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Sample records for aerosol transport models

  1. URBAN AEROSOL TRANSFORMATION AND TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modules for secondary aerosol formation have been included in the urban scale K-theory aerosol model, AR0S0L. hese are: (1) An empirical first-order 502 conversion scheme due to Meaghers, termed EMM; (2) The lumped parameter kinetic model termed the Carbon Bond Mechanism, in the ...

  2. Parameterization of Aerosol Sinks in Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The modelers point of view is that the aerosol problem is one of sources, evolution, and sinks. Relative to evolution and sink processes, enormous attention is given to the problem of aerosols sources, whether inventory based (e.g., fossil fuel emissions) or dynamic (e.g., dust, sea salt, biomass burning). On the other hand, aerosol losses in models are a major factor in controlling the aerosol distribution and lifetime. Here we shine some light on how aerosol sinks are treated in modern chemical transport models. We discuss the mechanisms of dry and wet loss processes and the parameterizations for those processes in a single model (GEOS-5). We survey the literature of other modeling studies. We additionally compare the budgets of aerosol losses in several of the ICAP models.

  3. Modeling of aerosol transport as an aid to corrosivity assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, R.D.; Roberge, P.R.; Tullmin, M.A.

    1999-07-01

    In certain regimes of atmospheric corrosion, the corrosion rate is limited not by electrochemical reactions but by the rate of mass transfer of pollutants. In these cases, a mass transfer model that accounts for the transport of pollutants, such as a marine salt aerosol, provides a theoretical and predictive framework for assessing corrosivity severity. Such a model of the transport of a marine aerosol fairly near the ground and well within the planetary boundary layer was developed. The predicted aerosol concentration as a function of distance for 1500 m from a steady source was consistent with published data on steel corrosion and salinity rates near an ocean. Implications from the model regarding objects that are exposed to aerosol-containing wind include: (1) increasing wind speed increases the aerosol deposition rate and therefore the corrosion rate, (2) objects that are in the lee of prevailing winds from an aerosol source will corrode faster than objects on the windward side of an aerosol source, and (3) smaller objects can be expected to corrode faster because of a greater capture efficiency of salt aerosols.

  4. Informing Aerosol Transport Models With Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limbacher, J.; Patadia, F.; Petrenko, M.; Martin, M. Val; Chin, M.; Gaitley, B.; Garay, M.; Kalashnikova, O.; Nelson, D.; Scollo, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the aerosol products from the NASA Earth Observing System's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) mature, we are placing greater focus on ways of using the aerosol amount and type data products, and aerosol plume heights, to constrain aerosol transport models. We have demonstrated the ability to map aerosol air-mass-types regionally, and have identified product upgrades required to apply them globally, including the need for a quality flag indicating the aerosol type information content, that varies depending upon retrieval conditions. We have shown that MISR aerosol type can distinguish smoke from dust, volcanic ash from sulfate and water particles, and can identify qualitative differences in mixtures of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol components in urban settings. We demonstrated the use of stereo imaging to map smoke, dust, and volcanic effluent plume injection height, and the combination of MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depth maps to constrain wildfire smoke source strength. This talk will briefly highlight where we stand on these application, with emphasis on the steps we are taking toward applying the capabilities toward constraining aerosol transport models, planet-wide.

  5. Secondary organic aerosol in the global aerosol - chemical transport model Oslo CTM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Berntsen, T.; Myhre, G.; Isaksen, I. S. A.

    2007-11-01

    The global chemical transport model Oslo CTM2 has been extended to include the formation, transport and deposition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Precursor hydrocarbons which are oxidised to form condensible species include both biogenic species such as terpenes and isoprene, as well as species emitted predominantly by anthropogenic activities (toluene, m-xylene, methylbenzene and other aromatics). A model simulation for 2004 gives an annual global SOA production of approximately 55 Tg. Of this total, 2.5 Tg is found to consist of the oxidation products of anthropogenically emitted hydrocarbons, and about 15 Tg is formed by the oxidation products of isoprene. The global production of SOA is increased to about 69 Tg yr-1 by allowing semi-volatile species to partition to ammonium sulphate aerosol. This brings modelled organic aerosol values closer to those observed, however observations in Europe remain significantly underestimated. Allowing SOA to partition into ammonium sulphate aerosol increases the contribution of anthropogenic SOA from about 4.5% to 9.4% of the total production. Total modelled organic aerosol (OA) values are found to represent a lower fraction of the measured values in winter (when primary organic aerosol (POA) is the dominant OA component) than in summer, which may be an indication that estimates of POA emissions are too low. Additionally, for measurement stations where the summer OA values are higher than in winter, the model generally underestimates the increase in summertime OA. In order to correctly model the observed increase in OA in summer, additional SOA sources or formation mechanisms may be necessary. The importance of NO3 as an oxidant of SOA precursors is found to vary regionally, causing up to 50%-60% of the total amount of SOA near the surface in polluted regions and less than 25% in more remote areas, if the yield of condensible oxidation products for β-pinene is used for NO3 oxidation of all terpenes. Reducing the yield

  6. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  7. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies Among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Chu, Allen; Levy, Robert; Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yoram; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Eck, Tom; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, .biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERON" at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  8. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Kaufman, Yoram; chu, Allen; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  9. Modeling study on the transport of summer dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sato, Y.; Jia, R.; Xie, Y.; Huang, J.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-11-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is located at the juncture of several important natural and anthropogenic aerosol sources. Satellites have observed substantial dust and anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere during summer over the TP. These aerosols have distinct effects on the earth's energy balance, microphysical cloud properties, and precipitation rates. To investigate the transport of summer dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the TP, we combined the Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS) with a non-hydrostatic regional model (NHM). The model simulation shows heavily loaded dust aerosols over the northern slope and anthropogenic aerosols over the southern slope and the east of the TP. The dust aerosols are primarily mobilized around the Taklimakan Desert, where a portion of the aerosols are transported eastward due to the northwesterly current; simultaneously, a portion of the particles are transported southward when a second northwesterly current becomes northeasterly because of the topographic blocking of the northern slope of the TP. Because of the strong upward current, dust plumes can extend upward to approximately 7-8 km a.s.l. over the northern slope of the TP. When a dust event occurs, anthropogenic aerosols that entrained into the southwesterly current via the Indian summer monsoon are transported from India to the southern slope of the TP. Simultaneously, a large amount of anthropogenic aerosol is also transported from eastern China to the east of the TP by easterly winds. An investigation on the transport of dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the plateau may provide the basis for determining aerosol impacts on summer monsoons and climate systems.

  10. Modeling study on the transport of summer dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sato, Y.; Jia, R.; Xie, Y.; Huang, J.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-05-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is located at the juncture of several important natural and anthropogenic aerosol sources. Satellites have observed substantial dust and anthropogenic aerosols in the atmosphere during summer over the TP. These aerosols have distinct effects on the earth's energy balance, microphysical cloud properties, and precipitation rates. To investigate the transport of summer dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the TP, we combined the Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS) with a non-hydrostatic regional model (NHM). The model simulation shows heavily loaded dust aerosols over the northern slope and anthropogenic aerosols over the southern slope and to the east of the TP. The dust aerosols are primarily mobilized around the Taklimakan Desert, where a portion of the aerosols are transported eastward due to the northwesterly current; simultaneously, a portion of the particles are transported northward when a second northwesterly current becomes northeasterly because of the topographic blocking of the northern slope of the TP. Because of the strong upward current, dust plumes can extend upward to approximately 7-8 km a.s.l. over the northern slope of the TP. When a dust event occurs, anthropogenic aerosols that entrain into the southwesterly current via the Indian summer monsoon are transported from India to the southern slope of the TP. Simultaneously, a large amount of anthropogenic aerosols is also transported from eastern China to east of the TP by easterly winds. An investigation on the transport of dust and anthropogenic aerosols over the plateau may provide the basis for determining aerosol impacts on summer monsoons and climate systems.

  11. Modelling the optical properties of aerosols in a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    According to the IPCC fifth assessment report (2013), clouds and aerosols still contribute to the largest uncertainty when estimating and interpreting changes to the Earth's energy budget. Therefore, understanding the interaction between radiation and aerosols is both crucial for remote sensing observations and modelling the climate forcing arising from aerosols. Carbon particles are the largest contributor to the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, thereby enhancing the warming of the planet. Modelling the radiative properties of carbon particles is a hard task and involves many uncertainties arising from the difficulties of accounting for the morphologies and heterogeneous chemical composition of the particles. This study aims to compare two ways of modelling the optical properties of aerosols simulated by a chemical transport model. The first method models particle optical properties as homogeneous spheres and are externally mixed. This is a simple model that is particularly easy to use in data assimilation methods, since the optics model is linear. The second method involves a core-shell internal mixture of soot, where sulphate, nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, sea salt, and water are contained in the shell. However, by contrast to previously used core-shell models, only part of the carbon is concentrated in the core, while the remaining part is homogeneously mixed with the shell. The chemical transport model (CTM) simulations are done regionally over Europe with the Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry (MATCH) model, developed by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). The MATCH model was run with both an aerosol dynamics module, called SALSA, and with a regular "bulk" approach, i.e., a mass transport model without aerosol dynamics. Two events from 2007 are used in the analysis, one with high (22/12-2007) and one with low (22/6-2007) levels of elemental carbon (EC) over Europe. The results of the study help to assess the

  12. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of indoor aerosol transport

    SciTech Connect

    Konecni, S.; Whicker, J. J.; Martin, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    When a hazardous aerosol or gas is inadvertently or deliberately released in an occupied facility, the airborne material presents a hazard to people. Inadvertent accidents and exposures continue to occur in Los Alamos and other nuclear facilities despite state-of-art engineering and administrative controls, and heightened diligence. Despite the obvious need in occupational settings and for homeland defense, the body of research in hazardous aerosol dispersion and control in large, complex, ventilated enclosures is extremely limited. The science governing generation, transport, inhalation, and detection of airborne hazards is lacking and must be developed to where it can be used by engineers or safety professionals in the prediction of worker exposure, in the prevention of accidents, or in the mitigation of terrorist actions. In this study, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX5.4, and experiments were used to assess flow field characteristics, and to investigate aerosol release and transport in a large, ventilated workroom in a facility at Savannah River Site. Steady state CFD results illustrating a complex, ventilation-induced, flow field with vortices, velocity gradients, and quiet zones are presented, as are time-dependent CFD and experimental aerosol dispersion results. The comparison of response times between CFD and experimental results was favorable. It is believed that future applications of CFD and experiments can have a favorable impact on the design of ventilation (HVAC) systems and worker safety with consideration to facility costs. Ultimately, statistical methods will be used in conjunction with CFD calculations to determine the optimal number and location of detectors, as well as optimal egress routes in event of a release.

  13. Global transport of Asian dust revealed by NASA/CALIPSO and a global aerosol transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, K.; Yumimoto, K.; Uno, I.; Takemura, T.

    2009-12-01

    Trans-Pacific transport of mineral dust and air pollutants originating from Asia to North America is well known. Eguchi et al. (2009, ACP) pointed out that the Taklimakan Desert supplies mineral dust for upper troposphere and can play an important role in intercontinental-scale dust transport. Asian dust is also detected from ice cores on Greenland and French Alps. The effects of Asian dust on cloud systems and the associated radiative forcing can extend over the Northern Hemisphere. In this study, we report the detailed structure of Asian dust during the global transport using integrated analysis of observations by CALIOP on-boarded NASA/CALIPSO satellite and a glocal aerosol transport model. We used the CALIOP Level 1B data products (ver. 2.01), containing the total attenuated backscatter coefficients at 532/1064 nm and the volume depolarization ratio at 532 nm. Dust extinction coefficients are then derived from the Fernald’s inversion method by setting the lidar ratio to S1=50 sr. As for a global aerosol transport model, we used the Spectral Radiation Transport Model for the Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS; Takemura et al., 2005, JGR). We performed a sensitivity experiment that aims at an analysis specified for a single dust event originating from the Taklimakan. The simulation was performed over May 2007. A sever dust storm occurred on 8-9 May 2007 in Taklimakan Desert. Dust cloud emitted during this dust storm is uplifted to altitude of 8-10 km and starts the travel of full circuit around the globe. It has a meridional width of 100-200 km. About one tenth of the original uplifted dust mass (8.1 Gg) is encircling the globe taking about 2 weeks. Because of its high transport height, the dust cloud almost unaffected by wet removal so that the decay of its concentration level is small. Over the western North Pacific of 2nd circuit, the dust cloud pulls down to the lower troposphere by anticyclonic down draft, and finally it settles on North Pacific because of wet

  14. REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.; MCGRAW, R.; BENKOVITZ, C.M.; WRIGHT, D.L.

    2001-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

  15. Modelling of primary aerosols in the chemical transport model MOCAGE: development and evaluation of aerosol physical parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sič, B.; El Amraoui, L.; Marécal, V.; Josse, B.; Arteta, J.; Guth, J.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P. D.

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with recent improvements to the global chemical transport model of Météo-France MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle) that consists of updates to different aerosol parameterizations. MOCAGE only contains primary aerosol species: desert dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and also volcanic ash in the case of large volcanic eruptions. We introduced important changes to the aerosol parameterization concerning emissions, wet deposition and sedimentation. For the emissions, size distribution and wind calculations are modified for desert dust aerosols, and a surface sea temperature dependant source function is introduced for sea salt aerosols. Wet deposition is modified toward a more physically realistic representation by introducing re-evaporation of falling rain and snowfall scavenging and by changing the in-cloud scavenging scheme along with calculations of precipitation cloud cover and rain properties. The sedimentation scheme update includes changes regarding the stability and viscosity calculations. Independent data from satellites (MODIS, SEVIRI), the ground (AERONET, EMEP), and a model inter-comparison project (AeroCom) are compared with MOCAGE simulations and show that the introduced changes brought a significant improvement on aerosol representation, properties and global distribution. Emitted quantities of desert dust and sea salt, as well their lifetimes, moved closer towards values of AeroCom estimates and the multi-model average. When comparing the model simulations with MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) observations over the oceans, the updated model configuration shows a decrease in the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB; from 0.42 to 0.10) and a better correlation (from 0.06 to 0.32) in terms of the geographical distribution and the temporal variability. The updates corrected a strong positive MNMB in the sea salt representation at high latitudes (from 0.65 to 0.16), and a negative MNMB in the desert

  16. New Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Structure from Space using the NASA Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): Applications for Aerosol Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, E. J.; Spinhime, J.; Palm, S.; Hlavka, D.; Hart, W.; Ginoux, P.; Chin, M.; Colarco, P.

    2004-01-01

    In the past, satellite measurements of aerosols have only been possible using passive sensors. Analysis of passive satellite data has lead to an improved understanding of aerosol properties, spatial distribution, and their effect on the earth,s climate. However, direct measurement of aerosol vertical distribution has not been possible using only the passive data. Knowledge of aerosol vertical distribution is important to correctly assess the impact of aerosol absorption, for certain atmospheric correction procedures, and to help constrain height profiles in aerosol transport models. On January 12,2003 NASA launched the first satellite-based lidar, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), onboard the ICESat spacecraft. GLAS is both an altimeter and an atmospheric lidar, and obtains direct measurements of aerosol and cloud heights. Here we show an overview of GLAS, provide an update of its current status, and discuss how GLAS data will be useful for modeling efforts. In particular, a strategy of using GLAS to characterize the height profile of dust plumes over source regions will be presented, along with initial results. Such information can be used to validate and improve output from aerosol transport models. Aerosol height profile comparisons between GLAS and transport models will be shown for regions downwind of aerosol sources. We will also discuss the feasibility of assimilating GLAS profiles into the models in order to improve their output.

  17. New Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Structure from Space Using the NASA Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): Applications for Aerosol Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Ginoux, Paul; Colarco, Peter; Chin, Mian; Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Steven P.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William

    2003-01-01

    In the past, satellite measurements of aerosols have only been possible using passive sensors. Analysis of passive satellite data has lead to an improved understanding of aerosol properties, spatial distribution, and their effect on the earth s climate. However, direct measurement of aerosol vertical distribution has not been possible using only the passive data. Knowledge of aerosol vertical distribution is important to correctly assess the impact of aerosol absorption, for certain atmospheric correction procedures, and to help constrain height profiles in aerosol transport models. On January 12,2003 NASA launched the first satellite-based lidar, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), onboard the ICESat spacecraft. GLAS is both an altimeter and an atmospheric lidar, and obtains direct measurements of aerosol and cloud heights. Here we show an overview of GLAS, provide an update of its current status, and discuss how GUS data will be useful for modeling efforts. In particular, a strategy of using GLAS to characterize the height profile of dust plumes over source regions will be presented, along with initial results. Such information can be used to validate and improve output from aerosol transport models. Aerosol height profile comparisons between GLAS and transport models will be shown for regions downwind of aerosol sources. We will also discuss the feasibility of assimilating GLAS profiles into the models in order to improve their output,

  18. Global model simulations of the impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, Mattia; Hendricks, Johannes; Sausen, Robert

    2013-04-01

    The transport sector, including land transport, shipping and aviation, is one of the major sources of tropospheric aerosol. Land transport, in particular, is a relevant source of pollution in highly populated areas (e.g. megacities), with significant impacts on climate and health. Transport emissions are expected to grow in the near future, especially in the developing countries. In this work we use the EMAC-MADE global aerosol model to quantify the impact of transport emissions on global aerosol, for both present-day (2000) and future (2030) scenarios. Number emissions are also included in the model and derived from mass emissions under different assumptions on the size distribution of particles emitted by the three transport modes. Additional sensitivity experiments are performed to quantify the effects of the uncertainties behind such assumptions. The model simulations reveal that land transport is the most important source of black carbon pollution in the densely populated regions of Eastern U.S. and Europe. High particle concentrations are simulated for Southeast Asian areas, although pollution in this region is mostly due to non-transport sources. Shipping strongly contributes to aerosol sulphate concentrations along the most-traveled routes of the Northern Atlantic and Northern Pacific oceans, with significant impact along the coastlines and nearby major harbors and with large effects on cloud properties. The impacts on particle number concentrations are very sensitive to the assumptions on size distribution of emitted particles, with the largest uncertainties simulated for the land transport sector. The model results further reveal significant climate impacts of transport-induced particles.

  19. A Model for the Transport of Sea-Spray Aerosols in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzola, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Demoisson, A.

    2015-05-01

    We study the dynamics of sea-spray particles in the coastal region of La Reunion Island on the basis of numerical simulations using the transport aerosol model MACMod (Marine Aerosol Concentration Model) and a survey of the aerosol size distributions measured at four locations at two different heights in the north-west part of the island. This allows evaluation of the performance of our model in case of pure marine air masses with implementation of accurate boundary conditions. First of all, an estimate of the aerosol concentration at 10-m height at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain is obtained using a revisited version of the MEDEX (Mediterranean Extinction) model. Estimates of the vertical profile of aerosol concentrations are then provided using aerosol data obtained at two different heights at the upwind boundary of the calculation domain. A parametrization of the vertical profiles of aerosol concentrations for maritime environment is proposed. The results are then compared to the vertical profiles of 0.532 m aerosol particle extinction coefficient obtained from lidar data provided by the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and also to the data provided by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). This allows validation of the complete vertical profiles in the mixed layer and shows the validity of satellite data for determination of the vertical profiles. Two kinds of simulation were made: one without a particle advection flux at the upwind boundary of the numerical domain, whereas the second simulation was made with a particle advection flux. In the first case, the influence of the distance to the shoreline on the local sea-spray dynamics is investigated. In the second set of simulation, the particles issued from the local production in the surf zone near the shoreline are mixed with aerosols advected from the remote ocean. A good agreement between the model calculations using our boundary conditions and the data was found. The

  20. Observation operator for the assimilation of aerosol type resolving satellite measurements into a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroedter-Homscheidt, M.; Elbern, H.; Holzer-Popp, T.

    2010-11-01

    Modelling of aerosol particles with chemical transport models is still based mainly on static emission databases while episodic emissions cannot be treated sufficiently. To overcome this situation, a coupling of chemical mass concentration modelling with satellite-based measurements relying on physical and optical principles has been developed. This study deals with the observation operator for a component-wise assimilation of satellite measurements. It treats aerosol particles classified into water soluble, water insoluble, soot, sea salt and mineral dust containing aerosol particles in the atmospheric boundary layer as separately assimilated aerosol components. It builds on a mapping of aerosol classes used both in observation and model space taking their optical and chemical properties into account. Refractive indices for primary organic carbon particles, anthropogenic particles, and secondary organic species have been defined based on a literature review. Together with a treatment of different size distributions in observations and model state, this allows transforming the background from mass concentrations into aerosol optical depths. A two-dimensional, variational assimilation is applied for component-wise aerosol optical depths. Error covariance matrices are defined based on a validation against AERONET sun photometer measurements. Analysis fields are assessed threefold: (1) through validation against AERONET especially in Saharan dust outbreak situations, (2) through comparison with the British Black Smoke and Sulphur Dioxide Network for soot-containing particles, and (3) through comparison with measurements of the water soluble components SO4, NH4, and NO3 conducted by the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) network. Separately, for the water soluble, the soot and the mineral dust aerosol components a bias reduction and subsequent a root mean square error reduction is observed in the analysis for a test period from July to November 2003

  1. Observation operator for the assimilation of aerosol type resolving satellite measurements into a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroedter-Homscheidt, M.; Elbern, H.; Holzer-Popp, T.

    2010-06-01

    Modelling of aerosol particles with chemical transport models is still based mainly on static emission databases while episodic emissions can not be treated sufficiently. To overcome this situation, a coupling of chemical mass concentration modelling with satellite-based measurements relying on physical and optical principles has been developed. This study deals with the observation operator for a component-wise assimilation of satellite measurements. It treats aerosol particles classified into water soluble, water insoluble, soot, sea salt and mineral dust containing aerosol particles in the atmospheric boundary layer as separately assimilated aerosol components. It builds on a mapping of aerosol classes used both in observation and model space taking their optical and chemical properties into account. Refractive indices for primary organic carbon particles, anthropogenic particles, and secondary organic species have been defined based on a literature review. Together with a treatment of different size distributions in observations and model state, this allows transforming the background from mass concentrations into aerosol optical depths. A two-dimensional, variational assimilation is applied for component-wise aerosol optical depths. Error covariance matrices are defined based on a validation against AERONET sun photometer measurements. Analysis fields are assessed threefold: (1) through validation against AERONET especially in Saharan dust outbreak situations, (2) through comparison with the British Black Smoke and Sulphur Dioxide Network for soot-containing particles, and (3) through comparison with measurements of the water soluble components SO4, NH4, and NO3 conducted by the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) network. Separately, for the water soluble, the soot and the mineral dust aerosol components a bias reduction and subsequent a root mean square error reduction is observed in the analysis for a test period from July to November 2003

  2. Development of a Global Tropospheric Aerosol Chemical Transport Model MASINGAR and its Application to the Dust Storm Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T. Y.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a new three-dimensional aerosol chemical transport model coupled with the MRI/JMA98 GCM, named Model of Aerosol Species IN the Global AtmospheRe (MASINGAR), for the study of atmospheric aerosols and related trace species. MASINGAR treats four major aerosol species that include nss-sulfate, carbonaceous, mineral dust, and sea-salt aerosols. The model accounts for large-scale advective transport, subgrid-scale eddy diffusive and convective transport, surface emission and deposition, wet deposition, as well as chemical reactions. The advective transport is calculated using the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme. Parameterization of convective transport is based on the convective mass flux by Arakawa-Schubert scheme. The space and time resolution of the model are variable, with a standard resolution of T42 (2.8ox2.8o) and 30 levels (up to 0.8hPa). In addition, the model has a built-in four-dimensional data assimilation with assimilated meteorological field, which enables the model to perform a realistic simulation on a specific period and short-period forecast of aerosols. The model was applied to the numerical forecasting of dust storm in spring, 2002, when the first intensive observational period of Aeolian Dust Experiment on the Climatic impact (ADEC) project was conducted. The model simulation of mineral dust aerosol suggests that the synoptic scale aerosol events can be simulated by MASINGAR.

  3. On-line coupling of volcanic ash and aerosols transport with multiscale meteorological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Alejandro; Folch, Arnau; Jorba, Oriol

    2014-05-01

    Large explosive volcanic eruptions can inject significant amounts of tephra and aerosols (e.g. SO2) into the atmosphere inducing a multi-scale array of physical, chemical and biological feedbacks within the environment. Effective coupled Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models capable to forecast on-line the spatial and temporal distribution of volcanic ash and aerosols are necessary to assess the magnitude of these feedback effects. However, due to several limitations (users from different communities, operational constrains, computational power, etc.), tephra transport models and NWP models have evolved independently. Within the framework of NEMOH(an Initial Training Network of the European Commission FP7 Program), we aim to quantify the feedback effects of volcanic ash clouds and aerosols emitted during large-magnitude eruptions on regional meteorology. As a first step, we have focused on the differences between the off-line hypothesis, currently assumed by tephra transport models (e.g. FALL3D), and the on-line approach, where transport and sedimentation of volcanic ash is coupled on-line to the NMMB (Non-hydrostatic Multiscale Meteorological model on a B grid) meteorological model; the evolution of the WRF-NMME meteorological model. We compared the spatiotemporal transport of volcanic ash particles simulated with the on-line coupled FALL3D-NMMB/BSC-CTM model with those from the off-line FALL3D model, by using the 2011 Cordón-Caulle eruption as a test-case and validating results against satellite data. Additionally, this presentation introduces the forthcoming steps to implement a sulfate aerosol module within the chemical transport module of the FALL3D-NMMB/BSC-CTM model, in order to quantify the feedback effects on the atmospheric radiative budget, particularly during large-magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions. Keywords: volcanic ash, SO2, FALL3D, NMMB, meteorology, on-line coupling, NEMOH.

  4. Simulation of the recent evolution of stratospheric aerosols by the MOSTRA Simulation of the recent evolution of stratospheric aerosols by the MOSTRA microphysical/transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingen, Christine; Errera, Quentin; Vanhellemont, Filip; Fussen, Didier; Mateshvili, Nina; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Loodts, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    We present recent advances in the development of a microphysical/transport model for stratospheric aerosols, called MOdel for STRatospheric Aerosols (MOSTRA). MOSTRA is a 3D model describing the evolution in time and space of the stratospheric aerosol distribution described using a set of discrete size bins. The microphysical module used in this model makes use of the PSCBOX model developed by Larsen (2000). The transport module is based on the flux-form semi-Lagragian scheme by Lin and Rood (1996). The model structure will be presented with simulations of the evolution of the volcanic aerosol plume after recent volcanic eruptions. References: N. Larsen, Polar Stratospheric Clouds, Microphysical and optical models, Scientific Report 00-06, Danish Meteorological Institute, 2000 Lin, S.-J. Rood, R.B., Multidimensional Flux-Form Semi-Lagrangian Transport Schemes, Monthly Weather Review, 124, 2046-2070, 1996.

  5. Coupling aerosol optics to the chemical transport model MATCH (v5.5.0) and aerosol dynamics module SALSA (v1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modelling aerosol optical properties is a notoriously difficult task due to the particles' complex morphologies and compositions. Yet aerosols and their optical properties are important for Earth system modelling and remote sensing applications. Operational optics models often make drastic and non realistic approximations regarding morphological properties, which can introduce errors. In this study a new aerosol optics model is implemented, in which more realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon aerosols. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey shell" model. Simulated results of radiative fluxes, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent from the new optics model are compared with results from another model simulating particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. To gauge the impact on the optical properties from the new optics model, the known and important effects from using aerosol dynamics serves as a reference. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing states influences the optical properties to the same degree as aerosol dynamics. This is an important finding suggesting that over-simplified optics models coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors; this can strongly effect simulations of radiative fluxes in Earth-system models, and it can compromise the use of remote sensing observations of aerosols in model evaluations and chemical data assimilation.

  6. Coupling aerosol optics to the MATCH (v5.5.0) chemical transport model and the SALSA (v1) aerosol microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Emma; Kahnert, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A new aerosol-optics model is implemented in which realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon particles. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey-shell" model. Simulated results of aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical depth, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent, as well as radiative fluxes are computed with the new optics model and compared with results from an older optics-model version that treats all particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing state impacts the aerosol optical properties to a degree of the same order of magnitude as the effects of aerosol-microphysical processes. For instance, the aerosol optical depth computed for two cases in 2007 shows a relative difference between the two optics models that varies over the European region between -28 and 18 %, while the differences caused by the inclusion or omission of the aerosol-microphysical processes range from -50 to 37 %. This is an important finding, suggesting that a simple optics model coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors affecting radiative fluxes in chemistry-climate models, compromising comparisons of model results with remote sensing observations of aerosols, and impeding the assimilation of satellite products for aerosols into chemical-transport models.

  7. Trend of surface solar radiation over Asia simulated by aerosol transport-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, T.; Ohmura, A.

    2009-12-01

    Long-term records of surface radiation measurements indicate a decrease in the solar radiation between the 1950s and 1980s (“global dimming”), then its recovery afterward (“global brightening”) at many locations all over the globe [Wild, 2009]. On the other hand, the global brightening is delayed over the Asian region [Ohmura, 2009]. It is suggested that these trends of the global dimming and brightening are strongly related with a change in aerosol loading in the atmosphere which affect the climate change through the direct, semi-direct, and indirect effects. In this study, causes of the trend of the surface solar radiation over Asia during last several decades are analyzed with an aerosol transport-climate model, SPRINTARS. SPRINTARS is coupled with MIROC which is a general circulation model (GCM) developed by Center for Climate System Research (CCSR)/University of Tokyo, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), and Frontier Research Center for Global Change (FRCGC) [Takemura et al., 2000, 2002, 2005, 2009]. The horizontal and vertical resolutions are T106 (approximately 1.1° by 1.1°) and 56 layers, respectively. SPRINTARS includes the transport, radiation, cloud, and precipitation processes of all main tropospheric aerosols (black and organic carbons, sulfate, soil dust, and sea salt). The model treats not only the aerosol mass mixing ratios but also the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations as prognostic variables, and the nucleation processes of cloud droplets and ice crystals depend on the number concentrations of each aerosol species. Changes in the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations affect the cloud radiation and precipitation processes in the model. Historical emissions, that is consumption of fossil fuel and biofuel, biomass burning, aircraft emissions, and volcanic eruptions are prescribed from database provided by the Aerosol Model Intercomparison Project (AeroCom) and the latest IPCC inventories

  8. Transport of aerosols into the UTLS and their impact on the Asian monsoon region as seen in a global model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadnavis, S.; Semeniuk, K.; Pozzoli, L.; Schultz, M. G.; Ghude, S. D.; Das, S.; Kakatkar, R.

    2013-09-01

    An eight-member ensemble of ECHAM5-HAMMOZ simulations for a boreal summer season is analysed to study the transport of aerosols in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) during the Asian summer monsoon (ASM). The simulations show persistent maxima in black carbon, organic carbon, sulfate, and mineral dust aerosols within the anticyclone in the UTLS throughout the ASM (period from July to September), when convective activity over the Indian subcontinent is highest, indicating that boundary layer aerosol pollution is the source of this UTLS aerosol layer. The simulations identify deep convection and the associated heat-driven circulation over the southern flanks of the Himalayas as the dominant transport pathway of aerosols and water vapour into the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Comparison of model simulations with and without aerosols indicates that anthropogenic aerosols are central to the formation of this transport pathway. Aerosols act to increase cloud ice, water vapour, and temperature in the model UTLS. Evidence of ASM transport of aerosols into the stratosphere is also found, in agreement with aerosol extinction measurements from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II. As suggested by the observations, aerosols are transported into the Southern Hemisphere around the tropical tropopause by large-scale mixing processes. Aerosol-induced circulation changes also include a weakening of the main branch of the Hadley circulation and a reduction of monsoon precipitation over India.

  9. Correcting transport errors during advection of aerosol and cloud moment sequences in eulerian models

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw R.

    2012-03-01

    Moment methods are finding increasing usage for simulations of particle population balance in box models and in more complex flows including two-phase flows. These highly efficient methods have nevertheless had little impact to date for multi-moment representation of aerosols and clouds in atmospheric models. There are evidently two reasons for this: First, atmospheric models, especially if the goal is to simulate climate, tend to be extremely complex and take many man-years to develop. Thus there is considerable inertia to the implementation of novel approaches. Second, and more fundamental, the nonlinear transport algorithms designed to reduce numerical diffusion during advection of various species (tracers) from cell to cell, in the typically coarse grid arrays of these models, can and occasionally do fail to preserve correlations between the moments. Other correlated tracers such as isotopic abundances, composition of aerosol mixtures, hydrometeor phase, etc., are subject to this same fate. In the case of moments, this loss of correlation can and occasionally does give rise to unphysical moment sets. When this happens the simulation can come to a halt. Following a brief description and review of moment methods, the goal of this paper is to present two new approaches that both test moment sequences for validity and correct them when they fail. The new approaches work on individual grid cells without requiring stored information from previous time-steps or neighboring cells.

  10. High-speed civil transport impact: Role of sulfate, nitric acid trihydrate, and ice aerosols studied with a two-dimensional model including aerosol physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pitari, G.; Ricciardulli, L.; Visconti, G.; Rizi, V.

    1993-12-20

    The authors discuss a two-dimensional model used to study the atmospheric interactions of ozone with exhaust gases from high speed civil transport (HSCT) fleets. Their model encompases the stratosphere and troposphere, includes photochemical reactions as part of the sulfur cycle, and models sulfuric acid aerosols. The inclusion of heterogeneous chemistry effects tempers the impact of nitrogen oxide emissions from HSCT on ozone depletion, in support of previous work from other studies.

  11. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2015-02-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA (Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications) in the European-scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The modeled PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at four measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at northern and central European sites and accumulation-mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. The low nucleation rate coefficient used in this study is an important reason for the underestimation. On the other hand, the model performs well for particle mass (including secondary inorganic aerosol components), while elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation. Updating the biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation.

  12. The Explicit-Cloud Parameterized-Pollutant Hybrid Approach for Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Multiscale Modelling Framework Models: Tracer Transport Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2008-05-30

    All estimates of aerosol indirect effects on the global energy balance have either completely neglected the influence of aerosol on convective clouds or treated the influence in a highly parameterized manner. Embedding cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within each grid cell of a global model provides a multiscale modelling framework for treating both the influence of aerosols on convective as well as stratiform clouds and the influence of all clouds on the aerosol, but treating the interactions explicitly by simulating all aerosol processes in the CRM would be computationally prohibitive. An alternate approach is to use horizontal statistics (e.g., cloud mass flux, cloud fraction, and precipitation) from the CRM simulation to drive a single-column parameterization of cloud effects on the aerosol and then use the aerosol profile to simulate aerosol effects on clouds within the CRM. Here we test this concept for vertical transport by clouds, using a CRM with tracer transport simulated explicitly to serve as a benchmark. We show that this parameterization, driven by the CRM’s cloud mass fluxes, reproduces the tracer transport by the CRM significantly better than a single column model that uses a conventional convective cloud parameterization.

  13. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  14. Aerosol Retrieval from Dual-wavelength Polarization Lidar Measurements over Tropical Pacific Ocean and Validation of a Global Aerosol Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Matsui, I.; Shimizu, A.; Takemura, T.; Okamoto, H.

    2009-03-01

    Spatial distributions of water-soluble, sea-salt and dust aerosols over the Tropical Pacific Ocean were analyzed from shipborne, dual-wavelength polarization Mie-scattering lidar measurements. The shipborne measurements by the R/V MIRAI were conducted over the Tropical Pacific Ocean in 2001, 2004, and 2006. We used an algorithm to retrieve the extinction coefficients for water-soluble, sea-salt and dust particles from the three-channel lidar data, i.e., the return signals at wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm and the depolarization ratio at a wavelength of 532 nm. The results revealed that the water-soluble and sea-salt particles existed in the planetary boundary layer formed below about 1.5 km for all the observation periods. Dust particles were scarcely present for any observation periods. The optical thicknesses of water-soluble particles were relatively large over the Pacific Ocean between Japan and New Guinea and in the eastern Indian Ocean, indicating transport of pollutants from the land. Furthermore we evaluated the global aerosol transport model SPRTNTARS using the retrieved aerosol extinction coefficients and the observed lidar signals at wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm for the 2001 observation period. We found rough agreement for the general pattern of the three aerosol components. However, the model underestimated the extinction coefficients for water-soluble particles by about 75% (0.03 km-1 in extinction coefficient) on average for the observation period. In contrast, the model overestimated the extinction coefficients for sea-salt by about 200% on average for the observation period. However, the difference in the extinction coefficient itself for sea-salt is small, about 0.01 km-1. The lidar signals simulated from the model outputs for aerosol and clouds revealed underestimations of 37% (50%) at a wavelength of 532 nm (1064 nm) on average for the observation period.

  15. Top-Down Inversion of Aerosol Emissions through Adjoint Integration of Satellite Radiance and GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Henze, D. K.; Qu, W.; Kopacz, M.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of aerosol emissions from both natural and anthropogenic sources are needed to study the impacts of tropospheric aerosol on atmospheric composition, climate, and human health, but large uncertainties persist in quantifying the aerosol sources with the current bottom-up methods. This study presents a new top-down approach that spatially constrains the amount of aerosol emissions from satellite (MODIS) observed reflectance with the adjoint of a chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem). We apply this technique with a one-month case study (April 2008) over the East Asia. The bottom-up estimated sulfate-nitrate-ammonium precursors, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), ammonia (NH3), and nitrogen oxides (NOx), all from INTEX-B 2006 inventory, emissions of black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) from Bond-2007 inventory, and mineral dust simulated from DEAD dust mobilization scheme, are spatially optimized from the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint constrained by the aerosol optical depth (AOD) that are derived from MODIS reflectance with the GEOS-Chem aerosol single scattering properties. The adjoint inverse modeling for the study period yields notable decreases in anthropogenic aerosol emissions over China: 436 Gg (33.5%) for SO2, 378 Gg (34.5%) for NH3, 319 (18.8%) for NOx, 10 Gg (9.1%) for BC, and 30 Gg (15.0%) for OC. The total amount of the mineral dust emission is reduced by 56.4% from the DEAD mobilization module which simulates dust production of 19020 Gg. Sub-regional adjustments are significant and directions of changes are spatially different. The model simulation with optimized aerosol emissions shows much better agreement with independent observations from sun-spectrophotometer observed AOD from AERONET, MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) AOD, OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) NO2 and SO2 columns, and surface aerosol concentrations measured over both anthropogenic pollution and dust source regions. Assuming the used bottom-up anthropogenic

  16. A novel approach for the characterisation of transport and optical properties of aerosol particles near sources - Part II: Microphysics-chemistry-transport model development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdebenito B, Álvaro M.; Pal, Sandip; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Lammel, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    A new high-resolution microphysics-chemistry-transport model (LES-AOP) was developed and applied for the investigation of aerosol transformation and transport in the vicinity of a livestock facility in northern Germany (PLUS1 field campaign). The model is an extension of a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model. The PLUS1 field campaign included the first deployment of the new eye-safe scanning aerosol lidar system of the University of Hohenheim. In a combined approach, model and lidar results were used to characterise a faint aerosol source. The farm plume structure was investigated and the absolute value of its particle backscatter coefficient was determined. Aerosol optical properties were predicted on spatial and temporal resolutions below 100 m and 1 min, upon initialisation by measured meteorological and size-resolved particulate matter mass concentration and composition data. Faint aerosol plumes corresponding to a particle backscatter coefficient down to 10 -6 sr -1 m -1 were measured and realistically simulated. Budget-related quantities such as the emission flux and change of the particulate matter mass, were estimated from model results and ground measurements.

  17. Development of an aerosol-chemistry transport model coupled to non-hydrostatic icosahedral atmospheric model (NICAM) through applying a stretched grid system to regional simulations around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, D.; Nakajima, T.; Masaki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Air pollution has a great impact on both climate change and human health. One effective way to tackle with these issues is a use of atmospheric aerosol-chemistry models with high-resolution in a global scale. For this purpose, we have developed an aerosol-chemistry model based on a global cloud-resolving model (GCRM), Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM; Tomita and Satoh, Fluid. Dyn. Res. 2004; Satoh et al., J. Comput. Phys. 2008, PEPS, 2014) under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project. In the present study, we have simulated aerosols and tropospheric ozone over Japan by our aerosol-chemistry model "NICAM-Chem" with a stretched-grid system of approximately 10 km resolution, for saving the computer resources. The aerosol and chemistry modules are based on Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS; Takemura et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2005) and Chemical AGCM for Study of Atmospheric Environment and Radiative Forcing (CHASER; Sudo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2002). We found that our model can generally reproduce both aerosols and ozone, in terms of temporal variations (daily variations of aerosols and diurnal variations of ozone). Under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project, we also have used these results obtained by NICAM-Chem for the assessment of their impact on human health.

  18. Aerosol Transport Over Equatorial Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Tyson, P. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kinyua, A. M.; Piketh, S.; King, M.; Helas, G.

    1999-01-01

    Long-range and inter-hemispheric transport of atmospheric aerosols over equatorial Africa has received little attention so far. Most aerosol studies in the region have focussed on emissions from rain forest and savanna (both natural and biomass burning) and were carried out in the framework of programs such as DECAFE (Dynamique et Chimie Atmospherique en Foret Equatoriale) and FOS (Fires of Savanna). Considering the importance of this topic, aerosols samples were measured in different seasons at 4420 meters on Mt Kenya and on the equator. The study is based on continuous aerosol sampling on a two stage (fine and coarse) streaker sampler and elemental analysis by Particle Induced X-ray Emission. Continuous samples were collected for two seasons coinciding with late austral winter and early austral spring of 1997 and austral summer of 1998. Source area identification is by trajectory analysis and sources types by statistical techniques. Major meridional transports of material are observed with fine-fraction silicon (31 to 68 %) in aeolian dust and anthropogenic sulfur (9 to 18 %) being the major constituents of the total aerosol loading for the two seasons. Marine aerosol chlorine (4 to 6 %), potassium (3 to 5 %) and iron (1 to 2 %) make up the important components of the total material transport over Kenya. Minimum sulfur fluxes are associated with recirculation of sulfur-free air over equatorial Africa, while maximum sulfur concentrations are observed following passage over the industrial heartland of South Africa or transport over the Zambian/Congo Copperbelt. Chlorine is advected from the ocean and is accompanied by aeolian dust recirculating back to land from mid-oceanic regions. Biomass burning products are transported from the horn of Africa. Mineral dust from the Sahara is transported towards the Far East and then transported back within equatorial easterlies to Mt Kenya. This was observed during austral summer and coincided with the dying phase of 1997/98 El

  19. Sources, Transport, and Climate Impacts of Biomass Burning Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation, I will first talk about fundamentals of modeling of biomass burning emissions of aerosols, then show the results of GOCART model simulated biomass burning aerosols. I will compare the model results with observations of satellite and ground-based network in terms of total aerosol optical depth, aerosol absorption optical depth, and vertical distributions. Finally the long-range transport of biomass burning aerosols and the climate effects will be addressed. I will also discuss the uncertainties associated with modeling and observations of biomass burning aerosols

  20. First implementation of secondary inorganic aerosols in the MOCAGE version R2.15.0 chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guth, J.; Josse, B.; Marécal, V.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop a secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) module for the MOCAGE chemistry transport model developed at CNRM. The aim is to have a module suitable for running at different model resolutions and for operational applications with reasonable computing times. Based on the ISORROPIA II thermodynamic equilibrium module, the new version of the model is presented and evaluated at both the global and regional scales. The results show high concentrations of secondary inorganic aerosols in the most polluted regions: Europe, Asia and the eastern part of North America. Asia shows higher sulfate concentrations than other regions thanks to emission reductions in Europe and North America. Using two simulations, one with and the other without secondary inorganic aerosol formation, the global model outputs are compared to previous studies, to MODIS AOD retrievals, and also to in situ measurements from the HTAP database. The model shows a better agreement with MODIS AOD retrievals in all geographical regions after introducing the new SIA scheme. It also provides a good statistical agreement with in situ measurements of secondary inorganic aerosol composition: sulfate, nitrate and ammonium. In addition, the simulation with SIA generally gives a better agreement with observations for secondary inorganic aerosol precursors (nitric acid, sulfur dioxide, ammonia), in particular with a reduction of the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB). At the regional scale, over Europe, the model simulation with SIA is compared to the in situ measurements from the EMEP database and shows a good agreement with secondary inorganic aerosol composition. The results at the regional scale are consistent with those obtained from the global simulations. The AIRBASE database was used to compare the model to regulated air quality pollutants: particulate matter, ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations. Introduction of the SIA in MOCAGE provides a reduction in the PM2.5 MNMB of 0.44 on a

  1. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2014-05-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA in the European scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The model PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at five measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at Northern and Central European sites and accumulation mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. On the other hand the model performs well for particle mass, including secondary inorganic aerosol components. Elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, both in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation, and for nitrogen gas-particle partitioning. Updating the biogenic SOA scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation. An improved nitrogen partitioning model may also improve the description of condensational growth.

  2. Numerical modeling of species transport in turbulent flow and experimental study on aerosol sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

    Numerical simulations were performed to study the turbulent mixing of a scalar species in straight tube, single and double elbow flow configurations. Different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models were used to model the turbulence in the flow. Conventional and dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid scale models were used for the LES simulations. Wall functions were used to resolve the near wall boundary layer. These simulations were run with both two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometries. The velocity and tracer gas concentration Coefficient of Variations were compared with experimental results. The results from the LES simulations compared better with experimental results than the results from the RANS simulations. The level of mixing downstream of a S-shaped double elbow was higher than either the single elbow or the U-shaped double elbow due to the presence of counter rotating vortices. Penetration of neutralized and non-neutralized aerosol particles through three different types of tubing was studied. The tubing used included standard PVC pipes, aluminum conduit and flexible vacuum hose. Penetration through the aluminum conduit was unaffected by the presence or absence of charge neutralization, whereas particle penetrations through the PVC pipe and the flexible hosing were affected by the amount of particle charge. The electric field in a space enclosed by a solid conductor is zero. Therefore charged particles within the conducting aluminum conduit do not experience any force due to ambient electric fields, whereas the charged particles within the non-conducting PVC pipe and flexible hose experience forces due to the ambient electric fields. This increases the deposition of charged particles compared to neutralized particles within the 1.5" PVC tube and 1.5" flexible hose. Deposition 2001a (McFarland et al. 2001) software was used to predict the penetration through transport lines. The prediction from the software compared

  3. Aerosol Types using Passive Remote Sensing: Global Distribution, Consistency Check, Total-Column Investigation and Translation into Composition Derived from Climate and Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Dawson, K. W.; Johnson, M. S.; Burton, S. P.; Redemann, J.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Butler, C. F.; Holben, B. N.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Froyd, K. D.; Dibb, J. E.; Shingler, T.; Sorooshian, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    To improve the predictions of aerosol composition in chemical transport models (CTMs) and global climate models (GCMs), we have developed an aerosol classification algorithm (called Specified Clustering and Mahalanobis Classification, SCMC) that assigns an aerosol type to multi-parameter retrievals by spaceborne, airborne or ground based passive remote sensing instruments [Russell et al., 2014]. The aerosol types identified by our scheme are pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke and pure marine. We apply the SCMC method to two different total-column datasets of aerosol optical properties: inversions from the ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and retrievals from the space-borne POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances) instrument. The POLDER retrievals that we use differ from the standard POLDER retrievals [Deuzé et al., 2001] as they make full use of multi-angle, multispectral polarimetric data [Hasekamp et al., 2011]. We analyze agreement in the aerosol types inferred from both AERONET and POLDER globally. Then, we investigate how our total-column "effective" SCMC aerosol types relate to different aerosol types within the column (i.e. either a mixture of different types within one layer in the vertical or the stacking of different aerosol types within the vertical column). For that, we compare AERONET-SCMC aerosol types to collocated NASA LaRC HSRL vertically resolved aerosol types [Burton et al., 2012] during the SEAC4RS and DISCOVER-AQ airborne field experiments, mostly over Texas in Aug-Sept 2013. Finally, in order to evaluate the GEOS-Chem CTM aerosol types, we translate each of our SCMC aerosol type into a unique distribution of GEOS-Chem aerosol composition (e.g. biomass burning, dust, sulfate, sea salt). We bridge the gap between remote sensing and model-inferred aerosol types by using multiple years of collocated AERONET

  4. Global aerosol modeling with the online NMMB/BSC Chemical Transport Model: sensitivity to fire injection height prescription and secondary organic aerosol schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, Michele; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Soares, Joana; Obiso, Vincenzo; Janjic, Zavisa; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    We develop and evaluate a fully online-coupled model simulating the life-cycle of the most relevant global aerosols (i.e. mineral dust, sea-salt, black carbon, primary and secondary organic aerosols, and sulfate) and their feedbacks upon atmospheric chemistry and radiative balance. Following the capabilities of its meteorological core, the model has been designed to simulate both global and regional scales with unvaried parameterizations: this allows detailed investigation on the aerosol processes bridging the gap between global and regional models. Since the strong uncertainties affecting aerosol models are often unresponsive to model complexity, we choose to introduce complexity only when it clearly improves results and leads to a better understanding of the simulated aerosol processes. We test two important sources of uncertainty - the fires injection height and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production - by comparing a baseline simulation with experiments using more advanced approaches. First, injection heights prescribed by Dentener et al. (2006, ACP) are compared with climatological injection heights derived from satellite measurements and produced through the Integrated Monitoring and Modeling System For Wildland Fires (IS4FIRES). Also global patterns of SOA produced by the yield conversion of terpenes as prescribed by Dentener et al. (2006, ACP) are compared with those simulated by the two-product approach of Tsigaridis et al. (2003, ACP). We evaluate our simulations using a variety of observations and measurement techniques. Additionally, we discuss our results in comparison to other global models within AEROCOM and ACCMIP.

  5. Development and validation of a size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme for application in aerosol transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A.; Zhang, L.

    2010-12-01

    A size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme is developed for inclusion in large-scale air quality and climate models where the size distribution and fate of atmospheric aerosols is of concern. The "resistance" structure is similar to what is proposed by Zhang et al. (2001), while a new "surface" deposition velocity (or surface resistance) is derived by simplification of a one-dimensional aerosol transport model (Petroff et al., 2008b, 2009). Compared to Zhang et al.'s model, the present model accounts for the leaf size, shape and area index as well as the height of the vegetation canopy. Consequently, it is more sensitive to the change of land covers, particularly in the accumulation mode (0.1-1 micron). A drift velocity is included to account for the phoretic effects related to temperature and humidity gradients close to liquid and solid water surfaces. An extended comparison of this model with experimental evidence is performed over typical land covers such as bare ground, grass, coniferous forest, liquid and solid water surfaces and highlights its adequate prediction. The predictions of the present model differ from Zhang et al.'s model in the fine mode, where the latter tends to over-estimate in a significant way the particle deposition, as measured by various investigators or predicted by the present model. The present development is thought to be useful to modellers of the atmospheric aerosol who need an adequate parameterization of aerosol dry removal to the earth surface, described here by 26 land covers. An open source code is available in Fortran90.

  6. Climatology of the aerosol optical depth by components from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and chemistry transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Huikyo; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Braverman, Amy; Garay, Michael J.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2016-06-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Joint Aerosol (JOINT_AS) Level 3 product has provided a global, descriptive summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol type information for each month over 16+ years since March 2000. Using Version 1 of JOINT_AS, which is based on the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol product, this study analyzes, for the first time, characteristics of observed and simulated distributions of AOD for three broad classes of aerosols: spherical nonabsorbing, spherical absorbing, and nonspherical - near or downwind of their major source regions. The statistical moments (means, standard deviations, and skewnesses) and distributions of AOD by components derived from the JOINT_AS are compared with results from two chemistry transport models (CTMs), the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) and SPectral RadIatioN-TrAnSport (SPRINTARS). Overall, the AOD distributions retrieved from MISR and modeled by GOCART and SPRINTARS agree with each other in a qualitative sense. Marginal distributions of AOD for each aerosol type in both MISR and models show considerable high positive skewness, which indicates the importance of including extreme AOD events when comparing satellite retrievals with models. The MISR JOINT_AS product will greatly facilitate comparisons between satellite observations and model simulations of aerosols by type.

  7. Influence of anthropogenic aerosol on cloud optical depth and albedo shown by satellite measurements and chemical transport modeling

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stephen E.; Harshvardhan; Benkovitz, Carmen M.

    2002-01-01

    The Twomey effect of enhanced cloud droplet concentration, optical depth, and albedo caused by anthropogenic aerosols is thought to contribute substantially to radiative forcing of climate change over the industrial period. However, present model-based estimates of this indirect forcing are highly uncertain. Satellite-based measurements would provide global or near-global coverage of this effect, but previous efforts to identify and quantify enhancement of cloud albedo caused by anthropogenic aerosols in satellite observations have been limited, largely because of strong dependence of albedo on cloud liquid water path (LWP), which is inherently highly variable. Here we examine satellite-derived cloud radiative properties over two 1-week episodes for which a chemical transport and transformation model indicates substantial influx of sulfate aerosol from industrial regions of Europe or North America to remote areas of the North Atlantic. Despite absence of discernible dependence of optical depth or albedo on modeled sulfate loading, examination of the dependence of these quantities on LWP readily permits detection and quantification of increases correlated with sulfate loading, which are otherwise masked by variability of LWP, demonstrating brightening of clouds because of the Twomey effect on a synoptic scale. Median cloud-top spherical albedo was enhanced over these episodes, relative to the unperturbed base case for the same LWP distribution, by 0.02 to 0.15. PMID:11854481

  8. Evaluation of the performance of four chemical transport models in predicting the aerosol chemical composition in Europe in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Marje; Sofiev, Mikhail; Tsyro, Svetlana; Hendriks, Carlijn; Semeena, Valiyaveetil; Vazhappilly Francis, Xavier; Butler, Tim; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Friedrich, Rainer; Hendricks, Johannes; Kong, Xin; Lawrence, Mark; Righi, Mattia; Samaras, Zissis; Sausen, Robert; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Sokhi, Ranjeet

    2016-05-01

    Four regional chemistry transport models were applied to simulate the concentration and composition of particulate matter (PM) in Europe for 2005 with horizontal resolution ~ 20 km. The modelled concentrations were compared with the measurements of PM chemical composition by the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) monitoring network. All models systematically underestimated PM10 and PM2.5 by 10-60 %, depending on the model and the season of the year, when the calculated dry PM mass was compared with the measurements. The average water content at laboratory conditions was estimated between 5 and 20 % for PM2.5 and between 10 and 25 % for PM10. For majority of the PM chemical components, the relative underestimation was smaller than it was for total PM, exceptions being the carbonaceous particles and mineral dust. Some species, such as sea salt and NO3-, were overpredicted by the models. There were notable differences between the models' predictions of the seasonal variations of PM, mainly attributable to different treatments or omission of some source categories and aerosol processes. Benzo(a)pyrene concentrations were overestimated by all the models over the whole year. The study stresses the importance of improving the models' skill in simulating mineral dust and carbonaceous compounds, necessity for high-quality emissions from wildland fires, as well as the need for an explicit consideration of aerosol water content in model-measurement comparison.

  9. Mesoscale and synoptic scale transport of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of mesoscale and synoptic-scale (macroscale) aerosol transport as observed in recent air pollution field studies. Examples of mesoscale transport systems are discussed, including urban plumes, sea breezes, the mountain-valley wind cycle, and the urban-heat-island circulation. The synoptic-scale systems considered are migrating high- and low-pressure systems. Documented cases are reviewed of aerosol transport in the various mesoscale systems, aerosol accumulation and transport in high-pressure systems, and acid precipitation in low-pressure systems. The characteristics of the transported aerosols are identified, along with the chemical species that occur primarily in aerosols in the accumulation mode (particle diameters of 0.1-3 microns). It is shown that aerosol particles in the accumulation mode are the most important in terms of synoptic-scale and mesoscale transport and that such particles are primarily responsible for visible haze.

  10. MELCOR aerosol transport module modification for NSSR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, B.J.; Hagrman, D.L.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes modifications of the MELCOR computer code aerosol transport module that will increase the accuracy of calculations for safety analysis of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The modifications generalize aerosol deposition models to consider gases other than air, add specialized models for aerosol deposition during high speed gas flows in ducts, and add models for resuspension of aerosols that are entrained in coolants when these coolants flash. Particular attention has been paid to the adhesion of aerosol particles once they are transported to duct walls. The results of calculations with the modified models have been successfully compared to data from Light Water Reactor Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) conducted by an international consortium at Hanford, Washington.

  11. Climatology of the aerosol optical depth by components from the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and a high-resolution chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Suzuki, K.; Braverman, A.; Garay, M. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Joint Aerosol (JOINT_AS) Level 3 product provides a global, descriptive summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol type information for each month between March 2000 and the present. Using Version 1 of JOINT_AS, which is based on the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol product, this study analyzes, for the first time, characteristics of observed and simulated distributions of AOD for three broad classes of aerosols: non-absorbing, absorbing, and non-spherical - near or downwind of their major source regions. The statistical moments (means, standard deviations, and skewnesses) and distributions of AOD by components derived from the JOINT_AS are compared with results from the SPectral RadIatioN-TrAnSport (SPRINTARS) model, a chemistry transport model (CTM) with very high spatial and temporal resolution. Overall, the AOD distributions of combined MISR aerosol types show good agreement with those from SPRINTARS. Marginal distributions of AOD for each aerosol type in both MISR and SPRINTARS show considerable high positive skewness, which indicates the importance of including extreme AOD events when comparing satellite retrievals with models. The MISR JOINT_AS product will greatly facilitate comparisons between satellite observations and model simulations of aerosols by type.

  12. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: A case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary C.; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, Manishkumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, Hugh; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, Glenn S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-01

    Wet scavenging of aerosols by continental deep convective clouds is studied for a supercell storm complex observed over Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry campaign. A new passive-tracer-based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize convective transport using vertical profiles of several passive trace gases. For this case, the analysis estimates that observed passive gas mixing ratios in the upper troposphere convective outflow consist of 47% low level (<3 km) inflow air, 32% entrained midtroposphere air, and 21% upper troposphere air. The new analysis framework is used to estimate aerosol wet scavenging efficiencies. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% for submicron aerosol mass. Organic, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols have similar wet scavenging efficiencies (80%-84%). The apparent scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol is much lower (57%), but the scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol plus nitric acid combined (84%) is close to the other species. Scavenging efficiencies for aerosol number are high for larger particles (84% for 0.15-2.5 µm diameter) but are lower for smaller particles (64% for 0.03-0.15 µm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Compared to the observation-based analysis, the standard model strongly underestimates aerosol scavenging efficiencies by 32% and 41% in absolute differences for submicron mass and number. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulated aerosol scavenging, producing wet scavenging efficiencies that are only 7% and 8% lower than observed efficiencies. This finding emphasizes the importance of secondary activation for aerosol wet removal in deep convective storms.

  13. Effects of agriculture crop residue burning on aerosol properties and long-range transport over northern India: A study using satellite data and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Safai, P. D.; Devara, P. C. S.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2016-09-01

    Agriculture crop residue burning in the tropics is a major source of the global atmospheric aerosols and monitoring their long-range transport is an important element in climate change studies. In this paper, we study the effects of agriculture crop residue burning on aerosol properties and long-range transport over northern India during a smoke event that occurred between 09 and 17 November 2013, with the help of satellite measurements and model simulation data. Satellite data observations on aerosol properties suggested transport of particles from agriculture crop residue burning in Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) over large regions. Additionally, ECMWF winds at 850 hPa have been used to trace the source, path and spatial extent of smoke events. Most of the smoke aerosols, during the study period, travel from a west-to-east pathway from the source-to-sink region. Furthermore, aerosol vertical profiles from CALIPSO show a layer of thick smoke extending from surface to an altitude of about 3 km. Smoke aerosols emitted from biomass burning activity from Punjab have been found to be a major contributor to the deterioration of local air quality over the NE Indian region due to their long range transport.

  14. Improving the representation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the MOZART-4 global chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, A.; Barsanti, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) module in the Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4) has been updated by replacing existing two-product (2p) parameters with those obtained from two-product volatility basis set (2p-VBS) fits, and by treating SOA formation from the following volatile organic compounds (VOCs): isoprene, propene and lumped alkenes. Strong seasonal and spatial variations in global SOA distributions were demonstrated, with significant differences in the predicted concentrations between the base-case and updated model versions. The base-case MOZART-4 predicted annual average SOA of 0.36 ± 0.50 μg m-3 in South America, 0.31 ± 0.38 μg m-3 in Indonesia, 0.09 ± 0.05 μg m-3 in the USA, and 0.12 ± 0.07 μg m-3 in Europe. Concentrations from the updated versions of the model showed a~marked increase in annual average SOA. Using the updated set of parameters alone (MZ4-v1) increased annual average SOA by ~8%, ~16%, ~56%, and ~108% from the base-case in South America, Indonesia, USA, and Europe, respectively. Treatment of additional parent VOCs (MZ4-v2) resulted in an even more dramatic increase of ~178-406% in annual average SOA for these regions over the base-case. The increases in predicted SOA concentrations further resulted in increases in corresponding SOA contributions to annual average total aerosol optical depth (AOD) by <1% for MZ4-v1 and ~1-6% for MZ4-v2. Estimated global SOA production was ~6.6 Tg yr-1 and ~19.1 Tg yr-1 with corresponding burdens of ~0.24 Tg and ~0.59 Tg using MZ4-v1 and MZ4-v2, respectively. The SOA budgets predicted in the current study fall well within reported ranges for similar modeling studies, 6.7 to 96 Tg yr-1, but are lower than recently reported observationally-constrained values, 50 to 380 Tg yr-1. With MZ4-v2, simulated SOA concentrations at the surface were also in reasonable agreement with comparable modeling studies and observations. Concentrations of estimated organic aerosol (OA

  15. Aerosol lenses propagation model.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grégoire; Roy, Gilles

    2011-09-01

    We propose a model based on the properties of cascading lenses modulation transfer function (MTF) to reproduce the irradiance of a screen illuminated through a dense aerosol cloud. In this model, the aerosol cloud is broken into multiple thin layers considered as individual lenses. The screen irradiance generated by these individual layers is equivalent to the point-spread function (PSF) of each aerosol lens. Taking the Fourier transform of the PSF as a MTF, we cascade the lenses MTF to find the cloud MTF. The screen irradiance is found with the Fourier transform of this MTF. We show the derivation of the model and we compare the results with the Undique Monte Carlo simulator for four aerosols at three optical depths. The model is in agreement with the Monte Carlo for all the cases tested. PMID:21886230

  16. IMPROVING CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODEL PREDICTIONS OF ORGANIC AEROSOL: MEASUREMENT AND SIMULATION OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM MOBILE AND NON-MOBILE SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic material contributes a significant fraction of PM2.5 mass across all regions of the United States, but state-of-the-art chemical transport models often substantially underpredict measured organic aerosol concentrations. Recent revisions to these models that...

  17. Seasonal variation of spherical aerosols distribution in East Asia based on ground and space Lidar observation and a Chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Y.; Yumimoto, K.; Uno, I.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Ohara, T.

    2009-12-01

    The anthropogenic aerosols largely impact on not only human health but also global climate system, therefore air pollution in East Asia due to a rapid economic growth has been recognized as a significant environmental problem. Several international field campaigns had been conducted to elucidate pollutant gases, aerosols characteristics and radiative forcing in East Asia. (e.g., ACE-Asia, TRACE-P, ADEC, EAREX 2005). However, these experiments were mainly conducted in springtime, therefore seasonal variation of aerosols distribution has not been clarified well yet. National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) has been constructing a lidar networks by automated dual wavelength / polarization Mie-lidar systems to observe the atmospheric environment in Asian region since 2001. Furthermore, from June 2006, space-borne backscatter lidar, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), onboard NASA/CALIPSO satellite, measures continuous global aerosol and cloud vertical distribution with very high spatial resolution. In this paper, we will show the seasonal variation of aerosols distribution in East Asia based on the NIES lidar network observation, Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling System (CMAQ) chemical transport model simulation and CALIOP observation over the period from July 2006 to December 2008. We found that CMAQ result explains the typical seasonal aerosol characteristics by lidar observations. For example, CMAQ and ground lidar showed a summertime peak of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at Beijing, an autumn AOT peak at Guangzhou and summertime AOT trough at Hedo, Okinawa. These characteristics are mainly controlled by seasonal variations of Asian summer/winter monsoon system. We also examined the CMAQ seasonal average aerosol extinction profiles with ground lidar and CALIOP extinction data. These comparisons clarified that the CMAQ reproduced the observed aerosol layer depth well in the downwind region. Ground lidar and CALIOP seasonal

  18. AERONET-based models of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2014-10-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol system. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of aerosol microphysical/optical parameters at 10 sites reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke observed at coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at the near-source sites. Differences between sites tend to be larger than variability at an individual site, although optical properties for some sites in different regions can be quite similar. Across the sites, typical midvisible SSA ranges from ~ 0.95-0.97 (sites dominated by boreal forest or peat burning, typically with larger fine-mode particle radius and spread) to ~ 0.88-0.9 (sites most influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning, typically smaller fine-mode particle radius and spread). The tropical forest site Alta Floresta (Brazil) is closer to this second category, although with intermediate SSA ~ 0.92. The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average midvisible SSA ~ 0.85. Sites with stronger absorption also tend to have stronger spectral gradients in SSA, becoming more absorbing at longer wavelengths. Microphysical/optical models are presented in detail so as to facilitate their use in radiative transfer calculations, including extension to UV (ultraviolet) wavelengths, and lidar ratios. One intended application is to serve as candidate optical models for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean often have insufficient absorption (i.e. too high SSA) to represent these biomass burning aerosols. The underestimates in satellite-retrieved AOD in smoke outflow regions, which have important consequences for applications of these satellite data sets, are consistent with

  19. Evaluation of liquid aerosol transport through porous media.

    PubMed

    Hall, R; Murdoch, L; Falta, R; Looney, B; Riha, B

    2016-07-01

    Application of remediation methods in contaminated vadose zones has been hindered by an inability to effectively distribute liquid- or solid-phase amendments. Injection as aerosols in a carrier gas could be a viable method for achieving useful distributions of amendments in unsaturated materials. The objectives of this work were to characterize radial transport of aerosols in unsaturated porous media, and to develop capabilities for predicting results of aerosol injection scenarios at the field-scale. Transport processes were investigated by conducting lab-scale injection experiments with radial flow geometry, and predictive capabilities were obtained by developing and validating a numerical model for simulating coupled aerosol transport, deposition, and multi-phase flow in porous media. Soybean oil was transported more than 2m through sand by injecting it as micron-scale aerosol droplets. Oil saturation in the sand increased with time to a maximum of 0.25, and decreased with radial distance in the experiments. The numerical analysis predicted the distribution of oil saturation with only minor calibration. The results indicated that evolution of oil saturation was controlled by aerosol deposition and subsequent flow of the liquid oil, and simulation requires including these two coupled processes. The calibrated model was used to evaluate field applications. The results suggest that amendments can be delivered to the vadose zone as aerosols, and that gas injection rate and aerosol particle size will be important controls on the process. PMID:27149690

  20. Evaluation of liquid aerosol transport through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R.; Murdoch, L.; Falta, R.; Looney, B.; Riha, B.

    2016-07-01

    Application of remediation methods in contaminated vadose zones has been hindered by an inability to effectively distribute liquid- or solid-phase amendments. Injection as aerosols in a carrier gas could be a viable method for achieving useful distributions of amendments in unsaturated materials. The objectives of this work were to characterize radial transport of aerosols in unsaturated porous media, and to develop capabilities for predicting results of aerosol injection scenarios at the field-scale. Transport processes were investigated by conducting lab-scale injection experiments with radial flow geometry, and predictive capabilities were obtained by developing and validating a numerical model for simulating coupled aerosol transport, deposition, and multi-phase flow in porous media. Soybean oil was transported more than 2 m through sand by injecting it as micron-scale aerosol droplets. Oil saturation in the sand increased with time to a maximum of 0.25, and decreased with radial distance in the experiments. The numerical analysis predicted the distribution of oil saturation with only minor calibration. The results indicated that evolution of oil saturation was controlled by aerosol deposition and subsequent flow of the liquid oil, and simulation requires including these two coupled processes. The calibrated model was used to evaluate field applications. The results suggest that amendments can be delivered to the vadose zone as aerosols, and that gas injection rate and aerosol particle size will be important controls on the process.

  1. A HTAP Multi-Model Assessment of the Influence of Regional Anthropogenic Emission Reductions on Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and the Role of Intercontinental Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; West, J. Jason; Atherton, Cynthia S.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bergmann, Dan; Bey, Isabelle; Bian, Huisheng; Diehl, Thomas; Forberth, Gerd; Hess, Peter; Schulz, Michael; Shindell, Drew; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tan, Qian

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we assess changes of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and direct radiative forcing (DRF) in response to the reduction of anthropogenic emissions in four major pollution regions in the northern hemisphere by using results from 10 global chemical transport models in the framework of the Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP). The multi-model results show that on average, a 20% reduction of anthropogenic emissions in North America, Europe, East Asia and South Asia lowers the global mean AOD and DRF by about 9%, 4%, and 10% for sulfate, organic matter, and black carbon aerosol, respectively. The impacts of the regional emission reductions on AOD and DRF extend well beyond the source regions because of intercontinental transport. On an annual basis, intercontinental transport accounts for 10-30% of the overall AOD and DRF in a receptor region, with domestic emissions accounting for the remainder, depending on regions and species. While South Asia is most influenced by import of sulfate aerosol from Europe, North America is most influenced by import of black carbon from East Asia. Results show a large spread among models, highlighting the need to improve aerosol processes in models and evaluate and constrain models with observations.

  2. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  3. Aerosol transport in the coastal environment and effects on extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, Elizabetta; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Berkowicz, Ruwim

    1998-11-01

    The aerosol in the coastal environment consists of a complicated mixture of anthropogenic and rural aerosol generated over land, and sea spray aerosol. Also, particles are generate dover sea by physical and chemical processes and the chemical composition may change due to condensation/evaporation of gaseous materials. The actual composition is a function of air mass history and fetch. At the land-sea transition the continental sources cease to exist, and thus the concentrations of land-based particles and gases will gradually decrease. At the same time, sea spray is generated due to the interaction between wind and waves in a developing wave field. A very intense source for sea spray aerosol is the surf zone. Consequently, the aerosol transported over sea in off-shore winds will abruptly charge at the land-sea transition and then gradually loose its continental character, while also the contribution of the surf-generated aerosol will decrease. The latter will be compensated, at least in part, by the production of sea spray aerosol. A Coastal Aerosol Transport model is being developed describing the evolution of the aerosol size distribution in an air column advected from the coast line over sea in off-shore winds. Both removal and production are taken into account. The result are applied to estimate the effect of the changing size distribution on the extinction coefficients. In this contribution, preliminary results are presented from a study of the effects of the surf-generated aerosol and the surface production.

  4. Role of anthropogenic aerosols in the20th century surface solar radiation, temperature, and meridional heat transport in the Max Planck Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It is still debated, to what degree anthropogenic aerosols were affected surface temperatures - especially over sea surfaces - through alteration of surface solar radiation (SSR). Previous work using mixed-layer ocean equilibria corroborated the relevance of anthropogenic aerosols for surface temperature response patterns obtained. Here we complement these studies by fully coupled simulations with the Max Planck Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) in its CMIP5 version. Experiments comprise preindustrial control and historical as in CMIP5, as well as transient experiments 1850 - 2000 with either anthropogenic aerosols or well-mixed greenhouse gases (WMGHG) kept at 1850 levels. With this suite of experiments, we analyse the impact of anthropogenic aerosols and WMGHG on the global energy balance and provide estimates of atmospheric and oceanic meridional heat transport changes in our modeling setup. We find that Global mean surface temperature responses to single forcings are additive. Furthermore, spatial surface temperature response patterns in the WMGHG only experiment are more strongly correlated with the historical experiment than the aerosol only case. We compare transient and equilibrium responses and discuss potential implications of not allowing for cloud-aerosol interactions in the transient modeling set-up.

  5. Dust aerosol characterization and transport features based on combined ground-based, satellite and model-simulated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study aerosol characteristics over an urban station in Western India, during a dust event that occurred between 19 and 26 March 2012, with the help of ground-based and satellite measurements and model simulation data. The aerosol parameters are found to change significantly during dust events and they suggest dominance of coarse mode aerosols. The fine mode fraction, size distribution and single scattering albedo reveal that dust (natural) aerosols dominate the anthropogenic aerosols over the study region. Ground-based measurements show drastic reduction in visibility on the dust-laden day (22 March 2012). Additionally, HYSPLIT model and satellite daily data have been used to trace the source, path and spatial extent of dust storm events. Most of the dust aerosols, during the study period, travel from west-to-east pathway from source-to-sink region. Furthermore, aerosol vertical profiles from CALIPSO and synoptic meteorological parameters from ECMWF re-analysis data reveal a layer of thick dust extending from surface to an altitude of about 4 km, and decrease in temperature and increase in specific humidity, respectively. The aerosol radiative forcing calculations indicate more cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere during dust event. The results of satellite observations are found to have good consistency with ground-based air quality measurements. Synthesis of satellite data integrated with ground-based observations, supplemented by model analysis, is found to be a promising technique for improved understanding of dust storm phenomenon and its impact on regional climate.

  6. Origin of surface and columnar Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) aerosols using source- and region-tagged emissions transport in a general circulation model - article no. D24211

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, S.; Venkataraman, C.; Boucher, O.

    2008-12-15

    We study the relative influence of aerosols emitted from different sectors and geographical regions on aerosol loading in south Asia. Sectors contributing aerosol emissions include biofuel and fossil fuel combustion, open biomass burning, and natural sources. Geographical regions include India, southeast Asia, east Asia, Africa-west Asia, and the rest of the world. Simulations of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), from January to March 1999, are made in the general circulation model of Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD-ZT GCM) with emissions tagged by sector and geographical region. Anthropogenic emissions dominate (54-88%) the predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) over all the receptor regions. Among the anthropogenic sectors, fossil fuel combustion has the largest overall influence on aerosol loading, primarily sulfate, with emissions from India (50-80%) and rest of the world significantly influencing surface concentrations and AOD. Biofuel combustion has a significant influence on both the surface and columnar black carbon (BC) in particular over the Indian subcontinent and Bay of Bengal with emissions largely from the Indian region (60-80%). Open biomass burning emissions influence organic matter (OM) significantly, and arise largely from Africa-west Asia. The emissions from Africa-west Asia affect the carbonaceous aerosols AOD in all receptor regions, with their largest influence (AOD-BC: 60%; and AOD-OM: 70%) over the Arabian Sea. Among Indian regions, the Indo-Gangetic Plain is the largest contributor to anthropogenic surface mass concentrations and AOD over the Bay of Bengal and India. Dust aerosols are contributed mainly through the long-range transport from Africa-west Asia over the receptor regions. Overall, the model estimates significant intercontinental incursion of aerosol, for example, BC, OM, and dust from Africa-west Asia and sulfate from distant regions (rest of the world) into the INDOEX domain.

  7. Sources, seasonality, and trends of Southeast US aerosol: an integrated analysis of surface, aircraft, and satellite observations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, P. S.; Jacob, D. J.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Zhu, L.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; Hair, J. W.; Fenn, M. A.; Butler, C. F.; Wagner, N. L.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Teng, A. P.; Millet, D. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.

    2015-07-01

    We use an ensemble of surface (EPA CSN, IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET), aircraft (SEAC4RS), and satellite (MODIS, MISR) observations over the Southeast US during the summer-fall of 2013 to better understand aerosol sources in the region and the relationship between surface particulate matter (PM) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM) with 25 km × 25 km resolution over North America is used as a common platform to interpret measurements of different aerosol variables made at different times and locations. Sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) are the main contributors to surface PM2.5 (mass concentration of PM finer than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) and AOD over the Southeast US. GEOS-Chem simulation of sulfate requires a missing oxidant, taken here to be stabilized Criegee intermediates, but which could alternatively reflect an unaccounted for heterogeneous process. Biogenic isoprene and monoterpenes account for 60 % of OA, anthropogenic sources for 30 %, and open fires for 10 %. 60 % of total aerosol mass is in the mixed layer below 1.5 km, 20 % in the cloud convective layer at 1.5-3 km, and 20 % in the free troposphere above 3 km. This vertical profile is well captured by GEOS-Chem, arguing against a high-altitude source of OA. The extent of sulfate neutralization (f = [NH4+]/(2[SO42-] + [NO3-])) is only 0.5-0.7 mol mol-1 in the observations, despite an excess of ammonia present, which could reflect suppression of ammonia uptake by organic aerosol. This would explain the long-term decline of ammonium aerosol in the Southeast US, paralleling that of sulfate. The vertical profile of aerosol extinction over the Southeast US follows closely that of aerosol mass. GEOS-Chem reproduces observed total column aerosol mass over the Southeast US within 6 %, column aerosol extinction within 16 %, and space-based AOD within 21 %. The large AOD decline observed from summer to winter is driven by sharp declines in both sulfate and OA from

  8. Sources, seasonality, and trends of southeast US aerosol: an integrated analysis of surface, aircraft, and satellite observations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, P. S.; Jacob, D. J.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Zhu, L.; Yantosca, R. M.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; Hair, J. W.; Fenn, M. A.; Butler, C. F.; Wagner, N. L.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Teng, A. P.; Millet, D. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.

    2015-09-01

    We use an ensemble of surface (EPA CSN, IMPROVE, SEARCH, AERONET), aircraft (SEAC4RS), and satellite (MODIS, MISR) observations over the southeast US during the summer-fall of 2013 to better understand aerosol sources in the region and the relationship between surface particulate matter (PM) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM) with 25 × 25 km2 resolution over North America is used as a common platform to interpret measurements of different aerosol variables made at different times and locations. Sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) are the main contributors to surface PM2.5 (mass concentration of PM finer than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter) and AOD over the southeast US. OA is simulated successfully with a simple parameterization, assuming irreversible uptake of low-volatility products of hydrocarbon oxidation. Biogenic isoprene and monoterpenes account for 60 % of OA, anthropogenic sources for 30 %, and open fires for 10 %. 60 % of total aerosol mass is in the mixed layer below 1.5 km, 25 % in the cloud convective layer at 1.5-3 km, and 15 % in the free troposphere above 3 km. This vertical profile is well captured by GEOS-Chem, arguing against a high-altitude source of OA. The extent of sulfate neutralization (f = [NH4+]/(2[SO42-] + [NO3-]) is only 0.5-0.7 mol mol-1 in the observations, despite an excess of ammonia present, which could reflect suppression of ammonia uptake by OA. This would explain the long-term decline of ammonium aerosol in the southeast US, paralleling that of sulfate. The vertical profile of aerosol extinction over the southeast US follows closely that of aerosol mass. GEOS-Chem reproduces observed total column aerosol mass over the southeast US within 6 %, column aerosol extinction within 16 %, and space-based AOD within 8-28 % (consistently biased low). The large AOD decline observed from summer to winter is driven by sharp declines in both sulfate and OA from August to October. These declines

  9. Improvement of aerosol optical properties modeling over Eastern Asia with MODIS AOD assimilation in a global non-hydrostatic icosahedral aerosol transport model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Tie; Schutgens, Nick A J; Goto, Daisuke; Shi, Guangyu; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2014-12-01

    A new global aerosol assimilation system adopting a more complex icosahedral grid configuration is developed. Sensitivity tests for the assimilation system are performed utilizing satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the results over Eastern Asia are analyzed. The assimilated results are validated through independent Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations. Our results reveal that the ensemble and local patch sizes have little effect on the assimilation performance, whereas the ensemble perturbation method has the largest effect. Assimilation leads to significantly positive effect on the simulated AOD field, improving agreement with all of the 12 AERONET sites over the Eastern Asia based on both the correlation coefficient and the root mean square difference (assimilation efficiency). Meanwhile, better agreement of the Ångström Exponent (AE) field is achieved for 8 of the 12 sites due to the assimilation of AOD only. PMID:25017412

  10. Stratospheric aerosol modification by supersonic transport operations with climate implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Pollack, J. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.; Hamill, P.

    1980-01-01

    The potential effects on stratospheric aerosois of supersonic transport emissions of sulfur dioxide gas and submicron size soot granules are estimated. An interactive particle-gas model of the stratospheric aerosol is used to compute particle changes due to exhaust emissions, and an accurate radiation transport model is used to compute the attendant surface temperature changes. It is shown that a fleet of several hundred supersonic aircraft, operating daily at 20 km, could produce about a 20% increase in the concentration of large particles in the stratosphere. Aerosol increases of this magnitude would reduce the global surface temperature by less than 0.01 K.

  11. Satellite Perspective of Aerosol Intercontinental Transport: From Qualitative Tracking to Quantitative Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chin, Mian; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of aerosol intercontinental transport (ICT) is both widespread and compelling. Model simulations suggest that ICT could significantly affect regional air quality and climate, but the broad inter-model spread of results underscores a need of constraining model simulations with measurements. Satellites have inherent advantages over in situ measurements to characterize aerosol ICT, because of their spatial and temporal coverage. Significant progress in satellite remote sensing of aerosol properties during the Earth Observing System (EOS) era offers opportunity to increase quantitative characterization and estimates of aerosol ICT, beyond the capability of pre-EOS era satellites that could only qualitatively track aerosol plumes. EOS satellites also observe emission strengths and injection heights of some aerosols, aerosol precursors, and aerosol-related gases, which can help characterize aerosol ICT. After an overview of these advances, we review how the current generation of satellite measurements have been used to (1) characterize the evolution of aerosol plumes (e.g., both horizontal and vertical transport, and properties) on an episodic basis, (2) understand the seasonal and inter-annual variations of aerosol ICT and their control factors, (3) estimate the export and import fluxes of aerosols, and (4) evaluate and constrain model simulations. Substantial effort is needed to further explore an integrated approach using measurements from on-orbit satellites (e.g., A-Train synergy) for observational characterization and model constraint of aerosol intercontinental transport and to develop advanced sensors for future missions.

  12. Sensitivity of aerosol properties to new particle formation mechanism and to primary emissions in a continental-scale chemical transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang,L.S.; Schwartz, S.E.; McGraw, R.; Lewis, E.R.

    2009-04-02

    Four theoretical formulations of new particle formation (NPF) and one empirical formulation are used to examine the sensitivity of observable aerosol properties to NPF formulation and to properties of emitted particles in a continental-scale model for the United States over a 1-month simulation (July 2004). For each formulation the dominant source of Aitken mode particles is NPF with only a minor contribution from primary emissions, whereas for the accumulation mode both emissions and transfer of particles from the Aitken mode are important. The dominant sink of Aitken mode number is coagulation, whereas the dominant sink of accumulation mode number is wet deposition (including cloud processing), with a minor contribution from coagulation. The aerosol mass concentration, which is primarily in the accumulation mode, is relatively insensitive to NPF formulation despite order-of-magnitude differences in the Aitken mode number concentration among the different parameterizations. The dominant sensitivity of accumulation mode number concentration is to the number of emitted particles (for constant mass emission rate). Comparison of modeled aerosol properties with aircraft measurements shows, as expected, better agreement in aerosol mass concentration than in aerosol number concentration for all NPF formulations considered. These comparisons yield instances of rather accurate simulations in the planetary boundary layer, with poor model performance in the free troposphere attributed mainly to lack of representation of biomass burning and/or to long-range transport of particles from outside the model domain. Agreement between model results and measurements is improved by using smaller grid cells (12 km versus 60 km).

  13. Intercontinental Transport of Aerosols: Implication for Regional Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ginoux, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol particles, also known as PM2.5 (particle diameter less than 2.5 microns) and PM10 (particle diameter less than 10 microns), is one of the key atmospheric components that determine ambient air quality. Current US air quality standards for PM10 (particles with diameter < 10 microns) and PM2.5 (particles with diameter 2.5 microns) are 50 pg/cu m and 15 pg/cu m, respectively. While local and regional emission sources are the main cause of air pollution problems, aerosols can be transported on a hemispheric or global scale. In this study, we use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to quantify contributions of long-range transport vs. local/regional pollution sources and from natural vs. anthropogenic sources to PM concentrations different regions. In particular, we estimate the hemispheric impact of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols and dust from major source areas on other regions in the world. The GOCART model results are compared with satellite remote sensing and ground-based network measurements of aerosol optical depth and concentrations.

  14. Hand calculations for transport of radioactive aerosols through sampling systems.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Mark; Thompson, Martha; Farfan, Eduardo; Hadlock, Dennis

    2014-05-01

    Workplace air monitoring programs for sampling radioactive aerosols in nuclear facilities sometimes must rely on sampling systems to move the air to a sample filter in a safe and convenient location. These systems may consist of probes, straight tubing, bends, contractions and other components. Evaluation of these systems for potential loss of radioactive aerosols is important because significant losses can occur. However, it can be very difficult to find fully described equations to model a system manually for a single particle size and even more difficult to evaluate total system efficiency for a polydispersed particle distribution. Some software methods are available, but they may not be directly applicable to the components being evaluated and they may not be completely documented or validated per current software quality assurance requirements. This paper offers a method to model radioactive aerosol transport in sampling systems that is transparent and easily updated with the most applicable models. Calculations are shown with the R Programming Language, but the method is adaptable to other scripting languages. The method has the advantage of transparency and easy verifiability. This paper shows how a set of equations from published aerosol science models may be applied to aspiration and transport efficiency of aerosols in common air sampling system components. An example application using R calculation scripts is demonstrated. The R scripts are provided as electronic attachments. PMID:24667389

  15. Photoacoustic study of airborne and model aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebić-Juretić, A.; Zetzsch, C.; Dóka, O.; Bicanic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Airborne particulates of either natural or anthropogenic origin constitute a significant portion of atmospheric pollution. Environmental xenobiotics, among which are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides, often adsorb to aerosols and as such are transported through the atmosphere with the physicochemical properties of the aerosols determining the lifetime of these organic compounds. As an example, the resistance of some PAHs against the photolysis is explained by the effect of the aerosol's "inner filter" that reduces the intensity of incident light reaching the mineral particles. On the other hand, some constituents of the aerosols can act as catalytic and/or stoichiometric reagents in atmospheric reactions on the solid surfaces. In the study described here the photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy in the UV-Vis was used to investigate natural and model aerosols. The PA spectra obtained from coal and wood ashes and of Saharan sand, all three representatives of airborne aerosols, provide the evidence for the existence of the "inner filter." Furthermore, valuable information about the different nature of the interaction between the model aerosols and adsorbed organics (e.g., PAH-pyranthrene and silica, alumina, and MgO) has been obtained. Finally, the outcome of the study conducted with powdered mixtures of chalk and black carbon suggests that the PA method is a candidate method for determination of carbon content in stack ashes.

  16. Simulations of Aerosol Microphysics in the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; Smith; Randles; daSilva

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol-cloud-chemistry interactions have potentially large but uncertain impacts on Earth's climate. One path to addressing these uncertainties is to construct models that incorporate various components of the Earth system and to test these models against data. To that end, we have previously incorporated the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module online in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model (GEOS-5). GEOS-5 provides a platform for Earth system modeling, incorporating atmospheric and ocean general circulation models, a land surface model, a data assimilation system, and treatments of atmospheric chemistry and hydrologic cycle. Including GOCART online in this framework has provided a path for interactive aerosol-climate studies; however, GOCART only tracks the mass of aerosols as external mixtures and does not include the detailed treatments of aerosol size distribution and composition (internal mixtures) needed for aerosol-cloud-chemistry-climate studies. To address that need we have incorporated the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) online in GEOS-5. CARMA is a sectional aerosol-cloud microphysical model, capable of treating both aerosol size and composition explicitly be resolving the aerosol distribution into a variable number of size and composition groupings. Here we present first simulations of dust, sea salt, and smoke aerosols in GEOS-5 as treated by CARMA. These simulations are compared to available aerosol satellite, ground, and aircraft data and as well compared to the simulated distributions in our current GOCART based system.

  17. Assessing Impact of Aerosol Intercontinental Transport on Regional Air Quality and Climate: What Satellites Can Help

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin

    2011-01-01

    Mounting evidence for intercontinental transport of aerosols suggests that aerosols from a region could significantly affect climate and air quality in downwind regions and continents. Current assessment of these impacts for the most part has been based on global model simulations that show large variability. The aerosol intercontinental transport and its influence on air quality and climate involve many processes at local, regional, and intercontinental scales. There is a pressing need to establish modeling systems that bridge the wide range of scales. The modeling systems need to be evaluated and constrained by observations, including satellite measurements. Columnar loadings of dust and combustion aerosols can be derived from the MODIS and MISR measurements of total aerosol optical depth and particle size and shape information. Characteristic transport heights of dust and combustion aerosols can be determined from the CALIPSO lidar and AIRS measurements. CALIPSO liar and OMI UV technique also have a unique capability of detecting aerosols above clouds, which could offer some insights into aerosol lofting processes and the importance of above-cloud transport pathway. In this presentation, I will discuss our efforts of integrating these satellite measurements and models to assess the significance of intercontinental transport of dust and combustion aerosols on regional air quality and climate.

  18. Unique DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles for studying aerosol transport

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harding, Ruth N.; Hara, Christine A.; Hall, Sara B.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Jones, A. Daniel; Day, James A.; Tur-Rojas, Vincent R.; Jorgensen, Trond; Herchert, Edwin; et al

    2016-03-22

    Data are presented for the first use of novel DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles that have been developed to track the fate of airborne contaminants in populated environments. Until DNATrax (DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol eXperiments) particles were developed, there was no way to rapidly validate air transport models with realistic particles in the respirable range of 1–10 μm in diameter. The DNATrax particles, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and tested with the assistance of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, are the first safe and effective materials for aerosol transport studies that are identified by DNA molecules. The usemore » of unique synthetic DNA barcodes overcomes the challenges of discerning the test material from pre-existing environmental or background contaminants (either naturally occurring or previously released). The DNATrax particle properties are demonstrated to have appropriate size range (approximately 1–4.5 μm in diameter) to accurately simulate bacterial spore transport. As a result, we describe details of the first field test of the DNATrax aerosol test particles in a large indoor facility.« less

  19. Modeling the Absorbing Aerosol Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce; Zhang, Sophia

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to model the absorbing aerosol index and improve the biomass carbon inventories by optimizing the difference between TOMS aerosol index (AI) and modeled AI with an inverse model. Two absorbing aerosol types are considered, including biomass carbon and mineral dust. A priori biomass carbon source was generated by Liousse et al [1996]. Mineral dust emission is parameterized according to surface wind and soil moisture using the method developed by Ginoux [2000]. In this initial study, the coupled CCM1 and GRANTOUR model was used to determine the aerosol spatial and temporal distribution. With modeled aerosol concentrations and optical properties, we calculate the radiance at the top of the atmosphere at 340 nm and 380 nm with a radiative transfer model. The contrast of radiance at these two wavelengths will be used to calculate AI. Then we compare the modeled AI with TOMS AI. This paper reports our initial modeling for AI and its comparison with TOMS Nimbus 7 AI. For our follow-on project we will model the global AI with aerosol spatial and temporal distribution recomputed from the IMPACT model and DAO GEOS-1 meteorology fields. Then we will build an inverse model, which applies a Bayesian inverse technique to optimize the agreement of between model and observational data. The inverse model will tune the biomass burning source strength to reduce the difference between modelled AI and TOMS AI. Further simulations with a posteriori biomass carbon sources from the inverse model will be carried out. Results will be compared to available observations such as surface concentration and aerosol optical depth.

  20. Simulating secondary organic aerosol in a 3-D Lagrangian chemistry transport model using the reduced Common Representative Intermediates mechanism (CRI v2-R5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utembe, S. R.; Cooke, M. C.; Archibald, A. T.; Shallcross, D. E.; Derwent, R. G.; Jenkin, M. E.

    2011-03-01

    A secondary organic aerosol (SOA) code, coupled to the reduced Common Representative Intermediates chemical mechanism (CRI v2-R5), has been used in the global 3-D chemistry-transport model, STOCHEM, to simulate the global distribution of organic aerosol (OA) mass loadings. The SOA code represents the gas-to-aerosol partitioning of products formed over several generations of oxidation of a variety of organic precursors emitted from anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources. The model also includes emissions of primary organic aerosol (POA), based on the AeroCom inventory and the Global Fire Emissions database (GFED). The calculated burdens for POA, 0.89 Tg, and SOA, 0.23 Tg, are well within the range of values that have been reported in previous modelling studies. The calculated SOA annual in-situ production of 22.5 Tg yr -1 also falls within the 8-110 Tg yr -1 range calculated by other models, but is somewhat lower than observationally-constrained top-down estimates which have been reported recently. The oxidation of biogenic precursors is found to account for about 90% of the global SOA burden, and this makes a substantial contribution to the highest annual mean surface OA concentrations (up to 8 μg m -3), which are simulated in tropical forested regions. Comparison of the simulated OA mass loadings with surface observations from a variety of locations indicate a good description of the OA distribution, but with an average underestimation of about a factor of 3. Sustained formation of SOA into the free troposphere is simulated, with important contributions from second and third-generation products of terpene oxidation in the upper troposphere. Comparison of the simulated OA mass loadings with vertical profiles from the ACE-Asia campaign indicates a very good description of the relative variation of OA with altitude, but with consistent underestimation of about a factor of 5. Although the absolute magnitude of the global source strength is underestimated

  1. Modelling of long-range transport of Southeast Asia biomass-burning aerosols to Taiwan and their radiative forcings over East Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chuan-Yao; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chen, Wei-Nei

    2014-10-12

    Biomass burning is a major source of aerosols and air pollutants during the springtime in Southeast Asia. At Lulin mountain background station (elevation 2862 m) in Taiwan, the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3) and particulate matter particles with diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), were measured around 150-250 ppb, 40-60 ppb, and 10-30μg/m3, respectively at spring time (February-April) during 2006 and 2009, which are about 2~3 times higher than those in other seasons. Observations and simulation results indicate that the higher concentrations during the spring time are clearly related to biomass burning plumes transported from the Indochina Peninsula of Southeast Asia. The spatial distribution of high aerosols optical depth (AOD) were identified by the satellite measurement and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) ground observation, and could be reasonably captured by the WRF-Chem model during the study period of 15-18 March, 2008. AOD reached as high as 0.8-1.0 in Indochina ranging from 10 to 22°N and 95 to 107°E. Organic carbon (OC) is a major contributor of AOD over Indochina according to simulation results. The contributor of AOD from black carbon (BC) is minor when compared with OC over the Indochina. However, the direct absorption radiative forcing of BC in the atmosphere could reach 35-50 W m-2, which is about 8-10 times higher than that of OC. The belt shape of radiation reduction at surface from Indochina to Taiwan could be as high 20-40 W m-2 during the study period. The implication of the radiative forcing from biomass burning aerosols and their impact on the regional climate in East Asia is our major concern.

  2. Aerosol Modeling for the Global Model Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an aerosol module to be used within the framework of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The model development work will be preformed jointly by the University of Michigan and AER, using existing aerosol models at the two institutions as starting points. The GMI aerosol model will be tested, evaluated against observations, and then applied to assessment of the effects of aircraft sulfur emissions as needed by the NASA Subsonic Assessment in 2001. The work includes the following tasks: 1. Implementation of the sulfur cycle within GMI, including sources, sinks, and aqueous conversion of sulfur. Aerosol modules will be added as they are developed and the GMI schedule permits. 2. Addition of aerosol types other than sulfate particles, including dust, soot, organic carbon, and black carbon. 3. Development of new and more efficient parameterizations for treating sulfate aerosol nucleation, condensation, and coagulation among different particle sizes and types.

  3. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this analysis, a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model is developed based on the nearly global SAGE 1 satellite observations in the non-volcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980. Zonally averaged profiles of the 1.0 micron aerosol extinction for the tropics and the mid- and high-altitudes for both hemispheres are obtained and presented in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. In addition, analytic expressions for these seasonal global zonal means, as well as the yearly global mean, are determined according to a third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set. This proposed background stratospheric aerosol model can be useful in modeling studies of stratospheric aerosols and for simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  4. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  5. Aerosol retrieval from two-wavelength backscatter and one-wavelength polarization lidar measurement taken during the MR01K02 cruise of the R/V Mirai and evaluation of a global aerosol transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Okamoto, Hajime; Takemura, Toshihiko; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2008-11-01

    Using two-wavelength lidar with one-wavelength depolarization measurement installed on the research vessel Mirai, we retrieved vertical distributions of extinction coefficients of water-soluble, sea-salt, and dust particles at 532 nm. In the retrieval, the mode radii, standard deviations, and refractive indexes for each aerosol component are prescribed; the retrieval uncertainties due to spherical assumption in our dust model are estimated to be 30-50%. The ship-based measurements were conducted in the western Pacific Ocean near Japan from 14 to 27 May 2001. For the analysis, we applied two-wavelength lidar algorithms to the three-channel lidar data, i.e., for signal strengths at 532 and 1064 nm and the total depolarization ratio at 532 nm. Water-soluble and sea-salt particles occurred below 1 km, whereas air masses dominated by water-soluble and dust particles were sometimes found above 1 km. We also investigated the correlation of sea-salt extinction coefficient with surface wind velocity for various altitudes. A positive correlation was found at low altitude, but no correlation was indicated at high altitude. We also compared the extinction coefficients of water-soluble and sea-salt particles directly under cloud bottom with those in clear-sky. Below clouds, the extinction coefficients of water-soluble and sea-salt particles were 1.6 and 1.4 times larger, respectively, than those in clear sky; this could be explained by hygroscopic growth using Hänel theory. Finally, we evaluated the global aerosol transport model SPRINTARS using the retrieved aerosol properties and measured lidar signals. The model underestimated sea salt and overestimated dust, although the general patterns agreed with the observed patterns.

  6. Code System to Calculate Particle Penetration Through Aerosol Transport Lines.

    1999-07-14

    Version 00 Distribution is restricted to US Government Agencies and Their Contractors Only. DEPOSITION1.03 is an interactive software program which was developed for the design and analysis of aerosol transport lines. Models are presented for calculating aerosol particle penetration through straight tubes of arbitrary orientation, inlets, and elbows. An expression to calculate effective depositional velocities of particles on tube walls is derived. The concept of maximum penetration is introduced, which is the maximum possible penetrationmore » through a sampling line connecting any two points in a three-dimensional space. A procedure to predict optimum tube diameter for an existing transport line is developed. Note that there is a discrepancy in this package which includes the DEPOSITION 1.03 executable and the DEPOSITION 2.0 report. RSICC was unable to obtain other executables or reports.« less

  7. Evolution of Asian aerosols during transpacific transport in INTEX-B

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlea, E. J.; DeCarlo, Peter; Aiken, Allison; Kimmel, Joel; Peltier, R. E.; Weber, R. J.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Shinozuka, Yohei; McNaughton, C. S.; Howell, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.; Emmons, L.; Apel, Eric; Pfister, G. G.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R. V.; Millet, D. B.; Heald, C. L.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-10-01

    Measurements of aerosol composition were made with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) on board the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B 5 (INTEX-B) field campaign over the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The HR-ToF-AMS measurements of non-refractory submicron aerosol mass are shown to compare well with other aerosol instrumentation in the INTEX-B field study. Two case studies are described for pollution layers transported across the Pacific from the Asian continent, intercepted 3–4 days and 7–10 days downwind of Asia, respectively. Aerosol chemistry is shown to 10 be a robust tracer for air masses originating in Asia, specifically the presence of sulfate dominated aerosol is a distinguishing feature of Asian pollution layers that have been transported to the Eastern Pacific. We examine the time scales of processing for sulfate and organic aerosol in the atmosphere and show that our observations confirm a conceptual model for transpacific transport from Asia proposed by Brock et al. (2004). 15 Our observations of both sulfate and organic aerosol in aged Asian pollution layers are consistent with fast formation near the Asian continent, followed by washout during lofting and subsequent transformation during transport across the Pacific. Our observations are the first atmospheric measurements to indicate that although secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from pollution happens on the timescale of one day, 20 the oxidation of organic aerosol continues at longer timescales in the atmosphere. Comparisons with chemical transport models of data from the entire campaign reveal an under-prediction of SOA mass in the MOZART model, but much smaller discrepancies with the GEOS-Chem model than found in previous studies over the Western Pacific. No evidence is found to support a previous hypothesis for significant secondary 25 organic aerosol formation in the free troposphere.

  8. Introducing the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-SAM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Timmreck, C.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-04-01

    We are presenting a new global aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2 to study the aerosol dynamics in the UTLS under background and volcanic conditions. The microphysical core modul SAM2 treats the formation, the evolution and the transport of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The aerosol size distribution and the weight percentage of the sulphuric acid solution is calculated dependent on the concentrations of H2SO4 and H2O, their vapor pressures, the atmospheric temperature and pressure. The fixed sectional method is used to resolve an aerosol distribution between 1 nm and 2.6 micron in particle radius. Homogeneous nucleation, condensation and evaporation, coagulation, water-vapor growth, sedimentation and sulphur chemistry are included. The module is applied in the middle-atmosphere MAECHAM5 model, resolving the atmosphere up to 0.01 hPa (~80 km) in 39 layers. It is shown here that MAECHAM5-SAM2 well represents in-situ measured size distributions of stratospheric background aerosol in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. Distinct differences can be seen when derived integrated aerosol parameters (surface area, effective radius) are compared with aerosol climatologies based on the SAGE II satellite instrument (derived by the University of Oxford and the NASA AMES laboratory). The bias between the model and the SAGE II data increases as the moment of the aerosol size distribution decreases. Thus the modeled effective radius show the strongest bias, followed by the aerosol surface area density. Correspondingly less biased are the higher moments volume area density and the mass density of the global stratospheric aerosol coverage. This finding supports the key finding No. 2 of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (2006), where it was shown that during periods of very low aerosol load in the stratosphere, the consistency between in-situ and satellite measurements, which exist in a volcanically perturbed stratosphere, breaks down and significant

  9. Aerosol Climate Interactions in Climate System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehl, J. T.

    2002-12-01

    Aerosols are widely recognized as an important process in Earth's climate system. Observations over the past decade have improved our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosols. Recently, field observations have highlighted the pervasiveness of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere. These aerosols are of particular interest, since they alter the vertical distribution of shortwave radiative heating between the surface and atmosphere. Given this increased knowledge of aerosols from various field programs, interest is focusing on how to integrate this understanding into global climate models. These types of models provide the best tool available to comprehensively study the potential effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system. Results from climate system model simulations that include aerosol effects will be presented to illustrate key aerosol climate interactions. These simulations employ idealized and realistic distributions of absorbing aerosols. The idealized aerosol simulations provide insight into the role of aerosol shortwave absorption on the global hydrologic cycle. The realistic aerosol distributions provide insight into the local response of aerosol forcing in the Indian subcontinent region. Emphasis from these simulations will be on the hydrologic cycle, since water availability is of emerging global environmental concern. This presentation will also consider what more is needed to significantly improve our ability to model aerosol processes in climate system models. Uncertainty in aerosol climate interactions remains a major source of uncertainty in our ability to project future climate change. Focus will be on interactions between aerosols and various physical, chemical and biogeochemical aspects of the Earth system.

  10. Global modeling of organic aerosol: the importance of reactive nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, H. O. T.; Chan, A. W. H.; Barkley, M. P.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-09-01

    Reactive nitrogen compounds, specifically NOx and NO3, likely influence global organic aerosol levels. To assess these interactions, GEOS-Chem, a chemical transport model, is updated to include improved biogenic emissions (following MEGAN v2.1/2.04), a new organic aerosol tracer lumping scheme, aerosol from nitrate radical (NO3) oxidation of isoprene, and NOx-dependent terpene aerosol yields. As a result of significant nighttime terpene emissions, fast reaction of monoterpenes with the nitrate radical, and relatively high aerosol yields from NO3 oxidation, biogenic hydrocarbon-NO3 reactions are expected to be a major contributor to surface level aerosol concentrations in anthropogenically influenced areas such as the United States. By including aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation in GEOS-Chem, terpene aerosol approximately doubles and isoprene aerosol is enhanced by 30 to 40% in the Southeast United States. In terms of the global budget of organic aerosol, however, aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation is somewhat minor (slightly more than 3 Tg/yr) due to the relatively high volatility of organic-NO3 oxidation products. Globally, 69 to 88 Tg/yr of organic aerosol is predicted to be produced annually, of which 14-15 Tg/yr is from oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and 8-9 Tg/yr from isoprene.

  11. Evaluation of chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol for air masses classified by particle-component-based factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroud, C. A.; Moran, M. D.; Makar, P. A.; Gong, S.; Gong, W.; Zhang, J.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Lu, G.; Brook, J. R.; Mihele, C.; Li, Q.; Sills, D.; Strawbridge, K. B.; McGuire, M. L.; Evans, G. J.

    2012-02-01

    Observations from the 2007 Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met 2007) in southern Ontario (ON), Canada, were used to evaluate Environment Canada's regional chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol (POA). Environment Canada's operational numerical weather prediction model and the 2006 Canadian and 2005 US national emissions inventories were used as input to the chemical transport model (named AURAMS). Particle-component-based factor analysis was applied to aerosol mass spectrometer measurements made at one urban site (Windsor, ON) and two rural sites (Harrow and Bear Creek, ON) to derive hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factors. Co-located carbon monoxide (CO), PM2.5 black carbon (BC), and PM1 SO4 measurements were also used for evaluation and interpretation, permitting a detailed diagnostic model evaluation. At the urban site, good agreement was observed for the comparison of daytime campaign PM1 POA and HOA mean values: 1.1 μg m-3 vs. 1.2 μg m-3, respectively. However, a POA overprediction was evident on calm nights due to an overly-stable model surface layer. Biases in model POA predictions trended from positive to negative with increasing HOA values. This trend has several possible explanations, including (1) underweighting of urban locations in particulate matter (PM) spatial surrogate fields, (2) overly-coarse model grid spacing for resolving urban-scale sources, and (3) lack of a model particle POA evaporation process during dilution of vehicular POA tail-pipe emissions to urban scales. Furthermore, a trend in POA bias was observed at the urban site as a function of the BC/HOA ratio, suggesting a possible association of POA underprediction for diesel combustion sources. For several time periods, POA overprediction was also observed for sulphate-rich plumes, suggesting that our model POA fractions for the PM2.5 chemical speciation profiles may be too high for these point sources. At the rural Harrow site

  12. Transport of Aerosols: Regional and Global Implications for Climate, Weather, and Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Bian, Huisheng; Remer, Lorraine; Kahn, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Long-range transport of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant impact on global climate, regional weather, and local air quality. In this study, we use a global model GOCART together with satellite data and ground-based measurements to assess the emission and transport of pollution, dust, biomass burning, and volcanic aerosols and their implications. In particular, we will show the impact of emissions and long-range transport of aerosols from major pollution and dust source regions to (1) the surface air quality, (2) the atmospheric heating rates, and (3) surface radiation change near the source and downwind regions.

  13. Modeling ozone and aerosol formation and transport in the pacific northwest with the community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Susan M; Lamb, Brian K; Chen, Jack; Claiborn, Candis; Finn, Dennis; Otterson, Sally; Figueroa, Cristiana; Bowman, Clint; Boyer, Mike; Wilson, Rob; Arnold, Jeff; Aalbers, Steven; Stocum, Jeffrey; Swab, Christopher; Stoll, Matt; Dubois, Mike; Anderson, Mary

    2006-02-15

    The Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system was used to investigate ozone and aerosol concentrations in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) during hot summertime conditions during July 1-15, 1996. Two emission inventories (El) were developed: emissions for the first El were based upon the National Emission Trend 1996 (NET96) database and the BEIS2 biogenic emission model, and emissions for the second El were developed through a "bottom up" approach that included biogenic emissions obtained from the GLOBEIS model. The two simulations showed that elevated PM2.5 concentrations occurred near and downwind of the Interstate-5 corridor along the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and in forested areas of central Idaho. The relative contributions of organic and inorganic aerosols varied by region, but generally organic aerosols constituted the largest fraction of PM2.5. In wilderness areas near the 1-5 corridor, organic carbon from anthropogenic sources contributed approximately 50% of the total organic carbon with the remainder from biogenic precursors, while in wilderness areas in Idaho, biogenic organic carbon accounted for 80% of the total organic aerosol. Regional analysis of the secondary organic aerosol formation in the Columbia River Gorge, Central Idaho, and the Olympics/Puget Sound showed that the production rate of secondary organic carbon depends on local terpene concentrations and the local oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere, which was strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions. Comparison with observations from 12 IMPROVE sites and 21 ozone monitoring sites showed that results from the two El simulations generally bracketed the average observed PM parameters and that errors calculated for the model results were within acceptable bounds. Analysis across all statistical parameters indicated that the NW-AIRQUEST El solution performed better at predicting PM2.5, PM1, and beta(ext) even though organic carbon PM was over-predicted, and the NET96 El

  14. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan

    Nearly global SAGE I satellite observations in the nonvolcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980 are used to produce a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model. Zonally average profiles of the 1.0-micron aerosol extinction for the tropics, midlatitudes, and high latitudes for both hemispheres are given in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. A third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set is used to derive analytic expressions for the seasonal global means and the yearly global mean. The results have application to the simulation of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  15. Numerical Modelling of Gelating Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Babovsky, Hans

    2008-09-01

    The numerical simulation of the gel phase transition of an aerosol system is an interesting and demanding task. Here, we follow an approach first discussed in [6, 8] which turns out as a useful numerical tool. We investigate several improvements and generalizations. In the center of interest are coagulation diffusion systems, where the aerosol dynamics is supplemented with diffusive spreading in physical space. This leads to a variety of scenarios (depending on the coagulation kernel and the diffusion model) for the spatial evolution of the gelation area.

  16. Evaluation of chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol for air masses classified by particle component-based factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroud, C. A.; Moran, M. D.; Makar, P. A.; Gong, S.; Gong, W.; Zhang, J.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Lu, G.; Brook, J. R.; Mihele, C.; Li, Q.; Sills, D.; Strawbridge, K. B.; McGuire, M. L.; Evans, G. J.

    2012-09-01

    Observations from the 2007 Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met 2007) in Southern Ontario, Canada, were used to evaluate predictions of primary organic aerosol (POA) and two other carbonaceous species, black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO), made for this summertime period by Environment Canada's AURAMS regional chemical transport model. Particle component-based factor analysis was applied to aerosol mass spectrometer measurements made at one urban site (Windsor, ON) and two rural sites (Harrow and Bear Creek, ON) to derive hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factors. A novel diagnostic model evaluation was performed by investigating model POA bias as a function of HOA mass concentration and indicator ratios (e.g. BC/HOA). Eight case studies were selected based on factor analysis and back trajectories to help classify model bias for certain POA source types. By considering model POA bias in relation to co-located BC and CO biases, a plausible story is developed that explains the model biases for all three species. At the rural sites, daytime mean PM1 POA mass concentrations were under-predicted compared to observed HOA concentrations. POA under-predictions were accentuated when the transport arriving at the rural sites was from the Detroit/Windsor urban complex and for short-term periods of biomass burning influence. Interestingly, the daytime CO concentrations were only slightly under-predicted at both rural sites, whereas CO was over-predicted at the urban Windsor site with a normalized mean bias of 134%, while good agreement was observed at Windsor for the comparison of daytime PM1 POA and HOA mean values, 1.1 μg m-3 and 1.2 μg m-3, respectively. Biases in model POA predictions also trended from positive to negative with increasing HOA values. Periods of POA over-prediction were most evident at the urban site on calm nights due to an overly-stable model surface layer. This model behaviour can be explained by a combination of model under

  17. Aerosol chamber and modelling studies on the reaction of soot aerosols with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Moehler, O.; Naumann, K.H.; Saathoff, H.

    1995-12-31

    Heterogeneous processes in atmospheric aerosols are known to play important roles in the chemical transformation of air pollutants. Especially irregularly shaped aerosol particles like soot have large surface areas to interact with trace gases. The overall efficiency of those processes depends on various parameters like the particle shape, the chemical surface conditions, the surface reaction mechanisms and the gas transport processes to and from the surface. The shape and surface of soot particles are transformed due to their heterogeneous chemical activity. Therefore, the surface reaction efficiency of atmospheric soot particles also depends on their age and history. The scope of this work is to investigate the ozone depletion potential of soot particles at typical atmospheric conditions. The experiments are carried out in a cylindrical aerosol vessel with a volume of 3.7 m{sup 3}. The soot aerosol is produced with a sparc generator and introduced into the aerosol vessel together with the ozone. The variation of the number concentration, the mass concentration and the size distribution of the soot aerosol within the aerosol vessel is measured and electron micrographs are taken to obtain information on the particle morphology. The ozone concentration is continuously monitored by UV-absorption. The experimental data are compared with model results to analyze the physical and chemical processes in the aerosol system in more detail. The aerosol model developed at our institute is based on the concept of fractal geometry and calculates the dynamic behaviour of irregularly shaped aerosols. More recently, the model was extended to describe the interaction of the aerosol particles with gases. This paper summarizes first results of the experimental and modelling work. The possible impact on tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  18. Projected effect of 2000-2050 changes in climate and emissions on aerosol levels in China and associated transboundary transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigate projected 2000–2050 changes in concentrations of aerosols in China and the associated transboundary aerosol transport by using the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem driven by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) 3 at 4° × ...

  19. Gas/Aerosol partitioning: a simplified method for global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S. M.

    2000-09-01

    . Thus, the necessary equilibrium equations can be solved analytically, so that numerical and therefore expensive iterative calculations are avoided. Subsequently, a new thermodynamic gas/aerosol partitioning model has been developed, called EQSAM (Equilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model). EQSAM has been compared with various other thermodynamical models presently in use, which shows that the results of EQSAM are well within the range produced by these more complex models. The application to global modeling further shows that EQSAM is indeed sufficiently fast and accurate. Especially the results of the global gas/aerosol partitioning calculations show that differences resulting from the thermodynamical treatment affect much less the aerosol composition compared to other, non-thermodynamical parameters, such as the model resolution or the boundary layer mixing scheme used. This indicates that the gas/aerosol partitioning calculations in atmospheric chemistry models are largely governed by transport processes, including meteorology, emission sources, as well as wet and dry deposition processes. Modeling results further indicate that gas/aerosol partitioning, especially at lower temperatures (during winter and nights), is of great importance for both the gas phase concentrations and the aerosol composition, including aerosol associated water. For instance, the mean surface gaseous nitric acid concentration is predicted to partition almost completely into the aerosol phase during winter and summer nights. This considerably increases the predicted aerosol load, compared to model calculations excluding gas/aerosol partitioning. This consequently affects the aerosol associated water (because the aerosol water is proportional to the amount of dissolved matter). Additionally, aerosol mass from gas/aerosol partitioning, such as ammonium nitrate, has a longer residence time than the precursor gases (NH3 and HNO3) and might, therefore, be subject to long-range transport from the

  20. Modeling comprehensive chemical composition of weathered oil following a marine spill to predict ozone and potential secondary aerosol formation and constrain transport pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Greg T.; Worton, David R.; Aeppli, Christoph; Reddy, Christopher M.; Zhang, Haofei; Variano, Evan; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2015-11-01

    Releases of hydrocarbons from oil spills have large environmental impacts in both the ocean and atmosphere. Oil evaporation is not simply a mechanism of mass loss from the ocean, as it also causes production of atmospheric pollutants. Monitoring atmospheric emissions from oil spills must include a broad range of volatile organic compounds (VOC), including intermediate-volatile and semivolatile compounds (IVOC, SVOC), which cause secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone production. The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster in the northern Gulf of Mexico during Spring/Summer of 2010 presented a unique opportunity to observe SOA production due to an oil spill. To better understand these observations, we conducted measurements and modeled oil evaporation utilizing unprecedented comprehensive composition measurements, achieved by gas chromatography with vacuum ultraviolet time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-VUV-HR-ToFMS). All hydrocarbons with 10-30 carbons were classified by degree of branching, number of cyclic rings, aromaticity, and molecular weight; these hydrocarbons comprise ˜70% of total oil mass. Such detailed and comprehensive characterization of DWH oil allowed bottom-up estimates of oil evaporation kinetics. We developed an evaporative model, using solely our composition measurements and thermodynamic data, that is in excellent agreement with published mass evaporation rates and our wind-tunnel measurements. Using this model, we determine surface slick samples are composed of oil with a distribution of evaporative ages and identify and characterize probable subsurface transport of oil.

  1. Research of transport and deposition of aerosol in human airway replica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Elcner, Jakub; Durdina, Lukas; Halasova, Tereza; Mravec, Filip; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Growing concern about knowledge of aerosol transport in human lungs is caused by great potential of use of inhaled pharmaceuticals. Second substantial motive for the research is an effort to minimize adverse effects of particular matter emitted by traffic and industry on human health. We created model geometry of human lungs to 7th generation of branching. This model geometry was used for fabrication of two physical models. The first one is made from thin walled transparent silicone and it allows a measurement of velocity and size of aerosol particles by Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA). The second one is fabricated by stereolithographic method and it is designed for aerosol deposition measurements. We provided a series of measurements of aerosol transport in the transparent model and we ascertained remarkable phenomena linked with lung flow. The results are presented in brief. To gather how this phenomena affects aerosol deposition in human lungs we used the second model and we developed a technique for deposition fraction and deposition efficiency assessment. The results confirmed that non-symmetric and complicated shape of human airways essentially affects transport and deposition of aerosol. The research will now focus on deeper insight in aerosol deposition.

  2. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  3. Acid aerosol transport episodes in Toronto, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.D. . Inst. of Environmental Medicine); Waldman, J. )

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the authors examine the pollution data collected during a 1986 field study in order to assess the nature and sources of acidic aerosols in the Toronto metropolitan area during this period. Through the examination of the continuous and filter aerosol data, isobaric back-trajectories of air masses, weather maps, and available trace element data, assessment are made of the character and possible sources of acid aerosols in this Southern Ontario city.

  4. Aerosol dynamics within and above forest in relation to turbulent transport and dry deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannik, Üllar; Zhou, Luxi; Zhou, Putian; Gierens, Rosa; Mammarella, Ivan; Sogachev, Andrey; Boy, Michael

    2016-03-01

    A 1-D atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model coupled with a detailed atmospheric chemistry and aerosol dynamical model, the model SOSAA, was used to predict the ABL and detailed aerosol population (characterized by the number size distribution) time evolution. The model was applied over a period of 10 days in May 2013 to a pine forest site in southern Finland. The period was characterized by frequent new particle formation events and simultaneous intensive aerosol transformation. The aim of the study was to analyze and quantify the role of aerosol and ABL dynamics in the vertical transport of aerosols. It was of particular interest to what extent the fluxes above the canopy deviate from the particle dry deposition on the canopy foliage due to the above-mentioned processes. The model simulations revealed that the particle concentration change due to aerosol dynamics frequently exceeded the effect of particle deposition by even an order of magnitude or more. The impact was, however, strongly dependent on particle size and time. In spite of the fact that the timescale of turbulent transfer inside the canopy is much smaller than the timescales of aerosol dynamics and dry deposition, leading us to assume well-mixed properties of air, the fluxes at the canopy top frequently deviated from deposition inside the forest. This was due to transformation of aerosol concentration throughout the ABL and resulting complicated pattern of vertical transport. Therefore we argue that the comparison of timescales of aerosol dynamics and deposition defined for the processes below the flux measurement level do not unambiguously describe the importance of aerosol dynamics for vertical transport above the canopy. We conclude that under dynamical conditions reported in the current study the micrometeorological particle flux measurements can significantly deviate from the dry deposition into the canopy. The deviation can be systematic for certain size ranges so that the time

  5. Review of models applicable to accident aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity.

  6. Modeling the Relationships Between Aerosol Properties and the Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols may affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing visible and infrared energy, They may also affect climate indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes, and by altering abundances of radiatively important gases through heterogeneous chemistry. Researchers understand which aerosol properties control the direct effect of aerosols on the radiation budget. Unfortunately, despite an abundance of data on certain types of aerosols, much work remains to be done to determine the values of these properties. For instance we have little idea about the global distribution, seasonal variation, or interannual variability of the aerosol optical depth. Also we do not know the visible light absorption properties of tropical aerosols which may contain much debris from slash and burn agriculture. A positive correlation between aerosol concentrations and albedos of marine stratus clouds is observed, and the causative microphysics is understood. However, models suggest that it is difficult to produce new particles in the marine boundary layer. Some modelers have suggested that the particles in the marine boundary layer may originate in the free troposphere and be transported into the boundary layer. Others argue that the aerosols are created in the marine boundary layer. There are no data linking aerosol concentration and cirrus cloud albedo, and models suggest cirrus properties may not be very sensitive to aerosol abundance. There is clear evidence of a radiatively significant change in the global lower stratospheric ozone abundance during the past few decades. These changes are caused by heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of particles. The rates of these reactions depend upon the chemical composition of the particles. Although rapid advances in understanding heterogeneous chemistry have been made, much remains to be done.

  7. Smoke aerosol transport patterns over the Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Peng; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Atwood, Samuel A.; Johnson, Randall S.; Hyer, Edward J.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Sessions, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Smoke transport patterns over the Maritime Continent (MC) are studied through a combination of approaches, including a) analyzing AODs obtained from satellite products; b) aerosol transport modeling with AOD assimilation along with the atmospheric flow patterns; c) analyzing smoke wet deposition distributions; and d) examining forward trajectories for smoke events defined in this study. It is shown that smoke transport pathways are closely related to the low-level atmospheric flow, i.e., during June-Sept, smoke originating from the MC islands with a dominant source over central and southern Sumatra, and southern and western Borneo, is generally transported northwestward south of the equator and northeastward north of the equator with the cross-equatorial flow, to the South China Sea (SCS), the Philippines and even further to the western Pacific. During the October-November transitional period, smoke transport paths are more zonally oriented compared to June-September. Smoke originating from Java, Bali, Timor etc, and southern New Guinea, which are in the domain of easterlies and southeasterlies during the boreal summer (June-November), is generally transported westward. It is also found that smoke transport over the MC exhibits multi-scale variability. Smoke typically lives longer and can be transported farther in El Niño years and later MJO phases compared with non El Niño years and earlier MJO phases. During El Niño periods there is much stronger westward transport to the east tropical Indian Ocean. Finally, orographic effect on smoke transport over the MC is also clearly discernable.

  8. Aerosol Behavior Log-Normal Distribution Model.

    2001-10-22

    HAARM3, an acronym for Heterogeneous Aerosol Agglomeration Revised Model 3, is the third program in the HAARM series developed to predict the time-dependent behavior of radioactive aerosols under postulated LMFBR accident conditions. HAARM3 was developed to include mechanisms of aerosol growth and removal which had not been accounted for in the earlier models. In addition, experimental measurements obtained on sodium oxide aerosols have been incorporated in the code. As in HAARM2, containment gas temperature, pressure,more » and temperature gradients normal to interior surfaces are permitted to vary with time. The effects of reduced density on sodium oxide agglomerate behavior and of nonspherical shape of particles on aerosol behavior mechanisms are taken into account, and aerosol agglomeration due to turbulent air motion is considered. Also included is a capability to calculate aerosol concentration attenuation factors and to restart problems requiring long computing times.« less

  9. Multi-Decadal Variation of Aerosols: Sources, Transport, and Climate Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Bian, Huisheng; Streets, David

    2008-01-01

    We present a global model study of multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their climate effects using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to longterm data records. We focus on a 27-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2006, during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. We will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, which involves a time-varying, comprehensive global emission dataset that we put together in our previous investigations and will be improved/extended in this project. This global emission dataset includes emissions of aerosols and their precursors from fuel combustion, biomass burning, volcanic eruptions, and other sources from 1980 to the present. Using the model and satellite data, we will analyze (1) the long-term global and regional aerosol trends and their relationship to the changes of aerosol and precursor emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources, (2) the intercontinental source-receptor relationships controlled by emission, transport pathway, and climate variability.

  10. Vertical transport and processing of aerosols in a mixed-phase convective cloud and the feedback on cloud development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Carslaw, K. S.; Feingold, G.

    2005-01-01

    A modelling study of vertical transport and processing of sulphate aerosol by a mixed-phase convective cloud, and the feedback of the cloud-processed aerosols on the development of cloud microphysical properties and precipitation is presented. An axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with bin-resolved microphysics and aqueousphase chemistry is developed and is used to examine the relative importance of microphysical and chemical processes on the aerosol budget, the fate of the aerosol material inside hydrometeors, and the size distributions of cloud-processed sulphate aerosols. Numerical simulations are conducted for a moderately deep convective cloud observed during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiments. The results show that aerosol particles that have been transported from the boundary layer, detrained, and then re-entrained at midcloud levels account for a large fraction of the aerosol inside hydrometeors (~40% by mass). Convective transport by the simulated cloud enhances upper-tropospheric aerosol number and mass concentrations by factors of 2-3 and 3-4, respectively. Sensitivity studies suggest that, for the simulated case, aqueous chemistry does not modify the evolution of the cloud significantly. Finally, ice-phase hydrometeor development is very sensitive to aerosol concentrations at midcloud levels. The latter result suggests that the occurrence of mid-tropospheric aerosol layers that have been advected through long-range transport could strongly affect cloud microphysical processes and precipitation formation.

  11. LMFBR aerosol release and transport program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, T.S.; Tobias, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes progress for the Aerosol Release and Transport Program sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Division of Accident Evaluation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the period July-September 1981. Topics discussed include (1) preparations for under-sodium tests at the Fast Aerosol Simulant Test Facility, (2) progress in interpretation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory-Sandia Laboratory normalization test results, (3) U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ in steam (light-water reactor accident) aerosol experiments conducted in the Nuclear Safety Power Plant, (4) experiments on B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ aerosols at the Containment Research Installation-II Facility, (5) fuel-melting tests in small-scale experimental facilities for the core-melt aerosol program, (6) analytical comparison of simple adiabatic nonlinear and linear analytical models of bubble oscillation phenomena with experimental data.

  12. Aerosol release and transport program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1981. [LMFBR; PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R. E.; Tobias, M. L.

    1982-05-01

    This report summarizes progress for the Aerosol Release and Transport Program sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Division of Accident Evaluation, for the period October-December 1981. Topics discussed include (1) under-sodium tests in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) Facility, (2) U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ and Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in steam (light-water reactor accident) aerosol experiments in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant, (3) generation and characterization of cadmium and CdO aerosols in the basic aerosol experimental program, (4) core-melt tests of Zircaloy-clad fuel capsules, (5) initial results of a piston-model bubble oscillation code allowing liquid bypass, and (6) calculations with the UVABUBL code to compare with underwater and under-sodium period measurements in FAST experiments.

  13. The stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer - Processes, models, observations, and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    After briefly reviewing the observational data on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, the chemical and physical processes that are likely to fix the properties of the layer are discussed. We present appropriate continuity equations for aerosol particles, and show how to solve the equations on a digital computer. Simulations of the unperturbed aerosol layer by various published models are discussed and the sensitivity of layer characteristics to variations in several aerosol model parameters is studied. We discuss model applications to anthropogenic pollution problems and demonstrate that moderate levels of aerospace activity (supersonic transport and Space Shuttle operations) will probably have only a negligible effect on global climate. Finally, we evaluate the possible climatic effect of a ten-fold increase in the atmospheric abundance of carbonyl sulfide.

  14. Sources and Transport of Aerosol above the Boundary Layer over the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Greg; Corrigan, Craig; Ritchie, John; Pont, Veronique; Claeys, Marine; Sciare, Jean; Mallet, Marc; Dulac, François; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean Region has been identified as sensitive to changes in the hydrological cycle, which could affect the water resources for millions of people by the turn of the century. However, prior to recent observations, most climate models have not accounted for the impacts of aerosol in this region. Past airborne studies have shown that aerosol sources from Europe and Africa are often transported throughout the lower troposphere; yet, because of their complex vertical distribution, it is a challenge to capture the variability and quantify the contribution of these sources to the radiative budget and precipitation processes. The PAEROS ChArMEx Mountain Experiment (PACMEx) complemented the regional activities by collecting aerosol data from atop a mountain on the island of Corsica, France in order to assess boundary layer / free troposphere atmospheric processes. In June/July 2013, PACMEx instruments were deployed at 2000 m.asl near the center of Corsica, France to complement ground-based aerosol observations at 550 m.asl on the northern peninsula, as well as airborne measurements. Comparisons between the peninsula site and the mountain site show similar general trends in aerosol properties; yet, differences in aerosol properties reveal the myriad transport mechanisms over the Mediterranean Basin. Using aerosol physicochemical data coupled with back trajectory analysis, different sources have been identified including Saharan dust transport, residual dust mixed with sea salt, anthropogenic emissions from Western Europe, and a period of biomass burning from Eastern Europe. Each period exhibits distinct signatures in the aerosol related to transport processes above and below the boundary layer. In addition, the total aerosol concentrations at the mountain site revealed a strong diurnal cycling the between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere, which is typical of mountain-top observations. PACMEx was funded by the National Science Foundation

  15. Long-range Transport of Aerosol at a Mountain Site in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Greg; Corrigan, Craig; Ritchie, John; Pont, Véronique; Claeys, Marine; Sciare, Jean; Dulac, François

    2016-04-01

    The Mediterranean Region has been identified as sensitive to changes in the hydrological cycle, which could affect the water resources for millions of people by the turn of the century. However, prior to recent observations, most climate models have not accounted for the impacts of aerosol in this region. Past airborne studies have shown that aerosol sources from Europe and Africa are often transported throughout the lower troposphere; yet, because of their complex vertical distribution, it is a challenge to capture the variability and quantify the contribution of these sources to the radiative budget and precipitation processes. The PAEROS ChArMEx Mountain Experiment (PACMEx) complemented the regional activities by collecting aerosol data from atop a mountain on the island of Corsica, France in order to assess boundary layer / free troposphere atmospheric processes. In June/July 2013, PACMEx instruments were deployed at 2000 m.asl near the center of Corsica, France to complement ground-based aerosol observations at 550 m.asl on the northern peninsula, as well as airborne measurements. Comparisons between the peninsula site and the mountain site show similar general trends in aerosol properties; yet, differences in aerosol properties reveal the myriad transport mechanisms over the Mediterranean Basin. Using aerosol physicochemical data coupled with back trajectory analysis, different sources have been identified including Saharan dust transport, residual dust mixed with sea salt, anthropogenic emissions from Western Europe, and a period of biomass burning from Eastern Europe. Each period exhibits distinct signatures in the aerosol related to transport processes above and below the boundary layer. In addition, the total aerosol concentrations at the mountain site revealed a strong diurnal cycling the between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere, which is typical of mountain-top observations. PACMEx was funded by the National Science Foundation

  16. Transport and Evolution of Aerosol Above/Below the Boundary Layer in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. C.; Corrigan, C.; Ritchie, J.; Pont, V.; Claeys, M.; Sciare, J.; Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Mediterranean Region has been identified as sensitive to changes in the hydrological cycle, which could affect the water resources for millions of people by the turn of the century. However, prior to recent observations, most climate models have not accounted for the impacts of aerosol in this region. Past airborne studies have shown that aerosol sources from Europe and Africa are often transported throughout the lower troposphere; yet, because of their complex vertical distribution, it is a challenge to capture the variability and quantify the contribution of these sources to the radiative budget and precipitation processes. The PAEROS ChArMEx Mountain Experiment (PACMEx) complemented the regional activities of the ChArMEx/ADRIMED summer 2013 campaign by collecting aerosol data from atop a mountain on the island of Corsica, France in order to assess boundary layer / free troposphere atmospheric processes. In June/July 2013, PACMEx instruments were deployed at 2000 m.asl near the center of Corsica to complement ground-based aerosol observations at 550 m.asl on the northern peninsula, as well as airborne measurements. Comparisons between the peninsula site and the mountain site show similar general trends in aerosol properties; yet, differences in aerosol properties reveal the myriad transport mechanisms over the Mediterranean Basin. Using aerosol physicochemical data coupled with back trajectory analysis, different sources have been identified including Saharan dust transport, residual dust mixed with sea salt, anthropogenic emissions from Western Europe, and a period of biomass burning from Eastern Europe. Each period exhibits distinct signatures in the aerosol related to transport processes above and below the boundary layer. In addition, the total aerosol concentrations at the mountain site revealed a strong diurnal cycling between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere, which is typical of mountain-top observations. PACMEx was funded by the

  17. A Satellite-based Assessment of Trans-Pacific Transport of Pollution Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Remer, Lorraine; Chin, Mian; Bian, Huisheng; Kleidman, Richard; Diehl. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    It has been well documented that pollution aerosol and dust from East Asia can transport across the North Pacific basin, reaching North America and beyond. Such intercontinental transport extends the impact of aerosols for climate change, air quality, atmospheric chemistry, and ocean biology from local and regional scales to hemispheric and global scales. Long term, measurement-based studies are necessary to adequately assess the implications of these wider impacts. A satellite-based assessment can augment intensive field campaigns by expanding temporal and spatial scales and also serve as constraints for model simulations. Satellite imagers have been providing a wealth of evidence for the intercontinental transport of aerosols for more than two decades. Quantitative assessments, however, became feasible only recently as a result of the much improved measurement accuracy and enhanced new capabilities of satellite sensors. In this study, we generated a 4-year (2002 to 2005) climatology of optical depth for pollution aerosol (defined as a mixture of aerosols from urbanlindustrial pollution and biomass burning in this study) over the North Pacific from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) observations of fine- and coarse-mode aerosol optical depths. The pollution aerosol mass loading and fluxes were then calculated using measurements of the dependence of aerosol mass extinction efficiency on relative humidity and of aerosol vertical distributions from field campaigns and available satellite observations in the region. We estimated that about 18 Tg/year pollution aerosol is exported from East Asia to the northwestern Pacific Ocean, of which about 25% reaches the west coast of North America. The pollution fluxes are largest in spring and smallest in summer. For the period we have examined the strongest export and import of pollution particulates occurred in 2003, due largely to record intense Eurasia wildfires in spring and summer. The overall

  18. Effect of particle settling on lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Groß, Silke

    2016-04-01

    A large amount of desert aerosol is transported in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) westwards from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean. Lidar profiles of transported Saharan aerosol may contain some information about the vertically-resolved aerosol microphysics that could be used to characterize processes that affected the measured aerosol during transport. We present modelled lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosol assuming that initially the SAL is well-mixed and that there is no vertical mixing of air within the SAL as soon as it reaches the Atlantic. We consider Stokes gravitational settling of aerosol particles over the ocean. The lidar profiles are calculated using optical models for irregularly-shaped mineral dust particles assuming settling-induced particle removal as function of distance from the SAL top. Within the SAL we find a decrease of both the backscatter coefficients and the linear depolarization ratios with decreasing distance from the SAL top. For example, the linear depolarization ratio at a wavelength of 532nm decreases from 0.289 at 1000m to 0.256 at 200m and 0.215 at 100m below SAL top. We compare the modelled backscatter coefficients and linear depolarization ratios to ground-based lidar measurements performed during the SALTRACE field campaign in Barbados (Caribbean) and find agreement within the estimated uncertainties. We discuss the uncertainties of our modeling approach in our presentation. Assumed mineral dust particle shapes, assumed particle mixture properties, and assumptions about processes in the SAL over the continent and the ocean are important aspects to be considered. Uncertainties are relevant for the potential of lidar measurements of transported Saharan dust to learn something about processes occuring in the SAL during long-range transport. We also compare our modeling results to modeling results previously published in the literature.

  19. Radiation Transfer Model for Aerosol Events in the Earth Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Yokomae, Takuma; Nakata, Makiko; Sano, Itaru

    Recently large scale-forest fire, which damages the Earth environment as biomass burning and emission of carbonaceous particles, frequently occurs due to the unstable climate and/or global warming tendency. It is also known that the heavy soil dust is transported from the China continent to Japan on westerly winds, especially in spring. Furthermore the increasing emis-sions of anthropogenic particles associated with continuing economic growth scatter serious air pollutants. Thus atmospheric aerosols, especially in Asia, are very complex and heavy loading, which is called aerosol event. In the case of aerosol events, it is rather difficult to do the sun/sky photometry from the ground, however satellite observation is an effective for aerosol monitoring. Here the detection algorithms from space for such aerosol events as dust storm or biomass burn-ing are dealt with multispectral satellite data as ADEOS-2/GLI, Terra/Aqua/MODIS and/or GOSAT/CAI first. And then aerosol retrieval algorithms are examined based on new radiation transfer code for semi-infinite atmosphere model. The derived space-based results are validated with ground-based measurements and/or model simulations. Namely the space-or surface-based measurements, multiple scattering calculations and model simulations are synthesized together for aerosol retrieval in this work.

  20. Impact of aging mechanism on model simulated carbonaceous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Wu, S.; Dubey, M. K.; French, N. H. F.

    2013-07-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols including organic carbon and black carbon have significant implications for both climate and air quality. In the current global climate or chemical transport models, a fixed hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion lifetime for carbonaceous aerosol (τ) is generally assumed, which is usually around one day. We have implemented a new detailed aging scheme for carbonaceous aerosols in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to account for both the chemical oxidation and the physical condensation-coagulation effects, where τ is affected by local atmospheric environment including atmospheric concentrations of water vapor, ozone, hydroxyl radical and sulfuric acid. The updated τ exhibits large spatial and temporal variations with the global average (up to 11 km altitude) calculated to be 2.6 days. The chemical aging effects are found to be strongest over the tropical regions driven by the low ozone concentrations and high humidity there. The τ resulted from chemical aging generally decreases with altitude due to increases in ozone concentration and decreases in humidity. The condensation-coagulation effects are found to be most important for the high-latitude areas, in particular the polar regions, where the τ values are calculated to be up to 15 days. When both the chemical aging and condensation-coagulation effects are considered, the total atmospheric burdens and global average lifetimes of BC, black carbon, (OC, organic carbon) are calculated to increase by 9% (3%) compared to the control simulation, with considerable enhancements of BC and OC concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere. Model evaluations against data from multiple datasets show that the updated aging scheme improves model simulations of carbonaceous aerosols for some regions, especially for the remote areas in the Northern Hemisphere. The improvement helps explain the persistent low model bias for carbonaceous aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere reported in literature. Further

  1. Influence of Aerosol Heating on the Stratospheric Transport of the Mt. Pinatubo Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquila, Valentina; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    On June 15th, 1991 the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (15.1 deg. N, 120.3 Deg. E) in the Philippines injected about 20 Tg of sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere, which was transformed into sulfuric acid aerosol. The large perturbation of the background aerosol caused an increase in temperature in the lower stratosphere of 2-3 K. Even though stratospheric winds climatological]y tend to hinder the air mixing between the two hemispheres, observations have shown that a large part of the SO2 emitted by Mt. Pinatubo have been transported from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere. We simulate the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) version 5 global climate model, coupled to the aerosol module GOCART and the stratospheric chemistry module StratChem, to investigate the influence of the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo on the stratospheric transport pattern. We perform two ensembles of simulations: the first ensemble consists of runs without coupling between aerosol and radiation. In these simulations the plume of aerosols is treated as a passive tracer and the atmosphere is unperturbed. In the second ensemble of simulations aerosols and radiation are coupled. We show that the set of runs with interactive aerosol produces a larger cross-equatorial transport of the Pinatubo cloud. In our simulations the local heating perturbation caused by the sudden injection of volcanic aerosol changes the pattern of the stratospheric winds causing more intrusion of air from the Northern into the Southern Hemisphere. Furthermore, we perform simulations changing the injection height of the cloud, and study the transport of the plume resulting from the different scenarios. Comparisons of model results with SAGE II and AVHRR satellite observations will be shown.

  2. Photochemistry of Model Organic Aerosol Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, S. A.; Bateman, A. P.; Dailo, M.; Do, T.; Nizkorodov, S. A.; Pan, X.; Underwood, J. S.; Walser, M. L.

    2007-05-01

    Up to 90 percent of urban aerosol particles have been shown to contain organic molecules. Reactions of these particles with atmospheric oxidants and/or sunlight result in large changes in their composition, toxicity, and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei. For this reason, chemistry of model organic aerosol particles initiated by oxidation and direct photolysis is of great interest to atmospheric, climate, and health scientists. Most studies in this area have focused on identifying the products of oxidation of the organic aerosols, while the products of direct photolysis of the resulting molecules remaining in the aerosol particle have been left mostly unexplored. We have explored direct photolytic processes occurring in selected organic aerosol systems using infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy to identify small gas phase products of photolysis, and mass-spectrometric and photometric techniques to study the condensed phase products. The first model system was secondary organic aerosol formed from the oxidation of several monoterpenes by ozone in the presence and absence of NOx, under different humidities. The second system modeled after oxidatively aged primary organic aerosol particles was a thin film of either alkanes or saturated fatty acids oxidized in several different ways, with the oxidation initiated by ozone, chlorine atom, or OH. In every case, the general conclusion was that the photochemical processing of model organic aerosols is significant. Such direct photolysis processes are believed to age organic aerosol particles on time scales that are short compared to the particles' atmospheric lifetimes.

  3. Influence of atmospheric parameters on vertical profiles and horizontal transport of aerosols generated in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Van Eijk, A. M. J.; Piazzola, J.

    2013-10-01

    The vertical and horizontal transport of aerosols generated over the surf zone is discussed. Experimental data were collected during the second campaign of the Surf Zone Aerosol Experiment that took place in Duck NC (USA) in November 2007. The Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method was used to analyze the vertical concentration gradients, and allowed separating the surf aerosols from aerosols advected from elsewhere. The numerical Marine Aerosol Concentration Model (MACMod) supported the analysis by confirming that the concentration gradients are more pronounced under stable conditions and that aerosol plumes are then more confined to the surface. The model also confirmed the experimental observations made during two boat runs along the offshore wind vector that surf-generated aerosols are efficiently advected out to sea over several tens of kilometers.

  4. Acid aerosol transport episodes in Toronto, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.D.; Waldman, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    Authors used recently developed equipment to continuously monitor levels of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, NH/sub 4/HSO/sub 4/ and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ concentrations in the ambient air outside Toronto, Ontario. These data were combined with 48-hour isobaric air mass back-trajectories ending in Toronto on each of the four days with highest acid (and sulfate) aerosol levels. The air masses with highest acid levels were found to have first passed over the SO/sub 2/ source region of the U.S. and then across the Great Lakes to Toronto. The role of ammonia as a modulator of aerosol acidity for eastern U.S. cities but not for Toronto (where the Great Lakes serve as ammonia sinks) is also discussed.

  5. Aerosol cloud processing with the global model ECHAM5-HAM-SALSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Korhonen, H.; Zubair, M.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Lehtinen, K.; Kokkola, H.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their interactions with clouds constitute the largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of the Earth's atmosphere. Increasing aerosol number concentrations increases the cloud droplet concentration and droplet surface and hence the cloud albedo. This mechanism is called the aerosol indirect effect on climate. Understanding the changes in cloud droplet number concentrations and size by anthropogenic aerosols are the key factors in the study of future climate change. Therefore the aerosols' formation and growth from nanoparticles to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) must be described accurately. The formation and growth of aerosols are shown to be described more accurately with sectional representations than with bulk (total aerosol mass only), modal (lognormal modes describing mass and number size distribution) or moment (processes tied to different moments of particle number size distribution) approaches. Recently the sectional aerosol models have been implemented to global climate models. However, the resolution of sectional models must be optimised to reduce the computational cost. We have implemented the sectional aerosol model SALSA in ECHAM5-HAM. SALSA describes the aerosol population with 20 size sections. The dynamics are optimised for large scale applications and the model includes an improved moving center sectional method. The particulate mass consists of five compounds: sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon, sea salt and dust. The aerosol processing has been studied extensively and there are many numerical models used to predict CCN number concentrations. However, due to computational limitations many of them are not suitable for utilisation in global climate models. Therefore in most global climate studies on aerosol activation to CCN is examined using cloud activation parameterisations. We study the aerosol cloud processing and its affect on transport of aerosols using Abdul-Razzak-Ghan aerosol cloud activation

  6. Aplication of LIRIC algorithm to study aerosol transport over Belsk, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietruczuk, Aleksander; Posyniak, Michał

    2015-04-01

    In this work synergy of measurements done by of a LIDAR and a sun-sky scanning photometer is presented. The LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) was applied to study periodic events of increased values of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed at Belsk (Poland). Belsk is a background site located in a rural area around 50 km south from Warsaw. Events of increased AOD occur mainly during spring and they coincide with events of elevated concentrations of particulate matter (PM10). This phenomenon is observed in all eastern Europe, e.g. in Minsk, and is caused by long range aerosol transport. Our previous work showed aerosol transport from the border between Belarus, Ukraine and Russia in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), and from north Africa in the free troposphere. The LIRIC algorithm, which uses optical and microphysical properties of the aerosol derived from photometric measurements and LIDAR profiles, was applied to study vertical distribution of fine and coarse modes of aerosol. The analysis of the airmass backward trajectories and models results (DREAM and NAAPS)was also used to determine a possible aerosol type and its source region. This study proved our previous findings. Most of events with increased AODs are observed during spring. In this season the fine mode aerosol is mainly present in the PBL. On the basis of the trajectory analysis and the NAAPS results we presume that it is the absorbing aerosol originating from the regions of seasonal biomass burning in eastern Europe, i.e. the area mentioned above. The events with increased AODs were also found during summer. In this case the fine mode aerosol is transported in the PBL a like to spring season. However, our analysis of trajectories and model results indicated western Europe as a source region. It is probably urban/industrial aerosol. The coarse mode aerosol is transported mainly in the free troposphere as separate layers. The analysis of backward trajectories indicates northern Africa as a

  7. Effects on stratospheric ozone from high-speed civil transport: Sensitivity to stratospheric aerosol loading

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenstein, D.K.; Ko, M.K.W.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Sze, N.

    1993-12-01

    The potential impact of high-speed civil transport (HSCT) aircraft emissions on stratospheric ozone and the sensitivity of these results to changes in aerosol loading are examined with a two-dimensional model. With aerosols fixed at background levels, calculated ozone changes due to HSCT aircraft emissions range from negligible up to 4-6% depletions in column zone at northern high latitudes. The magnitude of the ozone change depends mainly on the NO(x) increase due to aircraft emissions, which depends on fleet size, cruise altitude, and engine design. The partitioning of the odd nitrogen species in the lower stratosphere among NO, NO2, N2O5, is strongly dependent on the concentration of sulfuric acid aerosol particles, and thus the sensitivity of O3 to NO(x) emissions changes when the stratospheric aerosol loading changes. Aerosol concentrations 4 times greater than background levels have not been unusual in the last 2 decades. Our model results show that a factor of 4 increase in aerosol loading would significantly reduce the calculated ozone depletion due to HSCT emissions. Because of the neutral variabiltiy of stratospheric aerosols, the possible impact of HSCT emissions on ozone must be viewed as a range of possible results.

  8. Transported acid aerosols measured in southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Gerald J.; Spengler, John D.; Koutrakis, Petros; Allen, George A.; Raizenne, Mark; Stern, Bonnie

    During the period 29 June 1986-9 August 1986, a field health study assessing the acute health effects of air pollutants on children was conducted at a summer girls' camp on the northern shore of Lake Erie in SW Ontario. Continuous air pollution measurements of SO 2, O 3, NO x, particulate sulfates, light scattering, and meteorological measurements including temperature, dew point, and wind speed and direction were made. Twelve-hour integrated samples of size fractioned particles were also obtained using dichotomous samplers and Harvard impactors equipped with an ammonia denuder for subsequent hydrogen ion determination. Particulate samples were analyzed for trace elements by X-ray fluorescence and Neutron Activation, and for organic and elemental carbon by a thermal/optical technique. The measured aerosol was periodically very acidic with observed 12-h averaged H + concentrations in the range < 10-560 nmoles m -3. The aerosol H + appeared to represent the net strong acidity after H 2SO 4 reaction with NH 3(g). Average daytime concentrations were higher than night-time for aerosol H +, sulfate, fine mass and ozone. Prolonged episodes of atmospheric acidity, sulfate, and ozone were associated with air masses arriving at the measurement site from the west and from the southwest over Lake Erie. Sulfate concentrations measured at the lakeshore camp were more than twice those measured at inland sites during extreme pollution episodes. The concentration gradient observed with onshore flow was potentially due to enhanced deposition near the lakeshore caused by discontinuities in the meteorological fields in this region.

  9. Pollution transport efficiency toward the Arctic: Sensitivity to aerosol scavenging and source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Bey, Isabelle

    2011-04-01

    The processes driving current changes in Arctic atmospheric composition and climate are still uncertain. In particular the relative contributions of major source regions from the midlatitudes remain a matter of debate in the literature. The objectives of this study are to better quantify the relative contributions of different processes governing the transport of pollution from the midlatitudes to the Arctic and the relative contributions of different geopolitical source regions. We use a suite of observational data sets (including the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaigns and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite instrument) to constrain a global aerosol simulation from the ECHAM5-HAMMOZ model. Preliminary comparison of model results with vertical profiles of sulfate and black carbon (BC) collected during the ARCTAS campaigns and with aerosol extinction time series retrieved from CALIOP indicates that the model underestimates export of aerosols from the planetary boundary layer to the free troposphere in the midlatitudes and long-range transport of aerosols from the midlatitudes toward the Arctic. In contrast, observed CO profiles are relatively well simulated, which points to a possible problem with wet scavenging. Decreasing the prescribed aerosol scavenging coefficients within the range of experimental data available in the literature significantly improves the agreement with observations. Sulfate and BC burdens in the Arctic increase by a factor 5-6. Annual global lifetimes of sulfate and BC increase from 3.1 to 4.6 days and from 4.4 to 5.9 days, respectively. Using the improved simulation, we find that 59% of sulfate in the Arctic troposphere comes from the oxidation of SO2 emitted in Siberia (19%), Europe (18%), Asia (13%), and North America (9%). Anthropogenic and biomass burning BC emitted in Siberia, Asia, Europe, and North America contributes 29, 27, 25, and

  10. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 - Part 2: Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M.; Hendricks, J.; Sausen, R.

    2015-12-01

    We use the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications) to simulate the impact of aviation emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare our findings with the results of a previous study with the same model configuration focusing on year 2000 emissions. We also characterize the aviation results in the context of the other transport sectors presented in a companion paper. In spite of a relevant increase in aviation traffic volume and resulting emissions of aerosol (black carbon) and aerosol precursor species (nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide), the aviation effect on particle mass concentration in 2030 remains quite negligible (on the order of a few ng m-3), about one order of magnitude less than the increase in concentration due to other emission sources. Due to the relatively small size of the aviation-induced aerosol, however, the increase in particle number concentration is significant in all scenarios (about 1000 cm-3), mostly affecting the northern mid-latitudes at typical flight altitudes (7-12 km). This largely contributes to the overall change in particle number concentration between 2000 and 2030, which results also in significant climate effects due to aerosol-cloud interactions. Aviation is the only transport sector for which a larger impact on the Earth's radiation budget is simulated in the future: The aviation-induced RF in 2030 is more than doubled with respect to the year 2000 value of -15 mW m-2, with a maximum value of -63 mW m-2 simulated for RCP2.6.

  11. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol in 2030 - Part 2: Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, Mattia; Hendricks, Johannes; Sausen, Robert

    2016-04-01

    We use the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) global climate-chemistry model coupled to the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications) to simulate the impact of aviation emissions on global atmospheric aerosol and climate in 2030. Emissions of short-lived gas and aerosol species follow the four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) designed in support of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We compare our findings with the results of a previous study with the same model configuration focusing on year 2000 emissions. We also characterize the aviation results in the context of the other transport sectors presented in a companion paper. In spite of a relevant increase in aviation traffic volume and resulting emissions of aerosol (black carbon) and aerosol precursor species (nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide), the aviation effect on particle mass concentration in 2030 remains quite negligible (on the order of a few ng m-3), about 1 order of magnitude less than the increase in concentration due to other emission sources. Due to the relatively small size of the aviation-induced aerosol, however, the increase in particle number concentration is significant in all scenarios (about 1000 cm-3), mostly affecting the northern mid-latitudes at typical flight altitudes (7-12 km). This largely contributes to the overall change in particle number concentration between 2000 and 2030, which also results in significant climate effects due to aerosol-cloud interactions. Aviation is the only transport sector for which a larger impact on the Earth's radiation budget is simulated in the future: the aviation-induced radiative forcing in 2030 is more than doubled with respect to the year 2000 value of -15 mW m-2 in all scenarios, with a maximum value of -63 mW m-2 simulated for RCP2.6.

  12. Aerosol variability and atmospheric transport in the Himalayan region from CALIOP 2007-2010 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, S.; Cagnazzo, C.; Cairo, F.; Di Liberto, L.; Fierli, F.

    2014-05-01

    This work quantifies the spatial distribution of different aerosol types, their seasonal variability and sources.The analysis of four years of CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) vertically resolved aerosol data allows the identification of spatial patterns of desert dust and carbonaceous particles in different atmospheric layers. Clusters of Lagrangian back trajectories highlight the transport pathways from source regions during the dusty spring season. The analysis shows a prevalence of dust; at low heights it occurs frequently (up to 70% of available observations) and is distributed north of the Tibetan Plateau with a main contribution from the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts, and west of the Tibetan Plateau, originating from the deserts of southwest Asia and advected by the Westerlies. Above the Himalayas the dust amount is minor but still not negligible (occurrence around 20%) and mainly affected by the transport from more distant deserts sources (Sahara and Arabian Peninsula). Carbonaceous aerosol, produced mainly in northern India and eastern China, is subject to shorter-range transport and is indeed observed closer to the sources, while there is a limited amount reaching the top of the plateau. Data analysis reveals a clear seasonal variability in the frequencies of occurrence for the main aerosol types; dust is regulated principally by the monsoon dynamics, with maximal occurrence in spring. We also highlight relevant interannual differences, showing a larger presence of aerosol in the region during 2007 and 2008. The characterization of the aerosol spatial and temporal distribution in terms of observational frequency is a key piece of information that can be directly used for the evaluation of global aerosol models.

  13. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): Demonstrating New Techniques for Cloud and Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Selmer, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar that provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CATS payload has been operating since early February 2015 from the International Space Station (ISS). CATS was designed to operate for six months, and up to three years, providing a combination of operational science, in-space technology demonstration, and technology risk reduction for future Earth Science missions. One of the primary project goals of CATS is to demonstrate technology in support of future space-based lidar mission development. The CATS instrument has been demonstrating the high repetition rate laser and photon counting detection approach to lidar observations, in contrast to the low repetition rate, high energy technique employed by CALIPSO. Due to this technique, cloud and aerosol profile data exhibit high spatial and temporal resolution, which was never before possible from a space-based platform. Another important science goal of the CATS-FO project is accurate determination of aerosol type on a global scale. CATS provided the first space-based depolarization measurements at multiple wavelengths (532 and 1064 nm), and first measurements at 1064 nm from space. The ratio of the depolarization measurements at these two wavelengths enables significant improvement in aerosol typing. The CATS retrievals at 1064 nm also provide improvements to detecting aerosols above clouds. The CATS layer identification algorithm is a threshold-based layer detection method that uses the 1064 nm attenuated scattering ratio and also includes a routine to identify clouds embedded within aerosol layers. This technique allows CATS to detect the full extent of the aerosol layers above the cloud, and differentiate these two layers so that the optical properties can be more accurately determined.

  14. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol: simulations for year 2000 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M.; Hendricks, J.; Sausen, R.

    2013-05-01

    We use the EMAC-MADE global aerosol model to quantify the impact of transport emissions (land transport, shipping and aviation) on global aerosol. We consider a present-day (2000) scenario and the CMIP5 emission dataset developed in support of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. The model takes also into account particle number emissions, which are derived from mass emissions under different assumptions on the size distribution of particles emitted by the three transport sectors. Additional sensitivity experiments are performed to quantify the effects of the uncertainties behind such assumptions. The model simulations show that the impact of the transport sectors closely matches the emission patterns. Land transport is the most important source of black carbon pollution in USA, Europe and Arabian Peninsula. Shipping strongly contributes to aerosol sulfate concentrations along the most-traveled routes of the northern Atlantic and northern Pacific oceans, with a significant impact along the coastlines. The effect of aviation is mostly confined to the upper-troposphere (7-12 km), in the northern mid-latitudes, although significant effects are also simulated at the ground, due to the emissions from landing and take-off cycles. The transport-induced perturbations to particle number concentrations are very sensitive to the assumptions on the size distribution of emitted particles, with the largest uncertainties obtained for the land transport sector. The simulated climate impacts, due to aerosol direct and indirect effects, are strongest for the shipping sector, as a consequence of the large impact of sulfate aerosol on low marine clouds and their optical properties.

  15. New capabilities for space-based cloud and aerosols measurements: The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Palm, S. P.; Hart, W. D.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Vaughan, M.; Rodier, S. D.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Buchard-Marchant, V.

    2013-12-01

    Current uncertainties in cloud and aerosol properties limit our ability to accurately model the Earth's climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties in adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. NASA's A-Train satellites provide an unprecedented opportunity to address these uncertainties. In particular, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) satellite provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CALIOP lidar onboard CALIPSO has reached its seventh year of operation, well past its expected lifetime. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2016 or later. If the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational, there will be a gap in global lidar measurements. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), built at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a payload for the International Space Station (ISS), is set to launch in the summer of 2014. CATS is an elastic backscatter lidar with three wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm) and HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all three wavelengths. The ISS orbit is a 51 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of about 405 km. This orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three day repeat cycle. Thus, science applications of CATS include cloud and aerosol climate studies, air quality monitoring, and smoke/volcanic plume tracking. The primary science objectives of CATS include: continuing the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud vertical profile data record, providing near real time data to support operational applications such as air quality modeling, and advancing technology in support of future mission development using the HSRL channel. Furthermore, the vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties provided by CATS will complement current and future passive satellite

  16. Assessment of aerosol transport into the Mojave Desert. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Myrup, L.O.; Flocchini, R.G.

    1986-02-01

    The objective of the project was to assess the transport of atmospheric aerosols into the Mojave Desert from the San Joaquin Valley (via Techachapi Pass), Los Angeles (via Soledad Canyon), and San Bernadino (via Cajon Pass). The authors conducted a field study in summer, 1983 to measure the concentrations of aerosols and the meteorology at these three sites. They measured particles in five size ranges with a six-hour time resolution, hourly average wind speed and direction, temperature, and humidity at two meters and ten meters above ground, upper air winds (pibals) at four-hour intervals, and boundary layer structure with continuous acoustic sounder. The upper air data were not used in the analysis. The authors developed two new analytical methods for the data set, the 8-sector binary method and the shaped acceptance window method. Both methods proved useful in analyzing the data. As expected, there is a net transport of aerosol from the population centers to the Mojave Desert at each of the three passes studied. Lead and sulfur aerosol transport was highest at night, and was primarily from the direction of the passes. Crustal elements did not show a directional influence, so most likely were generated locally from wind-dust in the Mojave Desert.

  17. Aeronet-based Microphysical and Optical Properties of Smoke-dominated Aerosol near Source Regions and Transported over Oceans, and Implications for Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad families of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA 0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA 0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savanna at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA 0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysicaloptical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  18. Aerosol transport from Chiang Mai, Thailand to Mt. Lulin, Taiwan - Implication of aerosol aging during long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Engling, Guenter; Chang, Shih-Yu; Chang, Shuenn-Chin; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Lin, Neng-Huei; Sopajaree, Khajornsak; Chang, You-Jia; Hong, Guo-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosol from Indochina may cause a potential effect on climate change in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and the Western Pacific. Up to now, the understanding of BB aerosol composition modification during long-range transport (LRT) is still very limited due to the lack of observational data. In this study, atmospheric aerosols were collected at the Suthep/Doi Ang Khang (DAK) mountain sites in Chiang Mai, Thailand and the Lulin Atmospheric Background Station (Mt. Lulin) in central Taiwan from March to April 2010 and from February to April 2013, respectively. During the study period, an upwind and downwind relationship between the Suthep/DAK and Lulin sites (2400 km apart) was validated by backward trajectories. Comprehensive aerosol properties were resolved for PM2.5 water-soluble inorganic ions, carbonaceous content, water-soluble/insoluble organic carbon (WSOC/WIOC), dicarboxylic acids and their salts (DCAS), and anhydrosugars. A Modification Factor (MF) is proposed by employing non-sea-salt potassium ion (nss-K+) or fractionalized elemental carbon evolved at 580 °C after pyrolized OC correction (EC1-OP) as a BB aerosol tracer to evaluate the mass fraction changes of aerosol components from source to receptor regions during LRT. The MF values of nss-SO42-, NH4+, NO3-, OC1 (fractionalized organic carbon evolved from room temperature to 140 °C), OP (pyrolized OC fraction), DCAS, and WSOC were above unity, which indicated that these aerosol components were enhanced during LRT as compared with those in the near-source region. In contrast, the MF values of anhydrosugars ranged from 0.1 to 0.3, indicating anhydrosugars have degraded during LRT.

  19. Model Intercomparison of Indirect Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, J. E.; Quaas, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Takemura, T.; Boucher, O.; Guo, H.; Kirkevag, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Seland, O.

    2006-01-01

    Modeled differences in predicted effects are increasingly used to help quantify the uncertainty of these effects. Here, we examine modeled differences in the aerosol indirect effect in a series of experiments that help to quantify how and why model-predicted aerosol indirect forcing varies between models. The experiments start with an experiment in which aerosol concentrations, the parameterization of droplet concentrations and the autoconversion scheme are all specified and end with an experiment that examines the predicted aerosol indirect forcing when only aerosol sources are specified. Although there are large differences in the predicted liquid water path among the models, the predicted aerosol first indirect effect for the first experiment is rather similar, about -0.6 W/sq m to -0.7 W/sq m. Changes to the autoconversion scheme can lead to large changes in the liquid water path of the models and to the response of the liquid water path to changes in aerosols. Adding an autoconversion scheme that depends on the droplet concentration caused a larger (negative) change in net outgoing shortwave radiation compared to the 1st indirect effect, and the increase varied from only 22% to more than a factor of three. The change in net shortwave forcing in the models due to varying the autoconversion scheme depends on the liquid water content of the clouds as well as their predicted droplet concentrations, and both increases and decreases in the net shortwave forcing can occur when autoconversion schemes are changed. The parameterization of cloud fraction within models is not sensitive to the aerosol concentration, and, therefore, the response of the modeled cloud fraction within the present models appears to be smaller than that which would be associated with model "noise". The prediction of aerosol concentrations, given a fixed set of sources, leads to some of the largest differences in the predicted aerosol indirect radiative forcing among the models, with values of

  20. Multicomponent aerosol dynamics model UHMA: model development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.

    2004-05-01

    A size-segregated aerosol dynamics model UHMA (University of Helsinki Multicomponent Aerosol model) was developed for studies of multicomponent tropospheric aerosol particles. The model includes major aerosol microphysical processes in the atmosphere with a focus on new particle formation and growth; thus it incorporates particle coagulation and multicomponent condensation, applying a revised treatment of condensation flux onto free molecular regime particles and the activation of nanosized clusters by organic vapours (Nano-Köhler theory), as well as recent parameterizations for binary H2SO4-H2O and ternary H2SO4-NH3-H2O homogeneous nucleation and dry deposition. The representation of particle size distribution can be chosen from three sectional methods: the hybrid method, the moving center method, and the retracking method in which moving sections are retracked to a fixed grid after a certain time interval. All these methods can treat particle emissions and atmospheric transport consistently, and are therefore suitable for use in large scale atmospheric models. In a test simulation against an accurate high resolution solution, all the methods showed reasonable treatment of new particle formation with 20 size sections although the hybrid and the retracking methods suffered from artificial widening of the distribution. The moving center approach, on the other hand, showed extra dents in the particle size distribution and failed to predict the onset of detectable particle formation. In a separate test simulation of an observed nucleation event, the model captured the key qualitative behaviour of the system well. Furthermore, its prediction of the organic volume fraction in newly formed particles, suggesting values as high as 0.5 for 3-4 nm particles and approximately 0.8 for 10 nm particles, agrees with recent indirect composition measurements.

  1. Evaluating inter-continental transport of fine aerosols:(2) Global health impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Horowitz, Larry W.

    In this second of two companion papers, we quantify for the first time the global impact on premature mortality of the inter-continental transport of fine aerosols (including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, and mineral dust) using the global modeling results of (Liu et al., 2009). Our objective is to estimate the number of premature mortalities in each of ten selected continental regions resulting from fine aerosols transported from foreign regions in approximately year 2000. Our simulated annual mean population-weighted (P-W) concentrations of total PM2.5 (aerosols with diameter less than 2.5 μm) are highest in East Asia (EA, 30 μg m -3) and lowest in Australia (3.6 μg m -3). Dust is the dominant component of PM2.5 transported between continents. We estimate global annual premature mortalities (for adults age 30 and up) due to inter-continental transport of PM2.5 to be nearly 380 thousand (K) in 2000. Approximately half of these deaths occur in the Indian subcontinent (IN), mostly due to aerosols transported from Africa and the Middle East (ME). Approximately 90K deaths globally are associated with exposure to foreign (i.e., originating outside a receptor region) non-dust PM2.5. More than half of the premature mortalities associated with foreign non-dust aerosols are due to aerosols originating from Europe (20K), ME (18K) and EA (15K); and nearly 60% of the 90K deaths occur in EA (21K), IN (19K) and Southeast Asia (16K). The lower and higher bounds of our estimated 95% confidence interval (considering uncertainties from the concentration-response relationship and simulated aerosol concentrations) are 18% and 240% of the estimated deaths, respectively, and could be larger if additional uncertainties were quantified. We find that in 2000 nearly 6.6K premature deaths in North America (NA) were associated with foreign PM2.5 exposure (5.5K from dust PM2.5). NA is least impacted by foreign PM2.5 compared to receptors on the Eurasian continent. However, the

  2. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol: simulations for year 2000 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M.; Hendricks, J.; Sausen, R.

    2013-10-01

    We use the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) global model with the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications) to quantify the impact of transport emissions (land transport, shipping and aviation) on the global aerosol. We consider a present-day (2000) scenario according to the CMIP5 (Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) emission data set developed in support of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) Fifth Assessment Report. The model takes into account particle mass and number emissions: The latter are derived from mass emissions under different assumptions on the size distribution of particles emitted by the three transport sectors. Additional sensitivity experiments are performed to quantify the effects of the uncertainties behind such assumptions. The model simulations show that the impact of the transport sectors closely matches the emission patterns. Land transport is the most important source of black carbon (BC) pollution in the USA, Europe and the Arabian Peninsula, contributing up to 60-70% of the total surface-level BC concentration in these regions. Shipping contributes about 40-60% of the total aerosol sulfate surface-level concentration along the most-traveled routes of the northern Atlantic and northern Pacific oceans, with a significant impact (~ 10-20%) along the coastlines. Aviation mostly affects aerosol number, contributing about 30-40% of the particle number concentration in the northern midlatitudes' upper troposphere (7-12 km), although significant effects are also simulated at the ground, due to the emissions from landing and take-off cycles. The transport-induced perturbations to the particle number concentrations are very sensitive to the assumptions on the size distribution of emitted particles, with the largest uncertainties (about one order of magnitude) obtained for the land transport sector. The simulated climate impacts, due to aerosol direct and

  3. Online Simulations and Forecasts of the Global Aerosol Distribution in the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We present an analysis of simulations of the global aerosol system in the NASA GEOS-5 transport, radiation, and chemistry model. The model includes representations of all major tropospheric aerosol species, including dust, sea salt, black carbon, particulate organic matter, and sulfates. The aerosols are run online for the period 2000 through 2005 in a simulation driven by assimilated meteorology from the NASA Goddard Data Assimilation System. Aerosol surface mass concentrations are compared with existing long-term surface measurement networks. Aerosol optical thickness is compared with ground-based AERONET sun photometry and space-based retrievals from MODIS, MISR, and OMI. Particular emphasis is placed here on consistent sampling of model and satellite aerosol optical thickness to account for diurnal variations in aerosol optical properties. Additionally, we illustrate the use of this system for providing chemical weather forecasts in support of various NASA and community field missions.

  4. Aerosol Measurements From Recent Alaskan Volcanic Eruptions: Implications for Volcanic Ash Transport Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, C. F.; Rinkleff, P. G.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P.; Cahill, T. A.; Barnes, D. E.

    2007-12-01

    Size and time-resolved aerosol compositional measurements conducted during the 2006 Augustine Volcano and 2007 Pavlof Volcano eruptions provide ground-truth information for use in the validation of volcanic ash transport models. These measurements provide quantitative information on the size and concentration of the aerosol, which can be used to test the volcanic aerosol source profiles and transport characteristics used in volcanic ash transport models. Augustine Volcano is on an island in Cook Inlet in southern Alaska. For the 2006 Augustine Volcano eruption, the size and time-resolved aerosol measurements were made using an eight stage (35-5.0, 5.0-2.5, 2.5-1.15, 1.15- 0.75, 0.75-0.56, 0.56-0.34, 0.34-0.26 and 0.26-0.09 microns in aerodynamic diameter) DRUM aerosol impactor deployed in Homer, approximately 120 km northeast of the volcano. Aerosols from the volcano reached the sampler and showed that the size distribution of the volcanic emissions changed during the course of the eruption. For example, crustal elements were present in high concentrations in the largest size fraction (35-5.0 microns) but low concentrations in a smaller size fraction (0.75-0.56 microns) during the phreatomagmatic explosive events. However, during the magmatic emissions period, the concentrations of these elements in the large size fraction decreased, but greatly increased in the smaller size fraction. Pavlof Volcano is a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula in southwestern Alaska. During the 2007 Pavlof Volcano eruption, a network of four DRUM aerosol impactors was deployed downwind of the volcano in an attempt to characterize the change in aerosol size distribution and composition during transport away from the volcano. The samplers were located at Nelson Lagoon, approximately 80 km northeast of the volcano (eight stage DRUM impactor with a top cut point of approximately 12 microns), Sand Point approximately 90 km east of the volcano (three stage DRUM impactor with aerodynamic diameter

  5. ANISORROPIA: the adjoint of the aerosol thermodynamic model ISORROPIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capps, S. L.; Henze, D. K.; Hakami, A.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2011-08-01

    We present the development of ANISORROPIA, the discrete adjoint of the ISORROPIA thermodynamic equilibrium model that treats the Na+-SO42--HSO4--NH4+-NO3--Cl--H2O aerosol system, and we demonstrate its sensitivity analysis capabilities. ANISORROPIA calculates sensitivities of an inorganic species in aerosol or gas phase with respect to the total concentrations of each species present with only a two-fold increase in computational time over the forward model execution. Due to the highly nonlinear and discontinuous solution surface of ISORROPIA, evaluation of the adjoint required a new, complex-variable version of the the model, which determines first-order sensitivities with machine precision and avoids cancellation errors arising from finite difference calculations. The adjoint is verified over an atmospherically relevant range of concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. We apply ANISORROPIA to recent field campaign results from Atlanta, GA, USA, and Mexico City, Mexico, to characterize the inorganic aerosol sensitivities of these distinct urban air masses. The variability in the relationship between PM2.5 mass and precursor concentrations shown has important implications for air quality and climate. ANISORROPIA enables efficient elucidation of aerosol concentration dependence on aerosol precursor emissions in the context of atmospheric chemical transport model adjoints.

  6. The impact of long-range transport on secondary aerosol in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Carmichael, G. R.; Woo, J.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Long-range transport air pollution is an important issue in Northeast Asia. Large amounts of anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx aggravate air pollution in the region. Most of the emissions come from the industrialized regions along the East China coast. China and Korea are changing their air quality standards for particle pollutant from PM10 to PM2.5 in 2012 and 2015, respectively. According to many previous studies, the long-rang transport of particle matter contributes to Korean air pollution problems, but there are many uncertainties regarding the impact of long range transport. Secondary inorganic aerosols (sulfate, nitrate and ammonium) are dominant ionic contributors to PM2.5. Especially high relative contributions of secondary aerosol appear under westerly wind cases at Korea. The secondary aerosols are produced by converting from SO2 and NOx during the long-range transport, but the contribution varies dramatically depending on season and wind pattern. So far, sulfate is the primary contributor to PM2.5, but nitrate levels are increasing because that NOx emissions in China are increasing dramatically since 2000 due to the growth in power, industry, and transport, while SO2 emissions are trending downward since 2005. We will present chemical characteristics of PM2.5 by westerly long-range transport focused on secondary aerosol, tracking their transport pattern, and production pathway in order to better understand regional air quality modeling of the long-range transport. This study will be performed based on the international study, MICS-Asia phase III, initiated with many researchers. Results using CMAQ with the modeling domain covering Northeast and Southeast China, Korea, and Japan with 15km resolution will be discussed.

  7. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  8. Commuter exposure to aerosol pollution on public transport in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S.; Velasco, E.; Roth, M.; Norford, L.

    2013-12-01

    Personal exposure to aerosol pollutants in the transport microenvironment of Singapore has not been well documented. Studies from many cities suggest that brief periods of exposure to high concentrations of airborne pollutants may have significant health impacts. Thus, a large proportion of aerosol exposure may be experienced during daily commuting trips due to the proximity to traffic. A better understanding of the variability across transport modes is therefore needed to design transport policies that minimize commuters' exposure. In light of this, personal exposure measurements of PM10 and PM2.5, particle number (PN), black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAH), and active surface area (SA) were conducted on a selected route in downtown Singapore. Portable and real-time monitoring instruments were carried onto three different modes of public transport (bus, taxi, subway) and by foot. Simultaneous measurements were taken at a nearby park to capture the background concentrations. Large variability was observed amongst the various transport modes investigated. For example, the particle number concentration was on average 1.5, 1.6, 0.8, and 2.2 times higher inside buses, taxis, subway and by foot, respectively, than at the background site. Based on the results, it is possible to come up with a ranking of the 'cleanest' transport mode for Singapore.

  9. Investigation of biomass burning and aerosol loading and transport in South America utilizing geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzel, Paul; Prins, Elaine

    1995-01-01

    This study attempts to assess the extent of burning and associated aerosol transport regimes in South America and the South Atlantic using geostationary satellite observations, in order to explore the possible roles of biomass burning in climate change and more directly in atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer processes. Modeling and analysis efforts have suggested that the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosols from biomass burning may play a major role in the radiative balance of the earth and are an important factor in climate change calculations. One of the most active regions of biomass burning is located in South America, associated with deforestation in the selva (forest), grassland management, and other agricultural practices. As part of the NASA Aerosol Interdisciplinary Program, we are utilizing GOES-7 (1988) and GOES-8 (1995) visible and multispectral infrared data (4, 11, and 12 microns) to document daily biomass burning activity in South America and to distinguish smoke/aerosols from other multi-level clouds and low-level moisture. This study catalogues the areal extent and transport of smoke/aerosols throughout the region and over the Atlantic Ocean for the 1988 (July-September) and 1995 (June-October) biomass burning seasons. The smoke/haze cover estimates are compared to the locations of fires to determine the source and verify the haze is actually associated with biomass burning activities. The temporal resolution of the GOES data (half-hourly in South America) makes it possible to determine the prevailing circulation and transport of aerosols by considering a series of visible and infrared images and tracking the motion of smoke, haze and adjacent clouds. The study area extends from 40 to 70 deg W and 0 to 40 deg S with aerosol coverage extending over the Atlantic Ocean when necessary. Fire activity is estimated with the GOES Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (ABBA). To date, our efforts have focused on GOES-7 and GOES-8 ABBA

  10. Remote monitoring of aerosol layers over Sofia during Sahara dust transport episode (April, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Dimitar; Grigorov, Ivan; Deleva, Atanaska; Kolev, Nikolay; Peshev, Zahari; Kolarov, Georgi; Donev, Evgeni; Ivanov, Danko

    2013-03-01

    In this work we present results of lidar remote sensing of aerosol layers in the atmosphere above Sofia during an episode of Sahara dust transport, 02-07 April, 2012. The investigations were made using two lidar systems, one equipped with a CuBr-vapor laser, emitting at wavelength 510.6 nm, and a second one - with Nd:YAG laser, at wavelengths 1064 nm and 532 nm. The results of lidar measurements are presented in terms of vertical atmospheric backscatter coefficient profiles and color maps of the aerosol stratification evolution. The involved into discussions ceilometer data (CHM 15k ceilometer) and satellite data from CALIPSO lidar, enhance the synergy of observations. Conclusion about atmospheric aerosol's origin was made upon analyses of the information of weather-forecast maps provided by the Forecast system of Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, which are accessible via Internet. Additional information was provided by calculations of the backward air mass trajectories, using online software of NOAA about HYSPLIT model. The comparison between the data from the two lidars and the ceilometer showed similar behavior of aerosol layers development in the atmosphere above Sofia. All information about aerosol layers origin, their altitude above ground, persistence during lidar observations, confirmed the conclusion of observation of a long-distance Sahara dust transport beyond Balkans and Sofia. An interesting completion of CALIPSO lidar and ground based lidars results of measurement is presented in case of thick opaque cloud layer in the atmosphere, which slices the path of lidar sensing in both directions.

  11. Development and Validation of a Model to Predict Aerosol Breathing Zone Concentrations During Common Outdoor Activities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has been conducted on aerosol emission rates during various activities as well as aerosol transport into the breathing zone under idealized conditions. However, there has been little effort to link the two into a model for predicting a person’s breathing zone concentrat...

  12. The assessment of climatology of absorbing aerosol field with integration of aerosol-climate model, and ground-based and satellite remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G.; Wang, C.; Mahowald, N. M.; Rigby, M. L.; Martins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols play important roles in the Earth’s radiation budget and atmospheric circulation by absorbing sunlight and heating the atmosphere while cooling the surface. The strength of such effects depends on microphysical processes in the lifecycle of absorbing aerosols and their emissions to the atmosphere. Even though the knowledge of aerosol controlling processes and the techniques measuring aerosol properties have been greatly advanced, there are still significant gaps between model results and measurement data. The goal of this study is to minimize the model-observation discrepancy and to assess global 3-D absorbing aerosol fields. To achieve this goal, we investigate the errors related to aerosol models and measurements, and optimize the emissions of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols (BC) used in the models. In this study we first derive the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and absorbing aerosol optical depth (AAOD) of anthropogenic aerosols using the 3-D interactive aerosol-climate model [Kim et al., 2008] developed based on NCAR CAM3, running in an aerosol-transport-model (ATM) driven by NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data (2001~2003). Aerosol transformation in the atmosphere is fully considered in this model. We also derived the AOD and AAOD of dust aerosols based on the climatology from the Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) driven by the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data [Mahowald et al., 1997; Kistler et al., 2001]. In addition, the climatology (10-year mean) of the CAM3 sea salt model (Mahowald et al., 2006) is used to calculate the AOD of sea salt aerosols. An inverse modeling technique (Kalman filtering) is used to optimize the emissions of BC aerosols by minimizing the model-observation discrepancy of AAOD, and the emissions of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) aerosols and SO2 by minimizing the model-observation discrepancy of AOD. Initial estimates of carbonaceous aerosol emission due to fossil fuel are taken from the MIT EPPA model and Bond

  13. Evaluating global atmospheric transport of plutonium with dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, R.; Arimoto, R.; Gill, T. E.; Kang, C.; Goodell, P.

    2009-12-01

    The resuspension of soils contaminated with radionuclides from nuclear weapons tests is a mechanism by which plutonium can be re-distributed throughout the environment. To better understand the global atmospheric transport of plutonium, we measured the activity of Pu in aerosol samples from four widely separated sites that receive dust from distant sources in both Asia and Africa. High-volume aerosol samples were collected from Barbados (2005 - 2006); Gosan, South Korea (2005 - 2006); Izaña, Canary Islands (1989 - 1996); and Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (2005 - 2006) to evaluate the relationship between Pu activity and mineral dust concentrations (using crustal elements such as aluminum as a dust proxy). The activity of 239,240Pu (239Pu + 240Pu) in the aerosol samples was determined by alpha spectrometry following a series of chemical separations. Concentrations of other elements were determined by a variety of techniques. Pu activity was below the detection limit in many samples. In those samples where it was detected, the Gosan site had the highest dust concentrations and highest total plutonium activity, while Mauna Loa Observatory had the lowest dust concentrations and lowest 239,240Pu activity. The Izaña samples had the second highest concentrations of dust and plutonium activity, while Barbados had the third highest levels of both crustal aerosols and plutonium activity. The dust concentrations are consistent with previous observations at these remote sites, and we propose that the plutonium (primarily from past atmospheric nuclear weapons testing, much of which took place in arid lands) was deposited on erodible soil surfaces and subsequently transported as part of the overall mineral dust load. The results of this study have implications for the global transport and fate of Pu through its association with dust, the biogeochemical and environmental impacts of other substances associated with dust, and the workings of the dust cycle itself.

  14. Impact of aging mechanism on model simulated carbonaceous aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y.; Wu, S.; Dubey, M.K.; French, N. H. F.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols including organic carbon and black carbon have significant implications for both climate and air quality. In the current global climate or chemical transport models, a fixed hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion lifetime for carbonaceous aerosol (τ) is generally assumed, which is usually around one day. We have implemented a new detailed aging scheme for carbonaceous aerosols in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to account for both the chemical oxidation and the physical condensation-coagulation effects, where τ is affected by local atmospheric environment including atmospheric concentrations of water vapor, ozone, hydroxyl radical and sulfuric acid. The updated τ exhibits large spatial and temporal variations with the global average (up to 11 km altitude) calculated to be 2.6 days. The chemical aging effects are found to be strongest over the tropical regions driven by the low ozone concentrations and high humidity there. The τ resulted from chemical aging generally decreases with altitude due to increases in ozone concentration and decreases in humidity. The condensation-coagulation effects are found to be most important for the high-latitude areas, in particular the polar regions, where the τ values are calculated to be up to 15 days. When both the chemical aging and condensation-coagulation effects are considered, the total atmospheric burdens and global average lifetimes of BC, black carbon, (OC, organic carbon) are calculated to increase by 9% (3%) compared to the control simulation, with considerable enhancements of BC and OC concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere. Model evaluations against data from multiple datasets show that the updated aging scheme improves model simulations of carbonaceous aerosols for some regions, especially for the remote areas in the Northern Hemisphere. The improvement helps explain the persistent low model bias for carbonaceous aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere reported in literature. Further

  15. Meridional gradients in aerosol vertical distribution over Indian Mainland: Observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prijith, S. S.; Suresh Babu, S.; Lakshmi, N. B.; Satheesh, S. K.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-year observations from the network of ground-based observatories (ARFINET), established under the project 'Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India' (ARFI) of Indian Space Research Organization and space-borne lidar 'Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization' (CALIOP) along with simulations from the chemical transport model 'Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport' (GOCART), are used to characterize the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols over the Indian landmass and its spatial structure. While the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction showed higher values close to the surface followed by a gradual decrease at increasing altitudes, a strong meridional increase is observed in the vertical spread of aerosols across the Indian region in all seasons. It emerges that the strong thermal convections cause deepening of the atmospheric boundary layer, which although reduces the aerosol concentration at lower altitudes, enhances the concentration at higher elevations by pumping up more aerosols from below and also helping the lofted particles to reach higher levels in the atmosphere. Aerosol depolarization ratios derived from CALIPSO as well as the GOCART simulations indicate the dominance of mineral dust aerosols during spring and summer and anthropogenic aerosols in winter. During summer monsoon, though heavy rainfall associated with the Indian monsoon removes large amounts of aerosols, the prevailing southwesterly winds advect more marine aerosols over to landmass (from the adjoining oceans) leading to increase in aerosol loading at lower altitudes than in spring. During spring and summer months, aerosol loading is found to be significant, even at altitudes as high as 4 km, and this is proposed to have significant impacts on the regional climate systems such as Indian monsoon.

  16. Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

    2013-06-05

    Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF) that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC) due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold) increase in the winter (summer) months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold) increase in

  17. Global modeling of organic aerosol: the importance of reactive nitrogen (NOx and NO3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, H. O. T.; Chan, A. W. H.; Barkley, M. P.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    Reactive nitrogen compounds, specifically NOx and NO3, likely influence global organic aerosol levels. To assess these interactions, GEOS-Chem, a chemical transport model, is updated to include improved biogenic emissions (following MEGAN v2.1/2.04), a new organic aerosol tracer lumping scheme, aerosol from nitrate radical (NO3) oxidation of isoprene, and NOx-dependent monoterpene and sesquiterpene aerosol yields. As a result of significant nighttime terpene emissions, fast reaction of monoterpenes with the nitrate radical, and relatively high aerosol yields from NO3 oxidation, biogenic hydrocarbon-NO3 reactions are expected to be a major contributor to surface level aerosol concentrations in anthropogenically influenced areas such as the United States. By including aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation in GEOS-Chem, terpene (monoterpene + sesquiterpene) aerosol approximately doubles and isoprene aerosol is enhanced by 30 to 40% in the Southeast United States. In terms of the global budget of organic aerosol, however, aerosol from nitrate radical oxidation is somewhat minor (slightly more than 3 Tg/yr) due to the relatively high volatility of organic-NO3 oxidation products in the yield parameterization. Globally, 69 to 88 Tg/yr of organic aerosol is predicted to be produced annually, of which 14-15 Tg/yr is from oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes and 8-9 Tg/yr from isoprene.

  18. Inhomogeneous models of Titan's aerosol distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, M.; Bar-Nun, A.; Noy, N.; Giver, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    A model of Titan's aerosol is presented which allows the particle size to vary with height. The model assumes a refractive index appropriate to an ethylene polymer and a mass flux independent of height equal to the value derived from laboratory measurements. The free parameters of the model are determined by fitting to the observed geometric albedo at 4000 and 6000 A. A methane spectrum is derived which is in excellent agreement with observations. An aerosol optical depth of about 5 is found in the visible, with the particle radius varying from 0.01 to 8 microns. The presence of an optically thick methane cloud at the temperature minimum is indicated.

  19. Data-driven aerosol development in the GEOS-5 modeling and data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmenov, A.; da Silva, A.; Liu, X.; Colarco, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are important radiatively active agents that also affect clouds, atmospheric chemistry, the water cycle, land and ocean biogeochemistry. Furthermore, exposure to anthropogenic and/or natural fine particulates can have negative health effects. No single instrument or model is capable of quantifying the diverse and dynamic nature of aerosols at the range of spatial and temporal scales at which they interact with the other constituents and components of the Earth system. However, applying model-data integration techniques can minimize limitations of individual data products and remedy model deficiencies. The Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) is the latest version of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) Earth system model. GEOS-5 is a modeling and data assimilation framework well suited for aerosol research. It is being used to perform aerosol re-analysis and near real-time aerosol forecast on a global scale at resolutions comparable to those of aerosol products from modern spaceborne instruments. The aerosol processes in GEOS-5 derive from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) but it is implemented on-line, within the climate model. GEOS-5 aerosol modeling capabilities have recently been enhanced by inclusion of the Modal Aerosol Microphysics module (MAM-7) originally developed in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) model. This work will present examples of data driven model development that include refining parameterization of sea-salt emissions, tuning of biomass burning emissions from vegetation fires and the effect of the updated emissions on the modeled direct aerosol forcing. We will also present results from GOES-5/MAM-7 model evaluation against AOD and particulate pollution datasets, and outline future directions of aerosol data assimilation in the GEOS-5 system.

  20. The Dynamics of Aerosols: Recent Developments In Regional and Global Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, E.

    An efficient and accurate representation of aerosol size distributions and microphysi- cal processes is required to make physically consistent calculations of the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosols and their impact on climate. Various modelling approaches have been developed to simulate the dynamical evolu- tion of natural and anthropogenic aerosol populations. Among the components of the particulate phase, sulphate, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon and dust all play an important role. However their contributions vary from region to region. Modal models, in which the aerosol size distribution is represented by a number of modes, present a computational attractive approach for aerosol dynamic modelling in regional and global models. They can describe external as well as internal mixtures of aerosol particles and the full aerosol dynamics. The accuracy of modal models is however dependent on both the suitability of the lognormal approximation to the size distribution and the extent to which processes can be expressed in terms of distribution parameters. Simultaneously, recent developments have been made to treat many aerosol species in global models using discrete size bins. The detailed description allows a more ac- curate calculation of the aerosol water content, an important parameter required for calculations of aerosol optical properties. However, such a fine size resolution is usu- ally time consuming when used in large scale models, therefore sometimes not all the processes modifying aerosol properties are included. Modest requirements for storage and computations is one of the advantages of moment methods. These techniques have the capability of simultaneously represent the aerosol dynamic processes and transport in large scale models. An overview of recent developments of aerosol modelling in global and regional mod- els will be presented outlining the advantages and disadvantages of the various tech- niques for such large scales.

  1. A Simulated Climatology of Asian Dust Aerosol and Its Trans-Pacific Transport. Part I: Mean Climate and Validation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. L.; Gong, S. L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Blanchet, J.-P.; McKendry, I. G.; Zhou, Z. J.

    2006-01-01

    The Northern Aerosol Regional Climate Model (NARCM) was used to construct a 44-yr climatology of spring Asian dust aerosol emission, column loading, deposition, trans-Pacific transport routes, and budgets during 1960 2003. Comparisons with available ground dust observations and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Aerosol Index (AI) measurements verified that NARCM captured most of the climatological characteristics of the spatial and temporal distributions, as well as the interannual and daily variations of Asian dust aerosol during those 44 yr. Results demonstrated again that the deserts in Mongolia and in western and northern China (mainly the Taklimakan and Badain Juran, respectively) were the major sources of Asian dust aerosol in East Asia. The dust storms in spring occurred most frequently from early April to early May with a daily averaged dust emission (diameter d < 41 μm) of 1.58 Mt in April and 1.36 Mt in May. Asian dust aerosol contributed most of the dust aerosol loading in the troposphere over the midlatitude regions from East Asia to western North America during springtime. Climatologically, dry deposition was a dominant dust removal process near the source areas, while the removal of dust particles by precipitation was the major process over the trans-Pacific transport pathway (where wet deposition exceeded dry deposition up to a factor of 20). The regional transport of Asian dust aerosol over the Asian subcontinent was entrained to an elevation of <3 km. The frontal cyclone in Mongolia and northern China uplifted dust aerosol in the free troposphere for trans-Pacific transport. Trans-Pacific dust transport peaked between 3 and 10 km in the troposphere along a zonal transport axis around 40°N. Based on the 44-yr-averaged dust budgets for the modeling domain from East Asia to western North America, it was estimated that of the average spring dust aerosol (diameter d < 41 μm) emission of 120 Mt from Asian source regions, about 51% was

  2. Chromism of Model Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, Angela; Guzman, Marcelo; Hoffmann, Michael; Colussi, Agustin

    2008-03-01

    The optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol play a fundamental role in the Earth's radiative balance. Since more than half of the aerosol mass consists of complex organic matter that absorbs in the ultraviolet and visible regions of the spectrum, it is important to establish the identity of the organic chromophores. Here we report studies on the chromism vs. chemical composition of photolyzed (lambda longer than 305 nm) solutions of pyruvic acid, a widespread aerosol component, under a variety of experimental conditions that include substrate concentration, temperature and the presence of relevant spectator solutes, such ammonium sulfate. We use high resolution mass- and 13C NMR-spectrometries to track chemical speciation in photolyzed solutions as they undergo thermochromic and photobleaching cycles. Since the chemical identity of the components of these mixtures does not change in these cycles, in which photobleached solutions gradually recover their yellow color in the dark with non-conventional kinetics typical of aggregation processes, we infer that visible absorptions likely involve the intermolecular coupling of carbonyl chromophores in supramolecular assemblies made possible by the polyfunctional nature of the products of pyruvic acid photolysis.

  3. Modelling Aerosol Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, B. K.; Jones, D. P.; Gallagher, M. W.; McFiggans, G. B.; Watkins, A. P.

    2009-04-01

    Flow patterns within an urban street canyon are influenced by various micrometeorological factors. It also represents an environment where pollutants such as aerosols accumulate to high levels due to high volumes of traffic. As adverse health effects are being attributed to exposure to aerosols, an investigation of the dispersion of aerosols within such environments is of growing importance. In particular, one is concerned with the vertical structure of the aerosol concentration, the ventilation characteristics of the street canyon and the influence of aerosol microphysical processes. Due to the inherent heterogeneity of the aerosol concentrations within the street canyon and the lack of spatial resolution of measurement campaigns, these issues are an on-going debate. Therefore, a modelling tool is required to represent aerosol dispersion patterns to provide insights to results of past measurement campaigns. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models are able to predict detailed airflow patterns within urban geometries. This capability may be further extended to include aerosol dispersion, by an Euler-Euler multiphase approach. To facilitate the investigation, a two-dimensional, multiphase CFD tool coupled with the k-epsilon turbulence model and with the capability of modelling mixed convection flow regimes arising from both wind driven flows and buoyancy effects from heated walls was developed. Assuming wind blowing perpendicularly to the canyon axis and treating aerosols as a passive scalar, an attempt will be made to assess the sensitivities of aerosol vertical structure and ventilation characteristics to the various flow conditions. Numerical studies were performed using an idealized 10m by 10m canyon to represent a regular canyon and 10m by 5m to represent a deep one. An aerosol emission source was assigned on the centerline of the canyon to represent exhaust emissions. The vertical structure of the aerosols would inform future directives regarding the

  4. Chemical and Aerosol Signatures of Biomass Burning via Long Range Transport observed at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; Obrist, D.; McCubbin, I. B.; Fain, X.; Rahn, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the Steamboat Springs Ski Resort in Colorado at an elevation 3.2 km. During the spring of 2008, two field projects were conducted at SPL; Storm Peak Cloud and Aerosol Characterization (SPACC) and a State of Colorado Mercury Monitoring project. Measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), along with CO, ozone and aerosol concentrations and aerosol size distributions will be presented from April 28 to July 1st 2008. This work focuses on specific case studies pertaining to long range transport events. Specifically, high levels of GEM and CO will be presented from May 15, 2008. This data will be coupled with HYSPLIT backtrajectories, chemical modeling via MOZART, and satellite imagery (MODIS) to present evidence that Siberian wildfires impacted the air quality at Storm Peak Laboratory.

  5. A Global Aerosol Model Forecast for the ACE-Asia Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Lucchesi, Robert; Huebert, Barry; Weber, Rodney; Anderson, Tad; Masonis, Sarah; Blomquist, Byron; Bandy, Alan; Thornton, Donald

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of aerosol forecast during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) field experiment in spring 2001, using the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model and the meteorological forecast fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The aerosol model forecast provides direct information on aerosol optical thickness and concentrations, enabling effective flight planning, while feedbacks from measurements constantly evaluate the model, making successful model improvements. We verify the model forecast skill by comparing model predicted total aerosol extinction, dust, sulfate, and SO2 concentrations with those quantities measured by the C-130 aircraft during the ACE-Asia intensive operation period. The GEOS DAS meteorological forecast system shows excellent skills in predicting winds, relative humidity, and temperature for the ACE-Asia experiment area as well as for each individual flight, with skill scores usually above 0.7. The model is also skillful in forecast of pollution aerosols, with most scores above 0.5. The model correctly predicted the dust outbreak events and their trans-Pacific transport, but it constantly missed the high dust concentrations observed in the boundary layer. We attribute this missing dust source to the desertification regions in the Inner Mongolia Province in China, which have developed in recent years but were not included in the model during forecasting. After incorporating the desertification sources, the model is able to reproduce the observed high dust concentrations at low altitudes over the Yellow Sea. Two key elements for a successful aerosol model forecast are correct source locations that determine where the emissions take place, and realistic forecast winds and convection that determine where the aerosols are transported. We demonstrate that our global model can not only account for the large

  6. INDOOR CONCENTRATION MODELING OF AEROSOL STRONG ACIDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for estimating indoor concentrations of acid aerosol was applied to data collected during the summer of 1989, in a densely populated location in New Jersey. he model, from a study of a semi-rural community in Pennsylvania, was used to estimate indoor concentrations of aer...

  7. High Resolution Aerosol Modeling: Decadal Changes in Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C C; Govindasamy, B; Cameron-Smith, P J; Rotman, D A

    2005-02-01

    The Atmospheric Science Division of LLNL has performed high-resolution calculations of direct sulfate forcing using a DOE-provided computer resource at NERSC. We integrated our global chemistry-aerosol model (IMPACT) with the LLNL high-resolution global climate model (horizontal resolution as high as 100 km) to examine the temporal evolution of sulfate forcing since 1950. We note that all previous assessments of sulfate forcing reported in IPCC (2001) were based on global models with coarse spatial resolutions ({approx} 300 km or even coarser). However, the short lifetime of aerosols ({approx} days) results in large spatial and temporal variations of radiative forcing by sulfate. As a result, global climate models with coarse resolutions do not accurately simulate sulfate forcing on regional scales. It requires much finer spatial resolutions in order to address the effects of regional anthropogenic SO{sub 2} emissions on the global atmosphere as well as the effects of long-range transport of sulfate aerosols on the regional climate forcing. By taking advantage of the tera-scale computer resources at NERSC, we simulated the historic direct sulfate forcing at much finer spatial resolutions than ever attempted before. Furthermore, we performed high-resolution chemistry simulations and saved monthly averaged oxidant fields, which will be used in subsequent simulations of sulfate aerosol formation and their radiative impact.

  8. A physical model of Titan's aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Mckay, C. P.; Griffith, C. A.; Turco, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A modeling effort is presented for the nature of the stratospheric haze on Titan, under several simplifying assumptions; chief among these is that the aerosols in question are of a single composition, and involatile. It is further assumed that a one-dimensional model is capable of simulating the general characteristics of the aerosol. It is suggested in this light that the detached haze on Titan may be a manifestation of organized, Hadley-type motions above 300 km altitude, with vertical velocities of 1 cm/sec. The hemispherical asymmetry of the visible albedo may be due to organized vertical motions within the upper 150-200 km of the haze.

  9. Variabilities and uncertainties in characterising water transport kinetics in glassy and ultraviscous aerosol.

    PubMed

    Rickards, Andrew M J; Song, Young-Chul; Miles, Rachael E H; Preston, Thomas C; Reid, Jonathan P

    2015-04-21

    We present a comprehensive evaluation of the variabilities and uncertainties present in determining the kinetics of water transport in ultraviscous aerosol droplets, alongside new measurements of the water transport timescale in sucrose aerosol. Measurements are performed on individual droplets captured using aerosol optical tweezers and the change in particle size during water evaporation or condensation is inferred from shifts in the wavelength of the whispering gallery mode peaks at which spontaneous Raman scattering is enhanced. The characteristic relaxation timescale (τ) for condensation or evaporation of water from viscous droplets following a change in gas phase relative humidity can be described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function. To adequately characterise the water transport kinetics and determine τ, sufficient time must be allowed for the particle to progress towards the final state. However, instabilities in the environmental conditions can prevent an accurate characterisation of the kinetics over such long time frames. Comparison with established thermodynamic and diffusional water transport models suggests the determination of τ is insensitive to the choice of thermodynamic treatment. We report excellent agreement between experimental and simulated evaporation timescales, and investigate the scaling of τ with droplet radius. A clear increase in τ is observed for condensation with increase in drying (wait) time. This trend is qualitatively supported by model simulations. PMID:25786190

  10. Aerosol Resuspension Model for MELCOR for Fusion and Very High Temperature Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    B.J. Merrill

    2011-01-01

    Dust is generated in fusion reactors from plasma erosion of plasma facing components within the reactor’s vacuum vessel (VV) during reactor operation. This dust collects in cooler regions on interior surfaces of the VV. Because this dust can be radioactive, toxic, and/or chemically reactive, it poses a safety concern, especially if mobilized by the process of resuspension during an accident and then transported as an aerosol though out the reactor confinement building, and possibly released to the environment. A computer code used at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to model aerosol transport for safety consequence analysis is the MELCOR code. A primary reason for selecting MELCOR for this application is its aerosol transport capabilities. The INL Fusion Safety Program (FSP) organization has made fusion specific modifications to MELCOR. Recent modifications include the implementation of aerosol resuspension models in MELCOR 1.8.5 for Fusion. This paper presents the resuspension models adopted and the initial benchmarking of these models.

  11. Size distribution and optical properties of mineral dust aerosols transported in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, C.; Cassola, F.; Mazzino, A.; Triquet, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Grand, N.; Bourrianne, T.; Momboisse, G.; Sellegri, K.; Schwarzenbock, A.; Freney, E.; Mallet, M.; Formenti, P.

    2016-02-01

    This study presents in situ aircraft measurements of Saharan mineral dust transported over the western Mediterranean basin in June-July 2013 during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) airborne campaign. Dust events differing in terms of source region (Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco), time of transport (1-5 days) and height of transport were sampled. Mineral dust were transported above the marine boundary layer, which conversely was dominated by pollution and marine aerosols. The dust vertical structure was extremely variable and characterized by either a single layer or a more complex and stratified structure with layers originating from different source regions. Mixing of mineral dust with pollution particles was observed depending on the height of transport of the dust layers. Dust layers carried a higher concentration of pollution particles below 3 km above sea level (a.s.l.) than above 3 km a.s.l., resulting in a scattering Ångström exponent up to 2.2 below 3 km a.s.l. However, the optical properties of the dust plumes remained practically unchanged with respect to values previously measured over source regions, regardless of the altitude. Moderate absorption of light by the dust plumes was observed with values of aerosol single scattering albedo at 530 nm ranging from 0.90 to 1.00. Concurrent calculations from the aerosol chemical composition revealed a negligible contribution of pollution particles to the absorption properties of the dust plumes that was due to a low contribution of refractory black carbon in regards to the fraction of dust and sulfate particles. This suggests that, even in the presence of moderate pollution, likely a persistent feature in the Mediterranean, the optical properties of the dust plumes could be assumed similar to those of native dust in radiative transfer simulations, modelling studies and satellite retrievals

  12. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog in East Asia from AERONET and Satellite Remote Sensing: 2012 DRAGON Campaigns and Climatological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Lynch, P.; Schafer, J.; Giles, D. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sano, I.; Arola, A. T.; Munchak, L. A.; O'Neill, N. T.; Lyapustin, A.; Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Govindaraju, R.; Hyer, E. J.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. Major Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) field campaigns involving multiple AERONET sites in Japan and South Korea during Spring of 2012 have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth (AODf) signal from AERONET data for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors (from Dark Target, Deep Blue and MAIAC algorithms) were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. Underestimation of fine mode AOD by the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) and by the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis For Research And Applications Aerosol Re-analysis (MERRAaero) models at very high AOD at sites in China and Korea was observed, especially for observations that are cloud screened by AERONET (Level 2 data). Additionally, multi-year monitoring at several AERONET sites are examined for climatological statistics of cloud screening of fine mode aerosol events. Aerosol that has been affected by clouds or the near-cloud environment may be more prevalent than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in

  13. Properties of the stratospheric aerosol layer studied with a one-dimensional computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Hamill, P.; Kiang, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    Aerosol particle effects are often neglected in theoretical studies of stratospheric phenomena. In reality, the particulate matter normally found above the tropopause may influence the terrestrial radiation balance, catalyze heterogeneous chemical interactions, and serve as a tracer of atmospheric motions. The paper proposes a one-dimensional model of the stratospheric aerosol layer, and it is used to compare aerosol theory with observational data. The model considers gaseous sulfur photochemistry and the physical aerosol processes of nucleation, coagulation, sedimentation, and diffusion. Calculations of the effects on the aerosol layer of stratospheric injections of aluminum oxide particles by Space Shuttle engines and of sulfur dioxide molecules by volcanic activity are performed. The relation between measured aerosol variability and changes in stratospheric air temperatures and vertical transport rates are discussed.

  14. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, J.-C.; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, B.; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, J. D.

    2014-11-01

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using EMEP measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic, showing a good agreement, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5-6 km. Both modeled plume types had significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne LIDAR measurements. Evaluating the regional impacts in the Arctic of this event in terms of aerosol vertical structure, we find that during the 4 day presence of these aerosols in the lower European Arctic (< 75° N), biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface. The European plumes sampled during POLARCAT-France were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in Northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport event, the average modeled top of atmosphere (TOA

  15. SENSITIVITY OF OZONE AND AEROSOL PREDICTIONS TO THE TRANSPORT ALGORITHMS IN THE MODELS-3 COMMUNITY MULTI-SCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODELING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Models-3 CMAQ system is intended to provide a community modeling paradigm that allows continuous improvement of the one-atmosphere modeling capability in a unified fashion. CMAQ's modular design promotes incorporation of several sets of science process modules representing ...

  16. An AeroCom Initial Assessment - Optical Properties in Aerosol Component Modules of Global Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.; Textor, C.; Guibert, S.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Berglen, T.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, H.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Grini, A.; Hendricks, J.; Herzog, M.; Horrowitz, L.; Isaksen, I.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Kloster, S.; Koch, D.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Krol, M.; Lauer, A.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lesins, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, U.; Montanaro, V.; Myhre, G.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tie, X.

    2006-05-29

    The AeroCom exercise diagnoses multi-component aerosol modules in global modeling. In an initial assessment global fields for mass and for mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (aot) were compared among aerosol component modules of 21 different global models. There is general agreement among models for the annual global mean of component combined aot. At 0.12 to 0.14, simulated aot values are at the lower end of global averages suggested by remote sensing from ground (AERONET ca 0.14) and space (MODIS-MISR composite ca 0.16). More detailed comparisons, however, reveal that larger differences in regional distribution and significant differences in compositional mixture have remained. Of particular concern is the large model diversity for contributions by dust and carbon, because it leads to significant uncertainty in aerosol absorption (aab). Since not only aot but also aab influence the aerosol impact on the radiative energy-balance, aerosol (direct) forcing uncertainty in modeling is larger than differences in aot might suggest. New diagnostic approaches are proposed to trace model differences in terms of aerosol processing and transport: These include the prescription of common input (e.g. amount, size and injection of aerosol component emissions) and the use of observational capabilities from ground (e.g. measurements networks) and space (e.g. correlations between retrieved aerosol and cloud properties).

  17. Assimilation of Aerosols from Biomass Burning by the Radiative Transfer Model Brasil-Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, R. S.; Gonçalves, A. R.; Souza, J. G.; Martins, F. R.; Pereira, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative transfer model BRASIL-SR is the main tool used by the Earth System Science Centre from the National Institute for Space Research (CCST / INPE) for solar energy resource assessment. Due to large and frequent events of burning biomass in Brazil there is a need to improve the aerosol representation in this model, mainly during the dry season (September - November) in Northern and Central Brazil. The standard aerosol representation in this model is inadequate to capture these events. It is based on the mean monthly climatological horizontal visibility with latitudinal values based on coarse global observation data. To improve the aerosol representation, climatological data of daily horizontal visibility from National Institute of Meteorology (INMET) was used to generate monthly averages from 1999 to 2012. To do a better representation of aerosols from burning biomass events, from megacities aerosol generation, and from transport processes, horizontal visibility estimates performed using aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm data from MACC Project Reanalysis model were used to adjust the aerosol representation in regions were the simple horizontal visibility fails. A methodology to generate these new visibility data from the Reanalysis was made and the resulting data was compared with the average horizontal visibility to implement a new corrected database. The solar irradiation simulated by the model using this new aerosol representation proved to be better than the previous version of the model in all regions with high aerosol loading.

  18. Global Aerosol Optical Models and Lookup Tables for the New MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Loraine A.; Dubovik, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Since 2000, MODIS has been deriving aerosol properties over land from MODIS observed spectral reflectance, by matching the observed reflectance with that simulated for selected aerosol optical models, aerosol loadings, wavelengths and geometrical conditions (that are contained in a lookup table or 'LUT'). Validation exercises have showed that MODIS tends to under-predict aerosol optical depth (tau) in cases of large tau (tau greater than 1.0), signaling errors in the assumed aerosol optical properties. Using the climatology of almucantur retrievals from the hundreds of global AERONET sunphotometer sites, we found that three spherical-derived models (describing fine-sized dominated aerosol), and one spheroid-derived model (describing coarse-sized dominated aerosol, presumably dust) generally described the range of observed global aerosol properties. The fine dominated models were separated mainly by their single scattering albedo (omega(sub 0)), ranging from non-absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.95) in developed urban/industrial regions, to neutrally absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx.90) in forest fire burning and developing industrial regions, to absorbing aerosol (omega(sub 0) approx. 0.85) in regions of savanna/grassland burning. We determined the dominant model type in each region and season, to create a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid of assumed aerosol type. We used vector radiative transfer code to create a new LUT, simulating the four aerosol models, in four MODIS channels. Independent AERONET observations of spectral tau agree with the new models, indicating that the new models are suitable for use by the MODIS aerosol retrieval.

  19. Trans-Pacific transport and evolution of aerosols: evaluation of quasi-global WRF-Chem simulation with multiple observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Chun; Huang, Jianping; Leung, L. Ruby; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Huang, Lei; Kalashnikova, Olga V.

    2016-05-01

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem, the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry) has been configured to conduct quasi-global simulation for 5 years (2010-2014) and evaluated with multiple observation data sets for the first time. The evaluation focuses on the simulation over the trans-Pacific transport region using various reanalysis and observational data sets for meteorological fields and aerosol properties. The simulation generally captures the overall spatial and seasonal variability of satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and absorbing AOD (AAOD) over the Pacific that is determined by the outflow of pollutants and dust and the emissions of marine aerosols. The assessment of simulated extinction Ångström exponent (EAE) indicates that the model generally reproduces the variability of aerosol size distributions as seen by satellites. In addition, the vertical profile of aerosol extinction and its seasonality over the Pacific are also well simulated. The difference between the simulation and satellite retrievals can be mainly attributed to model biases in estimating marine aerosol emissions as well as the satellite sampling and retrieval uncertainties. Compared with the surface measurements over the western USA, the model reasonably simulates the observed magnitude and seasonality of dust, sulfate, and nitrate surface concentrations, but significantly underestimates the peak surface concentrations of carbonaceous aerosol likely due to model biases in the spatial and temporal variability of biomass burning emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production. A sensitivity simulation shows that the trans-Pacific transported dust, sulfate, and nitrate can make significant contribution to surface concentrations over the rural areas of the western USA, while the peaks of carbonaceous aerosol surface concentrations are dominated by the North American emissions. Both the retrievals and simulation show small

  20. Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan H; Molina, Mario J

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols affect weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track, using a multiscale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and preindustrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by -2.5 and +1.3 W m(-2), respectively, by emission changes from preindustrial to present day, and an increased cloud top height indicates invigorated midlatitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, a global perspective of the effects of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multiscale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on a global scale. PMID:24733923

  1. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  2. Evolution of ozone, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg A.; Peckham, Steven E.

    2006-11-01

    A new fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban- to regional-scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a 5 day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still underestimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  3. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne E.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-06-28

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth’s energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically-based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect using analytic representations of droplet nucleation, cloud and aerosol vertical structure, and horizontal variability in cloud water and aerosol concentration. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of aerosol indirect effects that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates are found to be sensitive to several uncertain parameters, including the preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the size of the primary particles, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Aerosol indirect effects are surprisingly linear in emissions. This simple model provides a much stronger physical basis for representing aerosol indirect effects than previous representations in integrated assessment models designed to quickly explore the parameter space of emissions-climate interactions. The model also produces estimates that depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models.

  4. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelle, L.; Raut, J.-C.; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, B.; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, J. D.

    2015-04-01

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5-6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this transport

  5. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-04-10

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that duringmore » the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant local atmospheric warming effect. We find that, during this

  6. Transport of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols from Europe to the Arctic during spring 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Marelle, L.; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, J. L.; Law, K. S.; Quennehen, Boris; Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2015-04-10

    During the POLARCAT-France airborne campaign in April 2008, pollution originating from anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions was measured in the European Arctic. We compare these aircraft measurements with simulations using the WRF-Chem model to investigate model representation of aerosols transported from Europe to the Arctic. Modeled PM2.5 is evaluated using European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurements in source regions and POLARCAT aircraft measurements in the Scandinavian Arctic. Total PM2.5 agrees well with the measurements, although the model overestimates nitrate and underestimates organic carbon in source regions. Using WRF-Chem in combination with the Lagrangian model FLEXPART-WRF, we find that during the campaign the research aircraft sampled two different types of European plumes: mixed anthropogenic and fire plumes from eastern Europe and Russia transported below 2 km, and anthropogenic plumes from central Europe uplifted by warm conveyor belt circulations to 5–6 km. Both modeled plume types had undergone significant wet scavenging (> 50% PM10) during transport. Modeled aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties below the aircraft are evaluated in the Arctic using airborne lidar measurements. Model results show that the pollution event transported aerosols into the Arctic (> 66.6° N) for a 4-day period. During this 4-day period, biomass burning emissions have the strongest influence on concentrations between 2.5 and 3 km altitudes, while European anthropogenic emissions influence aerosols at both lower (~ 1.5 km) and higher altitudes (~ 4.5 km). As a proportion of PM2.5, modeled black carbon and SO4= concentrations are more enhanced near the surface in anthropogenic plumes. The European plumes sampled during the POLARCAT-France campaign were transported over the region of springtime snow cover in northern Scandinavia, where they had a significant

  7. MIRAGE: Model Description and Evaluation of Aerosols and Trace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zhang, Yang; Saylor, Rick D.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bian, Xindi; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2004-10-27

    The MIRAGE (Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges) modeling system, designed to study the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the global environment, is described. MIRAGE consists of a chemical transport model coupled on line with a global climate model. The chemical transport model simulates trace gases, aerosol number, and aerosol chemical component mass [sulfate, MSA, organic matter, black carbon (BC), sea salt, mineral dust] for four aerosol modes (Aitken, accumulation, coarse sea salt, coarse mineral dust) using the modal aerosol dynamics approach. Cloud-phase and interstitial aerosol are predicted separately. The climate model, based on the CCM2, has physically-based treatments of aerosol direct and indirect forcing. Stratiform cloud water and droplet number are simulated using a bulk microphysics parameterization that includes aerosol activation. Aerosol and trace gas species simulated by MIRAGE are presented and evaluated using surface and aircraft measurements. Surface-level SO2 in N. American and European source regions is higher than observed. SO2 above the boundary layer is in better agreement with observations, and surface-level SO2 at marine locations is somewhat lower than observed. Comparison with other models suggests insufficient SO2 dry deposition; increasing the deposition velocity improves simulated SO2. Surface-level sulfate in N. American and European source regions is in good agreement with observations, although the seasonal cycle in Europe is stronger than observed. Surface-level sulfate at high-latitude and marine locations, and sulfate above the boundary layer, are higher than observed. This is attributed primarily to insufficient wet removal; increasing the wet removal improves simulated sulfate at remote locations and aloft. Because of the high sulfate bias, radiative forcing estimates for anthropogenic sulfur in Ghan et al. [2001c] are probably too high. Surface-level DMS is {approx}40% higher than observed

  8. Impact of Asian Aerosols on Precipitation Over California: An Observational and Model Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naeger, Aaron R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Creamean, Jessie M.

    2015-01-01

    Dust and pollution emissions from Asia are often transported across the Pacific Ocean to over the western United States. Therefore, it is essential to fully understand the impact of these aerosols on clouds and precipitation forming over the eastern Pacific and western United States, especially during atmospheric river events that account for up to half of California's annual precipitation and can lead to widespread flooding. In order for numerical modeling simulations to accurately represent the present and future regional climate of the western United States, we must account for the aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions associated with Asian dust and pollution aerosols. Therefore, we have constructed a detailed study utilizing multi-sensor satellite observations, NOAA-led field campaign measurements, and targeted numerical modeling studies where Asian aerosols interacted with cloud and precipitation processes over the western United States. In particular, we utilize aerosol optical depth retrievals from the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-11), and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) to effectively detect and monitor the trans-Pacific transport of Asian dust and pollution. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals are used in assimilating the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) in order to provide the model with an accurate representation of the aerosol spatial distribution across the Pacific. We conduct WRF-Chem model simulations of several cold-season atmospheric river events that interacted with Asian aerosols and brought significant precipitation over California during February-March 2011 when the NOAA CalWater field campaign was ongoing. The CalWater field campaign consisted of aircraft and surface measurements of aerosol and precipitation processes that help extensively validate our WRF

  9. Characterization of the seasonal cycle of south Asian aerosols: A Regional-Scale Modeling Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikary, Bhupesh; Carmichael, Gregory; Tang, Youhua; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Schauer, James J.; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Ramana, Muvva V.

    2007-11-07

    The STEM chemical transport model is used to study the aerosol distribution, composition and seasonality over South Asia from September 2004 to August 2005. Model predictions of sulfate, black carbon, primary organic carbon, other anthropogenic particulate matter, wind blown mineral dusts and sea salt are compared at two sites in South Asia where year long experimental observations are available from the Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) Project. The model predictions are able to capture both the magnitude and seasonality of aerosols over Hanimaadhoo Observatory, Maldives. However, the model is not able to explain the seasonality at the Kathmandu Observatory; but the model does capture Kathmandu’s observed annual mean concentration. The absence of seasonal brick kiln emissions within Kathmandu valley in the current inventory is a probable reason for this problem. This model study reveals high anthropogenic aerosol loading over the Ganges valley even in the monsoonal months, which needs to be corroborated by experimental observations. Modeling results also show a high dust loading over South Asia with a distinct seasonality. Model results of aerosol monthly composition are also presented at 5 cities in South Asia. Total and fine mode aerosol optical depth along with contribution from each aerosol species is presented; the results show that the anthropogenic fraction dominates in the dry season with major contributions from sulfate and absorbing aerosols. Finally comparison with observations show that model improvements are needed in the treatment of aerosol dry and wet removal processes and increase in sulfate production via heterogeneous pathways.

  10. Aerosol Models for the CALIPSO Lidar Inversion Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Winker, David M.; Won, Jae-Gwang

    2003-01-01

    We use measurements and models to develop aerosol models for use in the inversion algorithms for the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Imager Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO). Radiance measurements and inversions of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET1, 2) are used to group global atmospheric aerosols using optical and microphysical parameters. This study uses more than 105 records of radiance measurements, aerosol size distributions, and complex refractive indices to generate the optical properties of the aerosol at more 200 sites worldwide. These properties together with the radiance measurements are then classified using classical clustering methods to group the sites according to the type of aerosol with the greatest frequency of occurrence at each site. Six significant clusters are identified: desert dust, biomass burning, urban industrial pollution, rural background, marine, and dirty pollution. Three of these are used in the CALIPSO aerosol models to characterize desert dust, biomass burning, and polluted continental aerosols. The CALIPSO aerosol model also uses the coarse mode of desert dust and the fine mode of biomass burning to build a polluted dust model. For marine aerosol, the CALIPSO aerosol model uses measurements from the SEAS experiment 3. In addition to categorizing the aerosol types, the cluster analysis provides all the column optical and microphysical properties for each cluster.

  11. Size distribution and optical properties of mineral dust aerosols transported in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, C.; Cassola, F.; Mazzino, A.; Triquet, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Grand, N.; Bourrianne, T.; Momboisse, G.; Sellegri, K.; Schwarzenbock, A.; Freney, E.; Mallet, M.; Formenti, P.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents in situ aircraft measurements of Saharan mineral dust transported over the western Mediterranean basin in June-July 2013 during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) airborne campaign. Dust events differing in terms of source region (Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco), time of tranport (1-5 days) and height of transport were sampled. Mineral dust were transported above the marine boundary layer, which conversely was dominated by pollution and marine aerosols. The dust vertical structure was extremely variable and characterized by either a single layer or a more complex and stratified structure with layers originating from different source regions. Mixing of mineral dust with pollution particles was observed depending on the height of transport of the dust layers. Dust layers carried higher concentration of pollution particles at intermediate altitude (1-3 km) than at elevated altitude (> 3 km), resulting in scattering Angstrom exponent up to 2.2 within the intermediate altitude. However, the optical properties of the dust plumes remained practically unchanged with respect to values previously measured over source regions, regardless of the altitude. Moderate light absorption of the dust plumes was observed with values of aerosol single scattering albedo at 530 nm ranging from 0.90 to 1.00 ± 0.04. Concurrent calculations from the aerosol chemical composition revealed a negligible contribution of pollution particles to the absorption properties of the dust plumes that was due to a low contribution of refractory black carbon in regards to the fraction of dust and sulfate particles. This suggests that, even in the presence of moderate pollution, likely a persistent feature in the Mediterranean, the optical properties of the dust plumes could be assimilated to those of native dust in radiative transfer simulations, modeling studies and

  12. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    This document describes a model for condensation of sulfuric acid aerosol given an initial concentration and/or source of gaseous sulfur trioxide (e.g. fuming from oleum). The model includes the thermochemical effects on aerosol condensation and air parcel buoyancy. Condensation is assumed to occur heterogeneously onto a preexisting background aerosol distribution. The model development is both a revisiting of research initially presented at the Fall 2001 American Geophysical Union Meeting [1] and a further extension to provide new capabilities for current atmospheric dispersion modeling efforts [2]. Sulfuric acid is one of the most widely used of all industrial chemicals. In 1992, world consumption of sulfuric acid was 145 million metric tons, with 42.4 Mt (mega-tons) consumed in the United States [10]. In 2001, of 37.5 Mt consumed in the U.S., 74% went into producing phosphate fertilizers [11]. Another significant use is in mining industries. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] estimate that, in 1996, 68% of use was for fertilizers and 5.8% was for mining. They note that H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} use has been and should continue to be very stable. In the United States, the elimination of MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) and the use of ethanol for gasoline production are further increasing the demand for petroleum alkylate. Alkylate producers have a choice of either a hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid process. Both processes are widely used today. Concerns, however, over the safety or potential regulation of hydrofluoric acid are likely to result in most of the growth being for the sulfuric acid process, further increasing demand [11]. The implication of sulfuric acid being a pervasive industrial chemical is that transport is also pervasive. Often, this is in the form of oleum tankers, having around 30% free sulfur trioxide. Although sulfuric acid itself is not a volatile substance, fuming sulfuric acid (referred to as oleum) is [7], the volatile product being sulfur trioxide

  13. New Lidar Capabilities in Space: An Overview of the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, M. J.; Yorks, J. E.; Hlavka, D. L.; Selmer, P. A.; Hart, W. D.; Palm, S. P.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Vaughan, M.; Rodier, S. D.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Buchard, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), built at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a payload for the International Space Station (ISS), is set to launch in the late 2014. CATS is an elastic backscatter lidar operating in one of three science modes with three wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm) and HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at the 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths. The CATS science modes are described in Figure 1. The ISS orbit is a 51 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of about 405 km. This orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three day repeat cycle. Thus, science applications of CATS include cloud and aerosol climate studies, air quality monitoring, and smoke/volcanic plume tracking. Current uncertainties in cloud and aerosol properties limit our ability to accurately model the Earth's climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties in adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. A primary science objectives of CATS is to provide global aerosol and cloud vertical profile data in near real time to for assimilation in aerosol transport models such as the NASA GEOS-5 model. Furthermore, the vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties provided by CATS will complement current and future passive satellite sensors. Another important science objective of CATS is to advance technology in support of future mission development. CATS will employ 355 nm and HSRL capabilities, as well as depolarization at multiple wavelengths. These expanded measurement capabilities will provide the science community with new and improved global data products that have yet to be retrieved from space-based lidar. In preparation for launch, simulations of the CATS lidar signal are produced using GEOS5 model data to develop and test future data products. An example of the simulated CATS attenuated

  14. The relationship between aerosol model uncertainty and radiative forcing uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, Ken; Lee, Lindsay; Reddington, Carly

    2016-04-01

    There has been no systematic assessment of how reduction in the uncertainty of global aerosol models will feed through to the uncertainty in the predicted forcing. We use a global model perturbed parameter ensemble to show that tight observational constraint of aerosol concentrations in the model has a relatively small effect on the aerosol-related uncertainty in the calculated aerosol-cloud forcing between pre-industrial and present day periods. One factor is the low sensitivity of present-day aerosol to natural emissions that determine the pre-industrial aerosol state. But the major cause of the weak constraint is that the full uncertainty space of the model generates a large number of model variants that are "equally acceptable" compared to present-day aerosol observations. The narrow range of aerosol concentrations in the observationally constrained model gives the impression of low aerosol model uncertainty, but this hides a range of very different aerosol models. These multiple so-called "equifinal" model variants predict a wide range of forcings. Equifinality in the aerosol model means that tuning of a small number of model processes to achieve model-observation agreement could give a misleading impression of model robustness.

  15. Indoor concentration modeling of aerosol strong acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenka, M.; Waldman, J.; Suh, H.; Koutrakis, P.

    1993-01-01

    A model for estimating indoor concentrations of acid aerosol was applied to data collected during the summer of 1989, in a densely populated location in New Jersey. The model, from a study of a semi-rural community in Pennsylvania, was used to estimate indoor concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+) at an elderly care residence in suburban New Jersey. The purpose of the present work is to assess the applicability of the model for predicting H+ exposures in a suburban environment and to evaluate the models performance for daytime and nighttime periods. Indoor and outdoor samples were taken at an elderly care home between June 20 and July 30, 1989. The indoor and outdoor monitoring schedule collected two 12-h samples per day. Samples were taken with the Indoor Denuder Sampler (IDS). Samples were analyzed for indoor and outdoor concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+), ammonia (NH3), and anion determination. The model generally underestimated the indoor H+ concentration. Slight improvement was seen in the model estimate of H+ for the nighttime period (7:00 pm to 7:00 am, local time). The model applied to the site in New Jersey did not predict the indoor H+ concentrations as well as it did for the experiment from which it was developed.

  16. Models of size spectrum of tropospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.

    Quality criteria of a model distribution are considered. Information losses due to the nonorthogonality of the spectrum parameter transformation are discussed. Models are compared with a view to approximation accuracy and losses of information. Smerkalov's average tropospheric aerosol spectrum and 271 observed spectra have been used for test. Highest accuracy and lowest losses of information were yielded by a distribution having power asymptotes on both the left and the right sides.

  17. Transport and Mixing Patterns over Central California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.; Shaw, William J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Barnard, James C.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Erickson, Matthew H.; Jobson, Tom; Flowers, Bradley; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Springston, Stephen R.; Pirce, Bradley R.; Dolislager, Leon; Pederson, J. R.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-02-17

    We describe the synoptic and regional-scale meteorological conditions that affected the transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols in the vicinity of Sacramento, California during June 2010 when the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was conducted. The meteorological measurements collected by various instruments deployed during the campaign and the performance of the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) are both discussed. WRF-Chem was run daily during the campaign to forecast the spatial and temporal variation of carbon monoxide emitted from 20 anthropogenic source regions in California to guide aircraft sampling. The model is shown to reproduce the overall circulations and boundary-layer characteristics in the region, although errors in the upslope wind speed and boundary-layer depth contribute to differences in the observed and simulated carbon monoxide. Thermally-driven upslope flows that transported pollutants from Sacramento over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada occurred every afternoon, except during three periods when the passage of mid-tropospheric troughs disrupted the regional-scales flow patterns. The meteorological conditions after the passage of the third trough were the most favorable for photochemistry and likely formation of secondary organic aerosols. Meteorological measurements and model forecasts indicate that the Sacramento pollutant plume was likely transported over a downwind site that collected trace gas and aerosol measurements during 23 periods; however, direct transport occurred during only eight of these periods. The model also showed that emissions from the San Francisco Bay area transported by intrusions of marine air contributed a large fraction of the carbon monoxide in the vicinity of Sacramento, suggesting that this source likely affects local chemistry. Contributions from other sources of pollutants, such as those in the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin Valley

  18. Transport and mixing patterns over Central California during the carbonaceous aerosol and radiative effects study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect

    Fast J. D.; Springston S.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Berg, L. K.; Shaw, W. J.; Pekour, M.; Shrivastava, M.; Barnard, J. C.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. A.; Erickson, M.; Jobson, B. T.; Flowers, B.; Dubey, M. K.; Pierce, R. B.; Dolislager, L.; Pederson, J.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2012-02-17

    We describe the synoptic and regional-scale meteorological conditions that affected the transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols in the vicinity of Sacramento, California during June 2010 when the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was conducted. The meteorological measurements collected by various instruments deployed during the campaign and the performance of the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) are both discussed. WRF-Chem was run daily during the campaign to forecast the spatial and temporal variation of carbon monoxide emitted from 20 anthropogenic source regions in California to guide aircraft sampling. The model is shown to reproduce the overall circulations and boundary-layer characteristics in the region, although errors in the upslope wind speed and boundary-layer depth contribute to differences in the observed and simulated carbon monoxide. Thermally-driven upslope flows that transported pollutants from Sacramento over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada occurred every afternoon, except during three periods when the passage of mid-tropospheric troughs disrupted the regional-scale flow patterns. The meteorological conditions after the passage of the third trough were the most favorable for photochemistry and likely formation of secondary organic aerosols. Meteorological measurements and model forecasts indicate that the Sacramento pollutant plume was likely transported over a downwind site that collected trace gas and aerosol measurements during 23 time periods; however, direct transport occurred during only eight of these periods. The model also showed that emissions from the San Francisco Bay area transported by intrusions of marine air contributed a large fraction of the carbon monoxide in the vicinity of Sacramento, suggesting that this source likely affects local chemistry. Contributions from other sources of pollutants, such as those in the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin

  19. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Meigen; Feichter, J.; Liu, Xiaohong

    2010-07-14

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  20. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Wang, B.; Zhang, M.; Feichter, J.; Liu, X.

    2010-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  1. Aged Organic Aerosol in the Upper Troposphere: Aging of boundary layer aerosol during and after convective transport and in-situ SOA formation during DC3. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Hodzic, A.; Bela, M. M.; Barth, M. C.; Olson, J. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Brune, W. H.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Blake, D. R.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.

    2013-12-01

    While aerosol scavenging in deep convection is efficient (comparable to soluble species like formaldehyde), significant transport of submicron aerosol was observed repeatedly during storms targeted in the course of the DC3 (Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry ) campaign. The lofted aerosol was mostly organic, and even in fresh outflow was significantly more oxidized than the aerosol sampled in the source region of the convection. Organic aerosol (OA) sampled in both day-old outflow as well as in the background continental UT was in general significantly more oxidized than OA observed both in the fresh outflow, and in most lower tropospheric aerosol. This suggests either fast oxidative chemistry, and/or long residence times in the UT. Some of the potential factors contributing to this fast oxidation will be explored in this talk. A second source of UT OA was observed during several flights where gas-phase organics in the presence of NOx lead to the formation of secondary OA (SOA), including particulate organic nitrate. Most observations of this UT SOA during DC3 were made in fresh outflow. However, a unique opportunity to study the chemistry of this SOA formation in more detail with a box model presented itself in the flight on July 21st, 2012; here an initially near-particle-free UT airmass originating in the wake of a dissolving nighttime mesoscale convective system (MCS) was observed over several hours until new particle growth dominated by OA and particulate nitrate was measured.

  2. Transport of traffic-related aerosols in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Wróbel, A; Rokita, E; Maenhaut, W

    2000-08-10

    This study was undertaken to assess the influence of traffic on particulate air pollution in an urban area, and to characterise the short-range transport of the aerosols generated by traffic. The study was conducted in Kraków, a city located in southern Poland with a population of approximately 800,000. Aerosol samples were collected using automatic sampling equipment at five sites located at different distances from the main road in Kraków, ranging from 5 to 1500 m. The sampling set-up allowed standardisation of the results due to continuous determination of the meteorological parameters (temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction, rainfall and humidity). Aerosol particles were separated according to aerodynamic diameter into two size fractions: > 1.9 microm (coarse fraction); and 1.9-72 microm (fine fraction). The concentrations of 27 elements were measured in both size fractions (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, Pb). The multielement analyses were performed by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) spectrometry. Traffic contribution to particulate air pollution was determined on the basis of 13 elements which were present above the detection limit in all samples (Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb). It was found that the traffic contribution in the coarse size fraction was approximately 80% up to 150 m from the road; it dropped abruptly by a factor of 2 over a distance of 150-200 m and declined further to 20% at 1500 m from the road. Traffic contribution for the fine particle concentrations of individual elements was 50-70% in the close vicinity of the road (5 m); then there was a decrease, followed by an increase at a greater distance from the road. Possible explanations for this behaviour of the fine particles are given. PMID:10989929

  3. Optical, physical and chemical properties of transported African mineral dust aerosols in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Di Biagio, Claudia; Chevaillier, Servanne; Gaimoz, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Loisil, Rodrigue; Triquet, Sylvain; Zapf, Pascal; Roberts, Greg; Bourrianne, Thierry; Torres, Benjamin; Blarel, Luc; Sellegri, Karine; Freney, Evelyn; Schwarzenbock, Alfons; Ravetta, François; Laurent, Benoit; Mallet, Marc; Formenti, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The transport of mineral dust aerosols is a global phenomenon with strong climate implications. Depending on the travel distance over source regions, the atmospheric conditions and the residence time in the atmosphere, various transformation processes (size-selective sedimentation, mixing, condensation of gaseous species, and weathering) can modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral dust, which, in turn, can change the dust's optical properties. The model predictions of the radiative effect by mineral dust still suffer of the lack of certainty of these properties, and their temporal evolution with transport time. Within the frame of the ChArMex project (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/), two intensive airborne campaigns (TRAQA, TRansport and Air QuAlity, 18 June - 11 July 2012, and ADRIMED, Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact in the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region, 06 June - 08 July 2013) have been performed over the Central and Western Mediterranean, one of the two major transport pathways of African mineral dust. In this study we have set up a systematic strategy to determine the optical, physical and optical properties of mineral dust to be compared to an equivalent dataset for dust close to source regions in Africa. This study is based on airborne observations onboard the SAFIRE ATR-42 aircraft, equipped with state of the art in situ instrumentation to measure the particle scattering and backscattering coefficients (nephelometer at 450, 550, and 700 nm), the absorption coefficient (PSAP at 467, 530, and 660 nm), the extinction coefficient (CAPS at 530 nm), the aerosol optical depth (PLASMA at 340 to 1640 nm), the size distribution in the extended range 40 nm - 30 µm by the combination of different particle counters (SMPS, USHAS, FSSP, GRIMM) and the chemical composition obtained by filter sampling. The chemistry and transport model CHIMERE-Dust have been used to classify the air masses according to

  4. Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track, using a multiscale global aerosol–climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and preindustrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by −2.5 and +1.3 W m−2, respectively, by emission changes from preindustrial to present day, and an increased cloud top height indicates invigorated midlatitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides, for the first time to the authors’ knowledge, a global perspective of the effects of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multiscale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on a global scale. PMID:24733923

  5. Revisiting Aerosol Effects in Global Climate Models Using an Aerosol Lidar Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, P. L.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D. M.; Ghan, S.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol effects are considered a major source of uncertainty in global climate models and the direct and indirect radiative forcings have strong model dependency. These forcings are routinely evaluated (and calibrated) against observations, among them satellite retrievals are greatly used for their near-global coverage. However, the forcings calculated from model output are not directly comparable with those computed from satellite retrievals since sampling and algorithmic differences (such as cloud screening, noise reduction, and retrieval) between models and observations are not accounted for. It is our hypothesis that the conventional model validation procedures for comparing satellite observations and model simulations can mislead model development and introduce biases. Hence, we have developed an aerosol lidar simulator for global climate models that simulates the CALIOP lidar signal at 532nm. The simulator uses the same algorithms as those used to produce the "GCM-oriented CALIPSO Aerosol Product" to (1) objectively sample lidar signal profiles; and (2) derive aerosol fields (e.g., extinction profile, aerosol type, etc) from lidar signals. This allows us to sample and derive aerosol fields in the model and real atmosphere in identical ways. Using the Department of Energy's ACME model simulations, we found that the simulator-retrieved aerosol distribution and aerosol-cloud interactions are significantly different from those computed from conventional approaches, and that the model is much closer to satellite estimates than previously believed.

  6. Aerosol transport and deposition efficiency in the respiratory airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Laura; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    Prediction of aerosol deposition in the respiratory system is important for improving the efficiency of inhaled drug delivery and for assessing the toxicity of airborne pollutants. Particle deposition in the airways is typically described as a function of the Stokes number based on a reference flow timescale. This choice leads to significant scatter in deposition data since the velocity and length scales experienced by the particles as they are advected through the flow deviate considerably from the reference values in many sections of the airways. Therefore, the use of an instantaneous Stokes number based on the local properties of the flow field is proposed instead. We define the effective Stokes number as the time-average of the instantaneous value. Our results demonstrate that this average, or effective, Stokes number can deviate significantly from the reference value particularly in the intermediate Stokes number range. In addition, the effective Stokes number shows a very clear correlation with deposition efficiency, and is therefore a more appropriate parameter to describe aerosol transport.

  7. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  8. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  9. Properties of transported African mineral dust aerosols in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denjean, Cyrielle; Chevaillier, Servanne; Gaimoz, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Triquet, Sylvain; Zapf, Pascal; Loisil, Rodrigue; Bourrianne, Thierry; Freney, Evelyn; Dupuy, Regis; Sellegri, Karine; Schwarzenbock, Alfons; Torres, Benjamin; Mallet, Marc; Cassola, Federico; Prati, Paolo; Formenti, Paola

    2015-04-01

    The transport of mineral dust aerosols is a global phenomenon with strong climate implications. Depending on the travel distance over source regions, the atmospheric conditions and the residence time in the atmosphere, various transformation processes (size-selective sedimentation, mixing, condensation of gaseous species, and weathering) can modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral dust, which, in turn, can change the dust's optical properties. The model predictions of the radiative effect by mineral dust still suffer of the lack of certainty of these properties, and their temporal evolution with transport time. Within the frame of the ChArMex project (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean experiment, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/), one intensive airborne campaign (ADRIMED, Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact in the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region, 06 June - 08 July 2013) has been performed over the Central and Western Mediterranean, one of the two major transport pathways of African mineral dust. In this study we have set up a systematic strategy to determine the optical, physical and optical properties of mineral dust to be compared to an equivalent dataset for dust close to source regions in Africa. This study is based on airborne observations onboard the SAFIRE ATR-42 aircraft, equipped with state of the art in situ instrumentation to measure the particle scattering and backscattering coefficients (nephelometer at 450, 550, and 700 nm), the absorption coefficient (PSAP at 467, 530, and 660 nm), the extinction coefficient (CAPS at 530 nm), the aerosol optical depth (PLASMA at 340 to 1640 nm), the size distribution in the extended range 40 nm - 30 µm by the combination of different particle counters (SMPS, USHAS, FSSP, GRIMM) and the chemical composition obtained by filter sampling. The chemistry and transport model CHIMERE-Dust have been used to classify the air masses according to the dust origin and transport. Case studies of dust transport

  10. Aerosol measurements from a recent Alaskan volcanic eruption: Implications for volcanic ash transport predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Catherine F.; Rinkleff, Peter G.; Dehn, Jonathan; Webley, Peter W.; Cahill, Thomas A.; Barnes, David E.

    2010-12-01

    Size and time-resolved aerosol compositional measurements conducted during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano provide quantitative information on the size and concentration of the fine volcanic ash emitted during the eruption and carried and deposited downwind. These data can be used as a starting point to attempt to validate volcanic ash transport models. For the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, an island volcano in south-central Alaska, size and time-resolved aerosol measurements were made using an eight-stage (0.09-0.26, 0.26-0.34, 0.34-0.56, 0.56-0.75, 0.75-1.15, 1.15-2.5, 2.5-5.0, and 5.0-35.0 μm in aerodynamic diameter) Davis Rotating Unit for Monitoring (DRUM) aerosol impactor deployed near ground level in Homer, Alaska, approximately 110 km east-northeast of the volcano. The aerosol samples collected by the DRUM impactor were analyzed for mass and elemental composition every 90 min during a four-week sampling period from January 13 to February 11, 2006, that spanned several explosive episodes during the 2006 eruption. The collected aerosols showed that the size distribution of the volcanic ash fallout changed during this period of eruption. Ash had its highest concentrations in the largest size fraction (5.0-35.0 μm) with no ash present in the less than 1.15 μm size fractions during the short-lived explosive events. In contrast, during the continuous ash emission phase, concentrations of volcanic ash were more significant in the less than 1.15 μm size fractions. Settling velocities dictate that the smaller size particles will transport far from the volcano and, unlike the larger particles, not be retained in the proximal stratigraphic record. These results show that volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) model predictions based on massless tracer particles, such as the predictions from the PUFF VATD model, provide a good first-order approximation of the transport of both large and small volcanic ash particles. Unfortunately, the

  11. Airflow, transport and regional deposition of aerosol particles during chronic bronchitis of human central airways.

    PubMed

    Farkhadnia, Fouad; Gorji, Tahereh B; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, the effects of airway blockage in chronic bronchitis disease on the flow patterns and transport/deposition of micro-particles in a human symmetric triple bifurcation lung airway model, i.e., Weibel's generations G3-G6 was investigated. A computational fluid and particle dynamics model was implemented, validated and applied in order to evaluate the airflow and particle transport/deposition in central airways. Three breathing patterns, i.e., resting, light activity and moderate exercise, were considered. Using Lagrangian approach for particle tracking and random particle injection, an unsteady particle tracking method was performed to simulate the transport and deposition of micron-sized aerosol particles in human central airways. Assuming laminar, quasi-steady, three-dimensional air flow and spherical non-interacting particles in sequentially bifurcating rigid airways, airflow patterns and particle transport/deposition in healthy and chronic bronchitis (CB) affected airways were evaluated and compared. Comparison of deposition efficiency (DE) of aerosols in healthy and occluded airways showed that at the same flow rates DE values are typically larger in occluded airways. While in healthy airways, particles deposit mainly around the carinal ridges and flow dividers-due to direct inertial impaction, in CB affected airways they deposit mainly on the tubular surfaces of blocked airways because of gravitational sedimentation. PMID:26541595

  12. Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Aerosolization.

    PubMed

    Melenotte, Cléa; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Bechah, Yassina; Audoly, Gilles; Terras, Jérôme; Raoult, Didier; Brégeon, Fabienne

    2016-07-01

    Coxiella burnetii is mainly transmitted by aerosols and is responsible for multiple-organ lesions. Animal models have shown C. burnetii pathogenicity, but long-term outcomes still need to be clarified. We used a whole-body aerosol inhalation exposure system to mimic the natural route of infection in immunocompetent (BALB/c) and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. After an initial lung inoculum of 10(4) C. burnetii cells/lung, the outcome, serological response, hematological disorders, and deep organ lesions were described up to 3 months postinfection. C. burnetii-specific PCR, anti-C. burnetii immunohistochemistry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) targeting C. burnetii-specific 16S rRNA completed the detection of the bacterium in the tissues. In BALB/c mice, a thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia were first observed, prior to evidence of C. burnetii replication. In all SCID mouse organs, DNA copies increased to higher levels over time than in BALB/c ones. Clinical signs of discomfort appeared in SCID mice, so follow-up had to be shortened to 2 months in this group. At this stage, all animals presented bone, cervical, and heart lesions. The presence of C. burnetii could be attested in situ for all organs sampled using immunohistochemistry and FISH. This mouse model described C. burnetii Nine Mile strain spread using aerosolization in a way that corroborates the pathogenicity of Q fever described in humans and completes previously published data in mouse models. C. burnetii infection occurring after aerosolization in mice thus seems to be a useful tool to compare the pathogenicity of different strains of C. burnetii. PMID:27160294

  13. Evaluating Aerosol Process Modules within the Framework of the Aerosol Modeling Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. D.; Velu, V.; Gustafson, W. I.; Chapman, E.; Easter, R. C.; Shrivastava, M.; Singh, B.

    2012-12-01

    Factors that influence predictions of aerosol direct and indirect forcing, such as aerosol mass, composition, size distribution, hygroscopicity, and optical properties, still contain large uncertainties in both regional and global models. New aerosol treatments are usually implemented into a 3-D atmospheric model and evaluated using a limited number of measurements from a specific case study. Under this modeling paradigm, the performance and computational efficiency of several treatments for a specific aerosol process cannot be adequately quantified because many other processes among various modeling studies (e.g. grid configuration, meteorology, emission rates) are different as well. The scientific community needs to know the advantages and disadvantages of specific aerosol treatments when the meteorology, chemistry, and other aerosol processes are identical in order to reduce the uncertainties associated with aerosols predictions. To address these issues, an Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) has been developed that systematically and objectively evaluates new aerosol treatments for use in regional and global models. The AMT consists of the modular Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a series testbed cases for which extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties are available, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of meteorological, chemical, aerosol process modules. WRF contains various parameterizations of meteorological, chemical, and aerosol processes and includes interactive aerosol-cloud-radiation treatments similar to those employed by climate models. In addition, the physics suite from the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) have also been ported to WRF so that they can be tested at various spatial scales and compared directly with field campaign data and other parameterizations commonly used by the mesoscale modeling community. Data from several campaigns, including the 2006

  14. Contributions from transport, solid fuel burning and cooking to primary organic aerosols in two UK cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; Morgan, W. T.; Martin, C. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Lee, J.; Nemitz, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Coe, H.

    2009-09-01

    burning and occurred mainly at night. Grid-scale emission factors of the combustion aerosols suitable for use in chemical transport models were derived relative to CO and NOx. The traffic aerosols were found to be 14.4 μg m-3 ppm-1 relative to CO for Manchester and 28 μg m-3 ppm-1 relative to NOx for London. Solid fuel emissions were derived as 17.3 μg m-3 ppm-1 relative to CO for Manchester. These correspond to mass emission ratios of 0.012, 0.021 (as NO) and 0.014 respectively and are of a similar order to previously published estimates, derived from other regions or using other approaches.

  15. Contributions from transport, solid fuel burning and cooking to primary organic aerosols in two UK cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; Morgan, W. T.; Martin, C. L.; Flynn, M. J.; Lee, J.; Nemitz, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Coe, H.

    2010-01-01

    with biomass burning and occurred mainly at night. Grid-scale emission factors of the combustion aerosols suitable for use in chemical transport models were derived relative to CO and NOx. The traffic aerosols were found to be 20.5 μg m-3 ppm-1 relative to CO for Manchester and 31.6 μg m-3 ppm-1 relative to NOx for London. Solid fuel emissions were derived as 24.7 μg m-3 ppm-1 relative to CO for Manchester. These correspond to mass emission ratios of 0.018, 0.026 (as NO) and 0.021 respectively and are of a similar order to previously published estimates, derived from other regions or using other approaches.

  16. Modeling organic aerosols during MILAGRO: importance of biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Madronich, S.; Aiken, A. C.; Bessagnet, B.; Curci, G.; Fast, J.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Onasch, T. B.; Roux, G.; Schauer, J. J.; Stone, E. A.; Ulbrich, I. M.

    2009-09-01

    The meso-scale chemistry-transport model CHIMERE is used to assess our understanding of major sources and formation processes leading to a fairly large amount of organic aerosols - OA, including primary OA (POA) and secondary OA (SOA) - observed in Mexico City during the MILAGRO field project (March 2006). Chemical analyses of submicron aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) indicate that organic particles found in the Mexico City basin contain a large fraction of oxygenated organic species (OOA) which have strong correspondence with SOA, and that their production actively continues downwind of the city. The SOA formation is modeled here by the one-step oxidation of anthropogenic (i.e. aromatics, alkanes), biogenic (i.e. monoterpenes and isoprene), and biomass-burning SOA precursors and their partitioning into both organic and aqueous phases. Conservative assumptions are made for uncertain parameters to maximize the amount of SOA produced by the model. The near-surface model evaluation shows that predicted OA correlates reasonably well with measurements during the campaign, however it remains a factor of 2 lower than the measured total OA. Fairly good agreement is found between predicted and observed POA within the city suggesting that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are reasonably captured. Consistent with previous studies in Mexico City, large discrepancies are encountered for SOA, with a factor of 2-10 model underestimate. When only anthropogenic SOA precursors were considered, the model was able to reproduce within a factor of two the sharp increase in OOA concentrations during the late morning at both urban and near-urban locations but the discrepancy increases rapidly later in the day, consistent with previous results, and is especially obvious when the column-integrated SOA mass is considered instead of the surface concentration. The increase in the missing SOA mass in the afternoon coincides with the sharp drop in POA suggesting a

  17. Influence of aerosols on atmospheric variables in the HARMONIE model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamarchuk, Iuliia; Ivanov, Sergiy; Ruban, Igor; Pavlova, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    The mesoscale HARMONIE model is used to investigate the potential influence of aerosols on weather forecasts, and in particular, on precipitation. The study considers three numerical experiments over the Atlantic-Europe-Northern Africa region during 11-16 August 2010 with the following configurations: (a) no aerosols, (b) only the sea aerosols, and (c) the four types of the aerosols: sea, land, organic, and dust aerosols. The spatio-temporal analysis of forecast differences highlights the impact of aerosols on the prediction of main meteorological variables such as air temperature, humidity, precipitation, and cloud cover as well as their vertical profiles. The variations occur through changes in radiation fluxes and microphysics properties. The sensitivity experiments with the inclusion of climatological aerosol concentrations demonstrate the importance of aerosol effects on weather prediction.

  18. Transport and residence times of tropospheric aerosols inferred from a global three-dimensional simulation of Pb-210

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balkanski, Yves J.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Gardner, Geraldine M.; Graustein, William C.; Turekian, Karl K.

    1993-01-01

    A global three-dimensional model is used to investigate the transport and tropospheric residence time of Pb-210, an aerosol tracer produced in the atmosphere by radioactive decay of Rn-222 emitted from soils. The model uses meteorological input with 4 deg x 5 deg horizontal resolution and 4-hour temporal resolution from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model (GCM). It computes aerosol scavenging by convective precipitation as part of the wet convective mass transport operator in order to capture the coupling between vertical transport and rainout. Scavenging in convective precipitation accounts for 74% of the global Pb-210 sink in the model; scavenging in large-scale precipitation accounts for 12%, and scavenging in dry deposition accounts for 14%. The model captures 63% of the variance of yearly mean Pb-210 concentrations measured at 85 sites around the world with negligible mean bias, lending support to the computation of aerosol scavenging. There are, however, a number of regional and seasonal discrepancies that reflect in part anomalies in GCM precipitation. Computed residence times with respect to deposition for Pb-210 aerosol in the tropospheric column are about 5 days at southern midlatitudes and 10-15 days in the tropics; values at northern midlatitudes vary from about 5 days in winter to 10 days in summer. The residence time of Pb-210 produced in the lowest 0.5 km of atmosphere is on average four times shorter than that of Pb-210 produced in the upper atmosphere. Both model and observations indicate a weaker decrease of Pb-210 concentrations between the continental mixed layer and the free troposphere than is observed for total aerosol concentrations; an explanation is that Rn-222 is transported to high altitudes in wet convective updrafts, while aerosols and soluble precursors of aerosols are scavenged by precipitation in the updrafts. Thus Pb-210 is not simply a tracer of aerosols produced in the continental boundary layer, but

  19. Simulation of Aerosols and Chemistry with a Unified Global Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2004-01-01

    This project is to continue the development of the global simulation capabilities of tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry and aerosols in a unified global model. This is a part of our overall investigation of aerosol-chemistry-climate interaction. In the past year, we have enabled the tropospheric chemistry simulations based on the GEOS-CHEM model, and added stratospheric chemical reactions into the GEOS-CHEM such that a globally unified troposphere-stratosphere chemistry and transport can be simulated consistently without any simplifications. The tropospheric chemical mechanism in the GEOS-CHEM includes 80 species and 150 reactions. 24 tracers are transported, including O3, NOx, total nitrogen (NOy), H2O2, CO, and several types of hydrocarbon. The chemical solver used in the GEOS-CHEM model is a highly accurate sparse-matrix vectorized Gear solver (SMVGEAR). The stratospheric chemical mechanism includes an additional approximately 100 reactions and photolysis processes. Because of the large number of total chemical reactions and photolysis processes and very different photochemical regimes involved in the unified simulation, the model demands significant computer resources that are currently not practical. Therefore, several improvements will be taken, such as massive parallelization, code optimization, or selecting a faster solver. We have also continued aerosol simulation (including sulfate, dust, black carbon, organic carbon, and sea-salt) in the global model to cover most of year 2002. These results have been made available to many groups worldwide and accessible from the website http://code916.gsfc.nasa.gov/People/Chin/aot.html.

  20. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns in Asia from AERONET and Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Reid, Jeffrey; Lynch, Peng; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, George; Lyapustin, Alexei; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Siniuk, Alexander; Smirnov, Alexander; Wang, Pucai; Xia, Xiangao; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-04-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea during Spring of 2012 have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth (AOD) signal from AERONET data for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors (from both dark target and MAIAC algorithms) were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. Cloud properties retrieved from MODIS are also investigated in relation to the AERONET and satellite measurements of AOD. Underestimation of AOD by the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) model at very high AOD at sites in China and Korea was observed, especially for observations that are cloud screened by AERONET (L2 data). Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in Korea resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud

  1. Long-range transport and mixing of aerosol sources during the 2013 North American biomass burning episode: analysis of multiple lidar observations in the western Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancellet, Gerard; Pelon, Jacques; Totems, Julien; Chazette, Patrick; Bazureau, Ariane; Sicard, Michaël; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Dulac, Francois; Mallet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Long-range transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosols between North America and the Mediterranean region took place in June 2013. A large number of ground-based and airborne lidar measurements were deployed in the western Mediterranean during the Chemistry-AeRosol Mediterranean EXperiment (ChArMEx) intensive observation period. A detailed analysis of the potential North American aerosol sources is conducted including the assessment of their transport to Europe using forward simulations of the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model initialized using satellite observations by MODIS and CALIOP. The three-dimensional structure of the aerosol distribution in the ChArMEx domain observed by the ground-based lidars (Minorca, Barcelona and Lampedusa), a Falcon-20 aircraft flight and three CALIOP tracks, agrees very well with the model simulation of the three major sources considered in this work: Canadian and Colorado fires, a dust storm from western US and the contribution of Saharan dust streamers advected from the North Atlantic trade wind region into the westerlies region. Four aerosol types were identified using the optical properties of the observed aerosol layers (aerosol depolarization ratio, lidar ratio) and the transport model analysis of the contribution of each aerosol source: (i) pure BB layer, (ii) weakly dusty BB, (iii) significant mixture of BB and dust transported from the trade wind region, and (iv) the outflow of Saharan dust by the subtropical jet and not mixed with BB aerosol. The contribution of the Canadian fires is the major aerosol source during this episode while mixing of dust and BB is only significant at an altitude above 5 km. The mixing corresponds to a 20-30 % dust contribution in the total aerosol backscatter. The comparison with the MODIS aerosol optical depth horizontal distribution during this episode over the western Mediterranean Sea shows that the Canadian fire contributions were as large as the direct northward dust outflow

  2. Direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosols using the coupled system of aerosol HAM module and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, Rabab; Irannejad, Parviz; Feichter, Johann; Akbari Bidokhti, Abbas Ali Ali

    2010-05-01

    The fully coupled aerosol-cloud and radiation WRF-HAM modeling system is presented. The aerosol HAM model is implemented within the chemistry version of WRF modeling system. HAM is based on a "pseudo-modal" approach for representation of the particle size distribution. Aerosols are grouped into four geometrical size classes and two types of mixed and insoluble particles. The aerosol components considered are sulfate, black carbon, particulate organic matter, sea salt and mineral dust. Microphysical processes including nucleation, condensation and coagulation of aerosol particles are considered using the microphysics M7 scheme. Horizontal transport of the aerosol particles is simulated using the advection scheme in WRF. Convective transport and vertical mixing of aerosol particles are also considered in the coupled system. A flux-resistance method is used for dry deposition of aerosol particles. Aerosol sizes and chemical compositions are used to determine the aerosol optical properties. Direct effects of aerosols on incoming shortwave radiation flux are simulated by transferring the aerosol optical parameters to the Goddard shortwave radiation scheme. Indirect effects of aerosols are simulated by using a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets. The first and second indirect effects, i.e. the interactions of clouds and incoming solar radiation are implemented in WRF-Chem by linking the simulated cloud droplet number with the Goddard shortwave radiation scheme and the Lin et al. microphysics scheme. The simulations are carried out for a 6-day period from 22 to 28 February 2006 in a domain with 30-km grid spacing, encompassing the south-western Asia, North Africa and some parts of Europe. The results show a negative radiative forcing over most parts of the domain, mainly due to the presence of mineral dust aerosols. The simulations are evaluated using the measured downward radiation in

  3. The contribution of aerosol hygroscopic growth to the modeled aerosol radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkola, Harri; Kühn, Thomas; Kirkevåg, Alf; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Arola, Antti

    2016-04-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant effect on the direct radiative effect of atmospheric aerosol. However, there are significant uncertainties concerning how much of the radiative forcing is due to different chemical compounds, especially water. For example, modeled optical depth of water in global aerosol-climate models varies by more than a factor of two. These differences can be attributed to differences in modeled 1) hygroscopicity, 2) ambient relative humidity, and/or 3) aerosol size distribution. In this study, we investigate which of these above-mentioned factors cause the largest variability in the modeled optical depth of water. In order to do this, we have developed a tool that calculates aerosol extinction using interchangeable global 3D data of aerosol composition, relative humidity, and aerosol size distribution fields. This data is obtained from models that have taken part in the open international initiative AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models). In addition, we use global 3D data for relative humidity from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) flying on board NASA's Aqua satellite and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data. These observations are used to evaluate the modeled relative humidity fields. In the first stage of the study, we made a detailed investigation using the aerosol-chemistry-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ in which most of the aerosol optical depth is caused by water. Our results show that the model significantly overestimates the relative humidity over the oceans while over land, the overestimation is lower or it is underestimated. Since this overestimation occurs over the oceans, the water optical depth is amplified as the hygroscopic growth is very sensitive to changes in high relative humidities. Over land, error in modeled relative humidity is unlikely to cause significant errors in water optical depth as relative humidities are generally

  4. Transport of charged Aerosol OT inverse micelles in nonpolar liquids.

    PubMed

    Karvar, Masoumeh; Strubbe, Filip; Beunis, Filip; Kemp, Roger; Smith, Ashley; Goulding, Mark; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2011-09-01

    Surfactants such as Aerosol OT (AOT) are commonly used to stabilize and electrically charge nonpolar colloids in devices such as electronic ink displays. The electrical behavior of such devices is strongly influenced by the presence of charged inverse micelles, formed by excess surfactant that does not cover the particles. The presence of charged inverse micelles results in increased conductivity of the solution, affecting both the energy consumption of the device and its switching characteristics. In this work, we use transient current measurements to investigate the electrical properties of suspensions of the surfactant Aerosol OT in dodecane. No particles are added, to isolate the effect of excess surfactant. The measured currents upon application of a voltage step are found to be exponentially decaying, and can be described by an analytical model based on an equivalent electric circuit. This behavior is physically interpreted, first by the high generation rate of charged inverse micelles giving the suspension resistor like properties, and second by the buildup of layers of charged inverse micelles at both electrodes, acting as capacitors. The model explains the measurements over a large range of surfactant concentrations, applied voltages, and device thicknesses. PMID:21728309

  5. Evaluating model parameterizations of submicron aerosol scattering and absorption with in situ data from ARCTAS 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Matthew J.; Lonsdale, Chantelle R.; Macintyre, Helen L.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Ridley, David A.; Heald, Colette L.; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Cubison, Michael J.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kondo, Yutaka; Sahu, Lokesh K.; Dibb, Jack E.; Wang, Chien

    2016-07-01

    Accurate modeling of the scattering and absorption of ultraviolet and visible radiation by aerosols is essential for accurate simulations of atmospheric chemistry and climate. Closure studies using in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption can be used to evaluate and improve models of aerosol optical properties without interference from model errors in aerosol emissions, transport, chemistry, or deposition rates. Here we evaluate the ability of four externally mixed, fixed size distribution parameterizations used in global models to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption at three wavelengths using in situ data gathered during the 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign. The four models are the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) Combo model, GEOS-Chem v9-02, the baseline configuration of a version of GEOS-Chem with online radiative transfer calculations (called GC-RT), and the Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds (OPAC v3.1) package. We also use the ARCTAS data to perform the first evaluation of the ability of the Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP v2.1) to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption when in situ data on the aerosol size distribution are used, and examine the impact of different mixing rules for black carbon (BC) on the results. We find that the GMI model tends to overestimate submicron scattering and absorption at shorter wavelengths by 10-23 %, and that GMI has smaller absolute mean biases for submicron absorption than OPAC v3.1, GEOS-Chem v9-02, or GC-RT. However, the changes to the density and refractive index of BC in GC-RT improve the simulation of submicron aerosol absorption at all wavelengths relative to GEOS-Chem v9-02. Adding a variable size distribution, as in ASP v2.1, improves model performance for scattering but not for absorption, likely due to the assumption in ASP v2.1 that BC is present at a constant mass fraction

  6. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  7. Investigations of Global Chemistry-Climate Interactions and Organic Aerosol Using Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Havala Olson Taylor

    Aerosol, or particulate matter (PM), is an important component of the atmosphere responsible for negative health impacts, environmental degradation, reductions in visibility, and climate change. In this work, the global chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem, is used as a tool to examine chemistry-climate interactions and organic aerosols. GEOS-Chem is used to simulate present-day (year 2000) and future (year 2050) sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium aerosols and investigate the potential effects of changes in climate and emissions on global budgets and U.S. air quality. Changes in a number of meteorological parameters, such as temperature and precipitation, are potentially important for aerosols and could lead to increases or decreases in PM concentrations. Although projected changes in sulfate and nitrate precursor emissions favor lower PM concentrations over the U.S., projected increases in ammonia emissions could result in higher nitrate concentrations. The organic aerosol simulation in GEOS-Chem is updated to include aerosol from primary semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCS), intermediate volatility compounds (IVOCs), NOx dependent terpene aerosol, and aerosol from isoprene + NO3 reaction. SVOCs are identified as the largest global source of organic aerosol even though their atmospheric transformation is highly uncertain and emissions are probably underestimated. As a result of significant nighttime terpene emissions, fast reaction of monoterpenes with the nitrate radical, and high aerosol yields from NO3 oxidation, biogenic hydrocarbons reacting with the nitrate radical are expected to be a major contributor to surface level aerosol concentrations in anthropogenically influenced areas such as the United States. Globally, 69 to 88 Tg/yr of aerosol is predicted to be produced annually, approximately 22 to 24 Tg/yr of which is from biogenic hydrocarbons.

  8. METEOROLOGICAL AND TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advanced air quality simulation models, such as CMAQ, as well as other transport and dispersion models, require accurate and detailed meteorology fields. These meteorology fields include primary 3-dimensional dynamical and thermodynamical variables (e.g., winds, temperature, mo...

  9. Assessment of the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Ayantika, D. C.; Pandithurai, G.; Niranjan, K.

    2014-04-01

    This paper examines the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent as represented in 21 models from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations, wherein model simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) is compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The objective of the study is to provide an assessment of the capability of various global models, participating in CMIP5 project, in capturing the realistic spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent. Results from our analysis show that majority of the CMIP5 models (excepting HADGEM2-ES, HADGEM2-CC) seriously underestimates the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent, in particular over Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). Since IGP region is dominated by anthropogenic activities, high population density, and wind driven transport of dust and other aerosol species, MODIS observations reveal high AOD values over this region. Though the representation of black carbon (BC) loading in many models is fairly good, the dust loading is observed to be significantly low in majority of the models. The presence of pronounced dust activity over northern India and dust being one of the major constituent of aerosol species, the biases in dust loading has a great impact on the AOD of that region. We found that considerable biases in simulating the 850 hPa wind field (which plays important role in transport of dust from adjacent deserts) would be the possible reason for poor representation of dust AOD and in turn total AOD over Indian region in CMIP5 models. In addition, aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) underestimated/overestimated in most of the models. However, spatial distribution of ARF in multi-model ensemble mean is comparable reasonably well with observations with bias in magnitudes. This analysis emphasizes the fundamental need to improve the representation of aerosol species in current state of

  10. Evaluation of Observed and Modelled Aerosol Lifetimes Using Radioactive Tracers of Opportunity and an Ensemble of 19 Global Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivie, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Sovde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Shindell, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (Cs-137) and xenon-133 (Xe-133) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. Cs-137 size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation mode (AM) sulfate aerosols were the main carriers of cesium. Hence, Cs-137 can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulfate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas Xe-133 behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of Cs-137that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulfate, and Xe-133 emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulfate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled Cs-137and Xe-133 concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime e, calculated from station measurement data taken between 2 and 9 weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days (95

  11. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivié, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Søvde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bergman, T.; Evangeliou, N.; Wang, H.; Ma, P.-L.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P. J.; Liu, X.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; Zhao, S. Y.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Kokkola, H.; Martin, R. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Tost, H.; Zhang, H.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs) and xenon-133 (133Xe) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM) sulphate aerosols were the main carriers for the cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulphate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulphate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulphate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 37Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between two and nine weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days

  12. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivié, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Søvde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bergman, T.; Evangeliou, N.; Wang, H.; Ma, P.-L.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P. J.; Liu, X.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; Zhao, S. Y.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Kokkola, H.; Martin, R. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Tost, H.; Zhang, H.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs) and xenon-133 (133Xe) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM) sulfate aerosols were the main carriers of cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulfate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulfate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulfate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 137Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between 2 and 9 weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days (95

  13. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeger, A. R.; Gupta, P.; Zavodsky, B.; McGrath, K. M.

    2015-10-01

    The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2) to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America. However, we identify several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the new product can encounter significant uncertainties due to the inclusion of the geostationary AOD retrievals. The uncertainties associated with geostationary AOD retrievals are expected to be minimized after the successful launch of the next-generation advanced NOAA GOES-R and recently launched JMA Himawari satellites. Observations from these advanced satellites will ultimately provide an enhanced understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols over the Pacific.

  14. Aerosol transport along the Andes from Amazonia to the remote Pacific Ocean: A multiyear CALIOP assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Ekman, Annica; Krejci, Radovan

    2015-04-01

    The free troposphere over South America and the Pacific Ocean is a particularly interesting region to study due to the prevailing easterly wind direction, forcing air over Amazonia towards the Pacific Ocean but encountering a natural barrier - the Andes - in between which might play a significant role. In addition, the strong contrast between the wet, relatively clean season and the dry, relatively polluted season as well as the difference between day and night meteorological conditions may influence the vertical distribution of aerosols in the free troposphere. Six years (2007-2012) of CALIOP observations at both day and night were used to investigate the vertical distribution, transport and removal processes of aerosols over South America and the Pacific Ocean. The multiyear assessment shows that aerosols, mainly biomass burning particles emitted during the dry season in Amazonia, may be lifted along the Andes. During their lifting, aerosols remain in the boundary layer which makes them subject to scavenging and deposition processes. The removal aerosol extinction rate was quantified. After reaching the top of the Andes, free tropospheric aerosols are likely pushed by the large-scale subsidence towards the marine boundary layer (MBL) during their transport over the Pacific Ocean. CALIOP observations may indicate that aerosols are transported over thousands of kilometers in the free troposphere over the Pacific Ocean. During their long range transport, aerosols could be entrained into the MBL and may further act as cloud condensation nuclei, and influence climate and the radiative budget of the Earth.

  15. In Silico Models of Aerosol Delivery to the Respiratory Tract – Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Longest, P. Worth; Holbrook, Landon T.

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the application of computational models to simulate the transport and deposition of inhaled pharmaceutical aerosols from the site of particle or droplet formation to deposition within the respiratory tract. Traditional one-dimensional (1-D) whole-lung models are discussed briefly followed by a more in-depth review of three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The review of CFD models is organized into sections covering transport and deposition within the inhaler device, the extrathoracic (oral and nasal) region, conducting airways, and alveolar space. For each section, a general review of significant contributions and advancements in the area of simulating pharmaceutical aerosols is provided followed by a more in-depth application or case study that highlights the challenges, utility, and benefits of in silico models. Specific applications presented include the optimization of an existing spray inhaler, development of charge-targeted delivery, specification of conditions for optimal nasal delivery, analysis of a new condensational delivery approach, and an evaluation of targeted delivery using magnetic aerosols. The review concludes with recommendations on the need for more refined model validations, use of a concurrent experimental and CFD approach for developing aerosol delivery systems, and development of a stochastic individual path (SIP) model of aerosol transport and deposition throughout the respiratory tract. PMID:21640772

  16. Application of a coupled aerosol formation: Radiative transfer model to climatic studies of aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    A sophisticated one dimensional physical-chemical model of the formation and evolution of stratospheric aerosols was used to predict the size and number concentration of the stratospheric aerosols as functions of time and altitude following: a large volcanic eruption; increased addition of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) or sulfur dioxide (SO2) to the troposphere; increased supersonic aircraft (SST) flights in the stratosphere; and, large numbers of space shuttle (SS) flights through the stratosphere. A radiative-convective one dimensional climate sensitivity study, using the results of the aerosol formation model, was performed to assess the ground level climatic significance of these perturbations to the stratospheric aerosol layer. Volcanic eruptions and large OCS or SO2 increases could cause significant climatic changes. Currently projected SS launches and moderate fleets of SST's are unlikely to upset the stratospheric aerosol layer enough to significantly impact climate.

  17. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach. The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).

  18. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach.more » The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).« less

  19. How robust are models of precipitation response to aerosols?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, Ken; Johnson, Jill; Cui, Zhiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Models of cloud-aerosol interaction and effects on precipitation are complex and therefore slow to run, so our understanding mostly relies on case studies and a very limited exploration of model uncertainties. Here we address the concept of cloud model robustness. A robust model is one that is reliable under different conditions in spite of uncertainties in the underlying processes. To assess model robustness, we quantify how the accumulated precipitation from a mixed-phase convective cloud responds to changes in aerosol accounting for the combined uncertainties in ten microphysical processes. Sampling across the full uncertainty space is achieved using statistical emulators, which essentially enable tens of thousands of cloud-resolving model simulations to be performed. Overall, precipitation increases with aerosol when aerosol concentrations are low and decreases when aerosol concentrations are high. However, when we account for uncertainties across the ten-dimensional parameter space of microphysical processes, the direction of response can no longer be defined with confidence except under some rather narrow aerosol conditions. To assess robustness of the modelled precipitation response to aerosols, we select a set of model "variants" that display a particular response in one aerosol environment and use this subset of models to predict precipitation response in other aerosol environments. Despite essentially tight model tuning, the model has very little reliability in predicting precipitation responses in different aerosol environments. Based on these results, we argue that the neglect of model uncertainty and a narrow case-study approach using highly complex cloud models may lead to false confidence in our understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions.

  20. Modeling aerosol suspension from soils and oceans as sources of micropollutants to air.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Asif; MacLeod, Matthew; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2009-10-01

    Soil and marine aerosol suspension are two physical mass transfer processes that are not usually included in models describing fate and transport of environmental pollutants. Here, we review the literature on soil and marine aerosol suspension and estimate aerosol suspension mass transfer velocities for inclusion in multimedia models, as a global average and on a 1 x 1 scale. The yearly, global average mass transfer velocity for soil aerosol suspension is estimated to be 6 x 10(-10)mh(-1), approximately an order of magnitude smaller than marine aerosol suspension, which is estimated to be 8 x 10(-9)mh(-1). Monthly averages of these velocities can be as high as 10(-7)mh(-1) and 10(-5)mh(-1) for soil and marine aerosol suspension, respectively, depending on location. We use a unit-world multimedia model to analyze the relevance of these two suspension processes as a mechanism that enhances long-range atmospheric transport of pollutants. This is done by monitoring a metric of long-range transport potential, phi-one thousand (phi1000), that denotes the fraction of modeled emissions to air, water or soil in a source region that reaches a distance of 1000 km in air. We find that when the yearly, globally averaged mass transfer velocity is used, marine aerosol suspension increases phi1000 only fractionally for both emissions to air and water. However, enrichment of substances in marine aerosols, or speciation between ionic and neutral forms in ocean water may increase the influence of this surface-to-air transfer process. Soil aerosol suspension can be the dominant process for soil-to-air transfer in an emission-to-soil scenario for certain substances that have a high affinity to soil. When a suspension mass transfer velocity near the maximum limit is used, soil suspension remains important if the emissions are made to soil, and marine aerosol suspension becomes important regardless of if emissions are made to air or water compartments. We recommend that multimedia models

  1. Aerosol content survey by mini N 2 -Raman lidar: Application to local and long-range transport aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Chazette, Patrick; Lardier, Melody; Sauvage, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    This study shows an aerosol content survey in the low and middle troposphere over Paris with a compact and light Nitrogen-Raman lidar which has been recently developed by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and LEOSPHERE company. This eye-safe and wide field-of-view system (full overlap between 150 and 200 m) is particularly well-adapted to air pollution survey in the vicinity of Megalopolis. Extinction-to-backscatter coefficient (so-called Lidar Ratio LR) profiles obtained with a Tikhonov regularization scheme are presented for long-range transport events of aerosols (volcanic ash plume LR = 48 ± 10 sr, and desert dust, LR = 45 ± 8 sr) which may contribute to the local load of aerosols emitted by traffic and industries in Megalopolis. Due to an insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR < 30), a new dichotomous algorithm has been developed to perform daytime inversions every hour which is in accordance with the typical time evolution of aerosols within the planetary boundary layer. This inversion scheme is based on the constraint of the elastic channel with the aerosol optical depth (between typically 0.2 and 0.7 km) determined with the N 2-Raman channel and thus only gives access to an equivalent LR between 0.2 and 0.7 km with a relative uncertainty lower than 15%. This approach has been applied to retrieve diurnal cycle of LR for polluted continental aerosols over Paris and is compared with Tikhonov regularization applied during the night. We found a mean value of 85 ± 18 sr for polluted continental aerosols which is in agreement with other studies performed around the Paris urban area. Results for aerosol optical properties are presented and the error sources are discussed for each approach.

  2. Aerosol transport of biomass burning to the Bolivian Andean region from remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Ramirez, Daniel; Whiteman, David; Andrade, Marcos; Gasso, Santiago; Stein, Ariel; Torres, Omar; Eck, Tom; Velarde, Fernando; Aliaga, Diego

    2016-04-01

    This work deals with the analysis of columnar aerosol optical and microphysical properties obtained by the AERONET network in the region of Bolivia and its border with Brazil. Through the long record AERONET measurements we focus in the transport of biomass-burning aerosol from the Amazon basin (stations at Rio Branco, Cuiba, Ji Parana and Santa Cruz) to the Andean Altiplano (altitude above 3000 m a.s.l. at the station in the city of La Paz). Also, measurements from the space-sensors MODIS and OMI are used to understand spatial distribution. The main results is the high impact in the aerosol load during the months of August, September and August with mean values of aerosol optical depth at 500 nm (AOD) at the low lands of ≈ 0.60 ± 0.60 and Angstrom exponent (α(440-870)) of ≈ 1.52 ± 0.38. Satellite measurements also follow very similar patterns. Also, that season is characterized by some extreme events that can reach AOD of up to 6.0. Those events are cloud-screened by MODIS but not by OMI sensor, which is attributed to different pixel resolutions. The biomass-burning is clearly transport to the Andean region where higher values of AOD (~ 0.12 ± 0.06 versus 0.09 ± 0.04 in the no biomass-burning season) and α(440-870) (~ 0.95 ± 0.30 versus 0.84 ± 0.3 in the no biomass-burning season). However, the intensity of the biomass-burning season varies between different years. Analysis of precipitation anomalies using TRNM satellites indicates a strong correlation with AOD, which suggest that on dry years there is less vegetation to burn and so less aerosol load. The opposite is found for positive anomalies of precipitation. In the transport of biomass burning larger values of the effective radius (reff) are observed in La Paz (reff = 0.26 ± 0.10 μm) than in the low lands (reff = 0.63 ± 0.24 μm), which has been explained by aerosol aging processes. Moreover, although the spectral dependence is similar, single scattering albedo (SSA) is larger in the low lands

  3. Long range transport and mixing of aerosol sources during the 2013 North American biomass burning episode: analysis of multiple lidar observations in the Western Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancellet, G.; Pelon, J.; Totems, J.; Chazette, P.; Bazureau, A.; Sicard, M.; Di Iorio, T.; Dulac, F.; Mallet, M.

    2015-11-01

    Long range transport of biomass burning (BB) aerosols between North America and the Mediterranean region took place in June 2013. A large number of ground based and airborne lidar measurements were deployed in the Western Mediterranean during the Chemistry-AeRosol Mediterranean EXperiment (ChArMEx) intensive observation period. A detailed analysis of the potential North American aerosol sources is conducted including the assessment of their transport to Europe using forward simulations of the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model initialized using satellite observations by MODIS and CALIOP. The three dimensional structure of the aerosol distribution in the ChArMEx domain observed by the ground-based lidars (Menorca, Barcelona and Lampedusa), a Falcon-20 aircraft flight and three CALIOP tracks, agree very well with the model simulation of the three major sources considered in this work: Canadian and Colorado fires, a dust storm from Western US and the contribution of Saharan dust streamers advected from the North Atlantic trade wind region into the Westerlies region. Four aerosol types were identified using the optical properties of the observed aerosol layers (aerosol depolarization ratio, lidar ratio) and the transport model analysis of the contribution of each aerosol source: (I) pure BB layer, (II) weakly dusty BB, (III) significant mixture of BB and dust transported from the trade wind region (IV) the outflow of Saharan dust by the subtropical jet and not mixed with BB aerosol. The contribution of the Canadian fires is the major aerosol source during this episode while mixing of dust and BB is only significant at altitude above 5 km. The mixing corresponds to a 20-30 % dust contribution in the total aerosol backscatter. The comparison with the MODIS AOD horizontal distribution during this episode over the Western Mediterranean sea shows that the Canadian fires contribution were as large as the direct northward dust outflow from Sahara.

  4. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  5. Intra and inter-continental aerosol transport and local and regional impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Leona Ann Marie

    vertical layering of aerosols in the troposphere from passive remote sensing measurements. Therefore, the connection with air pollution is very poor. Furthermore, the vertical structure of the aerosol is very important in assessing transport events and how they mix with the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). The need to fill this data gap and supply vertical information on plume detection has led to the launch of the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) space borne lidar system, which can in principle provide vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter that can be used in the assimilation schemes. One particular problem which needs to be addressed, is the fact that the relationship between the optical scattering coefficients (or AOD) and the PM2.5 mass is not simple. Finally, regarding non-attainment of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), it has also been shown that a significant portion of the PM2.5 aerosol mass can be due to non-local sources. This fact is critical in assessing the appropriate strategy in emission controls, as part of the state implementation plan (SIP) to come into compliance. However, these studies are usually based on statistical analysis tools such as Positive Factor Analysis (PFA), and are not applicable to any single measurement. In addition, little is known about the impact of episodic long range transport as a possible mechanism for affecting local pollution. Such a mechanism cannot be investigated by statistical means or by any existing air transport models which do not consider high altitude plumes (aerosol layers), and must be studied solely with an appropriate suite of measurements including the simultaneous use of sky radiometers, lidars and satellites. Furthermore, since fine particulate matter is so crucial to identify, multi-wavelength determination of aerosol properties such as angstrom coefficient are necessary. It is our purpose to investigate the possibility that such long range transport events can

  6. MODIS Satellite Data and GOCART Model Characterization of the Global Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Chin, Mian; Remer, Lorraine; Tanre, Didier; Lau, William K.-M. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Recently produced daily MODIS aerosol data for the whole year of 2001 are used to show the concentration and dynamics of aerosol over ocean and large parts of the continents. The data were validated against the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements over land and ocean. Monthly averages and a movie based on the daily data are produced and used to demonstrate the spatial and temporal evolution of aerosol. The MODIS wide spectral range is used to distinguish fine smoke and pollution aerosol from coarse dust and salt. The aerosol is observed above ocean and land. The movie produced from the MODIS data provides a new dimension to aerosol observations by showing the dynamics of the system. For example in February smoke and dust emitted from the Sahel and West Africa is shown to travel to the North-East Atlantic. In April heavy dust and pollution from East Asia is shown to travel to North America. In May-June pollution and dust play a dynamical dance in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. In Aug-September smoke from South Africa and South America is shown to pulsate in tandem and to periodically to be transported to the otherwise pristine Southern part of the Southern Hemisphere. The MODIS data are compared with the GOCART model and used to estimate the first observation based direct anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate by aerosol.

  7. ISA-MIP: A co-ordinated intercomparison of Interactive Stratospheric Aerosol models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmreck, Claudia; Mann, Graham; Aquila, Valentina; Bruehl, Christoph; Chin, Mian; Dohmse, Sandip; English, Jason; Lee, Lindsay; Mills, Michael; Hommel, Rene; Neely, Ryan; Schmidt, Anja; Sheng, Jianxiong; Toohey, Matthew; Weisenstein, Debra

    2016-04-01

    The SPARC activity, "Stratospheric Sulfur and its Role in Climate" (SSiRC) was initiated to coordinate international research activities on modelling and observation of stratospheric sulphate aerosols (and precursor gases) in order to assess its climate forcing and feedback. With several international activities to extend and improve observational stratospheric aerosol capabilities and data sets, and a growing number of global models treating stratospheric aerosol interactively, a new model intercomparison activity "ISA-MIP" has been established in the frame of SSIRC. ISA-MIP will compare interactive stratospheric aerosol (ISA) models using a range of observations to constrain and improve the models and to provide a sound scientific basis for future work. Four ISA-MIP experiments have been designed to assess different periods of the obervational stratospheric aerosol record, and to explore key processes which influence the formation and temporal development of stratospheric aerosol. The "Background" experiment will focus on the role of microphysical and transport processes under volcanically quiescent conditions, where the stratospheric aerosol size distribution is only modulated by seasonal circulations. The "Model intercomparison of Transient Aerosol Record" (MiTAR) experiment will focus on addressing the role of small- to moderate-magnitude volcanic eruptions and transport processes in the upper troposphere - lower stratosphere (UTLS) aerosols loading over the period 1998-2011. Background and MiTAR simulations will be compared to recent in-situ and satellite observations to evaluate the performances of the model and understand their strengths and weaknesses. Two further experiments investigate the radiative forcing from historical major eruptions. The Historical Eruptions SO2 Emission Assessment (HErSEA) will involve models carrying out mini-ensembles of the stratospheric aerosol perturbations from each of the 1963 Agung, 1982 El Chichon and 1991 Pinatubo

  8. Impact of Local Pollution Versus Long Range Transported Aerosols on Clouds and Precipitation over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols form cloud droplets and ice crystals in clouds and can profoundly impact precipitation processes. In-situ aircraft measurements of the composition of individual cloud residuals have been used to study the impact of different aerosol sources including sea spray, dust, soot, and biomass burning on cloud microphysics and precipitation processes. Aircraft studies in 2011 as part of the CalWater project showed that long range transport of dust aerosols from as far away as Africa and biological particles can lead to an increase in the amount of snowfall over California. This presentation will describe results from CalWater-2015 involving aircraft and ground-based measurements at a coastal site. A discussion of the aerosol sources measured in clouds will be presented detailing the relative impacts of local versus long range transported pollution aerosols over California.

  9. Lagrangian Sampling of 3-D Air Quality Model Results for Regional Transport Contributions to Sulfate Aerosol Concentrations at Baltimore, MD in Summer of 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lagrangian method provides estimates of the chemical and physical evolution of air arriving in the daytime boundary layer at Baltimore. Study results indicate a dominant role for regional transport contributions of those days when sulfate air pollution is highest in Baltimor...

  10. Transport Simulations of Carbon Monoxide and Aerosols from Boreal Wildfires during ARCTAS using WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, W.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Winker, D. M.; Chu, A. D.; Kahn, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) was developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research as the next generation of mesoscale meteorology model. The inclusion of a chemistry module (WRF-Chem) allows transport simulations of chemical and aerosol species such as those observed during NASA’s Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) during 2008. The ARCTAS summer deployment phase during June and July coincided with large boreal wildfires in Saskatchewan and Eastern Russia. We identified fires using the GOES Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) and thermal hotspot detections from MODIS sensors onboard the Aqua and Terra satellites. The fires on both continents produced plumes large enough to affect the atmospheric chemical composition of downwind population centers as well as the Arctic. Atmospheric steering currents vary greatly with altitude, making plume injection height one of the most important aspects of accurately modeling the transport of burning emissions. WRF-Chem integrates a one-dimensional plume model at grid cells containing fires to explicitly resolve the upper and lower limits of injection height. The early July fires provide multiple cases to satellite remotely sense the horizontal and vertical evolution of carbon monoxide (AIRS/MISR) and aerosols (CALIPSO) downwind of the fires. Lidar and in situ measurements from the NASA DC-8 and B-200 aircraft permit further validation of results from WRF-Chem. Using these various data sources, this paper will evaluate the ability of WRF-Chem to properly model the biomass injection heights and the downwind transport of fire plumes. Model-derived plume characteristics also will be compared with those observed by the satellites and in situ data. Finally, forecast sensitivities to varying WRF-Chem grid resolutions and plume rise mechanics will be presented.

  11. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, Kirsty; Carslaw, Kenneth; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne; Adams, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) using analytic representations of cloud and aerosol distributions and processes. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of AIEs that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates by the simple model are sensitive to preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, preindustrial accumulation mode radius, width of the accumulation mode, size of primary particles, cloud thickness, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Estimates of present-day AIEs as low as 5 W/sq m and as high as 0.3 W/sq m are obtained for plausible sets of parameter values. Estimates are surprisingly linear in emissions. The estimates depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models, which adds to understanding of the dependence on AIE uncertainty on uncertainty in parameter values.

  12. Radiative Effects of Carbonaceous and Inorganic Aerosols over California during CalNex and CARES: Observations versus Model Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoj, V.; Fast, J. D.; Liu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols have been identified to be a major contributor to the uncertainty in understanding the present climate. Most of this uncertainty arises due to the lack of knowledge of their micro-physical and chemical properties as well as how to adequately represent their spatial and temporal distributions. Increased process level understanding can be achieved through carefully designed field campaigns and experiments. These measurements can be used to elucidate the aerosol properties, mixing, transport and transformation within the atmosphere and also to validate and improve models that include meteorology-aerosol-chemistry interactions. In the present study, the WRF-Chem model is used to simulate the evolution of carbonaceous and inorganic aerosols and their impact on radiation during May and June of 2010 over California when two field campaigns took place: the California Nexus Experiment (CalNex) and Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES). We merged CalNex and CARES data along with data from operational networks such as, California Air Resources Board (CARB's) air quality monitoring network, the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network, the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), and satellites into a common dataset for the Aerosol Modeling Test bed. The resulting combined dataset is used to rigorously evaluate the model simulation of aerosol mass, size distribution, composition, and optical properties needed to understand uncertainties that could affect regional variations in aerosol radiative forcing. The model reproduced many of the diurnal, multi-day, and spatial variations of aerosols as seen in the measurements. However, regionally the performance varied with reasonably good agreement with observations around Los Angeles and Sacramento and poor agreement with observations in the vicinity of Bakersfield (although predictions aloft were much better). Some aerosol species (sulfate and nitrate) were better represented

  13. Monitoring and tracking the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols using multi-satellite aerosol optical depth composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeger, Aaron R.; Gupta, Pawan; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; McGrath, Kevin M.

    2016-06-01

    The primary goal of this study was to generate a near-real time (NRT) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product capable of providing a comprehensive understanding of the aerosol spatial distribution over the Pacific Ocean, in order to better monitor and track the trans-Pacific transport of aerosols. Therefore, we developed a NRT product that takes advantage of observations from both low-earth orbiting and geostationary satellites. In particular, we utilize AOD products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellites. Then, we combine these AOD products with our own retrieval algorithms developed for the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2) to generate a NRT daily AOD composite product. We present examples of the daily AOD composite product for a case study of trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution and dust aerosols in mid-March 2014. Overall, the new product successfully tracks this aerosol plume during its trans-Pacific transport to the west coast of North America as the frequent geostationary observations lead to a greater coverage of cloud-free AOD retrievals equatorward of about 35° N, while the polar-orbiting satellites provide a greater coverage of AOD poleward of 35° N. However, we note several areas across the domain of interest from Asia to North America where the GOES-15 and MTSAT-2 retrieval algorithms can introduce significant uncertainties into the new product.

  14. Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. S.

    2009-03-01

    A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including smoke particle transport in the lungs, particle clogging of heat exchangers in construction vehicles, industrial nanoparticle transport and filtration systems, and dust fouling of electronic systems and MEMS components. Dust fouling of equipment is of particular concern for potential human occupation on dusty planets, such as Mars. The discrete-element method presented in this paper can be used for prediction of aggregate structure and breakup, for prediction of the effect of aggregate formation on the bulk fluid flow, and for prediction of the effects of small-scale flow features (e.g., due to surface roughness or MEMS patterning) on the aggregate formation. After presentation of the overall computational structure, the forces and torques acting on the particles resulting from fluid motion, particle-particle collision, and adhesion under van der Waals forces are reviewed. The effect of various parameters of normal collision and adhesion of two particles are examined in detail. The method is then used to examine aggregate formation and particle clogging in pipe and channel flow.

  15. Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.S.

    2009-03-20

    A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including smoke particle transport in the lungs, particle clogging of heat exchangers in construction vehicles, industrial nanoparticle transport and filtration systems, and dust fouling of electronic systems and MEMS components. Dust fouling of equipment is of particular concern for potential human occupation on dusty planets, such as Mars. The discrete-element method presented in this paper can be used for prediction of aggregate structure and breakup, for prediction of the effect of aggregate formation on the bulk fluid flow, and for prediction of the effects of small-scale flow features (e.g., due to surface roughness or MEMS patterning) on the aggregate formation. After presentation of the overall computational structure, the forces and torques acting on the particles resulting from fluid motion, particle-particle collision, and adhesion under van der Waals forces are reviewed. The effect of various parameters of normal collision and adhesion of two particles are examined in detail. The method is then used to examine aggregate formation and particle clogging in pipe and channel flow.

  16. Below-cloud rain scavenging of atmospheric aerosols for aerosol deposition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chate, D. M.; Murugavel, P.; Ali, K.; Tiwari, S.; Beig, G.

    2011-03-01

    Below-cloud aerosol scavenging is generally estimated from field measurements using advanced instruments that measure changes in aerosol distributions with respect to rainfall. In this study, we discuss various scavenging mechanisms and scavenging coefficients from past laboratory and field measurements. Scavenging coefficients derived from field measurements (representing natural aerosols scavenging) are two orders higher than that of theoretical ones for smaller particles (Dp < 2 μm). Measured size-resolved scavenging coefficients can be served as a better option to the default scavenging coefficient (e.g. a constant of 10-4 s-1 for all size of aerosols, as used in the CALPUFF model) for representing below-cloud aerosol scavenging. We propose scavenging correction parameter (CR) as an exponential function of size-resolved scavenging coefficients, winds and width in the downwind of the source-receptor system. For a wind speed of 3 m s-1, CR decrease with the width in the downwind for particles of diameters Dp < 0.1 μm but CR does not vary much for particles in the accumulation mode (0.1 < Dp < 2 μm). For a typical urban aerosol distribution, assuming 3 m s-1 air-flow in the source-receptor system, 10 km downwind width, 2.84 mm h-1 of rainfall and using aerosol size dependent scavenging coefficients in the CR, scavenging of aerosols is found to be 16% in number and 24% in volume of total aerosols. Using the default scavenging coefficient (10-4 s-1) in the CALPUFF model, it is found to be 64% in both number and volume of total aerosols.

  17. Evolution of Ozone, Particulates, and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in the Vicinity of Houston Using a Fully Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry-Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg; Peckham, S. E.

    2006-11-11

    A new fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban to regional scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a five day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still under-estimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  18. MATRIX-VBS Condensing Organic Aerosols in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Konstas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  19. Aerosols, Chemistry, and Radiative Forcing: A 3-D Model Analysis of Satellite and ACE-Asia data (ACMAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Zhao, Xue-Peng

    2005-01-01

    We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into the multi-national Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) mission. Our objectives are (1) to understand the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols and the processes that control those properties over the Asian-Pacific region, (2) to investigate the interaction between aerosols and tropospheric chemistry, and (3) to determine the aerosol radiative forcing over the Asia-Pacific region. We will use the Georgia TecWGoddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to link satellite observations and the ACE-Asia measurements. First, we will use the GOCART model to simulate aerosols and related species, and evaluate the model with satellite and in-situ observations. Second, the model generated aerosol vertical profiles and compositions will be used to validate the satellite products; and the satellite data will be used for during- and post- mission analysis. Third, we will use the model to analyze and interpret both satellite and ACE- Asia field campaign data and investigate the aerosol-chemistry interactions. Finally, we will calculate aerosol radiative forcing over the Asian-Pacific region, and assess the influence of Asian pollution in the global atmosphere. We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into

  20. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhola, T.; Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric models often represent the aerosol particle size distribution with a modal approach, in which particles are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. This approach reallocates particles numerically from one mode to another for example during particle growth, potentially leading to artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how the modal reallocation affects climate-relevant variables: cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), aerosol-cloud interaction parameter (ACI) and light extinction coefficient (qext). The ACI parameter gives the response of CDNC to a change in total aerosol number concentration. We compared these variables between a modal model (with and without reallocation routines) and a high resolution sectional model, which was considered a reference model. We analysed the relative differences in the chosen variables in four experiments designed to assess the influence of atmospheric aerosol processes. We find that limiting the allowed size ranges of the modes, and subsequent remapping of the distribution, leads almost always to an underestimation of cloud droplet number concentrations (by up to 100%) and an overestimation of light extinction (by up to 20%). On the other hand, the aerosol-cloud interaction parameter can be either over- or underestimated by the reallocating model, depending on the conditions. For example, in the case of atmospheric new particle formation events followed by rapid particle growth, the reallocation can cause on average a 10% overestimation of the ACI parameter. Thus it is shown that the reallocation affects the ability of a model to estimate aerosol climate effects accurately, and this should be taken into account when using and developing aerosol models.

  1. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  2. Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

    2010-07-05

    A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.45º×0.4º in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 2001–2004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is -1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and -8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60-138°E & Eq. -45°N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving -2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and -6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.’s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present study’s estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3

  3. Characterizing the influence of anthropogenic emissions and transport variability on sulfate aerosol concentrations at Mauna Loa Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Lauren E.

    Sulfate aerosol in the atmosphere has substantial impacts on human health and environmental quality. Most notably, atmospheric sulfate has the potential to modify the earth's climate system through both direct and indirect radiative forcing mechanisms (Meehl et al., 2007). Emissions of sulfur dioxide, the primary precursor of sulfate aerosol, are now globally dominated by anthropogenic sources as a result of widespread fossil fuel combustion. Economic development in Asian countries since 1990 has contributed considerably to atmospheric sulfur loading, particularly China, which currently emits approximately 1/3 of global anthropogenic SO2 (Klimont et al., 2013). Observational and modeling studies have confirmed that anthropogenic pollutants from Asian sources can be transported long distances with important implications for future air quality and global climate change. Located in the remote Pacific Ocean (19.54°N, 155.58°W) at an elevation of 3.4 kilometers above sea level, Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) is an ideal measurement site for ground-based, free tropospheric observations and is well situated to experience influence from springtime Asian outflow. This study makes use of a 14-year data set of aerosol ionic composition, obtained at MLO by the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Daily filter samples of total aerosol concentrations were made during nighttime downslope (free-tropospheric) transport conditions, from 1995 to 2008, and were analyzed for aerosol-phase concentrations of the following species: nitrate (NO3-), sulfate (SO42-), methanesulfonate (MSA), chloride (Cl-), oxalate, sodium (Na+), ammonium (NH 4+), potassium (K+), magnesium (Mg 2+), and calcium (Ca2+). An understanding of the factors controlling seasonal and interannual variations in aerosol speciation and concentrations at this site is complicated by the relatively short lifetimes of aerosols, compared with greenhouse gases which have also been sampled over long time periods at MLO. Aerosol filter

  4. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

    2011-03-02

    This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also fully exploiting data and findings from the first two activities. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) is a computational framework for the atmospheric sciences community that streamlines the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The AMT consists of a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of aerosol process modules via comparison with a wide range of field measurements. The philosophy of the AMT is to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules over local to regional spatial scales that are compatible with most field campaigns measurement strategies. The performance of new treatments can then be quantified and compared to existing treatments before they are incorporated into regional and global climate models. Since the AMT is a community tool, it also provides a means of enhancing collaboration and coordination among aerosol modelers.

  5. Effects of Transport and Processing on Aerosol Chemical and Optical Properties Across the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P.; Bates, T.; Baynard, T.; Onasch, T.; Coffman, D.; Covert, D.; Worsnop, D.; Goldan, P.; Kuster, B.; Degouw, J.; Stohl, A.

    2005-12-01

    NEAQS-ITCT 2004 took place in July and August to study natural and anthropogenic emissions from North America including the processing of gas and particle phase species during transport over the North Atlantic and the resulting impact on air quality and climate. During the experiment, measurements were made onboard the NOAA RV Ronald H. Brown with a ship track that extended from the coast along Cape Cod, MA, Boston, MA and Portland, ME, east into the Gulf of Maine and out to Chebogue Point, Nova Scotia. Although measurements on the ship were not made in a true Lagrangian sense, they reveal information about the effects of transport and processing on aerosol chemical and optical properties. Photochemical age based on measured toluene to benzene ratios can be used in this region to indicate 'younger' versus 'older' aerosol. This approach, coupled with FLEXPART estimates of source contributions and age, reveals that continental aerosol becomes more acidic as it ages with transport over the Gulf of Maine. The increasing acidity is due to the conversion of SO2 to SO4= with no further significant input of NH3 in the well-capped marine boundary layer to neutralize the aerosol. In addition, as the aerosol ages, the organic mass fraction decreases while the organics that are present become more oxidized. These same chemical features were observed in aerosol transported from the Ohio River Valley and beyond. In contrast, recently formed aerosol from urban centers along the Eastern Seaboard are neutralized, have a higher organic content, and the organics are less oxidized. The impact of the observed range of aerosol acidity, organic mass fraction, and degree of oxidation of the organic matter on the f(RH) of the aerosol will be described. Here, f(RH) refers to the dependence of light extinction on relative humidity.

  6. Mechanism for production of secondary organic aerosols and their representation in atmospheric models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Seinfeld, J.H.; Flagan, R.C.

    1999-06-07

    This document contains the following: organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons; gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds to model inorganic, organic, and ambient smog aerosols; and representation of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models.

  7. Non-spherical aerosol transport under oscillatory shear flows at low-Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shachar Berman, Lihi; Delorme, Yann; Hofemeier, Philipp; Frankel, Steven; Sznitman, Josue

    2014-11-01

    Most airborne particles are intrinsically non-spherical. In particular, non-spherical particles with high aspect ratios, such as fibers, are acknowledged to be more hazardous than their spherical counterparts due to their ability to penetrate into deeper lung regions, causing serious pulmonary diseases. Not only do particle properties such as size, shape, and density have a major impact on particle transport, for non-spherical aerosols, their orientations also greatly influence particle trajectories due to modified lift and drag characteristics. Until present, however, most of our understanding of the dynamics of inhaled particles in the deep airways of the lungs has been limited to spherical particles only. In the present work, we seek to quantify through numerical simulations the transport of non-spherical airborne particles and their deposition under oscillatory shear flows at low Reynolds numbers, characteristic of acinar airways. Here, the Euler-Lagrangian model is used to solve the translational movement of a fiber, whereas the Eulerian rotational equations are introduced and solved to predict detailed unsteady fiber orientations. Overall, our efforts provide new insight into realistic dynamics of inhaled non-spherical aerosols under characteristic breathing motions.

  8. First Evaluation of the CCAM Aerosol Simulation over Africa: Implications for Regional Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, H.; Garland, R. M.; Thatcher, M. J.; Naidoo, M.; van der Merwe, J.; Landman, W.; Engelbrecht, F.

    2015-12-01

    An accurate representation of African aerosols in climate models is needed to understand the regional and global radiative forcing and climate impacts of aerosols, at present and under future climate change. However, aerosol simulations in regional climate models for Africa have not been well-tested. Africa contains the largest single source of biomass-burning smoke aerosols and dust globally. Although aerosols are short-lived relative to greenhouse gases, black carbon in particular is estimated to be second only to carbon dioxide in contributing to warming on a global scale. Moreover, Saharan dust is exported great distances over the Atlantic Ocean, affecting nutrient transport to regions like the Amazon rainforest, which can further impact climate. Biomass burning aerosols are also exported from Africa, westward from Angola over the Atlantic Ocean and off the southeastern coast of South Africa to the Indian Ocean. Here, we perform the first extensive quantitative evaluation of the Conformal-Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM) aerosol simulation against monitored data, focusing on aerosol optical depth (AOD) observations over Africa. We analyze historical regional simulations for 1999 - 2012 from CCAM consistent with the experimental design of CORDEX at 50 km global horizontal resolution, through the dynamical downscaling of ERA-Interim data reanalysis data, with the CMIP5 emissions inventory (RCP8.5 scenario). CCAM has a prognostic aerosol scheme for organic carbon, black carbon, sulfate, and dust, and non-prognostic sea salt. The CCAM AOD at 550nm was compared to AOD (observed at 440nm, adjusted to 550nm with the Ångström exponent) from long-term AERONET stations across Africa. Sites strongly impacted by dust and biomass burning and with long continuous records were prioritized. In general, the model captures the monthly trends of the AERONET data. This presentation provides a basis for understanding how well aerosol particles are represented over Africa in

  9. A two-dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Jones, C. F.; Park, J.

    1976-01-01

    Observational data of the pre- and post-volcanic aerosols from the eruption of the Volcan de Fuego in Guatemala (15 deg N) in October 1974 were used in conjunction with predictions of a 2-D circulation model to gain better understanding of the transport, chemical and sedimentation processes which determine the stratospheric aeosol layer.

  10. Assessment of the Aerosol Distribution Over Indian Subcontinent in CMIP5 Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Pandithurai, G.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent as represented in 21 models from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations, wherein model simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) is compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The objective of the study is to provide an assessment of the capability of various global models, participating in CMIP5 project, in capturing the realistic spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent. Results from our analysis show that majority of the CMIP5 models seriously underestimates the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent, in particular over Indo-Gangetic Plains(IGP). Though the representation of black carbon (BC) loading in many models is fairly good, the dust loading is observed to be significantly low in majority of the models. The presence of pronounced dust activity over northern India and dust being one of the major constituent of aerosol species, the biases in dust loading has a great impact on the AOD of that region. We found that considerable biases in simulating the 850 hPa wind field (which plays important role in transport of dust from adjacent deserts) would be the possible reason for poor representation of dust AOD and in turn total AOD over Indian region in CMIP5 models. In addition, aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) underestimated/overestimated in most of the models. However, spatial distribution of ARF in multi-model ensemble mean is comparable reasonably well with observations with bias in magnitudes. This analysis emphasizes the fundamental need to improve the representation of aerosol species in current state of the art climate models. As reported in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4), the level of scientific understanding (LOSU) of climatic impact of aerosols is medium-low. For better understanding of

  11. Implementation of a new aerosol HAM model within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, R.; Irannejad, P.; Feichter, J.; Bidokhti, A. A.

    2009-07-01

    A new coupled system of aerosol HAM model and the Weather, Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is presented in this paper. Unlike the current aerosol schemes used in WRF model, the HAM is using a "pseudomodal" approach for the representation of the particle size distribution. The aerosol components considered are sulfate, black carbon, particulate organic matter, sea salt and mineral dust. The preliminary model results are presented for two different 6-day simulation periods from 22 to 28 February 2006 as a winter period and 6 to 12 May 2006 as a mild period. The mean shortwave radiation and thermal forcing were calculated from the model simulations with and without aerosols feedback for two simulation periods. A negative radiative forcing and cooling of the atmosphere were found mainly over the regions of high emission of mineral dust. The absorption of shortwave radiation by black carbon caused warming effects in some regions with positive radiative forcing. The simulated daily mean sulfate mass concentration showed a rather good agreement with the measurements in the European EMEP network. The diurnal variation of the simulated hourly PM10 mass concentration at Tehran was also qualitatively close to the observations in both simulation periods. The model captured diurnal cycle and the magnitude of the observed PM10 concentration during most of the simulation periods. The differences between the observed and simulated PM10 concentration resulted mostly from limitation of the model in simulating the clouds and precipitation, transport errors and uncertainties in the particulate emission rates. The inclusion of aerosols feedback in shortwave radiation scheme improved the simulated daily mean shortwave radiation fluxes in Tehran for both simulation periods.

  12. Antarctic and Southern Ocean Mineral Dust Aerosol Transport Pathways: Forward-Trajectory Modeling and Source Constraints Derived from the RICE Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, P. D.; Tuohy, A.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Edwards, R.

    2014-12-01

    Mineral dust fertilization of Southern Ocean surface waters, and mixing with Antarctic deep-water, influences oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide and draws down global atmospheric CO2concentration during glacial periods. Quantifying modern variability in dust source and transport strength, especially with respect to high- and low-latitude climate phenomena (e.g. SAM, ENSO), will improve understanding of this important aspect of the global carbon cycle. Here we present data from a new intermediate-depth, coastal ice core drilled at Roosevelt Island, Antarctica as part of the Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) project. Using HySPLIT forward trajectories, climate reanalysis and geochemistry data, this work explores variability in atmospheric transport for modern Southern Hemisphere dust source areas (primarily Australia, southern South America and southern Africa). While New Zealand represents a relatively small dust source at present, it is strongly-connected to the Antarctic due to its position within the circumpolar westerly winds and was a major dust source during the last glacial period. Geochemical data from the RICE ice core (79.36ºS, 161.71ºW, 550 m a.s.l.) are used to constrain sources of dust in this sector. The lanthanide elements—common in crustal material and not susceptible to fractionation—can preserve the signature of their original source material, allowing for characterisation of dust provenance. Initial results suggest that only air trajectories originating in New Zealand regularly reach the Ross Sea, Marie Byrd Land and Roosevelt Island within 3 to 5 days (see Figure 1), a characteristic travel time of suspended dust particles. We discuss estimates of the relative source strength of New Zealand compared with other dust source areas to evaluate its overall contribution. Figure 1: Daily 96-hour forward trajectories for Southern Hemisphere dust source areas, 2010-2013 (NOAA HySPLIT, NCEP reanalysis). NCEP reanalysis 1980

  13. Modeling organic aerosols during MILAGRO: application of the CHIMERE model and importance of biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Madronich, S.; Aiken, A. C.; Bessagnet, B.; Curci, G.; Fast, J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Onasch, T. B.; Roux, G.; Ulbrich, I. M.

    2009-05-01

    The meso-scale chemistry-transport model CHIMERE is used to assess our understanding of major sources and formation processes leading to a fairly large amount of organic aerosols (OA, including primary OA (POA) and secondary OA (SOA)) observed in Mexico City during the MILAGRO field project (March 2006). Chemical analyses of submicron aerosols from aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) indicate that organic particles found in the Mexico City basin contain a large fraction of oxygenated organic species (OOA) which have strong correspondence with SOA, and that their production actively continues downwind of the city. The SOA formation is modeled here by the one-step oxidation of anthropogenic (i.e. aromatics, alkanes), biogenic (i.e. monoterpenes and isoprene), and biomass-burning SOA precursors and their partitioning into both organic and aqueous phases. The near-surface model evaluation shows that predicted OA correlates reasonably well with measurements during the campaign, however it remains a factor of 2 lower than the measured total OA. Fairly good agreement is found between predicted and observed POA within the city suggesting that anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions are reasonably captured. Consistent with previous studies in Mexico City, large discrepancies are encountered for SOA, with a factor of 2-10 model underestimate. When only anthropogenic SOA precursors were considered, the model was able to reproduce within a factor of two the sharp increase in SOA concentrations during the late morning at both urban and near-urban locations but the discrepancy increases rapidly later in the day, consistent with previous results, and is especially obvious when the column-integrated SOA mass is considered instead of the surface concentration. The increase in the missing SOA mass in the afternoon coincides with the sharp drop in POA suggesting a tendency of the model to excessively evaporate the freshly formed SOA. Predicted SOA concentrations in our base case

  14. Estimate of Nutrient Input to the Pacific Ocean from Long-Range Transport of Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliff, S. S.; Vancuren, T.

    2003-12-01

    Dust and pollution generation and transport have increasingly become the subject of scrutiny for their impacts on global climate, the ecosystem, and human health. Several recent regional and hemispheric scale campaigns were conducted to better characterize aerosol composition and transport. These campaigns include the 2001 Aerosol Characterization Experiment in Asia (ACE-Asia) and the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation Experiment of 2002 (ITCT-2K2). In addition, long-term sampling has been conducted at National Parks and Monuments across the United States as part of the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) program. These data provide a basis for estimating the transport and deposition of atmospheric particulate matter to the northern hemisphere oceans. Here we focus on the aerosol that is generated in Asia (i.e. compositionally distinct from North America and Europe) and transported across the Pacific Basin. The flux of aerosol from the source region from ACE-Asia data combined with data from receptor sites in North America from ACE-Asia, ITCT, and IMPROVE sampling are used to estimate oceanic deposition. A previously identified signature for Asian aerosol (VanCuren and Cahill, JGR December 2003) is used as a marker for transport. Comparison with direct deposition measurements is made.

  15. HETEAC: The Aerosol Classification Model for EarthCARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Engelmann, Ronny; Hünerbein, Anja; Horn, Stefan; Kanitz, Thomas; Donovan, David; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Daou, David; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Filipitsch, Florian; Docter, Nicole; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the Hybrid End-To-End Aerosol Classification (HETEAC) model for the upcoming EarthCARE mission. The model serves as the common baseline for development, evaluation, and implementation of EarthCARE algorithms. It shall ensure the consistency of different aerosol products from the multi-instrument platform as well as facilitate the conform specification of broad-band optical properties necessary for the EarthCARE radiative closure efforts. The hybrid approach ensures the theoretical description of aerosol microphysics consistent with the optical properties of various aerosol types known from observations. The end-to-end model permits the uniform representation of aerosol types in terms of microphysical, optical and radiative properties.

  16. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE CMAQ MODEL AEROSOL MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster describes changes that were made to the aerosol module between CMAQ v4.4 and v4.5, as well as the effects of these changes on CMAQ model results. New aerosol diagnostic tools released with CMAQ v4.5 are also described and some illustrative results are provided

  17. A general circulation model (GCM) parameterization of Pinatubo aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lacis, A.A.; Carlson, B.E.; Mishchenko, M.I.

    1996-04-01

    The June 1991 volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo is the largest and best documented global climate forcing experiment in recorded history. The time development and geographical dispersion of the aerosol has been closely monitored and sampled. Based on preliminary estimates of the Pinatubo aerosol loading, general circulation model predictions of the impact on global climate have been made.

  18. Laboratory experiments on the formation and recoil jet transport of aerosol by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirooka, Yoshi; Tanaka, Kazuo A.; Imamura, Keisuke; Okazaki, Katsuya

    2016-05-01

    In a high-repetition rate inertial fusion reactor, the first wall will be subjected to repeated ablation along with pellet implosions, which then leads to the formation of aerosol to scatter and/or deflect laser beams for the subsequent implosion, affecting the overall reactor performance. Proposed in the present work is a method of in-situ directed transport of aerosol particles by the use of laser ablation-induced jet recoil momenta. Lithium and carbon are used as the primary ablation targets, the former of which is known to form aerosol in the form of droplet, and the latter of which tends to form carbon nanotubes. Laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted to irradiate airborne aerosol particles with high-intensity laser to produce ablation-induced jet. Data have indicated a change in aerosol flow direction, but only in the case of lithium.

  19. Response of different regional online coupled models to aerosol-radiation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Renate; Balzarini, Alessandra; Brunner, Dominik; Baró, Rocio; Curci, Gabriele; Hirtl, Marcus; Honzak, Luka; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San José, Roberto; Schröder, Wolfram; Tuccella, Paolo; Werhahn, Johannes; Wolke, Ralf; Žabkar, Rahela

    2016-04-01

    The importance of aerosol-meteorology interactions and their representation in online coupled regional atmospheric chemistry-meteorology models was investigated in COST Action ES1004 (EuMetChem, http://eumetchem.info/). Case study results from different models (COSMO-Muscat, COSMO-ART, and different configurations of WRF-Chem), which were applied for Europe as a coordinated exercise for the year 2010, are analyzed with respect to inter-model variability and the response of the different models to direct and indirect aerosol-radiation interactions. The main focus was on two episodes - the Russian heat wave and wildfires episode in July/August 2010 and a period in October 2010 with enhanced cloud cover and rain and including an of Saharan dust transport to Europe. Looking at physical plausibility the decrease in downward solar radiation and daytime temperature due to the direct aerosol effect is robust for all model configurations. The same holds for the pronounced decrease in cloud water content and increase in solar radiation for cloudy conditions and very low aerosol concentrations that was found for WRF-Chem when aerosol cloud interactions were considered. However, when the differences were tested for statistical significance no significant differences in mean solar radiation and mean temperature between the baseline case and the simulations including the direct and indirect effect from simulated aerosol concentrations were found over Europe for the October episode. Also for the fire episode differences between mean temperature and radiation from the simulations with and without the direct aerosol effect were not significant for the major part of the modelling domain. Only for the region with high fire emissions in Russia, the differences in mean solar radiation and temperature due to the direct effect were found to be significant during the second half of the fire episode - however only for a significance level of 0.1. The few observational data indicate that

  20. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Redemann, Jens

    2002-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects". It is a bibliographic compilation of 29 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 30 first-authored conference presentations. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed below with a brief comment as to the research performed. Copies of title/abstract pages of peer-reviewed publications are attached.

  1. Impact of Emissions and Long-Range Transport on Multi-Decadal Aerosol Trends: Implications for Air Quality and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2012-01-01

    We present a global model analysis of the impact of long-range transport and anthropogenic emissions on the aerosol trends in the major pollution regions in the northern hemisphere and in the Arctic in the past three decades. We will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to analyze the multi-spatial and temporal scale data, including observations from Terra, Aqua, and CALIPSO satellites and from the long-term surface monitoring stations. We will analyze the source attribution (SA) and source-receptor (SR) relationships in North America, Europe, East Asia, South Asia, and the Arctic at the surface and free troposphere and establish the quantitative linkages between emissions from different source regions. We will discuss the implications for regional air quality and climate change.

  2. A physical model of Titan's aerosols.

    PubMed

    Toon, O B; McKay, C P; Griffith, C A; Turco, R P

    1992-01-01

    Microphysical simulations of Titan's stratospheric haze show that aerosol microphysics is linked to organized dynamical processes. The detached haze layer may be a manifestation of 1 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes above 300 km. The hemispherical asymmetry in the visible albedo may be caused by 0.05 cm sec-1 vertical velocities at altitudes of 150 to 200 km, we predict contrast reversal beyond 0.6 micrometer. Tomasko and Smith's (1982, Icarus 51, 65-95) model, in which a layer of large particles above 220 km altitude is responsible for the high forward scattering observed by Rages and Pollack (1983, Icarus 55, 50-62), is a natural outcome of the detached haze layer being produced by rising motions if aerosol mass production occurs primarily below the detached haze layer. The aerosol's electrical charge is critical for the particle size and optical depth of the haze. The geometric albedo, particularly in the ultraviolet and near infrared, requires that the particle size be near 0.15 micrometer down to altitudes below 100 km, which is consistent with polarization observations (Tomasko and Smith 1982, West and Smith 1991, Icarus 90, 330-333). Above about 400 km and below about 150 km Yung et al.'s (1984, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 55, 465-506) diffusion coefficients are too small. Dynamical processes control the haze particles below about 150 km. The relatively large eddy diffusion coefficients in the lower stratosphere result in a vertically extensive region with nonuniform mixing ratios of condensable gases, so that most hydrocarbons may condense very near the tropopause rather than tens of kilometers above it. The optical depths of hydrocarbon clouds are probably less than one, requiring that abundant gases such as ethane condense on a subset of the haze particles to create relatively large, rapidly removed particles. The wavelength dependence of the optical radius is calculated for use in analyzing observations of the geometric albedo. The lower

  3. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Cirrus Clouds in Global Aerosol-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Zhou, C.; Penner, J.; Barahona, D.; Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei that promote ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning activities have substantially perturbed and enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Global aerosol-climate models (GCMs) have now been used to quantify the radiative forcing and effects of aerosols on cirrus clouds (IPCC AR5). However, the estimate uncertainty is very large due to the different representation of ice cloud formation and evolution processes in GCMs. In addition, large discrepancies have been found between model simulations in terms of the spatial distribution of ice-nucleating aerosols, relative humidity, and temperature fluctuations, which contribute to different estimates of the aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds. In this presentation, four GCMs with the start-of-the art representations of cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions are used to estimate the aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds and to identify the causes of the discrepancies. The estimated global and annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds ranges from 0.1 W m-2 to 0.3 W m-2 in terms of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation flux, and 0.5-0.6 W m-2 for the TOA longwave flux. Despite the good agreement on global mean, large discrepancies are found at the regional scale. The physics behind the aerosol indirect effect is dramatically different. Our analysis suggests that burden of ice-nucleating aerosols in the upper troposphere, ice nucleation frequency, and relative role of ice formation processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation) play key roles in determining the characteristics of the simulated aerosol indirect effects. In addition to the indirect effect estimate, we also use field campaign

  4. Role of Clouds, Aerosols, and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction in 20th Century Simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarenko, Larissa; Rind, David; Bauer, Susanne; Del Genio, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We use the new version of NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model, modelE2 with 2º by 2.5º horizontal resolution and 40 vertical layers, with the model top at 0.1 hPa [Schmidt et al., 2014]. We use two different treatments of the atmospheric composition and aerosol indirect effect: (1) TCAD(I) version has fully interactive Tracers of Aerosols and Chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. This model predicts total aerosol number and mass concentrations [Shindell et al., 2013]; (2) TCAM is the aerosol microphysics and chemistry model based on the quadrature methods of moments [Bauer et al., 2008]. Both TCADI and TCAM models include the first indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [Menon et al., 2010]; the TCAD model includes only the direct aerosol effect. We consider the results of the TCAD, TCADI and TCAM models coupled to "Russell ocean model" [Russell et al., 1995], E2-R. We examine the climate response for the "historical period" that include the natural and anthropogenic forcings for 1850 to 2012. The effect of clouds, their feedbacks, as well as the aerosol-cloud interactions are assessed for the transient climate change.

  5. Dynamics and Properties of Global Aerosol using MODIS, AERONET and GOCART Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Chin, Mian; Reme, Lorraine; Tanre, Didier; Mattoo, Shana

    2002-01-01

    Recently produced daily Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol data for the whole year of 2001 are used to show the concentration and dynamics of aerosol over ocean and large parts of the continents. The data were validated against the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements over land and ocean in a special issue in GRL now in press. Monthly averages and a movie based on the daily data are produced and used to demonstrate the spatial and temporal evolution of aerosol. The MODIS wide spectral range is used to distinguish fine smoke and pollution aerosol from coarse dust and salt. The aerosol is observed above ocean and land. The movie produced from the MODIS data provides a new dimension to aerosol observations by showing the dynamics of the system. For example in February smoke and dust emitted from the Sahel and West Africa is shown to travel to the North-East Atlantic. In April heavy dust and pollution from East Asia is shown to travel to North America. In May-June pollution and dust play a dynamical dance in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. In Aug-September smoke from South Africa and South America is shown to pulsate in tandem and to periodically to be transported to the otherwise pristine Southern part of the Southern Hemisphere. The MODIS data are compared with the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) model to test and adjust source and sink strengths in the model and to study the effect of clouds on the representation of the satellite data.

  6. Robust calibration of a global aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pringle, K. J.; Reddington, C.

    2013-12-01

    Comparison of models and observations is vital for evaluating how well computer models can simulate real world processes. However, many current methods are lacking in their assessment of the model uncertainty, which introduces questions regarding the robustness of the observationally constrained model. In most cases, models are evaluated against observations using a single baseline simulation considered to represent the models' best estimate. The model is then improved in some way so that its comparison to observations is improved. Continuous adjustments in such a way may result in a model that compares better to observations but there may be many compensating features which make prediction with the newly calibrated model difficult to justify. There may also be some model outputs whose comparison to observations becomes worse in some regions/seasons as others improve. In such cases calibration cannot be considered robust. We present details of the calibration of a global aerosol model, GLOMAP, in which we consider not just a single model setup but a perturbed physics ensemble with 28 uncertain parameters. We first quantify the uncertainty in various model outputs (CCN, CN) for the year 2008 and use statistical emulation to identify which of the 28 parameters contribute most to this uncertainty. We then compare the emulated model simulations in the entire parametric uncertainty space to observations. Regions where the entire ensemble lies outside the error of the observations indicate structural model error or gaps in current knowledge which allows us to target future research areas. Where there is some agreement with the observations we use the information on the sources of the model uncertainty to identify geographical regions in which the important parameters are similar. Identification of regional calibration clusters helps us to use information from observation rich regions to calibrate regions with sparse observations and allow us to make recommendations for

  7. Aerosol impacts in the Met Office global NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, Jane P.; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Milton, Sean F.

    2010-05-01

    An accurate representation of the direct and indirect effect of aerosols is of growing concern for global numerical weather prediction (NWP). Increased scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave (SW) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) fields due to the presence of aerosol layers in the atmosphere modifies the atmospheric heating profile and can affect large-scale circulation patterns. The current representation of aerosols in the global NWP configuration of the Met Office Unified ModelTM (MetUM) is based on a simple aerosol climatology (Cusack et al., 1998). Profiles of water soluble dust, soot, oceanic and stratospheric sulphate aerosols are described separately for land and ocean surfaces and are distributed over the boundary layer, free troposphere and stratosphere (sulphates only). While this improved the reflected SW radiative bias at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA), there is evidence that the climatology is too absorbing leading to a temperature bias in the lower troposphere of approximately 0.5 K/day. Furthermore, the omission of the scattering and absorption properties of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol particles in particular, is believed to be the principal cause of significant model biases (in the region of 50-56 W m-2) in both the model OLR at the TOA (Haywood et al., 2005) and the surface SW radiation fields (Milton et al., 2008). One of the objectives of the Global Aerosols (G-AER) component of the MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) project is to evaluate the impact of an improved aerosol representation on the performance of global NWP models. In a stepwise approach of increasing the aerosol complexity in the MetUM, the Cusack climatology is being replaced by the CLASSIC (Coupled Large-scale Aerosol Simulator for Studies in Climate) aerosol scheme, developed for the HadGEM (Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model) climate model. CLASSIC includes representations of external mixtures of sulphate, black carbon, organic

  8. Stratospheric aerosol forcing for climate modeling: 1850-1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfeuille, Florian; Luo, Beiping; Thomason, Larry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present here a stratospheric aerosol dataset produced using the available aerosol optical depth observations from the pre-satellite period. The scarce atmospheric observations are supplemented by additional information from an aerosol microphysical model, initialized by ice-core derived sulfur emissions. The model is used to derive extinctions at all altitudes, latitudes and times when sulfur injections are known for specific volcanic eruptions. The simulated extinction coefficients are then scaled to match the observed optical depths. In order to produce the complete optical properties at all wavelengths (and the aerosol surface area and volume densities) needed by climate models, we assume a lognormal size distribution of the aerosols. Correlations between the extinctions in the visible and the effective radius and distribution width parameters are taken from the better constrained SAGE II period. The aerosol number densities are then fitted to match the derived extinctions in the 1850-1978 period. From these aerosol size distributions, we then calculate extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors at all wavelengths using the Mie theory. The aerosol surface area densities and volume densities are also provided.

  9. Impacts of intercontinental transport of aerosols on human mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anenberg, S.; West, J. J.; Schulz, M.; Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP) modelers

    2011-12-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with deleterious health impacts, including premature death from cardiopulmonary disease and lung cancer. Although the lifetime of tropospheric PM2.5 is roughly only a week, observations and modeling studies demonstrate that PM2.5 can be transported long distances, impacting air quality and health on regional or global scales. We estimate the mortality impacts of 20% primary PM and PM precursor emission reductions in four major world regions - North America, Europe, East Asia, and South Asia. We use surface concentrations simulated by an ensemble of global chemical transport models convened by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution and epidemiologically-derived concentration-response functions to calculate mortality impacts. We estimate that while >90% of avoided premature deaths resulting from these emission reductions occur within the source region, about 9,600 annual avoided deaths occur in other parts of the world. Reducing emissions in Europe avoids the most extra-regional premature deaths, due to large downwind populations in relatively close proximity. Compared with a previous study of 20% ozone precursor emission reductions, we find that the impacts of intercontinental ozone are greater than or equal to those of PM2.5 for most source-receptor pairs, due to the longer atmospheric lifetime and greater transport efficiency for ozone. However, impacts of intercontinental PM2.5 are greater for source-receptor pairs not separated by an ocean, due to the stronger relationship of PM2.5 with mortality. We examine the sensitivity of estimated premature deaths to the shape and magnitude of the concentration-response function, as well as the inter-model variation in simulated PM2.5 responses to emission reductions.

  10. Aerosol chemistry during the wet season in central Amazonia - The influence of long-range transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Andreae, M. O.; Berresheim, H.; Artaxo, P.; Garstang, M.

    1990-01-01

    The temporal variation in the concentration and chemistry of the atmospheric aerosol over central Amazonia, Brazil, during the 1987 wet season is discussed based on ground and aircraft collected data obtained during the NASA GTE ABLE 2B expedition conducted in April/May 1987. It is found that wet-season aerosol concentrations and composition are variable in contrast to the more uniform biogenic aerosol observed during the 1985 dry season; four distinct intervals of enhanced aerosol concentration coincided with short periods (3 to 5 d) of extensive rainfall. It is hypothesized that aerosol chemistry in Amazonia during the wet season is strongly influenced by long-range transport of soil dust, marine aerosol, and possibly biomass combustion products advected into the central Basin by large-scale tropospheric circulation, producing periodic pulses of material input to local boundary layer air. The resultant wet-season aerosol regime is dynamic, in contrast to the uniformity of natural biogenic aerosols during the dry season.

  11. The regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietikäinen, J.-P.; O'Donnell, D.; Teichmann, C.; Karstens, U.; Pfeifer, S.; Kazil, J.; Podzun, R.; Fiedler, S.; Kokkola, H.; Birmili, W.; O'Dowd, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.; Gehrig, R.; Spindler, G.; Kulmala, M.; Feichter, J.; Jacob, D.; Laaksonen, A.

    2012-03-01

    REMO-HAM is a new regional aerosol-climate model. It is based on the REMO regional climate model and includes all of the major aerosol processes. The structure for aerosol is similar to the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM, for example the aerosol module HAM-M7 has been coupled with a two-moment stratiform cloud scheme. In this work, we have evaluated the model and compared the results against ECHAM5-HAM and measurements. Four different measurement sites was chosen for the comparison of total number concentrations, size distributions and gas phase sulfur dioxide concentrations: Hyytiälä in Finland, Melpitz in Germany, Mace Head in Ireland and Jungfraujoch in Switzerland. REMO-HAM is run with two different resolutions: 50×50 km2 and 10×10 km2. Based on our simulations, REMO-HAM can represent the measured values reasonably well. The total number concentrations are slightly underestimated, which is probably due to the missing boundary layer nucleation and online secondary organic aerosol model. The differences in the total number concentrations between REMO-HAM and ECHAM5-HAM can be mainly explained by the difference in the nucleation mode. From the meteorological point of view, REMO-HAM represents the precipitation fields and 2 m temperature profile very well compared to measurement. Overall, we have shown that REMO-HAM is a functional aerosol-climate model, which will be used in further studies.

  12. Aerosol optical properties at Lampedusa (Central Mediterranean) 1. Influence of transport and identification of different aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, G.; di Sarra, A.; Meloni, D.; Piacentino, S.; Chamard, P.

    2005-07-01

    Aerosol optical depth andÅngström exponent were obtained from multi filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) observations carried out at the island of Lampedusa, in the Central Mediterranean, in the period July 2001-September 2003. The average aerosol optical depth at 495.7 nm, τ, is 0.24±0.14; the averageÅngström exponent, α, is 0.86±0.63. The observed values of τ range from 0.03 to 1.13, and the values of α vary from -0.32 to 2.05, indicating a large variability in aerosol content and size. In cloud-free conditions, 36% of the airmasses come from Africa, 25% from Central-Eastern Europe, and 19% from Western France, Spain and the North Atlantic. In summer, 42% of the airmasses are of African origin. In almost all cases African aerosols display high values of τ and low values of α, typical of Saharan dust (average values of τ and α are 0.36 and 0.42, respectively). Particles originating from Central-Eastern Europe show relatively large average values of τ and α (0.23 and 1.5, respectively), while particles from Western France, Spain and the North Atlantic show the lowest average values of τ (0.15), and relatively small values of α (0.92). Intermediate values of α are often connected with relatively fast changes of the airmass originating sector, suggesting the contemporary presence of different types of particles in the air column. The largest values of α (about 2) were observed in August 2003, when large scale forest fires in Southern Europe produced consistent amounts of fine combustion particles that were transported to the Central Mediterranean by a persistent high pressure system over Central Europe. Smoke particles in some cases mix with desert dust, producing intermediate values of α. The seasonal distribution of the meteorological patterns over the Mediterranean, the efficiency of the aerosol production mechanisms, and the variability of the particles' residence time produce a distinct seasonal cycle of aerosol optical depths and

  13. Aerosol optical properties at Lampedusa (Central Mediterranean). 1. Influence of transport and identification of different aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, G.; di Sarra, A.; Meloni, D.; Piacentino, S.; Chamard, P.

    2006-03-01

    Aerosol optical depth and Ångström exponent were obtained from multi filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) observations carried out at the island of Lampedusa, in the Central Mediterranean, in the period July 2001-September 2003. The average aerosol optical depth at 495.7 nm, τ, is 0.24±0.14; the average Ångström exponent, α, is 0.86±0.63. The observed values of τ range from 0.03 to 1.13, and the values of α vary from -0.32 to 2.05, indicating a large variability in aerosol content and size. In cloud-free conditions, 36% of the airmasses come from Africa, 25% from Central-Eastern Europe, and 19% from Western France, Spain and the North Atlantic. In summer, 42% of the airmasses is of African origin. In almost all cases African aerosols display high values of τ and low values of α, typical of Saharan dust (average values of τ and α are 0.36 and 0.42, respectively). Particles originating from Central-Eastern Europe show relatively large average values of τ and α (0.23 and 1.5, respectively), while particles from Western France, Spain and the North Atlantic show the lowest average values of τ (0.15), and relatively small values of α (0.92). Intermediate values of α are often connected with relatively fast changes of the airmass originating sector, suggesting the contemporary presence of different types of particles in the air column. Clean marine conditions are rare at Lampedusa, and are generally associated with subsidence of the airmasses reaching the island. Average values of τ and α for clean marine conditions are 0.11 and 0.86, respectively. The largest values of α (about 2) were observed in August 2003, when large scale forest fires in Southern Europe produced consistent amounts of fine combustion particles, that were transported to the Central Mediterranean by a persistent high pressure system over Central Europe. Smoke particles in some cases mix with desert dust, producing intermediate values of α. The seasonal distribution of

  14. A numerical model of aerosol scavenging: Part 1, Microphysics parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Bradley, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional numerical model (OCTET) to simulate the dynamics and microphysics of clouds and the transport, diffusion and precipitation scavenging of aerosol particles. In this paper we describe the cloud microphysics and scavenging parameterizations. The representation of cloud microphysics is a bulk- water parameterization which includes water vapor and five types of hydrometeors (cloud droplets, rain drops, ice crystals, snow, and graupel). A parallel parameterization represents the scavenging interactions between pollutant particles and hydrometeors including collection of particles because of condensation nucleation, Brownian and phoretic attachment, and inertial capture, resuspension because of evaporation and sublimation; and transfer interactions where particles collected by one type of hydrometeor are transferred to another type of freezing, melting, accretion, riming and autoconversion.

  15. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2010-04-09

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.

  16. Models to support active sensing of biological aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Chaudhry, Zahra; Boggs, Nathan T.; Brown, David M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic backscatter LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) is a promising approach for stand-off detection of biological aerosol clouds. Comprehensive models that explain the scattering behavior from the aerosol cloud are needed to understand and predict the scattering signatures of biological aerosols under varying atmospheric conditions and against different aerosol backgrounds. Elastic signatures are dependent on many parameters of the aerosol cloud, with two major components being the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosols. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has been in a unique position to measure the size distributions of released biological simulant clouds using a wide assortment of aerosol characterization systems that are available on the commercial market. In conjunction with the size distribution measurements, JHU/APL has also been making a dedicated effort to properly measure the refractive indices of the released materials using a thin-film absorption technique and laboratory characterization of the released materials. Intimate knowledge of the size distributions and refractive indices of the biological aerosols provides JHU/APL with powerful tools to build elastic scattering models, with the purpose of understanding, and ultimately, predicting the active signatures of biological clouds.

  17. Dispersion and transport of tropospheric aerosol and pollutants in the Western Mediterranean: the role of the Po Valley under different transport regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, Silvia; Fierli, Federico; Ravetta, François; Raut, Jean Christophe; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Decesari, Stefano; Diliberto, Luca; Größ, Johannes; Pap, Ines; Weinhold, Kay; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Cairo, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a characterization of the vertical variability of tropospheric aerosol and gaseous pollutants, over the western Mediterranean, during the 2012 summer season. In particular, we investigate the role of the Po Valley region as a receptor and emissive region of both natural and anthropogenic aerosol. The observational analysis, based on a comprehensive database of meteorological, aerosol and chemical measurements, is integrated with a model analysis using the Lagrangian transport system FLEXPART combined with emission databases, and WRF-Chem, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with Chemistry. Observations have been performed in the framework of the Supersito project by Regional Agency of Prevention and Environment of the Emilia Romagna region (ARPA-ER, Ital), the TRAQA campaign (TRAnsport et Qualité de l'Air au dessus du bassin Méditerranéen) performed in the ChArMEx (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) project, and the european project PEGASOS (Pan-European Gas-AeroSOl-climate interaction Study). An alternation between different transport regimes characterized the 2012 summer, resulting in a large variability of aerosol and pollution at different time and spatial scales. Particles of different nature have been discriminated basing on optical properties retrieved from lidar data and supported by in-situ observations and transport analysis. Results show that, during the analysed season, aerosol in the Po Valley was mainly confined below 2000 m and dominated (50% of detections) by spherical particles. Two events of dust advection from northern Africa were identified (19th-21th June and 29th June-2nd July), with intrusion and mixing with local pollution in the PBL and a non-negligible occurrence (~7%) of dust at the ground. Frequent events (22% of occurrence) of non-spherical particles resuspension, likely due to uplift of mineral soil particles, were observed from the ground to 2000 m during afternoon and evening. In the

  18. SILAM and MACC reanalysis aerosol data used for simulating the aerosol direct radiative effect with the NWP model HARMONIE for summer 2010 wildfire case in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, V.; Reis, K.; Ots, R.; Kaasik, M.; Männik, A.; Prank, M.; Sofiev, M.

    2015-11-01

    Persistent high pressure conditions over the European part of Russia during summer 2010 were responsible for an extended period of hot and dry weather, creating favourable conditions for severe wildfires. The chemical transport model SILAM is used to simulate the dispersion of smoke aerosol for this case. Aerosol fields from SILAM are compared to the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis. Moreover, the model output is compared to in situ and remote sensing measurements, paying particular attention to the most intense fire period of August 7 to 9, when the plume reached the Baltic countries and Finland. The maximum observed aerosol optical depth was more than 4 at 550 nm during this time. The aerosol distributions from the SILAM run and the MACC reanalysis are subsequently used in meteorological simulations using the Hirlam Aladin Research for Mesoscale Operational Numerical Weather Prediction in Euromed (HARMONIE) model. The modelling results show a significant reduction of the daily average shortwave radiation fluxes at the surface (up to 125 W/m2) and daily average near-surface temperature (up to 4 °C) through the aerosol direct radiative effect. The simulated near-surface temperature and vertical temperature profile agree better with the observations, when the aerosol direct radiative effect is considered in the meteorological simulation. The boundary layer is more stably stratified, creating poorer dispersion conditions for the smoke.

  19. Role of clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interaction in 20th century simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, L.; Rind, D. H.; Bauer, S.; Del Genio, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Simulations of aerosols, clouds and their interaction contribute to the major source of uncertainty in predicting the changing Earth's energy and in estimating future climate. Anthropogenic contribution of aerosols affects the properties of clouds through aerosol indirect effects. Three different versions of NASA GISS global climate model are presented for simulation of the twentieth century climate change. All versions have fully interactive tracers of aerosols and chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. All chemical species are simulated prognostically consistent with atmospheric physics in the model and the emissions of short-lived precursors [Shindell et al., 2006]. One version does not include the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. The other two versions include a parameterization of the interactive first indirect aerosol effect on clouds following Menon et al. [2010]. One of these two models has the Multiconfiguration Aerosol Tracker of Mixing state (MATRIX) that permits detailed treatment of aerosol mixing state, size, and aerosol-cloud activation. The main purpose of this study is evaluation of aerosol-clouds interactions and feedbacks, as well as cloud and aerosol radiative forcings, for the twentieth century climate under different assumptions and parameterizations for aerosol, clouds and their interactions in the climate models. The change of global surface air temperature based on linear trend ranges from +0.8°C to +1.2°C between 1850 and 2012. Water cloud optical thickness increases with increasing temperature in all versions with the largest increase in models with interactive indirect effect of aerosols on clouds, which leads to the total (shortwave and longwave) cloud radiative cooling trend at the top of the atmosphere. Menon, S., D. Koch, G. Beig, S. Sahu, J. Fasullo, and D. Orlikowski (2010), Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10,4559-4571, doi:10.5194/acp-10-4559-2010. Shindell, D., G. Faluvegi

  20. Comparison of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) joint aerosol product with high-resolution model output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O.; Lee, H.; Suzuki, K.; Braverman, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Level 3 Joint Aerosol product (JOINT_AS) provides global, descriptive summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical thickness (AOT) for eight different types of aerosols at 5 x 5 degrees of horizontal resolution in each month between March 2000 and present. Using Version 22 JOINT_AS, this study analyzed characteristics of the observed AOT distributions and compared various statistical moments of aerosol optical thickness derived from JOINT_AS with the results from Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) simulation. Overall, marginal distributions of AOT show highly positive skewness at many grid points. Some of the large skewness values are related to the problems in MISR's retrieval algorithm. For example, the positive skewness in AOT for strongly absorbing aerosols at mid- and high latitudes in winter results from few outlier values is due to cloud contamination over a wide area. Combined AOT for multiple MISR aerosol types is comparable to the AOT for carbonaceous, sulfate aerosols and dust particles from the NICAM simulation implemented with aerosol transport processes. NICAM's carbonaceous aerosols in the Southwest Africa show good agreement with MISR's strongly absorbing aerosols. The AOT of dust particles in MISR and NICAM exhibit similar spatial patterns over the Sahara desert. The AOT of nonabsorbing aerosols in MISR well represents spatial distributions of the sulfate aerosols originating from industrial complex over the Shandong Peninsula in China. Our results indicate that MISR's AOT for each aerosol type may be useful for monitoring biomass burning, dust storms and air pollution and evaluating chemistry climate models.

  1. Model for assessing bronchial mucus transport

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, J.E.; Bateman, J.R.M.; Pavia, D.; Clarke, S.W.

    1984-02-01

    The authors propose a scheme for the assessment of regional mucus transport using inhaled Tc-99m aerosol particles and quantitative analysis of serial gamma-camera images. The model treats input to inner and intermediate lung regions as the total of initial deposition there plus subsequent transport into these regions from more peripheral airways. It allows for interregional differences in the proportion of particles deposited on the mucus-bearing conducting airways, and does not require a gamma image 24 hr after particle inhalation. Instead, distribution of particles reaching the respiratory bronchioles or alveoli is determined from a Kr-81m ventilation image, while the total amount of such deposition is obtained from 24-hr Tc-99m retention measured with a sensitive counter system. The model is applicable to transport by mucociliary action or by cough, and has been tested in ten normal and ten asthmatic subjects.

  2. Optical Modeling and Interpretation of TRACE-P Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, W. B.; Anderson, B. E.; Browell, E. V.; Butler, C. F.; Brackett, V. G.; Jordan, C. E.

    2002-12-01

    The NASA Langley airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system participated in the NASA-sponsored Transport and Atmospheric Chemistry near the Equator-Pacific (TRACE-P) mission, designed to study transport and transformation of emissions from Asia, from February 26 to April 9, 2001. The UV DIAL system measures backscatter in both nadir and zenith at 1064, 600, and 300 nm and depolarization ratio in the nadir at 600 nm. From the lidar backscatter measurement, the aerosol scattering ratio (ASR) is determined. The ASR is the ratio of aerosol backscatter to molecular backscatter and is derived by dividing the total backscatter by a standard atmosphere molecular density profile then normalizing in some low-aerosol region of the atmosphere. The wavelength dependence of aerosol backscatter, which is related to aerosol size, is determined from the ASRs at 1064 and 600 nm. The depolarization ratio, which is sensitive to irregularly shaped particles, is used to determine the presence of dust. Dust encountered during this mission originated primarily in China, but also in India and Africa. In situ instruments onboard the DC-8 provide additional information such as meteorological parameters, aerosol size distributions and chemical composition, and gas concentrations. These in situ data are being used along with the ASRs to help determine the aerosol optical properties. These optical properties will then enable the use of the extensive lidar profiles to achieve the goal of estimating the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing of the atmosphere over the western Pacific as well as over Asia near the coast.

  3. Indian monsoon and the elevated-heat-pump mechanism in a coupled aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Errico, Miriam; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Lau, William K. M.; Hardenberg, Jost; Fierli, Federico; Cherchi, Annalisa

    2015-09-01

    A coupled aerosol-atmosphere-ocean-sea ice climate model is used to explore the interaction between aerosols and the Indian summer monsoon precipitation on seasonal-to-interannual time scales. Results show that when increased aerosol loading is found on the Himalayas slopes in the premonsoon period (April-May), intensification of early monsoon rainfall over India and increased low-level westerly flow follow, in agreement with the elevated-heat-pump mechanism. The increase in rainfall during the early monsoon season has a cooling effect on the land surface. In the same period, enhanced surface cooling may also be amplified through solar dimming by more cloudiness and aerosol loading, via increased dust transported by low-level westerly flow. The surface cooling causes subsequent reduction in monsoon rainfall in July-August over India. The time-lagged nature of the reasonably realistic response of the model to aerosol forcing suggests that absorbing aerosols, besides their potential key roles in impacting monsoon water cycle and climate, may influence the seasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon.

  4. Volcanic Aerosol Evolution: Model vs. In Situ Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, M. A.; Rietmeijer, F. J.; Brearley, A. J.; Fischer, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    Volcanoes are the most significant non-anthropogenic source of tropospheric aerosols. Aerosol samples were collected at different distances from 92°C fumarolic source at Poás Volcano. Aerosols were captured on TEM grids coated by a thin C-film using a specially designed collector. In the sampling, grids were exposed to the plume for 30-second intervals then sealed and frozen to prevent reaction before ATEM analysis to determine aerosol size and chemistry. Gas composition was established using gas chromatography, wet chemistry techniques, AAS and Ion Chromatography on samples collected directly from a fumarolic vent. SO2 flux was measured remotely by COSPEC. A Gaussian plume dispersion model was used to model concentrations of the gases at different distances down-wind. Calculated mixing ratios of air and the initial gas species were used as input to the thermo-chemical model GASWORKS (Symonds and Reed, Am. Jour. Sci., 1993). Modeled products were compared with measured aerosol compositions. Aerosols predicted to precipitate out of the plume one meter above the fumarole are [CaSO4, Fe2.3SO4, H2SO4, MgF2. Na2SO4, silica, water]. Where the plume leaves the confines of the crater, 380 meters distant, the predicted aerosols are the same, excepting FeF3 replacing Fe2.3SO4. Collected aerosols show considerable compositional differences between the sampling locations and are more complex than those predicted. Aerosols from the fumarole consist of [Fe +/- Si,S,Cl], [S +/- O] and [Si +/- O]. Aerosols collected on the crater rim consist of the same plus [O,Na,Mg,Ca], [O,Si,Cl +/- Fe], [Fe,O,F] and [S,O +/- Mg,Ca]. The comparison between results obtained by the equilibrium gas model and the actual aerosol compositions shows that an assumption of chemical and thermal equilibrium evolution is invalid. The complex aerosols collected contrast the simple formulae predicted. These findings show that complex, non-equilibrium chemical reactions take place immediately upon volcanic

  5. Characterization of aerosol transport in a recoil transfer chamber for heavy element chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Morales, Gabriel; Tereshatov, Evgeny; Folden, Charles

    2014-09-01

    Heavy elements (HE) are elements with Z >103 that can be synthesized via target material bombardment by accelerated charged particles. Production and investigation of properties of new elements result in understanding of upper limit of Periodic Table of Elements. Study of chemical behavior of HE is usually based on comparison with their light homologue properties. Such experiments require transportation of elements of interest from a target chamber to a radiochemical laboratory within several seconds. Aerosol transport is a widely known way to transfer non-volatile elements in on-line experiments. This particular project is devoted to design, characterization and optimization of aerosol transport for implementation in future experiments at Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. Different types of aerosol generators and particle parameters such as: size distribution, concentration and charge have been considered. Results showing procedure development will be presented. *Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  6. Neutral and charged binary sulfate aerosol nucleation in the aerosol-climate modeling system ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Kokkola, H.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosol particles play an important role in the Earth's atmosphere and in the climate system: Aerosols scatter and absorb solar radiation, facilitate heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry, and change cloud characteristics in many ways. Aerosol particles can be directly emitted from surface sources (primary aerosol) or form from the gas phase (secondary aerosol). Secondary aerosol formation can significantly increase concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. Two important pathways of aerosol formation from the gas phase are neutral and charged binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water. We have introduced laboratory data based representations of these pathways into the aerosol-climate modeling system ECHAM5-HAM, and investigate their relative importance and spatial distribution in the troposphere, and discuss ramifications for processes in the Earth's atmosphere.

  7. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): a New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time data capability of the ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as air quality and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a summary of the science

  8. Ozone and aerosol tropospheric concentrations variability analyzed using the ADRIMED measurements and the WRF and CHIMERE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, L.; Mailler, S.; Siour, G.; Bessagnet, B.; Turquety, S.; Rea, G.; Briant, R.; Mallet, M.; Sciare, J.; Formenti, P.; Meleux, F.

    2015-06-01

    During the months of June and July 2013, over the Euro-Mediterranean area, the ADRIMED (Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) project was dedicated to characterize the ozone and aerosol concentrations in the troposphere. It is first shown that this period was not highly polluted compared to previous summers in this region, with a moderate ozone production, no significant vegetation fire events and several precipitation periods scavenging the aerosol. The period is modeled with the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) and CHIMERE models, and their ability to quantify the observed pollution transport events is presented. The CHIMERE model simulating all kinds of sources (anthropogenic, biogenic, mineral dust, vegetation fires); the aerosol speciation, not available with the measurements, is presented: during the whole period, the aerosol was mainly constituted by mineral dust, sea salt and sulfates close to the surface and mainly by mineral dust in the troposphere. Compared to the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) size distribution, it is shown that the model underestimates the coarse mode near mineral dust sources and overestimates the fine mode in the Mediterranean area, highlighting the need to improve the model representation of the aerosol size distribution both during emissions, long-range transport and deposition.

  9. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Earth Science Capability for ISS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, M. J.; Yorks, J. E.; Scott, S.; Kupchock, A.; Selmer, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a lidar remote sensing instrument developed for deployment to the International Space Station (ISS). The CATS lidar will provide range-resolved profile measurements of atmospheric aerosol and cloud distributions and properties. The CATS instrument uses a high repetition rate laser operating at three wavelengths (1064, 532, and 355 nm) to derive properties of cloud/aerosol layers including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The CATS mission was designed to capitalize on the Space Station's unique orbit and facilities to continue existing Earth Science data records, to provide observational data for use in forecast models, and to demonstrate new technologies for use in future missions. The CATS payload will be installed on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF). The payload is designed to operate on-orbit for at least six months, and up to three years. The payload is completed and currently scheduled for a mid-2014 launch. The ISS and, in particular, the JEM-EF, is an exciting new platform for spaceborne Earth observations. The ability to leverage existing aircraft instrument designs coupled with the lower cost possible for ISS external attached payloads permits rapid and cost effective development of spaceborne sensors. The CATS payload is based on existing instrumentation built and operated on the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft. The payload is housed in a 1.5 m x 1 m x 0.8 m volume that attaches to the JEM-EF. The allowed volume limits the maximum size for the collecting telescope to 60 cm diameter. Figure 1 shows a schematic layout of the CATS payload, with the primary instrument components identified. Figure 2 is a photo of the completed payload. CATS payload cut-away view. Completed CATS payload assembly.

  10. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2014-09-09

    Marine organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in goodmore » agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  11. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2014-09-01

    Marine organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.

  12. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-03-01

    Marine-sourced organic aerosols (MOAs) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem (Global Earth Observing System Chemistry) model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOAs observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOAs have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having >10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.

  13. Evaluating Organic Aerosol Model Performance: Impact of two Embedded Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Giroux, E.; Roth, H.; Yin, D.

    2004-05-01

    Organic aerosols are important due to their abundance in the polluted lower atmosphere and their impact on human health and vegetation. However, modeling organic aerosols is a very challenging task because of the complexity of aerosol composition, structure, and formation processes. Assumptions and their associated uncertainties in both models and measurement data make model performance evaluation a truly demanding job. Although some assumptions are obvious, others are hidden and embedded, and can significantly impact modeling results, possibly even changing conclusions about model performance. This paper focuses on analyzing the impact of two embedded assumptions on evaluation of organic aerosol model performance. One assumption is about the enthalpy of vaporization widely used in various secondary organic aerosol (SOA) algorithms. The other is about the conversion factor used to obtain ambient organic aerosol concentrations from measured organic carbon. These two assumptions reflect uncertainties in the model and in the ambient measurement data, respectively. For illustration purposes, various choices of the assumed values are implemented in the evaluation process for an air quality model based on CMAQ (the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model). Model simulations are conducted for the Lower Fraser Valley covering Southwest British Columbia, Canada, and Northwest Washington, United States, for a historical pollution episode in 1993. To understand the impact of the assumed enthalpy of vaporization on modeling results, its impact on instantaneous organic aerosol yields (IAY) through partitioning coefficients is analysed first. The analysis shows that utilizing different enthalpy of vaporization values causes changes in the shapes of IAY curves and in the response of SOA formation capability of reactive organic gases to temperature variations. These changes are then carried into the air quality model and cause substantial changes in the organic aerosol modeling

  14. Comparison of aerosol optical properties above clouds between POLDER and AeroCom models over the South East Atlantic Ocean during the fire season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peers, F.; Bellouin, N.; Waquet, F.; Ducos, F.; Goloub, P.; Mollard, J.; Myhre, G.; Skeie, R. B.; Takemura, T.; Tanré, D.; Thieuleux, F.; Zhang, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol properties above clouds have been retrieved over the South East Atlantic Ocean during the fire season 2006 using satellite observations from POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances). From June to October, POLDER has observed a mean Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Thickness (ACAOT) of 0.28 and a mean Above-Clouds Single Scattering Albedo (ACSSA) of 0.87 at 550 nm. These results have been used to evaluate the simulation of aerosols above clouds in five Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART), Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model 3 (HadGEM3), European Centre Hamburg Model 5-Hamburg Aerosol Module 2 (ECHAM5-HAM2), Oslo-Chemical Transport Model 2 (OsloCTM2), and Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS)). Most models do not reproduce the observed large aerosol load episodes. The comparison highlights the importance of the injection height and the vertical transport parameterizations to simulate the large ACAOT observed by POLDER. Furthermore, POLDER ACSSA is best reproduced by models with a high imaginary part of black carbon refractive index, in accordance with recent recommendations.

  15. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Mills, Michael J.; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M.; Neely, Ryan R.

    2015-06-01

    A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size-resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1-CARMA is approximately ˜2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial-temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground-based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ˜32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data.

  16. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-03-17

    Marine-sourced organic aerosols (MOAs) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem (Global Earth Observing System Chemistry) model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Modelmore » predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOAs observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOAs have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having >10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  17. Using global aerosol models and satellite data for air quality studies: Challenges and data needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol particles, also known as PM2.5 (particle diameter less than 2.5 pm) and PM10 (particle diameter less than 10 pm), are one of the key atmospheric components that determines air quality. Yet, air quality forecasts for PM are still in their infancy and remain a challenging task. It is difficult to simply relate PM levels to local meteorological conditions, and large uncertainties exist in regional air quality model emission inventories and initial and boundary conditions. Especially challenging are periods when a significant amount of aerosol comes from outside the regional modeling domain through long-range transport. In the past few years, NASA has launched several satellites with global aerosol measurement capabilities, providing large-scale chemical weather pictures. NASA has also supported development of global models which simulate atmospheric transport and transformation processes of important atmospheric gas and aerosol species. I will present the current modeling and satellite capabilities for PM2.5 studies, the possibilities and challenges in using satellite data for PM2.5 forecasts, and the needs of future remote sensing data for improving air quality monitoring and modeling.

  18. If I know the aerosol compositional model identifier, how can I get information about the corresponding aerosol model?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... Climatology Product (MIANACP) which contains the Aerosol Physical and Optical Properties (APOP) and the Mixture files. The Mixture file lists the pure particles in each model identifier. The APOP then gives the detailed information for the pure ...

  19. Two-dimensional modeling of multiply scattered laser radiation in optically dense aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Embury, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The discrete ordinates finite element radiation transport code TWOTRAN is applied to describe the multiple scattering of a laser beam from a reflecting target. For a model scenario involving a 99% relative humidity rural aerosol, we compute the average intensity of the scattered radiation and correction factors to the Lambert-Beer law arising from multiple scattering. As our results indicate, two-dimensional x-y and r-z geometry modeling can reliably describe a realistic three-dimensional scenario. Specific results are presented for the two visual ranges of 1.52 and 0.76 km which show that for sufficiently high aerosol concentrations (e.g., equivalent to V = 0.76 km) the target signature in a distant detector becomes dominated by multiply scattered radiation from interactions of the laser light with the aerosol environment.

  20. Introduction of the aerosol feedback process in the model BOLCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Felicita; Maurizi, Alberto; D'Isidoro, Massimo; Tampieri, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The effect of aerosols on the climate is still one of the least understood processes in the atmospheric science. The use of models to simulate the interaction between aerosols and climate can help understanding the physical processes that rule this interaction and hopefully predicting the future effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate. In particular regional models can help study the effect of aerosols on the atmospheric dynamics on a local scale. In the work performed here we studied the feedback of aerosols in the radiative transfer calculation using the regional model BOLCHEM. The coupled meteorology-chemistry model BOLCHEM is based on the BOLAM meteorological model. The BOLAM dynamics is based on hydrostatic primitive equations, with wind components u and v, potential temperature ?, specific humidity q, surface pressure ps, as dependent variables. The vertical coordinate σ is terrain-following with variables distributed on a non-uniformly spaced staggered Lorentz grid. In the standard configuration of the model a collection of climatological aerosol optical depth values for each aerosol species is used for the radiative transfer calculation. In the feedback exercise presented here the aerosol optical depth was calculated starting from the modeled aerosol concentrations using an approximate Mie formulation described by Evans and Fournier (Evans, B.T.N. and G.R. Fournier, Applied Optics, 29, 1990). The calculation was done separately for each species and aerosol size distribution. The refractive indexes for the different species were taken from P. Stier's work (P. Stier et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 2005) and the aerosol extinction obtained by Mie calculation were compared with the results reported by OPAC (M. Hess et al., Bull. Am. Met. Soc., 79, 1998). Two model runs, with and without the aerosol feedback, were performed to study the effects of the feedback on meteorological parameters. As a first setup of the model runs we selected a domain over the

  1. Combined observational and modeling efforts of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions over Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loftus, Adrian; Tsay, Si-Chee; Nguyen, Xuan Anh

    2016-04-01

    Low-level stratocumulus (Sc) clouds cover more of the Earth's surface than any other cloud type rendering them critical for Earth's energy balance, primarily via reflection of solar radiation, as well as their role in the global hydrological cycle. Stratocumuli are particularly sensitive to changes in aerosol loading on both microphysical and macrophysical scales, yet the complex feedbacks involved in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions remain poorly understood. Moreover, research on these clouds has largely been confined to marine environments, with far fewer studies over land where major sources of anthropogenic aerosols exist. The aerosol burden over Southeast Asia (SEA) in boreal spring, attributed to biomass burning (BB), exhibits highly consistent spatiotemporal distribution patterns, with major variability due to changes in aerosol loading mediated by processes ranging from large-scale climate factors to diurnal meteorological events. Downwind from source regions, the transported BB aerosols often overlap with low-level Sc cloud decks associated with the development of the region's pre-monsoon system, providing a unique, natural laboratory for further exploring their complex micro- and macro-scale relationships. Compared to other locations worldwide, studies of springtime biomass-burning aerosols and the predominately Sc cloud systems over SEA and their ensuing interactions are underrepresented in scientific literature. Measurements of aerosol and cloud properties, whether ground-based or from satellites, generally lack information on microphysical processes; thus cloud-resolving models are often employed to simulate the underlying physical processes in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud model has recently been enhanced with a triple-moment (3M) bulk microphysics scheme as well as the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) version 6 aerosol module. Because the aerosol burden not only affects cloud

  2. Development and basic evaluation of a prognostic aerosol scheme in the CNRM Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michou, M.; Nabat, P.; Saint-Martin, D.

    2014-09-01

    We have implemented a prognostic aerosol scheme in the CNRM-GAME/CERFACS climate model, based upon the GEMS/MACC aerosol module of the ECMWF operational forecast model. This scheme describes the physical evolution of the five main types of aerosols, namely black carbon, organic matter, sulfate, desert dust and sea-salt. In this work, we describe the specificities of our implementation, for instance, taking into consideration a different dust scheme or boosting biomass burning emissions by a factor of 2, as well as the evaluation performed on simulation outputs. The simulations consist of 2004 conditions and transient runs over the 1993-2012 period, and are either free-running or nudged towards the ERA-Interim Reanalysis. Evaluation data sets include several satellite instrument AOD products (i.e., MODIS Aqua classic and Deep-Blue products, MISR and CALIOP products), as well as ground-based AERONET data and the derived AERONET climatology, MAC-v1. The internal variability of the model has little impact on the seasonal climatology of the AODs of the various aerosols, and the characteristics of a nudged simulation reflect those of a free-running simulation. In contrast, the impact of the new dust scheme is large, with modelled dust AODs from simulations with the new dust scheme close to observations. Overall patterns and seasonal cycles of the total AOD are well depicted with, however, a systematic low bias over oceans. The comparison to the fractional MAC-v1 AOD climatology shows disagreements mostly over continents, while that to AERONET sites outlines the capability of the model to reproduce monthly climatologies under very diverse dominant aerosol types. Here again, underestimation of the total AOD appears in several cases, linked sometimes to insufficient efficiency of the aerosol transport away from the aerosol sources. Analysis of monthly time series at 166 AERONET sites shows, in general, correlation coefficients higher than 0.5 and lower model variance than

  3. Aerosol vertical distribution, optical properties and transport over Corsica (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léon, J.-F.; Augustin, P.; Mallet, M.; Bourrianne, T.; Pont, V.; Dulac, F.; Fourmentin, M.; Lambert, D.; Sauvage, B.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the aerosol vertical distribution observed in the western Mediterranean between February and April 2011 and between February 2012 and August 2013. An elastic backscattering lidar was continuously operated at a coastal site in the northern part of Corsica Island (Cap Corse) for a total of more than 14 000 h of observations. The aerosol extinction coefficient retrieved from cloud-free lidar profiles are analyzed along with the SEVIRI satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD). The SEVIRI AOD was used to constrain the retrieval of the aerosol extinction profiles from the lidar range-corrected signal and to detect the presence of dust or pollution aerosols. The daily average AOD at 550 nm is 0.16 (±0.09) and ranges between 0.05 and 0.80. A seasonal cycle is observed with minima in winter and maxima in spring-summer. High AOD days (above 0.3 at 550 nm) represent less than 10% of the totality of daily observations and correspond to the large scale advection of desert dust from Northern Africa or pollution aerosols from Europe. The respective origin of the air masses is confirmed using FLEXPART simulations in the backward mode. Dust events are characterized by a large turbid layer between 2 and 5 km height while pollution events show a lower vertical development with a thick layer below 3 km in altitude. However low level dust transport is also reported during spring while aerosol pollution layer between 2 and 4 km height has been also observed. We report an effective lidar ratio at 355 nm for pollution aerosols 68 (±13) Sr while it is 63 (±18) Sr for dust. The daily mean AOD at 355 nm for dust events is 0.61 (±0.14) and 0.71 (±0.16) for pollution aerosols events.

  4. The regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietikäinen, J.-P.; O'Donnell, D.; Teichmann, C.; Karstens, U.; Pfeifer, S.; Kazil, J.; Podzun, R.; Fiedler, S.; Kokkola, H.; Birmili, W.; O'Dowd, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.; Gehrig, R.; Spindler, G.; Kulmala, M.; Feichter, J.; Jacob, D.; Laaksonen, A.

    2012-11-01

    REMO-HAM is a new regional aerosol-climate model. It is based on the REMO regional climate model and includes most of the major aerosol processes. The structure for aerosol is similar to the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM, for example the aerosol module HAM is coupled with a two-moment stratiform cloud scheme. On the other hand, REMO-HAM does not include an online coupled aerosol-radiation nor a secondary organic aerosol module. In this work, we evaluate the model and compare the results against ECHAM5-HAM and measurements. Four different measurement sites were chosen for the comparison of total number concentrations, size distributions and gas phase sulfur dioxide concentrations: Hyytiälä in Finland, Melpitz in Germany, Mace Head in Ireland and Jungfraujoch in Switzerland. REMO-HAM is run with two different resolutions: 50 × 50 km2 and 10 × 10 km2. Based on our simulations, REMO-HAM is in reasonable agreement with the measured values. The differences in the total number concentrations between REMO-HAM and ECHAM5-HAM can be mainly explained by the difference in the nucleation mode. Since we did not use activation nor kinetic nucleation for the boundary layer, the total number concentrations are somewhat underestimated. From the meteorological point of view, REMO-HAM represents the precipitation fields and 2 m temperature profile very well compared to measurement. Overall, we show that REMO-HAM is a functional aerosol-climate model, which will be used in further studies.

  5. Aerosol cloud interactions in southeast Pacific stratocumulus: satellite observations, in situ data and regional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Rhea

    The influence of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud radiative properties in the persistent southeast Pacific stratocumulus deck is investigated using MODIS satellite observations, in situ data from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), and WRF-Chem, a regional model with interactive chemistry and aerosols. An albedo proxy is derived based on the fractional coverage of low cloud (a macrophysical field) and the cloud albedo, with the latter broken down into contributions from microphysics (cloud droplet concentration, Nd and macrophysics (liquid water path). Albedo variability is dominated by low cloud fraction variability, except within 10-15° of the South American coast, where cloud albedo variability contributes significantly. Covariance between cloud fraction and cloud albedo also contributes significantly to the variance in albedo, which highlights how complex and inseparable the factors controlling albedo are. N d variability contributes only weakly, which emphasizes that attributing albedo variability to the indirect effects of aerosols against the backdrop of natural meteorological variability is extremely challenging. Specific cases of aerosol changes can have strong impacts on albedo. We identify a pathway for periodic anthropogenic aerosol transport to the unpolluted marine stratocumulus >1000 km offshore, which strongly enhances Nd and albedo in zonally-elongated 'hook'-shaped arc. Hook development occurs with Nd increasing to polluted levels over the remote ocean primarily due to entrainment of a large number of small aerosols from the free troposphere that contribute a relatively small amount of aerosol mass to the marine boundary layer. Strong, deep offshore flow needed to transport continental aerosols to the remote ocean is favored by a trough approaching the South American coast and a southeastward shift of the climatological subtropical high pressure system. DMS significantly influences the aerosol number and

  6. PARAGON: A Systematic, Integrated Approach to Aerosol Observation and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Braverman, Amy J.; Davies, Roger; Martonchik, John V.; Menzies, Robert T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Seinfeld, John H.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Charlson, Robert J.; Bosenberg, Jens; Collins, William D.; Rasch, Philip J.; Holben, Brent N.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Miller, Mark A.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Ogren, John A.; Penner, Joyce E.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Torres, Omar; Travis, Larry D.; Yu, Bin

    2004-01-01

    Aerosols are generated and transformed by myriad processes operating across many spatial and temporal scales. Evaluation of climate models and their sensitivity to changes, such as in greenhouse gas abundances, requires quantifying natural and anthropogenic aerosol forcings and accounting for other critical factors, such as cloud feedbacks. High accuracy is required to provide sufficient sensitivity to perturbations, separate anthropogenic from natural influences, and develop confidence in inputs used to support policy decisions. Although many relevant data sources exist, the aerosol research community does not currently have the means to combine these diverse inputs into an integrated data set for maximum scientific benefit. Bridging observational gaps, adapting to evolving measurements, and establishing rigorous protocols for evaluating models are necessary, while simultaneously maintaining consistent, well understood accuracies. The Progressive Aerosol Retrieval and Assimilation Global Observing Network (PARAGON) concept represents a systematic, integrated approach to global aerosol Characterization, bringing together modern measurement and modeling techniques, geospatial statistics methodologies, and high-performance information technologies to provide the machinery necessary for achieving a comprehensive understanding of how aerosol physical, chemical, and radiative processes impact the Earth system. We outline a framework for integrating and interpreting observations and models and establishing an accurate, consistent and cohesive long-term data record.

  7. Indirect aerosol effect increases CMIP5 models projected Arctic warming

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chylek, Petr; Vogelsang, Timothy J.; Klett, James D.; Hengartner, Nicholas; Higdon, Dave; Lesins, Glen; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2016-02-20

    Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) climate models’ projections of the 2014–2100 Arctic warming under radiative forcing from representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) vary from 0.9° to 6.7°C. Climate models with or without a full indirect aerosol effect are both equally successful in reproducing the observed (1900–2014) Arctic warming and its trends. However, the 2014–2100 Arctic warming and the warming trends projected by models that include a full indirect aerosol effect (denoted here as AA models) are significantly higher (mean projected Arctic warming is about 1.5°C higher) than those projected by models without a full indirect aerosolmore » effect (denoted here as NAA models). The suggestion is that, within models including full indirect aerosol effects, those projecting stronger future changes are not necessarily distinguishable historically because any stronger past warming may have been partially offset by stronger historical aerosol cooling. In conclusion, the CMIP5 models that include a full indirect aerosol effect follow an inverse radiative forcing to equilibrium climate sensitivity relationship, while models without it do not.« less

  8. Polluted dust derived from long-range transport as a major end member of urban aerosols and its implication of non-point pollution in northern China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Y; Sun, Y B; Weiss, D; Liang, L J; Chen, H Y

    2015-02-15

    The contribution of polluted dust transported from local and distal sources remains poorly constrained due to their similar geophysical and geochemical properties. We sampled aerosols in three cities in northern China (Xi'an, Beijing, Xifeng) during the spring of 2009 to determine dust flux, magnetic susceptibility and elemental concentrations. Combining dust fluxes with wind speed and regional visibility records enabled to differentiate between dust transported from long range and derived from local sources, while the combination of magnetic susceptibility and enrichment factors (EF) of heavy metals (Pb, Zn) allowed to distinguish natural aerosols from polluted ones. Our results indicate that polluted dust from long-range transport became a major end member of urban dust aerosols. Human settlements as its potential sources were confirmed by a pollutant enriched regional dust event originating from populated areas to the south as inferred by back trajectory modeling, implying their non-point source nature of dust pollution. PMID:25433377

  9. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a

  10. An Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model for the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jin-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    This report is the final report for the Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1000. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are: (1) Development of an aerosol chemistry model; (2) Utilization of satellite measurements of trace gases along with analysis of temperatures and dynamic conditions to understand ice cloud formation, dehydration and sedimentation in the winter polar regions; (3) Comparison of the HALOE and SAGE II time dependencies of the Pinatubo aerosol decay. The publications are attached.

  11. MODELS-3 COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODEL AEROSOL COMPONENT 1: MODEL DESCRIPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerosol component of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is designed to be an efficient and economical depiction of aerosol dynamics in the atmosphere. The approach taken represents the particle size distribution as the superposition of three lognormal subdis...

  12. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aerosol transport test for Class...

  13. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aerosol transport test for Class...

  14. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aerosol transport test for Class...

  15. Model study on the dependence of primary marine aerosol emission on the sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, S.; Tegen, I.; Wolke, R.; van Pinxteren, M.

    2014-01-01

    Primary marine aerosol composed of sea salt and organic material is an important contributor to the global aerosol load. By comparing measurements from two EMEP (co-operative programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmissions of air-pollutants in Europe) intensive campaigns in June 2006 and January 2007 with results from an atmospheric transport model this work shows that accounting for the influence of the sea surface temperature on the emission of primary marine aerosol improves the model results towards the measurements in both months. Different sea surface temperature dependencies were evaluated. Using correction functions based on Sofiev et al. (2011) and Jaeglé et al. (2011) improves the model results for coarse mode particles. In contrast, for the fine mode aerosols no best correction function could be found. The model captures the low sodium concentrations at the marine station Virolahti II (Finland), which is influenced by air masses from the low salinity Baltic Sea, as well as the higher concentrations at Cabauw (Netherlands) and Auchencorth Moss (Scotland). These results indicate a shift towards smaller sizes with lower salinity for the emission of dry sea salt aerosols. Organic material was simulated as part of primary marine aerosol assuming an internal mixture with sea salt. A comparison of the model results for primary organic carbon with measurements by a Berner-impactor at Sao Vincente (Cape Verde) indicated that the model underpredicted the observed organic carbon concentration. This leads to the conclusion that the formation of secondary organic material needs to be included in the model to improve the agreement with the measurements.

  16. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Man Sing; Nichol, Janet E.; Lee, Kwon Ho

    2009-01-01

    The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future. PMID:22408531

  17. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part II: A new modelling approach and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Alexandre; Mailliat, Alain; Amielh, Muriel; Anselmet, Fabien

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the modelling of aerosol dry deposition on vegetation. It follows a companion article, in which a review of the current knowledge highlights the need for a better description of the aerosol behaviour within the canopy [Petroff, A., Mailliat, A., Amielh, M., Anselmet, F., 2008. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part I: Review of present knowledge. Atmospheric Environment, in press, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.09.043]. Concepts from multi-phase flow studies are used for describing the canopy medium and deriving a time and space-averaged aerosol balance equation and the associated deposition terms. The closure of the deposition terms follows an up-scaling procedure based on the statistical distribution of the collecting elements. This aerosol transport model is then applied in a stationary and mono-dimensional configuration and takes into account the properties of the vegetation, the aerosol and the turbulent flow. Deposition mechanisms are Brownian diffusion, interception, inertial and turbulent impactions, and gravitational settling. For each of them, a parameterisation of the particle collection is derived and the quality of their predictions is assessed by comparison with wind-tunnel deposition measurements on coniferous twigs [Belot, Y., Gauthier, D., 1975. Transport of micronic particles from atmosphere to foliar surfaces. In: De Vries, D.A., Afgan, N.H. (Eds.), Heat and Mass Transfer in the Biosphere. Scripta Book, Washington, DC, pp. 583-591; Belot, Y., 1977. Etude de la captation des polluants atmosphériques par les végétaux. CEA, R-4786, Fontenay-aux-Roses; Belot, Y., Camus, H., Gauthier, D., Caput, C., 1994. Uptake of small particles by canopies. The Science of the Total Environment 157, 1-6]. Under a real canopy configuration, the predictions of the aerosol transport model compare reasonably well with detailed on-site deposition measurements of Aitken mode particles [Buzorius, G., Rannik, Ü., M

  18. Inland Transport of Aerosolized Florida Red Tide Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Pierce, Richard; Cheng, Yung Sung; Henry, Michael S.; Blum, Patricia; Osborn, Shannon; Nierenberg, Kate; Pederson, Bradley A.; Fleming, Lora E.; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Backer, Lorraine C; Baden, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Florida red tides, an annual event off the west coast of Florida, are caused by the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins, brevetoxins, which kill fish, sea birds, and marine mammals, as well as sickening humans who consume contaminated shellfish. These toxins become part of the marine aerosol, and can also be inhaled by humans and other animals. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant increase in symptoms and decrease lung function in asthmatics after only one hour of beach exposure during an onshore Florida red tide bloom. This study constructed a transect line placing high volume air samplers to measure brevetoxins at sites beginning at the beach, moving approximately 6.4 km inland. One non-exposure and 2 exposure studies, each of 5 days duration, were conducted. No toxins were measured in the air during the non-exposure period. During the 2 exposure periods, the amount of brevetoxins varied considerably by site and by date. Nevertheless, brevetoxins were measured at least 4.2 kilometers from the beach and/or 1.6 km from the coastal shoreline. Therefore, populations sensitive to brevetoxins (such as asthmatics) need to know that leaving the beach may not discontinue their environmental exposure to brevetoxin aerosols. PMID:20161504

  19. Inland Transport of Aerosolized Florida Red Tide Toxins.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Pierce, Richard; Cheng, Yung Sung; Henry, Michael S; Blum, Patricia; Osborn, Shannon; Nierenberg, Kate; Pederson, Bradley A; Fleming, Lora E; Reich, Andrew; Naar, Jerome; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Backer, Lorraine C; Baden, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Florida red tides, an annual event off the west coast of Florida, are caused by the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces a suite of potent neurotoxins, brevetoxins, which kill fish, sea birds, and marine mammals, as well as sickening humans who consume contaminated shellfish. These toxins become part of the marine aerosol, and can also be inhaled by humans and other animals. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant increase in symptoms and decrease lung function in asthmatics after only one hour of beach exposure during an onshore Florida red tide bloom.This study constructed a transect line placing high volume air samplers to measure brevetoxins at sites beginning at the beach, moving approximately 6.4 km inland. One non-exposure and 2 exposure studies, each of 5 days duration, were conducted. No toxins were measured in the air during the non-exposure period. During the 2 exposure periods, the amount of brevetoxins varied considerably by site and by date. Nevertheless, brevetoxins were measured at least 4.2 kilometers from the beach and/or 1.6 km from the coastal shoreline. Therefore, populations sensitive to brevetoxins (such as asthmatics) need to know that leaving the beach may not discontinue their environmental exposure to brevetoxin aerosols. PMID:20161504

  20. Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

    2005-03-18

    The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Transport of Biomass Burning Emissions on South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    RibeirodeFreitas, Saulo

    2001-01-01

    Our research efforts have addressed theoretical and numerical modeling of sources emissions and transport processes of trace gases and aerosols emitted by biomass burning on the central of Brazil and Amazon basin. For this effort we coupled all Eulerian transport model with the mesoscale atmospheric model RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System).

  2. Advances In Global Aerosol Modeling Applications Through Assimilation of Satellite-Based Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James; Hyer, Edward; Zhang, Jianglong; Reid, Jeffrey; Westphal, Douglas; Xian, Peng; Vaughan, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Modeling the instantaneous three-dimensional aerosol field and its downwind transport represents an endeavor with many practical benefits foreseeable to air quality, aviation, military and science agencies. The recent proliferation of multi-spectral active and passive satellite-based instruments measuring aerosol physical properties has served as an opportunity to develop and refine the techniques necessary to make such numerical modeling applications possible. Spurred by high-resolution global mapping of aerosol source regions, and combined with novel multivariate data assimilation techniques designed to consider these new data streams, operational forecasts of visibility and aerosol optical depths are now available in near real-time1. Active satellite-based aerosol profiling, accomplished using lidar instruments, represents a critical element for accurate analysis and transport modeling. Aerosol source functions, alone, can be limited in representing the macrophysical structure of injection scenarios within a model. Two-dimensional variational (2D-VAR; x, y) assimilation of aerosol optical depth from passive satellite observations significantly improves the analysis of the initial state. However, this procedure can not fully compensate for any potential vertical redistribution of mass required at the innovation step. The expense of an inaccurate vertical analysis of aerosol structure is corresponding errors downwind, since trajectory paths within successive forecast runs will likely diverge with height. In this paper, the application of a newly-designed system for 3D-VAR (x,y,z) assimilation of vertical aerosol extinction profiles derived from elastic-scattering lidar measurements is described [Campbell et al., 2009]. Performance is evaluated for use with the U. S. Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) by assimilating NASA/CNES satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 0.532 μm measurements [Winker et al., 2009

  3. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosols over Europe: Impact of Activity Coefficients and Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sartelet, K.; Couvidat, F.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-volatile organic species (SVOC) can condense on suspended particulate materials (PM) in the atmosphere. The modeling of condensation/evaporation of SVOC often assumes that gas-phase and particle-phase concentrations are at equilibrium. However, recent studies show that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) may not be accurately represented by an equilibrium approach between the gas and particle phases, because organic aerosols in the particle phase may be very viscous. The condensation in the viscous liquid phase is limited by the diffusion from the surface of PM to its core. Using a surrogate approach to represent SVOC, depending on the user's choice, the secondary organic aerosol processor (SOAP) may assume equilibrium or model dynamically the condensation/evaporation between the gas and particle phases to take into account the viscosity of organic aerosols. The model is implemented in the three-dimensional chemistry-transport model of POLYPHEMUS. In SOAP, activity coefficients for organic mixtures can be computed using UNIFAC for short-range interactions between molecules and AIOMFAC to also take into account the effect of inorganic species on activity coefficients. Simulations over Europe are performed and POLYPHEMUS/SOAP is compared to POLYPHEMUS/H2O, which was previously used to model SOA using the equilibrium approach with activity coefficients from UNIFAC. Impacts of the dynamic approach on modeling SOA over Europe are evaluated. The concentrations of SOA using the dynamic approach are compared with those using the equilibrium approach. The increase of computational cost is also evaluated.

  4. Modelling the background aerosol climatologies (1989-2010) for the Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Guerrero, Pedro; Jerez, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    Aerosol levels and composition are influenced by multiple atmospheric physico-chemical processes that can affect them from its release point (as primary aerosol), or via gas-to-particle conversion processes that give rise to secondary aerosols. The contribution of the various aerosol sources, the role of long-range transport and the contribution of primary and secondary particulate matter to the ambient aerosol concentrations over Europe are not well known (Kulmala et al., 2009). Focusing on the Mediterranean, Querol et al. (2009) point out that there is a lack of studies on the variability of particulate matter (PM) along the Mediterranean basin, necessary for understanding the special features that differentiate aerosol processes between the western, eastern and central Mediterranean basins. In this perspective, modelling systems based on state-of-science chemistry transport models (CTMs) are fundamental elements to investigate the transport and chemistry of pollutants behaviour at different scales and to assess the impact of emissions in aerosol levels and composition. Therefore, this study aims to summarise the results on the levels and chemical composition of aerosols along the Mediterranean basin, highlighting the marked gradient between the western-central-eastern coasts. Special attention is paid to the analysis of the seasonality of PM composition and levels. For this purpose, the regional modelling system WRF-CHIMERE-EMEP has been implemented for conducting a full transient simulation for the ERA-Interim period (1989-2010) using year-to-year changing EMEP emissions. The domain of study covers Europe with a horizontal resolution of 25 km and a vertical resolution of 23 layers in the troposphere; however the analysis focuses on the Mediterranean area. The PM levels and composition are compared to the measured values reported by the EMEP network, showing a good agreement with observations for both western and eastern Mediterranean. The modelling results for

  5. Effects of long-range aerosol transport on the microphysical properties of low-level liquid clouds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopman, Quentin; Garrett, Timothy J.; Riedi, Jérôme; Eckhardt, Sabine; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The properties of low-level liquid clouds in the Arctic can be altered by long-range pollution transport to the region. Satellite, tracer transport model, and meteorological data sets are used here to determine a net aerosol-cloud interaction (ACInet) parameter that expresses the ratio of relative changes in cloud microphysical properties to relative variations in pollution concentrations while accounting for dry or wet scavenging of aerosols en route to the Arctic. For a period between 2008 and 2010, ACInet is calculated as a function of the cloud liquid water path, temperature, altitude, specific humidity, and lower tropospheric stability. For all data, ACInet averages 0.12 ± 0.02 for cloud-droplet effective radius and 0.16 ± 0.02 for cloud optical depth. It increases with specific humidity and lower tropospheric stability and is highest when pollution concentrations are low. Carefully controlling for meteorological conditions we find that the liquid water path of arctic clouds does not respond strongly to aerosols within pollution plumes. Or, not stratifying the data according to meteorological state can lead to artificially exaggerated calculations of the magnitude of the impacts of pollution on arctic clouds.

  6. Wintertime characteristics of aerosols at middle Indo-Gangetic Plain: Impacts of regional meteorology and long range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Tiwari, S.; Murari, V.; Singh, A. K.; Banerjee, T.

    2015-03-01

    To develop a coherent picture of possible origin of Asian aerosol, transport and meteorological interaction; wintertime aerosol (January, 1 to March, 31, 2014 (n = 90)) were measured in middle IGP in terms of aerosol mass loading, optical properties, altitudinal distributions and both high and low altitude transportation. Both space-borne passive (Aqua and Terra MODIS) and active sensor (CALIPSO-CALIOP) based measurements were concurrently used over the selected transect (25°10‧-25°19‧N and 82°54‧-83°4‧E). Exceptionally high aerosol mass loading was recorded for PM10 (233 ± 58.37 μg m-3) and PM2.5 (138 ± 47.12 μg m-3). Daily variations of PM2.5/PM10 persist in a range of 0.25-0.97 (mean = 0.60 ± 0.14; n = 90) and were in accordance to computed Angstrom exponent (0.078-1.407; mean: 1.002 ± 0.254) explaining concurrent contribution of both PM2.5 and PM10 for the region. Space borne (Aqua MODIS-AOD: 0.259-2.194) and ground based (MTP-AOD: 0.066-1.239) AODs revealed significant temporal variability and moderate association in terms of PM10 (MODIS-AOD: 0.46; MTP-AOD: 0.56) and PM2.5 (MODIS-AOD: 0.54; MTP-AOD: 0.39). Varying association of AOD and aerosol mass loading was also explained in terms of meteorological variables. CALIPSO altitude-orbit-cross-section profiles revealed presence of non-spherical coarse particulates (altitude: 1.2-5.4 km) and dominance of spherical fine particulates (altitude: 0.1-4.2 km). Contribution of trans-boundary aerosols transportation to mass loadings at middle IGP were recognized through lagrangian particle dispersion model, synoptic vector wind profiles at different geopotential heights and satellite images.

  7. Comparing regional modeling (CHIMERE) and satellite observations of aerosols (PARASOL): Methodology and case study over Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromatas, Stavros

    2010-05-01

    S. Stromatas (1), S. Turquety (1), H. Chepfer (1), L. Menut (1), B. Bessagnet (2), JC Pere (2), D. Tanré (3) . (1) Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, CNRS/IPSL, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France, (2) INERIS, Institut National de l'Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Parc technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte, FRANCE, (3) Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique/CNRS Univ. des Sciences et Tech. de Lille, 59650 - Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. Atmospheric suspended particles (aerosols) have significant radiative and environmental impacts, affecting human health, visibility and climate. Therefore, they are regulated by air quality standards worldwide, and monitored by regional observation networks. Satellite observations vastly improve the horizontal and temporal coverage, providing daily distributions. Aerosols are currently estimated using aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals, a quantitative measure of the extinction of solar radiation by aerosol scattering and absorption between the point of observation and the top of the atmosphere. Even though remarkable progresses in aerosol modeling by chemistry-transport models (CTM) and measurement experiments have been made in recent years, there is still a significant divergence between the modeled and observed results. However, AOD retrievals from satellites remains a highly challenging task mostly because it depends on a variety of different parameters such as cloud contamination, surface reflectance contributions and a priori assumptions on aerosol types, each one of them incorporating its own difficulties. Therefore, comparisons between CTM and observations are often difficult to interpret. In this presentation, we will discuss comparisons between regional modeling (CHIMERE CTM) over Mexico and satellite observations obtained by the POLDER instrument embarked on PARASOL micro-satellite. After a comparison of the model AOD with the retrieved L2 AOD, we will present an alternative

  8. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  9. Evaluating WRF-Chem multi-scale model in simulating aerosol radiative properties over the tropics – A case study over India

    SciTech Connect

    Seethala, C.; Pandithurai, G.; Fast, Jerome D.; Polade, Suraj D.; Reddy, M. S.; Peckham, Steven E.

    2012-01-24

    We utilized WRF-Chem multi-scale model to simulate the regional distribution of aerosols, optical properties and its effect on radiation over India for a winter month. The model is evaluated using measurements obtained from upper-air soundings, AERONET sun photometers, various satellite instruments, and pyranometers operated by the Indian Meteorological Department. The simulated downward shortwave flux was overestimated when the effect of aerosols on radiation and clouds was neglected. Downward shortwave radiation from a simulation that included aerosol-radiation interaction processes was 5 to 25 Wm{sup -2} closer to the observations, while a simulation that included aerosol-cloud interaction processes were another 1 to 20 Wm{sup -2} closer to the observations. For the few observations available, the model usually underestimated particulate concentration. This is likely due to turbulent mixing, transport errors and the lack of secondary organic aerosol treatment in the model. The model efficiently captured the broad regional hotspots such as high aerosol optical depth over Indo-Gangetic basin as well as the northwestern and southern part of India. The regional distribution of aerosol optical depth compares well with AVHRR aerosol optical depth and the TOMS aerosol index. The magnitude and wavelength-dependence of simulated aerosol optical depth was also similar to the AERONET observations across India. Differences in surface shortwave radiation between simulations that included and neglected aerosol-radiation interactions were as high as -25 Wm{sup -2}, while differences in surface shortwave radiation between simulations that included and neglect aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions were as high as -30 Wm{sup -2}. The spatial variations of these differences were also compared with AVHRR observation. This study suggests that the model is able to qualitatively simulate the impact of aerosols on radiation over India; however, additional measurements of particulate

  10. Inter-comparison of model-simulated and satellite-retrieved componential aerosol optical depths in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenshen; Yu, Chao; Chen, Liangfu; Tao, Jinhua; Letu, Husi; Ge, Wei; Si, Yidan; Liu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    China's large aerosol emissions have major impacts on global climate change as well as regional air pollution and its associated disease burdens. A detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns of aerosol components is necessary for the calculation of aerosol radiative forcing and the development of effective emission control policy. Model-simulated and satellite-retrieved aerosol components can support climate change research, PM2.5 source appointment and epidemiological studies. This study evaluated the total and componential aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the GEOS-Chem model (GC) and the Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART), and the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) from 2006 to 2009 in China. Linear regression analysis between the GC and AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) in China yielded similar correlation coefficients (0.6 daily, 0.71 monthly) but lower slopes (0.41 daily, 0.58 monthly) compared with those in the U.S. This difference was attributed to GC's underestimation of water-soluble AOD (WAOD) west of the Heihe-Tengchong Line, the dust AOD (DAOD) in the fall and winter, and the soot AOD (SAOD) throughout the year and throughout the country. GOCART exhibits the strongest dust estimation capability among all datasets. However, the GOCART soot distribution in the Northeast and Southeast has significant errors, and its WAOD in the polluted North China Plain (NCP) and the South is underestimated. MISR significantly overestimates the water-soluble aerosol levels in the West, and does not capture the high dust loadings in all seasons and regions, and the SAOD in the NCP. These discrepancies can mainly be attributed to the uncertainties in the emission inventories of both models, the poor performance of GC under China's high aerosol loading conditions, the omission of certain aerosol tracers in GOCART, and the tendency of MISR to misidentify dust and non-dust mixtures.

  11. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  12. QUantifying the Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effect over Eastern Mediterranean from Satellites (QUADIEEMS): Satellite, model and reanalysis data synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulias, A.; Zanis, P.; Poeschl, U.; Kourtidis, K.; Alexandri, G.; Dogras, C.; Marinou, E.; Amiridis, V.

    2013-12-01

    The research implemented within the QUADIEEMS project is presented here. Satellite data from five sensors (MODIS aboard EOS TERRA, MODIS aboard EOS AQUA, TOMS aboard Earth Probe, OMI aboard EOS AURA and CALIOP aboard CALIPSO) are combined with meteorological data from ECMWF ERA-interim reanalysis, aerosol data from a global chemical-aerosol-transport model (GOCART) and MACC reanalysis as well as simulation results from a regional climate model (RegCM4) coupled with a simplified aerosol scheme. QUADIEEMS focuses on Eastern Mediterranean [30N-45N, 17.5E-37.5E]. Various sources, like industry and transport, occasional Saharan dust intrusions, sea spray and agricultural fires in Southeastern and Eastern Europe as well as occasional fire events in the region, create an ideal environment for the investigation of the direct and indirect effects of various aerosol types. The acquired data were spatially homogenized resulting in a novel satellite-model-reanalysis high resolution (0.1x0.1 degree) dataset of aerosol and cloud optical properties. The relative contribution of marine, dust and anthropogenic aerosols to the total aerosol optical depth (AOD550) is quantified combining different parameters from our high resolution dataset. The same procedure is repeated at a moderate resolution (1.0x1.0 degree). Within QUADIEEMS, decadal REGCM4/aerosol regional climate model simulations are implemented for the greater European region at a resolution of 50 km. We evaluate the ability of REGCM4 to simulate AOD550 patterns. For different sub-regions of Eastern Mediterranean, the aerosol-cloud relationships are examined. The same procedure is repeated also taking into account the relative position of aerosol and cloud layers as defined by CALIPSO observations. Results and data from the first four components of the project are used in satellite-based parameterizations to quantify the direct and indirect (first) radiative effect of the different aerosol types at a resolution of 0.1x0

  13. Measurements of HNO3, SO2 High Resolution Aerosol SO4 (sup 2-), and Selected Aerosol Species Aboard the NASA DC-8 Aircraft: During the Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific Airborne Mission (TRACE-P)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Robert W.; Dibb, Jack E.

    2004-01-01

    The UNH investigation during TRACE-P provided measurements of selected acidic gases and aerosol species aboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. Our investigation focused on measuring HNO3, SO2, and fine (less than 2 microns) aerosol SO4(sup 2-) with two minute time resolution in near-real-time. We also quantified mixing ratios of aerosol ionic species, and aerosol (210)Pb and (7)Be collected onto bulk filters at better than 10 minute resolution. This suite of measurements contributed extensively to achieving the principal objectives of TRACE-P. In the context of the full data set collected by experimental teams on the DC-8, our observations provide a solid basis for assessing decadal changes in the chemical composition and source strength of Asian continental outflow. This region of the Pacific should be impacted profoundly by Asian emissions at this time with significant degradation of air quality over the next few decades. Atmospheric measurements in the western Pacific region will provide a valuable time series to help quantify the impact of Asian anthropogenic activities. Our data also provide important insight into the chemical and physical processes transforming Asian outflow during transport over the Pacific, particularly uptake and reactions of soluble gases on aerosol particles. In addition, the TRACE-P data set provide strong constraints for assessing and improving the chemical fields simulated by chemical transport models.

  14. Anthropogenic contribution to cloud condensation nuclei and the first aerosol indirect climate effect modelled by GEOS-Chem/APM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.

    2013-05-01

    Atmospheric particles influence climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud properties (albedo, lifetime, etc.) and precipitation. The first aerosol indirect radiative forcing (FAIRF) (i.e., cloud albedo effect) constitutes the largest uncertainty among the various radiative forcings quantified by the latest IPCC assessment report (IPCC2007). In order to confidently interpret climate change over the past century and project future change, it is essential to reduce the FAIRF uncertainty. One of the large sources of the uncertainty is the poor knowledge of the number concentrations and spatial distributions of pre-industrial and present-day aerosols. All previous and recent FAIRF studies are based on global models with simplified chemistry and aerosol microphysics, which may lead to large uncertainties in predicted aerosol properties and FAIRF values. Here, we investigate the anthropogenic contribution to CCN and associated FAIRF using a state-of-the-art global chemical transport and aerosol model (GEOS-Chem/APM) that contains a number of advanced features (including size-resolved sectional particle microphysics, online comprehensive SOx-NOx-Ox-VOCs chemistry, consideration of nitrate and secondary organic aerosols, online aerosol-cloud-radiation calculation, usage of more accurate assimilated meteorology, etc.). As far as we know, this is the first time that a global model with full chemistry and size-resolved (sectional) particle microphysics is employed to study FAIRF. Key aerosol properties predicted by GEOS-Chem/APM for the present-day case have been evaluated against a large set of land-, ship-, aircraft-, and satellite- based aerosol measurements including total particle number concentrations, CCN concentrations, AODs, and vertical profiles of extinction coefficients. The GEOS-Chem/APM model, with its advanced features and ability to reproduce observed aerosol properties (including CCN) around the globe, is expected to

  15. Distributions and regional budgets of aerosols and their precursors simulated with the EMAC chemistry-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzer, A.; de Meij, A.; Pringle, K. J.; Tost, H.; Doering, U. M.; van Aardenne, J.; Lelieveld, J.

    2012-01-01

    The new global anthropogenic emission inventory (EDGAR-CIRCE) of gas and aerosol pollutants has been incorporated in the chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry). A relatively high horizontal resolution simulation is performed for the years 2005-2008 to evaluate the capability of the model and the emissions to reproduce observed aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) values. Model output is compared with observations from different measurement networks (CASTNET, EMEP and EANET) and AODs from remote sensing instruments (MODIS and MISR). A good spatial agreement of the distribution of sulfate and ammonium aerosol is found when compared to observations, while calculated nitrate aerosol concentrations show some discrepancies. The simulated temporal development of the inorganic aerosols is in line with measurements of sulfate and nitrate aerosol, while for ammonium aerosol some deviations from observations occur over the USA, due to the wrong temporal distribution of ammonia gas emissions. The calculated AODs agree well with the satellite observations in most regions, while negative biases are found for the equatorial area and in the dust outflow regions (i.e. Central Atlantic and Northern Indian Ocean), due to an underestimation of biomass burning and aeolian dust emissions, respectively. Aerosols and precursors budgets for five different regions (North America, Europe, East Asia, Central Africa and South America) are calculated. Over East-Asia most of the emitted aerosols (precursors) are also deposited within the region, while in North America and Europe transport plays a larger role. Further, it is shown that a simulation with monthly varying anthropogenic emissions typically improves the temporal correlation by 5-10% compared to one with constant annual emissions.

  16. The Influence of Tropical Air-Sea Interaction on the Climate Impact of Aerosols: A Hierarchical Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, W. C.; Saravanan, R.; Chang, P.; Mahajan, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we use a hierarchical modeling approach to investigate the influence of tropical air-sea feedbacks on climate impacts of aerosols in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We construct four different models by coupling the atmospheric component of CESM, the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), to four different ocean models: (i) the Data Ocean Model (DOM; prescribed SST), (i) Slab Ocean Model (SOM; thermodynamic coupling), (iii) Reduced Gravity Ocean Model (RGOM; dynamic coupling), and (iv) the Parallel Ocean Program (POP; full ocean model). These four models represent progressively increasing degree of coupling between the atmosphere and the ocean. The RGOM model, in particular, is tuned to produce a good simulation of ENSO and the associated tropical air-sea interaction, without being impacted by the climate drifts exhibited by fully-coupled GCMs. For each method of coupling, a pair of numerical experiments, including present day (year 2000) and preindustrial (year 1850) sulfate aerosol loading, were carried out. Our results indicate that the inclusion of air-sea interaction has large impacts on the spatial structure of the climate response induced by aerosols. In response to sulfate aerosol forcing, ITCZ shifts southwards as a result of the anomalous clockwise MMC change which transports moisture southwardly across the Equator. We present analyses of the regional response to sulfate aerosol forcing in the equatorial Pacific as well as the zonally-averaged response. The decomposition of the change in the net surface energy flux shows the most dominant terms are net shortwave radiative flux at the surface and latent heat flux. Further analyses show all ocean model simulations simulate a positive change of northward atmospheric energy transport across the Equator in response to the perturbed radiative sulfate forcing. This positive northward atmospheric energy transport change plays a role in compensating partially cooling caused by sulfate aerosols.

  17. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : model and implementation.

    SciTech Connect

    Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-10-01

    In this report a model for simulating aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls is presented. The model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular (DEM) package within the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Modeling the interactions of small particles is relevant to a number of applications (e.g., soils, powders, colloidal suspensions, etc.). Modeling the behavior of aerosol particles during agglomeration and cluster dynamics upon impact with a wall is of particular interest. In this report we describe preliminary efforts to develop and implement physical models for aerosol particle interactions. Future work will consist of deploying these models to simulate aerosol cluster behavior upon impact with a rigid wall for the purpose of developing relationships for impact speed and probability of stick/bounce/break-up as well as to assess the distribution of cluster sizes if break-up occurs. These relationships will be developed consistent with the need for inputs into system-level codes. Section 2 gives background and details on the physical model as well as implementations issues. Section 3 presents some preliminary results which lead to discussion in Section 4 of future plans.

  18. Evidence for the Convective Transport of Dust Aerosol During DC-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Moore, R.; Winstead, E.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Shook, M.; Anderson, B. E.; Lawson, P.; Froyd, K. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Scheuer, E. M.; Dibb, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Bulk aerosol composition and aerosol volume size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 during the NCAR DC-3 (Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment) mission in May/June 2012 were used to investigate the transport of mineral dust through twelve storms encountered over Colorado and Oklahoma. Measurements made at low altitudes (< 5 km) in the storm inflow region were compared to those made in the outflow in and around storm cirrus anvils (altitude > 9 km). Total coarse (1 μm < diameter < 5 μm) aerosol volume (Vc) and Ca2+ measured in both storm inflow and outflow were highly correlated, thus dust was assumed to dominate the aerosol coarse volume. Mean outflow Ca2+ concentrations were comparable to mean inflow values as demonstrated by average outflow/inflow Ca2+ ratios near unity. Vc outflow/inflow ratios were also high (>> 0.5) for most storms, suggesting coarse mode dust was efficiently transported through the CO and OK storms. Comparisons between inflow aerosol number concentration (Nc) calculated over a size range characteristic of dust ice nuclei (0.5 μm < diameter < 5 μm) and ice particle concentrations in storm anvils further suggested interstitial coarse mode dust was present in these cirrus anvils. For over half the storms, mean inflow Nc exceeded mean anvil ice particle concentrations implying ice nucleation mechanisms may be sensitive to complex dust characteristics beyond size. Possible artifacts associated with shattered ice crystals were examined via 1) closure calculations for observations from different instrumentation and independent aircraft inlets, and 2) assessment of relationships with cloud microphysical observations. Initial results indicate minimal influence of ice shatter on aerosol measurements, but effects vary for individual storms with different cloud microphysical characteristics.

  19. Evaluation of aerosol properties simulated by the high resolution global coupled chemistry-aerosol-microphysics model C-IFS-GLOMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Flemming, Johannes; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Engelen, Richard; Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Benduhn, Francois; Hewson, Will; Woodhouse, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The EU Framework Programme GEMS and MACC consortium projects co-ordinated by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have developed an operational global forecasting and reanalysis system (Composition-IFS) for atmospheric composition including greenhouse gases, reactive gases and aerosol. The current operational C-IFS system uses a mass-based aerosol model coupled to data assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth measured by satellite (MODIS) to predict global aerosol properties. During MACC, the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics scheme was added to the system, providing information on aerosol size and number for improved representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting also for simulated global variations in size distribution and internally-mixed particle composition. The IFS-GLOMAP system has recently been upgraded to couple with the sulphur cycle simulated in the online TM5 tropospheric chemistry module for global reactive gases. This C-IFS-GLOMAP system is also being upgraded to use a new "nitrate-extended" version of GLOMAP which realistically treats the size-resolved gas-particle partitioning of semi volatile gases ammonia and nitric acid. In this poster we described C-IFS-GLOMAP and present an evaluation of the global sulphate aerosol distribution simulated in this coupled aerosol-chemistry C-IFS-GLOMAP, comparing to surface observations in Europe, North America and the North Atlantic and contrasting to the fixed timescale sulphate production scheme developed in GEMS. We show that the coupling to the TM5 sulphur chemistry improves the seasonal cycle of sulphate aerosol, for example addressing a persistent wintertime sulphate high bias in northern Europe. The improved skill in simulated sulphate aerosol seasonal cycle is a pre-requisite to realistically characterise nitrate aerosol since biases in sulphate affect the amount of free ammonia available to form ammonium nitrate.

  20. Aerosol optical and physical properties during winter monsoon pollution transport in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Verma, S; Bhanja, S N; Pani, S K; Misra, A

    2014-04-01

    We analysed aerosol optical and physical properties in an urban environment (Kolkata) during winter monsoon pollution transport from nearby and far-off regions. Prevailing meteorological conditions, viz. low temperature and wind speed, and a strong downdraft of air mass, indicated weak dispersion and inhibition of vertical mixing of aerosols. Spectral features of WinMon aerosol optical depth (AOD) showed larger variability (0.68-1.13) in monthly mean AOD at short-wavelength (SW) channels (0.34-0.5 μm) compared to that (0.28-0.37) at long-wavelength (LW) channels (0.87-1.02 μm), thereby indicating sensitivity of WinMon AOD to fine aerosol constituents and the predominant contribution from fine aerosol constituents to WinMon AOD. WinMon AOD at 0.5 μm (AOD 0. 5) and Angstrom parameter ( α) were 0.68-0.82 and 1.14-1.32, respectively, with their highest value in December. Consistent with inference from spectral features of AOD, surface aerosol loading was primarily constituted of fine aerosols (size 0.23-3 μm) which was 60-70 % of aerosol 10- μm (size 0.23-10 μm) concentration. Three distinct modes of aerosol distribution were obtained, with the highest WinMon concentration at a mass median diameter (MMD) of 0.3 μm during December, thereby indicating characteristics of primary contribution related to anthropogenic pollutants that were inferred to be mostly due to contribution from air mass originating in nearby region having predominant emissions from biofuel and fossil fuel combustion. A relatively higher contribution from aerosols in the upper atmospheric layers than at the surface to WinMon AOD was inferred during February compared to other months and was attributed to predominant contribution from open burning emissions arising from nearby and far-off regions. A comparison of ground-based measurements with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data showed an underestimation of MODIS AOD and α values for most of the days. Discrepancy in

  1. Model Evaluation of Aerosol Wet Scavenging in Deep Convective Clouds Based on Observations Collected during the DC3 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Easter, R. C.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Ghan, S. J.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Barth, M. C.; Fan, J.; Morrison, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Bela, M. M.; Markovic, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Deep convective storms greatly influence the vertical distribution of aerosols by transporting aerosols from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and by removing aerosols through wet scavenging processes. Model representation of wet scavenging is a major uncertainty in simulating the vertical distribution of aerosols due partly to limited constraints by observations. The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep mid-latitude continental convective clouds is studied for a severe storm case in the vicinity of the ARM Southern Great Plains site on May 29, 2012 during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign. A new budget analysis approach is developed to characterize the convective transport to the upper troposphere based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases (i.e., CO, acetone, and benzene). A similar budget framework is applied to aerosols combined with the known transport efficiency to estimate wet-scavenging efficiency. The chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) simulates the storm initiation timing and structure reasonably well when compared against radar observations from the NSSL national 3-D reflectivity Mosaic data. Simulated vertical profiles of humidity and temperature also closely agree with radiosonde measurements before and during the storm. High scavenging efficiencies (~80%) for aerosol number (Dp < 2.5μm) and mass (Dp < 1μm) are obtained from the observations. Both observation analyses and the simulation show that, between the two dominant aerosol species, organic aerosol shows a slightly higher scavenging efficiency than sulfate aerosol, and higher scavenging efficiency is found for larger particle sizes (0.15 - 2.5μm versus 0.03 - 0.15μm). However, the model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency (by up to 50%), in general, for both mass and number concentrations. The effect of neglecting secondary

  2. Development and application of an aerosol screening model for size-resolved urban aerosols.

    PubMed

    Stanier, Charles O; Lee, Sang-Rin

    2014-06-01

    Predictive models of vehicular ultrafine particles less than 0.1 microm in diameter (UFPs*) and other urban pollutants with high spatial and temporal variation are useful and important in applications such as (1) decision support for infrastructure projects, emissions controls, and transportation-mode shifts; (2) the interpretation and enhancement of observations (e.g., source apportionment, extrapolation, interpolation, and gap-filling in space and time); and (3) the generation of spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates where monitoring is unfeasible. The objective of the current study was to develop, test, and apply the Aerosol Screening Model (ASM), a new physically based vehicular UFP model for use in near-road environments. The ASM simulates hourly average outdoor concentrations of roadway-derived aerosols and gases. Its distinguishing features include user-specified spatial resolution; use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorologic model for winds estimates; use of a database of more than 100,000 road segments in the Los Angeles, California, region, including freeway ramps and local streets; and extensive testing against more than 9000 hours of observed particle concentrations at 11 sites. After initialization of air parcels at an upwind boundary, the model solves for vehicle emissions, dispersion, coagulation, and deposition using a Lagrangian modeling framework. The Lagrangian parcel of air is subdivided vertically (into 11 levels) and in the crosswind direction (into 3 parcels). It has overall dimensions of 10 m (downwind), 300 m (vertically), and 2.1 km (crosswind). The simulation is typically started 4 km upwind from the receptor, that is, the location at which the exposure is to be estimated. As parcels approach the receptor, depending on the user-specified resolution, step size is decreased, and crosswind resolution is enhanced through subdivision of parcels in the crosswind direction. Hourly concentrations and size

  3. Some Algorithms For Simulating Size-resolved Aerosol Dynamics Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debry, E.; Sportisse, B.

    The objective of this presentation is to show some algorithms used to solve aerosol dynamics in 3D dispersion models. INTRODUCTION The gas phase pollution has been widely studied and some models are now available . The situation is quite different with respect to atmospheric aerosols . However at- mospheric particulate matter significantly influences atmospheric properties such as radiative balance, cloud formation, gas pollutants concentrations ( gas to particle con- version ), and has an impact on man health. As aerosols properties ( optical, hygroscopic, noxiousness ) depend mainly on their size, it appears important to be able to follow the aerosol ( or particle ) size distribution (PSD) during time. This former is modified by physical processes as coagulation, condensation or evaporation, nucleation and removal. Aerosol dynamics is usually modelized by the well-known General Dynamics Equation (GDE) [1]. MODELS Several models already exist to solve this equation. Multi-modal models are widely used [2] [3] because of the few parameters needed, but the GDE is solved only on its moments and the PSD is assumed to remain in a log-normal form. On the contrary, size-resolved models implies a discretization of the aerosol size spec- trum into several bins and to solve the GDE within each one. This step can be per- formed either by resolving each process separately ( splitting ), for example coagula- tion can be resolved by the well-known "size-binning" algorithms [4] and condensa- tion leads to an advection equation on the PSD [5], or by coupling all processes, what the finite elements [6] and stochastic methods [7] allows. Stochastic algorithms may not be competitive compared to deterministic ones with respect to the computation time, but they provide reference solutions useful to validate more operational codes on realistic cases, as analytic solutions of the GDE exist only for academic cases. REFERENCES [1] Seinfeld, J.H. and Pandis,S.N. Atmospheric chemistry and

  4. Utilization of near real-time satellite data in atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, U. S.; Christopher, S. A.; Wu, Y.; Yang, E.; Keiser, K.

    2010-12-01

    Prior studies show that satellite derived land and aerosols products may be utilized to improve numerical model predictions of atmospheric transport and dispersion. Satellite derived smoke emissions can be effectively utilized in numerical modeling of smoke transport. Satellite derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT) provide an effective constraint for the column loading in aerosol transport models. Land surface heterogeneity has substantial impact on mesoscale and small scale atmospheric dispersion. Satellite derived land products such as albedo and leaf area index provide an effective constraint for land surface heterogeneity. Utilization of NASA MODIS land and aerosol products in multiple applications related to atmospheric dispersion, nutrient deposition and air quality modeling will be discussed. These applications are developed for near-real time use in a decision support related to emergency and environmental management in the State of Alabama. Experiences and lessons learned form the development of these applications will also be discussed.

  5. Dust in the Sky: Atmospheric Composition. Modeling of Aerosol Optical Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Kinne, Stefan; Torres, Omar; Holben, Brent; Duncan, Bryan; Martin, Randall; Logan, Jennifer; Higurashi, Akiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol is any small particle of matter that rests suspended in the atmosphere. Natural sources, such as deserts, create some aerosols; consumption of fossil fuels and industrial activity create other aerosols. All the microscopic aerosol particles add up to a large amount of material floating in the atmosphere. You can see the particles in the haze that floats over polluted cities. Beyond this visible effect, aerosols can actually lower temperatures. They do this by blocking, or scattering, a portion of the sun's energy from reaching the surface. Because of this influence, scientists study the physical properties of atmospheric aerosols. Reliable numerical models for atmospheric aerosols play an important role in research.

  6. Long- and/or short-range transportation of local Asian aerosols in DRAGON-Osaka Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, M.; Sano, I.; Mukai, S.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    This work intends to demonstrate the spatial and temporal variation of atmospheric particles in East Asia, especially around AERONET (Aerosol Robotics Network) -Osaka site during Dragon Asia period in the spring of 2012, named Dragon-Osaka. It is known that the air pollution in East Asia becomes to be severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols associated with economic growth and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols. Thus the precise observations of atmospheric particles in East Asia are desired. Osaka is the second big city in Japan and a typical Asian urban area. The population of the region is around 20 millions including neighbor prefectures. Therefore, air quality in the region is slightly bad compared to remote area due to industries and auto mobiles. In recent years, Asian dusts and anthropogenic small particles transported from China and cover those cities throughout year. AERONET Osaka site was established in 2002 on the campus of Kinki University. Nowadays, LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging), an SPM sampler (SPM-613D, Kimoto Electric, Japan) and others are available on the roof of a building. The site data are useful for algorithm development of aerosol retrieval over busy city. On the other hand, human activities in this region also emit the huge amount of pollutions, thus it is needed to investigate the local distribution of aerosols in this region. In order to investigate change of aerosol properties, PM-individual analysis is made with scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX). SEM/EDX is an effective instrument to observe the surface microstructure and analyze the chemical composition of such materials as metals, powders, biological specimens, etc. We used sampling data from the SPM sampler at AERONET Osaka site. During a period of DRAGON-Asia, high concentrations of air pollutant were observed on the morning of March 11 in Fukue Island in the East China Sea. On the

  7. Using the Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) to investigate aerosol-convection interactions in ECHAM6-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Wagner, Till

    2014-05-01

    Convection plays an important role in the climate system through its effects on radiation, precipitation, large-scale dynamics and vertical transport of aerosols and trace gases. The effects of aerosols on the development of convective cloud and precipitation are a source of considerable uncertainty in current climate modelling. Most current global climate models use 'mass-flux' convection schemes, which represent the ensemble of convective clouds in a GCM column by a single 'mean' updraught. In addition to over-simplifying the representation of such clouds, this presents particular problems in the context of aerosol-convection interactions: firstly because the relationship between aerosol and the droplet size distribution depends on the vertical velocity distribution, about which little or no information is available, and secondly because the effects of convective transport and scavenging may vary nonlinearly over the ensemble (e.g. between precipitating and non-precipitating clouds and due to different loadings). The Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) addresses these limitations by simulating a spectrum of updraughts with different cross-sectional areas within each GCM column, based on the quasi-equilibrium approach of Arakawa and Schubert. For each cloud type, an entraining Lagrangian parcel model is initiated by perturbations at the surface, allowing a realistic vertical velocity to develop by cloud base so that detailed size-resolved microphysics can be represented within the cloud above. These different cloud types interact via competition for resolved-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE). Transport of water, aerosol and other tracers is calculated separately for each cloud type, allowing for different entrainment and scavenging behaviours. By using CCFM embedded within the ECHAM6-HAM aerosol-climate model, we show how this approach can both improve the distribution of convective precipitation events compared to a typical mass-flux scheme, and

  8. Potential impact of combined NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions from future high speed civil transport aircraft on stratospheric aerosols and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, S.; Pyle, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    A two-dimensional sulfate aerosol model is used to assess the impact of combined NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions from future High Speed Civil Transports on stratospheric aerosols and ozone. The model predicts that SO[sub x] emitted by this fleet of supersonics may double the aerosol surface area and the number of optically active particles below 20 km in the northern lower stratosphere. When the heterogeneous conversion of N[sub 2]O[sub 5] to HNO[sub 3] on sulfate aerosols is taken into account, the predicted ozone changes due to future HSCTs emissions are smaller than those calculated when SO[sub x] and the subsequent increase in aerosol loading are neglected. It is worth noting that the doubling of the aerosol surface area may lead not only to a reduction in predicted ozone sensitivity to NO[sub x], but also to an enhancement in ozone sensitivity to chlorine in the lower stratosphere. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Bulk, surface, and gas-phase limited water transport in aerosol.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Haddrell, Allen E; Miles, Rachael E H; Bull, Craig R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-11-15

    The influence of solute species on mass transfer to and from aqueous aerosol droplets is investigated using an electrodynamic balance coupled with light scattering techniques. In particular, we explore the limitations imposed on water evaporation by slow bulk phase diffusion and by the formation of surface organic films. Measurements of evaporation from ionic salt solutions, specifically sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate, are compared with predictions from an analytical model framework, highlighting the uncertainties associated with quantifying gas diffusional transport. The influence of low solubility organic acids on mass transfer is reported and compared to both model predictions and previous work. The limiting value of the evaporation coefficient that can be resolved by this approach, when uncertainties in key thermophysical quantities are accounted for, is estimated. The limitation of slow bulk phase diffusion on the evaporation rate is investigated for gel and glass states formed during the evaporation of magnesium sulfate and sucrose droplets, respectively. Finally, the effect of surfactants on evaporation has been probed, with soluble surfactants (such as sodium dodecyl sulfate) leading to little or no retardation of evaporation through slowing of surface layer kinetics. PMID:23095147

  10. Investigation of biomass burning and aerosol loading and transport in South America utilizing geostationary satellites. Annual report, January-December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, P.; Prins, E.

    1995-12-01

    This study attempts to assess the extent of burning and associated aerosol transport regimes in South America and the South Atlantic using geostationary satellite observations, in order to explore the possible roles of biomass burning in climate change and more directly in atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer processes. Modeling and analysis efforts have suggested that the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosols from biomass burning may play a major role in the radiative balance of the earth and are an important factor in climate change calculations. One of the most active regions of biomass burning is located in South America, associated with deforestation in the selva (forest), grassland management, and other agricultural practices. As part of the NASA Aerosol Interdisciplinary Program, the authors are utilizing GOES-7 (1988) and GOES-8 (1995) visible and multispectral infrared data (4, 11, and 12 microns) to document daily biomass burning activity in South America and to distinguish smoke/aerosols from other multi-level clouds and low-level moisture. This study catalogues the areal extent and transport of smoke/aerosols throughout the region and over the Atlantic Ocean for the 1988 (July-September) and 1995 (June-October) biomass burning seasons. The smoke/haze cover estimates are compared to the locations of fires to determine the source and verify the haze is actually associated with biomass burning activities. The temporal resolution of the GOES data (half-hourly in South America) makes it possible to determine the prevailing circulation and transport of aerosols by considering a series of visible and infrared images and tracking the motion of smoke, haze and adjacent clouds. The study area extends from 40 to 70 deg W and 0 to 40 deg S with aerosol coverage extending over the Atlantic Ocean when necessary. Fire activity is estimated with the GOES Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (ABBA).

  11. Effects of long-range aerosol transport on the microphysical properties of low-level liquid clouds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopman, Q.; Garrett, T. J.; Riedi, J.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of clouds in the Arctic can be altered by long-range aerosol transport to the region. The goal of this study is to use satellite, tracer transport model, and meteorological data sets to determine the effects of pollution on cloud microphysics due only to pollution itself and not to the meteorological state. Here, A-Train, POLDER-3 and MODIS satellite instruments are used to retrieve low-level liquid cloud microphysical properties over the Arctic between 2008 and 2010. Cloud retrievals are co-located with simulated pollution represented by carbon-monoxide concentrations from the FLEXPART tracer transport model. The sensitivity of clouds to pollution plumes - including aerosols - is constrained for cloud liquid water path, temperature, altitude, specific humidity, and lower tropospheric stability (LTS). We define an Indirect Effect (IE) parameter from the ratio of relative changes in cloud microphysical properties to relative variations in pollution concentrations. Retrievals indicate that, depending on the meteorological regime, IE parameters range between 0 and 0.34 for the cloud droplet effective radius, and between -0.10 and 0.35 for the optical depth, with average values of 0.12 ± 0.02 and 0.15 ± 0.02 respectively. The IE parameter increases with increasing specific humidity and LTS. Further, the results suggest that for a given set of meteorological conditions, the liquid water path of arctic clouds does not respond strongly to pollution. Or, not constraining sufficiently for meteorology may lead to artifacts that exaggerate the magnitude of the aerosol indirect effect. The converse is that the response of arctic clouds to pollution does depend on the meteorologic state. Finally, we find that IE values are highest when pollution concentrations are low, and that they depend on the source of pollution.

  12. Contribution of long-range transported aerosols to aerosol optical and physical properties: 3-year measurements at Gosan, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, J.; Kim, S. W.; Kim, J. H.; Ogren, J. A.; Yoon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, more attentions have been paid to air quality in East Asia due to the enhanced loading of atmospheric pollutants related to rapid industrialization. Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO), Korea is regarded as an ideal site to study the transport of atmospheric pollutants because it is frequently influenced by various airmasses from China, Korea, Japan and Pacific Ocean. In order to understand aerosol optical and physical properties according to airmass transport routes, three-year (2012-2014) continuous measurements of aerosol scattering/absorption coefficient and number size distribution were analyzed, together with 48-hour backward trajectory calculations. The averaged aerosol absorption (σa) and scattering coefficient (σs) for airmasses transported from North China (NC; 36% of all trajectories) were 6.65 Mm-1 and 94.72 Mm-1 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively, which were similar to those for stagnant airmasses (ST; 22% of all trajectories; σa: 6.26 Mm-1, σs: 93.99 Mm-1). The highest values of σa (7.03 Mm-1) and σs (108.34 Mm-1) were observed when airmasses were traveled from South China (SC; 11% of all trajectories). σa and σs for airmasses from Korean Peninsula (KP; 7% of all trajectories) and Pacific Ocean (PO; 14% of all trajectories; in parenthesis) were 5.63 (2.76) Mm-1 and 73.63 (50.93) Mm-1, respectively. Compared to other airmasses, the higher values of Scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) for ST (1.65) is thought to be the build-up of anthropogenic fine particulate pollutants. The Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) was estimated to be 1.32 for NC airmass and 1.02 for SC airmass. Over the study period, 130 days of total 557 days were identified as new particle formation and growth event (NPF) from Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) measurements by Cyclostationary Empirical Orthogonal Function (CSEOF) approach. Especially, 55.4% (72 days) of total 130 NPF days were found when a cold and dry airmass comes from NC after passing the frontal

  13. Easy Aerosol - Robust and non-robust circulation responses to aerosol radiative forcing in comprehensive atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Aiko; Bony, Sandrine; Stevens, Bjorn; Boucher, Olivier; Medeiros, Brian; Pincus, Robert; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Lewinschal, Anna; Bellouin, Nicolas; Yang, Young-Min

    2015-04-01

    A number of recent studies illustrated the potential of aerosols to change the large-scale atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns. It remains unclear, however, to what extent the proposed aerosol-induced changes reflect robust model behavior or are affected by uncertainties in the models' treatment of parametrized physical processes, such as those related to clouds. "Easy Aerosol", a model-intercomparison project organized within the Grand Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity of the World Climate Research Programme, addresses this question by subjecting a suite of comprehensive atmosphere general circulation models with prescribed sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) to the same set of idealized "easy" aerosol perturbations. This contribution discusses the aerosol perturbations as well as their impact on the model's precipitation and surface winds. The aerosol perturbations are designed based on a global aerosol climatology and mimic the gravest mode of the anthropogenic aerosol. Specifically, the meridional and zonal distributions of total aerosol optical depth are approximated by a superposition of Gaussian plumes; the vertical distribution is taken as constant within the lowest 1250m of the atmosphere followed by an exponential decay with height above. The aerosol both scatters and absorbs shortwave radiation, but in order to focus on direct radiative effects aerosol-cloud interactions are omitted. Each model contributes seven simulations. A clean control case with no aerosol-radiative effects at all is compared to six perturbed simulations with differing aerosol loading, zonal aerosol distributions, and SSTs. To estimate the role of natural variability, one of the models, MPI-ESM, contributes a 5-member ensemble for each simulation. If the observed SSTs from years 1979-2005 are prescribed, the aerosol leads to a local depression of precipitation at the Northern Hemisphere center of the aerosol and a northward shift of the

  14. Combination of spaceborne sensor(s) and 3-D aerosol models to assess global daily near-surface air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol Particulate Matter (PM), measured by ground-based monitoring stations, is used as a standard by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) to evaluate daily air quality. PM monitoring is particularly important for human health protection because the exposure to suspended particles can contribute, among others, to lung and respiratory diseases and even premature death. However, most of the PM monitoring stations are located close to cities, leaving large areas without any operational data. Satellite remote sensing is well suited for a global coverage of the aerosol load and can provide an independent and supplemental data source to in situ monitoring. Nevertheless, PM at the ground cannot easily be determined from satellite AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) without additional information on the optical/microphysical properties and vertical distribution of the aerosols. The objective of this study is to explore the efficacy and accuracy of combining a 3-D aerosol transport model and satellite remote sensing as a cost-effective approach for estimating ground-level PM on a global and daily basis. The estimation of the near-surface PM will use the vertical distribution (and, if possible, the physicochemical properties) of the aerosols inferred from a transport model and the measured total load of particles in the atmospheric column retrieved by satellite sensor(s). The first step is to select a chemical transport model (CTM) that provides “good” simulated aerosol vertical profiles. A few global (e.g., WRF-Chem-GOCART) or regional (e.g., MM5-CMAQ, PM-CAMx) CTM will be compared during selected airborne campaigns like ARCTAS-CARB (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites- California Air Resources Board). The next step will be to devise an algorithm that combines the satellite and model data to infer PM mass estimates at the ground, after evaluating different spaceborne instruments and possible multi-sensor combinations.

  15. Optical Properties and Climate Impacts of Tropospheric Aerosols that Undergo Long-Range Transport to the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P.; Bates, T.; Coffman, D.; Schulz, K.; Shank, L.; Jefferson, A.; Ogren, J.; Burkhart, J.; Shaw, G.

    2009-04-01

    Tropospheric aerosol particles undergo long range transport from the mid-latitudes to the Arctic each winter and spring. Once in the Arctic, aerosols may impact regional climate in several ways. Aerosols can affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and altering cloud properties. In addition, absorbing aerosol that is deposited onto ice and snow can lower the surface albedo and enhance the ice-albedo feedback mechanism. Measurements of aerosol properties relevant to climate forcing (chemical composition, light scattering, and light absorption) have been made by NOAA at Barrow, AK for over a decade. Measurements of aerosol chemical composition have been made over the same time period at the three more southern Alaskan sites of Poker Flat, Denali National Park, and Homer. In addition, in March and April of 2008, aerosol measurements were made during a NOAA research cruise (ICEALOT) to the Greenland, Norwegian and Barents Seas. Onboard the ship, measurements were made of aerosol optical and cloud nucleating properties. Results from the long-term measurements and ICEALOT will be presented in order to describe trends and climate-relevant properties of aerosol particles transported to the Arctic.

  16. Advancing Models and Evaluation of Cumulus, Climate and Aerosol Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, Andrew

    2015-10-27

    This project was successfully able to meet its’ goals, but faced some serious challenges due to personnel issues. Nonetheless, it was largely successful. The Project Objectives were as follows: 1. Develop a unified representation of stratifom and cumulus cloud microphysics for NCAR/DOE global community models. 2. Examine the effects of aerosols on clouds and their impact on precipitation in stratiform and cumulus clouds. We will also explore the effects of clouds and precipitation on aerosols. 3. Test these new formulations using advanced evaluation techniques and observations and release

  17. An Aerosol Physical Chemistry Model for the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jin-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    This report is the final report for the Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1000. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed with a brief comment as to the research performed. The publications titles are: The effects of particle size and nitric acid uptake on the homogenous freezing of sulfate aerosols; Parameterization of an aerosol physical chemistry model (APCM) for the NH3/H2SO4/HNO3/H2O system at cold temperatures; and The onset, extent and duration of dehydration in the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex.

  18. Comparison of Five Bacteriophages as Models for Viral Aerosol Studies

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Martel, Bruno; Moineau, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are perceived to be good models for the study of airborne viruses because they are safe to use, some of them display structural features similar to those of human and animal viruses, and they are relatively easy to produce in large quantities. Yet, only a few studies have investigated them as models. It has previously been demonstrated that aerosolization, environmental conditions, and sampling conditions affect viral infectivity, but viral infectivity is virus dependent. Thus, several virus models are likely needed to study their general behavior in aerosols. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of aerosolization and sampling on the infectivity of five tail-less bacteriophages and two pathogenic viruses: MS2 (a single-stranded RNA [ssRNA] phage of the Leviviridae family), Φ6 (a segmented double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] phage of the Cystoviridae family), ΦX174 (a single-stranded DNA [ssDNA] phage of the Microviridae family), PM2 (a double-stranded DNA [dsDNA] phage of the Corticoviridae family), PR772 (a dsDNA phage of the Tectiviridae family), human influenza A virus H1N1 (an ssRNA virus of the Orthomyxoviridae family), and the poultry virus Newcastle disease virus (NDV; an ssRNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family). Three nebulizers and two nebulization salt buffers (with or without organic fluid) were tested, as were two aerosol sampling devices, a liquid cyclone (SKC BioSampler) and a dry cyclone (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health two-stage cyclone bioaerosol sampler). The presence of viruses in collected air samples was detected by culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Our results showed that these selected five phages behave differently when aerosolized and sampled. RNA phage MS2 and ssDNA phage ΦX174 were the most resistant to aerosolization and sampling. The presence of organic fluid in the nebulization buffer protected phages PR772 and Φ6 throughout the aerosolization and sampling with dry cyclones. In this

  19. A regional climate model study of how biomass burning aerosol impacts land-atmosphere interactions over the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Fu, Rong; Yu, Hongbin; Dickinson, Robert E.; Juarez, Robinson Negron; Chin, Mian; Wang, Hui

    2008-07-01

    Ensemble simulations of a regional climate model assuming smoke aerosol in the Amazon suggest that dynamic changes of cloud cover contributes to the radiative effect of the smoke on the diurnal cycles of surface fluxes and the depth and structure of planetary boundary layer (PBL). In addition to their local effects, the aerosol radiative forcing also appears to weaken or delay the circulation transition from dry to wet season, leading to a weaker moisture transport into the smoke area where the aerosols optical depth, AOD, exceeds 0.3 and a stronger moisture transport and increase of cloudiness in the region upwind to the smoke area. The land surface scheme is modified to improve the regional climate model simulation of the daily mean and diurnal cycle of the surface sensible and latent heat fluxes over the Amazon rain forest. The aerosol radiative forcing is applied to the model during a dry to wet transition season (August-October) in that region. Cloudiness decreases in early afternoon due to the absorption of solar radiation by smoke aerosols partially compensate for the reduction of surface solar flux by aerosol scattering, shifting the strongest changes of surface flux and the PBL to late morning. The reduction of net solar radiation at the surface by smoke is locally largely compensated by reduction of surface sensible flux, with reduction of latent flux only about 30% as large. The strong aerosol absorption in the top 1 km of the aerosol layer stabilizes the 2 to 3 km layer immediately above the daytime PBL and consequently cloudiness decreases. This reduced surface solar flux and more stable lapse rate at the top of the PBL stabilize the lower troposphere. These changes lead to anomalous wind divergence in the southern Amazon and anomalous wind convergence over the equatorial western Amazon in the upwind direction of the smoke area.

  20. An Aerosolized Brucella spp. Challenge Model for Laboratory Animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To characterize the optimal aerosol dosage of Brucella abortus strain 2308 (S2308) and B. melitensis (S16M) in a laboratory animal model of brucellosis, dosages of 10**3 to 10**10 CFU were nebulized to mice. Although tissue weights were minimally influenced, total colony-forming units (CFU) per tis...

  1. Aerosol transport over the Andes from the Amazon Basin to the remote Pacific Ocean: A multiyear CALIOP assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Krejci, Radovan

    2015-08-01

    Six years (2007-2012) of data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite instrument were used to investigate the vertical distribution and transport of aerosols over the tropical South American continent and the southeast Pacific Ocean. The multiyear aerosol extinction assessment indicates that aerosols, mainly biomass burning particles emitted during the dry season in the Amazon Basin, are lifted in significant amounts over the Andes. The aerosols are mainly transported in the planetary boundary layer between the surface and 2 km altitude with an aerosol extinction maximum near the surface. During the transport toward the Andes, the aerosol extinction decreases at a rate of 0.02 km-1 per kilometer of altitude likely due to dilution and deposition processes. Aerosols reaching the top of the Andes, at altitudes typically between 4 and 5 km, are entrained into the free troposphere (FT) over the southeast Pacific Ocean. A comparison between CALIOP observations and ERA-Interim reanalysis data indicates that during their long-range transport over the tropical Pacific Ocean, these aerosols are slowly transported toward the marine boundary layer by the large-scale subsidence at a rate of 0.4 cm s-1. The observed vertical/horizontal transport ratio is 0.7-0.8 m km-1. Continental aerosols linked to transport over the Andes can be traced on average over 4000 km away from the continent indicating an aerosol residence time of 8-9 days in the FT over the Pacific Ocean. The FT aerosol optical depth (AOD) above the Pacific Ocean near South American coast accounts on average for 6% and 25% of the total AOD during the season of low and high biomass burning, respectively. This result shows that, during the biomass burning season, continental aerosols largely influence the AOD over the remote southeast Pacific Ocean. Overall, FT AOD decrease exponentially with the distance to continental sources at a rate of about 10% per degree of longitude over the

  2. Monitoring biomass burning and aerosol loading and transport using multispectral GOES data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, W. Paul; Prins, Elaine

    1996-10-01

    The successful launch of GOES-8 in 1994 introduced an enhanced capability for diurnal monitoring of subpixel fire activity and aerosol transport in the Western Hemisphere. The higher spatial and temporal resolution, greater radiometric sensitivity, and improved navigation of GOES-8 offer many advantages for monitoring fires and smoke in North, Central, and South America. In South America the GOES-8 automated biomass burning algorithm (ABBA) is being used to continue monitoring trends in biomass burning associated with agricultural practices and deforestation activities as well as documenting the extent and transport of associated aerosols. GOES-8 ABBA results obtained during the 1995 biomass burning season indicate a strong diurnal cycle in fire activity and associated aerosol transport regimes extending over millions of km2. Examples of GOES-8 diurnal monitoring of fire intensity and size in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Guatemala and Belize show the utility of using GOES-8 as an early warning mechanism for identifying and monitoring wildfires in these regions. The success of the GOES-8 ABBA in the Western Hemisphere suggests the utility of initiating a global geostationary fire monitoring effort.

  3. Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Peters, Len K.

    2008-07-03

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a new Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC), with a special focus on addressing the long-standing issues associated with solving the dynamic partitioning of semi-volatile inorganic gases (HNO3, HCl, and NH3) to size-distributed atmospheric aerosol particles. The coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE) for dynamic gas-particle mass transfer are extremely stiff, and the available numerical techniques are either too expensive or produce oscillatory and/or inaccurate steady-state solutions. These limitations are overcome in MOSAIC, which couples an accurate and computationally efficient thermodynamic module [Zaveri et al., 2005a,b] with a new dynamic gas-particle partitioning module described here. The algorithm involves time-split integrations of non-volatile and semi-volatile species, and a new concept of “dynamic pH” and an adaptive time-stepping scheme hold the key to smooth, accurate, and efficient solutions over the entire relative humidity range. MOSAIC is found to be in excellent agreement with a benchmark version of the model that uses LSODES (a Gear solver) for rigorously integrating the stiff ODEs. The steady-state MOSAIC results for monodisperse aerosol test cases are also in excellent agreement with those obtained with the benchmark equilibrium model AIM. MOSAIC is also evaluated within a 3-D model, and the average CPU speed is estimated to be over 100 times faster than the dynamic aerosol model MADM [Pilinis et al., 2000]. These results suggest that MOSAIC is highly attractive for use in 3-D aerosol and air quality models in which both accuracy and efficiency are critically important.

  4. Evaluation of the sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA implementation in ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. J.; Makkonen, R.; Arola, A.; Mielonen, T.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Kulmala, M.; Kokkola, H.

    2011-12-01

    We present the implementation and evaluation of a sectional aerosol microphysics model SALSA within the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. This aerosol microphysics module has been designed to be flexible and computationally efficient so that it can be implemented in regional or global scale models. The computational efficiency has been achieved by keeping the number of variables needed to describe the size and composition distribution to the minimum. The aerosol size distribution is described using 20 size sections with 10 size sections in size space which cover diameters ranging from 3 nm to 10 μm divided to three subranges each having distinct optimised process and compound selection. The ability of the module to describe the global aerosol properties was evaluated by comparison against (1) measured continental and marine size distributions, (2) observed variability of continental modal number concentrations, (3) measured sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon and sea salt mass concentrations, (4) observations of AOD and other aerosol optical properties from satellites and AERONET network, (5) global aerosol budgets and concentrations from previous model studies, and (6) model results using M7 which is the default aerosol microphysics module in ECHAM5-HAM. The evaluation shows that the global aerosol properties can be reproduced reasonably well using the coarse resolution of 10 size sections in size space. The simulated global aerosol budgets are within the range of previous studies. Surface concentrations of sea salt, sulphate and carbonaceous species have an annual mean within a factor of five of the observations, while the simulated sea salt concentrations reproduce the observations less accurately and show high variability. Regionally, AOD is in relatively good agreement with the observations (within a factor of two). At mid-latitudes the observed AOD is captured well, while at high-latitudes as well as in some polluted and dust regions the modeled AOD is

  5. Elucidating determinants of aerosol composition through particle-type-based receptor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; Slowik, J. G.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Corbin, J. C.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Rehbein, P. J. G.; Sills, D. M. L.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Brook, J. R.; Evans, G. J.

    2011-03-01

    An aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed at a semi-rural site in Southern Ontario to characterize the size and chemical composition of individual particles. Particle-type-based receptor modelling of these data was used to investigate the determinants of aerosol chemical composition in this region. Individual particles were classified into particle-types and positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to their temporal trends to separate and cross-apportion particle-types to factors. The extent of chemical processing for each factor was assessed by evaluating the internal and external mixing state of the characteristic particle-types. The nine factors identified helped to elucidate the coupled interactions of these determinants. Nitrate-laden dust was found to be the dominant type of locally emitted particles measured by ATOFMS. Several factors associated with aerosol transported to the site from intermediate local-to-regional distances were identified: the Organic factor was associated with a combustion source to the north-west; the ECOC Day factor was characterized by nearby local-to-regional carbonaceous emissions transported from the south-west during the daytime; and the Fireworks factor consisted of pyrotechnic particles from the Detroit region following holiday fireworks displays. Regional aerosol from farther emissions sources were reflected through three factors: two biomass burning factors and a highly chemically processed long range transport factor. The biomass burning factors were separated by PMF due to differences in chemical processing which were caused in part by the passage of two thunderstorm gust fronts with different air mass histories. The remaining two factors, ECOC Night and Nitrate Background, represented the night-time partitioning of nitrate to pre-existing particles of different origins. The distinct meteorological conditions observed during this month-long study in the summer of 2007 provided a unique range

  6. Elucidating determinants of aerosol composition through particle-type-based receptor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; Slowik, J. G.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Corbin, J. C.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Rehbein, P. J. G.; Sills, D. M. L.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Brook, J. R.; Evans, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    An aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed at a semi-rural site in southern Ontario to characterize the size and chemical composition of individual particles. Particle-type-based receptor modelling of these data was used to investigate the determinants of aerosol chemical composition in this region. Individual particles were classified into particle-types and positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to their temporal trends to separate and cross-apportion particle-types to factors. The extent of chemical processing for each factor was assessed by evaluating the internal and external mixing state of the characteristic particle-types. The nine factors identified helped to elucidate the coupled interactions of these determinants. Nitrate-laden dust was found to be the dominant type of locally emitted particles measured by ATOFMS. Several factors associated with aerosol transported to the site from intermediate local-to-regional distances were identified: the Organic factor was associated with a combustion source to the north-west; the ECOC Day factor was characterized by nearby local-to-regional carbonaceous emissions transported from the south-west during the daytime; and the Fireworks factor consisted of pyrotechnic particles from the Detroit region following holiday fireworks displays. Regional aerosol from farther emissions sources was reflected through three factors: two Biomass Burning factors and a highly chemically processed Long Range Transport factor. The Biomass Burning factors were separated by PMF due to differences in chemical processing which were in part elucidated by the passage of two thunderstorm gust fronts with different air mass histories. The remaining two factors, ECOC Night and Nitrate Background, represented the night-time partitioning of nitrate to pre-existing particles of different origins. The distinct meteorological conditions observed during this month-long study in the summer of 2007 provided a unique

  7. Aerosol transport simulations in indoor and outdoor environments using computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landazuri, Andrea C.

    This dissertation focuses on aerosol transport modeling in occupational environments and mining sites in Arizona using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The impacts of human exposure in both environments are explored with the emphasis on turbulence, wind speed, wind direction and particle sizes. Final emissions simulations involved the digitalization process of available elevation contour plots of one of the mining sites to account for realistic topographical features. The digital elevation map (DEM) of one of the sites was imported to COMSOL MULTIPHYSICSRTM for subsequent turbulence and particle simulations. Simulation results that include realistic topography show considerable deviations of wind direction. Inter-element correlation results using metal and metalloid size resolved concentration data using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) under given wind speeds and directions provided guidance on groups of metals that coexist throughout mining activities. Groups between Fe-Mg, Cr-Fe, Al-Sc, Sc-Fe, and Mg-Al are strongly correlated for unrestricted wind directions and speeds, suggesting that the source may be of soil origin (e.g. ore and tailings); also, groups of elements where Cu is present, in the coarse fraction range, may come from mechanical action mining activities and saltation phenomenon. Besides, MOUDI data under low wind speeds (<2 m/s) and at night showed a strong correlation for 1 mum particles between the groups: Sc-Be-Mg, Cr-Al, Cu-Mn, Cd-Pb-Be, Cd-Cr, Cu-Pb, Pb-Cd, As-Cd-Pb. The As-Cd-Pb correlates strongly in almost all ranges of particle sizes. When restricted low wind speeds were imposed more groups of elements are evident and this may be justified with the fact that at lower speeds particles are more likely to settle. When linking these results with CFD simulations and Pb-isotope results it is concluded that the source of elements found in association with Pb in the fine fraction come from the ore that is subsequently processed

  8. Minority Transportation Expenditure Allocation Model

    1993-04-12

    MITRAM (Minority TRansportation expenditure Allocation Model) can project various transportation related attributes of minority (Black and Hispanic) and majority (white) populations. The model projects vehicle ownership, vehicle miles of travel, workers, new car and on-road fleet fuel economy, amount and share of household income spent on gasoline, and household expenditures on public transportation and taxis. MITRAM predicts reactions to sustained fuel price changes for up to 10 years after the change.

  9. Global modeling study of potentially bioavailable iron input from shipboard aerosol sources to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Akinori

    2013-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for phytoplankton. The majority of iron is transported from arid and semiarid regions to the open ocean, but it is mainly in an insoluble form. Since most aquatic organisms can take up iron only in the dissolved form, aerosol iron solubility is a key factor that can influence the air-sea CO2 fluxes and thus climate. Field observations have shown relatively high iron solubility in aerosols influenced by combustion sources, but specific emissions sources and their contributions to deposition fluxes largely remain uncertain. Here a global chemical transport model was used to investigate the effect of aerosol emissions from ship plumes on iron solubility in particles from the combustion and dust sources. The model results reveal that the oil combustion from shipping mainly contributes to high iron solubility (>10%) at low iron loading (1-110 ng m-3) observed over the high-latitude North Atlantic Ocean, rather than the other combustion sources from continental industrialized regions. Due to continuing growth in global shipping and no regulations regarding particles emissions over the open ocean, the input of potentially bioavailable iron from ship plumes is likely to increase during the next century. The model results suggest that deposition of soluble iron from ships in 2100 contributes 30-60% of the soluble iron deposition over the high-latitude North Atlantic and North Pacific.

  10. Evolution of a Canadian biomass burning aerosol smoke plume transported to the U.S. East Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. J.; Sun, K.; Zondlo, M. A.; Kanter, D.; Ginoux, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    We synthesize ground-based and satellite measurements to track the physical and chemical evolution of a biomass burning aerosol plume emitted in central Canada as it was transported to the U.S. East Coast. Biomass burning emissions strongly influence both air quality and radiative processes through trace gas and aerosol emissions. Organic carbon and black carbon smoke aerosols can be transported long distances downwind of the emissions source region. In some cases, biomass burning aerosol emissions have larger impacts than anthropogenic emissions, with implications for human health and aerosol radiative forcing on climate. Boreal forest fires in Canada on July 4, 2006 led to significant smoke aerosol emissions that were transported in layers at different altitudes over the Great Lakes to the northeastern United States. We track the aerosol plume with space-borne remote sensing satellite instrument (MODIS, OMI, MISR and CALIOP lidar) data as well as ground-based in-situ and remote aerosol observations (AERONET CIMEL sky/sun photometer, MPLNET lidar, IMPROVE and EPA AirNow). Combining total column, surface and vertical profile observations, we illustrate how plume altitude can affect spatial and temporal transport as well as optical and chemical properties. Convective lofting elevated smoke emissions above the boundary layer into the free troposphere (~3 km altitude) where higher speed winds led to rapid, long-range upper level transport to the Atlantic Ocean in 4-5 days. A lower aerosol layer led to enhancements in surface fine particulate matter (PM-2.5) mass concentrations accompanied by changes in aerosol composition as the plume mixed with anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. The extensive coverage of this smoke plume over the U.S. East Coast, a heavily populated region known for high anthropogenic aerosol loadings, significantly influenced regional air quality. Average PM-2.5 concentrations across Pennsylvania exceeded the U.S. EPA 24-hour PM-2.5 standard by 20.37

  11. Trace Gas/Aerosol Interactions and GMI Modeling Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Das, Bigyani; Bergmann, Dan; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Strahan, Susan; Wang, Minghuai; Feng, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Current global aerosol models use different physical and chemical schemes and parameters, different meteorological fields, and often different emission sources. Since the physical and chemical parameterization schemes are often tuned to obtain results that are consistent with observations, it is difficult to assess the true uncertainty due to meteorology alone. Under the framework of the NASA global modeling initiative (GMI), the differences and uncertainties in aerosol simulations (for sulfate, organic carbon, black carbon, dust and sea salt) solely due to different meteorological fields are analyzed and quantified. Three meteorological datasets available from the NASA DAO GCM, the GISS-II' GCM, and the NASA finite volume GCM (FVGCM) are used to drive the same aerosol model. The global sulfate and mineral dust burdens with FVGCM fields are 40% and 20% less than those with DAO and GISS fields, respectively due to its heavier rainfall. Meanwhile, the sea salt burden predicted with FVGCM fields is 56% and 43% higher than those with DAO and GISS, respectively, due to its stronger convection especially over the Southern Hemispheric Ocean. Sulfate concentrations at the surface in the Northern Hemisphere extratropics and in the middle to upper troposphere differ by more than a factor of 3 between the three meteorological datasets. The agreement between model calculated and observed aerosol concentrations in the industrial regions (e.g., North America and Europe) is quite similar for all three meteorological datasets. Away from the source regions, however, the comparisons with observations differ greatly for DAO, FVGCM and GISS, and the performance of the model using different datasets varies largely depending on sites and species. Global annual average aerosol optical depth at 550 nm is 0.120-0.131 for the three meteorological datasets.

  12. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures.

  13. A Global Model Simulation of Aerosol Effects of Surface Radiation Budget- Toward Understanding of the "Dimming to Brightening" Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Bian, Huisheng; Yu, Hongbin

    2008-01-01

    We present a global model study on the role aerosols play in the change of solar radiation at Earth's surface that transitioned from a decreasing (dimming) trend to an increasing (brightening) trend. Our primary objective is to understand the relationship between the long-term trends of aerosol emission, atmospheric burden, and surface solar radiation. More specifically, we use the recently compiled comprehensive global emission datasets of aerosols and precursors from fuel combustion, biomass burning, volcanic eruptions and other sources from 1980 to 2006 to simulate long-term variations of aerosol distributions and optical properties, and then calculate the multi-decadal changes of short-wave radiative fluxes at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere by coupling the GOCART model simulated aerosols with the Goddard radiative transfer model. The model results are compared with long-term observational records from ground-based networks and satellite data. We will address the following critical questions: To what extent can the observed surface solar radiation trends, known as the transition from dimming to brightening, be explained by the changes of anthropogenic and natural aerosol loading on global and regional scales? What are the relative contributions of local emission and long-range transport to the surface radiation budget and how do these contributions change with time?

  14. Monitoring aerosol elemental composition in particle size fractions of long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metternich, P.; Georgii, H.-W.; Groeneveld, K. O.

    1983-04-01

    Collection of atmospheric samples was performed at Malta, a semi-remote environment in the Mediterranean, in case of long-range transport studies of pollutants and natural substances. Using PIXE as a non-destructive trace-element analytical tool, the elemental composition of these samples was determined. Atmospheric concentrations obtained in this study were of one magnitude higher than those observed over the open North Alantic in purely marine air. For most of the anomalously enriched elements in the Mediterranean aerosol, the high concentrations can be explained by long-range transport.

  15. Intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols: implications for regional air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, T.; Ginoux, P.; Malm, W.

    2007-06-01

    We use the global model GOCART to examine the impact of pollution and dust aerosols emitted from their major sources on surface fine particulate matter concentrations at regional and hemispheric scales. Focusing on the North America region in 2001, we use measurements from the IMPROVE network in the United States to evaluate the model-simulated surface concentrations of the "reconstructed fine mass" (RCFM) and its components of ammonium sulfate, black carbon (BC), organic matter (OM), and fine mode dust. We then quantify the RCFM budget in terms of the RCFM composition, type, and origin to find that in the eastern U.S., ammonium sulfate is the dominant RCFM component (~60%) whereas in the western U.S., dust and OM are just as important as sulfate but have considerable seasonal variations, especially in the NW. On an annual average, North America regional pollution accounts for nearly 30-40% of the surface RCFM in the western U.S., and for a much higher proportion of 65-70% in the eastern U.S. By contrast, pollution from outside of North America contributes to just 2-6% (~0.2 μg m-3) of the total RCFM over the U.S. on an annual average. In comparison, long-range transport of dust is more efficient than that of pollution, which brings 3 to 4 times more fine particles to the U.S. (0.5-0.8 μg m-3 on an annual average) with a maximum influence in spring and over the NW. Of the major pollution regions, Europe has the largest potential to affect the surface aerosol concentrations in other continents due to its shorter distance from receptor continents and its larger fraction of sulfate-producing precursor gas in the outflow. With the IPCC emission scenario for the year 2000, we find that European emissions increase levels of ammonium sulfate by 1-5 μg m-3 over the surface of northern Africa and western Asia, and its contribution to eastern Asia (≥0.2 μg m-3) is twice as much as the Asian contribution to North America. Asia and North America pollution emissions exert

  16. Ship-based Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements in the Atlantic Ocean, Comparison with Satellite Retrievals and GOCART Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Sakerin, S.; Kabanov, D.; Slutsker, I.; Remer, L. A.; Kahn, R.; Ignatov, A.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T. L.; Mishchenko, M.; Liu, L.; Kucsera, T. L.; Giles, D.; Eck, T. F.; Torres, O.; Kopelevich, O.

    2005-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth measurements were made in October -December 2004 aboard of R/V Akademik Sergey Vavilov. The cruise area included the Atlantic transect from North Sea to Cape Town and then a crossing in the South Atlantic to Ushuaia, Argentina. The hand-held Microtops II sunphotometer was used to acquire 314 series of measurements spanning 38 days. The sunphotometer was pre-calibrated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center against a master sun/sky radiometer instrument of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The direct sun measurements were acquired in five spectral channels: 340, 440, 675, 870 and 940 nm. To retrieve aerosol optical depths we applied AERONET processing algorithm (Version 2) to the raw data. Aerosol optical depth values were close to background oceanic conditions (0.04-0.08) in the open oceanic areas not influenced by continental sources. Spectral dependence can be described as almost neutral (Angstrom parameter was less than 0.6), especially in the Southern Atlantic. A notable latitudinal variability of optical depth was observed between 15N and 21S, which was associated with the aerosol transport from Africa. Correlations between optical depth and meteorological parameters were considered and comparison between ship-based measurements and AERONET sites along the cruise track was made. Aerosol optical depths were compared to the global transport model (GOCART) simulations and satellite retrievals from MODIS, MISR, and AVHRR.

  17. On the relationship between aerosol model uncertainty and radiative forcing uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lindsay A; Reddington, Carly L; Carslaw, Kenneth S

    2016-05-24

    The largest uncertainty in the historical radiative forcing of climate is caused by the interaction of aerosols with clouds. Historical forcing is not a directly measurable quantity, so reliable assessments depend on the development of global models of aerosols and clouds that are well constrained by observations. However, there has been no systematic assessment of how reduction in the uncertainty of global aerosol models will feed through to the uncertainty in the predicted forcing. We use a global model perturbed parameter ensemble to show that tight observational constraint of aerosol concentrations in the model has a relatively small effect on the aerosol-related uncertainty in the calculated forcing between preindustrial and present-day periods. One factor is the low sensitivity of present-day aerosol to natural emissions that determine the preindustrial aerosol state. However, the major cause of the weak constraint is that the full uncertainty space of the model generates a large number of model variants that are equally acceptable compared to present-day aerosol observations. The narrow range of aerosol concentrations in the observa