 1.2 ± 0.6 μg C (BC). In ice cores well dated through annual layer counting and/or independent ages (e.g. volcanic horizons) such as Quelccaya, the ability to separate BC from TOC, as well as partition BC into fossil and modern contributions has potential for reconstructing pre- and post-industrial changes in aerosol composition and their impact on the energy budget.

  17. Black carbon aerosol optical properties are influenced by initial mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Healy, R. M.; Riemer, N.; West, M.; Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C. H.; Wenger, J.; Abbatt, J.; Lee, A.

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete combustion emits teragram quantities of black carbon (BC) aerosol to the troposphere each year, resulting in a significant warming effect on climate that may be second only to carbon dioxide. The magnitude of BC impacts on a global scale remains poorly constrained and is intimately related to its particle-scale physical and chemical properties. Using particle-resolved modeling informed by novel quantitative measurements from an Aerodyne soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), we show that initial mixing state (or the distribution of co-emitted components amongst fresh BC-containing particles) significantly affects BC-aerosol optical properties even after a day of atmospheric processing. Both single particle and ensemble observations indicate that BC near emission co-exists with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) in two distinct particle types: HOA-rich and BC-rich particles. The average mass fraction of black carbon (mfBC) in HOA- and BC-rich particle types was 0.02-0.08 and 0.72-0.93, respectively. Notably, positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of ensemble SP-AMS measurements indicates that BC-rich particles contribute the majority of BC mass (> 90%) in freshly emitted particles. This new measurement capability provides quantitative insight into the physical and chemical nature of BC-containing particles and is used to drive a particle-resolved aerosol box model. Significant differences in calculated single scattering albedo (an increase of 0.1) arise from accurate treatment of initial particle mixing state as compared to the assumption of uniform aerosol composition at the point of BC injection to the atmosphere.

  18. Radiocarbon source apportionment of urban and wildfire black and organic carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    Fossil and non-fossil sources of black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified unambiguously by radiocarbon (14C) measurements. However, accurate 14C-based source apportionment requires a clear and reproducible physical separation of OC and BC, as well as minimal sample contaminations with non-sample carbon. To achieve a clear separation, we used a thermo-optical aerosol analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc, USA) with a newly established protocol (Swiss_4S protocol, Zhang et al., 2012), specifically optimized to completely separate the OC and BC fractions with minimal charring and maximum BC recovery. A simple and efficient vacuum line was coupled to the analyzer to trap produced CO2 with high yields and low carbon blanks. Upon trapping, CO2 samples sealed into glass ampoules were converted to graphite and measured for their radiocarbon content at the Keck Carbon Cycle Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory at the University of California, Irvine. Here, we present the results from the radiocarbon analysis of a set of 14C reference materials, blanks and inter-comparison samples for both OC and BC with sample sizes as small as 5 μg C. We will also present initial results from a set of urban aerosol samples from Salt Lake City, collected throughout 2012 and 2013, and from interior Alaska, collected during the summer of 2013 near the Stuart Creek 2 wildfire.

  19. Spatially and Temporally Refined Sources of Black Carbon Aerosols in the Arctic in spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, L.; Li, Q.; Mao, Y.; Chen, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Wang, Q.; Hao, W. M.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols play a substantial role in the rapid warming of the Arctic. We systematically evaluate the simulation of BC vertical profile (ARCTAS and ARCPAC flights), surface concentrations and concentrations in snow (Doherty et al., 2010) in the Arctic in spring using a global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. We also provide highly spatially (2° lat ×2.5° lon) and temporally resolved source estimates of surface BC concentrations using GEOS-Chem adjoint. Results showed that the vertical profiles of BC agree with the aircraft observations from surface to 10 km within 50%. The monthly mean regional averaged BC concentrations in snow in Alaska, Arctic Ocean, Canada, Greenland and Russia agree with the observations within 40%, while the mean BC concentrations in snow in Svalbard and Norway agree with the observations within a factor of 3 because of inaccurate simulation of snow precipitation in GEOS5. We found Asian anthropogenic sources contributed 20-50% of BC concentrations through troposphere and in snow in the Arctic and are the major contributors in most regions. Adjoint analysis showed that BC concentrations of about 10 ng/m3 (30-100% of the total Asian contribution) observed at the surface stations are attributed to emissions emitted by Asian anthropogenic sources 30 days before the observation, and these background BC aerosols were transported to the station by circum-polar-vortex. Previous source estimates that repeated identified Europe as the major contributor of BC in the Arctic only trace back for 5 to 10 days and do not capture the background contribution from Asia. Russian biomass burning is important in mid-troposphere and accounts for 60% of total BC at 4-5 km. The relative contribution from different sources estimated by the adjoint of GEOS-Chem agrees with the forward estimate within 10%. Moreover, the adjoint analysis enables us to pinpoint the major sources to grid box level. Results showed that for surface observations

  20. Functional characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon of size fractionated aerosol in the Southern Mississippi Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalbot, M.-C. G.; Brown, J.; Chitranshi, P.; Gamboa da Costa, G.; Pollock, E. D.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2014-02-01

    The chemical content of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a function of particle size was characterized in Little Rock, Arkansas in winter and spring 2013. The objectives of this study were to: (i) compare the functional characteristics of coarse, fine and ultrafine WSOC and (ii) reconcile the sources of WSOC for the period when carbonaceous aerosol was the most abundant particulate component. The WSOC accounted for 5% of particle mass for particles with dp > 0.96 μm and 10% of particle mass for particles with dp < 0.96 μm. Non-exchangeable aliphatic (H-C), unsaturated aliphatic (H-C-C=), oxygenated saturated aliphatic (H-C-O), acetalic (O-CH-O) and aromatic (Ar-H) protons were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations varied from 4.1 ± 0.1 nmol m-3 for particles with 0.96 < dp < 1.5 μm to 73.9 ± 12.3 nmol m-3 for particles with dp < 0.49 μm, resulting in molar H / C ratios of 0.48 ± 0.05 to 0.92 ± 0.09 observed in combustion-related organic aerosol. The R-H was the most abundant group representing about 45% of measured total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentration followed by H-C-O (27%) and H-C-C= (26%). Levoglucosan, amines, ammonium and methanosulfonate were tentatively identified in NMR fingerprints of fine particles. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, formate and acetate were associated with coarse particles. These qualitative differences of 1H-NMR profiles for different particle sizes indicated the possible contribution of biological aerosol and a mixture of aliphatic and oxygenated compounds from biomass burning and traffic exhausts. The concurrent presence of ammonium and amines also suggested the presence of ammonium/aminium nitrate and sulfate secondary aerosol. The size-dependent origin of WSOC was further corroborated by the increasing δ13C abundance from -26.81 ± 0.18‰ for the smallest particles to -25.93 ± 0.31‰ for the largest particles and the relative

  1. Functional characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon of size-fractionated aerosol in the southern Mississippi Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalbot, M.-C. G.; Brown, J.; Chitranshi, P.; Gamboa da Costa, G.; Pollock, E. D.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2014-06-01

    The chemical content of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a function of particle size was characterized in Little Rock, Arkansas in winter and spring 2013. The objectives of this study were to (i) compare the functional characteristics of coarse, fine and ultrafine WSOC and (ii) reconcile the sources of WSOC for periods when carbonaceous aerosol was the most abundant particulate component. The WSOC accounted for 5% of particle mass for particles with dp > 0.96 μm and 10% of particle mass for particles with dp < 0.96 μm. Non-exchangeable aliphatic (H-C), unsaturated aliphatic (H-C-C=), oxygenated saturated aliphatic (H-C-O), acetalic (O-CH-O) and aromatic (Ar-H) protons were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations varied from 4.1 ± 0.1 nmol m-3 for particles with 1.5 < dp < 3.0 μm to 73.9 ± 12.3 nmol m-3 for particles with dp < 0.49 μm. The molar H / C ratios varied from 0.48 ± 0.05 to 0.92 ± 0.09, which were comparable to those observed for combustion-related organic aerosol. The R-H was the most abundant group, representing about 45% of measured total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations, followed by H-C-O (27%) and H-C-C= (26%). Levoglucosan, amines, ammonium and methanesulfonate were identified in NMR fingerprints of fine particles. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, formate and acetate were associated with coarse particles. These qualitative differences of 1H-NMR profiles for different particle sizes indicated the possible contribution of biological aerosols and a mixture of aliphatic and oxygenated compounds from biomass burning and traffic exhausts. The concurrent presence of ammonium and amines also suggested the presence of ammonium/aminium nitrate and sulfate secondary aerosol. The size-dependent origin of WSOC was further corroborated by the increasing δ13C abundance from -26.81 ± 0.18‰ for the smallest particles to -25.93 ± 0.31‰ for the largest

  2. Certain Results of Measurements of Characteristics of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer and Total Ozone Content at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey; Bazhenov, Oleg; Burlakov, Vladimir; Dolgii, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5°N, 85.0°E). The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO) content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data for the period 1979-1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk aftera series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, we record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  3. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  4. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON): overview and update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, David; Wennberg, Paul; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) is a network of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometers that record direct solar absorption spectra of the atmosphere in the near-infrared. From these spectra, accurate and precise column-averaged abundances of atmospheric constituents including CO2, CH4, N2O, HF, CO, H2O, and HDO, are retrieved. TCCON measurements are linked to WMO calibration scales by comparisons with co-incident in situ profiles measured from aircraft. For CO2, TCCON achieves 1-sigma precision of typically 0.2 ppm for single measurements, and a network wide comparability of better than 0.1 In this paper we present an overview and the current status of the network, ongoing efforts to improve network coverage, precision and accuracy, and examples of TCCON data and their application. Further information about TCCON and a full list of sites and TCCON partners is available from the TCCON wiki, https://tccon-wiki.caltech.edu/ and Wunch et al. (2011). Wunch, D., G.C. Toon, J.-F. Blavier, R. Washenfelder, J. Notholt, B. Connor, D.W.T. Griffith and P.O. Wennberg, The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A 2011. 369: p. 2087-2112.

  5. Titan Aerosol Formation as a Sink for Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Sebree, Joshua A.; Gautier, Thomas J.; Fuentes, Javier A.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D.; Mandt, Kathleen E.

    2015-11-01

    Stable isotope ratios of major elements can be used to infer much about local- and global-scale processes on a planet. On Titan, aerosol production is a significant sink of carbon and nitrogen in the atmosphere, and isotopic fractionation of these elements may be introduced during the advanced organic chemistry that leads to the condensed phase products. Several stable isotope pairs, including 12C/13C and 14N/15N, have been measured in situ or probed spectroscopically by Cassini-borne instruments, space telescopes, or through ground-based observations. However, the effect of a potentially critical pathway for isotopic fractionation - organic aerosol formation and subsequent deposition onto the surface of Titan - has not been considered due to insufficient data regarding fractionation during aerosol formation. To better understand the nature of this process, we have measured the isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of Titan aerosol analogs via far-UV irradiation of several methane (CH4) and nitrogen (N2) mixtures.Our initial results probed the fractionation of the aerosol product, relative to the reactant gases, as a function of CH4 abundance [1]. Our results show that the direction of carbon isotope fractionation during aerosol formation is in contrast to the expected result if the source of the fractionation is a kinetic isotope effect. The resultant fractionation in nitrogen favored the light (14N) isotope in the aerosol, with N/C ratios varying from 0.13 - 0.31. Ongoing work includes probing the effects of pressure and temperature on the direction and magnitude of the stable isotope fractionation. We will present results alongside interpretation of the driving processes, as well as implications for Titan if similar fractionation occurred during aerosol formation in the atmosphere.[1] Sebree, J.A., Stern, J.C., Mandt, K.E., Domagal-Goldman, S.D., and Trainer, M.G.: 13C and 15N Fractionation of CH4/N2 Mixtures during Photochemical Aerosol Formation

  6. Diurnal variations of carbonaceous components, major ions, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in suburban aerosols from northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nannan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    We report diurnal variations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and major ions as well as stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in ambient aerosols at a suburban site (Mangshan), 40 km north of Beijing, China. We found that aerosol chemical compositions were largely controlled by the air mass transport from Beijing in daytime with southerly winds and by relatively fresh air mass in nighttime from the northern forest areas with northerly winds. Higher concentrations of aerosol mass and total carbon were obtained in daytime. Further, higher OC/EC ratios were recorded in daytime (4.0 ± 1.7) than nighttime (3.2 ± 0.7), suggesting that OC is formed by photochemical oxidation of gaseous precursors in daytime. Contributions of WSOC to OC were slightly higher in daytime (38%) than nighttime (34%), possibly due to secondary formation of WSOC in daytime. We also found higher concentrations of Ca2+ in daytime, which was originated from the construction dust in Beijing area and transported to the sampling site. δ13C ranged from -25.3 to -21.2‰ (ave. -23.5 ± 0.9‰) in daytime and -29.0 to -21.4‰ (-24.0 ± 1.5‰) in nighttime, suggesting that Mangshan aerosols were more influenced by fossil fuel combustion products in daytime and by terrestrial C3 plants in nighttime. This study suggests that daytime air mass delivery from megacity Beijing largely influence the air quality at the receptor site in the north together with photochemical processing of organic aerosols during the atmospheric transport, whereas the Mangshan site is covered with relatively clean air masses at night.

  7. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent N.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-01-01

    The carbon emissions inventories used to initialize transport models and general circulation models are highly parameterized, and created on the basis of multiple sparse datasets (such as fuel use inventories and emission factors). The resulting inventories are uncertain by at least a factor of 2, and this uncertainty is carried forward to the model output. [Bond et al., 1998, Bond et al., 2004, Cooke et al., 1999, Streets et al., 2001] Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output on a continuous basis.

  8. Carbon and Aerosol Emissions from Biomass Fires in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, W. M.; Flores Garnica, G.; Baker, S. P.; Urbanski, S. P.

    2009-12-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of many atmospheric greenhouse gases and photochemically reactive trace gases. There are limited data available on the spatial and temporal extent of biomass fires and associated trace gas and aerosol emissions in Mexico. Biomass burning is a unique source of these gases and aerosols, in comparison to industrial and biogenic sources, because the locations of fires vary considerably both daily and seasonally and depend on human activities and meteorological conditions. In Mexico, the fire season starts in January and about two-thirds of the fires occur in April and May. The amount of trace gases and aerosols emitted by fires spatially and temporally is a major uncertainty in quantifying the impact of fire emissions on regional atmospheric chemical composition. To quantify emissions, it is necessary to know the type of vegetation, the burned area, the amount of biomass burned, and the emission factor of each compound for each ecosystem. In this study biomass burning experiments were conducted in Mexico to measure trace gas emissions from 24 experimental fires and wildfires in semiarid, temperate, and tropical ecosystems from 2005 to 2007. A range of representative vegetation types were selected for ground-based experimental burns to characterize fire emissions from representative Mexico fuels. A third of the country was surveyed each year, beginning in the north. The fire experiments in the first year were conducted in Chihuahua, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas states in pine forest, oak forest, grass, and chaparral. The second-year fire experiments were conducted on pine forest, oak forest, shrub, agricultural, grass, and herbaceous fuels in Jalisco, Puebla, and Oaxaca states in central Mexico. The third-year experiments were conducted in pine-oak forests of Chiapas, coastal grass, and low subtropical forest on the Yucatan peninsula. FASS (Fire Atmosphere Sampling System) towers were deployed for the experimental fires. Each FASS

  9. Radiocarbon-based source apportionment of black carbon (BC) in PM 10 aerosols from residential area of suburban Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Masao; Kumata, Hidetoshi; Koike, Yasuyo; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Uchida, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Kitao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-04-01

    The AMS technique was applied to analyse black carbon (BC), total organic carbon (TOC), and previously reported polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM 10 aerosols from a residential area, suburban Tokyo, to determine natural abundance of radiocarbon ( 14C), an ideal tracer to distinguish fossil fuel ( 14C-free) from modern biomass combustion sources of pyrolytic products. The 14C concentrations in BC, isolated using the CTO-375 method, were 42% and 30% pMC (in terms of percent Modern Carbon: pMC) in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C concentrations in BC were also compared with those of compound-class specific 14C content of PAHs previously reported for the same samples: they were 45% and 33% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. The 14C signals of BC were identical to those of high molecular weight (MW ⩾ 226, 5-6 rings) PAHs. The resemblance between 14C signals of BC and PAHs can be referred as a 'certificate' for the validity of the BC isolation method employed in this study. Also, it suggests that 14C-BC approach can be a surrogate for PAHs specific 14C analyses to monitor seasonal source variation of combustion-derived pyrolytic products. On the other hand, 14C contents of total organic carbon in 2004 were 61% and 42% pMC in summer and winter, respectively. This is likely attributed to higher contribution of plant activity in summer.

  10. Fossil and Nonfossil Sources of Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosols in the Outflow from Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Agrios, Konstantinos; Lee, Meehye; Salazar, Gary; Szidat, Sönke

    2016-06-21

    Source quantification of carbonaceous aerosols in the Chinese outflow regions still remains uncertain despite their high mass concentrations. Here, we unambiguously quantified fossil and nonfossil contributions to elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) of total suspended particles (TSP) from a regional receptor site in the outflow of Northeast China using radiocarbon measurement. OC and EC concentrations were lower in summer, representing mainly marine air, than in other seasons, when air masses mostly traveled over continental regions in Mongolia and northeast China. The annual-mean contribution from fossil-fuel combustion to EC was 76 ± 11% (0.1-1.3 μg m(-3)). The remaining 24 ± 11% (0.03-0.42 μg m(-3)) was attributed to biomass burning, with slightly higher contribution in the cold period (∼31%) compared to the warm period (∼21%) because of enhanced emissions from regional biomass combustion sources in China. OC was generally dominated by nonfossil sources, with an annual average of 66 ± 11% (0.5-2.8 μg m(-3)), approximately half of which was apportioned to primary biomass-burning sources (34 ± 6%). In winter, OC almost equally originated from primary OC (POC) emissions and secondary OC (SOC) formation from fossil fuel and biomass-burning sources. In contrast, summertime OC was dominated by primary biogenic emissions as well as secondary production from biogenic and biomass-burning sources, but fossil-derived SOC was the smallest contributor. Distinction of POC and SOC was performed using primary POC-to-EC emission ratios separated for fossil and nonfossil emissions. PMID:27203471

  11. Air pollution of Moscow by the carbon monoxide and aerosols, boundary layer parameters and estimation of the CO sources intensity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitin, V.; Fokeeva, E.; Kuznetsov, R.; Emilenko, A.; Kopeikin, V.

    2009-04-01

    The results of measurements of the carbon monoxide total content, the soot and submicron aerosols content are given for the period 2005-2008 over Moscow. Two identical grating spectrometers of medium resolution (0,2sm-1) are used with appropriate solar tracking systems, one of which is located outside the city at Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS 56oN, 38oE, 60km West from Moscow in the rural zone) and the other one is inside a city center. This method makes possible to determine the characteristics of anthropogenic pollution, urban part of the CO content. Some simultaneously measurements of aerosols content, the CO column and CO background concentrations in Moscow, autumn 2007 are presented. Nephelometer and quartz filters for soot sampling were used for aerosols measurements. Correlations coefficients between aerosols, CO background concentration and urban part of the CO content were obtained. Permanent sounding of boundary layer was carried out using acoustic locator (SODAR) LATAN-3. Applications of SODAR data (profile of wind speed and inversion height) makes possible to forecast of air pollution situations in megacities area. We obtained the correlation coefficients for the urban part of the CO content with the wind speed for cold and warm seasons. Analysis results of measurements demonstrated preeminent influence of the wind in certain boundary layer (up to 500m) upon the CO extension. The intensity of CO sources in Moscow was estimated. The systematization of CO diurnal variations for different meteorological conditions was performed. Comparing our results with the results of the earlier measurements period (1993-2005), we found out that the urban part of the CO content in the surface air layer over the city did not increase in spite of more than tripled number of motor-vehicles in Moscow. So using the applications of this spectroscopic method we can obtain the air pollution trend from the averaged air pollution measured values.

  12. Development and application of a dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler for HDI-derived total reactive isocyanate group.

    PubMed

    Rando, R J; Poovey, H G

    1999-01-01

    A dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler was developed for measurement of HDI (1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate)-derived total reactive isocyanate group (TRIG). The sampler consisted of an impactor or cyclone inlet, followed by an annular diffusional denuder, and a glass-fiber filter backup. The denuder walls and backup filter were each coated with 20 mg tributylphosphate and 1 mg MAMA reagent (9-N-methylamino-methylanthracene). After collection, MAMA-derivatized isocyanates were desorbed from the sampler and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with dual-wavelength ultraviolet absorbance and fluorescence detection. Test atmospheres of HDI vapor and of HDI/HDI-biuret aerosols were generated in the laboratory and sampled with the optimized dichotomous sampler. Vapor phase HDI was completely collected by the diffusional denuder. When a mixture of HDI-biuret and HDI (approximately 30 ppb) was nebulized and collected with the dichotomous sampler, approximately 78% of the HDI was in the vapor phase, whereas about 22% was associated with the aerosol fraction. The dichotomous sampler was then used to measure vapor and condensed phase TRIG in a paint spray booth during application of a polyurethane paint. Measured levels of TRIG during the spraying operation averaged 391 +/- 154 micrograms/m3. Concentrations of HDI monomer averaged only 14 +/- 6.5 micrograms/m3. HDI-biuret was the largest component of TRIG found in these samples and was completely in the condensed aerosol phase. In contrast, the majority of the HDI was in the vapor phase, but significant (15-26%) amounts were measured in the aerosol fraction of the paint overspray. Thus, significant partitioning of HDI between vapor and condensed phases was demonstrated in both the laboratory and field, even when its concentration was well below the vapor saturation point.

  13. Development and application of a dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler for HDI-derived total reactive isocyanate group.

    PubMed

    Rando, R J; Poovey, H G

    1999-01-01

    A dichotomous vapor/aerosol sampler was developed for measurement of HDI (1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate)-derived total reactive isocyanate group (TRIG). The sampler consisted of an impactor or cyclone inlet, followed by an annular diffusional denuder, and a glass-fiber filter backup. The denuder walls and backup filter were each coated with 20 mg tributylphosphate and 1 mg MAMA reagent (9-N-methylamino-methylanthracene). After collection, MAMA-derivatized isocyanates were desorbed from the sampler and determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with dual-wavelength ultraviolet absorbance and fluorescence detection. Test atmospheres of HDI vapor and of HDI/HDI-biuret aerosols were generated in the laboratory and sampled with the optimized dichotomous sampler. Vapor phase HDI was completely collected by the diffusional denuder. When a mixture of HDI-biuret and HDI (approximately 30 ppb) was nebulized and collected with the dichotomous sampler, approximately 78% of the HDI was in the vapor phase, whereas about 22% was associated with the aerosol fraction. The dichotomous sampler was then used to measure vapor and condensed phase TRIG in a paint spray booth during application of a polyurethane paint. Measured levels of TRIG during the spraying operation averaged 391 +/- 154 micrograms/m3. Concentrations of HDI monomer averaged only 14 +/- 6.5 micrograms/m3. HDI-biuret was the largest component of TRIG found in these samples and was completely in the condensed aerosol phase. In contrast, the majority of the HDI was in the vapor phase, but significant (15-26%) amounts were measured in the aerosol fraction of the paint overspray. Thus, significant partitioning of HDI between vapor and condensed phases was demonstrated in both the laboratory and field, even when its concentration was well below the vapor saturation point. PMID:10635539

  14. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and its temperature-resolved carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosols in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Zhangwei; Ci, Zhijia

    2016-11-01

    Investigation of temperature-resolved carbon fractions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) can improve our understanding of the chemical properties, formation processes and sources of WSOC in aerosols. We developed a method that can examine different temperature-resolved carbon fractions of WSOC and used this method to characterize aerosol samples (n = 102) collected from an urban site in Beijing in 2010-2011. The aerosol composition data including inorganic ions, elements and temperature-resolved carbon fractions of WSOC were used as input of positive matrix factorization (PMF) model to investigate the sources of WSOC. The results showed that the mean concentrations of WSOC were 10.2 μg m- 3 with increased values in winter and decreased values in summer, while WSOC/OC ratios (mean: 51.7%) were higher in spring and summer than in fall and winter. The sampling artifacts of WSOC (18.2%) were higher than those of OC (13.4%). Though WSOC was significantly influenced by biomass burning in spring and winter, the strong correlations between WSOC and other secondary components suggested that WSOC was secondary in nature. Results of temperature-resolved carbon fractions of OC and WSOC showed that WSOC/OC ratios for different carbon fractions had the highest value of 0.92 and lowest value of 0.30. PMF analysis identified four factors, three of which were associated with three organic polar compounds groups (low, medium, and high molecular weight compounds) based on their thermal evolution features, and one of which was attributed to inorganic secondary formation processes. Annually, the contributions of four factors were 20.5%, 46.2%, 12.4% and 20.9%, respectively.

  15. Size distribution, mixing state and source apportionment of black carbon aerosol in London during wintertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Coe, H.; Beddows, D.; Fleming, Z. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Harrison, R. M.; Lee, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Taylor, J. W.; Yin, J.; Williams, P. I.; Zotter, P.

    2014-09-01

    Black carbon aerosols (BC) at a London urban site were characterised in both winter- and summertime 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project. Positive matrix factorisation (PMF) factors of organic aerosol mass spectra measured by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) showed traffic-dominant sources in summer but in winter the influence of additional non-traffic sources became more important, mainly from solid fuel sources (SF). Measurements using a single particle soot photometer (SP2, DMT), showed the traffic-dominant BC exhibited an almost uniform BC core size (Dc) distribution with very thin coating thickness throughout the detectable range of Dc. However, the size distribution of sf (project average mass median Dc = 149 ± 22 nm in winter, and 120 ± 6 nm in summer) and BC coating thickness varied significantly in winter. A novel methodology was developed to attribute the BC number concentrations and mass abundances from traffic (BCtr) and from SF (BCsf), by using a 2-D histogram of the particle optical properties as a function of BC core size, as measured by the SP2. The BCtr and BCsf showed distinctly different sf distributions and coating thicknesses, with BCsf displaying larger Dc and larger coating thickness compared to BCtr. BC particles from different sources were also apportioned by applying a multiple linear regression between the total BC mass and each AMS-PMF factor (BC-AMS-PMF method), and also attributed by applying the absorption spectral dependence of carbonaceous aerosols to 7-wavelength Aethalometer measurements (Aethalometer method). Air masses that originated from westerly (W), southeasterly (SE), and easterly (E) sectors showed BCsf fractions that ranged from low to high, and whose mass median Dc values were 137 ± 10 nm, 143 ± 11 nm and 169 ± 29 nm, respectively. The corresponding bulk relative coating thickness of BC (coated particle size/BC core - Dp/Dc) for these same sectors was 1.28 ± 0.07, 1.45 ± 0

  16. Size distribution, mixing state and source apportionments of black carbon aerosols in London during winter time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J. D.; Young, D. E.; Coe, H.; Beddows, D.; Fleming, Z. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Harrison, R. M.; Lee, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Taylor, J. W.; Yin, J.; Williams, P. I.; Zotter, P.

    2014-06-01

    Black carbon aerosols (BC) at a London urban site were characterized in both winter and summer time 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) factors of organic aerosol mass spectra measured by a high resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) showed traffic-dominant sources in summer but in winter the influence of additional non-traffic sources became more important, mainly from solid fuel sources (SF). Measurements using a single particle soot photometer (SP2, DMT), showed the traffic-dominant BC exhibited an almost uniform BC core size (Dc) distribution with very thin coating thickness throughout the detectable range of Dc. However the size distribution of Dc (project average mass median Dc = 149 ± 22 nm in winter, and 120 ± 6 nm in summer) and BC coating thickness varied significantly in winter. A novel methodology was developed to attribute the BC number concentrations and mass abundances from traffic (BCtr) and from SF (BCsf), by using a 2-D histogram of the particle optical properties as a function of BC core size, as measured by the SP2. The BCtr and BCsf showed distinctly different Dc distributions and coating thicknesses, with BCsf displaying larger Dc and larger coating thickness compared to BCtr. BC particles from different sources were also apportioned by applying a multiple linear regression between the total BC mass and each AMS-PMF factor (BC-AMS-PMF method), and also attributed by applying the absorption spectral dependence of carbonaceous aerosols to 7-wavelength Aethalometer measurements (Aethalometer method). Air masses that originated from westerly (W), southeasterly (SE), or easterly (E) sectors showed BCsf fractions that ranged from low to high, and whose mass median Dc values were 137 ± 10 nm, 143 ± 11 nm, and 169 ± 29 nm respectively. The corresponding bulk relative coating thickness of BC (coated particle size / BC core - Dp / Dc) for these same sectors was 1.28 ± 0.07, 1.45 ± 0

  17. Measurements of Black Carbon and aerosol absorption during global circumnavigation and Arctic campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Močnik, Griša; Drinovec, Luka; Vidmar, Primož; Lenarčič, Matevž

    2015-04-01

    During two flight campaigns: around the world (2012) and over the Arctic (2013) we demonstrated the feasibility of scientific research and aerial measurements of aerosolized Black Carbon with ultra-light aircraft. Conducted measurements provided first ever information on Black Carbon concentrations and sources over such a large area at altitude. Ground-level measurements of atmospheric aerosols are routinely performed around the world, but there exists very little data on their vertical and geographical distribution in the global atmosphere. These data is a crucial requirement for our understanding of the dispersion of pollutant species of anthropogenic origin, and their possible effects on radiative forcing, cloud condensation, and other phenomena which can contribute to adverse outcomes. Light absorbing carbonaceous aerosols and black carbon (BC) in particular are a unique tracer for combustion emissions, and can be detected rapidly and with great sensitivity by filter-based optical methods. A single-seat ultra-light aircraft flew around the world and on a Arctic expedition. The flights covered all seven continents; crossed all major oceans; and operated at altitudes around 3000 m ASL and up to 8900 m ASL. The aircraft carried a specially-developed high-sensitivity miniaturized dual-wavelength Aethalometer, which recorded BC concentrations with very high temporal resolution and sensitivity [1, 2]. We present examples of data from flight tracks over remote oceans, uninhabited land masses, and densely populated areas. Measuring the dependence of the aerosol absorption on the wavelength, we show that aerosols produced during biomass combustion can be transported to high altitude in high concentrations and we estimate the underestimation of the direct forcing by models assuming a simple linear relationship between BC concentration and forcing in comparison to observations [3,4]. 1. , Carbon Sampling Takes Flight, Science 2012, 335, 1286. 2. G. Močnik, L. Drinovec, M

  18. Space Station Freedom Water Recovery test total organic carbon accountability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Michael W.; Slivon, Laurence; Sheldon, Linda; Traweek, Mary

    1991-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Water Recovery Test (WRT) addresses the concept of integrated hygiene and potable reuse water recovery systems baselined for Space Station Freedom (SSF). To assess the adequacy of water recovery system designs and the conformance of reclaimed water quality to established specifications, MSFC has initiated an extensive water characterization program. MSFC's goal is to quantitatively account for a large percentage of organic compounds present in waste and reclaimed hygiene and potable waters from the WRT and in humidity condensate from Spacelab missions. The program is coordinated into Phase A and B. Phase A's focus is qualitative and semi-quantitative. Precise quantitative analyses are not emphasized. Phase B's focus centers on a near complete quantitative characterization of all water types. Technical approaches along with Phase A and partial Phase B investigations on the compositional analysis of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Accountability are presented.

  19. Measuring the characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer and total ozone concentration at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey; Bazhenov, Oleg; Burlakov, Vladimir; Dolgii, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5 °N, 85.0 °E). The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO) content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of TOMS satellite data for the period 1979- 1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk after a series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, researchers record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  20. Aerosol optical depth and fine-mode fraction retrieval over East Asia using multi-angular total and polarized remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Gu, X.; Xie, D.; Li, Z.; Yu, T.; Chen, H.

    2012-03-01

    A new aerosol retrieval algorithm using multi-angular total and polarized measurements is presented. The algorithm retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF) for studying the impact of aerosol on climate change. The retrieval algorithm is based on a lookup table (LUT) method, which assumes that one fine and one coarse lognormal aerosol modes can be combined with proper weightings to represent the ambient aerosol properties. To reduce the ambiguity in retrieval algorithm, the key characteristics of aerosol model over East Asia are constrained using the cluster analysis technique based on the AERONET sun-photometer observation over East Asia, and the fine and coarse modes are not fixed but can vary. A mixing model of bare soil and green vegetation spectra and the Nadal and Breon model for the bidirectional polarized reflectance factor (BPDF) were used to simulate total and polarized surface reflectance of East Asia. By applying the present algorithm to POLDER measurements, three different aerosol cases of clear, polluted and dust are analyzed to test the algorithm. The comparison of retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and fine-mode fraction (FMF) with those of AERONET sun-photometer observations show reliable results. Preliminary validation is encouraging. Using the new aerosol retrieval algorithm for multi-angular total and polarized measurements, the spatial and temporal variability of anthropogenic aerosol optical properties over East Asia, which were observed during a heavy polluted event, were analyzed. Exceptionally high values of aerosol optical depth contributed by fine mode of up to 0.5 (at 0.865 μm), and high values of fine-mode fraction of up to 0.9, were observed in this case study.

  1. Controlled exposures of volunteers to respirable carbon and sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.R.; Avol, E.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Ruchuan Peng; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    Respirable carbon or fly ash particles are suspected to increase the respiratory toxicity of coexisting acidic air pollutants, by concentrating acid on their surfaces and so delivering it efficiently to the lower respiratory tract. To investigate this issue, the authors exposed 15 healthy and 15 asthmatic volunteers in a controlled-environment chamber to four test atmospheres: (1) clean air; (2) 0.5-{mu}m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol at {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from water solution; (3) 0.5-{mu}m carbon aerosol at {approx}250 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from highly pure carbon black with specific surface area comparable to ambient pollution particles; and (4) carbon as in (3) plus {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of ultrafine H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol generated from fuming sulfuric acid. Electron microscopy showed that nearly all acid in (4) became attached to carbon particle surfaces, and that most particles remained in the sub-{mu}m size range. Exposures were performed double-blind, 1 week apart. They lasted 1 hr each, with alternate 10-min periods of heavy exercise (ventilation {approx}50 L/min) and rest. Subjects gargled citrus juice before exposure to suppress airway ammonia. Lung function and symptoms were measured pre-exposure, after initial exercise, and at end-exposure. Bronchial reactivity to methacholine was measured after exposure. Statistical analyses tested for effects of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or carbon, separate or interactive, on health measures.

  2. Differences in the OC/EC Ratios that Characterize Ambient and Source Aerosols due to Thermal-Optical Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is typically used to measure the OC/EC (organic carbon/elemental carbon) and EC/TC (elemental carbon/total carbon) ratios in source and atmospheric aerosols. The present study utilizes a dual-optical carbon aerosol analyzer to examine the effects of...

  3. Mechanical desorption of immobilized proteins using carbon dioxide aerosols for reusable biosensors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Renu; Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Reusability of a biosensor has recently received considerable attention, and it is closely related with the effective desorption of probe molecules. We present a novel mechanical desorption technique to reuse biosensors by using periodic jets of carbon dioxide (CO2) aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO2), and demonstrate its feasibility by removing physically adsorbed and covalently bonded fluorescent proteins i.e., Escherichia coli fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody and bovine serum albumin (E. coli FITC-Ab and FITC-BSA) from silicon chips. The proteins on the chip surfaces were measured by fluorescent images before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured for various concentrations (1-20 μg mL(-1)) of E. coli FITC-Ab and FITC-BSA with two different removal cycles (5 and 11 cycles; each cycle: 8s). We observed high removal efficiencies (>93.5% for physically adsorbed Ab and >84.6% for covalently bonded Ab) at 11 cycle aerosol treatment. This CO2 aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization, which was confirmed by the fluorescent images of FITC-Abs for fresh and reused chips. Desorption of the immobilized layers was validated by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses. We also conducted an experiment on the regeneration of E. coli sensing chips using this aerosol treatment, and the chips were re-used 5 times successfully. This mechanical desorption technique is a highly effective and novel strategy for reusable biosensors. PMID:25467507

  4. Mechanical desorption of immobilized proteins using carbon dioxide aerosols for reusable biosensors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Renu; Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Reusability of a biosensor has recently received considerable attention, and it is closely related with the effective desorption of probe molecules. We present a novel mechanical desorption technique to reuse biosensors by using periodic jets of carbon dioxide (CO2) aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO2), and demonstrate its feasibility by removing physically adsorbed and covalently bonded fluorescent proteins i.e., Escherichia coli fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody and bovine serum albumin (E. coli FITC-Ab and FITC-BSA) from silicon chips. The proteins on the chip surfaces were measured by fluorescent images before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured for various concentrations (1-20 μg mL(-1)) of E. coli FITC-Ab and FITC-BSA with two different removal cycles (5 and 11 cycles; each cycle: 8s). We observed high removal efficiencies (>93.5% for physically adsorbed Ab and >84.6% for covalently bonded Ab) at 11 cycle aerosol treatment. This CO2 aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization, which was confirmed by the fluorescent images of FITC-Abs for fresh and reused chips. Desorption of the immobilized layers was validated by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses. We also conducted an experiment on the regeneration of E. coli sensing chips using this aerosol treatment, and the chips were re-used 5 times successfully. This mechanical desorption technique is a highly effective and novel strategy for reusable biosensors.

  5. In-situ measurements of total reactive nitrogen, total water vapor, and aerosols in polar stratospheric clouds in the Antarctic stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Poole, L. R.; Wilson, J. C.; Murphy, D. M.; Chan, K. Roland

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of total reactive nitrogen, NOy, total water vapor, and aerosols were made as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The measurements were made using instruments located onboard the NASA ER-2 aircrafts which conducted twelve flights over the Antarctic continent reaching altitudes of 18 km at 72 S latitude. Each instrument utilized an ambient air sample and provided a measurement up to 1 Hz or every 200 m of flight path. The data presented focus on the flights of Aug. 17th and 18th during which Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were encountered containing concentrations of 0.5 to 1.0 micron diameter aerosols greater than 1 cm/cu. The temperature pressure during these events ranged as low as 184 K near 75 mb pressure, with water values near 3.5 ppm by volume (ppmv). With the exception of two short periods, the PSC activity was observed at temperatures above the frost point of water over ice. The data gathered during these flights are analyzed and presented.

  6. Measurement of the seasonal and annual variability of total column aerosol in a northeastern U.S. network

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Schlemmer, J.A.; Harrison, L.C.; Berkheiser, W.E. III; Larson, N.R.; Laulainen, N.S.

    1994-09-01

    A network of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers has operated since late 1991 in the northeastern US. The data acquired are simultaneous measurements of total and diffuse horizontal irradiances in six narrowband filtered detectors and one broadband shortwave detector. The direct normal irradiances are calculated from these measurements. These direct data are corrected for cosine response and used to calculate extraterrestrial irradiance (I{sub o}) using the Langley method of regressing the natural logarithm of direct irradiance versus air mass. With frequent determinations of I{sub o}, changes in I{sub o} caused by soiling and filter degradation, for example, can be tracked. Using these I{sub o}`s, total optical depth is calculated for every clear 30-minute period in the record. Consequently, total optical depth may be obtained on a fair number of days throughout the year. Using daily average total optical depth the authors have calculated aerosol optical depths for five wavelengths by subtracting Rayleigh scattering optical depths and Chappuis ozone absorption optical depths at each wavelength. The aerosol pattern at nearly every site is an annual cycle superimposed on a decaying stratospheric loading associated with the Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption. An attempt is made to remove the volcanic signal using data from another site.

  7. Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols at Mount Lu in South China: implication for secondary organic carbon formation and long-range transport.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-hui; Wang, Yan; Li, Tao; Sun, Lei; Yi, Xianliang; Guo, Li-qiong; Su, Rui-hong

    2015-09-01

    In order to understand the sources and potential formation processes of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in South China, fine particle samples were collected at a high-elevation mountain site--Mount Lu (29°35' N, 115°59' E, 1165 m A.S.L.) during August-September, 2011. Eight carbonaceous fractions from particles were resolved following the IMPROVE thermal/optical reflectance protocol. During the observation campaign, the daily concentrations of PM2.5 at Mount Lu ranged from 7.69 to 116.39 μg/m(3), with an average of 58.76 μg/m(3). The observed average organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations in PM2.5 were 3.78 and 1.28 μg/m(3), respectively. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) concentration, estimated by EC-tracer method, was 2.07 μg/m(3) on average, accounting for 45.0% of the total OC. The enhancement of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation was observed during cloud/fog processing, and heterogeneous acid-catalyzed reactions may have contributed to SOA formation as well. Back trajectory analysis indicated that air masses were mainly sourced from southern China during observation period, and this air mass source was featured by highest values of OC and effective carbon ratio (ECR). Relation of carbonaceous species and principal component analysis indicated that multiple sources contributed to the carbonaceous aerosols at Mount Lu.

  8. Diurnal variations of organic molecular tracers and stable carbon isotopic compositions in atmospheric aerosols over Mt. Tai in North China Plain: an influence of biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, P. Q.; Kawamura, K.; Chen, J.; Li, J.; Sun, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Tachibana, E.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Okuzawa, K.; Tanimoto, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Wang, Z. F.

    2012-04-01

    Organic tracer compounds of tropospheric aerosols, as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of total carbon (TC) have been investigated for aerosol samples collected during early and late periods of Mount Tai eXperiment 2006 (MTX2006) field campaign in North China Plain. Total solvent extracts were investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. More than 130 organic compounds were detected in the aerosol samples. They were grouped into twelve organic compound classes, including biomass burning tracers, biogenic primary sugars, biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers, and anthropogenic tracers such as phthalates, hopanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In early June when the field burning activities of wheat straws in North China Plain were very active, the total identified organics (2090 ± 1170 ng m-3) were double those in late June (926 ± 574 ng m-3). All the compound classes were more abundant in early June than in late June, except phthalate esters, which were higher in late June. Levoglucosan (88-1210 ng m-3, 403 ng m-3) was found as the most abundant single compound in early June, while diisobutyl phthalate was the predominant species in late June. During the biomass-burning period in early June, the diurnal trends of most of the primary and secondary organic aerosol tracers were characterized by the concentration peaks observed at mid-night or in early morning, while in late June most of the organic species peaked in late afternoon. This suggests that smoke plumes from biomass burning can uplift the aerosol particulate matter to a certain altitude and then transported to and encountered the summit of Mt. Tai during nighttime. On the basis of the tracer-based method for the estimation of biomass-burning OC, fungal-spore OC and biogenic secondary organic carbon (SOC), we estimate that an average of 24% (up to 64%) of the OC in the Mt. Tai

  9. The appearance of carbon aerosol particles in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuan, R. L.; Woods, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    Very small carbonaceous particles, thought to be meteoritic, have been found in small quantities in the lower stratosphere during aircraft sampling flights. The sampling was accomplished using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) cascade impactor operating on a U-2 aircraft as it flew stratospheric sampling missions. Post flight analyses of the samples using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy have identified carbon particles 0.1 micron aerodynamic diameter and smaller in 16 of 28 sets of samples obtained between 1979 and 1983. The presence of such carbon particles in the stratosphere has implications relating to global climate, to the conversion of SO2 to sulfuric acid, and to the phenomenon of the Arctic haze.

  10. Development and application of an analytical method for the determination of total atmospheric biogenic non-methane organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnery, J.; Dindorf, T.; Hacker, L.; Andres, S.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the organic carbon which is present in the atmosphere is found as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dominantly emitted by the biosphere. This biogenic emission has a major impact on the chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere by contributing to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). One major limitation in advancing the understanding of this ozone and aerosol generation is the technical ability to accurately measure the sum of these volatile organics. Frequently used methods focus on the detection of a defined set of non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). However, adding these single compound concentrations might only represent a lower limit of atmospheric carbon concentrations, since no available method is able to analyze all organic compounds present in the atmosphere. A few studies are known that report on total NMOC concentration measurements in ambient air but measurements of the total NMOC exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere are missing. Therefore, we investigated the analysis of the total NMOC concentration by collecting these compounds on a solid adsorbent material for subsequent total carbon analysis. This first step is necessary to separate the stable gases CO, CO2 and CH4 from the volatile NMOC fraction. NMOC was desorbed and converted to CO2 by passing an oxidation unit. The CO2 is collected on a second preconcentration unit followed by thermal desorption and detection by an infrared gas analyzer. As major difficulties we identified the separation of CO2 from the NMOC compounds on the solid adsorbent unit and the choice of the catalytic material. The measurements were accompanied by GC analysis of single calibrated VOC species from permeation devices and measurements by a PTR-MS. Plant chamber measurements with Quercus ilex showed an expected diurnal course which was confirmed by the NMOC analyzer though with a discrepancy during the day of up to 40 %.

  11. Ambient spark generation to synthesize carbon-encapsulated metal nanoparticles in continuous aerosol manner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Park, Jae Hong; Yoon, Ki Young; Hwang, Jungho

    2009-11-01

    We report the use of spark generation in an inert gas atmosphere to synthesize carbon-encapsulated metal nanoparticles (CEMNs) in a continuous aerosol manner using a metal (nickel, cobalt, iron)-graphite carbon electrode configuration without the use of a vacuum. The spark-generated particles consisted of CEMNs and carbonaceous aggregated debris. The outer layer of the CEMNs showed parallel fringes (ordered graphitic nanostructures) while the debris consisted of disordered nanostructures. Electron and X-ray diffraction showed that both metal and graphite in the CEMNs were the pure elements except for iron-carbon, which contained a carbide phase. Based on the order of the activation energies for carbon diffusion into a metal: iron-carbon (10.5-16.5 kcal mol-1) < cobalt-carbon (34.7 kcal mol-1) ~ nickel-carbon (33.0-34.8 kcal mol-1), it was concluded that carbide particles form more easily from elemental iron than nickel or cobalt. The metal-to-carbon mass fractions of the spark-generated particles from nickel (anode)-carbon (cathode), cobalt-carbon, and iron-carbon spark configurations were 18.7, 28.3, and 11.2%, respectively, while the mass fractions for the configurations of metal (cathode)-carbon (anode) were 6.4, 9.1, and 4.3%, respectively. Similarly, the yield of CEMNs from the metal (anode)-carbon (cathode) electrodes was higher (54, 61, and 53%) than that of metal (cathode)-carbon (anode) electrodes (18, 30, and 18%).

  12. Aerosol measurements from plasma torch cuts on stainless steel, carbon steel, and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Brodrick, C.J.; Crawford, S.; Nasiatka, J.; Pierucci, K.; Reyes, V.; Sambrook, J.; Wrobel, S.; Yeary, J.

    1996-01-01

    The main purpose of this project is to quantify aerosol particle size and generation rates produced by a plasma torch whencutting stainless steel, carbon steel and aluminum. the plasma torch is a common cutting tool used in the dismantling of nuclear facilities. Eventually, other cutting tools will be characterized and the information will be compiled in a user guide to aid in theplanning of both D&D and other cutting operations. The data will be taken from controlled laboratory experiments on uncontaminated metals and field samples taken during D&D operations at ANL nuclear facilities. The plasma torch data was collected from laboratory cutting tests conducted inside of a closed, filtered chamber. The particle size distributions were determined by isokinetically sampling the exhaust duct using a cascade impactor. Cuts on different thicknesses showed there was no observable dependence of the aerosol quantity produced as a function of material thickness for carbon steel. However, data for both stainless steel and aluminum revealed that the aerosol mass produced for these materials appear to have some dependance on thickness, with thinner materials producing tmore aerosols. The results of the laboratory cutting tests show that most measured particle size distributions are bimodal with one mode at about 0.2 {mu}m and the other at about 10 {mu}m. The average Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameters (MMAD`s) for these tests are 0.36 {+-}0.08 {mu}m for stainless steel, 0.48 {+-}0.17{mu}m for aluminum and 0.52{+-}0.12 {mu}m for carbon steel.

  13. Validation of aerosol optical depth and total ozone column in the ultraviolet retrieved from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Chen, Maosi; Gao, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry factor (g) at seven ultraviolet wavelengths along with total column ozone (TOC) were retrieved based on Bayesian optimal estimation (OE) from the measurements of the UltraViolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR) deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during March to November in 2009. To assess the accuracy of the OE technique, the AOD retrievals are compared to both the Beer's law derived ones and the AErosol RObotic Network (AERONET) AOD product; and the TOC retrievals are compared to both the TOC product of the U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite data. The scatterplots of the AOD estimated by the OE method with the Beer's law derived ones and the collocated AERONET AOD product both show a very good agreement: the correlation coefficients vary between 0.98 and 0.99; the slopes range from 0.95 to 1.0; and the offsets are less than 0.02 at 368 nm. The comparison of TOC also shows a promising accuracy of the OE method: the standard deviations of the difference between the OE derived TOC and other TOC products are about 5 to 6 Dobson Units (DU). The validation of the OE retrievals on the selected dates suggests the OE technique has its merits and is a supplemental tool in analyzing UVMRP data.

  14. Dust transport over the eastern Mediterranean derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Aerosol Robotic Network, and surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Kubilay, N.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Vardavas, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-02-01

    Multiyear surface PM10 measurements performed on Crete Island, Greece, have been used in conjunction with satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) and ground-based remote sensing measurements (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)) to enhance our understanding of the evolution of mineral dust events over the eastern Mediterranean. An analysis of southerly air masses at altitudes of 1000 and 3000 m over a 5 year period (2000-2005), showed that dust can potentially arrive over Crete, either simultaneously in the lower free troposphere and inside the boundary layer (vertical extended transport (VET)) or initially into the free troposphere with the heavier particles gradually being scavenged inside the boundary layer (free troposphere transport (FTT)). Both pathways present significant seasonal variations but on an annual basis contribute almost equally to the dust transport in the area. During VET the aerosol index (AI) derived from TOMS was significantly correlated with surface PM10, and in general AI was found to be adequate for the characterization of dust loadings over the eastern Mediterranean on a climatological basis. A significant covariance between PM10 and AOT was observed during VET as well, indicating that AOT levels from AERONET may be estimated by PM10 levels at the surface. Surface measurements are thus crucial for the validation of remote sensing measurements and hence are a powerful tool for the investigation of the impact of aerosols on climate.

  15. Quality, compatibility, and synergy analyses of global aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Li, Zhanqing

    2005-05-01

    A number of global aerosol products of varying quality, strengths, and weaknesses have been generated. Presented here are synthetic analyses with regard to the quality, compatibility, and synergy of two long-term global (1983-2000) aerosol products derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Four essential aerosol parameters, namely, aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from AVHRR under the Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP), TOMS AOT, Ångström exponent (AE) from AVHRR, and TOMS aerosol index (AI) are analyzed together with various ancillary data sets on meteorological fields, ocean color, and ground-based AOT measurements. While the two satellite products reveal some common features, significant discrepancies exist. Reflectances measured at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths from the two sensors are incompatible in terms of the magnitude of AE computed from AOT derived from the two channels. The spatial distributions of the aerosol products from AVHRR and TOMS are complimentary in revealing different aspects of aerosol characteristics. In-depth analyses were carried out over several regions under the influence of different types of aerosols such as biomass burning, dust, sea salt, air pollution, and their mixtures. A classification algorithm was developed to identify dominant types of aerosols around the globe using aerosol products from the two instruments. Aerosol type information is used to develop and apply relationships between the AVHRR AOT and the TOMS AOT. The latter was used to extend the AOT at 0.55 μm over land around the globe. Comparisons of monthly mean AOTs with AERONET monthly mean AOTs showed a general agreement to within an estimated error range of ±0.08 ± 0.20τ. Finally, a comparison between the estimated AOT with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOT over land showed good agreement in terms of magnitude and seasonality, suggesting a means of

  16. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March-May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inland sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model-observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average +/- standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 +/- 2353 ng m(-3)) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61 %) and industrial (23 %) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.

  17. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inland sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.

  18. Sources of black carbon aerosols in South Asia and surrounding regions during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB)

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, R.; Barth, M. C.; Nair, V. S.; Pfister, G. G.; Suresh Babu, S.; Satheesh, S. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Carmichael, G. R.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2015-05-19

    This study examines differences in the surface black carbon (BC) aerosol loading between the Bay of Bengal (BoB) and the Arabian Sea (AS) and identifies dominant sources of BC in South Asia and surrounding regions during March–May 2006 (Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget, ICARB) period. A total of 13 BC tracers are introduced in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model coupled with Chemistry to address these objectives. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variability of BC distribution observed over the AS and the BoB during the ICARB ship cruise and captured spatial variability at the inlandmore » sites. In general, the model underestimates the observed BC mass concentrations. However, the model–observation discrepancy in this study is smaller compared to previous studies. Model results show that ICARB measurements were fairly well representative of the AS and the BoB during the pre-monsoon season. Elevated BC mass concentrations in the BoB are due to 5 times stronger influence of anthropogenic emissions on the BoB compared to the AS. Biomass burning in Burma also affects the BoB much more strongly than the AS. Results show that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, respectively, accounted for 60 and 37% of the average ± standard deviation (representing spatial and temporal variability) BC mass concentration (1341 ± 2353 ng m-3) in South Asia. BC emissions from residential (61%) and industrial (23%) sectors are the major anthropogenic sources, except in the Himalayas where vehicular emissions dominate. We find that regional-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions contributes up to 25% of BC mass concentrations in western and eastern India, suggesting that surface BC mass concentrations cannot be linked directly to the local emissions in different regions of South Asia.« less

  19. Cassini CAPS-ELS observations of carbon-based anions and aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Ravindra; Coates, Andrew; Wellbrock, Anne; Kataria, Dhiren; Jones, Geraint; Lewis, Gethyn; Waite, J.

    2016-06-01

    Cassini observations of Titans ionosphere revealed an atmosphere rich in positively charged ions with masses up to > 350 amu and negatively charged ions and aerosols with mass over charge ratios as high as 13,800 amu/q. The detection of negatively charged molecules by the Cassini CAPS Electron Spectrometer (CAPS-ELS) was particularly surprising and showed how the synthesis of large aerosol-size particles takes place at altitudes much greater than previously thought. Here, we present further analysis into this CAPS-ELS dataset, through an enhanced understanding of the instrument's response function. In previous studies the intrinsic E/E energy resolution of the instrument did not allow specific species to be identified and the detections were classified into broad mass ranges. In this study we use an updated fitting procedure to show how the ELS mass spectrum can be resolved into specific peaks at multiples of carbon-based anions up to > 100 amu/q. The negatively charged ions and aerosols in Titans ionosphere increase in mass with decreasing altitude, the lightest species being observed close to Titan's exobase of ˜1,450km and heaviest species observed at altitudes < 950km. We identify key stages in this apparent growth process and report on key intermediaries which appear to trigger the rapid growth of the larger aerosol-size particles.

  20. Single-Particle Black Carbon Aerosol Verticle Profiles From the Boundary Layer to the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. P.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Laurel, W. A.; Thomson, D. S.; Kok, G. L.; Baumgardner, D.; Wilson, J. C.; Lopez, J.; Aikin, K.; Jost, H.; Thompson, T. L.; Reeves, J. M.; Lowenstein, M.

    2005-12-01

    A single-particle soot photometer (SP2) was flown on a NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft in November 2004 from Houston, TX. The SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence to directly measure the mass of individual black-carbon (BC) particles in the mass range of ~0.3-300 fg. Scattered light is used to size non-absorbing aerosols in the range of ~150 - 700 nm diameter. Data from two mid-latitude flights has been used to generate size distributions and profiles of both aerosol types from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. Results for scattering aerosol concentrations are in good agreement with typical particle spectrometer measurements in the same region. Mass mixing ratios of BC between 5 and 18.7 km were roughly an order of magnitude lower than typical values as reported with wire impactor measurements and as predicted by two global BC models. The impact of this discrepancy on estimates of direct radiative forcing of BC aerosol will also be discussed.

  1. Simulated responses of terrestrial aridity to black carbon and sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Gettelman, A.; Xu, Y.; Fu, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Aridity index (AI), defined as the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (PET), is a measure of the dryness of terrestrial climate. Global climate models generally project future decreases of AI (drying) associated with global warming scenarios driven by increasing greenhouse gas and declining aerosols. Given their different effects in the climate system, scattering and absorbing aerosols may affect AI differently. Here we explore the terrestrial aridity responses to anthropogenic black carbon (BC) and sulfate (SO4) aerosols with Community Earth System Model simulations. Positive BC radiative forcing decreases precipitation averaged over global land at a rate of 0.9%/°C of global mean surface temperature increase (moderate drying), while BC radiative forcing increases PET by 1.0%/°C (also drying). BC leads to a global decrease of 1.9%/°C in AI (drying). SO4 forcing is negative and causes precipitation a decrease at a rate of 6.7%/°C cooling (strong drying). PET also decreases in response to SO4 aerosol cooling by 6.3%/°C cooling (contributing to moistening). Thus, SO4 cooling leads to a small decrease in AI (drying) by 0.4%/°C cooling. Despite the opposite effects on global mean temperature, BC and SO4 both contribute to the twentieth century drying (AI decrease). Sensitivity test indicates that surface temperature and surface available energy changes dominate BC- and SO4-induced PET changes.

  2. Growth of ultra long multiwall carbon nanotube arrays by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Heejun; Kim, Sang Yong; Koh, Ken Ha; Lee, Soonil

    2010-09-01

    Using a home-made aerosol nebulizer, we developed a new aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) process that made it possible to synthesize vertically-aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays with heights over a few millimeters routinely. An essential part of this technique was in-situ formation of metal catalyst nanoparticles via pyrolysis of ferrocene-ethanol aerosol right before CNT synthesis. Through the optimization of aerosol supply and CVD process parameters, we were able to synthesize clean VACNT arrays as long as 4.38 mm with very low metal contents in 20 min. Furthermore, it is worthy noting that such an outstanding height is achieved very quickly without supporting materials and water-assistance. By taking advantage of almost complete inhibition of CNT growth on low melting-temperature metals, we were able to fabricate patterned VACNT arrays by combining AACVD process with a conventional photolithograpic patterning of gold lines. Characterizations of as-grown nanotubes such as morphology, purity, and metal contents are presented. PMID:21133158

  3. Climatic and ecological impacts of tropospheric sulphate aerosols on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Alexey V.

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSA) may oxidise the photosynthesising tissues if they are taken up by plants. A parametrisation of this impact of tropospheric sulphate aerosols (TSA) on the terrestrial gross primary production is suggested. This parametrisation is implemented into the global Earth system model developed at the A.M. Obukhov Institute of the Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM). With this coupled model, the simulations are performed which are forced by common anthropogenic and natural climate forcings based on historical reconstructions followed by the RCP 8.5 scenario. The model response to sulphate aerosol loading is subdivided into the climatic (related to the influence of TSA on the radiative transport in the atmosphere) and ecological (related to the toxic influence of sulphate aerosol on terrestrial plants) impacts. We found that the former basically dominates over the latter on the global scale and modifies the responses of the global vegetation and soil carbon stocks to external forcings by 10%. At regional scale, however, ecological impact may be as much important as the climatic one.

  4. Characteristics of atmospheric organic and elemental carbon aerosols in urban Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Dongsheng; Zhang, Junke; He, Jun; Wang, Xiaoju; Pang, Bo; Liu, Zirui; Wang, Lili; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in PM2.5 were measured hourly with a semicontinuous thermal-optical analyzer in urban Beijing, China, from Mar 1, 2013 to Feb 28, 2014. The annual mean concentrations of OC and EC in Beijing were 14.0 ± 11.7 and 4.1 ± 3.2 μg/m3, respectively. The concentrations observed in this study were lower than those of other reports over the past ten years; however, the concentrations were higher than those reported from most of the megacities in North America and Europe. These findings suggest that OC and EC remained at high levels despite the implementation of strict control measures to improve air quality. The OC and EC concentrations exhibited strong seasonality, with high values in the autumn and winter but low values in the spring and summer in Beijing. The diurnal OC and EC cycles were characterized by higher values at night and in the morning because of primary emissions, accumulations and low boundary-layer heights. Due to increasing photochemical activity, a well-defined OC peak was observed at approximately noon. The OC and EC concentrations followed typical lognormal patterns in which more than 75% of the OC samples had concentrations between 0.9 and 18.0 μg/m3 and 75% of the EC samples had concentrations between 0.4 and 5.6 μg/m3. An EC tracer method and combined EC tracer and K+ mass balance methods were used to estimate the contributions from secondary formation and biomass burning, respectively. High secondary organic carbon (SOC) concentrations were found in the autumn and winter due to low temperatures, which are favorable for the absorption and condensation of semi-volatile organic compounds on existing particles. High correlations were found between the estimated SOC in PM2.5 and the observed OOA (oxidized organic aerosol) in PM1; thus, the method proved to be effective and reliable. The annual average OCBiomass burning (OCbb) contribution to the total OC concentration was 18.4%, suggesting that biomass

  5. Stratospheric Sulfuric Acid and Black Carbon Aerosol Measured During POLARIS and its Role in Ozone Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Pueschel, R. F.; Drdla, K.; Verma, S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol can affect the environment in three ways. Sulfuric acid aerosol have been shown to act as sites for the reduction of reactive nitrogen and chlorine and as condensation sites to form Polar Stratospheric Clouds, under very cold conditions, which facilitate ozone depletion. Recently, modeling studies have suggested a link between BCA (Black Carbon Aerosol) and ozone chemistry. These studies suggest that HNO3, NO2, and O3 may be reduced heterogeneously on BCA particles. The ozone reaction converts ozone to oxygen molecules, while HNO3 and NO2 react to form NOx. Finally, a buildup of BCA could reduce the single-scatter albedo of aerosol below a value of 0.98, a critical value that has been postulated to change the effect of stratospheric aerosol from cooling to warming. Correlations between measured BCA amounts and aircraft usage have been reported. Attempts to link BCA to ozone chemistry and other stratospheric processes have been hindered by questions concerning the amount of BCA that exists in the stratosphere, the magnitude of reaction probabilities, and the scarcity of BCA measurements. The Ames Wire Impactors (AWI) participated in POLARIS as part of the complement of experiments on the NASA ER-2. One of our main objectives was to determine the amount of aerosol surface area, particularly BCA, available for reaction with stratospheric constituents and assess if possible, the importance of these reactions. The AWI collects aerosol and BCA particles on thin Palladium wires that are exposed to the ambient air in a controlled manner. The samples are returned to the laboratory for subsequent analysis. The product of the AWI analysis is the size, surface area, and volume distributions, morphology and elemental composition of aerosol and BCA. This paper presents results from our experiments during POLARIS and puts these measurements in the context of POLARIS and other missions in which we have participated. It describes modifications to the AWI data

  6. Historical emissions of black and organic carbon aerosol from energy-related combustion, 1850-2000 - article no. GB2018

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, T.C.; Bhardwaj, E.; Dong, R.; Jogani, R.; Jung, S.K.; Roden, C.; Streets, D.G.; Trautmann, N.M.

    2007-05-15

    We present an emission inventory of primary black carbon (BC) and primary organic carbon (OC) aerosols from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion between 1850 and 2000. We reconstruct fossil fuel consumption and represent changes in technology on a national and sectoral basis. Our estimates rely on new estimates of biofuel consumption, and updated emission factors for old technologies. Emissions of black carbon increase almost linearly, totaling about 1000 Gg in 1850, 2200 Gg in 1900, 3000 Gg in 1950, and 4400 Gg in 2000. Primary organic carbon shows a similar pattern, with emissions of 4100 Gg, 5800 Gg, 6700 Gg, and 8700 Gg in 1850, 1900, 1950, and 2000, respectively. Biofuel is responsible for over half of BC emission until about 1890, and dominates energy-related primary OC emission throughout the entire period. Coal contributes the greatest fraction of BC emission between 1880 and 1975, and is overtaken by emissions from biofuel around 1975, and by diesel engines around 1990. Previous work suggests a rapid rise in BC emissions between 1950 and 2000. This work supports a more gradual increase between 1950 and 2000, similar to the increase between 1850 and 1925; implementation of clean technology is a primary reason.

  7. Climatological variations of total alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemayel, E.; Hassoun, A. E. R.; Benallal, M. A.; Goyet, C.; Rivaro, P.; Abboud-Abi Saab, M.; Krasakopoulou, E.; Touratier, F.; Ziveri, P.

    2015-12-01

    A compilation of data from several cruises between 1998 and 2013 was used to derive polynomial fits that estimate total alkalinity (AT) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) from measurements of salinity and temperature in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters. The optimal equations were chosen based on the 10-fold cross-validation results and revealed that second- and third-order polynomials fit the AT and CT data respectively. The AT surface fit yielded a root mean square error (RMSE) of ± 10.6 μmol kg-1, and salinity and temperature contribute to 96 % of the variability. Furthermore, we present the first annual mean CT parameterization for the Mediterranean Sea surface waters with a RMSE of ± 14.3 μmol kg-1. Excluding the marginal seas of the Adriatic and the Aegean, these equations can be used to estimate AT and CT in case of the lack of measurements. The identified empirical equations were applied on the 0.25° climatologies of temperature and salinity, available from the World Ocean Atlas 2013. The 7-year averages (2005-2012) showed that AT and CT have similar patterns with an increasing eastward gradient. The variability is influenced by the inflow of cold Atlantic waters through the Strait of Gibraltar and by the oligotrophic and thermohaline gradient that characterize the Mediterranean Sea. The summer-winter seasonality was also mapped and showed different patterns for AT and CT. During the winter, the AT and CT concentrations were higher in the western than in the eastern basin. The opposite was observed in the summer where the eastern basin was marked by higher AT and CT concentrations than in winter. The strong evaporation that takes place in this season along with the ultra-oligotrophy of the eastern basin determines the increase of both AT and CT concentrations.

  8. Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the Deepest Winter Mixed Layer Depths

    SciTech Connect

    Goyet, C.; Healy, R.; Ryan, J.; Kozyr, A.

    2000-05-01

    Modeling the global ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide system is becoming increasingly important to greenhouse gas policy. These models require initialization with realistic three-dimensional (3-D) oceanic carbon fields. This report presents an approach to establishing these initial conditions from an extensive global database of ocean carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) system measurements and well-developed interpolation methods.

  9. Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2°N, 76.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.67±0.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (∼30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1∼1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2∼2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.9±0.2 and 1.8±0.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions.

  10. Comparison of three different methods of total carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Kilborn, Susan H.; Bonnett, Brenda N.; Pook, Harold A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare total carbon dioxide (TCO(2)) levels measured by three different methods. Two hundred jugular venous blood samples from dogs admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Ontario Veterinary College with various clinical disorders were analyzed by the Radiometer blood gas analyzer (BGA) and the Coulter DACOS analyzer. In 70 of these samples, TCO(2) was also measured by the Kodak Ektachem DTE chemistry analyzer. Comparison of the agreement between methods revealed intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) of 0.63, 0.79, and 0.82 for the DACOS-Ektachem, DACOS-BGA and Ektachem-BGA comparisons, respectively. Evaluation of the effect of storage time on TCO(2) content of stored serum samples measured on the DACOS analyzer revealed a decrease of almost 2 mmol/L and a decrease in the intraclass correlation coefficient values between the DACOS analyzer and other methods after 7 hours storage time. The results of this observational study revealed lower agreement between the three methods in this study than previously reported between other methods of TCO(2) measurement. Possible reasons for the lower than expected agreement in this study included changes in DACOS values because of storage and differences in methodologies between the methods.

  11. Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2011-06-03

    Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and

  12. Vertical dependence of black carbon, sulphate and biomass burning aerosol radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, Bjørn H.; Myhre, Gunnar

    2011-12-01

    A global radiative transfer model is used to calculate the vertical profile of shortwave radiative forcing from a prescribed amount of aerosols. We study black carbon (BC), sulphate (SO4) and a black and organic carbon mixture typical of biomass burning (BIO), by prescribing aerosol burdens in layers between 1000 hPa and 20 hPa and calculating the resulting direct radiative forcing divided by the burden (NDRF). We find a strong sensitivity in the NDRF for BC with altitude, with a tenfold increase between BC close to the surface and the lower part of the stratosphere. Clouds are a major contributor to this dependence with altitude, but other factors also contribute. We break down and explain the different physical contributors to this strong sensitivity. The results show a modest regional dependence of the altitudinal dependence of BC NDRF between industrial regions, while for regions with properties deviating from the global mean NDRF variability is significant. Variations due to seasons and interannual changes in cloud conditions are found to be small. We explore the effect that large altitudinal variation in NDRF may have on model estimates of BC radiative forcing when vertical aerosol distributions are insufficiently constrained, and discuss possible applications of the present results for reducing inter-model differences.

  13. Black Carbon (Soot) Aerosol in the Lower Stratosphere and Upper Troposphere. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Black, D. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Hansen, A. D. A.; Verna, S.; Kato, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have used two approaches to measure BCA in the stratosphere. The first method consists of collecting aerosols by impaction on quartz rods, upon which are mounted strips of polystyrene filter material. Each 25 mm by 0.5 mm filter strip is alternately masked and exposed in 5 mm long sections. After sampling, the optical density of the exposed sections is measured and compared with the optical density of the masked (unexposed) sections. The filter strip is a Lambertian collector, the scattering property of which is not affected by the deposition of liquid sulfuric acid droplets which dominate the stratospheric aerosol. Hence, all attenuation greater in the exposed than in the non-exposed sections is due to absorption by BCA or rare opaque materials such as meteoritic iron. In a second approach we expose carbon-coated gold or palladium wires to air outside the aircraft boundary layer [Farlow et al., 1979; Pueschel et al., 1989]. With a field emission scanning electron microscope we are able to characterize BCA particles in addition to the dominant sulfuric acid droplets. Typically, soot is comprised of 20 nm diameter spheres linked together as branching chains or loosely packed aggregates (Figure 1a). The microscope has a lateral image resolution of 1.5 nm and can clearly resolve individual spheres making up BCA aggregates. Their morphology is uniquely different from that of the liquid sulfuric acid-water aerosol (Figure 1b). We approximate the size of each BCA particle by that of a sphere of equivalent volume and fit a lognormal size distribution to both the BCA and H2SO4/H2O aerosols. Both sampler types have been mounted on NASA's ER-2 high-altitude research aircraft (altitude ceiling of 70,000 feet), and on NASA's DC-8 (40,000 feet ceiling) aircraft to sample aerosols from a significant portion of the atmosphere.

  14. Case study of absorption aerosol optical depth closure of black carbon over the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Moteki, N.; Khatri, P.; Takamura, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Hashioka, H.; Matsui, H.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.

    2014-01-01

    aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements made by sun-sky photometers are currently the only constraint available for estimates of the global radiative forcing of black carbon (BC), but their validation studies are limited. In this paper, we report the first attempt to compare AAODs derived from single-particle soot photometer (SP2) and ground-based sun-sky photometer (sky radiometer, SKYNET) measurements. During the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) experiments, BC size distribution and mixing state vertical profiles were measured using an SP2 on board a research aircraft near the Fukue Observatory (32.8°N, 128.7°E) over the East China Sea in spring 2009 and late winter 2013. The aerosol extinction coefficients (bext) and single scattering albedo (SSA) at 500 nm were calculated based on aerosol size distribution and detailed BC mixing state information. The calculated aerosol optical depth (AOD) agreed well with the sky radiometer measurements (2 ± 6%) when dust loadings were low (lidar-derived nonspherical particle contribution to AOD less than 20%). However, under these low-dust conditions, the AAODs obtained from sky radiometer measurements were only half of the in situ estimates. When dust loadings were high, the sky radiometer measurements showed systematically higher AAODs even when all coarse particles were assumed to be dust for in situ measurements. These results indicate that there are considerable uncertainties in AAOD measurements. Uncertainties in the BC refractive index, optical calculations from in situ data, and sky radiometer retrieval analyses are discussed.

  15. Vegetation fires in the himalayan region - Aerosol load, black carbon emissions and smoke plume heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadrevu, Krishna Prasad; Ellicott, Evan; Giglio, Louis; Badarinath, K. V. S.; Vermote, Eric; Justice, Chris; Lau, William K. M.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the potential of multi-satellite datasets for quantifying the biomass burning emissions from the Himalayan region. A variety of satellite products were used for characterizing fire events including active fire counts, burnt areas, aerosol optical depth (AOD) variations, aerosol index and smoke plume heights. Results from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire product suggest March-June as the major fire season with the peak during the April. An average of 3908 fire counts per year were recorded with sixty four percent of the fires occurring in the low elevation areas in the Himalayan Region. We estimate average burnt areas of 1129 sq. km, with the black carbon emissions of 431 Mg, per year. The mean AOD (2005-2010) was 0.287 ± 0.105 (one sigma) with peak values in May. Correlation analysis between the fire counts and AOD resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.553; the correlation between the FRP and AOD is relatively weaker ( r = 0.499). Planetary boundary layer height retrieved from the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis For Research And Applications (MERRA) product suggests typical PBL height of 1000-1200 m during the April-May peak biomass burning season. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP) retrievals show the extent of smoke plume heights beyond the planetary boundary layer during the peak biomass burning month of April. However, comparison of fires in the Himalayan region with other regions and comparisons to aerosol index data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) suggest smoke plumes reaching less than 3 km. Our results on fires and smoke plume height relationships provide valuable information for addressing aerosol transport in the region.

  16. Estimating Black Carbon Aging Time-Scales with a Particle-Resolved Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Nicole; West, Matt; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-01-13

    Understanding the aging process of aerosol particles is important for assessing their chemical reactivity, cloud condensation nuclei activity, radiative properties and health impacts. In this study we investigate the aging of black carbon containing particles in an idealized urban plume using a new approach, the particleresolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC. We present a method to estimate aging time-scales using an aging criterion based on cloud condensation nuclei activation. The results show a separation into a daytime regime where condensation dominates and a nighttime regime where coagulation dominates. For the chosen urban plume scenario, depending on the supersaturation threshold, the values for the aging timescales vary between 0.06 hours and 10 hours during the day, and between 6 hours and 20 hours during the night.

  17. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  18. Diurnal variations of organic molecular tracers and stable carbon isotopic composition in atmospheric aerosols over Mt. Tai in the North China Plain: an influence of biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, P. Q.; Kawamura, K.; Chen, J.; Li, J.; Sun, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Tachibana, E.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Okuzawa, K.; Tanimoto, H.; Kanaya, Y.; Wang, Z. F.

    2012-09-01

    Organic tracer compounds, as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of total carbon (TC) have been investigated in aerosol samples collected during early and late periods of the Mount Tai eXperiment 2006 (MTX2006) field campaign in the North China Plain. Total solvent-extractable fractions were investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. More than 130 organic compounds were detected in the aerosol samples. They were grouped into twelve organic compound classes, including biomass burning tracers, biogenic primary sugars, biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers, and anthropogenic tracers such as phthalates, hopanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In early June when the field burning activities of wheat straws in the North China Plain were very active, the total identified organics (2090 ± 1170 ng m-3) were double those in late June (926 ± 574 ng m-3). All the compound classes were more abundant in early June than in late June, except phthalate esters, which were higher in late June. Levoglucosan (88-1210 ng m-3, mean 403 ng m-3) was found as the most abundant single compound in early June, while diisobutyl phthalate was the predominant species in late June. During the biomass-burning period in early June, the diurnal trends of most of the primary and secondary organic aerosol tracers were characterized by the concentration peaks observed at mid-night or in early morning, while in late June most of the organic species peaked in late afternoon. This suggests that smoke plumes from biomass burning can uplift the aerosol particulate matter to a certain altitude, which could be further transported to and encountered the summit of Mt. Tai during nighttime. On the basis of the tracer-based method for the estimation of biomass-burning OC, fungal-spore OC and biogenic secondary organic carbon (SOC), we estimate that an average of 24% (up to 64%) of the

  19. Total organic carbon in aggregates as a soil recovery indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciene Maltoni, Katia; Rodrigues Cassiolato, Ana Maria; Amorim Faria, Glaucia; Dubbin, William

    2015-04-01

    The soil aggregation promotes physical protection of organic matter, preservation of which is crucial to improve soil structure, fertility and ensure the agro-ecosystems sustainability. The no-tillage cultivation system has been considered as one of the strategies to increase total soil organic carbono (TOC) contents and soil aggregation, both are closely related and influenced by soil management systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of soil aggregates and the total organic carbon inside aggregates, with regard to soil recovery, under 3 different soil management systems, i.e. 10 and 20 years of no-tillage cultivation as compared with soil under natural vegetation (Cerrado). Undisturbed soils (0-5; 5-10; and 10-20 cm depth) were collected from Brazil, Central Region. The soils, Oxisols from Cerrado, were collected from a field under Natural Vegetation-Cerrado (NV), and from fields that were under conventional tillage since 1970s, and 10 and 20 years ago were changed to no-tillage cultivation system (NT-10; NT-20 respectively). The undisturbed samples were sieved (4mm) and the aggregates retained were further fractionated by wet sieving through five sieves (2000, 1000, 500, 250, and 50 μm) with the aggregates distribution expressed as percentage retained by each sieve. The TOC was determined, for each aggregate size, by combustion (Thermo-Finnigan). A predominance of aggregates >2000 μm was observed under NV treatment (92, 91, 82 %), NT-10 (64, 73, 61 %), and NT-20 (71, 79, 63 %) for all three depths (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm). In addition greater quantities of aggregates in sizes 1000, 500, 250 and 50 μm under NT-10 and NT-20 treatments, explain the lower aggregate stability under these treatments compared to the soil under NV. The organic C concentration for NV in aggregates >2000 μm was 24,4; 14,2; 8,7 mg/g for each depth (0-5; 5-10; 10-20 cm, respectively), higher than in aggregates sized 250-50 μm (7,2; 5,5; 4,4 mg/g) for all depths

  20. Contributions of modern and dead organic carbon to individual fatty acid homologues in spring aerosols collected from northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Matsumoto, Kohei; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) have been used as proxies to evaluate the contributions of modern/fossil carbon and marine/terrestrial organic matter, respectively, in geochemical samples. However, there are few such studies in atmospheric aerosols. Here, we measured 14C contents and δ13C of individual n-fatty acids in an aerosol sample collected from northern Japan in spring 2001 during Asian dust season. Our results show that the distribution of fatty acids in the spring aerosols was characterized by a strong even/odd carbon number predominance with two maxima at C16 and C26. Their δ13C (range: -30.6 to -20.5‰) showed higher values (average: -24.5‰) for lower molecular weight (LMW) fatty acids (C16 - C19) and lower values (average: -29.7‰) for higher MW (HMW) fatty acids (C20 - C32). This difference suggests that LMW acids are mainly derived from lacustrine and/or marine algal sources whereas HMW acids are predominantly from terrestrial C3 higher plants. Δ14C values of fatty acids were found to range from -96.9 to +122.9‰ with lower values for HMW acids and higher values for LMW acids. LMW acids in the aerosols contain only modern carbon. In contrast, HMW acids ≥C24 were found to contain up to 9.7 wt% dead carbon, although their major portion (up to 92.3%) is composed of modern carbon. Backward trajectory analyses indicated that the source regions of the spring aerosols were dominated by central and north China (62%). This study suggests that the old fatty acids in the spring aerosols are most likely originated from the loess deposits in China via long-range atmospheric transport over the western North Pacific, although their contribution to the aerosols was relatively small.

  1. Balloon-Borne Measurements of Total Reactive Nitrogen, Nitric Acid, and Aerosol in the Cold Arctic Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Aimedieu, P.; Matthews, W. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Murcray, D. G.; Hofmann, D. J.; Johnston, P. V.; Iwasaka, Y.; Iwata, A.; Sheldon, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Total reactive nitrogen (NO(Y)) between 15 and 29 km was measured for the first time on board a balloon within the Arctic cold vortex. Observations of HNO3, aerosol, and ozone were made by instruments on the same balloon gondola which was launched from Esrange, Sweden (68 deg N, 20 deg E) on January 23, 1989. The NO(y) mixing ratio was observed to increase very rapidly from 6 ppbv at 18 km altitude to a maximum of 21 ppbv at 21 km, forming a sharp layer with a thickness of about 2 km. A minimum in the NO(y) mixing ratio of 5 ppbv was found at 27 km. The measured HNO3 profile shows broad similarities to that of NO(y). This observation, together with the observed very low column amount of NO2, shows that NO(x) had been almost totally converted to HNO3, and that NO(y) was composed mainly of HNO3. The enhanced aerosol concentration between 19 and 22 km suggests that the maximum abundance of HNO3 trapped in the form of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was about 6 ppbv at 21 km. The sampled air parcels were highly supersaturated with respect to NAT. Although extensive denitrification throughout the stratosphere did not prevail, an indication of denitrification was found at altitudes of 27 and 22 km, and between 18 and 15 km.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Water-Soluble Anions and Organic Carbons in Bulk Aerosols Collected at the Ryukyu Islands, Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Ijyu, M.; Nakaema, F.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.; Furukawa, M.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols pose health risks to humans and change global climate. Ryukyu Islands in Japan are mainly covered with maritime air mass in summer and continental air mass for the rest of the seasons. Thus, it is possible to estimate the origins of chemical components, in particular transboundary air pollutants from East Asia. Ryukyu Islands are one of the best locations for monitoring the changes in Asia's atmosphere. This study tried to elucidate the spatial and temporal distribution of water-soluble anions and organic carbons, and chemical changes during the transportation processes. Aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Sep. 2005 - Dec. 2010), Kume Island (KM, ca. 100 km from Naha), and Minami-Daitou Island (MD, ca. 350 km from Naha) from June 2008 to June 2010 on quartz filters by using identical high-volume air samplers. The sample filters were exchanged every week. The concentrations of water-soluble anions (Cl-,Br-,NO3-,NO2-,SO42-) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were determined by using ion chromatography and total organic carbon analyzer, respectively. And, concentrations of non-sea-salt SO(nss-SO42-) were calculated based on the concentrations of Na+. For the samples collected at CHAAMS, seawater component accounted for on average 56±5% of total aerosol mass. Monthly mean concentrations of nss-SO42- showed distinctive difference among the sampling sites (KM>CHAAMS>MD) during Jan. to May, suggesting that distance from Asian continent affected on its behavior. Yearly average concentrations of NO3- and nss-SO42- showed +42% and +16% increase, respectively between 2005 and 2011. Annual rate of NO3- increase was much faster than that of nss-SO42-, probably reflecting changes in lifestyles in Asian continent.

  3. Inferring brown carbon content from UV aerosol absorption measurements during biomass burning season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Arola, A. T.; Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Andrade, M.; Labow, G. J.; Eck, T. F.; Li, Z.; Dickerson, R. R.; Stenchikov, G. L.; Osipov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring spectral dependence of light absorption by colored organic or "brown" carbon (BrC) is important, because of its effects on photolysis rates of ozone and surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Enhanced UV spectral absorption by BrC can in turn be exploited for simultaneous retrievals of BrC and black carbon (BC) column amounts in field campaigns. We present an innovative ground-based retrieval of BC and BrC volume fractions and their mass absorption efficiencies during the biomass burning season in Santa Cruz, Bolivia in September-October 2007. Our method combines retrieval of BC volume fraction using AERONET inversion in visible wavelengths with the inversion of total BC+BrC absorption (i.e., column effective imaginary refractive index, kmeas) using Diffuse/Direct irradiance measurements in UV wavelengths. First, we retrieve BrC volume fraction by fitting kmeas at 368nm using Maxwell-Garnett (MG) mixing rules assuming: (1) flat spectral dependence of kBC, (2) known value of kBrC at 368nm from laboratory absorption measurements or smoke chamber experiments, and (3) known BC volume fraction from AERONET inversion. Next, we derive kBrC in short UVB wavelengths by fitting kmeas at 305nm, 311nm, 317nm, 325nm, and 332nm using MG mixing rules and fixed volume fractions of BC and BrC. Our retrievals show larger than expected spectral dependence of kBrC in UVB wavelengths, implying reduced surface UVB irradiance and inhibited photolysis rates of surface ozone destruction. We use a one-dimensional chemical box model to show that the observed strong wavelength dependence of BrC absorption leads to inhibited photolysis of ozone to O(1D), a loss mechanism, while having little impact or even accelerating photolysis of NO2, an ozone production mechanism. Although BC only absorption in biomass burning aerosols is important for climate radiative forcing in the visible wavelengths, additional absorption by BrC is important because of its impact on surface UVB radiation

  4. Comparative Climate Responses of Anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases, All Major Aerosol Components, Black Carbon, and Methane, Accounting for the Evolution of the Aerosol Mixing State and of Clouds/Precipitation from Multiple Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2005-12-01

    Several modeling studies to date have simulated the global climate response of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and bulk (non-size-resolved) sulfate or generic aerosol particles together, but no study has examined the climate response of greenhouse gases simultaneously with all major size- and composition resolved aerosol particle components. Such a study is important for improving our understanding of the effects of anthropogenic pollutants on climate. Here, the GATOR-GCMOM model is used to study the global climate response of (a) all major greenhouse gases and size-resolved aerosol components, (b) all major greenhouse gases alone, (c) fossil-fuel soot (black carbon, primary organic matter, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate), and (d) methane. Aerosol components treated in all simulations included water, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, hydrogen ion, soil dust, and pollen/spores. Fossil-fuel soot (FFS) was emitted into its own size distribution. All other components, including biofuel and biomass soot, sea-spray, soil dust, etc., were emitted into a second distribution (MIX). The FFS distribution grew by condensation of secondary organic matter and sulfuric acid, hydration of water, and dissolution of nitric acid, ammonia, and hydrochloric acid. It self-coagulated and heterocoagulated with the MIX distribution, which also grew by condensation, hydration, and dissolution. Treatment of separate distributions for FFS allowed FFS to evolve from an external mixture to an internal mixture. In both distributions, black carbon was treated as a core component for optical calculations. Both aerosol distributions served as CCN during explicit size-resolved cloud formation. The resulting clouds grew by coagulation and condensation, coagulated with interstitial aerosol particles, and fell to the surface as rain and snow, carrying aerosol constituents with them. Thus, cloud

  5. Brown carbon and thermal-optical analysis: A correction based on optical multi-wavelength apportionment of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, D.; Caponi, L.; Bove, M. C.; Prati, P.

    2016-01-01

    Thermo-optical analysis is widely adopted for the quantitative determination of total, TC, organic, OC and elemental, EC, Carbon in aerosol samples collected on quartz fibre filters. Nevertheless, the methodology presents several issues in particular about the artefacts related to the formation of pyrolytic carbon. It is usually neglected the uncertainty due to the possible presence of brown carbon (BrC) in the sample under analysis, i.e. the optically active fraction of OC produced by biomass burning and with characteristics intermediate between OC and EC. We introduce here a novel correction to the standard thermo-optical protocol based on the determination of the fraction of the sample absorbance due to the (possible) presence of BrC. This is achievable thanks to the coupled use of the Multi Wavelength Absorbance Analyser (MWAA) of the University of Genoa and a standard Sunset Inc. EC/OC analyser. Our correction provides a firmer OC/EC separation as well as an operative quantification of the BrC mass. The methodology has been validated against independent determination of the levoglucosan content in the same filters sent to the Sunset analysis. Corrections up to 23% in the OC and EC values, determined via the standard and new thermo-optical analysis, have been found in a set of PM10 (i.e. Particulate Matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) samples collected wintertime at a mountain site in Northern Italy.

  6. Redistribution of black and brown carbon in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, U. K.; Brunamonti, S.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) and to a lesser degree brown carbon is a major anthropogenic greenhouse agent, yet substantial uncertainties obstruct understanding its radiative forcing. Particularly debated is the extent of the absorption enhancement by internally compared to externally mixed BC, which critically depends on the interior morphology of the BC-containing particles. Here we suggest that a currently unaccounted morphology, optically very different from the customary core shell and volume-mixing assumptions, likely occurs in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Using Raman spectroscopy on micrometer-sized droplets, we show that LLPS of an organic/inorganic model system drives redistribution of BC into the outer (organic) phase of the host particle. This results in an inverted core-shell structure, in which a transparent aqueous core is surrounded by a BC-containing absorbing shell. We also study the redistribution of a model proxy for brown carbon, carminic acid, in single, levitated aqueous aerosol particles undergoing LLPS and compare the measured absorption efficiency with corresponding Mie calculations.

  7. Aerosol generation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Polk, William W; Sharma, Monita; Sayes, Christie M; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Clippinger, Amy J

    2016-04-23

    Aerosol generation and characterization are critical components in the assessment of the inhalation hazards of engineered nanomaterials (NMs). An extensive review was conducted on aerosol generation and exposure apparatus as part of an international expert workshop convened to discuss the design of an in vitro testing strategy to assess pulmonary toxicity following exposure to aerosolized particles. More specifically, this workshop focused on the design of an in vitro method to predict the development of pulmonary fibrosis in humans following exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Aerosol generators, for dry or liquid particle suspension aerosolization, and exposure chambers, including both commercially available systems and those developed by independent researchers, were evaluated. Additionally, characterization methods that can be used and the time points at which characterization can be conducted in order to interpret in vitro exposure results were assessed. Summarized below is the information presented and discussed regarding the relevance of various aerosol generation and characterization techniques specific to aerosolized MWCNTs exposed to cells cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The generation of MWCNT aerosols relevant to human exposures and their characterization throughout exposure in an ALI system is critical for extrapolation of in vitro results to toxicological outcomes in humans.

  8. Determination of the total grain size distributionin a vulcanian eruption column, and its implications to stratospheric aerosol perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Murrow, P.J.; Rose, W.I. Jr.; Self, S.

    1980-11-01

    Grain size analysis of samples representing all sampleable portions of the airfall deposit produced by the Fuego volcano in Guatemala on 14 October 1974 form the basis for estimating the total grain size distribution of tephra from this eruption. The region enclosed by each isopach has a particular average grain size distribution which can be weighted proportionally to its percentage volume. The grain size of pyroclastic avalanche deposits produced during the eruption are also included. The total grain size distribution calculated as a sum of weighted distributions has a median grain size of 0.80 (0.6mm) and a sorting coefficient (sigma0) of 2.3. The size distribution seems to approximate Rosin and Rammler's law of crushing and this observation allows us to estimate that no more than 15% volume of the fine tail of the total size distribution is likely to be missing. The ash composed of these fine particles did not fall in the region of the volcano as part of the recognizable tephra blanket. The eruption column reached well into the stratosphere: heights estimated from the ground were 10 to 12 km above sea level but estimated heights based on mass flux rates are higher (18 to 23 km). The proportion of ash smaller than 2 ..mu..m, which could remain for substantial periods in the stratosphere, is no more than 0.8% volume of the total. It seems probable that acid aerosol particles from vulcanian type eruptions are more important to stratospheric aerosol perturbation than fine silicate ash particles by at least an order of magnitude.

  9. Evaluation of 1047-nm photoacoustic instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs from gasoline and diesel powered vehicles.

    PubMed

    Arnott, W P; Zielinska, B; Rogers, C F; Sagebiel, J; Park, Kihong; Chow, Judith; Moosmüller, Hans; Watson, John G; Kelly, K; Wagner, D; Sarofim, A; Lighty, J; Palmer, G

    2005-07-15

    A series of measurements have been performed at Hill Air Force Base to evaluate real-time instruments for measurements of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHs emitted from spark and ignition compression vehicles. Vehicles were operated at idle or fast idle in one set of measurements and were placed under load on a dynamometer during the second series. Photoacoustic instruments were developed that operated at a wavelength of 1047 nm where gaseous interference is negligible, although sensitivity to black carbon is good. Compact, efficient, solid-state lasers with direct electronic modulation capabilities are used in these instruments. Black carbon measurements are compared with samples collected on quartz fiber filters that were evaluated using the thermal optical reflectance method. A measure of total particle-bound PAH was provided by photoelectric aerosol sensors (PAS) and is evaluated against a sum of PAH mass concentrations obtained with a filter-denuder combination. The PAS had to be operated with a dilution system held at approximately 150 degrees C for most of the source sampling to prevent spurious behavior, thus perhaps compromising detection of lighter PAHs. PA and PAS measurements were found to have a high degree of correlation, perhaps suggesting that the PAS can respond to the polycyclic nature of the black carbon aerosol. The PAS to PA ratio for ambient air in Fresno, CA is 3.7 times as large in winter than in summer months, suggesting that the PAS clearly does respond to compounds other than BC when the instrument is used without the heated inlet. PMID:16082972

  10. Long-term trends in California mobile source emissions and ambient concentrations of black carbon and organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Brian C; Goldstein, Allen H; Harley, Robert A

    2015-04-21

    A fuel-based approach is used to assess long-term trends (1970-2010) in mobile source emissions of black carbon (BC) and organic aerosol (OA, including both primary emissions and secondary formation). The main focus of this analysis is the Los Angeles Basin, where a long record of measurements is available to infer trends in ambient concentrations of BC and organic carbon (OC), with OC used here as a proxy for OA. Mobile source emissions and ambient concentrations have decreased similarly, reflecting the importance of on- and off-road engines as sources of BC and OA in urban areas. In 1970, the on-road sector accounted for ∼90% of total mobile source emissions of BC and OA (primary + secondary). Over time, as on-road engine emissions have been controlled, the relative importance of off-road sources has grown. By 2010, off-road engines were estimated to account for 37 ± 20% and 45 ± 16% of total mobile source contributions to BC and OA, respectively, in the Los Angeles area. This study highlights both the success of efforts to control on-road emission sources, and the importance of considering off-road engine and other VOC source contributions when assessing long-term emission and ambient air quality trends. PMID:25793355

  11. Long-term trends in California mobile source emissions and ambient concentrations of black carbon and organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Brian C; Goldstein, Allen H; Harley, Robert A

    2015-04-21

    A fuel-based approach is used to assess long-term trends (1970-2010) in mobile source emissions of black carbon (BC) and organic aerosol (OA, including both primary emissions and secondary formation). The main focus of this analysis is the Los Angeles Basin, where a long record of measurements is available to infer trends in ambient concentrations of BC and organic carbon (OC), with OC used here as a proxy for OA. Mobile source emissions and ambient concentrations have decreased similarly, reflecting the importance of on- and off-road engines as sources of BC and OA in urban areas. In 1970, the on-road sector accounted for ∼90% of total mobile source emissions of BC and OA (primary + secondary). Over time, as on-road engine emissions have been controlled, the relative importance of off-road sources has grown. By 2010, off-road engines were estimated to account for 37 ± 20% and 45 ± 16% of total mobile source contributions to BC and OA, respectively, in the Los Angeles area. This study highlights both the success of efforts to control on-road emission sources, and the importance of considering off-road engine and other VOC source contributions when assessing long-term emission and ambient air quality trends.

  12. Sensitivity studies for space-based measurement of atmospheric total column carbon dioxide by reflected sunlight.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S Randolph

    2004-02-01

    The feasibility of making space-based carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon-cycle studies is explored. With the proposed detection method, we use absorption of reflected sunlight near 1.58 microm. The results indicate that the small (degrees 1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable provided that an adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable. Modification of the sunlight path by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could, however, lead to systematic errors in the CO2 column retrieval; therefore ancillary aerosol and cloud data are important to reduce errors. Precise measurement of surface pressure and good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile are also required.

  13. Biomass burning dominates brown carbon absorption in the rural southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Brock, C. A.; Guo, H.; Xu, L.; Weber, R. J.; Ng, N. L.; Allen, H. M.; Ayres, B. R.; Baumann, K.; Cohen, R. C.; Draper, D. C.; Duffey, K. C.; Edgerton, E.; Fry, J. L.; Hu, W. W.; Jimenez, J. L.; Palm, B. B.; Romer, P.; Stone, E. A.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    carbon aerosol consists of light-absorbing organic particulate matter with wavelength-dependent absorption. Aerosol optical extinction, absorption, size distributions, and chemical composition were measured in rural Alabama during summer 2013. The field site was well located to examine sources of brown carbon aerosol, with influence by high biogenic organic aerosol concentrations, pollution from two nearby cities, and biomass burning aerosol. We report the optical closure between measured dry aerosol extinction at 365 nm and calculated extinction from composition and size distribution, showing agreement within experiment uncertainties. We find that aerosol optical extinction is dominated by scattering, with single-scattering albedo values of 0.94 ± 0.02. Black carbon aerosol accounts for 91 ± 9% of the total carbonaceous aerosol absorption at 365 nm, while organic aerosol accounts for 9 ± 9%. The majority of brown carbon aerosol mass is associated with biomass burning, with smaller contributions from biogenically derived secondary organic aerosol.

  14. The Pagami Creek smoke plume after long-range transport to the upper troposphere over Europe - aerosol properties and black carbon mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlkötter, F.; Gysel, M.; Sauer, D.; Minikin, A.; Baumann, R.; Seifert, P.; Ansmann, A.; Fromm, M.; Voigt, C.; Weinzierl, B.

    2013-11-01

    During the CONCERT~2011 field experiment with the DLR research aircraft Falcon an enhanced aerosol layer with particle linear depolarization ratios of 6-8% at 532 nm has been observed at altitudes above 10 km over northeast Germany on 16 September 2011. Dispersion simulations with HYSPLIT suggest that the elevated aerosol layer originated from the pyro-convective Pagami Creek forest fire in Minnesota, USA. The 3-4 days old smoke plume has high total refractory black carbon (rBC) mass concentrations of 0.03-0.35 μg m-3 at standard temperature and pressure (stp) with rBC mass equivalent diameters predominantly smaller than 130 nm. Assuming a~core-shell particle structure, the BC cores exhibit very thick (median: 105-136 nm) BC-free coatings, which modify the radiative transfer through this layer. A large fraction of the BC-containing particles disintegrate while passing the laser beam of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). This is shown for the first time for high-altitude aerosol layers in this study, giving evidence for heterogeneous mixing structures and possibly modified light-scattering and light-absorbing properties of the particles. This case study estimates the rBC mass import from the Pagami Creek forest fire into the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) region (best estimate: 25 Mg BC). A comparison to black carbon emission rates from aviation underlines the relevance of the import of forest fire aerosol on the BC load in the UTLS region. Our detailed information on the microphysics and the mixing state of the BC forest fire aerosol layer will help to better understand and investigate its radiative impact.

  15. Carbon monoxide total column retrievals from TROPOMI shortwave infrared measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, Jochen; aan de Brugh, Joost; Scheepmaker, Remco; Borsdorff, Tobias; Hu, Haili; Houweling, Sander; Butz, Andre; Aben, Ilse; Hasekamp, Otto

    2016-10-01

    The Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) spectrometer is the single payload of the Copernicus Sentinel 5 Precursor (S5P) mission. It measures Earth radiance spectra in the shortwave infrared spectral range around 2.3 µm with a dedicated instrument module. These measurements provide carbon monoxide (CO) total column densities over land, which for clear sky conditions are highly sensitive to the tropospheric boundary layer. For cloudy atmospheres over land and ocean, the column sensitivity changes according to the light path through the atmosphere. In this study, we present the physics-based operational S5P algorithm to infer atmospheric CO columns satisfying the envisaged accuracy ( < 15 %) and precision ( < 10 %) both for clear sky and cloudy observations with low cloud height. Here, methane absorption in the 2.3 µm range is combined with methane abundances from a global chemical transport model to infer information on atmospheric scattering. For efficient processing, we deploy a linearized two-stream radiative transfer model as forward model and a profile scaling approach to adjust the CO abundance in the inversion. Based on generic measurement ensembles, including clear sky and cloudy observations, we estimated the CO retrieval precision to be ≤ 11 % for surface albedo ≥ 0.03 and solar zenith angle ≤ 70°. CO biases of ≤ 3 % are introduced by inaccuracies in the methane a priori knowledge. For strongly enhanced CO concentrations in the tropospheric boundary layer and for cloudy conditions, CO errors in the order of 8 % can be introduced by the retrieval of cloud parameters of our algorithm. Moreover, we estimated the effect of a distorted spectral instrument response due to the inhomogeneous illumination of the instrument entrance slit in the flight direction to be < 2 % with pseudo-random characteristics when averaging over space and time. Finally, the CO data exploitation is demonstrated for a TROPOMI orbit of simulated shortwave infrared

  16. Arabian Sea tropical cyclones intensified by emissions of black carbon and other aerosols.

    PubMed

    Evan, Amato T; Kossin, James P; Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V

    2011-11-02

    Throughout the year, average sea surface temperatures in the Arabian Sea are warm enough to support the development of tropical cyclones, but the atmospheric monsoon circulation and associated strong vertical wind shear limits cyclone development and intensification, only permitting a pre-monsoon and post-monsoon period for cyclogenesis. Thus a recent increase in the intensity of tropical cyclones over the northern Indian Ocean is thought to be related to the weakening of the climatological vertical wind shear. At the same time, anthropogenic emissions of aerosols have increased sixfold since the 1930s, leading to a weakening of the southwesterly lower-level and easterly upper-level winds that define the monsoonal circulation over the Arabian Sea. In principle, this aerosol-driven circulation modification could affect tropical cyclone intensity over the Arabian Sea, but so far no such linkage has been shown. Here we report an increase in the intensity of pre-monsoon Arabian Sea tropical cyclones during the period 1979-2010, and show that this change in storm strength is a consequence of a simultaneous upward trend in anthropogenic black carbon and sulphate emissions. We use a combination of observational, reanalysis and model data to demonstrate that the anomalous circulation, which is radiatively forced by these anthropogenic aerosols, reduces the basin-wide vertical wind shear, creating an environment more favourable for tropical cyclone intensification. Because most Arabian Sea tropical cyclones make landfall, our results suggest an additional impact on human health from regional air pollution.

  17. Effect of photochemical self-action of carbon-containing aerosol: Wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, I. B.; Berezin, E. V.; Beekmann, M.

    2016-05-01

    It has been shown by numerical simulation that the rate of formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) in smoke plumes caused by vegetation and peat fires under real conditions can significantly depend on the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). The AOT determines the photodissociation rate and hydroxyl radical concentration, which in turn determines the rate of SOA generation as a result of oxidation of semivolatile organic compounds. Quantitative analysis has been carried out for the situation that took place in European Russia during the 2010 Russian wildfires. The state-of-the-art 3D chemical transport model is used in this study; the simulations are optimized and validated using the data of monitoring of the particulate matter in the Moscow region and Finland. The findings indicate that it is important to allow for this effect in studies focused on the analysis and prediction of air pollution due to wildfires, as well as climate and weather studies, whose results may depend on the assumptions about the content and properties of atmospheric carbon-containing aerosol.

  18. Long-Term Observations on Aerosol Elemental Carbon and Mass Concentrations in Winter-Time in New Delhi: Implications for Local Source Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, S. G.; Singh, K.; Singh, N.; Gupta, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    Fossil-fuel and bio-fuel burning are the two major sources identified for high carbonaceous aerosol loadings in several mega cities in India. In the last decade, according to a report from the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB, 1999), the vehicular emission (mostly diesel-powered engines) was contributed to ~67% of the total air pollution load in New Delhi. Therefore, a policy decision was taken by the government, and most of the diesel-powered engines were converted to compressed natural gas (CNG) -powered engines by 2003. To better understand the effect of these changes on air quality, we collected high volume aerosol samples (total suspended particles, TSP) mostly for a day basis at our institute building in New Delhi almost everyday during winter season (November to January) from 2002 to 2008. We found very high mean aerosol loading, i.e., 488±47 μg m-3 in 2002 winter, which dropped significantly to 280±73 μg m-3 in 2003 winter. Thereafter, a steadily increased trend of aerosol mass loadings was observed, i.e., 339±112, 339±120, 412±107 and 444±55 μg m-3 in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 winters, respectively. Similar trend was also observed for elemental carbon (EC) concentration in TSP, which was peaked in 2002 (47±11 μg m-3) and minimized in 2003 (32±6 μg m-3), and then gradually increased to 41±8 μg m-3 in 2007 winter. These decline trends of aerosol mass and EC concentrations in 2003 can be explained well, because of the conversion of diesel engine to CNG engines of public transport facilities. However, again increase in aerosol mass and EC concentrations possibly because of a high increase in road traffic in recent years. According to the economic survey of New Delhi 2008-09, the number of vehicles (which includes all types of engines, i.e., petrol, diesel and CNG) has grown from ~3.3 millions in 1997-98 to ~5.6 millions in 2007-08. The influence of engine types and vehicle population on aerosol loading can also be explained well by SO2 and

  19. A study of workers' exposures to the inhalable and 'total' aerosol fractions in the primary nickel production industry using mannequins to simulate personal sampling.

    PubMed

    Tsai, P J; Vincent, J H

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes a study that was carried out at work sites in the primary nickel production industry to investigate the difference between inhalable and 'total' aerosol exposures by using the mannequin sampling method, and to compare the results with those from an earlier study where actual workers' personal exposures were assessed in the same way. Experiments were carried out at 21 work sites located in mining, milling, smelting, and refining works of two primary nickel production companies. During sampling, mannequins were used to simulate the physical presence of workers and the 'exposures' of these were obtained for strategic positions at selected work sites. The orientations of each mannequin with respect to the wind were rotated through 90 degrees every hour in order to simulate the approximate orientation-averaging corresponding to actual workers. Two samplers were placed side-by-side on each mannequin: the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable aerosol sampler, and the 37-mm plastic cassette widely used as a personal sampler for 'total' aerosol. Each collected sample was analyzed to obtain both overall dust and overall nickel content. A total of 116 such sample pairs were collected. The results show that inhalable aerosol exposure levels-for both overall dust and for total nickel content-were consistently and significantly higher than the corresponding total aerosol exposure levels. Weighted least squares linear regression yielded (inhalable/'total') aerosol ratios ranging from 1.38 to 3.90 and 1.20 to 4.01, respectively, for overall dust and for total nickel content for different work sites. Comparison of these results with those from the earlier study of actual workers' personal exposures were in good agreement for most of the work sites studies. However, the actual intensities of exposure using the mannequin sampling method were consistently lower than those obtained from actual workers' personal sampling in our earlier study. The

  20. A study of workers' exposures to the inhalable and 'total' aerosol fractions in the primary nickel production industry using mannequins to simulate personal sampling.

    PubMed

    Tsai, P J; Vincent, J H

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes a study that was carried out at work sites in the primary nickel production industry to investigate the difference between inhalable and 'total' aerosol exposures by using the mannequin sampling method, and to compare the results with those from an earlier study where actual workers' personal exposures were assessed in the same way. Experiments were carried out at 21 work sites located in mining, milling, smelting, and refining works of two primary nickel production companies. During sampling, mannequins were used to simulate the physical presence of workers and the 'exposures' of these were obtained for strategic positions at selected work sites. The orientations of each mannequin with respect to the wind were rotated through 90 degrees every hour in order to simulate the approximate orientation-averaging corresponding to actual workers. Two samplers were placed side-by-side on each mannequin: the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable aerosol sampler, and the 37-mm plastic cassette widely used as a personal sampler for 'total' aerosol. Each collected sample was analyzed to obtain both overall dust and overall nickel content. A total of 116 such sample pairs were collected. The results show that inhalable aerosol exposure levels-for both overall dust and for total nickel content-were consistently and significantly higher than the corresponding total aerosol exposure levels. Weighted least squares linear regression yielded (inhalable/'total') aerosol ratios ranging from 1.38 to 3.90 and 1.20 to 4.01, respectively, for overall dust and for total nickel content for different work sites. Comparison of these results with those from the earlier study of actual workers' personal exposures were in good agreement for most of the work sites studies. However, the actual intensities of exposure using the mannequin sampling method were consistently lower than those obtained from actual workers' personal sampling in our earlier study. The

  1. Discrete dipole approximation for black carbon-containing aerosols in arbitrary mixing state: A hybrid discretization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteki, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-01

    An accurate and efficient simulation of light scattering by an atmospheric black carbon (BC)-containing aerosol-a fractal-like cluster of hundreds of carbon monomers that is internally mixed with other aerosol compounds such as sulfates, organics, and water-remains challenging owing to the enormous diversities of such aerosols' size, shape, and mixing state. Although the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) is theoretically an exact numerical method that is applicable to arbitrary non-spherical inhomogeneous targets, in practice, it suffers from severe granularity-induced error and degradation of computational efficiency for such extremely complex targets. To solve this drawback, we propose herein a hybrid DDA method designed for arbitrary BC-containing aerosols: the monomer-dipole assumption is applied to a cluster of carbon monomers, whereas the efficient cubic-lattice discretization is applied to the remaining particle volume consisting of other materials. The hybrid DDA is free from the error induced by the surface granularity of carbon monomers that occurs in conventional cubic-lattice DDA. In the hybrid DDA, we successfully mitigate the artifact of neglecting the higher-order multipoles in the monomer-dipole assumption by incorporating the magnetic dipole in addition to the electric dipole into our DDA formulations. Our numerical experiments show that the hybrid DDA method is an efficient light-scattering solver for BC-containing aerosols in arbitrary mixing states. The hybrid DDA could be also useful for a cluster of metallic nanospheres associated with other dielectric materials.

  2. Functional characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon of size-fractionated aerosol in the southern Mississippi Valley

    PubMed Central

    Chalbot, M.-C. G.; Brown, J.; Chitranshi, P.; da Costa, G. Gamboa; Pollock, E. D.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2016-01-01

    The chemical content of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as a function of particle size was characterized in Little Rock, Arkansas in winter and spring 2013. The objectives of this study were to (i) compare the functional characteristics of coarse, fine and ultrafine WSOC and (ii) reconcile the sources of WSOC for periods when carbonaceous aerosol was the most abundant particulate component. The WSOC accounted for 5 % of particle mass for particles with δp > 0.96 μm and 10 % of particle mass for particles with δp < 0.96 μm. Non-exchangeable aliphatic (H–C), unsaturated aliphatic (H–C–C=), oxygenated saturated aliphatic (H–C–O), acetalic (O–CH–O) and aromatic (Ar–H) protons were determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations varied from 4.1 ± 0.1 nmol m−3 for particles with 1.5 < δp < 3.0 μm to 73.9 ± 12.3 nmol m−3 for particles with δp < 0.49 μm. The molar H/C ratios varied from 0.48 ± 0.05 to 0.92 ± 0.09, which were comparable to those observed for combustion-related organic aerosol. The R–H was the most abundant group, representing about 45 % of measured total non-exchangeable organic hydrogen concentrations, followed by H–C–O (27 %) and H–C–C= (26 %). Levoglucosan, amines, ammonium and methanesulfonate were identified in NMR fingerprints of fine particles. Sucrose, fructose, glucose, formate and acetate were associated with coarse particles. These qualitative differences of 1H-NMR profiles for different particle sizes indicated the possible contribution of biological aerosols and a mixture of aliphatic and oxygenated compounds from biomass burning and traffic exhausts. The concurrent presence of ammonium and amines also suggested the presence of ammonium/aminium nitrate and sulfate secondary aerosol. The size-dependent origin of WSOC was further corroborated by the increasing δ13C abundance from −26.81 ± 0.18 ‰ for the smallest particles to

  3. Synthesis of carbon containing TiO2 nano powders by aerosol flame deposition for photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gyeong-Taek; Kim, Yeon-Hong; Jeong, Hyung-Gon; Woo, Hee-Gweon; Ohk, Seung-Ho; Kim, Do-Heyoung

    2008-09-01

    In-situ carbon-doped-TiO2 nano-powder was prepared by an AFD (aerosol flame deposition) technique using ethanol and isopropanol, and the photocatalytic activity of the prepared powder was examined. There were no significant effect of the solvents on the phase of the prepared TiO2, but the level of carbon in the deposits prepared with ethanol was lower than that prepared with isopropanol. Also, the average sizes of the particles prepared with ethanol were slightly smaller than that formed with isopropanol. All the samples showed excellent photocatalytic activity in the decomposing of methylene blue (MB). We even observed photocatalytic activity of the powder under visible light irradiation, although the decomposition rate of MB under this irradiation was slightly slower than under UV-A light irradiation. PMID:19049067

  4. Constraining Black Carbon Aerosol over Asia using OMI Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth and the Adjoint of GEOS-Chem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Li; Henze, David K.; Grell, Georg A.; Carmichael. Gregory R.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Zhang, Qiang; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo; Lu, Zifeng; Cao, Junji; Mao, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the emissions and distribution of black carbon (BC) in the region referred to here as Southeastern Asia (70degE-l50degE, 11degS-55degN) are critical to studies of the atmospheric environment and climate change. Analysis of modeled BC concentrations compared to in situ observations indicates levels are underestimated over most of Southeast Asia when using any of four different emission inventories. We thus attempt to reduce uncertainties in BC emissions and improve BC model simulations by developing top-down, spatially resolved, estimates of BC emissions through assimilation of OMI observations of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) with the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint for April and October of 2006. Overwhelming enhancements, up to 500%, in anthropogenic BC emissions are shown after optimization over broad areas of Southeast Asia in April. In October, the optimization of anthropogenic emissions yields a slight reduction (1-5%) over India and parts of southern China, while emissions increase by 10-50% over eastern China. Observational data from in situ measurements and AERONET observations are used to evaluate the BC inversions and assess the bias between OMI and AERONET AAOD. Low biases in BC concentrations are improved or corrected in most eastern and central sites over China after optimization, while the constrained model still underestimates concentrations in Indian sites in both April and October, possibly as a. consequence of low prior emissions. Model resolution errors may contribute up to a factor of 2.5 to the underestimate of surface BC concentrations over northern India. We also compare the optimized results using different anthropogenic emission inventories and discuss the sensitivity of top-down constraints on anthropogenic emissions with respect to biomass burning emissions. In addition, the impacts of brown carbon, the formulation of the observation operator, and different a priori constraints on the optimization are

  5. OSIRIS Detections of a Tropospheric Aerosol that Absorbs at Wavelengths Near 350 nm - Black Carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenstein, D. A.; Roth, C.; Bourassa, A. E.; Lloyd, N.

    2014-12-01

    The Canadian built OSIRIS instrument has been in operation onboard the Swedish spacecraft Odin since the autumn of 2001. During this 13 year period OSIRIS has recorded millions of spectra of the limb-scattered radiance in the wavelength range from 280 nm to 810 nm with approximately 1 nm spectral resolution. These measurements that scan tangents altitudes from 10 km to 65 km have primarily been used to retrieve stratospheric composition including vertical profiles of ozone, nitrogen dioxide, sulphate aerosol and bromine monoxide. The ozone retrieval is done is such a way that it uses the vertical radiance profile at 350 nm as a non-ozone absorbing reference measurement and it is these measurements that have serendipitously indicated the presence of an absorbing aerosol at tropospheric altitudes. At this time there is no indication of the exact composition of this absorber but it has characteristics that are curiously like those of black carbon. This poster will outline: the technique used to detect the black carbon from OSIRIS measurements; the wavelength dependence of a pseudo absorber used in the SASKTARN radiative transfer model to accurately simulate the OSIRIS measurements; and the geographical distribution of the detections of this pseudo absorber.

  6. The Carbon Aerosol / Particles Nucleation with a Lidar: Numerical Simulations and Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Francis, Mirvatte; David, Gregory; Rairoux, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution, we present the results of two recent papers [1,2] published in Optics Express, dedicated to the development of two new lidar methodologies. In [1], while the carbon aerosol (for example, soot particles) is recognized as a major uncertainty on climate and public health, we couple lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII) to allow retrieving the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by the carbon aerosol, in agreement with Planck's law, in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. In paper [2], awarded as June 2014 OSA Spotlight, we identify the optical requirements ensuring an elastic lidar to be sensitive to new particles formation events (NPF-events) in the atmosphere, while, in the literature, all the ingredients initiating nucleation are still being unrevealed [3]. Both papers proceed with the same methodology by identifying the optical requirements from numerical simulation (Planck and Kirchhoff's laws in [1], Mie and T-matrix numerical codes in [2]), then presenting lidar field application case studies. We believe these new lidar methodologies may be useful for climate, geophysical, as well as fundamental purposes.

  7. Carbon-specific analysis of humic-like substances in atmospheric aerosol and precipitation samples.

    PubMed

    Limbeck, Andreas; Handler, Markus; Neuberger, Bernhard; Klatzer, Barbara; Puxbaum, Hans

    2005-11-15

    A new approach for the carbon-specific determination of humic-like substances (HULIS) in atmospheric aerosols is presented. The method is based on a two-step isolation procedure of HULIS and the determination of HULIS carbon with a dissolved organic carbon analyzer. In the first step, a C18 solid-phase extraction is performed to separate HULIS from inorganic and hydrophilic organic sample constituents in aqueous sample solutions. The second isolation step is conducted on a strong anion exchanger to separate HULIS from remaining carbonaceous compounds. This ion chromatographic separation step including the subsequent on-line detection of HULIS carbon was performed fully automated to avoid the risk of sample contamination and to enhance the reproducibility of the method. With a 5-mL sample volume, a limit of detection of 1.0 mg C/L was obtained; this corresponds to an absolute amount of 5 microg of HULIS carbon. The reproducibility of the method given as the relative standard deviation was 4.3% (n = 10). The method was applied for the determination of water-soluble HULIS in airborne particulate matter. PM10 concentrations at an urban site in Vienna, Austria, ranged from around 0.1 to 1.8 microg of C/m(3) (n = 49); the fraction of water-soluble HULIS in OC was 12.1 +/- 7.2% (n = 49).

  8. Light absorption of black and brown carbon aerosols: comparison of an inventory-based model estimate and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Liu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Spectrally resolved absorption measurements have been used to attribute the absorption and radiative effects due to brown carbon (BrC), and suggest a significant contribution. Since black carbon (BC) and BrC are co-emitted from combustion and burning processes, BrC absorption in global models has either been implicitly included in absorption by BC or more recently, characterized by a global constant refractive index. An inventory-based optical treatment for the brown carbon absorption has been developed for primary organic aerosol emissions. Results of a simple radiative transfer model with a global emission inventory show that the BrC absorptivity leads to a ˜27% reduction in the cooling effect by organic aerosols compared to the non-absorbing assumption. Here we implement the wavelength-dependent absorption properties of brown carbon parameterized as a function of BC to organic carbon ratio into a global climate model (CAM5) for different fuel emission sectors and biomass burning. This version of CAM5 also simulates the aging of freshly emitted BC and BrC into the aged accumulation-mode aerosols due to condensation of sulfate and organics. The calculated aerosol light absorption properties and spectral dependence will be compared with ground-based AERONET measurements and field observations available. Sensitivity studies of BrC radiative effects based on a global constant refractive index and the inventory-based method in this study will be discussed.

  9. Formation of brown carbon via reactions of ammonia with secondary organic aerosols from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Updyke, Katelyn M.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2012-12-01

    Filter samples of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from the ozone (O3)- and hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of various biogenic (isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, α-cedrene, α-humulene, farnesene, pine leaf essential oils, cedar leaf essential oils) and anthropogenic (tetradecane, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, naphthalene) precursors were exposed to humid air containing approximately 100 ppb of gaseous ammonia (NH3). Reactions of SOA compounds with NH3 resulted in production of light-absorbing "brown carbon" compounds, with the extent of browning ranging from no observable change (isoprene SOA) to visible change in color (limonene SOA). The aqueous phase reactions with dissolved ammonium (NH4+) salts, such as ammonium sulfate, were equally efficient in producing brown carbon. Wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients (MAC) of the aged SOA were quantified by extracting known amounts of SOA material in methanol and recording its UV/Vis absorption spectra. For a given precursor, the OH-generated SOA had systematically lower MAC compared to the O3-generated SOA. The highest MAC values, for brown carbon from SOA resulting from O3 oxidation of limonene and sesquiterpenes, were comparable to MAC values for biomass burning particles but considerably smaller than MAC values for black carbon aerosols. The NH3/NH4+ + SOA brown carbon aerosol may contribute to aerosol optical density in regions with elevated concentrations of NH3 or ammonium sulfate and high photochemical activity.

  10. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature. PMID:25272147

  11. Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, Natalie; Rothenberg, D.; Lindsay, Keith; Doney, Scott C.; Moore, Jefferson Keith; Randerson, James T.; Thornton, Peter E; Jones, C. D.

    2011-02-01

    Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

  12. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature.

  13. Exposure and Emissions Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production—Part I: Elemental Carbon and Iron–Soot Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Birch, M. Eileen; Ku, Bon-Ki; Evans, Douglas E.; Ruda-Eberenz, Toni A.

    2015-01-01

    Production of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes (CNFs/CNTs) and their composite products is increasing globally. High volume production may increase the exposure risks for workers who handle these materials. Though health effects data for CNFs/CNTs are limited, some studies raise serious health concerns. Given the uncertainty about their potential hazards, there is an immediate need for toxicity data and field studies to assess exposure to CNFs/CNTs. An extensive study was conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes CNFs. Filter, sorbent, cascade impactor, bulk, and microscopy samples, combined with direct-reading instruments, provided complementary information on air contaminants. Samples were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with EC as a measure of CNFs. Transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy also was applied. Fine/ultrafine iron-rich soot, PAHs, and carbon monoxide were production byproducts. Direct-reading instrument results were reported previously [Evans DE et al. (Aerosol monitoring during carbon nanofiber production: mobile direct-reading sampling. Ann Occup Hyg 2010;54:514–31.)] Results for time-integrated samples are reported as companion papers in this Issue. OC and EC, metals, and microscopy results are reported here, in Part I, while results for PAHs are reported in Part II [Birch ME. (Exposure and Emissions Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production—Part II: Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Ann. Occup. Hyg 2011; 55: 1037–47.)]. Respirable EC area concentrations inside the facility were about 6–68 times higher than outdoors, while personal breathing zone samples were up to 170 times higher. PMID:21965464

  14. Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption and Single-Scattering Albedo On Ambient Relative Humidity for Sulfate Aerosols with Black Carbon Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Hamill, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols frequently contain hygroscopic sulfate species and black carbon (soot) inclusions. In this paper we report results of a modeling study to determine the change in aerosol absorption due to increases in ambient relative humidity (RH), for three common sulfate species, assuming that the soot mass fraction is present as a single concentric core within each particle. Because of the lack of detailed knowledge about various input parameters to models describing internally mixed aerosol particle optics, we focus on results that were aimed at determining the maximum effect that particle humidification may have on aerosol light absorption. In the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm, maximum absorption humidification factors (ratio of wet to 'dry=30% RH' absorption) for single aerosol particles are found to be as large as 1.75 when the RH changes from 30 to 99.5%. Upon lesser humidification from 30 to 80% RH, absorption humidification for single particles is only as much as 1.2, even for the most favorable combination of initial ('dry') soot mass fraction and particle size. Integrated over monomodal lognormal particle size distributions, maximum absorption humidification factors range between 1.07 and 1.15 for humidification from 30 to 80% and between 1.1 and 1.35 for humidification from 30 to 95% RH for all species considered. The largest humidification factors at a wavelength of 450 nm are obtained for 'dry' particle size distributions that peak at a radius of 0.05 microns, while the absorption humidification factors at 700 nm are largest for 'dry' size distributions that are dominated by particles in the radius range of 0.06 to 0.08 microns. Single-scattering albedo estimates at ambient conditions are often based on absorption measurements at low RH (approx. 30%) and the assumption that aerosol absorption does not change upon humidification (i.e., absorption humidification equal to unity). Our modeling study suggests that this assumption alone can

  15. The Antarctic environment and its effect upon the total carbon and sulfur abundances in recovered meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Andrawes, F. F.

    1980-01-01

    Total carbon and sulfur abundances have been measured for 25 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills area of Antarctica. The majority (greater than 67%) of the meteorites analyzed do not contain enriched carbon abundances resulting from weathering processes. The presence of secondary carbonates in samples which give no apparent evidence of weathering was noted during pyrolysis experiments, despite the 'normal' total carbon abundances. In selected cases, the surfaces of weathered samples may contain up to a factor of two greater carbon content than the interior. Variations in carbon abundances may reflect the degree of weathering and the amount of secondary minerals present. One of the surprises of this study is that the majority of the Antarctic meteorites studied do not exhibit total carbon and sulfur abundances outside the ranges previously observed for falls.

  16. Multifunctional iron-carbon nanocomposites through an aerosol-based process for the in situ remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jingjing; Kolesnichenko, Igor; Sunkara, Bhanukiran; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Piringer, Gerhard; John, Vijay T

    2011-03-01

    Spherical iron-carbon nanocomposites were developed through a facile aerosol-based process with sucrose and iron chloride as starting materials. These composites exhibit multiple functionalities relevant to the in situ remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE). The distribution and immobilization of iron nanoparticles on the surface of carbon spheres prevents zerovalent nanoiron aggregation with maintenance of reactivity. The aerosol-based carbon microspheres allow adsorption of TCE, thus removing dissolved TCE rapidly and facilitating reaction by increasing the local concentration of TCE in the vicinity of iron nanoparticles. The strongly adsorptive property of the composites may also prevent release of any toxic chlorinated intermediate products. The composite particles are in the optimal range for transport through groundwater saturated sediments. Furthermore, those iron-carbon composites can be designed at low cost, the process is amenable to scale-up for in situ application, and the materials are intrinsically benign to the environment.

  17. Aerosol Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production: Mobile Direct-Reading Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Douglas E.; Ku, Bon Ki; Birch, M. Eileen; Dunn, Kevin H.

    2010-01-01

    Detailed investigations were conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Presented research summarizes the direct-reading monitoring aspects of the study. A mobile aerosol sampling platform, equipped with an aerosol instrument array, was used to characterize emissions at different locations within the facility. Particle number, respirable mass, active surface area, and photoelectric response were monitored with a condensation particle counter (CPC), a photometer, a diffusion charger, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, respectively. CO and CO2 were additionally monitored. Combined simultaneous monitoring of these metrics can be utilized to determine source and relative contribution of airborne particles (CNFs and others) within a workplace. Elevated particle number concentrations, up to 1.15 × 106 cm−3, were found within the facility but were not due to CNFs. Ultrafine particle emissions, released during thermal treatment of CNFs, were primarily responsible. In contrast, transient increases in respirable particle mass concentration, with a maximum of 1.1 mg m−3, were due to CNF release through uncontrolled transfer and bagging. Of the applied metrics, our findings suggest that particle mass was probably the most useful and practical metric for monitoring CNF emissions in this facility. Through chemical means, CNFs may be selectively distinguished from other workplace contaminants (Birch et al., in preparation), and for direct-reading monitoring applications, the photometer was found to provide a reasonable estimate of respirable CNF mass concentration. Particle size distribution measurements were conducted with an electrical low-pressure impactor and a fast particle size spectrometer. Results suggest that the dominant CNF mode by particle number lies between 200 and 250 nm for both aerodynamic and mobility equivalent diameters. Significant emissions of CO were also evident in this facility. Exposure control recommendations

  18. Comparison of black carbon (BC) aerosols in two urban areas - concentrations and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Tohno, S.

    In this study, the BC aerosol measured at two very different urban sites is compared in terms of concentration, seasonal variation, and size distribution. During a 14 month study, one impactor sample was performed each month on a day with typical meteorological conditions. One (Vienna) or three (Uji) filter samples were obtained during the sampling time of the impactors. BC concentration in both the filter and impactor samples was analyzed with an optical technique (integrating sphere technique), where a calibration curve obtained from commercial carbon black is used to convert the optical signal to BC mass. Gravimetric mass concentration was measured at both sites. The gravimetric mass size distribution was measured only in Vienna. At both sites, the yearly average of the BC concentration on the sampling days was around 5 μg m -3. In Vienna, some seasonal trend with high concentrations during the cold season was observed, while in Uji, no pronounced seasonal trend was found. The BC size distribution in Uji was distinctly bimodal in the submicron size range. Log-normal distributions were fitted through the impactor data. The average BC mass median diameters (MMD) of the two submicron modes were 0.15 and 0.39 μm. Each mode contained about the same amount of BC mass. In Vienna only one submicron BC mode (average MMD 0.3 μm) was found because of the low size resolution of the impactor. An analysis of humidity effects on the MMDs of BC (both sites) and gravimetric mass (Vienna only) indicates that the Vienna aerosol is partly mixed internally with respect to BC, while the Uji aerosol seems to be externally mixed.

  19. Aerosol monitoring during carbon nanofiber production: mobile direct-reading sampling.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Ku, Bon Ki; Birch, M Eileen; Dunn, Kevin H

    2010-07-01

    Detailed investigations were conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Presented research summarizes the direct-reading monitoring aspects of the study. A mobile aerosol sampling platform, equipped with an aerosol instrument array, was used to characterize emissions at different locations within the facility. Particle number, respirable mass, active surface area, and photoelectric response were monitored with a condensation particle counter (CPC), a photometer, a diffusion charger, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, respectively. CO and CO(2) were additionally monitored. Combined simultaneous monitoring of these metrics can be utilized to determine source and relative contribution of airborne particles (CNFs and others) within a workplace. Elevated particle number concentrations, up to 1.15 x 10(6) cm(-3), were found within the facility but were not due to CNFs. Ultrafine particle emissions, released during thermal treatment of CNFs, were primarily responsible. In contrast, transient increases in respirable particle mass concentration, with a maximum of 1.1 mg m(-3), were due to CNF release through uncontrolled transfer and bagging. Of the applied metrics, our findings suggest that particle mass was probably the most useful and practical metric for monitoring CNF emissions in this facility. Through chemical means, CNFs may be selectively distinguished from other workplace contaminants (Birch et al., in preparation), and for direct-reading monitoring applications, the photometer was found to provide a reasonable estimate of respirable CNF mass concentration. Particle size distribution measurements were conducted with an electrical low-pressure impactor and a fast particle size spectrometer. Results suggest that the dominant CNF mode by particle number lies between 200 and 250 nm for both aerodynamic and mobility equivalent diameters. Significant emissions of CO were also evident in this facility. Exposure control

  20. Amorphous Carbon Deposited by a Novel Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition for Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nurfadzilah; Kamaruzzaman, Dayana; Rusop, Mohamad

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) solar cells were successfully prepared using a novel and self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using camphor oil as a precursor. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved an efficiency of 0.008% with a fill factor of 0.15 for the device deposited at 0.5 h. The current-voltage (I-V) graph emphasized on the linear graph (ohmic) for the a-C thin films, whereas for the p-n device structure, a rectifying curve was obtained. The rectifying curves signify the heterojunction between the p-type a-C film and the n-Si substrate and designate the generation of electron-hole pair of the samples under illumination. Photoresponse characteristics of the deposited a-C was highlighted when being illuminated (AM 1.5 illumination: 100 mW/cm2, 25 °C). Transmittance spectrum exhibit a large transmittance value (>85%) and absorption coefficient value of 103-104 cm-1 at the visible range of 390 to 790 nm. The atomization of a liquid precursor solution into fine sub-micrometre-sized aerosol droplets in AACVD induced the smooth surface of a-C films. To the best of our knowledge, fabrication of a-C solar cell using this AACVD method has not yet been reported.

  1. Redistribution of black carbon in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunamonti, S.; Krieger, U. K.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a major anthropogenic greenhouse agent, yet substantial uncertainties obstruct understanding its radiative forcing. Particularly debated is the extent of the absorption enhancement by internally compared to externally mixed BC, which critically depends on the interior morphology of the BC-containing particles. Here we suggest that a currently unaccounted morphology, optically very different from the customary core-shell and volume-mixing assumptions, likely occurs in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Using Raman spectroscopy on micrometer-sized droplets, we show that LLPS of an organic/inorganic model system drives redistribution of BC into the outer (organic) phase of the host particle. This results in an inverted core-shell structure, in which a transparent aqueous core is surrounded by a BC-containing absorbing shell. Based on Mie theory calculations, we estimate that such a redistribution can increase the absorption efficiency of internally mixed BC aerosols by up to 25% compared to the core-shell approximation.

  2. Redistribution of black carbon in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunamonti, Simone; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a major anthropogenic greenhouse agent, yet substantial uncertainties obstruct understanding its radiative forcing. Particularly debated is the extent of the absorption enhancement by internally compared to externally mixed BC, which critically depends on the interior morphology of the BC-containing particles. Here we suggest that a currently unaccounted morphology, optically very different from the customary core-shell and volume-mixing assumptions, likely occurs in aerosol particles undergoing liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Using Raman spectroscopy on micrometer-sized droplets, we show that LLPS of an organic/inorganic model system drives redistribution of BC into the outer (organic) phase of the host particle. This results in an inverted core-shell structure, in which a transparent aqueous core is surrounded by a BC-containing absorbing shell. Based on Mie theory calculations, we estimate that such a redistribution can reduce the absorption efficiency of internally-mixed BC aerosols by up to 25% compared to the volume-mixing approximation.

  3. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y.-L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to a vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average, 91 % of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our setup, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our setup were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  4. Inference of Spatiotemporal Distribution of Black Carbon Aerosols over Northern Pacific from Satellite Observations (2005-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Li, Z.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Fan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.; He, C.; Yi, K.; Tao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge on the spatiotemporal distribution of black carbon aerosol over the Northern Pacific is limited by a deficiency of observations. The HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observation (HIPPO) program from 2009 to 2011 is the most comprehensive data source available and it reveals a 2 to 10 times overestimates of BC by current global models. Incorporation and assimilation of more data sources is needed to increase our understanding of the spatiotemporal distribution of black carbon aerosol and its corresponding climate effects. Based on measurements from aircraft campaigns and satellites, a robust association is observed between BC concentrations and satellite retrieved CO, tropospheric NO2, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) (R2 > 0.7). Such robust relationships indicate that BC aerosols share a similar emission sources, evolution processes and transport characteristics with other pollutants measured by satellite observations. It also establishes a basis to derive a satellite-based proxy (BC*) over remote oceans. The inferred satellite-based BC* shows that Asian export events in spring bring much more BC aerosols to the mid-Pacific than occurs in other seasons. In addition, inter-annual variability of BC* is seen over the Northern Pacific, with abundances correlated to the springtime Pacific/North American (PNA) index. The inferred BC* dataset also indicates a widespread overestimation of BC loadings by models over most remote oceans beyond the Pacific. Our method presents a novel approach to infer BC concentrations by combining satellite and aircraft observations.

  5. Airborne measurements of black carbon aerosol over the Southeastern U.S. during the Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.; Watts, L.; Holloway, J.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Welti, A.; Liao, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) field campaign was a large-scale, collaborative project, which took place in the Southeastern U.S. in June and July of 2013. The goal of the campaign was to investigate the impacts of biogenic and anthropogenic gases and aerosols on the formation of haze and anomalous climate cooling in the region. During SAS, a NOAA Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument was utilized onboard NOAA WP-3D research aircraft for measurements of black carbon (BC) aerosol mass and microphysical properties. BC aerosol is emitted into the atmosphere from biomass burning (BB) and incomplete combustion of fossil and biofuel. Hence, BC sources are strongly linked to anthropogenic activity. BC aerosol is currently the second largest anthropogenic climate forcing agent after CO2(g), and its climate impacts, which depend on vertical burden and internal mixing, are not fully understood. In the Southeast, BC aerosol is expected to provide surface area for the condensation of semi-volatile products of VOC oxidation and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Hence, BC is expected to impact the haze formation and regional climate. In this work we present an overview of BC measurements during Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study, the NOAA contribution to SAS. Geographical variations in mass mixing ratios, mass size distributions, and mixing state of BC over the Southeast U.S. are discussed. Relationships of BC with carbon monoxide (CO), acetonitrile (ACN) and other trace gases are used to investigate the impacts of urban, BB, natural gas development, and power plant emissions on the distribution and properties of BC aerosol in the region. Among studied urban centers, St. Louis and Atlanta were determined to be the largest source regions of BC. A clear weekend effect in BC mass mixing ratios and microphysical properties was observed in the metropolitan Atlanta region. Compared to BB and urban centers, power plants and natural gas developments

  6. Carbon dioxide accumulation during small animal, whole body plethysmography: effects on ventilation, indices of airway function, and aerosol deposition.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Edgar C; Whitehead, Gregory S; Reboulet, James E; Carpenter, Robert L

    2002-01-01

    Barometric (whole body) plethysmography is used to examine changes in ventilation and breathing pattern in unrestrained animals during exposure to therapeutic or toxic aerosols. Whole body plethysmographs (WBP) may be operated with a bias flow in order to maintain an adequate supply of oxygen and remove expired CO(2). However, some aerosol generation and delivery methods may require operation of the WBP without bias flow, which would artificially deplete aerosol concentration. Under these conditions, expired CO(2) accumulates in the plethysmograph and stimulates ventilation, increasing total aerosol deposition, shifting regional deposition, and significantly altering some airway function indices. We characterized these effects in guinea pigs using a commercially available 4.5-L WBP, with and without a 1 L/min bias flow. CO(2)-induced changes in breathing frequency (f), tidal volume (Vt), minute ventilation (Ve), and indices of airway function -- including enhanced pause (penh), flow derived parameter (FDP), and respiratory duty cycle -- were measured. Without bias flow, CO(2) in the plethysmograph increased steadily to 5.4% after 30 min compared to a steady state 0.9% with bias flow. This resulted in a moderate suppression of f, and significant increases in Vt and Ve by factors of 1.5 and 1.4, respectively. Changes in regional deposition were stimulated for 300 mg/m(3) polydisperse aerosols with mass median aerodynamic diameters of 0.3, 1, 3, or 7 microm and geometric standard deviations of 1.7. Percent increase in aerosol deposition from CO(2) inhalation ranged from 24% to 90%, by mass, depending on aerosol size distribution and respiratory tract region. In addition, fractional deposition shifted toward the pulmonary region. Empirical indices of airway constriction, penh and FDP, also were increased significantly to 1.7 and 1.3 times their respective baseline values. The study quantifies the effect of inadvertent coexposure to CO(2) on ventilation, aerosol

  7. Absorption Coefficient, Molecular Composition, and Photodegradation of Different Types of Brown Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Aiona, P. K.; Nizkorodov, S.; Laskin, J.; Laskin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols that absorb solar radiation have a direct effect on climate. Brown carbon (BrC) represents the type of carbonaceous aerosols characterized by large absorption coefficients in the near-UV range of the spectrum. BrC can be either directly emitted into the atmosphere from combustion sources, or be formed in the atmosphere through multi-phase reactions, such as aging of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) mediated by ammonium sulfate (AS). Under the conditions of exposure to solar radiation, both primary and secondary BrC can potentially change their molecular composition and optical properties as a result of photodegradation of chromophoric compounds. This presentation will discuss the molecular level composition, the absorption and fluorescence spectra, and the mechanism of photodegradation among several representative types of BrC. The primary BrC samples include aerosol produced by smoldering wood combustion. The secondary BrC samples include AS aged products of chamber-generated SOA, products of reaction between methylglyoxal and AS, and SOA produced by the hogh-NOx photooxdiation of aromatic compounds, such as naphthalene. This presentation will also include preliminary data on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of photo-degraded bioaerosols. In all cases, absorption spectra of extracted bulk samples are measured during irradiation by a known flux of UV or visible light. The molecular level composition of the fresh and photobleached samples are characterized by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS). Photobleaching of BrC is found to occur over a range of atmospherically relevant time scales. In many cases, the molecular level composition of photobleached BrC exhibits only subtle changes suggesting that the optical and fluorescence properties of BrC are controlled by a few compounds present in low quantities. The observed fluorescence from non-biological BrC indicates potential issues in using fluorescence

  8. THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOSIN AIR, CARPETING, AND DUST AND ITS REEMISSION FROM CARPETING FOLLOWING THE USE OF TOTAL RELEASE AEROSOLS IN AN INDOOR AIR QUALITY TEST HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of experiments to explore the relationships between the insecticide chlorpyrifos and its distribution into carpet., carpet dust, and reemission into air. Two total release aerosols containing 0.5% chlorpyrifos were applied in the living room and den of EP...

  9. Sources of black carbon in aerosols: fossil fuel burning vs. biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The uncertainty in black carbon (BC) analysis and our inability to directly quantify the BC sources in the atmosphere has led to the uncertainty in compiling a regional or global BC emission inventory attributed to biomass burnings. We initiate this study to demonstrate a new approach, which quantifies the source of BC in the atmosphere between biomass and fossil fuel burnings. We applied the newly developed multi-element scanning thermal analysis (MESTA) technology to quantify BC and organic carbon (OC), respectively, in aerosol samples. MESTA can also separate BC from OC for subsequent radiocarbon analyses. Because fossil fuel has been depleted of radiocarbon and biomass has radiocarbon of the modern atmospheric level, we can quantify the sources of BC between fossil fuel and biomass burnings. We sampled the PM2.5 in the ambient air of central Tallahassee and its rural areas during the May-June (prescribed burning) and Nov-Dec (non-burning) periods. The results indicate that biomass burning contributed 89×1% and 67×2% of BC, respectively, during May-June and Nov.-Dec. periods. The rest of PM2.5 BC was contributed from fossil fuel burning. The radiocarbon contents of the OC was 103.42×0.55 percent modern carbon (pmC), which is consistent with the current atmospheric level with a trace of the bomb radiocarbon remained from the open atmosphere nuclear testing.

  10. Observations of Black Carbon and Aerosol Optical Depth in the Kali Gandaki Valley, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungel, S.; Panday, A. K.; Mahata, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    During recent years there has been increasing concern about the deposition of black carbon from the Indo-Gangetic Plains onto the glaciers and snowfields of the Tibetan Plateau. There has also been increasing concern about the rapid increase in air temperature at high altitudes over the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalaya. To date, there is very little knowledge about the transport pathways for pollutants traveling from the Indo-Gangetic Plains across the Himalaya to the Tibetan Plateau. The Kali Gandaki Valley in Nepal is one of the deepest gorges in the world, and has some of the highest up-valley winds in the world. It is also one of the most open connecting points for air from South Asia to reach the Tibetan Plateau. In 2010 the University of Virginia, in collaboration with ICIMOD and Nepal Wireless, established an atmospheric research station in Jomsom, Nepal (28.78N, 83.42E, 2900 m.a.s.l.). The station is equipped to measure black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone concentrations. It also has an automated weather station, a filter sampler, and a NASA Aeronet Sunphotometer. Observations of BC and aerosol optical depth (AOD) from Aeronet are analyzed and presented. Diurnal and seasonal patterns of BC have been observed with higher values during the day and lower at night and also highest during pre-monsoon and lowest during monsoon season, with observed BC concentrations exceeding 5 μg while average concentration around 3.7 μg.

  11. Use of levoglucosan, potassium, and water-soluble organic carbon to characterize the origins of biomass-burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Roberta Cerasi; Lima-Souza, Michele; Caetano-Silva, Letícia; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C.; Nogueira, Raquel F. P.; Allen, Andrew G.; Cardoso, Arnaldo A.; Held, Gerhard; Campos, Maria Lucia A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Three chemical species related to biomass burning, levoglucosan, potassium and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), were measured in aerosol samples collected in a rural area on the outskirts of the municipality of Ourinhos (São Paulo State, Brazil). This region is representative of the rural interior of the State, where the economy is based on agro-industrial production, and the most important crop is sugar cane. The manual harvesting process requires that the cane be first burned to remove excess foliage, leading to large emissions of particulate materials to the atmosphere. Most of the levoglucosan (68-89%) was present in small particles (<1.5 μm), and its concentration in total aerosol ranged from 25 to 1186 ng m-3. The highest values were found at night, when most of the biomass burning occurs. In contrast, WSOC showed no diurnal pattern, with an average concentration of 5.38 ± 2.97 μg m-3 (n = 27). A significant linear correlation between levoglucosan and WSOC (r = 0.54; n = 26; p < 0.0001) confirmed that biomass burning was in fact an important source of WSOC in the study region. A moderate (but significant) linear correlation between levoglucosan and potassium concentrations (r = 0.62; n = 40; p < 0.0001) was indicative of the influence of other sources of potassium in the study region, such as soil resuspension and fertilizers. When only the fine particles (<1.5 μm; typical of biomass burning) were considered, the linear coefficient increased to 0.91 (n = 9). In this case, the average levoglucosan/K+ ratio was 0.24, which may be typical of biomass burning in the study region. This ratio is about 5 times lower than that previously found for Amazon aerosol collected during the day, when flaming combustion prevails. This suggests that the levoglucosan/K+ ratio may be especially helpful for characterization of the type of vegetation burned (such as crops or forest), when biomass-burning is the dominant source of potassium. The relatively high

  12. Aerosol volatility in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, S. A. K.; ńijälä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; Junninen, H.; Virkkula, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-04-01

    Climate and health effects of atmospheric aerosols are determined by their properties such as their chemical composition. Aerosol chemical composition can be studied indirectly by measuring volatility of aerosol particles. The volatility of submicron aerosol particles (20-500 nm) was studied in a boreal forest site at SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station (Vesala et al., 1998) in Hyytiälä, Finland, during 01/2008-05/2010. The instrument used for the measurements was VDMPS (Volatility Differential Mobility Particle Sizer), which consists of two separate instruments: DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, Aalto et al., 2001) and TD (Thermodenuder, Wehner et al., 2002). Aerosol evaporation was examined by heating the aerosol and comparing the total aerosol mass before and after heating. In the VDMPS system ambient aerosol sample was heated up to temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 280 °C. The higher the heating temperature was the more aerosol material was evaporated. There was a non-volatile residual present in aerosol particles when heated up to 280 °C. This residual explained (20±8)% of the total aerosol mass. Aerosol non-volatile mass fraction was highest during winter and smallest during summer months. The role of black carbon in the observed non-volatile residual was determined. Black carbon explained 40 to 90% of the non-volatile mass. Especially during colder seasons noticeable amount of non-volatile material, something else than black carbon, was observed. According to Kalberer et al. (2004) some atmospheric organic species can form polymers that have high evaporation temperatures. Also low-volatile organic salts may contribute to the non-volatile aerosol (Smith et al., 2010). Aerosol mass composition measured directly with AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, Jayne et al., 2000) was analyzed in order to examine the properties of the non-volatile material (other than black carbon). The AMS measurements were performed

  13. Methane and carbon dioxide total column retrievals from cloudy GOSAT soundings over the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, D.; Butz, A.; Hu, H.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Arnold, S. G.; Schneider, M.; Feist, D. G.; Morino, I.; Pollard, D.; Aben, I.; Landgraf, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel physics-based retrieval method to infer total column mixing ratios of methane (XCH4) and carbon dioxide (XCO2) from space-borne short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) Earth radiance observations over the cloud-covered ocean. In nadir observing geometry in the SWIR spectral range, backscattering at the ocean surface is negligible. Hence, space-borne radiance measurements of ocean scenes generally do not provide sufficient level to retrieve XCO2 and XCH4. Our approach specifically targets cloudy GOSAT ocean soundings to provide sufficient radiance signal in nadir soundings in ocean areas. Currently, exploiting space-borne SWIR soundings over oceans relies on soundings in Sun glint geometry, observing the specular solar reflection at the ocean surface. The glint observation mode requires cloud-free conditions and a suitable observation geometry, severely limiting their number and geographical coverage. The proposed method is based on the existing RemoTeC algorithm that is extensively used to retrieve CH4 and CO2 columns from GOSAT SWIR measurements over land. For ocean pixels, we describe light scattering by clouds and aerosols by a single-layer water cloud with Gaussian height distribution. We infer the height and the geometrical thickness of the cloud layer jointly with the droplet size and the number density and the column abundances of CO2, CH4, and H2O. The CO2 and CH4 column product is validated with ground-based total column measurements performed at eight stations from the TCCON network that are geographically close to an ocean coastline. For the TCCON site with the most robust statistics (Lauder, New Zealand), we find a retrieval bias of 0.36% for XCH4 combined with a standard deviation of retrieval errors of 1.12%. For XCO2, the bias is 0.51% combined with a standard deviation of 1.03%. Averaged over all TCCON sites, our retrievals are biased -0.01% for XCO2 and -0.32% for XCH4. The standard deviation of station biases amounts to 0.45% for XCO2

  14. Apparatus for hydrogen and carbon production via carbon aerosol-catalyzed dissociation of hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muradov, Nazim Z. (Inventor); Smith, Franklyn (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A novel process and apparatus is disclosed for sustainable, continuous production of hydrogen and carbon by catalytic dissociation or decomposition of hydrocarbons at elevated temperatures using in-situ generated carbon particles. Carbon particles are produced by decomposition of carbonaceous materials in response to an energy input. The energy input can be provided by at least one of a non-oxidative and oxidative means. The non-oxidative means of the energy input includes a high temperature source, or different types of plasma, such as, thermal, non-thermal, microwave, corona discharge, glow discharge, dielectric barrier discharge, or radiation sources, such as, electron beam, gamma, ultraviolet (UV). The oxidative means of the energy input includes oxygen, air, ozone, nitrous oxide (NO.sub.2) and other oxidizing agents. The method, apparatus and process of the present invention is applicable to any gaseous or liquid hydrocarbon fuel and it produces no or significantly less CO.sub.2 emissions compared to conventional processes.

  15. Impact of the aging process of black carbon aerosols on their spatial distribution, hygroscopicity, and radiative forcing in a global climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, D.; Oshima, N.; Nakajima, T.; Takemura, T.; Ohara, T.

    2012-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) absorbs shortwave radiation more strongly than any other type of aerosol, and an accurate simulation of the aging processes of BC-containing particle is required to properly predict aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and climate change. However, BC aging processes have been simplified in general circulation models (GCMs) due to limited computational resources. In particular, differences in the representation of the mixing states of BC-containing particles between GCMs constitute one of main reasons for the uncertainty in ARF estimates. To understand an impact of the BC aging processes and the mixing state of BC on the spatial distribution of BC and ARF caused by BC (BC-ARF), we implemented three different methods of incorporating BC aging processes into a global aerosol transport model, SPRINTARS: (1) the "AGV" method, using variable conversion rates of BC aging based on a new type of parameterization depending on both BC amount and sulfuric acid; (2) the "AGF" method, using a constant conversion rate used worldwide in GCMs; and (3) the "ORIG" method, which is used in the original SPRINTARS. First, we found that these different methods produced different BC burden within 10% over industrial areas and 50% over remote oceans. Second, a ratio of water-insoluble BC to total BC (WIBC ratio) was very different among the three methods. Near the BC source region, for example, the WIBC ratios were estimated to be 80-90% (AGV and AGF) and 50-60% (ORIG). Third, although the BC aging process in GCMs had small impacts on the BC burden, they had a large impact on BC-ARF through a change in both the WIBC ratio and non-BC compounds coating on BC cores. As a result, possible differences in the treatment of the BC aging process between aerosol modeling studies can produce a difference of approximately 0.3 Wm-2 in the magnitude of BC-ARF, which is comparable to the uncertainty suggested by results from a global aerosol modeling intercomparison project, AeroCom. The

  16. The composition and flux of water-soluble organic nitrogen and carbon in the marine aerosol of a remote island over the southern East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wang, B.; Wang, W.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed 194 aerosol samples, collected coarse and fine particles by using a dichotomous sampler from September 2009 to September 2010 at a remote island (Pengchiayu) on the southern East China Sea, for water-soluble major ions, inorganic nitrogen, and high/low organic nitrogen and carbon. To investigate the possible sources of WSON and WSOC, an Ultrafiltration method was used to separate WSON and WSOC into high (HMW; >1kDa) and low (LMW; <1kDa) molecular weight categories. In addition, 4-d back trajectories of air masses arriving daily at the sampling site were calculated to determine the potential aerosol source regions. In this study, the sources of WSON and WSOC were identified by indicator ions (Na+, nss-SO42-, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+), and the fluxes of nitrogen and carbon were calculated by a dual mode model. The obtained concentrations of major ions indicate that a continental source was dominant from January to May and from November to December, a local source derived from Taiwan Island from June and July, and an oceanic source during August. The measured atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen and carbon species show clear seasonal variations and correspond to the different sources and weather conditions. The results indicate that HMW/ LMW of organic nitrogen and carbon contributed 63%/37% and 29%/71%, respectively, to the total dissolved organic species concentration. The results of a factor analysis of combined major ions and organic nitrogen and carbon indicate that biomass burning, crustal sources, and marine sources are the three major controlling factors. The annual fluxes of HMW/ LMW organic nitrogen and carbon were estimated to be 7.61/12.0 and 29.6/12.7 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively.

  17. Flow-injection analysis for the determination of total inorganic carbon and total organic carbon in water using the H2O2-luminol-uranine chemiluminescent reaction.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shun-Li; Qu, Fang; Zhao, Lixia; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2006-12-01

    In the presence of carbonate and uranine, the chemiluminescent intensity from the reaction of luminol with hydrogen peroxide was dramatically enhanced in a basic medium. Based on this fact and coupled with the technique of flow-injection analysis, a highly sensitive method was developed for the determination of carbonate with a wide linear range. The method provided the determination of carbonate with a wide linear range of 1.0 x 10(-10)-5.0 x 10(-6) mol L(-1) and a low detection limit (S/N = 3) of carbonate of 1.2 x 10(-11) mol L(-1). The average relative standard deviation for 1.0 x 10(-9)-9.0 x 10(-7) mol L(-1) of carbonate was 3.7% (n = 11). Combined with the wet oxidation of potassium persulfate, the method was applied to the simultaneous determination of total inorganic carbon (TIC) and total organic carbon (TOC) in water. The linear ranges for TIC and TOC were 1.2 x 10(-6)-6.0 x 10(-2) mg L(-1) and 0.08-30 mg L(-1) carbon, respectively. Recoveries of 97.4-106.4% for TIC and 96.0-98.5% for TOC were obtained by adding 5 or 50 mg L(-1) of carbon to the water samples. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2.6-4.8% for TIC and 4.6-6.6% for TOC (n = 5). The mechanism of the chemiluminescent reaction was also explored and a reasonable explanation about chemical energy transfer from luminol to uranine was proposed.

  18. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Holben, Brent; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Duncan, Bryan; Ginoux, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine what are the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption, and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  19. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Kaufman, Yoram; chu, Allen; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  20. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Torres, Omar; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Ginoux, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET, satellite retrievals from the TOMS instrument, and field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption. and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  1. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Main; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Duncan, Bryan; Ginoux, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption, and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  2. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies Among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Chu, Allen; Levy, Robert; Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yoram; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Eck, Tom; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, .biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERON" at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  3. Evaluation and field calibration of the Miniram PDM-3 aerosol monitor for measuring respirable and total coal dust.

    PubMed

    Middendorf, P J; Lehocky, A H; Williams, P L

    1999-01-01

    The MIE Miniram PDM-3 is a real-time aerosol dust monitor designed to measure dust based on Mie scattering. It has an optional in-line filter that, when attached to a constant flow air sampling pump, allows a gravimetric air sample to be collected from the same air stream that passes through the Miniram sensing chamber. This study compared real-time Miniram digital respirable and total dust readings with concentrations from an in-line 5 microns polyvinyl chloride filter connected to a constant flow pump and with results from traditional respirable and total dust samples. Area samples were collected at three coal-fired power generating facilities over a 2-month period. Traditional respirable dust concentrations ranged from 0.04 to 10.8 mg/m3. In the monitored range of concentrations the Miniram respirable concentrations and the in-line respirable dust concentrations were not significantly different (p > or = 0.05), nor were the Miniram in-line filter concentrations and the side-by-side respirable dust concentrations significantly different (p > or = 0.05). However, the Miniram respirable concentrations and the traditional respirable concentrations were significantly different (p = 0.02). The Statistical Analysis System (SAS) procedure CALIS, which meets the statistical requirements for developing calibration lines for two variables each measured with error, is used to develop field calibration curves for the comparisons between direct-reading instrument concentrations and concentrations from traditional National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health methods for total and respirable dust.

  4. Compound-specific carbon isotope analyses of individual long-chain alkanes and alkanoic acids in Harmattan aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    The higher molecular weight n-alkane, n-alkanol and n-alkanoic acid series from higher plant wax are ubiquitous components of aerosol particles in remote areas. The carbon isotopic compositions of individual n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids have been determined in samples of Harmattan aerosol and composited vegetation wax from Nigeria. The data confirm the terrestrial origin of these compounds and support the distinction among the vegetation sources of C 4 plants (savannah) from C 3 and CAM plants (wet climate, mixed vegetation). The superimposed petroleum components from vehicular emissions in urban areas could not be differentiated from C 3 vegetation by compound-specific isotope analysis.

  5. Determining Total Soil Carbon Storage in the Critical Zone Using Topography and Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, N. R.; Lohse, K. A.; Seyfried, M. S.; Crosby, B. T.; Godsey, S.

    2015-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid regions comprise over 41% of the terrestrial ecosystems on Earth and are considered to be one of the most susceptible to environmental change. Estimating the amount and distribution of soil carbon in these regions is challenging due to their high degree of spatial heterogeneity. We aim to develop a total soil carbon model using tangential curvature, total mobile regolith depth, and aspect in order to predict the distribution of soil carbon in complex terrain within a semi-arid environment. We excavated 45 randomly selected soil pits down to saprolite in a first order watershed within the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory located in Southwestern Idaho. Total mobile regolith depth was measured vertically and plotted against tangential curvature to produce an inverse linear relationship function, predicting soil depth to an r2 value of 0.86. Soil depths were plotted against total soil carbon for both the north and south-facing aspects. A quadratic polynomial function fit well with r2 values of 0.90 and 0.89, respectively. Across the watershed, total soil carbon on the north-facing aspect was 8.02 x1011 Kg C or ~38% of the total soil carbon, despite comprising only ~33% of the total land area. South-facing aspect totaled 9.87 x1011 Kg C, or ~46% of the total soil carbon. East and west aspects were excluded. If samples were collected to a maximum depth of 1 m, total soil carbon would be underestimated by ~1.6 times the amount that we predict (1.31 x1012 to 2.12 x1012 Kg C, respectively). By sampling down to saprolite, our model has the potential to provide more accurate total carbon pools than other models, which focus only on the upper 1 m of soil. Our findings indicate that a significant amount of carbon is stored deep in critical zone that may be less sensitive to loss and that estimates of soil carbon significantly underestimate total soil carbon stores on complex terrain.

  6. Black carbon and wavelength-dependent aerosol absorption in the North China Plain based on two-year aethalometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Deng, Z. Z.; Wang, P. C.; Xia, X. A.

    2016-10-01

    Light-absorbing components of atmospheric aerosols have gained particular attention in recent years due to their climatic and environmental effects. Based on two-year measurements of aerosol absorption at seven wavelengths, aerosol absorption properties and black carbon (BC) were investigated in the North China Plain (NCP), one of the most densely populated and polluted regions in the world. Aerosol absorption was stronger in fall and the heating season (from November to March) than in spring and summer at all seven wavelengths. Similar spectral dependence of aerosol absorption was observed in non-heating seasons despite substantially strong absorption in fall. With an average absorption Angström exponent (α) of 1.36 in non-heating seasons, freshly emitted BC from local fossil fuel burning was thought to be the major component of light-absorbing aerosols. In the heating season, strong ultraviolet absorption led to an average α of 1.81, clearly indicating the importance of non-BC light-absorbing components, which were possibly from coal burning for domestic heating and aging processes on a regional scale. Diurnally, the variation of BC mass concentrations experienced a double-peak pattern with a higher level at night throughout the year. However, the diurnal cycle of α in the heating season was distinctly different from that in non-heating seasons. α peaked in the late afternoon in non-heating seasons with concomitantly observed low valley in BC mass concentrations. In contrast, α peaked around the midnight in the heating season and lowered down during the daytime. The relationship of aerosol absorption and winds in non-heating seasons also differed from that in the heating season. BC mass concentrations declined while α increased with increasing wind speed in non-heating seasons, which suggested elevated non-BC light absorbers in transported aged aerosols. No apparent dependence of α on wind speed was found in the heating season, probably due to well mixed

  7. Accuracy and precision of 14C-based source apportionment of organic and elemental carbon in aerosols using the Swiss_4S protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G. O.; Fahrni, S. M.; Santos, G. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Szidat, S.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol source apportionment remains a critical challenge for understanding the transport and aging of aerosols, as well as for developing successful air pollution mitigation strategies. The contributions of fossil and non-fossil sources to organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in carbonaceous aerosols can be quantified by measuring the radiocarbon (14C) content of each carbon fraction. However, the use of 14C in studying OC and EC has been limited by technical challenges related to the physical separation of the two fractions and small sample sizes. There is no common procedure for OC/EC 14C analysis, and uncertainty studies have largely focused on the precision of yields. Here, we quantified the uncertainty in 14C measurement of aerosols associated with the isolation and analysis of each carbon fraction with the Swiss_4S thermal-optical analysis (TOA) protocol. We used an OC/EC analyzer (Sunset Laboratory Inc., OR, USA) coupled to vacuum line to separate the two components. Each fraction was thermally desorbed and converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) in pure oxygen (O2). On average 91% of the evolving CO2 was then cryogenically trapped on the vacuum line, reduced to filamentous graphite, and measured for its 14C content via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). To test the accuracy of our set-up, we quantified the total amount of extraneous carbon introduced during the TOA sample processing and graphitization as the sum of modern and fossil (14C-depleted) carbon introduced during the analysis of fossil reference materials (adipic acid for OC and coal for EC) and contemporary standards (oxalic acid for OC and rice char for EC) as a function of sample size. We further tested our methodology by analyzing five ambient airborne particulate matter (PM2.5) samples with a range of OC and EC concentrations and 14C contents in an interlaboratory comparison. The total modern and fossil carbon blanks of our set-up were 0.8 ± 0.4 and 0.67 ± 0.34 μg C, respectively

  8. Carbon pool densities and a first estimate of the total carbon pool in the Mongolian forest-steppe.

    PubMed

    Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Klinge, Michael; Degener, Jan; Khishigjargal, Mookhor; Chenlemuge, Tselmeg; Bat-Enerel, Banzragch; Yeruult, Yolk; Saindovdon, Davaadorj; Ganbaatar, Kherlenchimeg; Tsogtbaatar, Jamsran; Leuschner, Christoph; Hauck, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The boreal forest biome represents one of the most important terrestrial carbon stores, which gave reason to intensive research on carbon stock densities. However, such an analysis does not yet exist for the southernmost Eurosiberian boreal forests in Inner Asia. Most of these forests are located in the Mongolian forest-steppe, which is largely dominated by Larix sibirica. We quantified the carbon stock density and total carbon pool of Mongolia's boreal forests and adjacent grasslands and draw conclusions on possible future change. Mean aboveground carbon stock density in the interior of L. sibirica forests was 66 Mg C ha(-1) , which is in the upper range of values reported from boreal forests and probably due to the comparably long growing season. The density of soil organic carbon (SOC, 108 Mg C ha(-1) ) and total belowground carbon density (149 Mg C ha(-1) ) are at the lower end of the range known from boreal forests, which might be the result of higher soil temperatures and a thinner permafrost layer than in the central and northern boreal forest belt. Land use effects are especially relevant at forest edges, where mean carbon stock density was 188 Mg C ha(-1) , compared with 215 Mg C ha(-1) in the forest interior. Carbon stock density in grasslands was 144 Mg C ha(-1) . Analysis of satellite imagery of the highly fragmented forest area in the forest-steppe zone showed that Mongolia's total boreal forest area is currently 73 818 km(2) , and 22% of this area refers to forest edges (defined as the first 30 m from the edge). The total forest carbon pool of Mongolia was estimated at ~ 1.5-1.7 Pg C, a value which is likely to decrease in future with increasing deforestation and fire frequency, and global warming.

  9. Determination of total dissolved inorganic carbon in freshwaters by reagent-free ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Polesello, Stefano; Tartari, Gabriele; Giacomotti, Paola; Mosello, Rosario; Cavalli, Silvano

    2006-06-16

    Studies of inorganic carbon cycle in natural waters provide important information on the biological productivity and buffer capacity. Determination of total inorganic carbon, alkalinity and dissolved carbon dioxide gives an indication of the balance between photosynthesis and respiration by biota, both within the water column and sediments, and carbon dioxide transfers from the water column to the atmosphere. There are few methods to measure and distinguish the different forms of inorganic carbon, but all require a measure or an indirect quantification of total inorganic carbon. A direct measurement of TIC in water is made possible by the introduction of electrolytic generated hydroxide eluent in ion chromatography which allows to detect a chromatographic peak for carbonate. The advantage of this method is that all the inorganic forms of carbon are converted in carbonate at eluent pH and can be detected as a single peak by conductivity detection. Repeatability of carbonate peak was evaluated at different levels from 0.02 to 6 mequiv.l(-1) both in high purity water and in real samples and ranged from 1 to 9%. The calibration curve was not linear and has to be fitted by a quadratic curve. Limit of detection was estimated to be 0.02 mequiv.l(-1). Accuracy has been estimated by comparing ion chromatography method with total inorganic carbon calculated from alkalinity and pH. The correlation between the two methods was good (R(2)=0.978, n=141). The IC method has been applied to different typologies of surface waters (alpine and subalpine lakes and rivers) characterised by different chemical characteristics (alkalinity from 0.05 to 2 mequiv.l(-1) and pH from 6.7 to 8.5) and low total organic carbon concentrations. This analytical method allowed to describe the distribution of TIC along the water column of two Italian deep lakes. PMID:16620857

  10. [Size distributions of organic carbon and elemental carbon in Nanjing aerosol particles].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Long; Guo, Zhao-Bing; Liu, Feng-Ling; Liu, Jie; Lu, Xi; Jiang, Lin-Xian

    2014-02-01

    The concentrations and size distributions of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in particles collected in Nanjing Normal University representing urban area and in Nanjing College of Chemical Technology standing for industrial area were analyzed using Model 2001A Thermal Optical Carbon Analyzer. The mass concentrations were the highest with the size below 0.43 microm in urban and industrial area. OC accounted for 20.9%, 21.9%, 29.6%, 27.9% respectively and those were 24.0%, 23.5%, 31.4%, 22.6% respectively for EC in the four seasons in urban area. In the industrial area, OC accounted for 18.6%, 45.8%, 26.6%, 25.9% respectively and the proportions of EC were 16.7%, 60.9%, 26.3%, 24.3% respectively. Overall, OC and EC were enriched in fine particles below 2.1 microm and they accounted for the highest proportion in summer in urban area while it did not show significant seasonal variation for industrial area. SOC in fine particles achieved high values in summer while the unobvious seasonal variation in coarse particles might be attributed to the contribution of different pollution sources and meteorological factors. Correlations and OC/EC ratio method implied that OC and EC mainly came from vehicles exhaust and coal combustion in fine particles while they were also related to biomass combustion and cooking in coarse particles.

  11. SEDIMENT TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON: IS IT TIME TO PULL THE PLUG ON THIS INDICATOR?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) content of sediments has been used as an indicator of benthic community condition during multiple cycles of the EPA National Coastal Assessment (NCA). Because percent TOC is generally positively correlated with sediment percent fines, previous analyses...

  12. SEDIMENT TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON: IS THIS A USEFUL INDICATOR OF SEDIMENT CONDITION FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARIES?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) content of sediments has been used as an indicator of benthic community condition during multiple cycles of the EPA National Coastal Assessment (NCA). Because percent TOC is generally positively correlated with sediment percent fines, previous analyses...

  13. INVESTIGATION OF RESPONSE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN DIFFERENT TYPES OF TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON (TOC) ANALYTICAL INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have long been used to estimate the amount of natural organic matter (NOM) found in raw and finished drinking water. In recent years, computer automation and improved instrumental analysis technologies have created a ...

  14. Organic carbon in the sea surface microlayer and in submicron aerosol particles - measurements from the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, Manuela; Wadinga Fomba, Kanneh; Müller, Konrad; Barthel, Stefan; von Tümpling, Wolf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    The export of organic compounds from the oceans can establish a considerable carbon flux in the Earth system. The detailed transport processes and especially the impact of environmental drivers in the organic carbon transfer are not yet fully understood. Here we present a broad study of measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations and enrichment in the sea surface microlayer (SML) as well as equivalent measurements in marine aerosol particles. For the first time, enrichment factors of organic carbon in marine ambient aerosol are reported that based on concerted measurements of seawater and aerosol particles. The measurements were conducted at different field campaigns in the Atlantic Ocean: at the Cape Verde islands, during two Atlantic transects with the RV Polarstern, and during a campaign at the Raune Fjord in Bergen, Norway. In oceanic water, concentration of DOC were in average 161 μmol/L in bulk water and 225 μmol/L in the SML. Average POC concentrations were 13 μmol/L in bulk water and 17 μmol/L in the SML. Instead of a constant enrichment of DOC or POC there are rather two pattern: high enrichment in samples with low concentrations and low enrichment when concentration were high. In seawater (bulk water and SML) small, mostly insignificant effects, concerning concentration and enrichment of DOC and POC were found regarding the impact of wind stress and chl-a concentrations. Differences between SML and bulk water concentrations are more pronounced at times of high chl-a, but all in all these effects are not strong. The thickness of the SML is affected by biological activity but probably caused by a more surface-active part of the DOC/POC pool and this is not reflected in the sum parameters. In the ambient marine aerosol particles water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and water-insoluble organic carbon (WISOC) concentrations were in average about 0.2 μg m-3, respectively. Higher concentration differences of

  15. Further evidence for charge transfer complexes in brown carbon aerosols from excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Sabrina M; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2015-05-14

    The light-absorbing fraction of organic molecules in ambient aerosols, known as "brown carbon," is an important yet poorly characterized component. Despite the fact that brown carbon could alter the radiative forcing of aerosols significantly, identification of specific chromophores has remained challenging. We recently demonstrated that charge transfer (CT) complexes formed in organic molecules could be responsible for a large fraction of absorption observed in water-extracted ambient particulate matter.1 In the present study, we use excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy to further corroborate the importance of CT complexes in defining aerosol optical properties. Monotonically increasing and decreasing quantum yields, decreasing Stokes shifts, and red-shifting emission maxima are observed from ambient particulate matter collected in Athens, Georgia, strongly suggesting that a superposition of independent chromophores is not sufficient to explain brown carbon absorption and fluorescence. Instead, we show that a model in which such chromophores are energetically coupled to a dense manifold of CT complexes is consistent with all of the observations. Further, we suggest that a significant fraction of the observed fluorescence originates from CT complexes and that their contribution to brown carbon absorption is likely greater than we reported previously.

  16. Study on size distribution of total aerosol and water-soluble ions during an Asian dust storm event at Jeju Island, Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Song, C B; Kim, M C; Kwon, S B; Lee, K W

    2004-01-01

    Soil dust particles transported from loess regions of the Asian continent, called Asian dust, highly influences the air quality of north-eastern Asia and the northern Pacific Ocean. In order to investigate the effects of these dust storms on the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosol particles with different size, measurements of size distributions of total aerosol and major ion species were carried out on Jeju Island, Korea during April 2001. Juju Island was chosen for the study because the levels of emissions of anthropogenic air pollutants are very low. A 5-stage cascade impactor was used to sample size-fractionated aerosol particles. Samples were analyzed for major water-soluble ions using Dionex DX-120 ion chromatograph. The average mass concentration of total aerosol was found to be 24.4 and 108.3 microg m(-3) for non-Asian dust and Asian dust periods, respectively. The total aerosol size distribution, measured during the non-Asian dust period, was bimodal, whereas the coarse particles dominated the size distribution of total aerosol during the Asian dust period. It was found that SO4(2-), NH4+ and K+ were mainly distributed in fine particles, while Cl-, NO3-, Na+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ were in coarse particles. Although SO4(2-) was mainly distributed in fine particles, during the Asian dust period, the concentrations in coarse particles were significantly increased. This indicates heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 on wet surfaces of basic soil dust particles. The NH4+ was found to exist as (NH4)2SO4 in fine particles, with a molar ratio of NH4+ to SO4(2-) of 2.37 and 1.52 for non-Asian dust and Asian dust periods, respectively. Taking into account the proximity of the sampling site to the sea, and the observed chloride depletion, coarse mode nitrate, during the non-Asian dust period, is assumed to originate from the reaction of nitric acid with sodium chloride on the surfaces of sea-salt particles although the chloride depletion was not shown to be large enough to

  17. Indoor/outdoor radon decay products associated aerosol particle-size distributions and their relation to total number concentrations.

    PubMed

    Moriizumi, Jun; Yamada, Shinya; Xu, Yang; Matsuki, Satoru; Hirao, Shigekazu; Yamazawa, Hiromi

    2014-07-01

    The activity size distributions of indoor and outdoor radioactive aerosol associated with short-lived radon decay products were observed at Nagoya, Japan, for some periods from 2010 to 2012, following the indoor observation by Mostafa et al. [Mostafa, A. M. A., Tamaki, K., Moriizumi, J., Yamazawa, H. and Iida, T. The weather dependence of particle size distribution of indoor radioactive aerosol associated with radon decay products. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 146: (1-3), 19-22 (2011)]. The tendency of smaller indoor activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) after rainfalls showed in the previous study was not consistently obtained, while the consistent tendency of less indoor radioactive particles with diameters in the accumulation mode was observed again after rainfalls. The indoor aerosols showed activity size distributions similar to the outdoor ones. Non-radioactive aerosol particle concentrations measured with a laser particle counter suggested a somewhat liner relationship with AMAD.

  18. Reactivity of liquid and semisolid secondary organic carbon with chloride and nitrate in atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; O'Brien, Rachel E.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Shilling, John E.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-05-14

    Constituents of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in atmospheric aerosols are often mixed with inorganic components and compose a significant mass fraction of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere. Interactions between SOC and other condensed-phase species are not well understood. Here, we investigate the reactions of liquid-like and semi-solid SOC from ozonolysis of limonene (LSOC) and α-pinene (PSOC) with NaCl using a set of complementary micro-spectroscopic analyses. These reactions result in chloride depletion in the condensed phase, release of gaseous HCl, and formation of organic salts. The reactions attributed to acid displacement by SOC acidic components are driven by the high volatility of HCl. Similar reactions can take place in SOC/NaNO₃ particles. The results show that an increase in SOC mass fraction in the internally mixed SOC/NaCl particles leads to higher chloride depletion. Glass transition temperatures and viscosity of PSOC were estimated for atmospherically relevant conditions. Data show that the reaction extent depends on SOC composition, particle phase state and viscosity, mixing state, temperature, relative humidity (RH), and reaction time. LSOC shows slightly higher potential to deplete chloride than PSOC. Higher particle viscosity at low temperatures and RH can hinder these acid displacement reactions. Formation of organic salts from these overlooked reactions can alter particle physiochemical properties and may affect their reactivity and ability to act as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The release and potential recycling of HCl and HNO₃ from reacted aerosol particles may have important implications for atmospheric chemistry.

  19. Spatial distribution of aerosol black carbon over India during pre-monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum, S. Naseema; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Badarinath, K. V. S.; Safai, P. D.; Devara, P. C. S.; Singh, Sacchidanand; Vinod; Dumka, U. C.; Pant, P.

    Aerosol black carbon (BC) mass concentrations ([BC]), measured continuously during a mutli-platform field experiment, Integrated Campaign for Aerosols gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB, March-May 2006), from a network of eight observatories spread over geographically distinct environments of India, (which included five mainland stations, one highland station, and two island stations (one each in Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal)) are examined for their spatio-temporal characteristics. During the period of study, [BC] showed large variations across the country, with values ranging from 27 μg m -3 over industrial/urban locations to as low as 0.065 μg m -3 over the Arabian Sea. For all mainland stations, [BC] remained high compared to highland as well as island stations. Among the island stations, Port Blair (PBR) had higher concentration of BC, compared to Minicoy (MCY), implying more absorbing nature of Bay of Bengal aerosols than Arabian Sea. The highland station Nainital (NTL), in the central Himalayas, showed low values of [BC], comparable or even lower than that of the island station PBR, indicating the prevalence of cleaner environment over there. An examination of the changes in the mean temporal features, as the season advances from winter (December-February) to pre-monsoon (March-May), revealed that: (a) Diurnal variations were pronounced over all the mainland stations, with an afternoon low and a nighttime high; (b) At the islands, the diurnal variations, though resembled those over the mainlands, were less pronounced; and (c) In contrast to this, highland station showed an opposite pattern with an afternoon high and a late night or early morning low. The diurnal variations at all stations are mainly caused by the dynamics of local Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL). At the entire mainland as well as island stations (except HYD and DEL), [BC] showed a decreasing trend from January to May. This is attributed to the increased convective mixing and to the

  20. Synthesis of Spherical Carbon Nitride-Based Polymer Composites by Continuous Aerosol-Photopolymerization with Efficient Light Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Poostforooshan, Jalal; Badiei, Alireza; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Weber, Alfred P

    2016-08-24

    Here we report a novel, facile, and sustainable approach for the preparation of spherical submicrometer carbon nitride-based polymer composites by a continuous aerosol-photopolymerization process. In this regard, spherical mesoporous carbon nitride (SMCN) nanoparticles were initially prepared via a nanocasting approach using spray-drying synthesized spherical mesoporous silica (SMS) nanoparticles as hard templates. In addition to experimental characterization, the effect of porosity on the light absorption enhancement and consequently the generation rate of electron-hole pairs inside the SMCN was simulated using a three-dimensional finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. To produce the carbon nitride-based polymer composite, SMCN nanoparticles exhibit excellent performance in photopolymerization of butyl acrylate (PBuA) monomer in the presence of n-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) as a co-initiator in a continuous aerosol-based process. In this one-pot synthesis, SMCN nanoparticles act not only as photoinitiators but at the same time as fillers and templates. The average aerosol residence time in the photoreactor is about 90 s. The presented aerosol-photopolymerization process avoids the need for solvent and surfactant, operates at room temperature, and, more importantly, is suitable to produce the spherical composite with hydrophobic polymers. Furthermore, we simulated the condition of SMCN nanoparticles during illumination in the gas phase process, which can freely rotate. The results demonstrated that the hole (h(+)) density is almost equally distributed in the whole part of the SMCN nanoparticles due to their rotation, leading to efficient light harvesting and more homogeneous photoreaction. The combination of the outstanding features of environmentally friendly SMCN, photopolymerization, and aerosol processing might open new avenues, especially in green chemistry, to produce novel polymer composites with multifunctional properties. PMID:27483090

  1. Synthesis of Spherical Carbon Nitride-Based Polymer Composites by Continuous Aerosol-Photopolymerization with Efficient Light Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Poostforooshan, Jalal; Badiei, Alireza; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Weber, Alfred P

    2016-08-24

    Here we report a novel, facile, and sustainable approach for the preparation of spherical submicrometer carbon nitride-based polymer composites by a continuous aerosol-photopolymerization process. In this regard, spherical mesoporous carbon nitride (SMCN) nanoparticles were initially prepared via a nanocasting approach using spray-drying synthesized spherical mesoporous silica (SMS) nanoparticles as hard templates. In addition to experimental characterization, the effect of porosity on the light absorption enhancement and consequently the generation rate of electron-hole pairs inside the SMCN was simulated using a three-dimensional finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. To produce the carbon nitride-based polymer composite, SMCN nanoparticles exhibit excellent performance in photopolymerization of butyl acrylate (PBuA) monomer in the presence of n-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) as a co-initiator in a continuous aerosol-based process. In this one-pot synthesis, SMCN nanoparticles act not only as photoinitiators but at the same time as fillers and templates. The average aerosol residence time in the photoreactor is about 90 s. The presented aerosol-photopolymerization process avoids the need for solvent and surfactant, operates at room temperature, and, more importantly, is suitable to produce the spherical composite with hydrophobic polymers. Furthermore, we simulated the condition of SMCN nanoparticles during illumination in the gas phase process, which can freely rotate. The results demonstrated that the hole (h(+)) density is almost equally distributed in the whole part of the SMCN nanoparticles due to their rotation, leading to efficient light harvesting and more homogeneous photoreaction. The combination of the outstanding features of environmentally friendly SMCN, photopolymerization, and aerosol processing might open new avenues, especially in green chemistry, to produce novel polymer composites with multifunctional properties.

  2. Aerosol black carbon at five background measurement sites over Finland, a gateway to the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Kolmonen, P.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Virkkula, A.; Leskinen, A.; Komppula, M.; Hatakka, J.; Burkhart, J.; Stohl, A.; Aalto, P.; Kulmala, M.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Viisanen, Y.; Lihavainen, H.

    2011-08-01

    Aerosol equivalent black carbon (BC e) was measured at five different background stations in Finland, with the longest data set from Hyytiälä, December 2004-December 2008. Measurements were conducted either with an aethalometer or a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer, MAAP. Measured black carbon concentrations were highest in Virolahti in southeastern Finland, with annual averages ranging from 385 to 460 ng m -3, followed by Hyytiälä (250-370 ng m -3), Utö (230-270 ng m -3), Puijo (225-230 ng m -3), and Pallastunturi (60-70 ng m -3) in northern Finland. The BC e fractions of measured PM 2.5 concentrations were generally between 5 and 10%, with highest fractions at Virolahti close to the Eastern border. At all the stations, the highest concentrations were observed during the spring and the winter, and the lowest concentrations during the summer. The seasonal cycle could generally be attributed to the reaching of long-range-transported black carbon. Additional reasons were increasing domestic wood burning and reduced boundary-layer height during winter, and a more effective vertical mixing during summer. The highest concentrations for each station occurred with southerly winds, and on the basis of trajectory analyses, the source areas of BC e resided mostly in Central and Eastern Europe. Occasionally the long-range-transported BC e concentrations were elevated for short periods to fulfill the characteristics of pollution episodes. From these episodes, about 62% were a result of non-fire anthropogenic sources and 36% due to open biomass burning sources. Episodes from the biomass burning sources were most often observed during the spring.

  3. Measurements and Analysis of Black Carbon Aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, A.; Ozdemir, H.; Kindap, T.; Demir, G.; Karaca, M.; Khan, M. N.

    2010-12-01

    In a world where at least 50 percent of the population is living in urban environments, air pollution and specifically particulate matter became one of the most critical issues. There have been many studies that focused on mass concentration measurements of PM10 and PM2.5. Recent studies suggest that chemical composition is critical in understanding the effects of PM on health as well as climate. For example, public health studies reveal that, components of the atmospheric aerosols have different impacts on human health. Smith et al. (2009) stated that; on the basis of the 1μg/m3 contrast, the percentage increase in all-cause mortality for PM2.5 was 0.58; sulfate effects were about twice those of PM2.5, and effects of elemental carbon (an indicator of black carbon mass) about ten times greater. To date, many studies and national inventories have been based on particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5), and the major greenhouse pollutants, but not speciated emissions, especially in the developing world (Smith et al., 2009; Chow et al., 2010). But air quality standards will soon need to include particulate black carbon (BC), as it directly afffects climate, visibility, and human health. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing dramatically worldwide and recent estimates of global BC emissions range from 8 to 24 Tg (1012 g) per year. In this study, we investigated BC pollution for the first time in Istanbul, Turkey. Istanbul is a megacity of over 15 million inhabitants (OECD, 2008). On-road traffic is also increasing rapidly in the city (over 3 million vehicles on the road). Hence, the city has a potential to be an important source for both local and regional pollution in the Eastern Mediterranean. In our study, an Aethalometer (<0.1μg/m3 sensitivity) was used for continuous and real-time measurements of BC concentration. Measurements were carried out at the selected five different locations throughout the city. 1st and 2nd sites were near high-traffic streets; in the city

  4. The Pagami Creek smoke plume after long-range transport to the upper troposphere over Europe - aerosol properties and black carbon mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlkötter, F.; Gysel, M.; Sauer, D.; Minikin, A.; Baumann, R.; Seifert, P.; Ansmann, A.; Fromm, M.; Voigt, C.; Weinzierl, B.

    2014-06-01

    During the CONCERT 2011 field experiment with the DLR research aircraft Falcon, an enhanced aerosol layer with particle linear depolarization ratios of 6-8% at 532 nm was observed at altitudes above 10 km over northeast Germany on 16 September 2011. Dispersion simulations with HYSPILT suggest that the elevated aerosol layer originated from the Pagami Creek forest fire in Minnesota, USA, which caused pyro-convective uplift of particles and gases. The 3-4 day-old smoke plume had high total refractory black carbon (rBC) mass concentrations of 0.03-0.35 μg m-3 at standard temperature and pressure (STP) with rBC mass equivalent diameter predominantly smaller than 130 nm. Assuming a core-shell particle structure, the BC cores exhibit very thick (median: 105-136 nm) BC-free coatings. A large fraction of the BC-containing particles disintegrated into a BC-free fragment and a BC fragment while passing through the laser beam of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). In this study, the disintegration is a result of very thick coatings around the BC cores. This is in contrast to a previous study in a forest-fire plume, where it was hypothesized to be a result of BC cores being attached to a BC-free particle. For the high-altitude forest-fire aerosol layer observed in this study, increased mass specific light-absorption cross sections of BC can be expected due to the very thick coatings around the BC cores, while this would not be the case for the attached-type morphology. We estimate the BC mass import from the Pagami Creek forest fire into the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) region (best estimate: 25 Mg rBC). A comparison to black carbon emission rates from aviation underlines the importance of pyro-convection on the BC load in the UTLS region. Our study provides detailed information on the microphysics and the mixing state of BC in the forest-fire aerosol layer in the upper troposphere that can be used to better understand and investigate the radiative

  5. Identification of haze-creating sources from fine particulate matter in Dhaka aerosol using carbon fractions.

    PubMed

    Begum, Bilkis A; Hopke, Philip K

    2013-09-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) samples were simultaneously collected on Teflon and quartz filters between February 2010 and February 2011 at an urban monitoring site (CAMS2) in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The samples were collected using AirMetrics MiniVol samplers. The samples on Teflon filters were analyzed for their elemental composition by PIXE and PESA. Particulate carbon on quartz filters was analyzed using the IMPROVE thermal optical reflectance (TOR) method that divides carbon into four organic carbons (OC), pyrolized organic carbon (OP), and three elemental carbon (EC) fractions. The data were analyzed by positive matrix factorization using the PMF2 program. Initially, only total OC and total EC were included in the analysis and five sources, including road dust, sea salt and Zn, soil dust, motor vehicles, and brick kilns, were obtained. In the second analysis, the eight carbon fractions (OC1, OC2, OC3, OC4, OP, EC1, EC2, EC3) were included in order to ascertain whether additional source information could be extracted from the data. In this case, it is possible to identify more sources than with only total OC and EC. The motor vehicle source was separated into gasoline and diesel emissions and a fugitive Pb source was identified. Brick kilns contribute 7.9 microg/m3 and 6.0 microg/m3 of OC and EC, respectively, to the fine particulate matter based on the two results. From the estimated mass extinction coefficients and the apportioned source contributions, soil dust, brick kiln, diesel, gasoline, and the Pb sources were found to contribute most strongly to visibility degradation, particularly in the winter. PMID:24151680

  6. Investigating the impacts of aviation NOX, SO2 and black carbon emissions on ozone, aerosol and climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapadia, Zarashpe; Borman, Duncan; Spracklen, Dominick; Arnold, Stephen; Mann, Graham; Williams, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Aviation is currently responsible for 3% of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions, but 2-14% of anthropogenic induced warming due to the co-emission of NOX, SO2 and black carbon and formation of contrails. The impact of aviation emissions on ozone and aerosol is uncertain with recent research demonstrating the need to include atmospheric nitrate chemistry. The inclusion of nitrate chemistry may lead to a 20% reduction in aviation induced ozone forcing estimates due to the competition for atmospheric oxidants such as OH . Compounding this, uncertainties relating to the effects of NOx on ozone and methane illustrate the need for refining the understanding of aviation induced impacts. Furthermore the role of aerosol microphysics in controlling the climate impacts of aviation has not yet been explored. Here we use the TOMCAT 3-D chemical transport model coupled to the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics model to quantify the impacts of aviation NOX, SO2 and BC emissions on ozone, aerosol and climate. GLOMAP-mode treats size resolved aerosol using a two-moment modal approach. We evaluate the effects of nitrate processing on the diagnosed impacts of aviation emissions on atmospheric composition including the first assessment of the impact on the global concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. We investigate interactions between gas-phase oxidant photochemistry and aerosol microphysics in regions influenced by aircraft emissions, using fully-coupled tropospheric chemistry and multi-component aerosol treatment (BC, sulphate, nitrate). Finally, we use a 3-D radiative transfer model to quantify the ozone and aerosol direct and indirect radiative effects of aviation emissions. The work presented here is part of a wider research project which will be the first study to combine aviation NOX, SO2 and black carbon emission in a global size-resolved model which considers atmospheric nitrate chemistry, which will aim to add to the science surrounding present day aviation impacts by

  7. Integrated Data Fusion and Mining Techniques for Monitoring Total Organic Carbon Concentrations in a Lake

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic carbon (TOC) in surface waters, markedly of seasonal variations, is a known precursor of disinfection byproducts such as Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM) in drinking water treatment. Real-time knowledge of TOC distribution in source water can help treatment operation to...

  8. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-09-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all with substantial secondary formation from the photooxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), was conducted in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and in PM alone. Their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and, consequently, a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33 ‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9 ‰ and approximately 20 % of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban center with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in summer, a substantial difference is observed. This

  9. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient secondary organic aerosols in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Huang, L.; Moukhtar, S.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-06-01

    A method to quantify concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been applied to study atmospheric nitrophenols in Toronto, Canada. The sampling of five nitrophenols, all primarily formed from the photo-oxidation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC), in the gas phase and particulate matter (PM) together and PM alone was conducted. Since all of the target compounds are secondary products, their concentrations in the atmosphere are in the low ng m-3 range and consequently a large volume of air (> 1000 m3) is needed to analyze samples for stable carbon isotope ratios, resulting in sampling periods of typically 24 h. While this extended sampling period increases the representativeness of average values, it at the same time reduces possibilities to identify meteorological conditions or atmospheric pollution levels determining nitrophenol concentrations and isotope ratios. Average measured carbon isotope ratios of the different nitrophenols are between -34 and -33‰, which is well within the range predicted by mass balance calculations. However, the observed carbon isotope ratios cover a range of nearly 9‰, and approximately 20% of the isotope ratios of the products have isotope ratios lower than predicted from the kinetic isotope effect of the first step of the reaction mechanism and the isotope ratio of the precursor. This can be explained by isotope fractionation during reaction steps following the initial reaction of the precursor VOCs with the OH radical. Limited evidence for local production of nitrophenols is observed since sampling was done in the Toronto area, an urban centre with significant anthropogenic emission sources. Strong evidence for significant local formation of nitrophenols is only found for samples collected in summer. On average, the difference in carbon isotope ratios between nitrophenols in the particle phase and in the gas phase is insignificant, but for a limited number of observations in

  10. Absorption and scattering properties of organic carbon versus sulfate dominant aerosols at Gosan climate observatory in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Lee, M.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Lee, G.; Lee, Y. J.

    2014-08-01

    Carbonaceous and soluble ionic species of PM1.0 and PM10 were measured along with the absorption and scattering properties and aerosol number size distributions at Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO) from January to September 2008. The daily averaged equivalent black carbon (EBC) measured as aerosol absorption exhibited two types of spectral dependence with a distinct maximum (peak) at either 370 nm or 880 nm, by which two subsets were extracted and classified into the respective groups (370 and 880 nm). The 370 nm group was distinguished by high organic carbon (OC) concentrations relative to elemental carbon (EC) and sulfate, but sulfate was predominant for the 880 nm group. The PM1.0 OC of the 370 nm group was mainly composed of refractory and pyrolized components that correlated well with PM1.0 EC1, referred to as char EC, which suggests biofuel and biomass combustion as the source of these OC fractions, particularly during winter. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and the number size distributions implied that aerosols of the 370 nm group were externally mixed upon transport in fast-moving air masses that passed through the Beijing area in about one day. In contrast, the aerosols of the 880 nm group were characterized by high sulfate concentrations, and seemed to be internally mixed during slow transport over the Yellow Sea region over approximately 2 to 4 days. The absorption and scattering coefficients of the 880 nm group were noticeably higher compared to those of the 370 nm group. The average absorption ångström exponent (AAE) was estimated to be 1.29 and 1.0 for the 370 and 880 nm groups, respectively, in the range 370-950 nm. These results demonstrated that the optical properties of aerosols were intimately linked to chemical composition and mixing state, characteristics determined both by source and atmospheric aging processes. In OC dominant aerosols, absorption was enhanced in the UV region, which was possibly due to refractory and pyrolized

  11. Kinetic characteristics of the synthesis of multiwall carbon nanotubes by aerosol pyrolysis of a ferrocene solution in benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasov, N. B.; Savilov, S. B.; Pryakhin, A. N.; Ivanov, A. S.; Lunin, V. V.

    2012-03-01

    Approximating the experimental data on the mass distribution of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MCNT) along a reactor, a three-step kinetic model of their synthesis in the aerosol pyrolysis of a ferrocene solution in benzene is proposed. The values of effective rate constants upon the introduction of a catalyst in situ for the reactions that are the basis for synthesizing MCNT via the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons are obtained for the first time.

  12. Vertical profiles of aerosol and black carbon in the Arctic: a seasonal phenomenology along 2 years (2011-2012) of field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Luca; Cappelletti, David; Busetto, Maurizio; Mazzola, Mauro; Lupi, Angelo; Lanconelli, Christian; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Caiazzo, Laura; Giardi, Fabio; Moroni, Beatrice; Crocchianti, Stefano; Fierz, Martin; Močnik, Griša; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Perrone, Maria G.; Maturilli, Marion; Vitale, Vito; Udisti, Roberto; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a systematic study of vertical profiles of aerosol number size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations conducted in the Arctic, over Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard). The campaign lasted 2 years (2011-2012) and resulted in 200 vertical profiles measured by means of a tethered balloon (up to 1200 m a.g.l.) during the spring and summer seasons. In addition, chemical analysis of filter samples, aerosol size distribution and a full set of meteorological parameters were determined at ground. The collected experimental data allowed a classification of the vertical profiles into different typologies, which allowed us to describe the seasonal phenomenology of vertical aerosol properties in the Arctic. During spring, four main types of profiles were found and their behavior was related to the main aerosol and atmospheric dynamics occurring at the measuring site. Background conditions generated homogenous profiles. Transport events caused an increase of aerosol concentration with altitude. High Arctic haze pollution trapped below thermal inversions promoted a decrease of aerosol concentration with altitude. Finally, ground-based plumes of locally formed secondary aerosol determined profiles with decreasing aerosol concentration located at different altitude as a function of size. During the summer season, the impact from shipping caused aerosol and BC pollution plumes to be constrained close to the ground, indicating that increasing shipping emissions in the Arctic could bring anthropogenic aerosol and BC in the Arctic summer, affecting the climate.

  13. Total organic carbon and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy methods to determine total carbon and hydrocarbons in mercuric iodide single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, S.; Kaplan, I.; Schieber, M.; Ortale, C.; Skinner, N.; van den Berg, L.

    1989-11-01

    Total organic carbon was determined by measuring the CO2 produced by combustion in a sealed quartz vessel. The CO2 was quantified by nondispersive IR and by titration using commercial detectors. The total organic carbon was found to be around 10-100 μg/g in both starting materials and in single crystals. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) measurements were made on hexane extracts of mercuric iodide (HgI2) dissolved in potassium iodide solution. Hydrocarbons starting with C10 (DIENE) and up to C26 were found. In addition, phthalates, such as diethyl and dioctyl phthalate were also found. Some of the organic compounds, for example, such hydrocarbons as branched nC16, nC20, nC21, nC22, nC23, and nC24, were present in some HgI2 materials in quantities of the order of weight ppm, but were eliminated in the purification process and were not found in the single crystals. Other organic compounds such as the phthalates were not always eliminated and were identified in the single crystals. In general, the GC/MS could identify only hydrocarbons of C10 and higher which account for only a few percent of the total organic carbon determined by oxidation.

  14. Intercomparison of thermal-optical methods for the determination of organic and elemental carbon: influences of aerosol composition and implications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Duan, Feng-kui; He, Ke-bin; Zheng, Mei; Du, Zhen-yu; Ma, Yong-liang; Tan, Ji-hua

    2011-12-01

    An intercomparison of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) measurements was conducted based on ambient aerosol samples collected during four seasons in Beijing, China. Dependence of OC and EC values on the temperature protocol and the charring correction method is presented and influences of aerosol composition are investigated. EC was found to decrease with the peak inert mode temperature (T(peak)) such that EC determined by the IMPROVE (the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments)-A protocol (T(peak) was 580 °C) was 2.85 ± 1.31 and 3.83 ± 2.58 times that measured by an alternative protocol with a T(peak) of 850 °C when using the transmittance and reflectance correction, respectively. It was also found that reflectance correction tends to classify more carbon as EC compared with transmittance; results from the IMPROVE-A protocol showed that the ratio of EC defined by reflectance correction (EC(R)) to that based on transmittance (EC(T)) averaged 1.50 ± 0.42. Moreover, it was demonstrated that emissions from biomass burning would increase the discrepancy between EC values determined by different temperature protocols. On the other hand, the discrepancy between EC(R) and EC(T) was strongly associated with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) which was shown to be an important source of the organics that pyrolyze during the inert mode of thermal-optical analysis. PMID:22044188

  15. Intercomparison of thermal-optical methods for the determination of organic and elemental carbon: influences of aerosol composition and implications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Duan, Feng-kui; He, Ke-bin; Zheng, Mei; Du, Zhen-yu; Ma, Yong-liang; Tan, Ji-hua

    2011-12-01

    An intercomparison of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) measurements was conducted based on ambient aerosol samples collected during four seasons in Beijing, China. Dependence of OC and EC values on the temperature protocol and the charring correction method is presented and influences of aerosol composition are investigated. EC was found to decrease with the peak inert mode temperature (T(peak)) such that EC determined by the IMPROVE (the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments)-A protocol (T(peak) was 580 °C) was 2.85 ± 1.31 and 3.83 ± 2.58 times that measured by an alternative protocol with a T(peak) of 850 °C when using the transmittance and reflectance correction, respectively. It was also found that reflectance correction tends to classify more carbon as EC compared with transmittance; results from the IMPROVE-A protocol showed that the ratio of EC defined by reflectance correction (EC(R)) to that based on transmittance (EC(T)) averaged 1.50 ± 0.42. Moreover, it was demonstrated that emissions from biomass burning would increase the discrepancy between EC values determined by different temperature protocols. On the other hand, the discrepancy between EC(R) and EC(T) was strongly associated with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) which was shown to be an important source of the organics that pyrolyze during the inert mode of thermal-optical analysis.

  16. Effectiveness and acceptance of total release insecticidal aerosol cans as a control measure in reducing dengue vectors.

    PubMed

    Pai, Hsiu-Hua; Hsu, Err-Lieh

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of regular application of insecticidal fogging in reducing dengue is questionable, since delays occur between peak time of outbreak and insecticide administrations. Moreover, many residents do not accept indoor application because of concern about insecticide contamination of household items. The study described in this article was designed to evaluate the effectiveness and acceptance of insecticidal aerosol cans to reduce dengue vectors inside and outside of homes. Residents in Kaohsiung City of South Taiwan were provided with two formulations of aerosol cans (permethrin 3.75% weight/weight [w/w] and cypermethrin 1.716% w/w) and were requested to use these aerosol cans. Although the indoor ovitrap index of the permethrin group returned to the original level in week 3, the index of the cypermethrin group decreased 60% to 20%. The residents accepted the insecticidal aerosol cans but complained of unfavorable effects caused by traditional insecticidal fogging. Results indicate that the insecticidal aerosol cans may serve as a supplementary household control measure for dengue vectors during the time period between the peak of outbreak and the administration of government-organized insecticide fogging. PMID:24645416

  17. Aerosol-CFD modelling of ultrafine and black carbon particle emission, dilution, and growth near roadways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Gong, S. L.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Stroud, C. A.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J. R.; Jia, C. Q.

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have shown that on-road vehicle emissions are the dominant source of ultrafine particles (UFP; diameter < 100 nm) in urban areas and near-roadway environments. In order to advance our knowledge on the complex interactions and competition among atmospheric dilution, dispersion and dynamics of UFPs, an aerosol dynamics-CFD coupled model is developed and validated against field measurements. A unique approach of applying periodic boundary conditions is proposed to model pollutant dispersion and dynamics in one unified domain from the tailpipe level to the ambient near-road environment. This approach significantly reduces the size of the computational domain, and therefore, allows fast simulation of multiple scenarios. The model is validated against measured turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and pollution gradients near a major highway. Through a model sensitivity analysis, the relative importance of individual aerosol dynamical processes on the total particle number concentration (N) and particle number-size distribution (PSD) near a highway is investigated. The results demonstrate that (1) coagulation has a negligible effect on N and particle growth, (2) binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) of H2SO4-H2O is likely responsible for elevated N closest to the road, (3) N and particle growth are very sensitive to the condensation of semi-volatile organics (SVOCs), particle dry deposition, and the interaction between these processes. The results also indicate that, without the proper treatment of atmospheric boundary layer (i.e. its wind profile and turbulence quantities), the nucleation rate would be underestimated by a factor of 5 in the vehicle wake region due to overestimated mixing. Therefore, introducing ABL conditions to activity-based emission models may potentially improve their performance in estimating UFP traffic emissions.

  18. Adopting a modified pressure calcimeter with temperature compensation for testing total carbonates in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barouchas, Pantelis; Koulos, Vasilios

    2016-04-01

    The total carbonates content of the soil is an important soil quality indicator highly related with soil carbon sequestration and a tool for understanding biogeochemical processes or liming practices. A portable digital pressure calcimeter with multisensory technology was used in order to test total carbonates in soil samples. The concept of the measurement is based on the simultaneous measurement of pressure and temperature after the sample reaction with hydrochloric acid in a closed vessel and a built-in module for automatic temperature compensation, so that performs measurements with higher accuracy. For these purposes two stages of analysis followed in order to document the precision of the methodology: (i) Total carbonates testing in Sand/CaCO3 mixtures and (ii) Total carbonates testing in soil samples. The instrument has a typical mean error of ± 0.3% calcium carbonates content of the soil sample and a recovery more than 98% comparing to certified inter-laboratory soil samples (proficiency tests) for quality assurance. The methodology adopts portable capabilities with soil moisture correction in situ, providing to the end-user the advantages of automatic analysis, fast testing operation, fast re-samples for analysis and productivity.

  19. Sugars as source indicators of biogenic organic carbon in aerosols collected above the Howland Experimental Forest, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Patricia M.; Conte, Maureen H.; Weber, John C.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Bulk aerosols (>1 μm) were collected continuously above the canopy at the Howland Experimental Forest, Maine, USA from May to October 2002. Each sample integrated over an approximately 2-week period. Mono- and disaccharide sugars were extracted using a microscale technique and were analyzed as their TMS derivatives by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Concentrations of total aerosol sugars ranged from 10 to 180 ng m -3. Glucose was the most abundant sugar (40-75% of the total sugars). The monosaccharides arabinose, fructose, galactose, mannose, arabitol and mannitol, and the disaccharides sucrose, maltose and mycose (aka trehalose) were also present in lower concentrations. The sugar composition in the aerosols varied seasonally. Fructose and sucrose were prevalent in early spring and decreased in relative abundance as the growing season progressed. Sugar polyols (arabitol and mannitol) and the disaccharide mycose (a fungal metabolite) were more prevalent in autumn during the period of leaf senescence. The changes in the sugar composition in the aerosol samples appear to reflect the seasonality of sugar production and utilization by the ecosystem. Plant waxes were present as significant components also indicating an input from biogenic background. Smoke plumes from Quebec forest fires passed over the Howland site in early July 2002. Levoglucosan, a biomarker of biomass burning, increased by an order of magnitude in the aerosol samples collected during this time. Glucose, mannose, arabinose, galactose, and also, plant waxes increased in concentration by factors of 2-5 in the smoke-impacted samples, indicating that wildfires enhance atmospheric emissions of uncombusted organic compounds. In contrast, concentrations of fructose, sugar polyols and disaccharides were not significantly higher in the smoke-impacted samples and indicated that biomass burning was not a significant source of these compounds in the aerosols.

  20. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  1. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  2. Determination of multiple organic matter sources in aerosol PM10 from Wrocław, Poland using molecular and stable carbon isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górka, Maciej; Rybicki, Maciej; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Marynowski, Leszek

    2014-06-01

    from coupling of organic tracer analysis and carbon isotopic data of PM10 was that the total carbon (including insoluble soot) is likely derived from fossil fuel combustion, while the extractable organic matter is a mixture from different sources with significant inputs of biomass burning. We have also shown that dominant organic tracers do not always represent the major input source in aerosol PM and the unresolved part of the organic matter (soot) is important in the carbon budget.

  3. Application of the integrating sphere method to separate the contributions of brown and black carbon in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Hitzenberger, Regina; Bauer, Heidi; Pouresmaeil, Parissa; Klatzer, Barbara; Caseiro, Alexandre; Puxbaum, Hans

    2009-02-15

    Until about a decade ago, black carbon (BC) was thought to be the only light absorbing substance in the atmospheric aerosol except for soil or desert dust In more recent years, light absorbing polymeric carbonaceous material was found in atmospheric aerosols. Absorption increases appreciably toward short wavelengths, so this fraction was called brown carbon. Because brown carbon is thermally rather refractory, it influences the split between organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in thermal methods and, through its light absorption characteristics, leads to overestimations of BC concentrations. The goal of the present study was to extend the integrating sphere method to correct the BC signal for the contribution of brown carbon and to obtain an estimate of brown carbon concentrations. Humic acid sodium salt was used as proxy for brown carbon. The extended method is first tested on mixtures of test substances and then applied to atmospheric samples collected during biomass smoke episodes (Easter bonfires) in Austria. The resulting concentrations of black and brown carbon are compared to EC obtained with a widely used thermal method, the Cachier method (Cachier et al. Tellus 1989, 41B, 379-390) and a thermal-optical method (Schmid et al. Atmos. Environ. 2001, 35, 2111-2121), as well as to concentrations of humic like substances (HULIS) and to biomass smoke POM (particulate organic matter). Both the thermal methods were found to overestimate BC on days with large contributions of woodsmoke, which agrees with the findings of the method intercomparison study by Reisinger et at. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42, 884-889). During the days of the bonfires, the Cachier method gave EC concentrations that were higher by a factor of 3.8 than the BC concentrations, while the concentrations obtained with the thermal-optical method were higher by a factor of 2.6.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Brown Carbon (BrC) Chromophores in Secondary Organic Aerosol Generated From Photo-Oxidation of Toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric Brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365nm = 0.78 m2 g-1) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene < 1/300). Fifteen compounds, most of which are nitrophenols, are identified as major BrC chromophores responsible for the enhanced light absorption of Tol-SOA material produced in the presence of NOx. The integrated absorbance of these fifteen chromophores accounts for 40-60% of the total light absorbance by Tol-SOA at wavelengths between 300 nm and 500 nm. The combination of tandem LC-UV/Vis-ESI/HRMS measurements provides an analytical platform for predictive understanding of light absorption properties by BrC and their relationship to the structure of individual chromophores. General trends in the UV/vis absorption by plausible isomers of the BrC chromophores were evaluated using theoretical chemistry calculations. The molecular-level understanding of BrC chemistry is helpful for better understanding the evolution and behavior of light absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere.

  5. Molecular characterization of brown carbon (BrC) chromophores in secondary organic aerosol generated from photo-oxidation of toluene.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E; Kathmann, Shawn M; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365 nm = 0.78 m(2) g(-1)) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene < 1/300). Fifteen compounds, most of which are nitrophenols, are identified as major BrC chromophores responsible for the enhanced light absorption of Tol-SOA material produced in the presence of NOx. The integrated absorbance of these fifteen chromophores accounts for 40-60% of the total light absorbance by Tol-SOA at wavelengths between 300 nm and 500 nm. The combination of tandem LC-UV/Vis-ESI/HRMS measurements provides an analytical platform for predictive understanding of light absorption properties by BrC and their relationship to the structure of individual chromophores. General trends in the UV/Vis absorption by plausible isomers of the BrC chromophores were evaluated using theoretical chemistry calculations. The molecular-level understanding of BrC chemistry is helpful for better understanding the evolution and behavior of light absorbing aerosols in the

  6. Determination of the organic aerosol mass to organic carbon ratio in IMPROVE samples.

    PubMed

    El-Zanan, Hazem S; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Zielinska, Barbara; Chow, Judith C; Kumar, Naresh

    2005-07-01

    The ratio of organic mass (OM) to organic carbon (OC) in PM(2.5) aerosols at US national parks in the IMPROVE network was estimated experimentally from solvent extraction of sample filters and from the difference between PM(2.5) mass and chemical constituents other than OC (mass balance) in IMPROVE samples from 1988 to 2003. Archived IMPROVE filters from five IMPROVE sites were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), acetone and water. The extract residues were weighed to determine OM and analyzed for OC by thermal optical reflectance (TOR). On average, successive extracts of DCM, acetone, and water contained 64%, 21%, and 15%, respectively, of the extractable OC, respectively. On average, the non-blank-corrected recovery of the OC initially measured in these samples by TOR was 115+/-42%. OM/OC ratios from the combined DCM and acetone extracts averaged 1.92 and ranged from 1.58 at Indian Gardens, AZ in the Grand Canyon to 2.58 at Mount Rainier, WA. The average OM/OC ratio determined by mass balance was 2.07 across the IMPROVE network. The sensitivity of this ratio to assumptions concerning sulfate neutralization, water uptake by hygroscopic species, soil mass, and nitrate volatilization were evaluated. These results suggest that the value of 1.4 for the OM/OC ratio commonly used for mass and light extinction reconstruction in IMPROVE is too low.

  7. Remote Sensing of Global Fire Patterns, Aerosol Optical Thickness, and Carbon Monoxide During April 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Wang, Min; Klich, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.; Nolf, Scott; Connors, Vickie S.

    1997-01-01

    Fires play a crucial role in several ecosystems. They are routinely used to burn forests in order to accommodate the needs of the expanding population, clear land for agricultural purposes, eliminate weeds and pests, regenerate nutrients in grazing and crop lands and produce energy for cooking and heating purposes. Most of the fires on earth are related to biomass burning in the tropics, although they are not confined to these latitudes. The boreal and tundra regions also experience fires on a yearly basis. The current study examines global fire patterns, Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) and carbon monoxide concentrations during April 9-19, 1994. Recently, global Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data at nadir ground spatial resolution of 1 km are made available through the NASA/NOAA Pathfinder project. These data from April 9-19, 1994 are used to map fires over the earth. In summary, our analysis shows that fires from biomass burning appear to be the dominant factor for increased tropospheric CO concentrations as measured by the MAPS. The vertical transport of CO by convective activities, along with horizontal transport due to the prevailing winds, are responsible for the observed spatial distribution of CO.

  8. Simplified route to multi-walled carbon nanotube synthesis by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Antúnez-Flores, W; Valenzuela-Muñiz, A M; Amézaga-Madrid, P; Alonso-Nuñez, G; Verde, Y; Martínez-Sánchez, R; Miki-Yoshida, M

    2008-12-01

    Uniform multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were obtained decomposing toluene inside of fused silica tubing previously covered with Co oxide thin film. The two-step process, ruled successively in the same aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) set up, constitutes a simplified route to the synthesis of MWCNTs. First, Co oxide thin film was deposited inside of fused silica tubing at 723 K, using a precursor solution of Co acetate in absolute methanol. After Co oxide deposition, the covered tubing was heated up to 1173 K under Ar flow, then a mist of toluene was injected inside the tubing, using also Ar as carrier gas, consequently MWCNTs were obtained in the internal wall of the tubing. The Co oxide film and the MWCNTs were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Uniform and very long MWCNTs (several tens of microm) with diameters around 20 to 100 nm were observed, with the advantage that the content of Co particles inside the nanotube was very low. PMID:19205220

  9. Determination of the organic aerosol mass to organic carbon ratio in IMPROVE samples.

    PubMed

    El-Zanan, Hazem S; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Zielinska, Barbara; Chow, Judith C; Kumar, Naresh

    2005-07-01

    The ratio of organic mass (OM) to organic carbon (OC) in PM(2.5) aerosols at US national parks in the IMPROVE network was estimated experimentally from solvent extraction of sample filters and from the difference between PM(2.5) mass and chemical constituents other than OC (mass balance) in IMPROVE samples from 1988 to 2003. Archived IMPROVE filters from five IMPROVE sites were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), acetone and water. The extract residues were weighed to determine OM and analyzed for OC by thermal optical reflectance (TOR). On average, successive extracts of DCM, acetone, and water contained 64%, 21%, and 15%, respectively, of the extractable OC, respectively. On average, the non-blank-corrected recovery of the OC initially measured in these samples by TOR was 115+/-42%. OM/OC ratios from the combined DCM and acetone extracts averaged 1.92 and ranged from 1.58 at Indian Gardens, AZ in the Grand Canyon to 2.58 at Mount Rainier, WA. The average OM/OC ratio determined by mass balance was 2.07 across the IMPROVE network. The sensitivity of this ratio to assumptions concerning sulfate neutralization, water uptake by hygroscopic species, soil mass, and nitrate volatilization were evaluated. These results suggest that the value of 1.4 for the OM/OC ratio commonly used for mass and light extinction reconstruction in IMPROVE is too low. PMID:15950041

  10. Decadal trend of black carbon and refractory carbonaceous aerosol in the western rim of the North Pacific Ocean: atmospheric concentration and the retrieved record of deposition flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyasu, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Noguchi, Izumi; Akiyama, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2013-04-01

    The long-term trend of light absorbing carbonaceous aerosols (or black carbon: BC) or refractory carbonaceous aerosol (or elemental carbon: EC) concentration is reported at European background sites such as Mace Head, and that of aerosol absorption coefficient are monitored in many GAW sites. On the contrary, such long-term data are relatively scarce at around the western part of the North Pacific Ocean. Thus, to understand the long-term variation of in the area, BC in fine aerosol fraction has been measured at Chichi-jima Islands, Japan. Chichi-jima Island is located 1000 km south of the Japanese mainland, and 1800 km west of the coast line of the Asian continent. BC has been measured with an Aethalometer (Magee, AE-16 and AE-30) since December, 1998 with 1 hr time resolution. Mass flowmeter embedded inside the Aethalometer is calibrated with a rotational dry gas-meter once a year. Monthly averaged BC concentration shows an obvious seasonal variation, i.e. high concentration during late autumn-winter-spring period resulting from the transport from East Asia, with maximum daily concentration above 500 ng m-3. In summer, daily concentration was usually less than 20 ng m-3, due to the clean background airmass originating from the North Pacific Anticyclone. Decadal trend of the annual averaged BC concentration showed a increasing trend from 2000 to 2007 and started to decrease after 2008, which roughly coincides with the reported emission trend of SO2 in China (Lu et al., 2010). In addition, total (i.e., wet + dry) deposition record of refractory carbon at two sites in the northern Japan (Rishiri Island: a remote island site, and Sapporo City: an urban site) are retrieved. At these sites, the local government have been measuring the chemical components in precipitation water collected by deposition gauges. In the deposition gauge, a membrane filter made of cellulose-acetate is fixed at the bottom of the funnel to remove water-insoluble particles from the precipitated

  11. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  12. Simultaneous reductions in emissions of black carbon and co-emitted species will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in the short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate atmosphere-only model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero with prescribed sea surface temperature and sea ice cover, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with recent past year 2000 levels if the emissions of only BC are reduced to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial~for the mitigation of global warming. However, both aerosol negative direct and indirect radiative effects are weakened when BC and its co-emitted species (sulfur dioxide and organic carbon) are simultaneously reduced. Relative to year 2000 levels, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 if the emissions of all these aerosols are decreased to the levels projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  13. Brown carbon aerosols from burning of boreal peatlands: microphysical properties, emission factors, and implications for direct radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Gyawali, Madhu; Yatavelli, Reddy L. N.; Pandey, Apoorva; Watts, Adam C.; Knue, Joseph; Chen, Lung-Wen A.; Pattison, Robert R.; Tsibart, Anna; Samburova, Vera; Moosmüller, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The surface air warming over the Arctic has been almost twice as much as the global average in recent decades. In this region, unprecedented amounts of smoldering peat fires have been identified as a major emission source of climate-warming agents. While much is known about greenhouse gas emissions from these fires, there is a knowledge gap on the nature of particulate emissions and their potential role in atmospheric warming. Here, we show that aerosols emitted from burning of Alaskan and Siberian peatlands are predominantly brown carbon (BrC) - a class of visible light-absorbing organic carbon (OC) - with a negligible amount of black carbon content. The mean fuel-based emission factors for OC aerosols ranged from 3.8 to 16.6 g kg-1. Their mass absorption efficiencies were in the range of 0.2-0.8 m2 g-1 at 405 nm (violet) and dropped sharply to 0.03-0.07 m2 g-1 at 532 nm (green), characterized by a mean Ångström exponent of ≈ 9. Electron microscopy images of the particles revealed their morphologies to be either single sphere or agglomerated "tar balls". The shortwave top-of-atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing per unit optical depth under clear-sky conditions was estimated as a function of surface albedo. Only over bright surfaces with albedo greater than 0.6, such as snow cover and low-level clouds, the emitted aerosols could result in a net warming (positive forcing) of the atmosphere.

  14. Carbon pool densities and a first estimate of the total carbon pool in the Mongolian forest-steppe.

    PubMed

    Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Klinge, Michael; Degener, Jan; Khishigjargal, Mookhor; Chenlemuge, Tselmeg; Bat-Enerel, Banzragch; Yeruult, Yolk; Saindovdon, Davaadorj; Ganbaatar, Kherlenchimeg; Tsogtbaatar, Jamsran; Leuschner, Christoph; Hauck, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The boreal forest biome represents one of the most important terrestrial carbon stores, which gave reason to intensive research on carbon stock densities. However, such an analysis does not yet exist for the southernmost Eurosiberian boreal forests in Inner Asia. Most of these forests are located in the Mongolian forest-steppe, which is largely dominated by Larix sibirica. We quantified the carbon stock density and total carbon pool of Mongolia's boreal forests and adjacent grasslands and draw conclusions on possible future change. Mean aboveground carbon stock density in the interior of L. sibirica forests was 66 Mg C ha(-1) , which is in the upper range of values reported from boreal forests and probably due to the comparably long growing season. The density of soil organic carbon (SOC, 108 Mg C ha(-1) ) and total belowground carbon density (149 Mg C ha(-1) ) are at the lower end of the range known from boreal forests, which might be the result of higher soil temperatures and a thinner permafrost layer than in the central and northern boreal forest belt. Land use effects are especially relevant at forest edges, where mean carbon stock density was 188 Mg C ha(-1) , compared with 215 Mg C ha(-1) in the forest interior. Carbon stock density in grasslands was 144 Mg C ha(-1) . Analysis of satellite imagery of the highly fragmented forest area in the forest-steppe zone showed that Mongolia's total boreal forest area is currently 73 818 km(2) , and 22% of this area refers to forest edges (defined as the first 30 m from the edge). The total forest carbon pool of Mongolia was estimated at ~ 1.5-1.7 Pg C, a value which is likely to decrease in future with increasing deforestation and fire frequency, and global warming. PMID:26463754

  15. Micro-scale (μg) radiocarbon analysis of water-soluble organic carbon in aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-lin; Liu, Jun-wen; Salazar, Gary A.; Li, Jun; Zotter, Peter; Zhang, Gan; Shen, Rong-rong; Schäfer, Klaus; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Prévôt, André S. H.; Szidat, Sönke

    2014-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) measurement of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in ambient aerosols is a quantitative tool for unambiguously distinguishing fossil and non-fossil sources. In this study, a fast and reliable method for measuring 14C in micro-scale (μg) WSOC aerosol samples is successfully developed, which includes three steps: (1) extraction (2) freeze drying, and (3) online 14C analysis of CO2 from WSOC combustion. Procedure blanks are carefully assessed by measuring high-purity water and reference materials. Accurate 14C results could be obtained for WSOC with only 10 μg C, and thus the potential applications are substantially broadened because much less filter material is needed compared to previous reported methods. This method is applied to aerosols samples collected during winter from Switzerland and China. The results demonstrate that non-fossil sources are important if not dominant contributors of WSOC. These non-fossil components are consistently enriched in WSOC compared to bulk OC and water-insoluble OC for all samples, due to high water solubility of primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols. However, the presence of fossil WSOC is still considerable indicating a substantial contribution of secondary OC (SOC) formed from precursors emitted by fossil emissions. Larger fossil contributions to WSOC is found in China than in Switzerland and previously reported values in Europe, USA and South Asia, which may be attributed to higher fossil-derived SOC formation in China.

  16. Automated determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aqueous samples: RSIL lab codes 1851 and 1852

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Révész, Kinga M.; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab codes 1851 and 1852 are to determine the total carbon mass and the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) for total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, lab code 1851) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC, lab code 1852) in aqueous samples. The analysis procedure is automated according to a method that utilizes a total carbon analyzer as a peripheral sample preparation device for analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas by a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The carbon analyzer produces CO2 and determines the carbon mass in parts per million (ppm) of DIC and DOC in each sample separately, and the CF-IRMS determines the carbon isotope ratio of the produced CO2. This configuration provides a fully automated analysis of total carbon mass and δ13C with no operator intervention, additional sample preparation, or other manual analysis. To determine the DIC, the carbon analyzer transfers a specified sample volume to a heated (70 °C) reaction vessel with a preprogrammed volume of 10% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which allows the carbonate and bicarbonate species in the sample to dissociate to CO2. The CO2 from the reacted sample is subsequently purged with a flow of helium gas that sweeps the CO2 through an infrared CO2 detector and quantifies the CO2. The CO2 is then carried through a high-temperature (650 °C) scrubber reactor, a series of water traps, and ultimately to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. For the analysis of total dissolved organic carbon, the carbon analyzer performs a second step on the sample in the heated reaction vessel during which a preprogrammed volume of sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) is added, and the hydroxyl radicals oxidize the organics to CO2. Samples containing 2 ppm to 30,000 ppm of carbon are analyzed. The precision of the carbon isotope analysis is within 0.3 per mill for DIC, and within 0.5 per mill for DOC.

  17. Speciation of water-soluble organic carbon compounds in boundary layer aerosols during the LBA/CLAIRE/SMOCC-2002 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Pashynska, V.; Vermeylen, R.; Vas, G.; Cafmeyer, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Artaxo, P.

    2003-04-01

    The water-soluble, hygroscopic aerosol fraction is of climatic interest because of its role as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the associated effects on cloud formation and cloud properties. As part of the LBA/CLAIRE/SMOCC experiment in Amazonia, September-November 2002, aerosol samples were collected using various types of samplers. The campaign spanned from the peak of the burning season, with high smoke concentrations, to fairly clean conditions in the early rainy season. Separate day and night samples were collected, and the collection time per sample varied from 12 hours in September to up to 48 hours in November. Fine (< 2.5 μm) and coarse (> 2.5 μm) aerosol size fractions were obtained using a Hi-Vol dichotomous sampler, and the samples were analysed for organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and various water-soluble organic carbon compounds. The latter compounds included the anhydrosugars, levoglucosan, mannosan, and galactosan, which are markers for wood combustion, the polyols, arabitol and mannitol, which originate from the natural forest environment, as well as the hydroxydicarboxylic acid, malic acid, which is a late product in the photochemistry of fatty acids and n-alkanes. Preliminary results including the mass concentrations of OC, EC, WSOC and the water-soluble organic compounds will be presented. By far the major water-soluble organic carbon compound in the fine size fraction was levoglucosan, showing concentrations in the range of 1-6 μg m-3 in the peak of the burning season (17-24 September).

  18. Modeling Aerosol Microphysical and Radiative Effects on Clouds and Implications for the Effects of Black and Brown Carbon on Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Hoeve, J. E.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    simulations that include and exclude biomass burning emissions. This study suggests by cause and effect through numerical modeling that aerosol radiative effects counteract microphysical effects at high AODs, a result previously shown by correlation alone. As such, computer models that exclude treatment of cloud radiative effects are likely to overpredict the indirect effects of aerosols on clouds and underestimate the warming due to aerosols containing black carbon.

  19. Black carbon surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Soot particles are the most strongly light-absorbing particles commonly found in the atmosphere. They are major contributors to the radiative budget of the Earth and to the toxicity of atmospheric pollution. Atmospheric aging of soot may change its health- and climate-relevant properties by oxidizing the primary black carbon (BC) or organic particulate matter (OM) which, together with ash, comprise soot. This atmospheric aging, which entails the condensation of secondary particulate matter as well as the oxidation of the primary OM and BC emissions, is currently poorly understood. In this study, atmospheric aging of wood-stove soot aerosols was simulated in a continuous-flow reactor. The composition of fresh and aged soot particles was measured in real time by a dual-vaporizer aerosol-particle mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The dual-vaporizer SP-AMS provided information on the OM and BC components of the soot as well as on refractory components internally mixed with BC. By switching the SP-AMS laser vaporizer off and using only the AMS thermal vaporizer (at 600 °C), information on the OM component only was obtained. In both modes, OM appeared to be generated largely by cellulose and/or hemicellulose pyrolysis and was only present in large amounts when new wood was added to the stove. In SP-AMS mode, BC signals otherwise dominated the mass spectrum. These signals consisted of ions related to refractory BC (rBC, C1-5+), oxygenated carbonaceous ions (CO1-2+), potassium (K+), and water (H2O+ and related fragments). The C4+ : C3+ ratio, but not the C1+ : C3+ ratio, was consistent with the BC-structure trends of Corbin et al. (2015c). The CO1-2+ signals likely originated from BC surface groups: upon aging, both CO+ and CO2+ increased relative to C1-3+ while CO2+ simultaneously increased relative to CO+. Factor analysis (positive matrix factorization) of SP-AMS and AMS data, using a modified error model to address peak-integration uncertainties, indicated that the surface

  20. Black-carbon-surface oxidation and organic composition of beech-wood soot aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, J. C.; Lohmann, U.; Sierau, B.; Keller, A.; Burtscher, H.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    Soot particles are the most strongly light-absorbing particles commonly found in the atmosphere. They are major contributors to the radiative budget of the Earth and to the toxicity of atmospheric pollution. Atmospheric aging of soot may change its health- and climate-relevant properties by oxidizing the primary black carbon (BC) or organic particulate matter (OM) which, together with ash, comprise soot. This atmospheric aging, which entails the condensation of secondary particulate matter as well as the oxidation of the primary OM and BC emissions, is currently poorly understood. In this study, atmospheric aging of wood-stove soot aerosols was simulated in a continuous-flow reactor. The composition of fresh and aged soot particles was measured in real time by a dual-vaporizer aerosol-particle mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS provided information on the OM, BC, and surface composition of the soot. The OM appeared to be generated largely by cellulose and/or hemicellulose pyrolysis, and was only present in large amounts when new wood was added to the stove. BC signals otherwise dominated the mass spectrum. These signals consisted of ions related to refractory BC (rBC, C+1-5), oxygenated surface groups (CO+1-2), potassium (K+) and water (H+2O and related fragments). The C+4 : C+3 ratio, but not the C+1 : C+3 ratio, was consistent with the BC-structure trends of Corbin et al. (2015c). The CO+1-2 signals likely originated from BC surface groups: upon aging, both CO+ and CO+2 increased relative to C+1-3 while CO+2 simultaneously increased relative to CO+. Factor analysis (PMF) of SP-AMS and AMS data, using a new error model to account for peak-integration uncertainties, indicated that the surface composition of the BC was approximately constant across all stages of combustion for both fresh and aged samples. These results represent the first time-resolved measurements of in-situ BC-surface aging and suggest that the surface of beech-wood BC may be modelled as a

  1. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ(13)C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19-C36), fatty acids (C8-C32) and n-alcohols (C16-C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ(13)C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from -34.1 to -24.7% and -26.9 to -24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  2. Quality assurance and quality control for thermal/optical analysis of aerosol samples for organic and elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Robles, Jerome; Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, L-W Antony; Trimble, Dana L; Kohl, Steven D; Tropp, Richard J; Fung, Kochy K

    2011-12-01

    Accurate, precise, and valid organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC, respectively) measurements require more effort than the routine analysis of ambient aerosol and source samples. This paper documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures that should be implemented to ensure consistency of OC and EC measurements. Prior to field sampling, the appropriate filter substrate must be selected and tested for sampling effectiveness. Unexposed filters are pre-fired to remove contaminants and acceptance tested. After sampling, filters must be stored in the laboratory in clean, labeled containers under refrigeration (<4 °C) to minimize loss of semi-volatile OC. QA activities include participation in laboratory accreditation programs, external system audits, and interlaboratory comparisons. For thermal/optical carbon analyses, periodic QC tests include calibration of the flame ionization detector with different types of carbon standards, thermogram inspection, replicate analyses, quantification of trace oxygen concentrations (<100 ppmv) in the helium atmosphere, and calibration of the sample temperature sensor. These established QA/QC procedures are applicable to aerosol sampling and analysis for carbon and other chemical components. PMID:21626190

  3. Impact of idealized future stratospheric aerosol injection on the large-scale ocean and land carbon cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjiputra, J. F.; Grini, A.; Lee, H.

    2016-01-01

    Using an Earth system model, we simulate stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI) on top of the Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 future scenario. Our idealized method prescribes aerosol concentration, linearly increasing from 2020 to 2100, and thereafter remaining constant until 2200. In the aggressive scenario, the model projects a cooling trend toward 2100 despite warming that persists in the high latitudes. Following SAI termination in 2100, a rapid global warming of 0.35 K yr-1 is simulated in the subsequent 10 years, and the global mean temperature returns to levels close to the reference state, though roughly 0.5 K cooler. In contrast to earlier findings, we show a weak response in the terrestrial carbon sink during SAI implementation in the 21st century, which we attribute to nitrogen limitation. The SAI increases the land carbon uptake in the temperate forest-, grassland-, and shrub-dominated regions. The resultant lower temperatures lead to a reduction in the heterotrophic respiration rate and increase soil carbon retention. Changes in precipitation patterns are key drivers for variability in vegetation carbon. Upon SAI termination, the level of vegetation carbon storage returns to the reference case, whereas the soil carbon remains high. The ocean absorbs nearly 10% more carbon in the geoengineered simulation than in the reference simulation, leading to a ˜15 ppm lower atmospheric CO2 concentration in 2100. The largest enhancement in uptake occurs in the North Atlantic. In both hemispheres' polar regions, SAI delays the sea ice melting and, consequently, export production remains low. In the deep water of North Atlantic, SAI-induced circulation changes accelerate the ocean acidification rate and broaden the affected area.

  4. Investigating cloud absorption effects: Global absorption properties of black carbon, tar balls, and soil dust in clouds and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2012-03-01

    This study examines modeled properties of black carbon (BC), tar ball (TB), and soil dust (SD) absorption within clouds and aerosols to understand better Cloud Absorption Effects I and II, which are defined as the effects on cloud heating of absorbing inclusions in hydrometeor particles and of absorbing aerosol particles interstitially between hydrometeor particles at their actual relative humidity (RH), respectively. The globally and annually averaged modeled 550 nm aerosol mass absorption coefficient (AMAC) of externally mixed BC was 6.72 (6.3-7.3) m2/g, within the laboratory range (6.3-8.7 m2/g). The global AMAC of internally mixed (IM) BC was 16.2 (13.9-18.2) m2/g, less than the measured maximum at 100% RH (23 m2/g). The resulting AMAC amplification factor due to internal mixing was 2.41 (2-2.9), with highest values in high RH regions. The global 650 nm hydrometeor mass absorption coefficient (HMAC) due to BC inclusions was 17.7 (10.6-19) m2/g, ˜9.3% higher than that of the IM-AMAC. The 650 nm HMACs of TBs and SD were half and 1/190th, respectively, that of BC. Modeled aerosol absorption optical depths were consistent with data. In column tests, BC inclusions in low and mid clouds (CAE I) gave column-integrated BC heating rates ˜200% and 235%, respectively, those of interstitial BC at the actual cloud RH (CAE II), which itself gave heating rates ˜120% and ˜130%, respectively, those of interstitial BC at the clear-sky RH. Globally, cloud optical depth increased then decreased with increasing aerosol optical depth, consistent with boomerang curves from satellite studies. Thus, CAEs, which are largely ignored, heat clouds significantly.

  5. Tracking Transport and Transformation of Aerosols using C and O-triple Isotopic Composition of Carbonates: CSI La Jolla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Shaheen, R.; Chong, K.; Hill, A.; Wong, J.; Zhang, Z.; Dominguez, G.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols affect climate in numerous ways, including change in the earth's energy balance by absorbing and scattering solar radiations, alteration of the hydrological cycle by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, change in biogeochemical cycles by providing nutrients. Another significant process is the effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere by providing surfaces for heterogeneous chemical reactions. Fine particles of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5μm (PM2.5) also impinge upon human health by admission to the respiratory system causing a range of cardiopulmonary diseases. Both climate and public health aspects depend on their physical and chemical properties, therefore, understanding physico-chemical and photochemical transformations on aerosol surfaces is important for predicting their effects on climate change, atmospheric chemistry and human health. Here we present initial findings on the processes occurring on aerosol surfaces using isotopes to delineate day and night time chemistry, thus resolving photochemistry effects, and to identify their sources by way of the carbon isotopes. Aerosols were collected on filter papers for 12h during the day and at night time from June-Dec. 2011in La Jolla, CA., using high volume, multi stage cascade impactors. CO2 released after treating these filter papers with 100% phosphoric acid at 27oC was collected, purified chromatographically and analyzed for both C and O isotopes. Our data indicate that both C and O isotopes can be used to distinguish between heterogeneous and photochemical transformations. Aerosol carbonates collected during the day time were depleted in δ13Cday = -23 to -28‰ and δ18Oday = +3 to +10‰ and were isotopically distinct from the carbonates collected at night time δ13Cnight = 0 to -12‰, δ18Onightnight = +23 to +32‰. Higher chloride concentration in the samples collected at night time indicated the transport of marine air masses whereas higher nitrate and sulfate concentration

  6. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  7. Pole-to-Pole Distribution of Stratospheric Black Carbon (Soot) Aerosol from Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Ferry, G. V.; Verma, S.; Howard, S. D.; Strawa, Anthony W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of black carbon (soot) aerosol (BCA) in the atmosphere is of interest for several reasons: (1) Because BCA has the highest absorption cross section of any compound known, it can absorb solar radiation to cause atmospheric warming. (2) Because it is a strong adsorber of gases, it can catalyze heterogeneous reactions to change the chemical composition of the atmosphere.(3) If aircraft are a major source of BCA, it is an important tracer of aircraft emissions. Analysis for BCA of impactor samples from Arctic and Antarctic deployments, utilizing particle morphology of scanning electron microscopy images, permits the following conclusions: (1) The BCA concentration in the northern stratosphere varies between 0 and 2.6 ng m-3 averaging 0.6 ng/cu m. (2) This BCA loading is commensurate with estimated fuel consumptions in the stratosphere by the current commercial fleet and an emission index E=0.03 g BCA per kg fuel burnt which was measured in jet exhaust at al titude.Thus, most stratospheric BCA in the northern stratosphere results from aircraft emissions. The background BCA concentration in the southern stratosphere varies between 0 and 0.6 ng cu m averaging 0.1 ng/cu m. This strong meridional gradient implies that stratospheric BCA residence time- is shorter than are mixing times between hemispheres. Projected annual fuel consumption of a future supersonic commercial fleet is 7E13 g. This fleet would increase stratospheric BCA loadings by a factor of 2-3, because almost all fuel would be burnt above the tropopause. An improved EI(BCA) by a factor of ten would result in an increase of stratospheric BCA loadings by approximately 50 %.

  8. The ``Micro'' Aethalometer - an enabling technology for new applications in the measurement of Aerosol Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. D.; Močnik, G.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosol Black Carbon (BC) is a tracer for combustion emissions; a primary indicator of adverse health effects; and the second leading contributor to Global Climate Change. The “Micro” Aethalometer is a recently-developed miniature instrument that makes a real-time measurement of BC on a very short timebase in a self-contained, battery-powered package that is lightweight and pocket sized. This technological development critically enables new areas of research: Measurements of the vertical profile of BC, by carrying the sampler aloft on a balloon (tethered or released) or aircraft (piloted or UAV); Estimates of the concentration of BC in the troposphere and lower stratosphere in the 8 - 12 km. altitude range, by measurements in the passenger cabin during commercial air travel; Epidemiological studies of personal exposure to BC, by carrying the sampler on a subject person in health studies; Measurements of the concentration of BC in rural and remote regions, by means of a small, battery-powered instrument that is convenient to deploy; measurements of high concentrations of “smoke” in indoor and outdoor environments in developing countries; Unobtrusive monitoring of BC infiltration into indoor environments, by means of a small, quiet instrument that can be placed in publicly-used spaces, school classrooms, museums, and other potentially-impacted locations; Adaptation of the technology to the direct source measurement of BC concentrations in emissions from diesel exhausts, combustion plumes, and other sources. We will show examples of data from various recent projects to illustrate the capabilities and applications of this new instrument.

  9. Numerical investigation on the Ångström exponent of black carbon aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Liu, Chao; Yin, Yan; Kumar, K. Raghavendra

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) plays an important role on the global and regional climate, whereas there are significant uncertainties on its optical properties. Among various optical properties, the Ångström exponent (AE) indicates the spectral variation of the particle-optic interaction and is widely used to understand the aerosol properties. We consider the influence of BC geometry on its optical properties and assess the sensitivity of the AE to particle geometry and size distribution. The fractal aggregates with different fractal dimensions are used to represent realistic BC particles, and popular equivalent volume spherical and spheroidal models are also considered for comparison. Even if the fractal aggregates become highly compact and spherical, their optical properties are still significantly different from those of equivalent volume spheres or spheroids. Meanwhile, the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation can hardly provide accurate results for all optical quantities of aggregates with different dimensions. The extinction Ångström exponent (EAE) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) are sensitive to both particle geometry and size distribution. With BC becoming more compact (from fractal aggregate to spheroid and to sphere), the AE becomes more sensitive to particle size distribution. The EAE and AAE of aggregates with different size distributions vary between 1.10-1.63 and 0.87-1.50, respectively, whereas those of the spheres or spheroids have wider ranges. Furthermore, the AE at smaller wavelengths (between 0.35 µm and 0.55 µm) is more sensitive to geometry and size distribution than that given by optical properties at larger wavelengths (between 0.55 µm and 0.88 µm).

  10. Catalysis of CuSO4 for total organic carbon detection based on supercritical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hui, Zhang; Dongdong, Han; Yi, Chen; Chunmian, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic effects of CuSO4 in total organic carbon (TOC) detecting processes based on supercritical water oxidation have been investigated. Using benzoic acid as a model pollutant, the presence of a CuSO4 catalyst can significantly decrease the reaction temperature and H2O2 multiple during the TOC detection processes. A better TOC conversion efficiency was obtained at a much lower temperature in the catalytic system compared with the non-catalytic condition. The use of the catalyst effectively lowered the necessary H2O2 multiple from 20.0 without catalyst to 3.0 in the catalytic system. The established device could detect the TOC concentration precisely in model wastewater without inorganic carbon (IC). Moreover, the detection of the practical wastewater was studied. Detection results were total carbon of wastewater rather than TOC of practical wastewater. A detection or removal unit of IC is necessary before it can be practically utilized. PMID:27438232

  11. Properties of light-absorbing aerosols in the Nagoya urban area, Japan, in August 2011 and January 2012: Contributions of brown carbon and lensing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Kawana, Kaori; Mochida, Michihiro; Ikemori, Fumikazu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    The optical properties of aerosols at 405 and 781 nm were measured in an urban site in Nagoya, Japan, in August 2011 and in January 2012 using a photoacoustic spectrometer. Comparison of the absorption coefficient at 781 nm of aerosols that did and did not pass through a thermo-denuder showed that an increase in black carbon (BC) light absorption due to the coating of non-refractory materials (i.e., the lensing effect) was small (on average, 10%) in August and negligible in January. The effective density distributions for the particles that did and did not pass through the thermo-denuder, which were measured simultaneously in August, suggested that the majority of BC particles sampled had a minimal coating. The small lensing effect observed can be explained partly by assuming that a large portion of non-refractory materials was mixed externally with BC. The contribution of direct light absorption by organic matter (OM) that vaporized at temperatures below 300°C to the total light absorption at 405 nm was negligible in August, but those by OM that vaporized below 300 and 400°C averaged 11 and 17%, respectively, in January. The larger contribution of light-absorbing OM in January is likely due to the greater contribution of OM originating from the burning of biomass, including biofuel and agricultural residue, in Japan, northern China, or Siberia, during the winter.

  12. Carbon-14 Dating with the Liquid Scintillation Counter: Total Synthesis of the Benzene Solvent.

    PubMed

    Tamers, M A

    1960-09-01

    Samples are analyzed for natural radiocarbon content by a total synthesis of benzene from their organic constituents. The benzene is employed as the solvent in a liquid scintillation counter. The instrument used permits 15grams of carbon to be counted with an efficiency of 40 percent and a background of 13 counts per minute.

  13. Soil organic carbon and total nitrogen responses after 34 years of tillage of a sandy ultisol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage and crop management strategies are available to increase soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents, but long-term (> 30 yrs) field results quantifying these increases are sparse. Our objectives were to quantity above ground biomass inputs and changes in vertica...

  14. TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON ANALYZERS AS TOOLS FOR MEASURING CARBONACEOUS MATTER IN NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For some utilities, new US drinking water regulations may require removal of disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursor material as a means of mimnimizing DBP formation. The EPa's Stage 1 DBP Rule relies on total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations as a measure of the effectiveness o...

  15. Soil total carbon content, aggregation, bulk density, and penetration resistance of croplands and nearby grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Converting native grassland (NGL) to cropland (CL) decreases soil organic matter contents (components of soil total carbon contents, STCCs), which often leads to soil degradation. Reestablishing grass on CL generally increases soil organic matter, which improves soil conditions. This study was condu...

  16. INTERLABORATORY METHODS COMPARISON FOR THE TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON ANALYSIS OF AQUIFER MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The total organic carbon (TOC) content of aquifer materials has been found to have significant effects on the movement of pollutants in the subsurface environment. Accurate quantification of TOC is therefore of great im- portance to research in groundwater contamination. However,...

  17. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, the organic carbon concentration is measured using thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) from quartz fiber filters. Here, methods are presented whereby Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters are used to accurately predict TOR OC. Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filters. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites sampled during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to artifact-corrected TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date which leads to precise and accurate OC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, all μg m-3 values based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; this division also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass indicating that the

  18. Neurotoxicity following acute inhalation of aerosols generated during resistance spot weld-bonding of carbon steel

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Krishnan; Jefferson, Amy M.; Lin, Gary X.; Afshari, Aliakbar; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Meighan, Terence G.; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L.; Leonard, Howard D.; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Welding generates complex metal aerosols, inhalation of which is linked to adverse health effects among welders. An important health concern of welding fume (WF) exposure is neurological dysfunction akin to Parkinson’s disease (PD). Some applications in manufacturing industry employ a variant welding technology known as “weld-bonding” that utilizes resistance spot welding, in combination with adhesives, for metal-to-metal welding. The presence of adhesives raises additional concerns about worker exposure to potentially toxic components like Methyl Methacrylate, Bisphenol A and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Here, we investigated the potential neurotoxicological effects of exposure to welding aerosols generated during weld-bonding. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed (25 mg/m3 targeted concentration; 4 h/day × 13 days) by whole-body inhalation to filtered air or aerosols generated by either weld-bonding with sparking (high metal, low VOCs; HM) or without sparking (low metal; high VOCs; LM). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited complex aerosols that contained both metal oxide particulates and VOCs. LM aerosols contained a greater fraction of VOCs than HM, which comprised largely metal particulates of ultrafine morphology. Short-term exposure to LM aerosols caused distinct changes in the levels of the neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), in various brain areas examined. LM aerosols also specifically decreased the mRNA expression of the olfactory marker protein (Omp) and tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) in the olfactory bulb. Consistent with the decrease in Th, LM also reduced the expression of dopamine transporter (Slc6a3; Dat), as well as, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2) in the olfactory bulb. In contrast, HM aerosols induced the expression of Th and dopamine D5 receptor (Drd5) mRNAs, elicited neuroinflammation and blood–brain barrier-related changes in the olfactory bulb, but did not alter the expression of Omp. Our findings

  19. Neurotoxicity following acute inhalation of aerosols generated during resistance spot weld-bonding of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Jefferson, Amy M; Lin, Gary X; Afshari, Aliakbar; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Meighan, Terence G; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Leonard, Howard D; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2014-10-01

    Welding generates complex metal aerosols, inhalation of which is linked to adverse health effects among welders. An important health concern of welding fume (WF) exposure is neurological dysfunction akin to Parkinson's disease (PD). Some applications in manufacturing industry employ a variant welding technology known as "weld-bonding" that utilizes resistance spot welding, in combination with adhesives, for metal-to-metal welding. The presence of adhesives raises additional concerns about worker exposure to potentially toxic components like Methyl Methacrylate, Bisphenol A and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Here, we investigated the potential neurotoxicological effects of exposure to welding aerosols generated during weld-bonding. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed (25 mg/m³ targeted concentration; 4 h/day × 13 days) by whole-body inhalation to filtered air or aerosols generated by either weld-bonding with sparking (high metal, low VOCs; HM) or without sparking (low metal; high VOCs; LM). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited complex aerosols that contained both metal oxide particulates and VOCs. LM aerosols contained a greater fraction of VOCs than HM, which comprised largely metal particulates of ultrafine morphology. Short-term exposure to LM aerosols caused distinct changes in the levels of the neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), in various brain areas examined. LM aerosols also specifically decreased the mRNA expression of the olfactory marker protein (Omp) and tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) in the olfactory bulb. Consistent with the decrease in Th, LM also reduced the expression of dopamine transporter (Slc6a3; Dat), as well as, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2) in the olfactory bulb. In contrast, HM aerosols induced the expression of Th and dopamine D5 receptor (Drd5) mRNAs, elicited neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier-related changes in the olfactory bulb, but did not alter the expression of Omp. Our findings

  20. Reviews and syntheses: Calculating the global contribution of coralline algae to total carbon burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, L. H.; Kamenos, N. A.

    2015-11-01

    The ongoing increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is changing the global marine environment and is causing warming and acidification of the oceans. Reduction of CO2 to a sustainable level is required to avoid further marine change. Many studies investigate the potential of marine carbon sinks (e.g. seagrass) to mitigate anthropogenic emissions, however, information on storage by coralline algae and the beds they create is scant. Calcifying photosynthetic organisms, including coralline algae, can act as a CO2 sink via photosynthesis and CaCO3 dissolution and act as a CO2 source during respiration and CaCO3 production on short-term timescales. Long-term carbon storage potential might come from the accumulation of coralline algae deposits over geological timescales. Here, the carbon storage potential of coralline algae is assessed using meta-analysis of their global organic and inorganic carbon production and the processes involved in this metabolism. Net organic and inorganic production were estimated at 330 g C m-2 yr-1 and 900 g CaCO3 m-2 yr-1 respectively giving global organic/inorganic C production of 0.7/1.8 × 109 t C yr-1. Calcium carbonate production by free-living/crustose coralline algae (CCA) corresponded to a sediment accretion of 70/450 mm kyr-1. Using this potential carbon storage for coralline algae, the global production of free-living algae/CCA was 0.4/1.2 × 109 t C yr-1 suggesting a total potential carbon sink of 1.6 × 109 tonnes per year. Coralline algae therefore have production rates similar to mangroves, salt marshes and seagrasses representing an as yet unquantified but significant carbon store, however, further empirical investigations are needed to determine the dynamics and stability of that store.

  1. Wavelength Dependence of the Absorption of Black Carbon Particles: Predictions and Results from the TARFOX Experiment and Implications for the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Hignett, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption coefficient taken during the Tropical Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) over the northern Atlantic. The data show an approximate lamda(exp -1) variation between 0.40 and 1.0 micrometers. The theoretical basis of the wavelength variation of the absorption of solar radiation by elemental carbon [or black carbon (BC)] is explored. For a wavelength independent refractive index the small particle absorption limit simplifies to a lambda(exp -1) variation in relatively good agreement with the data. This result implies that the refractive indices of BC were relatively constant in this wavelength region, in agreement with much of the data on refractive indices of BC. However, the result does not indicate the magnitude of the refractive indices. The implications of the wavelength dependence of BC absorption for the spectral behavior of the aerosol single scattering albedo are discussed. It is shown that the single scattering albedo for a mixture of BC and nonabsorbing material decreases with wavelength in the solar spectrum (i.e., the percentage amount of absorption increases). This decease in the single scattering albedo with wavelength for black carbon mixtures is different from the increase in single scattering allied for most mineral aerosols (dusts). This indicates that, if generally true, the spectral variation of the single- scattering albedo can be used to distinguish aerosol types. It also highlights the importance of measurements of the spectral variation of the aerosol absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo.

  2. Retrievals of aerosol optical depth and total column ozone from Ultraviolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements based on an optimal estimation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Chen, Maosi; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A Bayesian optimal estimation (OE) retrieval technique was used to retreive aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), and an asymmetry factor ( g) at seven ultraviolet wavelengths, along with total column ozone (TOC), from the measurements of the UltraViolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR) deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during March through November in 2009. The OE technique specifies appropriate error covariance matrices and optimizes a forward model (Tropospheric ultraviolet radiative transfer model, TUV), and thus provides a supplemental method for use across the network of the Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) for the retrieval of aerosol properties and TOC with reasonable accuracy in the UV spectral range under various atmospheric conditions. In order to assess the accuracy of the OE technique, we compared the AOD retreivals from this method with those from Beer's Law and the AErosol RObotic Network (AERONET) AOD product. We also examine the OE retrieved TOC in comparison with the TOC from the U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite data. The scatterplots of the estimated AOD from the OE method agree well with those derived from Beer's law and the collocated AERONETAOD product, showing high values of correlation coefficients, generally 0.98 and 0.99, and large slopes, ranging from 0.95 to 1.0, as well as small offsets, less than 0.02 especially at 368 nm. The comparison of TOC retrievals also indicates the promising accuracy of the OE method in that the standard deviations of the difference between the OE derived TOC and other TOC products are about 5 to 6 Dobson Units (DU). Validation of the OE retrievals on these selected dates suggested that the OE technique has its merits and can serve as a supplemental tool in further analyzing UVMRP data.

  3. Fine Mode Aerosol over the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Reid, J. S.; Reid, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol loading of the atmosphere over the Arabian Gulf region is extremely diverse and is composed not only of dust, but also of pollution that is derived largely from oil-related activities. Fine mode pollution particles are most efficient at scattering incoming solar radiation and have the potential to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and may therefore have implications for climate change. The smaller aerosols may also pose a health hazard if present in high concentrations. The United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2) was designed to investigate aerosol and meteorological characteristics over the region using ground-based, aircraft and satellite measurements, and was conducted in August and September 2004. Aerosol chemical composition has been obtained from filters that were collected at the site of the Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Characterization Observatory (MAARCO) on the coast of the UAE between Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Filter samples were also collected on an airborne platform in order to assess how aerosol chemical composition varies across the region and throughout the depth of the boundary layer. Results of the analysis of the PM2.5 coastal samples show that ammonium sulphate is the most prevalent constituent of the fine mode aerosol in the region (>50% of the mass), followed by organic matter, alumino-silicates, calcium carbonate and black carbon. Source apportionment indicates that most of the fine aerosol mass is derived from fossil fuel combustion, while mineral dust and local vehicle emissions also contribute to the fine aerosol loading. The organic carbon-to-total carbon ratio of the aerosol is 0.65, which is typical of fossil fuel combustion. The dominance of sulphates means that the fine mode aerosol in the region is probably responsible for a negative radiative forcing, and that the polluting emissions significantly elevate the concentration of CCN.

  4. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  5. Chemical characterization of water-soluble organic carbon aerosols at a rural site in the Pearl River Delta, China, in the summer of 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Shiraiwa, M.; Takegawa, N.; Miyakawa, T.; Han, S.; Kita, K.; Hu, M.; Deng, Z. Q.; Zhao, Y.; Sugimoto, N.; Blake, D. R.; Weber, R. J.

    2009-07-01

    Online measurements of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) aerosols were made using a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) combined with a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer at a rural site in the Pearl River Delta region, China, in July 2006. A macroporous nonionic (DAX-8) resin was used to quantify hydrophilic and hydrophobic WSOC, which are defined as the fractions of WSOC that penetrated through and retained on the DAX-8 column, respectively. Laboratory calibrations showed that hydrophilic WSOC (WSOCHPI) included low-molecular aliphatic dicarboxylic acids and carbonyls, saccharides, and amines, while hydrophobic WSOC (WSOCHPO) included longer-chain aliphatic dicarboxylic acids and carbonyls, aromatic acids, phenols, organic nitrates, cyclic acids, and fulvic acids. On average, total WSOC (TWSOC) accounted for 60% of OC, and WSOCHPO accounted for 60% of TWSOC. Both WSOCHPI and WSOCHPO increased with photochemical aging determined from the NOx/NOy ratio. In particular, the average WSOCHPO mass was found to increase by a factor of five within a timescale of ˜10 hours, which was substantially larger than that of WSOCHPI (by a factor of 2-3). The total increase in OC mass with photochemical aging was associated with the large increase in WSOCHPO mass. These results, combined with the laboratory calibrations, suggest that significant amounts of hydrophobic organic compounds (likely containing large carbon numbers) were produced by photochemical processing. By contrast, water-insoluble OC (WIOC) mass did not exhibit significant changes with photochemical aging, suggesting that chemical transformation of WIOC to WSOC was not a dominant process for the production of WSOC during the study period.

  6. Organic aerosols and inorganic species from post-harvest agricultural-waste burning emissions over northern India: impact on mass absorption efficiency of elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Darshan

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 2.5 μm), collected from a source region [Patiala: 30.2 °N; 76.3 °E; 250 m above mean sea level] of emissions from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy-residue) burning in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), North India, has been studied for its chemical composition and impact on regional atmospheric radiative forcing. On average, organic aerosol mass accounts for 63% of PM2.5, whereas the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) is ∼3.5%. Sulphate, nitrate and ammonium contribute up to ∼85% of the total water-soluble inorganic species (WSIS), which constitutes ∼23% of PM2.5. The potassium-to-organic carbon ratio from paddy-residue burning emissions (KBB(+)/OC: 0.05 ± 0.01) is quite similar to that reported from Amazonian and Savanna forest-fires; whereas non-sea-salt-sulphate-to-OC ratio (nss-SO4(2-)/OC: 0.21) and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratio of 2.6 are significantly higher (by factor of 5 to 8). The mass absorption efficiency of EC (3.8 ± 1.3 m(2) g(-1)) shows significant decrease with a parallel increase in the concentrations of organic aerosols and scattering species (sulphate and nitrate). A cross plot of OC/EC and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratios show distinct differences for post-harvest burning emissions from paddy-residue as compared to those from fossil-fuel combustion sources in south-east Asia.

  7. Black carbon aerosol characterization in a coastal city in South China using a single particle soot photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Tian-Le; Zeng, Li-Wu; Yu, Guang-He; Luan, Sheng-Ji

    2012-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the dominant light-absorbing aerosol component in the atmosphere and plays an important role in atmospheric pollution and climate change. The light-absorbing properties of BC rely on particle size, shape, composition, as well as the BC mixing state with other aerosol components, thus more thorough exploration of BC aerosol characteristics is critical in understanding its atmospheric sources and effects. In this study, a newly-developed Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was deployed in Shenzhen, China, for continuous BC measurements to obtain the important information about size distribution and mixing state of BC under severe air pollution conditions of China. The mean BC mass concentrations were found to be 6.0 and 4.1 μg m-3 at an urban site (UT) in the fall and winter, respectively, while it is much lower (2.6 μg m-3) at a rural site (BG) in the fall. The mass size distributions of BC in volume equivalent diameter (VED) at the three sites showed a similar lognormal pattern, with the peak diameter at BG (222 nm) slightly larger than at the UT (210 nm) site. As to mixing state, the average percentage of internally mixed BC at the UT site was detected to be 40% and 46% in the fall and winter, respectively, while that at the BG site in the fall was only a slightly higher (47%), which implies that fresh local fossil fuel combustions were still significant at this rural site. The analysis of extremely high BC concentrations (>20 μg m-3) at UT indicates that they were a complex of comparable contributions from both local fresh emissions and regional transport under unfavorable meteorology. Other characteristics of BC aerosol and their influencing factors in Shenzhen were also discussed.

  8. Emissions of Black Carbon, Organic, and Inorganic Aerosols From Biomass Burning in North America and Asia in 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Matsui, H.; Moteki, N.; Sahu, L.; Takegawa, N.; Kajino, M.; Zhao, Y.; Cubison, M. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Vay, S.; Diskin, G. S.; Anderson, B.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Blake, D. R.; Huey, G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Brune, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable assessment of the impact of aerosols emitted from boreal forest fires on the Arctic climate necessitates improved understanding of emissions and the microphysical properties of carbonaceous (black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA)) and inorganic aerosols. The size distributions of BC were measured by an SP2 based on the laser-induced incandescence technique on board the DC-8 aircraft during the NASA ARCTAS campaign. Aircraft sampling was made in fresh plumes strongly impacted by wildfires in North America (Canada and California) in summer 2008 and in those transported from Asia (Siberia in Russia and Kazakhstan) in spring 2008. We extracted biomass burning plumes using particle and tracer (CO, CH3CN, and CH2Cl2) data. OA constituted the dominant fraction of aerosols mass in the submicron range. The large majority of the emitted particles did not contain BC. We related the combustion phase of the fire as represented by the modified combustion efficiency (MCE) to the emission ratios between BC and other species. In particular, we derived the average emission ratios of BC/CO = 2.3 +/- 2.2 and 8.5 +/- 5.4 ng/cu m/ppbv for BB in North America and Asia, respectively. The difference in the BC/CO emission ratios is likely due to the difference in MCE. The count median diameters and geometric standard deviations of the lognormal size distribution of BC in the BB plumes were 136-141 nm and 1.32-1.36, respectively, and depended little on MCE. These BC particles were thickly coated, with shell/core ratios of 1.3-1.6. These parameters can be used directly for improving model estimates of the impact of BB in the Arctic.

  9. Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosols using Semi-Continuous Thermal-Optical Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2011-08-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols are major components in air pollution as a result of energy consumption, thus measurement of them is important to waste management. Increasing interest has been drawn to the identification, measurement, analysis, and modeling of carbon aerosols in the past decade. This book chapter will provide a review of current state-of-art techniques to determine carbonaceous aerosols in relation to air pollution and waste management. The chapter will be composed of four parts. The introduction will discuss why carbon aerosols including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and total carbon (TC=EC+OC) are important to energy consumption, air pollution, waste management, and global climate change. Key definitions will be introduced. Relevant terminologies will be provided. The second part will be a review of the current state-of the art measurement techniques that are used to determine carbon aerosols. Both on-line and off-line methods will be described. Comparisons of different techniques that provide the same physical quantity will be provided based on recent literature findings. Differences among the physical parameters determined by various techniques will be discussed. The third part will focus on data analysis and products obtained from carbon aerosol measurements. In addition to EC, OC, and TC, primary organic carbon (POC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) are of interest to researchers to understand the source and sink of carbonaceous aerosols. Techniques used to determine POC and SOC, such as the EC tracer method and positive matrix factorization, will be described and their differences discussed. Examples will be provided showing field data comparison between the Sunset organic carbon and elemental carbon field analyzer and the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, both of which are widely used for on-line aerosol measurements. The last part will report new trends and summarize future research needs in carbon aerosol measurement. Emerging

  10. U-series dating of impure carbonates: An isochron technique using total-sample dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, J.L.; Fitzpatrick, J.A. )

    1991-02-01

    U-series dating is a well-established technique for age determination of Late Quaternary carbonates. Materials of sufficient purity for nominal dating, however, are not as common as materials with mechanically inseparable aluminosilicate detritus. Detritus contaminates the sample with extraneous Th. The authors propose that correction for contamination is best accomplished with the isochron technique using total sample dissolution (TSD). Experiments were conducted on artificial mixtures of natural detritus and carbonate and on an impure carbonate of known age. Results show that significant and unpredictable transfer of radionuclides occur from the detritus to the leachate on commonly used selective leaching procedures. The effects of correcting via leachate-residue pairs and isochron plots were assessed. Isochrons using TSD gave best results, followed by isochron plots of leachates only.

  11. Continuous measurement of black carbon aerosol in urban Nanjing of Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, B. L.; Wang, T. J.; Liu, J.; Li, S.; Xie, M.; Yang, X. Q.; Fu, C. B.; Sun, J. N.; Yin, C. Q.; Liao, J. B.; Zhu, J. L.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-06-01

    As a short-lived climate forcing agent, black carbon (BC) aerosol plays an important role in climate change, atmospheric environment, and human health. In this study, continuous measurements of BC and trace gases were made at an urban site in Nanjing, Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of China in 2012. The annual mean BC concentration in Nanjing was found to be 4157 ± 2626 ng/m3, with a range of 221-24,686 ng/m3. The value was much lower than that in most megacities of China and also lower than that in LinAn, a rural site in YRD. BC concentrations in Nanjing showed strong seasonality, high in spring and autumn and low in summer. The concentrations also varied diurnally, high at rush hours and low in the afternoon. The diurnal cycles of BC loadings in winter to spring 2012 were similar to those in 2011 in magnitude and shape. BC concentrations followed a typical lognormal pattern, with over 75% of data samples between 1000 and 6000 ng/m3. The maximum frequency occurred in low BC concentrations in summer and high BC concentrations in other seasons. In Nanjing, high levels of BC were mainly caused by local and regional emissions. Low levels of BC were mostly associated with winds from northern and eastern directions of Nanjing. BC and CO varied similarly with season, having a correlation coefficient over 0.7 in most seasons. Annual mean ΔBC/ΔCO was about 7 ng/m3/ppb, implying that the sources of the BC likely came from combustions of bio-fuel, industry-coal, and vehicle-gasoline. Serious pollution episodes with high levels of BC were detected in early June at the site. Analysis suggested that the episodes were due to biomass burning in northwestern region of Nanjing. During this period, ΔBC/ΔCO reached about 9.7 ng/m3/ppb and much higher BC levels were found at mid-night.

  12. Miniaturized dielectric barrier discharge carbon atomic emission spectrometry with online microwave-assisted oxidation for determination of total organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjun; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and portable system consisted of a laboratory-built miniaturized dielectric barrier discharge atomic emission spectrometer and a microwave-assisted persulfate oxidation reactor was developed for sensitive flow injection analysis or continuous monitoring of total organic carbon (TOC) in environmental water samples. The standard/sample solution together with persulfate was pumped to the reactor to convert organic compounds to CO2, which was separated from liquid phase and transported to the spectrometer for detection of the elemental specific carbon atomic emission at 193.0 nm. The experimental parameters were systematically investigated. A limit of detection of 0.01 mg L(-1) (as C) was obtained based on a 10 mL sample injection volume, and the precision was better than 6.5% (relative standard deviation, RSD) at 0.1 mg L(-1). The system was successfully applied for TOC analysis of real environmental water samples. The obtained TOC value of 30 test samples agreed well with those by the standard high-temperature combustion coupled nondispersive infrared absorption method. Most importantly, the system showed good capability of in situ continuous monitoring of total organic carbon in environmental water.

  13. Photosynthetic light reactions increase total lipid accumulation in carbon-supplemented batch cultures of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Benjamin D; Mead, Rebecca L; Nichols, Courtney N; Kolling, Derrick R J

    2015-03-01

    Microalgae are an attractive biofuel feedstock because of their high lipid to biomass ratios, lipid compositions that are suitable for biodiesel production, and the ability to grow on varied carbon sources. While algae can grow autotrophically, supplying an exogenous carbon source can increase growth rates and allow heterotrophic growth in the absence of light. Time course analyses of dextrose-supplemented Chlorella vulgaris batch cultures demonstrate that light availability directly influences growth rate, chlorophyll production, and total lipid accumulation. Parallel photomixotrophic and heterotrophic cultures grown to stationary phase reached the same amount of biomass, but total lipid content was higher for algae grown in the presence of light (an average of 1.90 mg/mL vs. 0.77 mg/mL over 5 days of stationary phase growth).

  14. On the diurnal cycle of urban aerosols, black carbon and the occurrence of new particle formation events in springtime São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Hakala, J.; Nieminen, T.; Manninen, H. E.; Morais, F.; Aalto, P. P.; Siivola, E.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Artaxo, P.; Virkkula, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.

    2012-12-01

    Large conurbations are a significant source of the anthropogenic pollution and demographic differences between cities that result in a different pollution burden. The metropolitan area of São Paulo (MASP, population 20 million) accounts for one fifth of the Brazilian vehicular fleet. A feature of MASP is the amount of ethanol used by the vehicular fleet, known to exacerbate air quality. The study describes the diurnal behaviour of the submicron aerosol and relies on total particle number concentration, particle number size distribution, light scattering and light absorption measurements. Modelled planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth and air mass movement data were used to aid the interpretation. During morning rush-hour, stagnant air and a shallow PBL height favour the accumulation of aerosol pollution. During clear-sky conditions, there was a wind shift towards the edge of the city indicating a heat island effect with implications on particulate pollution levels at the site. The median total particle number concentration for the submicron aerosol typically varied in the range 1.6 × 104-3.2 × 104 cm-3 frequently exceeding 4 × 104 cm-3 during the day. During weekdays, nucleation-mode particles are responsible for most of the particles by numbers. The highest concentrations of total particle number concentrations and black carbon (BC) were observed on Fridays. Median diurnal values for light absorption and light scattering (at 637 nm wavelength) varied in the range 12-33 Mm-1 and 21-64 Mm-1, respectively. The former one is equal to 1.8-5.0 μg m-3 of BC. The growth of the PBL, from the morning rush-hour until noon, is consistent with the diurnal cycle of BC mass concentrations. Weekday hourly median single-scattering albedo (ω0) varied in the range 0.59-0.76. Overall, this suggests a top of atmosphere (TOA) warming effect. However, considering the low surface reflectance of urban areas, for the given range of ω0, the TOA radiative forcing can be either positive

  15. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS OVER THE UNITED STATES: ESTIMATES ON THE BASIS OF OBSERVED ORGANIC CARBON (OC) AND ELEMENTAL CARBON (EC), AND AIR QUALITY MODELED PRIMARY (OC/EC) RATIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The temporal and spatial distributions of primary and secondary organic carbon aerosols (OC) over the continental US during June 15 to August 31, 1999, were estimated by using observational OC and elemental carbon (EC) data from Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environm...

  16. Biophysical properties as determinants for soil organic carbon and total nitrogen in grassland salinization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chengchen; Zhao, Halin; Zhao, Xueyong; Han, Huibang; Wang, Yan; Li, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Grassland salinization causes considerable changes to soil and vegetation, which can lead to changes in soil organic carbon (C) and total nitrogen (N). These changes have complex causal relationships. A significant correlation between soil organic C and total N and any soil or vegetation property does not necessarily imply a significant direct effect of the property on soil organic C and total N. In this study, a field survey was conducted to investigate the changes in soil organic C and total N in grassland along a salinity gradient in Hexi corridor, China, and the direct and indirect effects of soil and vegetation properties on both stocks were quantified using a path analysis approach. Significant decrease in soil organic C and total N contents were observed with increasing salinity. Both had significant positive correlations with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), soil water, and fine particles (silt+clay) content (p<0.01) and significant negative correlations with soil EC, and sand content (p<0.01). NDVI, fine particles content and soil water content had positive direct effects on soil organic C and total N stocks. Soil EC affected soil organic C and total N stocks mainly through its indirect negative effect on NDVI, soil texture, and water content. NDVI, soil texture, and moisture also indirectly affected soil organic C and total N stocks via changes in each other. These indirect effects augmented each other, although in some cases indirect effects worked in opposing directions.

  17. Biophysical Properties as Determinants for Soil Organic Carbon and Total Nitrogen in Grassland Salinization

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chengchen; Zhao, Halin; Zhao, Xueyong; Han, Huibang; Wang, Yan; Li, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Grassland salinization causes considerable changes to soil and vegetation, which can lead to changes in soil organic carbon (C) and total nitrogen (N). These changes have complex causal relationships. A significant correlation between soil organic C and total N and any soil or vegetation property does not necessarily imply a significant direct effect of the property on soil organic C and total N. In this study, a field survey was conducted to investigate the changes in soil organic C and total N in grassland along a salinity gradient in Hexi corridor, China, and the direct and indirect effects of soil and vegetation properties on both stocks were quantified using a path analysis approach. Significant decrease in soil organic C and total N contents were observed with increasing salinity. Both had significant positive correlations with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), soil water, and fine particles (silt+clay) content (p<0.01) and significant negative correlations with soil EC, and sand content (p<0.01). NDVI, fine particles content and soil water content had positive direct effects on soil organic C and total N stocks. Soil EC affected soil organic C and total N stocks mainly through its indirect negative effect on NDVI, soil texture, and water content. NDVI, soil texture, and moisture also indirectly affected soil organic C and total N stocks via changes in each other. These indirect effects augmented each other, although in some cases indirect effects worked in opposing directions. PMID:23372776

  18. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-06-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to ‑24.7% and ‑26.9 to ‑24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China.

  19. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to −24.7% and −26.9 to −24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  20. Double blanket effect caused by two layers of black carbon aerosols escalates warming in the Brahmaputra River Valley.

    PubMed

    Rahul, P R C; Bhawar, R L; Ayantika, D C; Panicker, A S; Safai, P D; Tharaprabhakaran, V; Padmakumari, B; Raju, M P

    2014-01-14

    First ever 3-day aircraft observations of vertical profiles of Black Carbon (BC) were obtained during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) conducted on 30(th) August, 4(th) and 6(th) September 2009 over Guwahati (26° 11'N, 91° 44'E), the largest metropolitan city in the Brahmaputra River Valley (BRV) region. The results revealed that apart from the surface/near surface loading of BC due to anthropogenic processes causing a heating of 2 K/day, the large-scale Walker and Hadley atmospheric circulations associated with the Indian summer monsoon help in the formation of a second layer of black carbon in the upper atmosphere, which generates an upper atmospheric heating of ~2 K/day. Lofting of BC aerosols by these large-scale circulating atmospheric cells to the upper atmosphere (4-6 Km) could also be the reason for extreme climate change scenarios that are being witnessed in the BRV region.

  1. Double blanket effect caused by two layers of black carbon aerosols escalates warming in the Brahmaputra River Valley

    PubMed Central

    Rahul, P. R. C.; Bhawar, R. L.; Ayantika, D. C.; Panicker, A. S.; Safai, P. D.; Tharaprabhakaran, V.; Padmakumari, B.; Raju, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    First ever 3-day aircraft observations of vertical profiles of Black Carbon (BC) were obtained during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) conducted on 30th August, 4th and 6th September 2009 over Guwahati (26°11′N, 91°44′E), the largest metropolitan city in the Brahmaputra River Valley (BRV) region. The results revealed that apart from the surface/near surface loading of BC due to anthropogenic processes causing a heating of 2 K/day, the large-scale Walker and Hadley atmospheric circulations associated with the Indian summer monsoon help in the formation of a second layer of black carbon in the upper atmosphere, which generates an upper atmospheric heating of ~2 K/day. Lofting of BC aerosols by these large-scale circulating atmospheric cells to the upper atmosphere (4–6 Km) could also be the reason for extreme climate change scenarios that are being witnessed in the BRV region. PMID:24419075

  2. Black carbon concentration and deposition estimations in Finland by the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Pietikäinen, J.-P.; Jacob, D.; Pozdun, R.; Petäjä, T.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.

    2012-09-01

    The prediction skill of the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM was assessed against the black carbon (BC) concentration measurements from five locations in Finland, with focus on Hyytiälä station for the year 2005. We examined to what extent the model is able to reproduce the measurements using several statistical tools: median comparison, overlap coefficient OVL (the common area under two probability distributions curves) and Z-score (a measure of standard deviation, shape and spread of the distributions). The results of the statistics showed that the model is biased low, suggesting either an excessive loss of black carbon in the model, or missing emissions. A further examination of the precipitation data from both measurements and model showed that there is no correlation between REMO's excessive precipitation and BC underestimation. This suggests that the excessive wet removal is not the main cause for the low black carbon concentration output. In addition, a comparison of wind directions in relation with high black carbon concentrations shows that REMO-HAM is able to predict the BC source directions relatively well. Cumulative black carbon deposition fluxes over Finland were estimated, including the deposition on snow.

  3. Emissions of organic aerosol mass, black carbon, particle number, and regulated and unregulated gases from scooters and light and heavy duty vehicles with different fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, R.; Clairotte, M.; Adam, T. W.; Giechaskiel, B.; Heringa, M. F.; Elsasser, M.; Martini, G.; Manfredi, U.; Streibel, T.; Sklorz, M.; Zimmermann, R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Astorga, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Prevot, A. S. H.

    2014-06-01

    A sampling campaign with seven different types of vehicles was conducted in 2009 at the vehicle test facilities of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra (Italy). The vehicles chosen were representative of some categories circulating in Europe and were fueled either with standard gasoline or diesel and some with blends of rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel. The aim of this work was to improve the knowledge about the emission factors of gas phase and particle-associated regulated and unregulated species from vehicle exhaust. Unregulated species such as black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosol (OA) content, particle number (PN), monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and a~selection of unregulated gaseous compounds, including nitrous acid (N2O), ammonia (NH3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and methane (CH4), were measured in real time with a suite of instruments including a high-resolution aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer, a resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a high resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Diesel vehicles, without particle filters, featured the highest values for particle number, followed by gasoline vehicles and scooters. The particles from diesel and gasoline vehicles were mostly made of BC with a low fraction of OA, while the particles from the scooters were mainly composed of OA. Scooters were characterized by super high emissions factors for OA, which were orders of magnitude higher than for the other vehicles. The heavy duty diesel vehicle (HDDV) featured the highest nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions, while the scooters had the highest emissions for total hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds due to the unburned and partially burned gasoline and lubricant oil mixture. Generally, vehicles fuelled with biodiesel blends showed lower emission factors of OA and total aromatics than those from the standard fuels

  4. Characterization of Speciated Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Over California

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Easter, Richard C.; Hand, Jenny; Avise, J.

    2013-03-16

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem) with added capability of diagnosing the spatial and seasonal distribution of radiative forcings for individual aerosol species over California is used to characterize the radiative forcing of speciated aerosols in California. Model simulations for the year of 2005 are evaluated with various observations including meteorological data from California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), aerosol mass concentrations from US EPA Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE), and aerosol optical depth from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and satellites. The model well captures the observed seasonal meteorological conditions over California. Overall, the simulation is able to reproduce the observed spatial and seasonal distribution of mass concentration of total PM2.5 and the relative contribution from individual aerosol species, except the model significantly underestimates the surface concentrations of organic matter (OM) and elemental carbon (EC), potentially due to uncertainty in the anthropogenic emissions of OM and EC and the outdated secondary organic aerosol mechanism used in the model. A sensitivity simulation with anthropogenic EC emission doubled significantly reduces the model low bias of EC. The simulation reveals high anthropogenic aerosol loading over the Central Valley and the Los Angeles metropolitan regions and high natural aerosol (dust) loading over southeastern California. The seasonality of aerosol surface concentration is mainly determined by vertical turbulent mixing, ventilation, and photochemical activity, with distinct characteristics for individual aerosol species and between urban and rural areas. The simulations show that anthropogenic aerosols dominate the aerosol optical depth (AOD). The ratio of AOD to AAOD (aerosol absorption optical depth) shows distinct seasonality with a winter maximum and a summer minimum

  5. Intercomparison of elemental concentrations in total and size-fractionated aerosol samples collected during the mace head experiment, April 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Filip; Maenhaut, Willy; Colin, Jean-Louis; Losno, Remi; Schulz, Michael; Stahlschmidt, Thomas; Spokes, Lucinda; Jickells, Timothy

    During an intercomparison field experiment, organized at the Atlantic coast station of Mace Head, Ireland, in April 1991, aerosol samples were collected by four research groups. A variety of samplers was used, combining both high- and low-volume devices, with different types of collection substrates: Hi-Vol Whatman 41 filter holders, single Nuclepore filters and stacked filter units, as well as PIXE cascade impactors. The samples were analyzed by each participating group, using in-house analytical techniques and procedures. The intercomparison of the daily concentrations for 15 elements, measured by two or more participants, revealed a good agreement for the low-volume samplers for the majority of the elements, but also indicated some specific analytical problems, owing to the very low concentrations of the non-sea-salt elements at the sampling site. With the Hi-Vol Whatman 41 filter sampler, on the other hand, much higher results were obtained in particular for the sea-salt and crustal elements. The discrepancy was dependent upon the wind speed and was attributed to a higher collection efficiency of the Hi-Vol sampler for the very coarse particles, as compared to the low-volume devices under high wind speed conditions. The elemental mass size distribution, as derived from parallel cascade impactor samplings by two groups, showed discrepancies in the submicrometer aerosol fraction, which were tentatively attributed to differences in stage cut-off diameters and/or to bounce-off or splintering effects on the quartz impactor slides used by one of the groups. However, the atmospheric concentrations (sums over all stages) were rather similar in the parallel impactor samples and were only slightly lower than those derived from stacked filter unit samples taken in parallel.

  6. Hydrofluoroalkane-134a beclomethasone dipropionate extrafine aerosol provides equivalent asthma control to chlorofluorocarbon beclomethasone dipropionate at approximately half the total daily dose.

    PubMed

    Davies, R J; Stampone, P; O'Connor, B J

    1998-06-01

    The mandatory requirement to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as propellants in pharmaceutical aerosols has provided the opportunity to enhance significantly the delivery of aerosol drugs to the respiratory tract. This randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, double-dummy, multicentre study was undertaken to assess whether beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) in hydrofluoroalkane-134a (HFA) provided equivalent control of moderately severe asthma to BDP in CFC but at approximately half the total daily dose, as might be expected from the improved lung deposition of the HFA-BDP extrafine aerosol. The novel study design included a 10-12 day run-in period to confirm that patients met established criteria of moderately severe asthma and were symptomatic on current therapy (inhaled beta-agonist plus CFC-BDP 400-800 micrograms day-1). This run-in period was followed by a short course of oral steroid therapy (prednisolone 30 mg day-1 for 7-13 days) to demonstrate steroid responsiveness [> or = 15% improvement in morning peak expiratory flow (PEF)] and to provide a within-study baseline of improved asthma control. A total of 233 patients were randomized to treatment for 12 weeks with HFA-BDP 800 micrograms day-1 (116 patients) or CFC-BDP 1500 micrograms day-1 (117 patients). The mean change from oral steroid treatment in morning PEF with HFA-BDP was equivalent to that seen with CFC-BDP at all time intervals. Changes in other measures of pulmonary function, asthma symptom scores and beta-agonist use were equivalent in the two treatment groups throughout the 12 week treatment period. The safety profile of HFA-BDP compared favourably with that of CFC-BDP with no unexpected adverse events reported. Fewer patients on HFA-BDP than on CFC-BDP had plasma cortisol levels below the normal reference range after 12 weeks of therapy (5.1% vs. 17.3%, respectively). In conclusion, HFA-BDP extrafine aerosol was found to provide equivalent control of moderately severe asthma to CFC-BDP at

  7. Watershed scale spatial variability in dissolved and total organic and inorganic carbon in contrasting UK catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumberland, S.; Baker, A.; Hudson, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    ) Recent investigations into carbon fluxes in British rivers have focused on long term increases in DOC in rural and predominantly upland catchments. Our results suggest that research is needed into understanding long term variations in inorganic carbon concentration, as well as total (organic and inorganic) carbon fluxes from British rivers, to obtain total carbon loads. In particular, we provide evidence that DIC concentrations may be greater in urbanized catchments compared to equivalent non-urban catchments, with the implication that increasing urbanization in the future will see increases in riverine DIC and a decrease in the strength of any DOC DIC anti correlation. Further studies of urban catchment DIC sources, within stream processing, long term trends, and potential ecological impacts, are required.

  8. Black carbon aerosol variations over Patiala city, Punjab, India—A study during agriculture crop residue burning period using ground measurements and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Badarinath, K. V. S.; Sharma, Anu Rani; Mahalakshmi, D. V.; Singh, Darshan; Prasad, V. Krishna

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, we have analyzed the variations in black carbon (BC) aerosol mass concentration over Patiala city, Punjab, India, during October/November-2008 associated with agriculture crop residue burning activities. BC mass concentration, observed to be very high (above 20 μg m-3) on certain days during November-2008, was closely associated with intensive agriculture crop residue burning practices over the region. Higher values (>1.0) of ground-measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) together with increase (>1.2) in angstrom exponent (α) values suggested dominance of fine mode aerosols over the region. Satellite observations clearly define the fire spot areas and the enhanced aerosol burden over the region. BC absorption coefficient calculated from seven channels aethalometer exhibits a pronounced diurnal variation with higher values during early morning and evening hours and lower during noon and early afternoon associated with biomass-burning activities and boundary-layer dynamics over the region.

  9. Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations Amplify Alternaria alternata Sporulation and Total Antigen Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Julie; O’Neill, Nichole R.; Rogers, Christine A.; Muilenberg, Michael L.; Ziska, Lewis H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the effect of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on pollen production has been established in some plant species, impacts on fungal sporulation and antigen production have not been elucidated. Objective Our purpose was to examine the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the quantity and quality of fungal spores produced on timothy (Phleum pratense) leaves. Methods Timothy plants were grown at four CO2 concentrations (300, 400, 500, and 600 μmol/mol). Leaves were used as growth substrate for Alternaria alternata and Cladosporium phlei. The spore abundance produced by both fungi, as well as the size (microscopy) and antigenic protein content (ELISA) of A. alternata, were quantified. Results Leaf carbon-to-nitrogen ratio was greater at 500 and 600 μmol/mol, and leaf biomass was greater at 600 μmol/mol than at the lower CO2 concentrations. Leaf carbon-to-nitrogen ratio was positively correlated with A. alternata spore production per gram of leaf but negatively correlated with antigenic protein content per spore. At 500 and 600 μmol/mol CO2 concentrations, A. alternata produced nearly three times the number of spores and more than twice the total antigenic protein per plant than at lower concentrations. C. phlei spore production was positively correlated with leaf carbon-to-nitrogen ratio, but overall spore production was much lower than in A. alternata, and total per-plant production did not vary among CO2 concentrations. Conclusions Elevated CO2 concentrations often increase plant leaf biomass and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Here we demonstrate for the first time that these leaf changes are associated with increased spore production by A. alternata, a ubiquitous allergenic fungus. This response may contribute to the increasing prevalence of allergies and asthma. PMID:20462828

  10. Correlating benzene, total hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions from wood-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, A.J.; Grande, D.E.; Berens, J.R.; Piotrowski, J.

    1997-12-31

    Hazardous air pollutants, including benzene, are generated by the incomplete combustion of fuels. Organic compound emissions, which are generally products of incomplete combustion, are reduced by promoting high quality combustion, for example by controlling furnace exit temperatures and establishing minimum residence times. Monitoring carbon monoxide (CO) emissions is important since the amount of carbon monoxide emitted represents the quality of combustion which in turn represents the amount of hazardous air pollutants being generated. Total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions are also related to the quality of combustion. Recently the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) measured the benzene and total hydrocarbon emissions from two large industrial wood fired boilers. These boilers are located at Tenneco Packaging, a container board manufacturing facility in northern Wisconsin. Temperature, oxygen and carbon monoxide concentrations were sampled continuously by Tenneco Packaging`s emission monitoring system. The Department`s team used an organic vapor analyzer to continuously measure concentrations of total hydrocarbons (THC). The Department`s team also used a modified USEPA Method 18 sampling train to capture organic vapors for subsequent analysis by gas chromatography. The data show correlations between benzene and carbon monoxide, and between benzene and THC concentrations. The emissions sampling occurred both upstream of the particulate emissions control system as well as at the stack. The CO variations during actual boiler operation appeared to be well correlated with changes in boiler steam load. That is, increases in CO generally accompanied a change, either up or down, in boiler load. Lower concentrations of CO were associated with stable combustion, as indicated by periods of constant or nearly constant boiler load.

  11. Whole-ecosystem exposure to elevated carbon dioxide increases total ecosystem carbon and nitrogen in the Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. D.; Koyama, A.; Sonderegger, D.; Charlet, D.; Newingham, B. A.; Fenstermaker, L.; Ogle, K.; Smith, S. D.; Nowak, R.

    2011-12-01

    Arid ecosystems are predicted to be among the most responsive to global change and their response is globally significant considering their extensive spatial coverage. Although carbon cycling in arid lands is an important component of the global carbon budget, there is substantial uncertainty about the potential impacts of global change drivers, such as elevated CO2, on arid land carbon budgets. Studies suggest that productivity may be stimulated by elevated CO2 directly due to enhanced plant water-use efficiency. The indirect impacts of elevated CO2 on ecosystem productivity may also be constrained by available nitrogen, but little is known about how the importance of the nitrogen constraint or how the nitrogen cycle may be affected by global change drivers. Here we present the carbon and nitrogen mass budgets of a Mojave Desert ecosystem after ten years of exposure to elevated CO2. The Nevada Desert Free-Air Carbon Enrichment Facility (FACE) was established in 1997 to evaluate the response of an intact Mojave Desert ecosystem to elevated CO2. The CO2 concentration of the atmosphere in the elevated treatment was maintained at 513 uL/L until harvest in 2007. At harvest time, all aboveground biomass for 2/3 of each plot was harvested and soils and roots were removed down to 1 m depth and analyzed for total carbon and nitrogen. We observed significantly greater carbon (10,800 versus 9,200 kg C/ha, P=0.004) and nitrogen (1,400 versus 1,100 kg N/ha, P=0.002) in elevated compared to ambient CO2 treatments. Differences between treatments were due solely to greater C and N in soils across all cover types, and no differences were observed in above and belowground plant biomass. Companion research shows that increased soil C was from increased root exudation, microbial residues, and episodic increased litter input under elevated CO2, and these increased C inputs in turn stimulated production of inorganic nitrogen. Results from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility demonstrate

  12. Mexico city aerosol analysis during MILAGRO using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry at the urban supersite (T0) - Part 2: Analysis of the biomass burning contribution and the non-fossil carbon fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, A.C.; Wang, J.; de Foy, B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Wehrli, M. N.; Szidat, S.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Noda, J.; Wacker, L.; Volkamer, R.; Fortner, E.; Laskin, A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Molina, L. T.; Sosa, G.; Querol, X.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-16

    periods or a correlation with fire counts, FLEXPART-predicted FIFs or fire tracers, indicating that it is dominated by urban and/or regional sources and not by the fires near the MCMA. A new 14C aerosol dataset is presented. Both this new and a previously published dataset of 14C analysis suggest a similar BBOA contribution as the AMS and chemical mass balance (CMB), resulting in 13% higher non-fossil carbon during the high vs. low regional fire periods. The new dataset has {approx}15% more fossil carbon on average than the previously published one, and possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. During the low regional fire period, 38% of organic carbon (OC) and 28% total carbon (TC) are from non-fossil sources, suggesting the importance of urban and regional non-fossil carbon sources other than the fires, such as food cooking and regional biogenic SOA. The ambient BBOA/CH3CN ratio is much higher in the afternoon when the wildfires are most intense than during the rest of the day. Also, there are large differences in the contributions of the different OA components to the surface concentrations vs. the integrated column amounts. Both facts may explain some apparent disagreements between BB impacts estimated from afternoon aircraft flights vs. those from 24-h ground measurements. We show that by properly accounting for the non-BB sources of K, all of the BB PM estimates from MILAGRO can be reconciled. Overall, the fires from the region near the MCMA are estimated to contribute 15-23% of the OA and 7-9% of the fine PM at T0 during MILAGRO, and 2-3% of the fine PM as an annual average. The 2006 MCMA emissions inventory contains a substantially lower impact of the forest fire emissions, although a fraction of these emissions occur just outside of the MCMA inventory area.

  13. Mexico city aerosol analysis during MILAGRO using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry at the urban supersite (T0) - Part 2: Analysis of the biomass burning contribution and the non-fossil carbon fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, A. C.; de Foy, B.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Wehrli, M. N.; Szidat, S.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Noda, J.; Wacker, L.; Volkamer, R.; Fortner, E.; Wang, J.; Laskin, A.; Shutthanandan, V.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Paredes-Miranda, G.; Arnott, W. P.; Molina, L. T.; Sosa, G.; Querol, X.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    correlation with fire counts, FLEXPART-predicted FIFs or fire tracers, indicating that it is dominated by urban and/or regional sources and not by the fires near the MCMA. A new 14C aerosol dataset is presented. Both this new and a previously published dataset of 14C analysis suggest a similar BBOA contribution as the AMS and chemical mass balance (CMB), resulting in 13% higher non-fossil carbon during the high vs. low regional fire periods. The new dataset has ~15% more fossil carbon on average than the previously published one, and possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. During the low regional fire period, 38% of organic carbon (OC) and 28% total carbon (TC) are from non-fossil sources, suggesting the importance of urban and regional non-fossil carbon sources other than the fires, such as food cooking and regional biogenic SOA. The ambient BBOA/ΔCH3CN ratio is much higher in the afternoon when the wildfires are most intense than during the rest of the day. Also, there are large differences in the contributions of the different OA components to the surface concentrations vs. the integrated column amounts. Both facts may explain some apparent disagreements between BB impacts estimated from afternoon aircraft flights vs. those from 24-h ground measurements. We show that by properly accounting for the non-BB sources of K, all of the BB PM estimates from MILAGRO can be reconciled. Overall, the fires from the region near the MCMA are estimated to contribute 15-23% of the OA and 7-9% of the fine PM at T0 during MILAGRO, and 2-3% of the fine PM as an annual average. The 2006 MCMA emissions inventory contains a substantially lower impact of the forest fire emissions, although a fraction of these emissions occur just outside of the MCMA inventory area.

  14. Variation of total organic carbon content along the stream Harsit, Eastern Black Sea Basin, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Adem; Önsoy, Hizir; Akinci, Görkem; Bulut, Volkan Numan

    2011-11-01

    The TOC in surface waters and wastewater is an important analytical parameter describing the total content of all organic substances containing carbon. In practice, the TOC originated from natural and anthropogenic sources, and even if it is not directly responsible for dangers on human health, its determination is important for any kind of water that is used by public. The aim of this study was to determine variation of total organic carbon (TOC) and total carbon (TC) content in the stream Harsit, which courses in Eastern Black Sea Region, Turkey. Sampling was fortnightly conducted in each of the four seasons between March 2009 and February 2010. A total of 230 water samples were collected from ten sampling stations along the main branch of the stream Harsit with 143 km of length. Obtained TOC values were evaluated and used to classify the water quality of stream Harsit, according to the Turkish Water Pollution Control Regulation (TWPCR). The annual average TOC content values for the stations were found between 2.33 and 6.97 mg/L. It was seen that the TOC content have increased along the streamcourse of Harsit until the fourth station, where reaches its maximum value. The TOC content, then, has decreased and the minimum value was observed in the eighth station. The results showed that, except in winter season, maximum TOC content observed in many of the water samples were above Class I water standard indicated in TWPCR, which classifies the water resources according to the different area of uses. It was also found that TOC has a small contribution to TC and the highest TOC content in stream waters were measured in Gumushane station where direct discharge of city wastewaters and solid waste dumping to the stream were observed.

  15. The Isiokpo oil-pipeline leakage: total organic carbon/organic matter contents of affected soils.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Leo C; Adesiyan, Samuel O

    2005-08-01

    The environmental impact of the 1997 leakage of the high-pressure crude-oil pipeline at Isiokpo in the Niger Delta in the southeast of Nigeria was evaluated, with particular reference to total-organic-carbon (TOC) and total-organic-matter (TOM) contents of soils within the vicinity of the oil spillage. The soils, taken from depths of 0-15 cm (surface) and 15-30 cm (subsurface), were found to be more acidic (pH 4.2-5.6) than the unpolluted soils, with a high average moisture content of 6.8%. The extractable hydrocarbon content ranged from 2.71-3.48 mg/kg, indicating hydrocarbon contamination. However, contrary to expectation, the TOC and TOM contents of the polluted soils did not show any significant increase in concentration, supposedly due to natural rehabilitation of the affected mat layer of soils. Thus, notwithstanding the possible proliferation of heterotrophic organisms by the presence of the added petroleum hydrocarbons, environmental conditions such as weathering and climatic predispositions, as well as physico-chemical parameters such as pH, moisture content, and temperature must have encumbered the carbon-mineralizing capacity of the heterotrophs, thereby reducing the turnover of carbon and the decomposition of organic matter. The restrictions by high moisture content might not come directly from H(2)O itself, but are probably a consequence of hindered soil ventilation, which reduces O(2) supply and gaseous diffusion, conditions that might have been substantially aggravated by the added petroleum hydrocarbons.

  16. Removal of total organic carbon from sewage wastewater using poly(ethylenimine)-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Ramnath; Sanchez-Dominguez, Margarita; Matutes-Aquino, Jose A; Wennmalm, Stefan; Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna

    2014-02-01

    The increased levels of organic carbon in sewage wastewater during recent years impose a great challenge to the existing wastewater treatment process (WWTP). Technological innovations are therefore sought that can reduce the release of organic carbon into lakes and seas. In the present study, magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized, functionalized with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), and characterized using TEM (transmission electron microscopy), X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), CCS (confocal correlation spectroscopy), SICS (scattering interference correlation spectroscopy), magnetism studies, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and other contaminants using PEI-coated magnetic nanoparticles (PEI-NPs) was tested in wastewater obtained from the Hammarby Sjöstadsverk sewage plant, Sweden. The synthesized NPs were about 12 nm in diameter and showed a homogeneous particle size distribution in dispersion by TEM and CCS analyses, respectively. The magnetization curve reveals superparamagnetic behavior, and the NPs do not reach saturation because of surface anisotropy effects. A 50% reduction in TOC was obtained in 60 min when using 20 mg/L PEI-NPs in 0.5 L of wastewater. Along with TOC, other contaminants such as turbidity (89%), color (86%), total nitrogen (24%), and microbial content (90%) were also removed without significant changes in the mineral ion composition of wastewater. We conclude that the application of PEI-NPs has the potential to reduce the processing time, complexity, sludge production, and use of additional chemicals in the WWTP.

  17. Observation of low single scattering albedo of aerosols in the downwind of the East Asian desert and urban areas during the inflow of dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Pradeep; Takamura, Tamio; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed data observed at Fukue-jima (32.752°N, 128.682°E), the downwind of the East Asian desert and urban areas, during the spring season (March-April) of 2008-2011 aiming to understand the light-absorption capacity of Asian dust aerosols, which is a topic of controversy. We observed the decreasing tendency of single-scattering albedo (SSA) with the decrease of Ångström exponent and the increase of the ratio of dust aerosol optical thickness to total aerosol optical thickness, suggesting the important role of coarse-mode dust aerosols on observed low SSAs. The observational data further indicated that the low SSAs during strong dust events were less likely due to the effect of only strong light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, such as black carbon (BC), indicating the association of aerosol size distribution on modulating SSA. Such observational results are justified by numerical calculations showing that aerosol size distribution can be the key factor on modulating SSA even without any change in relative amount of light-absorbing aerosol as well as total aerosol optical thickness. Therefore, the observed low SSAs in the downwind regions during dust events could be partially due to the dominance of coarse-mode aerosols over fine-mode aerosols, which are usual in dust events, along with the effect of mixed light-absorbing aerosols. The study further suggests that such effect of aerosol size distribution on SSA can be one of the important reasons for the low SSAs of dust aerosols in the source region as reported by some studies, if coarse-mode aerosols dominate fine-mode aerosols.

  18. Discrepancy between Measured Serum Total Carbon Dioxide Content and Bicarbonate Concentration Calculated from Arterial Blood Gases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngho; Massie, Larry; Murata, Glen H

    2015-01-01

    Large differences between the concentrations of serum total carbon dioxide (TCO2) and blood gas bicarbonate (HCO3-) were observed in two consecutive simultaneously drawn sets of samples of serum and arterial blood gases in a patient who presented with severe carbon dioxide retention and profound acidemia. These differences could not be explained by the effect of the high partial pressure of carbon dioxide on TCO2, by variations in the dissociation constant of the carbonic acid/bicarbonate system or by faults caused by the algorithms of the blood gas apparatus that calculate HCO3-. A recalculation using the Henderson-Hasselbach equation revealed arterial blood gas HCO3- values close to the corresponding serum TCO2 values and clarified the diagnosis of the acid-base disorder, which had been placed in doubt by the large differences between the reported TCO2 and HCO3- values. Human error in the calculation of HCO3- was identified as the source of these differences. Recalculation of blood gas HCO3- should be the first step in identifying the source of large differences between serum TCO2 and blood gas HCO3-. PMID:26824002

  19. Constraints on total fire carbon emissions over maritime southeast Asia in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijnen, Vincent; Wooster, Martin; Kaiser, Johannes; Gaveau, David; Flemming, Johannes; Parrington, Mark; Inness, Antje; Murdiyarso, Daniel; Main, Bruce; van Weele, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    In September and October 2015 widespread forest and peatland fires burned over large parts of maritime southeast Asia, releasing large amounts of terrestrially-stored carbon into the atmosphere, primarily in the form of CO2, CO and CH4. Although seasonal fires are a frequent occurrence in the human modified landscapes in the south of Kalimantan, the southeastern provinces of Sumatra, and West Papua, the extent of the fires was greatly inflated by an extended period of drought associated with a particularly strong El Niño. In this contribution we provide an estimate of the total carbon released in these fires, making use of satellite observations of the fire's radiative power output as processed with GFAS, applied in the modelling and assimilation framework of the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS: http://atmosphere.copernicus.eu/). The carbon emissions are further constrained with MOPITT atmospheric CO column measurements as well as unique on-site plume measurements on Kalimantan. We estimate the carbon emissions from the 2015 fires to be the largest over the maritime southeast Asian region since those associated with the record breaking El Niño of 1997.

  20. An electrochemically based total organic carbon analyzer for planetary and terrestrial on-site applications.

    PubMed

    Stroble, Shannon T; Kounaves, Samuel P

    2012-07-17

    The search for organics on Mars began over 30 years ago. Neither the Viking GC/MS nor the more recent thermal and evolved gas analyzer (TEGA) aboard Phoenix were successful in detecting organics in the Martian soil. The most recent hypothesis for the "missing" Martian organics is thermal decomposition of organic material to CO(2) during the pyrolysis step of these analyses caused by the recently discovered ~1 wt % perchlorate in the Martian soil. To avoid this problem, an entirely different approach for the analysis of organics on Mars has been developed using an electrochemically based total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer, designated the Mars Organic Carbon Analyzer (MOCA). MOCA is designed as a small, lightweight, low-power instrument that electrochemically oxidizes organics to CO(2). The CO(2) is subsequently detected and quantified to determine the amount of TOC in the soil. MOCA can use the perchlorate present in the Martian soil to its advantage as an electrolyte, thus requiring only a buffered solution. Through a series of proof-of-concept tests, MOCA is shown to oxidize a variety of low-molecular-weight 1-5-carbon-containing molecules, including those containing carbon-13 using platinum and boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes at concentrations as low as 10 mg/kg. MOCA can also be used in terrestrial settings for on-site analysis of dissolved TOC. PMID:22725848

  1. Evaluation of Cloud and Aerosol Screening of Early Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) Observations with Collocated MODIS Cloud Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. R.; Taylor, T.; O'Dell, C.; Cronk, H. Q.; Partain, P.; Frankenberg, C.; Eldering, A.; Crisp, D.; Gunson, M. R.; Chang, A.; Fisher, B.; Osterman, G. B.; Pollock, H. R.; Savtchenko, A.; Rosenthal, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Effective cloud and aerosol screening is critically important to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), which can accurately determine column averaged dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2) only when scenes are sufficiently clear of scattering material. It is crucial to avoid sampling biases, in order to maintain a globally unbiased XCO2 record for inversion modeling to determine sources and sinks of carbon dioxide. This work presents analysis from the current operational B7 data set, which is identifying as clear approximately 20% of the order one million daily soundings. Of those soundings that are passed to the L2 retrieval algorithm, we find that almost 80% are yielding XCO2 estimates that converge. Two primary preprocessor algorithms are used to cloud screen the OCO-2 soundings. The A-Band Preprocessor (ABP) uses measurements in the Oxygen-A band near 0.76 microns (mm) to determine scenes with large photon path length modifications due to scattering by aerosol and clouds. The Iterative Maximum A-Posteriori (IMAP) Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm (IDP) computes ratios of retrieved CO2 (and H2O) in the 1.6mm (weak CO2) and 2.0mm (strong CO2) spectral bands to determine scenes with spectral differences, indicating contamination by scattering materials. We demonstrate that applying these two algorithms in tandem provides robust cloud screening of the OCO-2 data set. We compare the OCO-2 cloud screening results to collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud mask data and show that agreement between the two sensors is approximately 85-90%. A detailed statistical analysis is performed on a winter and spring 16-day repeat cycle for the nadir-land, glint-land and glint-water viewing geometries. No strong seasonal, spatial or footprint dependencies are found, although the agreement tends to be worse at high solar zenith angles and for snow and ice covered surfaces.

  2. Diel Variability of Total and Speciated Water-Soluble Inorganic Iodine in PM2.5 Aerosol at a Southern California Coastal Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pszenny, A.; Cotter, K.; Deegan, B.; Fischer, E.; Johnson, D.

    2007-12-01

    PM2.5 aerosol was sampled over nominal 3-hour intervals at the head of Zuma Beach in Malibu, California (USA) from 6 to 24 October 2006 by filtration at 1.13 m3 min-1 (STP) through 20 x 25 cm cellulose fiber (Whatman 41) filters that had been rinsed with deionized water (DIW). Exposed filters were removed from support cartridges as soon as possible after retrieval (usually within 2 hours), immediately sealed in clean polyethylene bags, and stored frozen until further processing. Following the field campaign one quarter of each filter was pressed into a pellet (2.0 cm diameter x 0.5 cm thick) and analyzed by neutron activation for total concentrations of I and several other trace elements. Our preliminary analyses indicate that sodium and iodine show a clear diel variation characterized by higher concentrations from late morning to early evening. We hypothesize that this diel variability is related to a persistent land/sea breeze circulation associated with the nearby coastal region. Other elements are indicative of variability in other aerosol sources such as soil dust (Al, Mn) and fossil fuel combustion (V). Second quarters are currently being extracted in DIW and analyzed in two ways: 1) for iodide by ion chromatography, and 2) for inorganic iodine in higher oxidation states (i.e., V to 0) by chemical reduction with ascorbic acid followed by determination of iodide by ion chromatography. Results of the trace element and speciated iodine analyses will be presented.

  3. Daily duration of vitamin D synthesis in human skin with relation to latitude, total ozone, altitude, ground cover, aerosols and cloud thickness.

    PubMed

    Engelsen, Ola; Brustad, Magritt; Aksnes, Lage; Lund, Eiliv

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin D production in human skin occurs only when incident UV radiation exceeds a certain threshold. From simulations of UV irradiances worldwide and throughout the year, we have studied the dependency of the extent and duration of cutaneous vitamin D production in terms of latitude, time, total ozone, clouds, aerosols, surface reflectivity and altitude. For clear atmospheric conditions, no cutaneous vitamin D production occurs at 51 degrees latitude and higher during some periods of the year. At 70 degrees latitude, vitamin D synthesis can be absent for 5 months. Clouds, aerosols and thick ozone events reduce the duration of vitamin D synthesis considerably, and can suppress vitamin D synthesis completely even at the equator. A web page allowing the computation of the duration of cutaneous vitamin D production worldwide throughout the year, for various atmospheric and surface conditions, is available on the Internet at http://zardoz.nilu.no/~olaeng/fastrt/VitD.html and http://zardoz.nilu.no/~olaeng/fastrt/VitD-ez.html. The computational methodology is outlined here.

  4. Characterizing the long-range transport of black carbon aerosols during Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sunita; Worden, John; Payra, Swagata; Jourdain, Line; Shim, Changsub

    2009-07-01

    A major aircraft experiment Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) mission over the NW Pacific in March-April 2001 was conducted to better understand how outflow from the Asian continent affects the composition of the global atmosphere. In this paper, a global climate model, GEOS-Chem is used to investigate possible black carbon aerosol contributions from TRACE-P region. Our result depicts that absorbing black carbon ("soot") significantly outflow during lifting to the free troposphere through warm conveyor belt and convection associated with this lifting. The GEOS-Chem simulation results show significant transport of black carbon aerosols from Asian regions to the Western Pacific region during the spring season. As estimated by GEOS-Chem simulations, approximately 25% of the black carbon concentrations over the western pacific originate from SE Asia in the spring.

  5. Nonlinear absorbance amplification using a diffuse reflectance cell: total organic carbon monitoring at 214 nm.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin-Huan; Shelor, C Phillip; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2015-01-20

    We present an absorption spectrometric method using a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) cell as a diffuse reflector. The system was used for monitoring ultrapure water. All compounds absorb to some degree at low UV wavelengths, and the absorption at 214 nm from a zinc lamp source was monitored using a charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. The absorption was interpreted in terms of total organic carbon present. The cell acts as a nonlinear absorbance amplifier, improving both the limit of detection (LOD) and the dynamic range. Potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) and glucose were used to evaluate the system and provided respective LODs of 46.5 ng/L and 4.5 mg/L as carbon. Although the physical path length was 25 cm, a maximum effective path length of 280 cm was observed at the lowest tested KHP concentrations. The system is intended for real-time monitoring of ultrapure water.

  6. Leaching behavior of total organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus from banana peel.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruixue; Sun, Shujuan; Xu, Yan; Qiu, Xiudong; Yang, Jili; Li, Xiaochen

    2015-01-01

    The leaching behavior of organic carbon and nutrient compounds from banana peel (BP) was investigated in batch assays with respect to particle size, contact time, pH value, and temperature. The granularity, contact time, pH, and temperature caused no significant effects on the leaching of total phosphorus (TP) from the BP. The maximum leached total nitrogen (TN) content was found at pH 5.0 and 90 minutes, while no significant effects were caused by the granularity and temperature. The maximum leached total organic carbon (TOC) content was found by using a powder of 40 mesh, 150 minutes and at pH 6.0, while the temperature had no effect on the TOC leaching. The proportions of the TN, TP, and TOC contents leached from the dried BP ranged from 33.6% to 40.9%, 60.4% to 72.7%, and 8.2% to 9.9%, respectively, indicating that BP could be a potential pollution source for surface and ground water if discharged as domestic waste or reutilized without pretreatment.

  7. A field measurement based scaling approach for quantification of major ions, organic carbon, and elemental carbon using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; Huang, X. H. Hilda; Griffith, Stephen M.; Li, Mei; Li, Lei; Zhou, Zhen; Wu, Cheng; Meng, Junwang; Chan, Chak K.; Louie, Peter K. K.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2016-10-01

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (SPAMS) have been increasingly deployed for aerosol studies in Asia. To date, SPAMS is most often used to provide unscaled information for both the size and chemical composition of individual particles. The instrument's lack of accuracy is primarily due to only a fraction of particles being detected after collection, and the instrumental sensitivity is un-calibrated for various chemical species in mixed ambient aerosols. During a campaign from January to April 2013 at a coastal site in Hong Kong, the particle number information and ion intensity of major PM2.5 components collected by SPAMS were scaled by comparing with collocated bulk PM2.5 measurements of hourly or higher resolution. The bulk measurements include PM2.5 mass by a SHARP 5030 Monitor, major ions by a Monitor for Aerosols & Gases in ambient Air (MARGA), and organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) by a Sunset OCEC analyzer. During the data processing, both transmission efficiency (scaled with the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) and hit efficiency conversion were considered, and component ion intensities quantified as peak area (PA) and relative peak area (RPA) were analyzed to track the performance. The comparison between the scaled particle mass assuming a particle density of 1.9 g cm-3 from SPAMS and PM2.5 concentration showed good correlation (R2 = 0.81) with a slope of 0.814 ± 0.004. Regression analysis results suggest an improved scaling performance using RPA compared with PA for most of the major PM2.5 components, including sulfate, nitrate, potassium, ammonium, OC and EC. Thus, we recommend preferentially scaling these species using the RPA. For periods of high K+ concentrations (>1.5 μg m-3), under-estimation of K+ by SPAMS was observed due to exceeding the dynamic range of the acquisition board. When only applying the hit efficiency correction, data for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium and OC were in reasonably good correlation (R2 = 0

  8. Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized by Aerosol CVD-Method Using Ferrocene and CuNi Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomakin, M. V.; Rybakov, M. S.; Kosobutsky, A. V.; Sevostyanov, O. G.; Shandakov, S. D.

    2015-09-01

    Properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) obtained by aerosol method of chemical deposition from the gas phase using ethanol, ferrocene, and CuNi nanoparticles are studied. The structural and vibrational characteristics of synthesis products are determined by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of the catalyst nanoparticles introduced into the reaction mixture on the properties of the synthesized SWCNTs is discussed.

  9. SECONDARY ORGANIC CARBON AND AEROSOL YIELDS FROM THE IRRADIATIONS OF ISOPRENE AND á-PINENE IN THE PRESENCE OF NO X AND SO 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was carried out to investigate the secondary organic carbon (SOC) yields of a-pinene and isoprene in the presence of SO2, which produces acidic aerosol in the system. Experiments were based on irradiating each hydrocarbon (HC) with NOx in ...

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and elemental carbon size distributions in Los Angeles aerosol: Source resolution and deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, C.

    1992-01-01

    Particulate PAH size distributions for several species were measured, for the first time, at three ambient sites in Los Angeles. PAH size distributions in automobile exhaust were also measured by sampling aerosol in two traffic tunnels. A low flow impactor was used to minimize sampling losses in combination with a high resolution analysis method based on HPLC and fluorescence detection. Elemental carbon size distributions were measured using a thermal evolution method and flame ionization detection. Differences in ambient concentrations and size distributions are explained in terms of location within the basin, seasonal variations and differences in species reactivity and volatility. Differences between tunnel and ambient size distributions are explained in terms of gas to particle conversion. A particle morphology study confirmed that the structure of primary particles (0.05-0.5 [mu]m) is similar to soot agglomerates while the accumulation mode particles (0.5-1 [mu]m) are coated with a film of liquid aerosol. PAH profiles were estimated for the automobile source from the traffic tunnel measurements. These were used along with a characteristic PAH profile for meat cooking to apportion ambient aerosol PAH concentrations at Pico Rivera and Upland. Model estimates show that the Pico Rivera site is dominated by auto emissions which account for over 90% of all PAH (exception chrysene, 75%) and CO concentrations measured at the site. 61% of the EC concentration was explained by the model and attributed to auto emissions. In contrast, meat cooking operations contributed significantly (20 to 80%) to the concentrations of 2-4 ring PAH measured at Upland. The 5-ring and larger PAH were attributed to auto emissions at this site as well.

  11. Measurement and analysis of black carbon aerosols over a tropical semi-arid station in Kadapa, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begam, G. Reshma; Vachaspati, C. Viswanath; Ahammed, Y. Nazeer; Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Babu, S. Suresh; Reddy, R. R.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents aerosol light absorption measurements using a seven channel Aethalometer (AE-42), recorded during September 2011-November 2012 over a tropical semi-arid site in Kadapa, India. The annual average black carbon (BC) mass concentration ([BC]) during the studied period was 2.20 ± 0.78 μg m- 3 which is in agreement when compared to other sites of similar environment. Strong seasonal variation was observed with high values during winter (2.87 ± 0.81 μg m- 3) and low in monsoon (1.30 ± 0.31 μg m- 3) season, which could be attributed to regional synoptic meteorology and long range transport. The two peaks in diurnal variations of [BC] were observed during morning between 06:00 and 08:00 h local time (LT) and in the evening around 19:00-21:00 h LT, with a minimum peak in the afternoon (~ 16:00 h LT) which is strongly correlated with the boundary layer dynamics, local and regional sources, and associated meteorology. The relationships between measured [BC] and the corresponding meteorological parameters for the studied region were also analysed. The estimated monthly mean spectral absorption coefficient values range from 0.56 to 1.15 with an average of 0.90, which suggests high BC/OC ratio and possible source of emission of aerosols is fossil fuel burning. Trajectory cluster analysis showed significant impact of long range transport of BC aerosols towards the observational site during the period of study.

  12. Effects of Aerosols over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Aerosols that contain black carbon both absorb and reflect incoming sunlight. Even as these atmospheric particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface, they increase the amount of solar energy absorbed in the atmosphere, thus making it possible to both cool the surface and warm the atmosphere. The images above show satellite measurements of the region studied during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)a vast region spanning the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (west to east), and from the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, across the Indian subcontinent to the southern Indian Ocean (north to south). The Aerosol images show aerosol pollution (brownish pixels) in the lower atmosphere over the INDOEX study area, as measured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra. These were composited from March 14-21, 2001. The Albedo images show the total solar energy reflected back to space, as measured by Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) aboard Terra. White pixels show high values, greens are intermediate values, and blues are low. Note how the aerosols, particularly over the ocean, increase the amount of energy reflected back to space. The Atmospheric Warming images show the absorption of the black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere. Where the aerosols are most dense, the absorption is highest. Red pixels indicate the highest levels of absorption, blues are low. The Surface Cooling images show that the aerosol particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface. Dark pixels show where the aerosols exert their cooling influence on the surface (or a high magnitude of negative radiative forcing). The bright pixels show where there is much less aerosol pollution and the incoming sunlight is relatively unaffected.

  13. Observed high-altitude warming and snow cover retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas enhanced by black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau provide the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In situ observations of snow cover extent since the 1960s suggest that the snowpack in the region have retreated significantly, accompanied by a surface warming of 2-2.5 °C observed over the peak altitudes (5000 m). Using a high-resolution ocean-atmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) aerosol forcing, we attribute the observed altitude dependence of the warming trends as well as the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover extent to various anthropogenic factors. At the Tibetan Plateau altitudes, the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration exerted a warming of 1.7 °C, BC 1.3 °C where as cooling aerosols cause about 0.7 °C cooling, bringing the net simulated warming consistent with the anomalously large observed warming. We therefore conclude that BC together with CO2 has contributed to the snow retreat trends. In particular, BC increase is the major factor in the strong elevation dependence of the observed surface warming. The atmospheric warming by BC as well as its surface darkening of snow is coupled with the positive snow albedo feedbacks to account for the disproportionately large role of BC in high-elevation regions. These findings reveal that BC impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections, in particular on high-altitude cryosphere.

  14. CMAQ model performance enhanced when in-cloud secondary organic aerosol is included: comparisons of organic carbon predictions with measurements.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Annmarie G; Turpin, Barbara I; Altieri, Katye E; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Mathur, Rohit; Roselle, Shawn J; Weber, Rodney J

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that low-volatility (particle-phase) organic compounds form in the atmosphere through aqueous phase reactions in clouds and aerosols. Although some models have begun including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through cloud processing, validation studies that compare predictions and measurements are needed. In this work, agreement between modeled organic carbon (OC) and aircraft measurements of water soluble OC improved for all 5 of the compared ICARTT NOAA-P3 flights during August when an in-cloud SOA (SOAcld) formation mechanism was added to CMAQ (a regional-scale atmospheric model). The improvement was most dramatic for the August 14th flight, a flight designed specifically to investigate clouds. During this flight the normalized mean bias for layer-averaged OC was reduced from -64 to -15% and correlation (r) improved from 0.5 to 0.6. Underpredictions of OC aloft by atmospheric models may be explained, in part, by this formation mechanism (SOAcld). OC formation aloft contributes to long-range pollution transport and has implications to radiative forcing, regional air quality and climate. PMID:19192800

  15. Black carbon mass size distributions of diesel exhaust and urban aerosols measured using differential mobility analyzer in tandem with Aethalometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhi; Chan, K. L.; Wong, K. C.; Westerdahl, Dane; Močnik, Griša; Zhou, J. H.; Cheung, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the dominant component of the light absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere, changing earth's radiative balance and affecting the climate. The mixing state and size distribution of atmospheric BC are largely unknown and cause uncertainties in climate models. BC is also a major component of diesel PM emissions, recently classified by World Health Organization as Category I Carcinogen, and has been associated with various adverse health effects. This study presents a novel approach of direct and continuous measurement of BC mass size distribution by tandem operation of a differential mobility spectrometry and a refined Aethalometer. A condensation particle counter was deployed in parallel with the Aethalometer to determine particle number size distribution. A wide range of particle sizes (20-600 nm) was investigated to determine the BC modal characteristics in fresh diesel engine tailpipe emissions and in different urban environments including a typical urban ambient site and a busy roadside. The study provided a demonstration of a new analytic approach and showed the evolution of BC mass size distribution from fresh engine emissions to the aged aerosols in the roadside and ambient environments. The results potentially can be used to refine the input for climate modeling to determine the effect of particle-bound atmospheric BC on the global climate.

  16. Size distribution and mixing state of refractory black carbon aerosol from a coastal city in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyuan; Huang, Ru-Jin; Zhao, Zhuzi; Zhang, Ningning; Wang, Yichen; Ni, Haiyan; Tie, Xuexi; Han, Yongming; Zhuang, Mazhan; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Jieru; Zhang, Xuemin; Dusek, Uli; Cao, Junji

    2016-11-01

    An intensive measurement campaign was conducted in the coastal city of Xiamen, China to investigate the size distribution and mixing state of the refractory black carbon (rBC) aerosol. The average rBC concentration for the campaign, measured with a ground-based single particle soot photometer (SP2), was 2.3 ± 1.7 μg m- 3, which accounted for ~ 4.3% of the PM2.5 mass. A potential source contribution function model indicated that emissions from coastal cities to the southwest were the most important source for the rBC and that shipping traffic was another likely source. The mass size distribution of the rBC particles was mono-modal and approximately lognormal, with a mass median diameter (MMD) of ~ 185 nm. Larger MMDs (~ 195 nm) occurred during polluted conditions compared with non-polluted times (~ 175 nm) due to stronger biomass burning activities during pollution episodes. Uncoated or thinly-coated particles composed the bulk of the rBC aerosol, and on average ~ 31% of the rBC was internally-mixed or thickly-coated. A positive matrix factorization model showed that organic materials were the predominant component of the rBC coatings and that mixing with nitrate increased during pollution conditions. These findings should lead to improvements in the parameterizations used to model the radiative effects of rBC.

  17. CMAQ model performance enhanced when in-cloud secondary organic aerosol is included: comparisons of organic carbon predictions with measurements.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Annmarie G; Turpin, Barbara I; Altieri, Katye E; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Mathur, Rohit; Roselle, Shawn J; Weber, Rodney J

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that low-volatility (particle-phase) organic compounds form in the atmosphere through aqueous phase reactions in clouds and aerosols. Although some models have begun including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through cloud processing, validation studies that compare predictions and measurements are needed. In this work, agreement between modeled organic carbon (OC) and aircraft measurements of water soluble OC improved for all 5 of the compared ICARTT NOAA-P3 flights during August when an in-cloud SOA (SOAcld) formation mechanism was added to CMAQ (a regional-scale atmospheric model). The improvement was most dramatic for the August 14th flight, a flight designed specifically to investigate clouds. During this flight the normalized mean bias for layer-averaged OC was reduced from -64 to -15% and correlation (r) improved from 0.5 to 0.6. Underpredictions of OC aloft by atmospheric models may be explained, in part, by this formation mechanism (SOAcld). OC formation aloft contributes to long-range pollution transport and has implications to radiative forcing, regional air quality and climate.

  18. RT-MATRIX: Measuring Total Organic Carbon by Photocatalytic Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inevitably accumulate in enclosed habitats such as the International Space Station and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as a result of human metabolism, material off-gassing, and leaking equipment. Some VOCs can negatively affect the quality of the crew's life, health, and performance; and consequently, the success of the mission. Air quality must be closely monitored to ensure a safe living and working environment. Currently, there is no reliable air quality monitoring system that meets NASA's stringent requirements for power, mass, volume, or performance. The ultimate objective of the project -- the development of a Real-Time, Miniaturized, Autonomous Total Risk Indicator System (RT.MATRIX).is to provide a portable, dual-function sensing system that simultaneously determines total organic carbon (TOC) and individual contaminants in air streams.

  19. Black and Brown Carbon in Biogenic Settings with Different Levels of Anthropogenic Influence, and The Effect of Semivolatile Compounds on Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglou, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Khlystov, A.; Saha, P.; Grieshop, A. P.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a major contributor to the global aerosol burden. Black carbon (BC) is a significant climate warming agent, while light-absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon, BrC), also impacts the atmospheric radiative balance. The optical properties of ambient aerosols can be affected by biogenic SOA through the lensing effect (coating of BC cores by semivolatile SOA), and by the potential formation of BrC from biogenic sources influenced by anthropogenic sources. To evaluate these effects, measurements of ambient aerosol optical properties and BC concentrations were made in rural Centreville, AL (a remote site with little anthropogenic influence) in summer 2013 and at Duke Forest in Chapel Hill, NC (a site close to high density vehicular traffic and industrial sources), during summer 2015. Photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX, 405 nm and 532 nm) measured particulate light absorption and a single particle soot photometer (SP2) measured BC mass at both locations. A seven-wavelength Aethalometer and a three-wavelength nephelometer were also deployed at Duke Forest. A third PAX (870 nm) was deployed at Centreville. For absorption and BC measurements, the sample was cycled between a dry line and a dry/thermally-denuded line. Hourly samples were collected with a steam jet aerosol collector (SJAC) for online (2013) and offline (2015) chemical composition analysis. BC concentrations were generally higher at Duke Forest compared to the rural Centreville site. The Aethalometer readings at Duke Forest show greater absorption at the shorter wavelengths (370 nm and 470 nm) than expected from the absorption at 880 nm coupled with an inverse wavelength dependence, suggesting the presence of brown carbon. This presentation will examine the evidence for brown carbon at the two sites, as well as the effect of non-BC coatings on BC light absorption (the lensing effect.)

  20. Nanostructured Graphene-Titanium Dioxide Composites Synthesized by a Single-Step Aerosol Process for Photoreduction of Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Ning; Jiang, Yi; Fortner, John D.; Biswas, Pratim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to hydrocarbons by using nanostructured materials activated by solar energy is a promising approach to recycling CO2 as a fuel feedstock. CO2 photoreduction, however, suffers from low efficiency mainly due to the inherent drawback of fast electron-hole recombination in photocatalysts. This work reports the synthesis of nanostructured composites of titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets via an aerosol approach. The role of synthesis temperature and TiO2/GO ratio in CO2 photoreduction was investigated. As-prepared nanocomposites demonstrated enhanced CO2 conversion performance as compared with that of pristine TiO2 NPs due to the strong electron trapping capability of the rGO nanosheets. PMID:25053879

  1. Mesoscale Distribution and Bacterial Cycling of Total Organic Carbon In North Atlantic Ocean (pomme Area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempere, R.; van Wambeke, F.; Sohrin, R.; Guigue, C.; Vernet, M.; Lefevre, D.; Bianchi, M.

    Seawater samples were collected during September-October 2000 and January- February 2001 in North Eastern Atlantic Ocean in the framework of the French pro- gram SPommeS. They were studied for total organic carbon (TOC) and semi-labile ´ (sl-TOC) by using high combustion technique (HTC). Over 0-600 m, integrated TOC averaged 379.4 s´ 14.6 g C m-2, in September-October and 381.9 s´ 20.1 g C m-2 in January. These results showed that there is little variation of TOC stock in the water column despite we observed different vertical variations of TOC concentrations be- tween the two seasons. For the winter period, we also estimated labile-TOC (l-TOC), as well as bacterial carbon demand and bacterial growth efficiencies through bacterial production measurements and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) biodegradation exper- iments. Here, we discuss about the lability of TOC in relation to the bacterioplankton utilization.

  2. Continuous flame aerosol synthesis of carbon-coated nano-LiFePO(4) for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Waser, Oliver; Büchel, Robert; Hintennach, Andreas; Novák, Petr; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2011-10-01

    Core-shell, nano-sized LiFePO(4)-carbon particles were made in one step by scalable flame aerosol technology at 7 g/h. Core LiFePO(4) particles were made in an enclosed flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) unit and were coated in-situ downstream by auto thermal carbonization (pyrolysis) of swirl-fed C(2)H(2) in an O(2)-controlled atmosphere. The formation of acetylene carbon black (ACB) shell was investigated as a function of the process fuel-oxidant equivalence ratio (EQR). The core-shell morphology was obtained at slightly fuel-rich conditions (1.0carbon shell and core LiFePO(4) and even slight LiFePO(4) crystal growth but better electrochemical performance. The present carbon-coated LiFePO(4) showed superior cycle stability and higher rate capability than the benchmark, commercially available LiFePO(4). PMID:23407817

  3. Continuous flame aerosol synthesis of carbon-coated nano-LiFePO4 for Li-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Waser, Oliver; Büchel, Robert; Hintennach, Andreas; Novák, Petr; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell, nanosized LiFePO4-carbon particles were made in one step by scalable flame aerosol technology at 7 g/h. Core LiFePO4 particles were made in an enclosed flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) unit and were coated in-situ downstream by auto thermal carbonization (pyrolysis) of swirl-fed C2H2 in an O2-controlled atmosphere. The formation of acetylene carbon black (ACB) shell was investigated as a function of the proces