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Sample records for aerosol vertical profile

  1. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  2. Vertical Profile of Aerosol Properties at Pico Mountain, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Dzepina, K.; Hueber, J.; China, S.; Sharma, N.

    2013-12-01

    Pico Mountain (2325m asl) is a dormant volcano in the archipelago of the Azores1500 km west of Lisbon, Portugal in the North Atlantic. It differs from typical mountain ranges such as the Alps or the Rockies, which are large and present a complex orography. Pico Mountain has a simple cone-like structure with only one main peak and is thousands of kilometers away from any other significant mountain range. In summer months, it is typical for air masses to move around the mountain rather than traveling up its face. This implies that often the peak of the mountain lies above the marine boundary layer in the free troposphere, while the lower part of the mountain is affected by marine clouds and marine air-masses. An atmospheric monitoring station, the Pico Mountain Observatory was established in 2001 in the summit caldera of the volcano at 2225m above sea level. The observatory is far from large populations or pollution sources, which makes the station ideal to study atmospheric gases and aerosols transported over long-ranges in the free troposphere. The station is reachable only by foot following a steep and strenuous hiking trail. In the summer of 2013 we began to collect vertical profiles of aerosol by carrying an instrumented backpack up to the summit of the mountain, with the goal of studying the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols from the marine boundary layer to the free troposphere. The backpack was carried from the base of trail at 1200m asl. The backpack was equipped with the following instruments: 1. Nephelometer to measure light scattering from aerosol 2. 2-size optical particle counter (300-500 nm) 3. Portable micro-aethalometer to measure absorbing aerosols 4. SEM/TEM sampler to collect particles for off-line electron microscopy analysis 5. Battery powered data logger to measure relative humidity, temperature and pressure 6. GPS tracking device We provide a preliminary analysis of data collected in 2013 to gain insight on the vertical distribution

  3. Global profiles of the direct aerosol effect using vertically resolved aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Pappas, Vasilios; Matsoukas, Christos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In general, aerosols cause cooling of the surface and the planet, while they warm the atmosphere due to scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. The importance of vertically resolved direct radiative effect (DRE) and heating/cooling effects of aerosols is strong, while large uncertainties still lie with their magnitudes. In order to be able to quantify them throughout the atmosphere, a detailed vertical profile of the aerosol effect is required. Such data were made available recently by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. CALIOP is the first polarization lidar to fly in space and has been acquiring unique data on aerosols and clouds since June 2006. The aim of this study is to investigate both the vertically resolved geographic and seasonal variation of the DRE due to aerosols. The vertical profile of DRE under all-sky and clear-sky conditions is computed using the deterministic spectral radiative transfer model FORTH. From the DRE, the effect on atmospheric heating/cooling rate profiles due to aerosols can also be derived. We use CALIOP Level 2-Version 3 Layer aerosol optical depth data as input to our radiation transfer model, for a period of 3 complete years (2007-2009). These data are provided on a 5 km horizontal resolution and in up to 8 vertical layers and have been regridded on our model horizontal and vertical resolutions. We use cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), while the aerosol asymmetry factor and single scattering albedo are taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model computations are performed on a monthly, 2.5°× 2.5° resolution on global scale, at 40

  4. Deriving Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Sizes from TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Smith, M. D.; McConnochie, T. H.; Flittner, D. E.; Fouchet, T.

    2011-12-01

    Vertical variations in aerosol particle sizes can have a dramatic effect in their net impact on the state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. Recent analyses of data from the Spectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instruments offer some long overdue progress in constraining this aspect of aerosols. However, significantly more work remains to be done along these lines in order to better constrain and inform modern dynamical simulations of the Martian atmosphere. Thus, the primary goal of our work is to perform retrievals of particle size as a function of altitude for both dust and water ice aerosols. The choice of the TES dataset, with pole-to-pole coverage over a period of nearly three martian years, provides the crucial systematic temporal and spatial sampling. Additional leverage on the particle size will be obtained by using both solarband bolometry and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Our presentation will include: 1) A summary of our limb radiative transfer comparison/validation exercises which include Monte Carlo, Gauss-Seidel, and discrete-ordinate algorithms (including the plane-parallel source function approximation). 2) The initial results of the application of our particle size retrieval scheme to the TES observations of the 2001 planet encircling dust event. 3) A few test applications to the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) radiance profiles (enabled by the recent solarband radiometric calibration by Bandfield and collaborators). 4) Our plans for additional retrievals (aphelion cloud season, lower optical depth locations and seasons, etc.) and the distribution of the derived profiles.

  5. Radiosonde aerosol counter for vertical profiling of atmospheric dust layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Rogers, G.

    2010-05-01

    A low-cost, miniature aerosol particle counter has been developed, intended for use with balloon-borne meteorological radiosondes. It is particularly suitable for airborne mineral dust measurements. Ambient air is drawn into the counter using a diaphragm pump at a rate of 0.5 litre per minute. The counter detects particles in the airstream using a diode laser and a photodiode. Output from the photodiode is digitised into 5 size bins, with minimum particle diameters equivalent to 0.6, 1.4, 2.6, 5.4 and 10.6 micrometers. The counter is interfaced to a Vaisala RS92 radiosonde, which transmits data from the counter together with meteorological parameters and GPS-derived position to a ground based receiver at 1 Hz rate. Statistically significant particle size distributions can be obtained once a second for number concentrations down to about 100,000 particle per litre (within the measured size range), or correspondingly less at lower temporal resolutions. At the same time, the counter is capable of measuring dust number concentrations exceeding a million per litre without incurring significant errors. Soundings during the DREAME campaign in Kuwait (Ulanowski et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) and on Cape Verde Islands (Nicoll et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) provided dust concentration profiles with a typical vertical resolution of 4 m. Comparisons with integrated dust column size distribution measurements from AERONET sun photometers showed good agreement in two out of three cases where near-simultaneous retrievals were available. Optical thickness calculations based on the size distributions measured in Kuwait, with the assumption that the dust particles were prolate spheroids, agreed with the AERONET optical thickness at 675 nm to within 15%.

  6. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Volume from High Spectral Resolution Infrared Transmission Measurements: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, Annmarie; Kahn, Brian H.; Mills, Franklin P.; Irion, Fredrick W.; Steele, Helen M.; Gunson, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment are utilized to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density and extinction coefficient. Following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991, the ATMOS spectra obtained on three Space Shuttle missions (1992, 1993, and 1994) provide a unique opportunity to study the global stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer shortly after a major volcanic eruption and periodically during the decay phase. Synthetic sulfate aerosol spectra are fit to the observed spectra, and a global fitting inversion routine is used to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density. Vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density for the three missions over portions of the globe are presented, with the peak in aerosol volume density occurring from as low as 10 km (polar latitudes) to as high as 20 km (subtropical latitudes). Derived aerosol volume density is as high as 2-3.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-10% in 1992, decreasing to 0.2-0.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-20% in 1994, in agreement with other experiments. Vertical extinction profiles derived from ATMOS are compared with profiles from Improved Stratospheric And Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) and Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) that coincide in space and time and show good general agreement. The uncertainty of the ATMOS vertical profiles is similar to CLAES and consistently smaller than ISAMS at similar altitudes.

  7. Vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei, aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and scattering across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Brock, C. A.; Gordon, T. D.; Lack, D.; Law, D. C.; Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Richardson, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The evolutions of vertical distributions of aerosol chemical, microphysical, hygroscopic, and optical properties present fundamental challenges to the understanding of ground-level air quality and radiative transfer, and few datasets exist to date for evaluation of atmospheric models. Data collected from recent NASA and NOAA field campaigns in the California Central Valley (DISCOVER-AQ), southeast United States (SENEX, SEAC4RS) and Texas (DISCOVER-AQ) allow for a unique opportunity to constrain vertical profiles of climate-relevant aerosol properties. This work presents in-situ aircraft measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and derivations of aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and light scattering. Aerosol hygroscopicity is derived from CCN and aerosol measurements. Inorganic water uptake is calculated from aerosol composition using ISORROPIA, a chemical thermodynamic model, while organic water uptake is calculated from organic hygroscopicity. Aerosol scattering closure is performed between scattering from water uptake calculations and in-situ scattering measurements.

  8. Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Profiles and Optical Properties during INDOEX 1999 Using Micro-Pulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.; Gordon, Howard R.; Johnson, James E.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    lower troposphere) calculates extinction near the surface in agreement with the ship-level measurements only when the MBL aerosols are well mixed with aerosols above. Finally, a review of the MPL extinction profiles showed that the model of aerosol vertical extinction developed during an earlier INDOEX field campaign (at the Maldives) did not correctly describe the true vertical distribution over the greater Indian Ocean region. Using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions, a new model of aerosol vertical extinction was determined for marine atmospheres over the Indian Ocean. A new model of aerosol vertical extinction for polluted marine atmospheres was also developed using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions influenced by continental aerosols.

  9. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  10. Hemispheric aerosol vertical profiles: anthropogenic impacts on optical depth and cloud nuclei.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Antony; Kapustin, Vladimir

    2010-09-17

    Understanding the effect of anthropogenic combustion upon aerosol optical depth (AOD), clouds, and their radiative forcing requires regionally representative aerosol profiles. In this work, we examine more than 1000 vertical profiles from 11 major airborne campaigns in the Pacific hemisphere and confirm that regional enhancements in aerosol light scattering, mass, and number are associated with carbon monoxide from combustion and can exceed values in unperturbed regions by more than one order of magnitude. Related regional increases in a proxy for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and AOD imply that direct and indirect aerosol radiative effects are coupled issues linked globally to aged combustion. These profiles constrain the influence of combustion on regional AOD and CCN suitable for challenging climate model performance and informing satellite retrievals.

  11. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  12. Vertical profiles of aerosol volume from high-spectral-resolution infrared transmission measurements. I. Methodology.

    PubMed

    Eldering, A; Irion, F W; Chang, A Y; Gunson, M R; Mills, F P; Steele, H M

    2001-06-20

    The wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction in the 800-1250-cm(-1) region has been derived from ATMOS (atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy) high-spectral-resolution IR transmission measurements. Using models of aerosol and cloud extinction, we have performed weighted nonlinear least-squares fitting to determine the aerosol-volume columns and vertical profiles of stratospheric sulfate aerosol and cirrus cloud volume. Modeled extinction by use of cold-temperature aerosol optical constants for a 70-80% sulfuric-acid-water solution shows good agreement with the measurements, and the derived aerosol volumes for a 1992 occultation are consistent with data from other experiments after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The retrieved sulfuric acid aerosol-volume profiles are insensitive to the aerosol-size distribution and somewhat sensitive to the set of optical constants used. Data from the nonspherical cirrus extinction model agree well with a 1994 mid-latitude measurement indicating the presence of cirrus clouds at the tropopause.

  13. Development of ATLID-MSI synergy for retrieving the vertical profiles of aerosol components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Nishizawa, T.; Higurashi, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Oikawa, E.

    2014-12-01

    EarthCARE is an earth observation satellite and will be launched in 2016. Using its two sensors, ATLID (High spectral resolution lidar) and MSI (Multi-spectral imager), we are developing the synergy algorithm to retrieve the vertical profiles of extinction coefficients at 355 nm of four aerosol components (Water-soluble, black carbon, dust, and sea-salt particles), and the column mean of mode radii of water-soluble and dust particles. The ATLID data are extinction coefficient, backscatter coefficient, and depolarization ratio for total aerosols at 355 nm. The MSI data are radiances at 670 and 865 nm. The dry volume concentrations of four aerosol components at each altitude and the mode radii of water-soluble and dust particles in the column are simultaneously optimized to ATLID and MSI data by the gauss newton method. After the optimization, the vertical profiles of the extinction coefficient at 355 nm of four aerosol components are obtained. The size distributions of four aerosol components are assumed to be a lognormal distribution. The refractive indices of four aerosol components are given from previously observational studies. The humidity growth is considered for water-soluble and sea-salt particles. The volume concentration and the mode radius of the sea-salt particle are parameterized using the surface wind speed on the ocean. We assumed that the shape of the water-soluble, black carbon, and sea-salt particles are spherical, and the shape of the dust particle is spheroidal. We tested the algorithm using the ATLID and MSI data simulated using clean, dust-transported, and smoke-transported aerosols. The extinction coefficients of each component at 355 nm are retrieved well. The mode radius of water-soluble and dust particles were somehow overestimated.

  14. How well can we Measure the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (MOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to-date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(sub ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well proven and new aerosol instrumentation, devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from 6 different instuments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, ground-based Raman lidar and 2 ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in-situ measured sigma(sub ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002 - 0.004 K/m equivalent to 12-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(sub ep)(lambda) are higher. An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system looking at the collective results from 6 field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(sub ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(sub ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(sub ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated with measuring the tropospheric vertical profile of the ambient aerosol extinction with current state of-the art instrumentation is 15-20% at visible wavelengths and potentially larger in

  15. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    The ACTRIS-2 project, funded by Horizon 2020, addresses the scope of integrating state-of-the-art European ground-based stations for long term observations of aerosols, clouds and short lived gases, capitalizing on the work of FP7-ACTRIS. It aims at achieving the construction of a user-oriented RI, unique in the EU-RI landscape for providing 4-D integrated high-quality data from near-surface to high altitude (vertical profiles and total-column) which are relevant to climate and air-quality research. ACTRIS-2 develops and implements, in a large network of stations in Europe and beyond, observational protocols that permit the harmonization of collected data and their dissemination. ACTRIS secures provision and dissemination of a unique set of data and data-products that would not otherwise be available with the same level of quality and standardization. This results from a 10-year plus effort in constructing a research infrastructure capable of responding to community needs and requirements, and has been engaged since the start of the FP5 EU commission program. ACTRIS ensures compliance with reporting requirements (timing, format, traceability) defined by the major global observing networks. EARLINET (European Aerosol research Lidar NETwork), the aerosol vertical profiling component of ACTRIS, is providing since May 2000 vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter over Europe. A new structure of the EARLINET database has been designed in a more user oriented approach reporting new data products which are more effective for specific uses of different communities. In particular, a new era is starting with the Copernicus program during which the aerosol vertical profiling capability will be fundamental for assimilation and validation purposes. The new data products have been designed thanks to a strong link with EARLINET data users, first of all modeling and satellite communities, established since the beginning of EARLINET and re-enforced within ACTRIS2

  16. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measurements and the results of the first step. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of the size distribution, refractive index (real and imaginary parts), extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor. Sensitivity tests were conducted by applying the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the simulated sky radiometer and lidar data for vertical profiles of three different aerosols, continental average, transported dust, and pollution aerosols. The vertical profiles of the size distribution, extinction coefficient, and asymmetry factor were well estimated in all cases. The vertical profiles of the refractive index and single-scattering albedo of transported dust, but not those of transported pollution aerosol, were well estimated. To demonstrate the performance and validity of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, we applied the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the actual measurements at Tsukuba, Japan. The detailed vertical structures of the aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate of transported dust and smoke were investigated. Examination of the relationship between the solar heating rate and the aerosol optical properties showed that the vertical profile of the asymmetry factor played an important role in creating vertical variation in the solar heating rate. We then compared the columnar optical properties retrieved with the SKYLIDAR algorithm to those produced with the more established scheme SKYRAD.PACK, and the surface solar irradiance calculated from the SKYLIDAR

  17. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Gysel, Martin; Rubach, Florian; Mentel, Thomas F.; Goger, Brigitta; Poulain, Laurent; Schlag, Patrick; Miettinen, Pasi; Pajunoja, Aki; Virtanen, Annele; Klein Baltink, Henk; Bas Henzing, J. S.; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Weingartner, Ernest; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol particles hygroscopic properties, their mixing state as well as chemical composition were measured above northern Italy and the Netherlands. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; for chemical composition) and a white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS; for hygroscopic growth) were deployed on a Zeppelin NT airship within the PEGASOS project. This allowed one to investigate the development of the different layers within the planetary boundary layer (PBL), providing a unique in situ data set for airborne aerosol particles properties in the first kilometre of the atmosphere. Profiles measured during the morning hours on 20 June 2012 in the Po Valley, Italy, showed an increased nitrate fraction at ˜ 100 m above ground level (a.g.l.) coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth compared to ˜ 700 m a. g. l. This result was derived from both measurements of the aerosol composition and direct measurements of the hygroscopicity, yielding hygroscopicity parameters (κ) of 0.34 ± 0.12 and 0.19 ± 0.07 for 500 nm particles, at ˜ 100 and ˜ 700 m a. g. l., respectively. The difference is attributed to the structure of the PBL at this time of day which featured several independent sub-layers with different types of aerosols. Later in the day the vertical structures disappeared due to the mixing of the layers and similar aerosol particle properties were found at all probed altitudes (mean κ ≈ 0.18 ± 0.07). The aerosol properties observed at the lowest flight level (100 m a. g. l.) were consistent with parallel measurements at a ground site, both in the morning and afternoon. Overall, the aerosol particles were found to be externally mixed, with a prevailing hygroscopic fraction. The flights near Cabauw in the Netherlands in the fully mixed PBL did not feature altitude-dependent characteristics. Particles were also externally mixed and had an even larger hygroscopic fraction compared to the results in Italy. The mean κ from

  18. Variability in Vertical Profiles of Water Vapor Associated with African Aerosol over the Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Zhang, C.; Prospero, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    We used four years (2003-2006) of MODIS aerosol optical depth and concurrent AIRS profiled water vapor to explore how the vertical distribution of water vapor may systematically change with outbreaks of African aerosol over the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The first step was to look for a relationship in the Barbados region using in-situ Barbados dust record and the profiled relative humidity from meteorological soundings. We extended the study to the synoptic scale in the West Indies using the MODIS and AIRS products. In the tropical Atlantic, preliminary results indicate that water vapor at 850-1000 hPa is significantly less in July on dusty days than clean days over the northeastern tropical Atlantic [5-25N, 30-20W] where African dust is predominant. In contrast, over the southeastern tropical Atlantic [15S-0, 5W-10E], where African biomass burning smoke prevails, water vapor at 600-1000 hPa is significantly higher in August on smoky days than clean days. Additionally, in January when African mixed aerosol (dust and smoke) is anomalously high over the equatorial eastern tropical Atlantic [5S-5N, 15W-5E], less water vapor is observed at two levels: 925-1000 hPa and 500-600 hPa. It is hypothesized that these results are associated with the non-hygroscopic nature of African dust, the hygroscopic properties of African smoke, and their transport pathways over the tropical Atlantic. These results are useful in the design and diagnostics of model simulations of climate effects of aerosols such as aerosol related precipitation change.

  19. A sensitivity study on the retrieval of aerosol vertical profiles using the oxygen A-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosimo, S. F.; Natraj, V.; Sander, S. P.; Stutz, J.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric absorption in the O2 A-band (12 950-13 200 cm-1) offers a unique opportunity to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from space-borne measurements due to the large dynamic range of optical thickness in that spectral region. Absorptions in strong O2 lines are saturated; therefore, any radiance measured in these lines originates from scattering in the upper part of the atmosphere. Outside of O2 lines, or in weak lines, the atmospheric column absorption is small, and light penetrates to lower atmospheric layers, allowing for the quantification of aerosols and other scatterers near the surface. While the principle of aerosol profile retrieval using O2 A-band absorption from space is well known, a thorough quantification of the information content, i.e., the amount of vertical profile information that can be obtained, and the dependence of the information content on the spectral resolution of the measurements, has not been thoroughly conducted. Here, we use the linearized vector radiative transfer model VLIDORT to perform spectrally resolved simulations of atmospheric radiation in the O2 A-band in the presence of aerosol for four different generic scenarios: Urban, Highly polluted, Elevated layer, and Marine-Arctic. The high-resolution radiances emerging from the top of the atmosphere are degraded to different spectral resolutions, simulating spectrometers with different resolving powers. We use optimal estimation theory to quantify the information content in the aerosol profile retrieval with respect to different aerosol parameters and instrument spectral resolutions. The simulations show that better spectral resolution generally leads to an increase in the total amount of information that can be retrieved, with the number of degrees of freedom (DoF) varying between 0.34-2.11 at low resolution (5 cm-1) to 3.43-5.92 at high resolution (0.05 cm-1) for the four different cases. A particularly strong improvement was found in the retrieval of tropospheric

  20. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration. PMID:26421659

  1. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration.

  2. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Particle Sizes using MGS/TES and MRO/MCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Smith, M. D.; Benson, J. L.; McConnochie, T. H.; Pankine, A.

    2012-12-01

    Vertical variations in aerosol particle sizes often have a dramatic impact on the state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. Recent analyses of data from the Spectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM), the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) instruments offer some long overdue progress in constraining this aspect of aerosols. However, significantly more work remains to be done along these lines in order to better constrain and inform modern dynamical simulations of the Martian atmosphere. Thus, the primary goal of our work is to perform retrievals of particle size as a function of altitude for both dust and water ice aerosols. The choice of the TES and MCS dataset, with pole-to-pole coverage over a period of nearly eight martian years, provides the crucial systematic temporal and spatial sampling. Our presentation will include: 1) A summary of our limb radiative transfer algorithms and retrieval schemes; 2) The initial results of the application of our particle size retrieval scheme to the 2001 TES and 2007 MCS observations of those planet encircling dust events; 3) Near-term plans for for additional retrievals (aphelion cloud season, lower optical depth locations and seasons, etc.); 4) Location of the archive to be used for the distribution of the derived profiles and associated retrieval metadata.

  3. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  4. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Gysel, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Goger, B.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Miettinen, P.; Pajunoja, A.; Virtanen, A.; Bialek, J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne measurements of the aerosol hygroscopic and optical properties as well as chemical composition were performed in the Netherlands and northern Italy on board of a Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012. The vertical changes in aerosol properties during the development of the mixing layer were studied. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 95% relative humidity were determined using the white-light humidified optical particles spectrometer (WHOPS) for dry diameters of 300 and 500 nm particles. These measurements were supplemented by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and an aethalometer providing information on the aerosol chemical composition. Several vertical profiles between 100 and 700 m a.g. were flown just after sunrise close to the San Pietro Capofiume ground station in the Po Valley, Italy. During the early morning hours the lowest layer (newly developing mixing layer) contained a high nitrate fraction (20%) which was coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth. In the layer above (residual layer) small nitrate fractions of ~ 2% were measured as well as low GFs. After full mixing of the layers, typically around noon and with increased temperature, the nitrate fraction decreased to 2% at all altitudes and led to similar hygroscopicity values as found in the residual layer. These distinct vertical and temporal changes underline the importance of airborne campaigns to study aerosol properties during the development of the mixed layer. The aerosol was externally mixed with 22 and 67% of the 500 nm particles in the range GF < 1.1 and GF > 1.5, respectively. Contributors to the non-hygroscopic mode in the observed size range are most likely mineral dust and biological material. Mean hygroscopicity parameters (κ) were 0.34, 0.19 and 0.18 for particles in the newly forming mixing layer, residual layer and fully mixed layer, respectively. These results agree well with those from chemical analysis which found values of κ = 0.27, 0.21 and 0

  5. A sensitivity study on the retrieval of aerosol vertical profiles using the oxygen A-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele Colosimo, Santo; Natraj, Vijay; Sander, Stanley P.; Stutz, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric absorption in the O2 A-band (12 950-13 200 cm-1) offers a unique opportunity to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from space-borne measurements due to the large dynamic range of optical thickness in that spectral region. Absorptions in strong O2 lines are saturated; therefore, any radiance measured in these lines originates from scattering in the upper part of the atmosphere. Outside of O2 lines, or in weak lines, the atmospheric column absorption is small, and light penetrates to lower atmospheric layers, allowing for the quantification of aerosols and other scatterers near the surface.

    While the principle of aerosol profile retrieval using O2 A-band absorption from space is well-known, a thorough quantification of the information content, i.e., the amount of vertical profile information that can be obtained, and the dependence of the information content on the spectral resolution of the measurements, has not been thoroughly conducted. Here, we use the linearized vector radiative transfer model VLIDORT to perform spectrally resolved simulations of atmospheric radiation in the O2 A-band for four different aerosol extinction profile scenarios: urban (urban-rural areas), highly polluted (megacity areas with large aerosol extinction), elevated layer (identifying elevated plumes, for example for biomass burning) and low extinction (representative of small aerosol extinction, such as vegetated, marine and arctic areas). The high-resolution radiances emerging from the top of the atmosphere measurements are degraded to different spectral resolutions, simulating spectrometers with different resolving powers. We use optimal estimation theory to quantify the information content in the aerosol profile retrieval with respect to different aerosol parameters and instrument spectral resolutions. The simulations show that better spectral resolution generally leads to an increase in the total amount of information that can be retrieved, with the number of

  6. Influence of the vertical absorption profile of mixed Asian dust plumes on aerosol direct radiative forcing over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Lee, Kwonho; Kim, Kwanchul; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Dong Ho

    2016-08-01

    We estimate the aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) and heating rate profiles of mixed East Asian dust plumes in the solar wavelength region ranging from 0.25 to 4.0 μm using the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients and single-scattering albedos (SSA) were derived from measurements with a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system. The data are used as input parameters for our radiative transfer calculations. We considered four cases of radiative forcing in SBDART: 1. dust, 2. pollution, 3. mixed dust plume and the use of vertical profiles of SSA, and 4. mixed dust plumes and the use of column-averaged values of SSA. In our sensitivity study we examined the influence of SSA and aerosol layer height on our results. The ADRF at the surface and in the atmosphere shows a small dependence on the specific shape of the aerosol extinction vertical profile and its light-absorption property for all four cases. In contrast, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the ADRF is largely affected by the vertical distribution of the aerosols extinction. This effect increases if the light-absorption capacity (decrease of SSA) of the aerosols increases. We find different radiative effects in situations in which two layers of aerosols had different light-absorption properties. The largest difference was observed at the TOA for an absorbing aerosol layer at high altitude in which we considered in one case the vertical profile of SSA and in another case the column-averaged SSA only. The ADRF at the TOA increases when the light-absorbing aerosol layer is located above 3 km altitude. The differences between height-resolved SSA, which can be obtained from lidar data, and total layer-mean SSA indicates that the use of a layer-mean SSA can be rather misleading as it can induce a large error in the calculation of the ADRF at the TOA, which in turn may cause errors in the vertical profiles of heating rates.

  7. The potential of LIRIC to validate the vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration estimated by an air quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Filoglou, Maria; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyros; Melas, Dimitris; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Balis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by a retrieval algorithm that uses combined sunphotometer and LIDAR data (LIRIC) were used in order to validate the mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. LIDAR and CIMEL measurements of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki were used for this validation.The aerosol mass concentration profiles of the fine and coarse mode derived by CAMx were compared with the respective profiles derived by the retrieval algorithm. For the coarse mode particles, forecasts of the Saharan dust transportation model BSC-DREAM8bV2 were also taken into account. Each of the retrieval algorithm's profiles were matched to the models' profile with the best agreement within a time window of four hours before and after the central measurement. OPAC, a software than can provide optical properties of aerosol mixtures, was also employed in order to calculate the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values for 355nm and 532nm for each of the model's profiles aiming in a comparison with the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values derived by the retrieval algorithm for each measurement. The comparisons between the fine mode aerosol concentration profiles resulted in a good agreement between CAMx and the retrieval algorithm, with the vertical mean bias error never exceeding 7 μgr/m3. Concerning the aerosol coarse mode concentration profiles both CAMx and BSC-DREAM8bV2 values are severely underestimated, although, in cases of Saharan dust transportation events there is an agreement between the profiles of BSC-DREAM8bV2 model and the retrieval algorithm.

  8. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  9. Vertical profiles of aerosol and black carbon in the Arctic: a seasonal phenomenology along 2 years (2011-2012) of field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Luca; Cappelletti, David; Busetto, Maurizio; Mazzola, Mauro; Lupi, Angelo; Lanconelli, Christian; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Caiazzo, Laura; Giardi, Fabio; Moroni, Beatrice; Crocchianti, Stefano; Fierz, Martin; Močnik, Griša; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Perrone, Maria G.; Maturilli, Marion; Vitale, Vito; Udisti, Roberto; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a systematic study of vertical profiles of aerosol number size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations conducted in the Arctic, over Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard). The campaign lasted 2 years (2011-2012) and resulted in 200 vertical profiles measured by means of a tethered balloon (up to 1200 m a.g.l.) during the spring and summer seasons. In addition, chemical analysis of filter samples, aerosol size distribution and a full set of meteorological parameters were determined at ground. The collected experimental data allowed a classification of the vertical profiles into different typologies, which allowed us to describe the seasonal phenomenology of vertical aerosol properties in the Arctic. During spring, four main types of profiles were found and their behavior was related to the main aerosol and atmospheric dynamics occurring at the measuring site. Background conditions generated homogenous profiles. Transport events caused an increase of aerosol concentration with altitude. High Arctic haze pollution trapped below thermal inversions promoted a decrease of aerosol concentration with altitude. Finally, ground-based plumes of locally formed secondary aerosol determined profiles with decreasing aerosol concentration located at different altitude as a function of size. During the summer season, the impact from shipping caused aerosol and BC pollution plumes to be constrained close to the ground, indicating that increasing shipping emissions in the Arctic could bring anthropogenic aerosol and BC in the Arctic summer, affecting the climate.

  10. Vertical Profiles of Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Condensation Nuclei, Optical Aerosol, Aerosol Optical Properties, and Aerosol Volatility Measured from Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, T.; Snider, J. R.; Vali, G.

    1998-01-01

    Under the support of this grant a balloon-borne gondola containing a variety of aerosol instruments was developed and flown from Laramie, Wyoming, (41 deg N, 105 deg W) and from Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S, 170 deg E). The gondola includes instruments to measure the concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), optically detectable aerosol (OA.) (r greater than or equal to 0.15 - 2.0 microns), and optical scattering properties using a nephelometer (lambda = 530 microns). All instruments sampled from a common inlet which was heated to 40 C on ascent and to 160 C on descent. Flights with the CN counter, OA counter, and nephelometer began in July 1994. The CCN counter was added in November 1994, and the engineering problems were solved by June 1995. Since then the flights have included all four instruments, and were completed in January 1998. Altogether there were 20 flights from Laramie, approximately 5 per year, and 2 from Lauder. Of these there were one or more engineering problems on 6 of the flights from Laramie, hence the data are somewhat limited on those 6 flights, while a complete data set was obtained from the other 14 flights. Good CCN data are available from 12 of the Laramie flights. The two flights from Lauder in January 1998 were successful for all measurements. The results from these flights, and the development of the balloon-bome CCN counter have formed the basis for five conference presentations. The heated and unheated CN and OA measurements have been used to estimate the mass fraction of the aerosol volatile, while comparisons of the nephelometer measurements were used to estimate the light scattering, associated with the volatile aerosol. These estimates were calculated for 0.5 km averages of the ascent and descent data between 2.5 km and the tropopause, near 11.5 km.

  11. How Well Do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction Compare?

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, Richard; Flynn, Connor M.; Elleman, Robert; Covert, David; Strawa, A.; Welton, E J.; Turner, David D.; Jonsson, Haf; Redemann, Jens; Eilers, J.; Ricci, K.; Hallar, A. G.; Clayton, M. B.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Barnard, James C.

    2006-02-01

    The recent U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Observation Period (AIOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to-date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well proven and new aerosol instrumentation, devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from 6 different instruments: airborne Sun photometer, airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, ground-based Raman lidar and two ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in situ measurements to be biased low (2 - 4 Mm 1 equivalent to 12-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared) when compared to airborne sunphotometer extinction. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar ?ep(?) are biased high. Bias differences are 0.004 Km-1 (13%) and 0.007 Km-1 (24%) for the two elastic back-scatter lidars (MPLARM and MPLNET, ? = 523 nm) and 0.029 Km-1 (54%) for the Raman lidar (? = 355 nm). An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system. Looking at the collective results from six field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of extinction tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne sunphotometer extinction. On the other hand, extinction derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. We conclude that the error associated with measuring the tropospheric vertical profile of the ambient aerosol extinction with current state-of-the art instrumentation is 15-20% at visible wavelengths

  12. How Well do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction Compare?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.; Eilers, J.; Ricci, K.; Hallar, A. G.; Clayton, M.; Michalsky, J.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Barnard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (AIOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well-characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well-proven and new aerosol instrumentation devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from six different instruments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, groundbased Raman lidar, and two ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in situ measured sigma(ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002-0.004 Km!1 equivalent to 13-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(ep)(lambda) are higher: Bias differences are 0.004 Km(-1) (13%) and 0.007 Km(-1) (24%) for the two elastic backscatter lidars (MPLNET and MPLARM, lambda = 523 nm) and 0.029 Km(-1) (54%) for the Raman lidar (lambda = 355 nm). An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP, and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system. Looking at the collective results from six field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated

  13. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, N.; Filioglou, M.; Poupkou, A.; Liora, N.; Dimopoulos, S.; Melas, D.; Chaikovsky, A.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC), that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E) from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  14. Vertical profiling of marine aerosol, dust and their mixtures utilizing the synergy of sunphotometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Lopatin, Anton; Marinou, Eleni; Engelman, Ronny; Baars, Holger; Wandinger, Ulla; Ansmann, Albert; Solomos, Stavros; Dubovik, Oleg; Schüttemeyer, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    combines ground-based lidar and sunphotometer measurements, developed in the frame of ACTRIS. Our results for cases of marine-only, dust-only and mixtures of marine and dust retrievals provide an evaluation of the algorithm capabilities for marine environments, producing vertical profiles of physical and optical properties of marine and dust particles.

  15. Influence of atmospheric parameters on vertical profiles and horizontal transport of aerosols generated in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Van Eijk, A. M. J.; Piazzola, J.

    2013-10-01

    The vertical and horizontal transport of aerosols generated over the surf zone is discussed. Experimental data were collected during the second campaign of the Surf Zone Aerosol Experiment that took place in Duck NC (USA) in November 2007. The Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method was used to analyze the vertical concentration gradients, and allowed separating the surf aerosols from aerosols advected from elsewhere. The numerical Marine Aerosol Concentration Model (MACMod) supported the analysis by confirming that the concentration gradients are more pronounced under stable conditions and that aerosol plumes are then more confined to the surface. The model also confirmed the experimental observations made during two boat runs along the offshore wind vector that surf-generated aerosols are efficiently advected out to sea over several tens of kilometers.

  16. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  17. Surface observations of aerosols and vertical ozone profiling: Influence from the Indo Gangetic Plain, biomass burning and LRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naja, M. K.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Singh, N.; Phani, D. V.; Dumka, U. C.; Kumar, R.; Ojha, N.; Bhardhwaj, P.; Lal, S.

    2013-12-01

    South Asia is the home to one of the most populated and polluted region (The Indo-Gangetic Plain, IGP) of the world and variety of anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources are exiting in the same region. Despite of the poor understanding of the physical, chemical, and dynamical processes in the lower atmosphere over this region, there are very limited ground based observations in South Asia. In view of this, an observational facility was setup at ARIES, Nainital (29.4N, 79.5E; 1950 m) in the central Himalayas and at two sites in the IGP region for the surface based trace gases and aerosols observations as well as balloon-borne ozone observations. Further, First Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF1), DOE, was setup at ARIES during a GVAX campaign (June 2011-March 2012) and extensive observations of vertical profiling was also carried out using balloons, doppler Lidar, microwave radiometer, wind profiler and ceilometers. Observations of trace gases and aerosols show a clear enhancement during pre-monsoon and a secondary peak during post-monsoon period. The average scattering Angstrom exponent suggests dominance of relatively larger size particles and single scattering albedo indicates more scattering or less absorbing aerosols in this region. Events of the long-range transport are seen, when concentrations of bigger particle are observed to be higher. Apart from LRT, events of downward transport of ozone rich but drier air-masses are also observed. Extensive in-situ observations of ozone, CO, BC, aerosol absorption, scattering and number-concentration, along with back-air trajectories and MODIS fire-counts have been used to demonstrate evidences of the influence of biomass burning over this region. Aerosol organic enrichment and subsequent evolution to predominantly accumulation mode have been observed. This enrichment and its simultaneous size-growth caused it to get brighter during the biomass burning season. A very clear enhancement (20

  18. Results of a comprehensive atmospheric aerosol-radiation experiment in the southwestern United States. I - Size distribution, extinction optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosols suspended in the atmosphere. II - Radiation flux measurements and

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluisi, J. J.; Furukawa, F. M.; Gillette, D. A.; Schuster, B. G.; Charlson, R. J.; Porch, W. M.; Fegley, R. W.; Herman, B. M.; Rabinoff, R. A.; Twitty, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for a field test that was aimed at acquiring a sufficient set of measurements of aerosol properties required as input for radiative-transfer calculations relevant to the earth's radiation balance. These measurements include aerosol extinction and size distributions, vertical profiles of aerosols, and radiation fluxes. Physically consistent, vertically inhomogeneous models of the aerosol characteristics of a turbid atmosphere over a desert and an agricultural region are constructed by using direct and indirect sampling techniques. These results are applied for a theoretical interpretation of airborne radiation-flux measurements. The absorption term of the complex refractive index of aerosols is estimated, a regional variation in the refractive index is noted, and the magnitude of solar-radiation absorption by aerosols and atmospheric molecules is determined.

  19. Impact of black carbon aerosol over Italian basin valleys: high-resolution measurements along vertical profiles, radiative forcing and heating rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, L.; Castelli, M.; Ferrini, B. S.; Moscatelli, M.; Perrone, M. G.; Sangiorgi, G.; D'Angelo, L.; Rovelli, G.; Moroni, B.; Scardazza, F.; Močnik, G.; Bolzacchini, E.; Petitta, M.; Cappelletti, D.

    2014-09-01

    A systematic study of black carbon (BC) vertical profiles measured at high-resolution over three Italian basin valleys (Terni Valley, Po Valley and Passiria Valley) is presented. BC vertical profiles are scarcely available in literature. The campaign lasted 45 days and resulted in 120 measured vertical profiles. Besides the BC mass concentration, measurements along the vertical profiles also included aerosol size distributions in the optical particle counter range, chemical analysis of filter samples and a full set of meteorological parameters. Using the collected experimental data, we performed calculations of aerosol optical properties along the vertical profiles. The results, validated with AERONET data, were used as inputs to a radiative transfer model (libRadtran). The latter allowed an estimation of vertical profiles of the aerosol direct radiative effect, the atmospheric absorption and the heating rate in the lower troposphere. The present measurements revealed some common behaviors over the studied basin valleys. Specifically, at the mixing height, marked concentration drops of both BC (range: from -48.4 ± 5.3 to -69.1 ± 5.5%) and aerosols (range: from -23.9 ± 4.3 to -46.5 ± 7.3%) were found. The measured percentage decrease of BC was higher than that of aerosols: therefore, the BC aerosol fraction decreased upwards. Correspondingly, both the absorption and scattering coefficients decreased strongly across the mixing layer (range: from -47.6 ± 2.5 to -71.3 ± 3.0% and from -23.5 ± 0.8 to -61.2 ± 3.1%, respectively) resulting in a single-scattering albedo increase along height (range: from +4.9 ± 2.2 to +7.4 ± 1.0%). This behavior influenced the vertical distribution of the aerosol direct radiative effect and of the heating rate. In this respect, the highest atmospheric absorption of radiation was predicted below the mixing height (~ 2-3 times larger than above it) resulting in a heating rate characterized by a vertical negative gradient (range

  20. Influence of aerosol vertical distribution on radiative budget and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Michou, Martine; Saint-Martin, David; Watson, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols interact with shortwave and longwave radiation with ensuing consequences on radiative budget and climate. Aerosols are represented in climate models either using an interactive aerosol scheme including prognostic aerosol variables, or using climatologies, such as monthly aerosol optical depth (AOD) fields. In the first case, aerosol vertical distribution can vary rapidly, at a daily or even hourly scale, following the aerosol evolution calculated by the interactive scheme. On the contrary, in the second case, a fixed aerosol vertical distribution is generally imposed by climatological profiles. The objective of this work is to study the impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol radiative forcing, with ensuing effects on climate. Simulations have thus been carried out using CNRM-CM, which is a global climate model including an interactive aerosol scheme representing the five main aerosol species (desert dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black carbon and organic matter). Several multi-annual simulations covering the past recent years are compared, including either the prognostic aerosol variables, or monthly AOD fields with different aerosol vertical distributions. In the second case, AOD fields directly come from the first simulation, so that all simulations have the same integrated aerosol loads. The results show that modifying the aerosol vertical distribution has a significant impact on radiative budget, with consequences on global climate. These differences, highlighting the importance of aerosol vertical distribution in climate models, probably come from the modification of atmospheric circulation induced by changes in the heights of the different aerosols. Besides, nonlinear effects in the superposition of aerosol and clouds reinforce the impact of aerosol vertical distribution, since aerosol radiative forcing depends highly upon the presence of clouds, and upon the relative vertical position of aerosols and clouds.

  1. Dependence of the drizzle growth process on the cloud top height and its relevance to the aerosol vertical profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, K.; Suzuki, K.

    2013-12-01

    Transitional processes among cloud droplets, drizzle and raindrops are still uncertain and more efforts are required for the better understanding. In this situation, difference in the drizzle growth process was examined according to the cloud top height using the CloudSat and MODIS synergetic datasets. From the CloudSat products such as 2B-GEOPROF, 2B-TAU, ECMWF-AUX, only one-layered water clouds whose top temperatures were warmer than 273K were extracted over China (a circular area having a diameter of 1800km of the center at 35°N and 120°E) and over ocean (a circular area having a diameter of 1500km of the center at 35°N and 150°E). Then a threshold of 3km of the cloud top height was adopted to divide the extracted clouds into upper and lower cases. First, the probability distribution functions (PDF) of the cloud droplet number density (Nc) and the effective particle radius (Re) were calculated for these four cases (land/ocean/upper/lower). Nc was obtained assuming the adiabatic liquid water content from MODIS-derived cloud optical depth and Re. Oceanic clouds had fewer Nc than land clouds, and almost the same for upper and lower cases. Land clouds had more Nc for the lower case than for the higher case. On the other hand, oceanic clouds had larger Re than land clouds, and almost the same for upper and lower cases. Land clouds had smaller Re for the lower case than for the higher case. These results quite agreed with our existing knowledge on the vertical profile of the aerosol number concentration over ocean (pristine) and land (polluted). Although the number of aerosol particles is fewer and almost the same regardless of the height over the ocean, it is more near the surface and it rapidly decreases according to the height over the land. Next, examining PDF of the radar reflectivity (Ze), we found that although PDFs of Ze were almost the same for oceanic clouds regardless of the cloud top height, PDF of land lower clouds were less frequent at around from

  2. Vertical aerosol structure of Neptune - Constraints from center-to-limb profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, H. B.; Baines, K. H.; Bergstralh, J. T.

    1989-08-01

    New center-to-limb (CTL) equatorial region profiles of Neptune have been extracted from spatially well-resolved images. The 8900-A CTL profile entails the presence of material above the 5-mbar level whose optical depth is less than 0.5. CH4-band data admit of thin scattering hazes in the 0.4-1.5 bar pressure level, although optical depths must be lower than 0.05; so thin a haze falls short of the reflected flux at 6340 A, thereby implying the presence of another scattering layer deeper than 1.5 bars. A good fit to the observed reflectivity is obtained by a bright cloud layer with an optical depth of 3.0.

  3. Vertical Profiles of Light-Absorbing Aerosol: A Combination of In-situ and AERONET Observations during NASA DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Corr, C.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Hudgins, C.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols plays a vital role in utilizing spaceborne, column-integrated satellite observations. The properties and distribution of light-absorbing aerosol are particularly uncertain despite significant air quality and climate ramifications. Advanced retrieval algorithms are able to derive complex aerosol properties (e.g., wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo) from remote-sensing measurements, but quantitative relationships to surface conditions remain a challenge. Highly systematic atmospheric profiling during four unique deployments for the NASA DISCOVER-AQ project (Baltimore, MD, 2011; San Joaquin Valley, CA, 2013; Houston, TX, 2013; Denver, CO, 2014) allow statistical assessment of spatial, temporal, and source-related variability for light-absorbing aerosol properties in these distinct regions. In-situ sampling in conjunction with a dense network of AERONET sensors also allows evaluation of the sensitivity, limitations, and advantages of remote-sensing data products over a wide range of conditions. In-situ aerosol and gas-phase observations were made during DISCOVER-AQ aboard the NASA P-3B aircraft. Aerosol absorption coefficients were measured by a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). Approximately 200 profiles for each of the four deployments were obtained, from the surface (25-300m altitude) to 5 km, and are used to calculate absorption aerosol optical depths (AAODs). These are quantitatively compared to AAOD derived from AERONET Level 1.5 retrievals to 1) explore discrepancies between measurements, 2) quantify the fraction of AAOD that exists directly at the surface and is often missed by airborne sampling, and 3) evaluate the potential for deriving ground-level black carbon (BC) concentrations for air quality prediction. Aerosol size distributions are used to assess absorption contributions from mineral dust, both at the surface and aloft. SP2 (Single Particle Soot

  4. Measurements of Vertical Profiles of Turbulence, Temperature, Ozone, Aerosols, and BrO over Sea Ice and Tundra Snowpack during BROMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepson, P.; Caulton, D.; Cambaliza, M. L.; Dhaniyala, S.; Fuentes, J. D.; General, S.; Halfacre, J. W.; Nghiem, S. V.; Perez Perez, L.; Peterson, P. K.; Platt, U.; Pohler, D.; Pratt, K. A.; Simpson, W. R.; Stirm, B.; Walsh, S. J.; Zielcke, J.

    2012-12-01

    During the BROMEX field campaign of March 2012, we conducted measurements of boundary layer structure, ozone, BrO and aerosol, from a light, twin-engine aircraft during eleven flights originating from Barrow, AK. Flights were conducted over the sea ice in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, and over the tundra from Barrow to the Brooks Range, with vertical profiles covering altitudes from the surface to 3.5km in the free troposphere. Flights over the course of one month allowed a variety of sea ice conditions, including open water, nilas, first year sea ice, and frost flowers, to be examined over the Chukchi Sea. Atmospheric turbulence was measured using a calibrated turbulence probe, which will enable characterization of both the structure and turbulence of the Arctic boundary layer. Ozone was measured using a 2B UV absorption instrument. A GRIMM optical particle counter was used to measure 0.25-4 μm sized aerosol particles. The MAX-DOAS instrument enabled measurements of BrO vertical profiles. The aircraft measurements can be used to connect the surface measurements of ozone and BrO from the "Icelander" buoys, and the surface sites at Barrow, with those measured on the aircraft. Here we will discuss the spatial variability/coherence in these data. A major question that will be addressed using these data is the extent to which bromine is activated through reactions at the snowpack/ice surface versus the surface of aerosols. Here we will present a preliminary analysis of the relationships between snow/ice surface types, aerosol size-resolved number concentrations, and the vertical profiles of ozone and BrO.

  5. Quantifying Wintertime Aerosol Nitrate Formation Pathways and Their Vertical Profiles in the Great Lakes Region of North America by CMAQ Process Analysis and Hourly Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Spak, S.; Carmichael, G. R.; Riemer, N. S.; Baek, J.; Fontaine, A.; Janssen, M.; Kenski, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    In order to better understand wintertime episodes of elevated fine particle (PM2.5) in the Great Lakes region, a modeling analysis using the CMAQ air quality model was conducted for January-March 2009, a period where special surface based observations were conducted at a pair of urban and rural sites in Wisconsin. The episodes are found to be regional and are characterized by low wind speeds, near-freezing temperatures, and elevated levels of ammonium nitrate. Integrated process rate (IPR) analysis and integrated reaction rate analysis (IRR) in 12 km regional simulations with the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) are employed to quantify contributions to nitrate formation from all simulated processes, most importantly local chemical production and transport. Substantial vertical profiles are found for nitric acid, nitrate, and N2O5. The maximum concentrations of aerosol nitrate occur at the surface and decrease with altitude. Nitric acid is produced most efficiently 50-200m above the surface at night. Surface concentrations of aerosol nitrate are maintained by downward transport via vertical diffusion. Aerosol nitrate is predominantly removed by dry deposition. The aerosol production rate is significantly higher during episodes, and both daytime and nighttime (N2O5) chemical pathways are important contributors to elevated concentrations. Near the surface at Milwaukee, the daytime formation pathway for nitric acid is larger than the nighttime pathways, while in rural areas, the relative magnitudes are reversed. Across the region, the importance of the nighttime pathway increases with altitude. A spatial analysis highlights regional variability at the surface layer and ~90m above surface for the period February 4 thru February 10, which includes two PM2.5 episodes. The net aerosol chemistry process rates and concentrations show the evolution of regional PM build-up of aerosol nitrate and nitric acid.

  6. Characterizing the vertical profile of aerosol particle extinction and linear depolarization over Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent: The 2007-2009 view from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Jianglong; Tackett, Jason L.; Chew, Boon Ning; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Aoki, Kazuma; Winker, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Vertical profiles of 0.532 μm aerosol particle extinction coefficient and linear volume depolarization ratio are described for Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent. Quality-screened and cloud-cleared Version 3.01 Level 2 NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 5-km Aerosol Profile datasets are analyzed from 2007 to 2009. Numerical simulations from the U.S. Naval Aerosol Analysis and Predictive System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer quality-assured datasets, combined with regional ground-based lidar measurements, are considered for assessing CALIOP retrieval performance, identifying bias, and evaluating regional representativeness. CALIOP retrievals of aerosol particle extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are high over land and low over open waters relative to NAAPS (0.412/0.312 over land for all data points inclusive, 0.310/0.235 when the per bin average is used and each is treated as single data points; 0.102/0.151 and 0.086/0.124, respectively, over ocean). Regional means, however, are very similar (0.180/0.193 for all data points and 0.155/0.159 when averaged per normalized bin), as the two factors offset one another. The land/ocean offset is investigated, and discrepancies attributed to interpretation of particle composition and a-priori assignment of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (“lidar ratio”) necessary for retrieving the extinction coefficient from CALIOP signals. Over land, NAAPS indicates more dust present than CALIOP algorithms are identifying, indicating a likely assignment of a higher lidar ratio representative of more absorptive particles. NAAPS resolves more smoke over water than identified with CALIOP, indicating likely usage of a lidar ratio characteristic of less absorptive particles to be applied that biases low AOD there. Over open waters except within the Bay of

  7. Characterizing the Vertical Profile of Aerosol Particle Extinction and Linear Depolarization over Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent: The 2007-2009 View from CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Jianglong; Tackett, Jason L.; Chew, Boon Ning; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Aoki, Kazuma; Winker, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Vertical profiles of 0.532 µm aerosol particle extinction coefficient and linear volume depolarization ratio are described for Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent. Quality-screened and cloud-cleared Version 3.01 Level 2 NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 5-km Aerosol Profile datasets are analyzed from 2007 to 2009. Numerical simulations from the U.S. Naval Aerosol Analysis and Predictive System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multi-angle Imaging Spectro- Radiometer quality-assured datasets, combined with regional ground-based lidar measurements, are considered for assessing CALIOP retrieval performance, identifying bias, and evaluating regional representativeness. CALIOP retrievals of aerosol particle extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are high over land and low over open waters relative to NAAPS (0.412/0.312 over land for all data points inclusive, 0.310/0.235 when the per bin average is used and each is treated as single data points; 0.102/0.151 and 0.086/0.124, respectively, over ocean). Regional means, however, are very similar (0.180/0.193 for all data points and 0.155/0.159 when averaged per normalized bin), as the two factors offset one another. The land/ocean offset is investigated, and discrepancies attributed to interpretation of particle composition and a-priori assignment of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio") necessary for retrieving the extinction coefficient from CALIOP signals. Over land, NAAPS indicates more dust present than CALIOP algorithms are identifying, indicating a likely assignment of a higher lidar ratio representative of more absorptive particles. NAAPS resolvesmore smoke overwater than identified with CALIOP, indicating likely usage of a lidar ratio characteristic of less absorptive particles to be applied that biases low AOD there. Over open waters except within the Bay of Bengal

  8. Aircraft vertical profiles of trace gas and aerosol pollution over the mid-Atlantic United States: Statistics and meteorological cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, B. F.; Hains, J. C.; Thompson, A. M.; Marufu, L. T.; Doddridge, B. G.; Stehr, J. W.; Piety, C. A.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2006-05-01

    From 1997 to 2003, airborne measurements of O3, CO, SO2, and aerosol properties were made during summertime air pollution episodes over the mid-Atlantic United States (34.7-44.6°N, 68.4-81.6°W) as part of the Regional Atmospheric Measurement, Modeling, and Prediction Program (RAMMPP). Little diurnal variation was identified in the CO, SO2, and Ångström exponent profiles, although the Ångström exponent profiles decreased with altitude. Boundary layer O3 was greater in the afternoon, while lower free tropospheric O3 was invariant at ˜55 ppbv. The single scattering albedo increased from morning to afternoon (0.93 ± 0.01-0.94 ± 0.01); however, both profiles decreased with altitude. A cluster analysis of back trajectories in conjunction with the vertical profile data was used to identify source regions and characteristic transport patterns during summertime pollution episodes. When the greatest trajectory density lay over the northern Ohio River Valley, the result was large O3 values, large SO2/CO ratios, highly scattering particles, and large aerosol optical depths. Maximum trajectory density over the southern Ohio River Valley resulted in little pollution. The greatest afternoon O3 values occurred during periods of stagnation. North-northwesterly and northerly flow brought the least pollution overall. The contribution of regional transport to afternoon boundary layer O3 was quantified. When the greatest cluster trajectory density lay over the Ohio River Valley (˜59% of the profiles), transport accounted for 69-82% of the afternoon boundary layer O3. Under stagnant conditions (˜27% of the profiles), transport only accounted for 58% of the afternoon boundary layer O3. The results from this study provide a description of regional chemical and transport processes that will be valuable to investigators from the Baltimore, New York, and Pittsburgh EPA Supersites.

  9. Continental pollution in the western Mediterranean basin: vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gases measured over the sea during TRAQA 2012 and SAFMED 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Doppler, L.; Gaimoz, C.; Grand, N.; Ancellet, G.; Raut, J.-C.; Beekmann, M.; Borbon, A.; Sartelet, K.; Attié, J.-L.; Ravetta, F.; Formenti, P.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we present airborne observations of aerosol and trace gases obtained over the sea in the western Mediterranean basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity) and SAFMED (Secondary Aerosol Formation in the MEDiterranean) campaigns in summer 2012 and 2013. A total of 23 vertical profiles were measured up to 5000 m above sea level over an extended area (40-45° N and 2° W-12° E) including the Gulf of Genoa, southern France, the Gulf of Lion, and the Spanish coast. During TRAQA and SAFMED the study area experienced a wide range of meteorological conditions which favoured pollution export from different sources located around the basin. Also, several events of dust outflows were measured during the campaigns. Observations from the present study show that continental pollution largely affects the western Mediterranean both close to coastal regions and in the open sea as far as ~ 250 km from the coastline. The measured aerosol scattering coefficient varies between ~ 20 and 120 Mm-1, while carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) mixing ratios are in the range of 60-165 and 30-85 ppbv, respectively. Pollution reaches 3000-4000 m in altitude and presents a very complex and highly stratified structure characterized by fresh and aged layers both in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere. Within pollution plumes the measured particle concentration in the Aitken (0.004-0.1 μm) and accumulation (0.1-1.0 μm) modes is between ~ 30 and 5000-6000 scm-3 (standard cm-3), which is comparable to the aerosol concentration measured in continental areas under pollution conditions. Additionally, our measurements indicate the presence of highly concentrated Aitken layers (10 000-15 000 scm-3) observed both close to the surface and in the free troposphere, possibly linked to the influence of new particle formation (NPF) episodes over the basin.

  10. Continental pollution in the Western Mediterranean Basin: vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gases measured over the sea during TRAQA 2012 and SAFMED 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Doppler, L.; Gaimoz, C.; Grand, N.; Ancellet, G.; Raut, J.-C.; Beekmann, M.; Borbon, A.; Sartelet, K.; Attié, J.-L.; Ravetta, F.; Formenti, P.

    2015-03-01

    In this study we present airborne observations of aerosol and trace gases obtained over the sea in the Western Mediterranean Basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity) and SAFMED (Secondary Aerosol Formation in the MEDiterranean) campaigns in summers 2012 and 2013. A total of 23 vertical profiles were measured up to 5000 m a.s.l. over an extended area (40-45° N latitude and 2° W-12° E longitude) including the Gulf of Genoa, Southern France, the Gulf of Lion, and the Spanish coast. TRAQA and SAFMED successfully measured a wide range of meteorological conditions which favoured the pollution export from different sources located around the basin. Also, several events of dust outflows were measured during the campaigns. Observations from the present study indicate that continental pollution largely affects the Western Mediterranean both close to coastal regions and in the open sea as far as ~250 km from the coastline. Aerosol layers not specifically linked with Saharan dust outflows are distributed ubiquitously which indicates quite elevated levels of background pollution throughout the Western Basin. The measured aerosol scattering coefficient varies between ~20 and 120 M m-1, while carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) mixing ratios are in the range of 60-170 and 30-85 ppbv, respectively. Pollution reaches 3000-4000 m in altitude and presents a very complex and highly stratified structure characterized by fresh and aged layers both in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere. Within pollution plumes the measured particle concentration in the Aitken (0.004-0.1 μm) and accumulation (0.1-1.0 μm) modes is between ˜ 100 and 5000-6000 s cm-3 (standard cm-3), which is comparable to the aerosol concentration measured in continental urban areas. Additionally, our measurements indicate the presence of highly concentrated Aitken layers (10 000-15 000 s cm-3) observed both close to the surface and in the free troposphere, possibly linked to the influence of new

  11. Retrievals of Extensive and Intensive Aerosol Parameters from Vertical Profiles of Extinction Coefficient Acquired by the MAESTRO Occultation Spectrometer: Case Study of Sarychev Volcano Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, A.; O'Neill, N. T.; McElroy, C. T.; Sioris, C.; Zou, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Canadian MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) instrument aboard the SCISAT-1 Satellite is an aerosol profiling occultation device that is part of the ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) mission. This spectrometer produces spectra of aerosol extinction profiles above the upper troposphere. The extinction coefficient spectra permit the discrimination of sub-micron (fine mode) and super-micron (coarse mode) contributions and, in principle, the retrieval of fine mode effective radius. Retrievals applied to lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosol plumes resulting from the eruption of the Sarychev-peak volcano in June of 2009 are presented. Preliminary results indicate that the fine and coarse mode discrimination and the particle sizing capability are coherent with available information on Sarychev aerosols.

  12. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  13. Inter-comparison of MAX-DOAS Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Extinction, SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands with LIDAR Data and GEM-MACH Air Quality Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zoe; Friess, Udo; Strawbridge, Kevin; Whiteway, James; Aggarwal, Monika; Makar, Paul; Li, Shao-Meng; O'Brien, Jason; Baray, Sabour; Schnitzler, Elijah; Olfert, Jason S.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Understanding industrial emissions of trace gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands is essential to maintaining air quality standards and informing public policy. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of trace gases can improve knowledge of pollutant levels, vertical distribution and chemical transformation. During an intensive air measurement campaign to study emissions, transport, transformation and deposition of oil sands air pollutants from August to September of 2013, a MAX-DOAS instrument was deployed at a site north of Fort McMurray, Alberta to determine the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, NO2 and SO2 through retrieval from the MAX-DOAS spectral measurements using an optimal estimation method. The large complement of data collected from multiple instruments deployed during this field campaign provides a unique opportunity to validate and characterize the performance of the MAX-DOAS vertical profile retrievals. Aerosol extinction profiles determined from two Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instruments, one collocated and the other on a Twin Otter aircraft that flew over the site during the study, will be compared to the MAX-DOAS aerosol extinction profile retrievals. Vertical profiles of NO2 and SO2 retrieved from the MAX-DOAS measurements will be further compared with the composite vertical profiles measured from the flights of a second aircraft, the NRC-Convair 580, over the field site during the same measurement period. Finally, the MAX-DOAS retrieved tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of SO2 and NO2 will be compared to the predicted VCDs from Environment and Climate Change Canada's Global Environmental Multi-scale - Modelling Air quality and Chemistry (GEM-MACH) air quality model over the grid cell containing the field site. Emission estimates of SO2 from the major oil mining facility Syncrude Mildred Lake using the MAX-DOAS VCD results, validated through the detailed characterization above

  14. Effect of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol-radiation interaction: A theoretical prospect.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amit Kumar; Koren, Ilan; Rudich, Yinon

    2015-10-01

    This study presents a theoretical investigation of the effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the aerosol radiative effect (ARE). Four aerosol composition models (dust, polluted dust, pollution and pure scattering aerosols) with varying aerosol vertical profiles are incorporated into a radiative transfer model. The simulations show interesting spectral dependence of the ARE on the aerosol layer height. ARE increases with the aerosol layer height in the ultraviolet (UV: 0.25-0.42 μm) and thermal-infrared (TH-IR: 4.0-20.0 μm) regions, whereas it decreases in the visible-near infrared (VIS-NIR: 0.42-4.0 μm) region. Changes in the ARE with aerosol layer height are associated with different dominant processes for each spectral region. The combination of molecular (Rayleigh) scattering and aerosol absorption is the key process in the UV region, whereas aerosol (Mie) scattering and atmospheric gaseous absorption are key players in the VIS-NIR region. The longwave emission fluxes are controlled by the environmental temperature at the aerosol layer level. ARE shows maximum sensitivity to the aerosol layer height in the TH-IR region, followed by the UV and VIS-NIR regions. These changes are significant even in relatively low aerosol loading cases (aerosol optical depth ∼0.2-0.3). Dust aerosols are the most sensitive to altitude followed by polluted dust and pollution in all three different wavelength regions. Differences in the sensitivity of the aerosol type are explained by the relative strength of their spectral absorption/scattering properties. The role of surface reflectivity on the overall altitude dependency is shown to be important in the VIS-NIR and UV regions, whereas it is insensitive in the TH-IR region. Our results indicate that the vertical distribution of water vapor with respect to the aerosol layer is an important factor in the ARE estimations. Therefore, improved estimations of the water vapor profiles are needed for the further reduction in

  15. Effect of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol-radiation interaction: A theoretical prospect.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amit Kumar; Koren, Ilan; Rudich, Yinon

    2015-10-01

    This study presents a theoretical investigation of the effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the aerosol radiative effect (ARE). Four aerosol composition models (dust, polluted dust, pollution and pure scattering aerosols) with varying aerosol vertical profiles are incorporated into a radiative transfer model. The simulations show interesting spectral dependence of the ARE on the aerosol layer height. ARE increases with the aerosol layer height in the ultraviolet (UV: 0.25-0.42 μm) and thermal-infrared (TH-IR: 4.0-20.0 μm) regions, whereas it decreases in the visible-near infrared (VIS-NIR: 0.42-4.0 μm) region. Changes in the ARE with aerosol layer height are associated with different dominant processes for each spectral region. The combination of molecular (Rayleigh) scattering and aerosol absorption is the key process in the UV region, whereas aerosol (Mie) scattering and atmospheric gaseous absorption are key players in the VIS-NIR region. The longwave emission fluxes are controlled by the environmental temperature at the aerosol layer level. ARE shows maximum sensitivity to the aerosol layer height in the TH-IR region, followed by the UV and VIS-NIR regions. These changes are significant even in relatively low aerosol loading cases (aerosol optical depth ∼0.2-0.3). Dust aerosols are the most sensitive to altitude followed by polluted dust and pollution in all three different wavelength regions. Differences in the sensitivity of the aerosol type are explained by the relative strength of their spectral absorption/scattering properties. The role of surface reflectivity on the overall altitude dependency is shown to be important in the VIS-NIR and UV regions, whereas it is insensitive in the TH-IR region. Our results indicate that the vertical distribution of water vapor with respect to the aerosol layer is an important factor in the ARE estimations. Therefore, improved estimations of the water vapor profiles are needed for the further reduction in

  16. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  17. Vertical profiling of air pollution at RAPCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newchurch, Michael J.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Bowdle, David A.; Johnson, Steven; McNider, Richard T.; Knupp, Kevin; Lapenta, Bill; Gillani, Noor; Biazar, Arastoo; Burris, John

    2004-09-01

    Local and regional pollution interact at the interface between the Planetary Boundary Layer and the Free Troposphere. The vertical distributions of ozone, aerosols, and winds must be measured with high temporal and vertical resolution to characterize this interchange and ultimately to accurately forecast ozone and aerosol pollution. To address this critical issue, the Regional Atmospheric Profiling Center for Discovery (RAPCD) was built and instrumented in the National Space Science and Technology Center on the UAH campus. The UV DIAL ozone lidar, Nd:YAG aerosol lidar, and 2-micron Doppler wind lidar, along with balloon-borne ECC ozonesondes, form the core of the RAPCD instrumentation for studying this problem. Instrumentation in the associated Mobile Integrated Profiling (MIPS) laboratory includes a 915Mhz profiler, sodar, and ceilometer. The collocated Applied Micro-particle Optics and Radiometry (AμOR) laboratory hosts the FTIR, MOUDI, and optical particle counter. Using MODELS-3 analysis by colleagues, and cooperative ventures with the co-located National Weather Service Forecasting Office in Huntsville, AL, we are developing a unique facility for advancing the state-of-the-science in pollution forecasting.

  18. Vertical Profiling of Air Pollution at RAPCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, Michael J.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Bowdle, David A.; Johnson, Steven; Knupp, Kevin; Gillani, Noor; Biazar, Arastoo; Mcnider, Richard T.; Burris, John

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between local and regional pollution levels occurs at the interface of the Planetary Boundary Layer and the Free Troposphere. Measuring the vertical distribution of ozone, aerosols, and winds with high temporal and vertical resolution is essential to diagnose the nature of this interchange and ultimately for accurately forecasting ozone and aerosol pollution levels. The Regional Atmospheric Profiling Center for Discovery, RAPCD, was built and instrumented to address this critical issue. The ozone W DIAL lidar, Nd:YAG aerosol lidar, and 2.1 micron Doppler wind lidar, along with balloon- borne ECC ozonesondes form the core of the W C D instrumentation for addressing this problem. Instrumentation in the associated Mobile Integrated Profiling (MIPS) laboratory includes 91 5Mhz profiler, sodar, and ceilometer. The collocated Applied particle Optics and Radiometry (ApOR) laboratory hosts an FTIR along with MOUDI and optical particle counters. With MODELS-3 analysis by colleagues in the National Space Science and Technology Center on the UAH campus and the co- located National Weather Service Forecasting Office in Huntsville, AL we are developing a unique facility for advancing the state of the science of pollution forecasting.

  19. Longitudinal variability of black carbon vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. P.; Weinzierl, B.; Samset, B. H.; Perring, A. E.; Dollner, M.; Heimerl, K.; Markovic, M. Z.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol contributes substantially to both climate forcing and climate forcing uncertainty. An important source of this uncertainty derives from the difficulty in predicting BC's global abundance and vertical distribution. Here we present a multi-year record of black carbon (BC) vertical concentration profiles from both sides of the Atlantic, obtained from airborne Single Particle Soot Photometers (SP2s) flown on the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon research aircraft from the CONCERT, ACCESS, DC3, SEAC4RS, and SALTRACE campaigns. The measurements constrain the relative rates of BC transport/removal from, and zonal mixing in, the upper troposphere, as well as the range of BC loadings in these regions. They also constrain the time-rates of change of BC loads in altitudes at which it is a highly efficient (although sparse) climate forcer, and a relatively long-lived aerosol tracer. We find that concentration of BC in the upper troposphere can vary by a factor 10. Over the Northern mid-latitudes concentrations are however consistent to a fraction of this range over wide longitudinal ranges, over month-long timescales. The data show that BC becomes zonally mixed here starting at 500 hPa and extending to near the tropopause. These results imply broader value than previously associated with measured vertical profiles in constraining global scale BC loadings aloft.

  20. Tropospheric Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical, Microphysical and Concentration Properties in the Frame of the Hygra-CD Campaign (Athens, Greece 2014): A Case Study of Long-Range Transport of Mixed Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannis, Alexandros; Argyrouli, Athina; Müller, Detlef; Tsaknakis, Georgios; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Kazadzis, Stelios; Solomos, Stavros; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2016-06-01

    Combined multi-wavelength aerosol Raman lidar and sun photometry measurements were performed during the HYGRA-CD campaign over Athens, Greece during May-June 2014. The retrieved aerosol optical properties (3 aerosol backscatter at 355-532-1064 nm and 2 aerosol extinction profiles at 355-532 nm) were used as input to an inversion code to retrieve the aerosol microphysical properties (effective radius reff and number concentration N) using regularization techniques. Additionally, the volume concentration profile was derived for fine particles using the LIRIC code. In this paper we selected a complex case study of long-range transport of mixed aerosols (biomass burning particles mixed with dust) arriving over Athens between 10-12 June 2014 in the 1.5-4 km height. Between 2-3 km height we measured mean lidar ratios (LR) ranging from 45 to 58 sr (at 355 and 532 nm), while the Ångström exponent (AE) aerosol extinction-related values (355nm/532nm) ranged between 0.8-1.3. The retrieved values of reff and N ranged from 0.19±0.07 to 0.22±0.07 μm and 460±230 to 2200±2800 cm-3, respectively. The aerosol linear depolarization ratio (δ) at 532 nm was lower than 5-7% (except for the Saharan dust cases, where δ~10-15%).

  1. Vertical Profiles of Light Scattering, Light Absorption, and Single Scattering Albedo during the Dry, Biomass Burning Season in Southern Africa and Comparisons of In Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, Brian I.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Schmid, Beat; Redermann, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol light scattering, light absorption, and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0)) are presented for a number of locations in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season. Features of the profiles include haze layers, clean air slots, and marked decreases in light scattering in passing from the boundary layer into the free troposphere. Frequency distributions of omega (sub 0) reflect the strong influence of smoke from biomass burning. For example, during a period when heavy smoke was advected into the region from the north, the mean value of omega (sub 0) in the boundary layer was 0.81 +/- 0.02 compared to 0.89 +/- 0.03 prior to this intrusion. Comparisons of layer aerosol optical depths derived from the in situ measurements with those measured by a Sun photometer aboard the aircraft show excellent agreement.

  2. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired large datasets of aerosol extinction (532nm), backscatter (532 and 1064nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064nm) profiles during 349 science flights in 19 field missions across North America since 2006. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio"), aerosol depolarization ratios, and backscatter color ratio measurements from HSRL-1 are scale-invariant parameters that depend on aerosol type but not concentration. These four aerosol intensive parameters are combined to qualitatively classify HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate composition types. The classification methodology uses models formed from "training cases" with known aerosol type. The remaining measurements are then compared with these models using the Mahalanobis distance. Aerosol products from the CALIPSO satellite include aerosol type information as well, which is used as input to the CALIPSO aerosol retrieval. CALIPSO aerosol types are inferred using a mix of aerosol loading-dependent parameters, estimated aerosol depolarization, and location, altitude, and surface type information. The HSRL instrument flies beneath the CALIPSO satellite orbit track, presenting the opportunity for comparisons between the HSRL aerosol typing and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask Aerosol Subtype product, giving insight into the performance of the CALIPSO aerosol type algorithm. We find that the aerosol classification from the two instruments frequently agree for marine aerosols and pure dust, and somewhat less frequently for pollution and smoke. In addition, the comparison suggests that the CALIPSO polluted dust type is overly inclusive, encompassing cases of dust combined with marine aerosol as well as cases without much evidence of dust. Qualitative classification of aerosol type combined with quantitative profile measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction has many useful

  3. Profiling Transboundary Aerosols over Taiwan and Assessing Their Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chou, Ming-Dah; Tsay, Si-Chee; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Hsu, N. Christina; Giles, David M.; Liu, Gin-Rong; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A synergistic process was developed to study the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties and their effects on solar heating using data retrieved from ground-based radiation measurements and radiative transfer simulations. Continuous MPLNET and AERONET observations were made at a rural site in northern Taiwan from 2005 to 2007. The aerosol vertical extinction profiles retrieved from ground-based lidar measurements were categorized into near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, representing 76% of all cases. Fine-mode (Angstrom exponent, alpha, approx.1.4) and moderate-absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo approx.0.93, asymmetry factor approx.0.73 at 440 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. The column-integrated aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (tau(sub 500nm)) ranges from 0.1 to 0.6 for the near-surface transport type, but can be doubled in the presence of upper-layer aerosol transport. We utilize aerosol radiative efficiency (ARE; the impact on solar radiation per unit change of tau(sub 500nm)) to quantify the radiative effects due to different vertical distributions of aerosols. Our results show that the ARE at the top-of-atmosphere (-23 W/ sq m) is weakly sensitive to aerosol vertical distributions confined in the lower troposphere. On the other hand, values of the ARE at the surface are -44.3, -40.6 and -39.7 W/sq m 38 for near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, respectively. Further analyses show that the impact of aerosols on the vertical profile of solar heating is larger for the near-surface transport type than that of two-layer transport type. The impacts of aerosol on the surface radiation and the solar heating profiles have implications for the stability and convection in the lower troposphere.

  4. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical and Microphysical Properties During a Rare Case of Long-range Transport of Mixed Biomass Burning-polluted Dust Aerosols from the Russian Federation-kazakhstan to Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannis, Alexandros; Argyrouli, Athina; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Tsaknakis, Georgios; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Solomos, Stavros; Kazadzis, Stylianos; Samaras, Stefanos; Böckmann, Christine; Raptis, Panagiotis; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2016-06-01

    Multi-wavelength aerosol Raman lidar measurements with elastic depolarization at 532 nm were combined with sun photometry during the HYGRA-CD campaign over Athens, Greece, on May-June 2014. We retrieved the aerosol optical [3 aerosol backscatter profiles (baer) at 355-532-1064 nm, 2 aerosol extinction (aaer) profiles at 355-532 nm and the aerosol linear depolarization ratio (δ) at 532 nm] and microphysical properties [effective radius (reff), complex refractive index (m), single scattering albedo (ω)]. We present a case study of a long distance transport (~3.500-4.000 km) of biomass burning particles mixed with dust from the Russian Federation-Kazakhstan regions arriving over Athens on 21-23 May 2014 (1.7-3.5 km height). On 23 May, between 2-2.75 km we measured mean lidar ratios (LR) of 35 sr (355 nm) and 42 sr (532 nm), while the mean Ångström exponent (AE) aerosol backscatter-related values (355nm/532nm and 532nm/1064nm) were 2.05 and 1.22, respectively; the mean value of δ at 532 nm was measured to be 9%. For that day the retrieved mean aerosol microphysical properties at 2-2.75 km height were: reff=0.26 μm (fine mode), reff=2.15 μm (coarse mode), m=1.36+0.00024i, ω=0.999 (355 nm, fine mode), ω=0.992(355 nm, coarse mode), ω=0.997 (532 nm, fine mode), and ω=0.980 (532 nm, coarse mode).

  5. Comparisons of Airborne HSRL and Modeled Aerosol Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Ismail, S.; Rogers, R. R.; Notari, A.; Berkoff, T.; Butler, C. F.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Fenn, M. A.; Scarino, A. J.; Clayton, M.; Mueller, D.; Chemyakin, E.; Fast, J. D.; Berg, L. K.; Randles, C. A.; Colarco, P. R.; daSilva, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol profiles derived from a regional and a global model are compared with aerosol profiles acquired by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidars (HSRLs) during recent field missions. We compare simulated aerosol profiles obtained from the WRF-Chem regional model with those measured by the airborne HSRL-2 instrument over the Atlantic Ocean east of Cape Cod in July 2012 during the Department of Energy Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). While deployed on the LaRC King Air during TCAP, HSRL-2 acquired profiles of aerosol extinction at 355 and 532 nm, as well as aerosol backscatter and depolarization at 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Additional HSRL-2 data products include profiles of aerosol type, mixed layer depth, and aerosol microphysical parameters (e.g. effective radius, concentration). The HSRL-2 and WRF-Chem aerosol profiles are compared along the aircraft flight tracks. HSRL-2 profiles acquired during the NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission over Houston during September 2013 are compared with the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System global model, version 5 (GEOS-5) profiles. In addition to comparing backscatter and extinction profiles, the fraction of aerosol extinction and optical thickness from various aerosol species from GEOS-5 are compared with aerosol extinction and optical thickness contributed by aerosol types derived from HSRL-2 data. We also compare aerosol profiles modeled by GEOS-5 with those measured by the airborne LaRC DIAL/HSRL instrument during August and September 2013 when it was deployed on the NASA DC-8 for the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) mission. DIAL/HSRL measured extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization profiles (532 and 1064 nm) in both nadir and zenith directions during long transects over the

  6. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect Its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  7. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, Stefan; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, Kai

    2013-03-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  8. Intercomparison of aerosol extinction profiles retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieß, U.; Klein Baltink, H.; Beirle, S.; Clémer, K.; Hendrick, F.; Henzing, B.; Irie, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Li, A.; Moerman, M. M.; van Roozendael, M.; Shaiganfar, R.; Wagner, T.; Wang, Y.; Xie, P.; Yilmaz, S.; Zieger, P.

    2016-07-01

    A first direct intercomparison of aerosol vertical profiles from Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations, performed during the Cabauw Intercomparison Campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) in summer 2009, is presented. Five out of 14 participants of the CINDI campaign reported aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) as deduced from observations of differential slant column densities of the oxygen collision complex (O4) at different elevation angles. Aerosol extinction vertical profiles and AOT are compared to backscatter profiles from a ceilometer instrument and to sun photometer measurements, respectively. Furthermore, the near-surface aerosol extinction coefficient is compared to in situ measurements of a humidity-controlled nephelometer and dry aerosol absorption measurements. The participants of this intercomparison exercise use different approaches for the retrieval of aerosol information, including the retrieval of the full vertical profile using optimal estimation and a parametrised approach with a prescribed profile shape. Despite these large conceptual differences, and also differences in the wavelength of the observed O4 absorption band, good agreement in terms of the vertical structure of aerosols within the boundary layer is achieved between the aerosol extinction profiles retrieved by the different groups and the backscatter profiles observed by the ceilometer instrument. AOTs from MAX-DOAS and sun photometer show a good correlation (R>0.8), but all participants systematically underestimate the AOT. Substantial differences between the near-surface aerosol extinction from MAX-DOAS and from the humidified nephelometer remain largely unresolved.

  9. SAGE II aerosol correlative observations - Profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Rosen, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan; Livinfston, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of the aerosol extinction measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with profiles from five correlative experiments between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative profiles were derived from six-channel dustsonde measurements and two-wavelength lidar backscatter data. The correlation between the dustsonde- and lidar-derived measurements and the SAGE II data is good, validating the SAGE II lower stratospheric aerosol extinction measurements.

  10. Dust layer profiling using an aerosol dropsonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Kaye, Paul Henry; Hirst, Edwin; Wieser, Andreas; Stanley, Warren

    2015-04-01

    Routine meteorological data is obtained in the atmosphere using disposable radiosondes, giving temperature, pressure, humidity and wind speed. Additional measurements are obtained from dropsondes, released from research aircraft. However, a crucial property not yet measured is the size and concentration of atmospheric particulates, including dust. Instead, indirect measurements are employed, relying on remote sensing, to meet the demands from areas such as climate research, air quality monitoring, civil emergencies etc. In addition, research aircraft can be used in situ, but airborne measurements are expensive, and aircraft use is restricted to near-horizontal profiling, which can be a limitation, as phenomena such as long-range transport depend on the vertical distribution of aerosol. The Centre for Atmospheric and Instrumentation Research at University of Hertfordshire develops light-scattering instruments for the characterization of aerosols and cloud particles. Recently a range of low-cost, miniature particle counters has been created, intended for use with systems such as disposable balloon-borne radiosondes, dropsondes, or in dense ground-based sensor networks. Versions for different particle size ranges exist. They have been used for vertical profiling of aerosols such as mineral dust or volcanic ash. A disadvantage of optical particle counters that sample through a narrow inlet is that they can become blocked, which can happen in cloud, for example. Hence, a different counter version has been developed, which can have open-path geometry, as the sensing zone is defined optically rather than being delimited by the flow system. This counter has been used for ground based air-quality monitoring around Heathrow airport. The counter has also been adapted for use with radiosondes or dropsondes. The dropsonde version has been successfully tested by launching it from research aircraft together with the so-called KITsonde, developed at the Karlsruhe Institute of

  11. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

    2009-05-05

    This project focused on: 1) evaluating the performance of the DOE ARM SGP Raman lidar system in measuring profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and 2) the use of the Raman lidar measurements of aerosol and water vapor profiles for assessing the vertical distribution of aerosols and water vapor simulated by global transport models and examining diurnal variability of aerosols and water vapor. The highest aerosol extinction was generally observed close to the surface during the nighttime just prior to sunrise. The high values of aerosol extinction are most likely associated with increased scattering by hygroscopic aerosols, since the corresponding average relative humidity values were above 70%. After sunrise, relative humidity and aerosol extinction below 500 m decreased with the growth in the daytime convective boundary layer. The largest aerosol extinction for altitudes above 1 km occurred during the early afternoon most likely as a result of the increase in relative humidity. The water vapor mixing ratio profiles generally showed smaller variations with altitude between day and night. We also compared simultaneous measurements of relative humidity, aerosol extinction, and aerosol optical thickness derived from the ARM SGP Raman lidar and in situ instruments on board a small aircraft flown routinely over the ARM SGP site. In contrast, the differences between the CARL and IAP aerosol extinction measurements are considerably larger. Aerosol extinction derived from the IAP measurements is, on average, about 30-40% less than values derived from the Raman lidar. The reasons for this difference are not clear, but may be related to the corrections for supermicron scattering and relative humidity that were applied to the IAP data. The investigators on this project helped to set up a major field mission (2003 Aerosol IOP) over the DOE ARM SGP site. One of the goals of the mission was to further evaluate the aerosol and water vapor retrievals from this lidar system

  12. Vertical profiles of BC direct radiative effect over Italy: high vertical resolution data and atmospheric feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Močnik, Griša; Ferrero, Luca; Castelli, Mariapina; Ferrini, Barbara S.; Moscatelli, Marco; Grazia Perrone, Maria; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Rovelli, Grazia; D'Angelo, Luca; Moroni, Beatrice; Scardazza, Francesco; Bolzacchini, Ezio; Petitta, Marcello; Cappelletti, David

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), and its vertical distribution, affects the climate. Global measurements of BC vertical profiles are lacking to support climate change research. To fill this gap, a campaign was conducted over three Italian basin valleys, Terni Valley (Appennines), Po Valley and Passiria Valley (Alps), to characterize the impact of BC on the radiative budget under similar orographic conditions. 120 vertical profiles were measured in winter 2010. The BC vertical profiles, together with aerosol size distribution, aerosol chemistry and meteorological parameters, have been determined using a tethered balloon-based platform equipped with: a micro-Aethalometer AE51 (Magee Scientific), a 1.107 Grimm OPC (0.25-32 μm, 31 size classes), a cascade impactor (Siuotas SKC), and a meteorological station (LSI-Lastem). The aerosol chemical composition was determined from collected PM2.5 samples. The aerosol absorption along the vertical profiles was measured and optical properties calculated using the Mie theory applied to the aerosol size distribution. The aerosol optical properties were validated with AERONET data and then used as inputs to the radiative transfer model libRadtran. Vertical profiles of the aerosol direct radiative effect, the related atmospheric absorption and the heating rate were calculated. Vertical profile measurements revealed some common behaviors over the studied basin valleys. From below the mixing height to above it, a marked concentration drop was found for both BC (from -48.4±5.3% up to -69.1±5.5%) and aerosol number concentration (from -23.9±4.3% up to -46.5±7.3%). These features reflected on the optical properties of the aerosol. Absorption and scattering coefficients decreased from below the MH to above it (babs from -47.6±2.5% up to -71.3±3.0% and bsca from -23.5±0.8% up to -61.2±3.1%, respectively). Consequently, the Single Scattering Albedo increased above the MH (from +4.9±2.2% to +7.4±1.0%). The highest aerosol absorption was

  13. Research on aerosol profiles and parameterization scheme in Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Deng, Tao; Tan, Haobo; Liu, Xiantong; Yang, Honglong

    2016-09-01

    The vertical distribution of the aerosol extinction coefficient serves as a basis for evaluating aerosol radiative forcing and air quality modeling. In this study, MODIS AOD data and ground-based lidar extinction coefficients were employed to verify 6 years (2009-2014) aerosol extinction data obtained via CALIOP for Southeast China. The objective was mainly to provide the parameterization scheme of annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles. The results showed that the horizontal and vertical distributions of CALIOP extinction data were highly accurate in Southeast China. The annual average AOD below 2 km accounted for 64% of the total layer, with larger proportions observed in winter (80%) and autumn (80%) and lower proportions observed in summer (70%) and spring (59%). The AOD was maximum in the spring (0.58), followed by the autumn and winter (0.44), and reached a minimum in the summer (0.40). The near-surface extinction coefficient increased from summer, spring, autumn and winter, in that order. The Elterman profile is obviously lower than the profiles observed by CALIOP in Southeast China. The annual average and seasonal aerosol profiles showed an exponential distribution, and could be divided into two sections. Two sections exponential fitting was used in the parameterization scheme. In the first section, the aerosol scale height reached 2200 m with a maximum (3,500 m) in summer and a minimum (1,230 m) in winter, which meant that the aerosol extinction decrease with height slower in summer, but more rapidly in winter. In second section, the aerosol scale height was maximum in spring, which meant that the higher aerosol diffused in spring.

  14. Vertical Distribution of Dust and Water Ice Aerosols from CRISM Limb-geometry Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael Doyle; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, Todd; Kleinbohl, Armin; Murchie, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb enables the vertical distribution of both dust and water ice aerosols to be retrieved. More than a dozen sets of CRISM limb observations have been taken so far providing pole-to-pole cross sections, spanning more than a full Martian year. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the spherical geometry of the limb observations. Both dust and water ice vertical profiles often show a significant vertical structure for nearly all seasons and latitudes that is not consistent with the well-mixed or Conrath-v assumptions that have often been used in the past for describing aerosol vertical profiles for retrieval and modeling purposes. Significant variations are seen in the retrieved vertical profiles of dust and water ice aerosol as a function of season. Dust typically extends to higher altitudes (approx. 40-50km) during the perihelion season than during the aphelion season (<20km), and the Hellas region consistently shows more dust mixed to higher altitudes than other locations. Detached water ice clouds are common, and water ice aerosols are observed to cap the dust layer in all seasons.

  15. Vertical distribution of aerosol extinction cross section and inference of aerosol imaginary index in the troposphere by lidar technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    The paper reports on vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter in the troposphere which were obtained from multi zenith angle lidar measurements. It is reported that a direct slant path solution was found to be not possible due to horizontal inhomogeneity of the atmosphere. Attention is given to the use of a regression analysis with respect to zenith angle for a layer integration of the angle dependent lidar equation in order to determine the optical thickness and aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio for defined atmospheric layers and the subsequent evaluation of cross-section profiles.

  16. Recent Improvements to CALIOP Level 3 Aerosol Profile Product for Global 3-D Aerosol Extinction Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackett, J. L.; Getzewich, B. J.; Winker, D. M.; Vaughan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    With nine years of retrievals, the CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product provides an unprecedented synopsis of aerosol extinction in three dimensions and the potential to quantify changes in aerosol distributions over time. The CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product, initially released as a beta product in 2011, reports monthly averages of quality-screened aerosol extinction profiles on a uniform latitude/longitude grid for different cloud-cover scenarios, called "sky conditions". This presentation demonstrates improvements to the second version of the product which will be released in September 2015. The largest improvements are the new sky condition definitions which parse the atmosphere into "cloud-free" views accessible to passive remote sensors, "all-sky" views accessible to active remote sensors and "cloudy-sky" views for opaque and transparent clouds which were previously inaccessible to passive remote sensors. Taken together, the new sky conditions comprehensively summarize CALIOP aerosol extinction profiles for a broad range of scientific queries. In addition to dust-only extinction profiles, the new version will include polluted-dust and smoke-only extinction averages. A new method is adopted for averaging dust-only extinction profiles to reduce high biases which exist in the beta version of the level 3 aerosol profile product. This presentation justifies the new averaging methodology and demonstrates vertical profiles of dust and smoke extinction over Africa during the biomass burning season. Another crucial advancement demonstrated in this presentation is a new approach for computing monthly mean aerosol optical depth which removes low biases reported in the beta version - a scenario unique to lidar datasets.

  17. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions.

  18. Comparison of Aerosol Classification Results from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Measurements and the Calipso Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Froyd, K. D.; Omar, A.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the vertical profile, composition, concentration, and size of aerosols is required for assessing the direct impact of aerosols on radiation, the indirect effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation, and attributing these effects to natural and anthropogenic aerosols. Because anthropogenic aerosols are predominantly submicrometer, fine mode fraction (FMF) retrievals from satellite have been used as a tool for deriving anthropogenic aerosols. Although column and profile satellite retrievals of FMF have been performed over the ocean, such retrievals have not yet been been done over land. Consequently, uncertainty in satellite estimates of the anthropogenic component of the aerosol direct radiative forcing is greatest over land, due in large part to uncertainties in the FMF. Satellite measurements have been used to detect and evaluate aerosol impacts on clouds; however, such efforts have been hampered by the difficulty in retrieving vertically-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration, which is the most direct parameter linking aerosol and clouds. Recent studies have shown correlations between average satellite derived column aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and in situ measured CCN. However, these same studies, as well as others that use detailed airborne in situ measurements have noted that vertical variability of the aerosol distribution, impacts of relative humidity, and the presence of coarse mode aerosols such as dust introduce large uncertainties in such relations.

  19. The Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site Measured versus Modeled

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, R.; Turner, D.D.; Clayton, M.; Guibert, S.; Schulz, M.; Chin, M.

    2005-03-18

    Aerosol extinction profiles measured by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Raman lidar are used to evaluate aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) simulated by aerosol models as part of the Aerosol module inter- Comparison in global models (AEROCOM) project. This project seeks to diagnose aerosol modules of global models and subsequently identify and eliminate weak components in aerosol modules used for global modeling; AEROCOM activities also include assembling data sets to be used in the evaluations. The AEROCOM average aerosol extinction profiles typically show good agreement with the Raman lidar profiles for altitudes above about 2 km; below 2 km the average model profiles are significantly (30-50%) lower than the Raman lidar profiles. The vertical variability in the average aerosol extinction profiles simulated by these models is less than the variability in the corresponding Raman lidar pro files. The measurements also show a much larger diurnal variability than the Interaction with Chemistry and Aerosols (INCA) model, particularly near the surface where there is a high correlation between aerosol extinction and relative humidity.

  20. New Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Structure from Space using the NASA Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): Applications for Aerosol Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, E. J.; Spinhime, J.; Palm, S.; Hlavka, D.; Hart, W.; Ginoux, P.; Chin, M.; Colarco, P.

    2004-01-01

    In the past, satellite measurements of aerosols have only been possible using passive sensors. Analysis of passive satellite data has lead to an improved understanding of aerosol properties, spatial distribution, and their effect on the earth,s climate. However, direct measurement of aerosol vertical distribution has not been possible using only the passive data. Knowledge of aerosol vertical distribution is important to correctly assess the impact of aerosol absorption, for certain atmospheric correction procedures, and to help constrain height profiles in aerosol transport models. On January 12,2003 NASA launched the first satellite-based lidar, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), onboard the ICESat spacecraft. GLAS is both an altimeter and an atmospheric lidar, and obtains direct measurements of aerosol and cloud heights. Here we show an overview of GLAS, provide an update of its current status, and discuss how GLAS data will be useful for modeling efforts. In particular, a strategy of using GLAS to characterize the height profile of dust plumes over source regions will be presented, along with initial results. Such information can be used to validate and improve output from aerosol transport models. Aerosol height profile comparisons between GLAS and transport models will be shown for regions downwind of aerosol sources. We will also discuss the feasibility of assimilating GLAS profiles into the models in order to improve their output.

  1. New Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Structure from Space Using the NASA Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): Applications for Aerosol Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Ginoux, Paul; Colarco, Peter; Chin, Mian; Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Steven P.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William

    2003-01-01

    In the past, satellite measurements of aerosols have only been possible using passive sensors. Analysis of passive satellite data has lead to an improved understanding of aerosol properties, spatial distribution, and their effect on the earth s climate. However, direct measurement of aerosol vertical distribution has not been possible using only the passive data. Knowledge of aerosol vertical distribution is important to correctly assess the impact of aerosol absorption, for certain atmospheric correction procedures, and to help constrain height profiles in aerosol transport models. On January 12,2003 NASA launched the first satellite-based lidar, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), onboard the ICESat spacecraft. GLAS is both an altimeter and an atmospheric lidar, and obtains direct measurements of aerosol and cloud heights. Here we show an overview of GLAS, provide an update of its current status, and discuss how GUS data will be useful for modeling efforts. In particular, a strategy of using GLAS to characterize the height profile of dust plumes over source regions will be presented, along with initial results. Such information can be used to validate and improve output from aerosol transport models. Aerosol height profile comparisons between GLAS and transport models will be shown for regions downwind of aerosol sources. We will also discuss the feasibility of assimilating GLAS profiles into the models in order to improve their output,

  2. Decoration of vertical graphene with aerosol nanoparticles for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; Ren, Ren; Zhou, Guihua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-08-01

    A facile method was demonstrated to decorate aerosol Ag nanoparticles onto vertical graphene surfaces using a mini-arc plasma reactor. The vertical graphene was directly grown on a sensor electrode using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The aerosol Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Then, the nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of vertical graphene through the assistance of an electric field. Based on our observation, nonagglomerated Ag nanoparticles formed in the gas phase and were assembled onto vertical graphene sheets. Nanohybrids of Ag nanoparticle-decorated vertical graphene were characterized for ammonia gas detection at room temperature. The vertical graphene served as the conductance channel, and the conductance change upon exposure to ammonia was used as the sensing signal. The sensing results show that Ag nanoparticles significantly improve the sensitivity, response time, and recovery time of the sensor.

  3. Aerosol profiling by calibrated ceilometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiß, Alexander; Wiegner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Recently, networks of automated single-wavelength backscatter lidars ("ceilometers") were implemented, primarily by weather services. As a consequence, the potential of ceilometers to quantitatively determine the spatiotemporal distribution of atmospheric aerosols was investigated, to derive mixing layer heights for air quality studies and to assess optical properties. The main issues are the limited signal-to-noise ratio and the inherent problems of the calibration. We have studied several approaches for calibrating ceilometers, based on different numerical solutions and on auxiliary data of different remote sensing techniques. As a result, the backscatter coefficient can be determined with a relative accuracy of typically 10% and a time resolution in the order of 5 minutes. This parameter is used to estimate the mixing layer height by applying different techniques of averaging and pattern recognition. In this context, it is assumed that aerosols are a good tracer for the thermodynamic stratification of the troposphere. Our algorithm is fully automated and was tested for several commercially available ceilometers. For this purpose, a simplified version for non-calibrated ceilometers, based on the so called range corrected signal, was additionally developed. We used data of the CHM15k-x ceilometer (manufactured by Jenoptik) from more than 5 years of continuous operation by the LMU-MIM in Munich (Germany) to establish climatologies of mixing layer heights (MLH), cloud cover, cloud heights and vertical profiles of the backscatter coefficient. Among others, the mean diurnal cycle and the interannual variability of the MLH for different months were determined. Ceilometer derived MLH were also used to validate different parameterization of chemistry transport models and to validate forecasts of the dispersion of aerosol layers. For the latter applications backscatter coefficients are required. That means, a calibration of the ceilometers is mandatory.

  4. Vertical resolved separation of aerosol types using CALIPSO level-2 product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, Elina; Balis, Dimitris; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2011-11-01

    A lidar-based method was used to separate profiles of optical parameters due to different aerosol types over different European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET) stations. The method makes uses of particle backscatter profiles at 532 nm and vertically resolved linear particle depolarization ratio measurements at the same wavelength. Values of particle depolarization ratio of 'pure' aerosol types (Saharan dust, biomass burning aerosols, anthropogenic aerosols, Volcanic ash aerosols) were taken from literature. Cases of CALIPSO space-borne lidar system were selected on the basis of different mixing state of the atmosphere over EARLINET stations. To identify the origin of air-masses four-day air mass back trajectories were computed using HYbrid Single-Particle Langrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, for different arrival heights, for the location and time under study was used. Also, the Dust REgional Atmospheric Modeling (DREAM) model was used to identify cases where dust from Saharan region was affecting the place under study. For our analysis we have used Atmospheric Volume Description (AVD), Cloud-Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) and extinction Quality Control (QC) flags to screen out CALIOP data. The method was applied for different horizontal resolution of 5, 25, 45 and 105 km. The height-resolved lidar results were finally compared with column-integrated products obtained with Aerosol Robotic Network Sun photometer (AERONET) in order to see to what extent Sun photometer columnar data are representative when different aerosol layers are present in the atmosphere.

  5. Impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol direct radiative effect and heating rate in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Vasileios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Koras Carracca, Mario; Kinne, Stefan; Vardavas, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    It is now well-established that aerosols cause an overall cooling effect at the surface and a warming effect within the atmosphere. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), both positive and negative forcing can be found, depending on a number of other factors, such as surface albedo and relative position of clouds and aerosols. Whilst aerosol surface cooling is important due to its relation with surface temperature and other bio-environmental reasons, atmospheric heating is of special interest as well having significant impacts on atmospheric dynamics, such as formation of clouds and subsequent precipitation. The actual position of aerosols and their altitude relative to clouds is of major importance as certain types of aerosol, such as black carbon (BC) above clouds can have a significant impact on planetary albedo. The vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds has recently drawn the attention of the aerosol community, because partially can account for the differences between simulated aerosol radiative forcing with various models, and therefore decrease the level of our uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing, which is one of our priorities set by IPCC. The vertical profiles of aerosol optical and physical properties have been studied by various research groups around the world, following different methodologies and using various indices in order to present the impact of aerosols on radiation on different altitudes above the surface. However, there is still variability between the published results as to the actual effect of aerosols on shortwave radiation and on heating rate within the atmosphere. This study uses vertical information on aerosols from the Max Planck Aerosol Climatology (MAC-v1) global dataset, which is a combination of model output with quality ground-based measurements, in order to provide useful insight into the vertical profile of atmospheric heating for the Mediterranean region. MAC-v1 and the science behind this aerosol dataset have already

  6. Vertical grid of retrieved atmospheric profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccherini, Simone; Carli, Bruno; Raspollini, Piera

    2016-05-01

    The choice of the vertical grid of atmospheric profiles retrieved from remote sensing observations is discussed considering the two cases of profiles used to represent the results of individual measurements and of profiles used for subsequent data fusion applications. An ozone measurement of the MIPAS instrument is used to assess, for different vertical grids, the quality of the retrieved profiles in terms of profile values, retrieval errors, vertical resolutions and number of degrees of freedom. In the case of individual retrievals no evident advantage is obtained with the use of a grid finer than the one with a reduced number of grid points, which are optimized according to the information content of the observations. Nevertheless, this instrument dependent vertical grid, which seems to extract all the available information, provides very poor results when used for data fusion applications. A loss of about a quarter of the degrees of freedom is observed when the data fusion is made using the instrument dependent vertical grid relative to the data fusion made using a vertical grid optimized for the data fusion product. This result is explained by the analysis of the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix and leads to the conclusion that different vertical grids must be adopted when data fusion is the expected application.

  7. Fabrication of vertical nanowire resonators for aerosol exposure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merzsch, Stephan; Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Stranz, Andrej; Hinze, Peter; Weimann, Thomas; Peiner, Erwin; Waag, Andreas

    2013-05-01

    Vertical silicon nanowire (SiNW) resonators are designed and fabricated in order to assess exposure to aerosol nanoparticles (NPs). To realize SiNW arrays, nanolithography and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) at cryogenic temperature are utilized in a top-down fabrication of SiNW arrays which have high aspect ratios (i.e., up to 34). For nanolithography process, a resist film thickness of 350 nm is applied in a vacuum contact mode to serve as a mask. A pattern including various diameters and distances for creating pillars is used (i.e., 400 nm up to 5 μm). In dry etching process, the etch rate is set high of 1.5 μm/min to avoid underetching. The etch profiles of Si wires can be controlled aiming to have either perpendicularly, negatively or positively profiled sidewalls by adjusting the etching parameters (e.g., temperature and oxygen content). Moreover, to further miniaturize the wire, multiple sacrificial thermal oxidations and subsequent oxide stripping are used yielding SiNW arrays of 650 nm in diameter and 40 μm in length. In the resonant frequency test, a piezoelectric shear actuator is integrated with the SiNWs inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) chamber. The observation of the SiNW deflections are performed and viewed from the topside of the SiNWs to reduce the measurement redundancy. Having a high deflection of ~10 μm during its resonant frequency of 452 kHz and a low mass of 31 pg, the proposed SiNW is potential for assisting the development of a portable aerosol resonant sensor.

  8. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the "effective" aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  9. Aerosol vertical distribution, optical properties and transport over Corsica (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léon, J.-F.; Augustin, P.; Mallet, M.; Bourrianne, T.; Pont, V.; Dulac, F.; Fourmentin, M.; Lambert, D.; Sauvage, B.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the aerosol vertical distribution observed in the western Mediterranean between February and April 2011 and between February 2012 and August 2013. An elastic backscattering lidar was continuously operated at a coastal site in the northern part of Corsica Island (Cap Corse) for a total of more than 14 000 h of observations. The aerosol extinction coefficient retrieved from cloud-free lidar profiles are analyzed along with the SEVIRI satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD). The SEVIRI AOD was used to constrain the retrieval of the aerosol extinction profiles from the lidar range-corrected signal and to detect the presence of dust or pollution aerosols. The daily average AOD at 550 nm is 0.16 (±0.09) and ranges between 0.05 and 0.80. A seasonal cycle is observed with minima in winter and maxima in spring-summer. High AOD days (above 0.3 at 550 nm) represent less than 10% of the totality of daily observations and correspond to the large scale advection of desert dust from Northern Africa or pollution aerosols from Europe. The respective origin of the air masses is confirmed using FLEXPART simulations in the backward mode. Dust events are characterized by a large turbid layer between 2 and 5 km height while pollution events show a lower vertical development with a thick layer below 3 km in altitude. However low level dust transport is also reported during spring while aerosol pollution layer between 2 and 4 km height has been also observed. We report an effective lidar ratio at 355 nm for pollution aerosols 68 (±13) Sr while it is 63 (±18) Sr for dust. The daily mean AOD at 355 nm for dust events is 0.61 (±0.14) and 0.71 (±0.16) for pollution aerosols events.

  10. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the 'effective' aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  11. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, N.; Caps, H.

    2015-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed by introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects once set in the film is related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerically solving the adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position is predicted by simple modeling that takes into account the mechanical equilibrium of the films coupled to previous thickness measurements.

  12. Atmospheric aerosol profiling with a bistatic imaging lidar system.

    PubMed

    Barnes, John E; Sharma, N C Parikh; Kaplan, Trevor B

    2007-05-20

    Atmospheric aerosols have been profiled using a simple, imaging, bistatic lidar system. A vertical laser beam is imaged onto a charge-coupled-device camera from the ground to the zenith with a wide-angle lens (CLidar). The altitudes are derived geometrically from the position of the camera and laser with submeter resolution near the ground. The system requires no overlap correction needed in monostatic lidar systems and needs a much smaller dynamic range. Nighttime measurements of both molecular and aerosol scattering were made at Mauna Loa Observatory. The CLidar aerosol total scatter compares very well with a nephelometer measuring at 10 m above the ground. The results build on earlier work that compared purely molecular scattered light to theory, and detail instrument improvements. PMID:17514239

  13. Vertical Aerosol Backscatter Variability from an Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements using a continuous wave focused Doppler lidar at 9.1 micron wavelength were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean during 13 - 26 September, 1995 as part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on board the NASA DC8 aircraft. Backscatter variability was measured for approximately 52 flight hours, covering equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 25,000 km in the troposphere. Quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents which ranged between approximately 0.1 to 12.0 km altitude. Aerosol haze layers were encountered at different altitudes. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and over ocean were observed. A mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was found with modal value approximately 1O(exp -10)/m/sr, consistent with previous airborne and ground-based datasets.

  14. Modeling The Vertical Profile Of Tholin Particles In The Atmosphere Of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Mao-Chang; Li, C.; Zhang, X.; Yung, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Detailed vertical profiles of minor species from 100 to 1000 km and of tholins above 300 km have recently been deduced from Cassini observations. To match the observed profiles of three major C2-hydrocarbons (C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6), modifications to the existing kinetics and vertical transport are needed. The latter plays a crucial role. Incorporating these modifications and a parameterized aerosol formation pathway into a chemistry-diffusion model, we could explain the observed tholin profile made by the Cassini/UVIS instrument. Processes that affect the profile are (1) aerosol production, (2) aerosol coagulation, and (3) dynamical transport. Sensitivity of the resulting tholin profile to the processes is examined and discussed.

  15. Changes in the vertical temperature structure associated with carbonaceous aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Penner, J E; Chuang, C C; Santer, B D; Taylor, K

    2002-02-08

    Carbonaceous aerosols from anthropogenic activities act to both scatter and absorb solar radiation. It has been postulated that absorption by aerosols might significantly alter both the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere and cloud fraction [Hansen et al. 1997, Ackerman et al, 2000]. Since both effects may alter the assessment of climate change associated with human activities, it is very important to understand both the magnitude and the mechanism by which carbonaceous aerosols affect climate. In this paper, we used a coupled climate and chemistry transport model to estimate the effects of carbonaceous aerosols on the vertical temperature structure and their effects on cloud fraction. A series Of control simulations were also carried out to compare the results of the model in which carbonaceous aerosols interact with climate with those in which they do not. We will present the temperature difference between simulations that include the effect of black carbon on the radiation field and those that do not, both at the surface and in the free troposphere. We will also discuss the change of temperature lapse rate and changes of cloud fraction associated with black carbon.

  16. Comparison of Aerosol Classification From Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris a.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of aerosol composition and vertical distribution is crucial for assessing the impact of aerosols on climate. In addition, aerosol classification is a key input to CALIOP aerosol retrievals, since CALIOP requires an inference of the lidar ratio in order to estimate the effects of aerosol extinction and backscattering. In contrast, the NASA airborne HSRL-1 directly measures both aerosol extinction and backscatter, and therefore the lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio). Four aerosol intensive properties from HSRL-1 are combined to infer aerosol type. Aerosol classification results from HSRL-1 are used here to validate the CALIOP aerosol type inferences.

  17. Seasonal variation of vertical distribution of aerosol single scattering albedo over Indian sub-continent: RAWEX aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Babu, S.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the vertical distribution of aerosols and its seasonality (especially the single scattering albedo, SSA) extensive profiling of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients have been carried out using an instrumented aircraft from seven base stations spread across the Indian mainland during winter 2012 and spring/pre-monsoon 2013 under the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment (RAWEX). Spatial variation of the vertical profiles of the asymmetry parameter, the wavelength exponent of the absorption coefficient and the single scattering albedo, derived from the measurements, are used to infer the source characteristics of winter and pre-monsoon aerosols as well as the seasonality of free tropospheric aerosols. The relatively high value of the wavelength exponent of absorption coefficient over most of the regions indicates the contribution from biomass burning and dust aerosols up to lower free tropospheric altitudes. A clear enhancement in aerosol loading and its absorbing nature is seen at lower free troposphere levels (above the planetary boundary layer) over the entire mainland during spring/pre-monsoon season compared to winter, whereas concentration of aerosols within the boundary layer showed a decrease from winter to spring. This could have significant implications on the aerosol heating structure over the Indian region and hence the regional climate.

  18. Aerosol vertical distribution over east China from RIEMS-Chem simulation in comparison with CALIPSO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Han, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    The horizontal and vertical distributions of aerosol extinction coefficient (AEC) and mass concentration over east China in October 2010 were investigated by using an online-coupled regional climate model and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) data. Model performance was evaluated comprehensively against ground observations of meteorological variables and PM10 concentrations and CALIPSO retrieved AEC profiles, which demonstrated a good ability of the model in simulating spatial distribution and evolution of aerosol concentration and optical properties. Severe pollution episodes were found over wide areas of east China during the study period, with the maximum mean PM10 concentration exceeding 200 μg m-3 in the Chongqing district and a part of the lower reaches of the Yellow River on 8-10 October. Both CALIPSO retrievals and model simulations revealed high AEC values (≥1 km-1) often occurred within 2 km above ground over most areas of east China. AEC vertical profile in or in the vicinity of China major cities along CALIPSO orbit track exhibited two typical features: one was AEC reached its maximum (∼4 km-1) near the surface (<200 m) and decreased rapidly to < 0.1 km-1 at altitudes above 1 km, another one was AEC peaked at higher altitudes of about 0.5-1 km with a maximum up to 3 km-1. AEC vertical profile was strongly dependent on vertical distribution of both aerosol concentration, composition and relative humidity. The vertical cross sections over typical regions of east China exhibited a decreasing AEC in magnitude from the continent to the China seas. Over the continent, AEC was either maximum near the surface or peaked at higher altitudes (0.5-1.0 km) due to increases of relative humidity or aerosol concentration in those regions, whereas over the seas of China, AEC profile was characterized by peak values at an altitude around 1 km, mainly due to an elevated relative humidity there, which favored rapid aerosol

  19. The Vertical Structure, Sources, and Evolution of Aerosols in the Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Greg; Bourrianne, Thierry; Léon, Jean-François; Pont, Véronique; Mallet, Marc; Lambert, Dominique; Augustin, Patrick; Dulac, François; Junkermann, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The VESSAER campaign (VErtical Structure and Sources of AERosols in the Mediterranean Region) was designed to characterize the different sources of aerosol in the Mediterranean Basin and assess the regional impact of aerosol on cloud microphysical and radiative properties. VESSAER was conducted on an ultra-light aircraft in summer 2012. Research activities included ground-based observations in the central and northern regions of Corsica, as well as aerosol lidar and sunphotometer measurements near the eastern coast. The main scientific goals were to investigate local versus long-range sources of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and their vertical stratification in the lower troposphere, study evolution and ageing due to atmospheric processes, and determine aerosol direct radiative impacts over a larger spatial scale. The background aerosol concentrations (D > 0.01 um) within the boundary layer in Corsica were nearly 2000 cm^-3 and increased to ca. 104 cm^-3 during pollution events when back-trajectories originated from coastal areas in France and Italy and the Po Valley. Nearly all of these particles were CCN-active at 0.38% supersaturation, indicating a relatively hygroscopic aerosol. Vertical profiles of aerosol hygroscopicity revealed that ageing (with respect to CCN-activity) of European emissions occurred exclusively in the boundary layer. Within two days, the European emissions had become hygroscopic, probably a result of cloud processing. In contrast, aerosol hygroscopicity did not change as a function of transport time in elevated aerosol layers, suggesting that photochemical ageing of less hygroscopic material is relatively slow compared to ageing processes in the boundary layer. The vertical profiles clearly showed the long-range transport of dust from the Saharan Desert and pollution from the European continent, which were the two major sources of aerosol during the campaign. Two of the research flights coincided with CALIPSO overpasses, when

  20. Vertical Distribution of Aerosols and Water Vapor Using CRISM Limb Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; CRISM Science; Operations Teams

    2011-12-01

    Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb allows the vertical distribution of both dust and ice aerosols to be retrieved. These data serve as an important supplement to the aerosol profiling provided by the MRO/MCS instrument allowing independent validation and giving additional information on particle physical and scattering properties through multi-wavelength studies. A total of at least ten CRISM limb observations have been taken so far covering a full Martian year. Each set of limb observations nominally contains about four dozen scans across the limb giving pole-to-pole coverage for two orbits at roughly 100 and 290 W longitude over the Tharsis and Syrtis/Hellas regions, respectively. At each longitude, limb scans are spaced roughly 10 degrees apart in latitude, with a vertical spatial resolution on the limb of roughly 800 m. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations. We compute synthetic CRISM limb spectra using a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer code that accounts for multiple scattering from aerosols and accounts for spherical geometry of the limb observations by integrating the source functions along curved paths in that coordinate system. Retrieved are 14-point vertical profiles for dust and water ice aerosols with resolution of 0.4 scale heights between one and six scale heights above the surface. After the aerosol retrieval is completed, the abundances of CO2 (or surface pressure) and H2O gas are retrieved by matching the depth of absorption bands at 2000 nm for carbon dioxide and at 2600 nm for water vapor. In addition to the column abundance of water vapor, limited information on its vertical structure can also be retrieved depending on the signal available

  1. The Aerosol Limb Imager: acousto-optic imaging of limb scattered sunlight for stratospheric aerosol profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elash, B. J.; Bourassa, A. E.; Loewen, P. R.; Lloyd, N. D.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Aerosol Limb Imager (ALI) is an optical remote sensing instrument designed to image scattered sunlight from the atmospheric limb. These measurements are used to retrieve spatially resolved information of the stratospheric aerosol distribution, including spectral extinction coefficient and particle size. Here we present the design, development and test results of an ALI prototype instrument. The long term goal of this work is the eventual realization of ALI on a satellite platform in low earth orbit, where it can provide high spatial resolution observations, both in the vertical and cross-track. The instrument design uses a large aperture Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter (AOTF) to image the sunlit stratospheric limb in a selectable narrow wavelength band ranging from the visible to the near infrared. The ALI prototype was tested on a stratospheric balloon flight from the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) launch facility in Timmins, Canada, in September 2014. Preliminary analysis of the hyperspectral images indicate that the radiance measurements are of high quality, and we have used these to retrieve vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient from 650-1000 nm, along with one moment of the particle size distribution. Those preliminary results are promising and development of a satellite prototype of ALI within the Canadian Space Agency is ongoing.

  2. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Artamonova, Maria S.; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2013-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regionalmore » sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  3. So2 vertical profile on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duricic, Alen; Leitner, Johannes; Firneis, Maria G.

    2010-05-01

    Introduction The distribution of SO2 below the clouds of Venus is an unsettled matter because various entry probes and earth observed values show big differences for the same altitude levels. A new analysis of the SO2 vertical profile with a 'best of' data set [1] is compared to the Vega 1 and Vega 2 results. For the analysis of the SO2 vertical profile two models have been formulated. While one model considers the fast decrease of SO2 with descending altitude and starts with 0 ppmV at the surface, the other model starts with 25 ppmV, as indicated by Vega 1. Although there is a lack of information on the lowest 10 kms of the atmosphere, an analysis should be done to understand the geological evolution and a possible activity on Venus. Vertical Profiles The two models produce two different vertical profiles and with those it was possible to calculate the mass of SO2 in the whole lower atmosphere. It is important to note that SO2 nearly disappears at 69 km height [1,3] while 99,6% of the whole mass is still contained in the lower atmosphere. The difference in the results is based on the different surface values, which have been used. The first model stands in good agreement with the Vega mission data and the second model can be used as an upper limit of SO2 in the atmosphere. The results yield a good estimation of how much SO2 is existent and give new discussion points about volcanic activity on Venus and a possible still unknown SO2 destroying mechanism. References [1] Bertaux, J. et al. (1996) JGR, 101, 12709-12745. [2] de Bergh, C. et al. (2006) Planetary and Space Sci., 54, 1389-1397. [3] Esposito L.W. et al., (1997) Venus II : Geology, Geophysics, Atmosphere, and Solar Wind Environment. Edited by Stephen W. Bougher, D.M. Hunten, and R.J. Philips. Tucson, AZ : University of Arizona Press, 415-458

  4. Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution and associated radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Youfei; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor; Cribb, Maureen

    2012-08-01

    Four years of columnar aerosol optical properties and a one-year vertical profiles of aerosol particle extinction coefficient at 527 nm are analyzed at Taihu in the central Yangtze River Delta region in eastern China. Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution, and influence on shortwave radiation and heating rates were investigated. Multiyear variations of aerosol optical depths (AOD), Ångstrom exponents, single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (ASY) are analyzed, together with the vertical profile of aerosol extinction. AOD is largest in summer and smallest in winter. SSAs exhibit weak seasonal variation with the smallest values occurring during winter and the largest during summer. The vast majority of aerosol particles are below 2 km, and about 62%, 67%, 67% and 83% are confined to below 1 km in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. Five-day back trajectory analyses show that the some aerosols aloft are traced back to northern/northwestern China, as far as Mongolia and Siberia, in spring, autumn and winter. The presence of dust aerosols were identified based on the linear depolarization measurements together with other information (i.e., back trajectory, precipitation, aerosol index). Dust strongly impacts the vertical particle distribution in spring and autumn, with much smaller effects in winter. The annual mean aerosol direct shortwave radiative forcing (efficiency) at the bottom, top and within the atmosphere are -34.8 ± 9.1 (-54.4 ± 5.3), -8.2 ± 4.8 (-13.1 ± 1.5) and 26.7 ± 9.4 (41.3 ± 4.6) W/m2 (Wm-2 τ-1), respectively. The mean reduction in direct and diffuse radiation reaching surface amount to 109.2 ± 49.4 and 66.8 ± 33.3 W/m2, respectively. Aerosols significantly alter the vertical profile of solar heating, with great implications for atmospheric stability and dynamics within the lower troposphere.

  5. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field Br ˜ (10-4-10-2)(r/ AU)-2 G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ˜1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  6. Vertical distribution of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficient measured by a CCD side-scattering lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Ma, Xiaomin; Shi, Bo; Shan, Huihui; Zhao, Ming; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2015-09-01

    The near-ground aerosols have the most impact on the human beings. Its fine spatial and temporal distribution, with which the environmental and meteorological departments concern themselves most, has not been elaborated very well due to the unavailable measurement tools. We present the continuous observations of the vertical profile of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficients by employing our self-developed side-scattering lidar system based on charge-coupled device camera. During the experimental period from April 2013 to August 2014, four catalogs of aerosol backscattering coefficient profiles are found in the near ground. The continuous measurement is revealed by the contour plots measured during the whole night. These experimental results indicate that the aerosol backscattering coefficients in near ground are inhomogeneous and vary with altitude and time, which are very useful for the model researchers to study the regional air pollution and its climate impact.

  7. Balloonborne measurements of ozone and aerosol profiles at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, during the austral spring of 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.J.; Deshler, T. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports some of the findings of an overall study of the ozone hole over Antarctica. Vertical profiles of ozone and aerosols were measured, and the inclusion of aerosols from the June 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo was of particular interest. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, R. E.; Ansmann, A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of number concentrations of aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (APC50, reservoir of favorable CCN) and with radius > 250 nm (APC250, reservoir of favorable INP), as well as profiles of the aerosol particle surface area concentration (ASC, used in INP parameterization) can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) with relative uncertainties of a factor of around 2 (APC50), and of about 25-50 % (APC250, ASC). Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to identify mineral dust particles and to distinguish and separate the aerosol properties of basic aerosol types such as mineral dust and continental pollution (haze, smoke). We investigate the relationship between AEC and APC50, APC250, and ASC for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm and main aerosol types (dust, pollution, marine). Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures of continental pollution, mineral dust, and marine aerosol. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple relationship between APC50 and the CCN-reservoir particles (APCCCN) and published INP parameterization schemes (with APC250 and ASC as input) we finally compute APCCCN and INP concentration profiles. We apply the full methodology to a lidar observation of a heavy dust outbreak crossing Cyprus with dust up to 8 km height and to a case during which anthropogenic pollution dominated.

  9. Vertical structure and size distributions of Martian aerosols from solar occultation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Blamont, J. E.; Krasnopol'skii, V. A.; Korablev, O. I.; Atreya, S. K.; West, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Phobos 2 spectrometer measurements of solar occultations close to the evening terminator have furnished data on the vertical structure of the Martian aerosols near the northern spring equinox. Since the thermal structure derived from saturated IR profiles of water vapor does not allow the reaching of the CO2 frost point at cloud altitudes, said clouds' particles may be formed by H2O ice. Dust was also monitored at two wavelengths; it is assumed that the dust particles are levitated by eddy mixing. A parallel is drawn between these thin clouds and the polar mesospheric clouds observed on earth.

  10. Tropospheric aerosol profile information from high-resolution oxygen A-band measurements from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, A.; Bösch, H.

    2015-02-01

    Aerosols are an important factor in the Earth climatic system and they play a key role in air quality and public health. Observations of the oxygen A-band at 760 nm can provide information on the vertical distribution of aerosols from passive satellite sensors that can be of great interest for operational monitoring applications with high spatial coverage if the aerosol information is obtained with sufficient precision, accuracy and vertical resolution. To address this issue, retrieval simulations of the aerosol vertical profile retrieval from O2 A-band observations by GOSAT, the upcoming Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) and Sentinel 5-P missions, and the proposed CarbonSat mission have been carried out. Precise retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) within the boundary layer were found to favour low-resolution, high signal-to-noise instruments such as Sentinel-5 P, whereas higher-resolution instruments such as OCO-2 showed greater performance at higher altitudes and in information content above the boundary layer. Retrieval of the AOD in the 0-2 km range with precision appears difficult from all studied instruments and the retrieval errors typically exceed a value of 0.05 for AODs up to 0.3. Constraining the surface albedo is a promising and effective way of improving the retrieval of aerosol, but the accuracy of the required prior knowledge is very high. Due to the limited information content of the aerosol profile retrieval, the use of a parameterised aerosol distribution is assessed, and we show that the AOD and height of an aerosol layer can be retrieved well if the aerosol layer is uplifted to the free troposphere; however, errors are often large for aerosol layers in the boundary layer. Additional errors are introduced by incorrect assumptions on surface pressure and aerosol mixture, which can both bias retrieved AOD and height by up to 45%. In addition, assumptions of the boundary layer temperature are found to yield an additional error of up to 8

  11. Novel Co:MgF2 lidar for aerosol profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharekar, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Lidars are of great interest because of their unique capabilities in remote sensing applications in sounding of the atmosphere, meteorology, and climatology. In this small business innovative research (SBIR) phase II program, laser sources including Co:MgF2, CTH:YAG, CTH:YSGG, CT:YAG, and Er:Glass were evaluated. Modulator of fused silica and TeO2 materials with Brewster's angle end faces were used with these lasers as acousto-optical (AO) Q-switches. A higher hold-off energy and hence a higher Q-switched energy was obtained by using a high power RF driver. The report provides performance characteristics of these lasers. The tunable (1.75-2.50 microns) Co:MgF2 laser damaged the TeO2 Q-switch cell. However, the CTH:YAG laser operating at 2.09 microns provided output energy of over 300 mJ/p in 50 ns pulse width using the fused silica Q-switch. This Q-switched CTH:YAG laser was used in a breadboard vertical aerosol profiler. A 40 cm diameter telescope, InSb and InGaAs detectors were used in the receiver. The data obtained using this lidar is provided in the report. The data shows that the eye safe lidar using CTH:YAG laser for the vertical aerosol density and range measurements is the viable approach.

  12. Vertical dependence of black carbon, sulphate and biomass burning aerosol radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, Bjørn H.; Myhre, Gunnar

    2011-12-01

    A global radiative transfer model is used to calculate the vertical profile of shortwave radiative forcing from a prescribed amount of aerosols. We study black carbon (BC), sulphate (SO4) and a black and organic carbon mixture typical of biomass burning (BIO), by prescribing aerosol burdens in layers between 1000 hPa and 20 hPa and calculating the resulting direct radiative forcing divided by the burden (NDRF). We find a strong sensitivity in the NDRF for BC with altitude, with a tenfold increase between BC close to the surface and the lower part of the stratosphere. Clouds are a major contributor to this dependence with altitude, but other factors also contribute. We break down and explain the different physical contributors to this strong sensitivity. The results show a modest regional dependence of the altitudinal dependence of BC NDRF between industrial regions, while for regions with properties deviating from the global mean NDRF variability is significant. Variations due to seasons and interannual changes in cloud conditions are found to be small. We explore the effect that large altitudinal variation in NDRF may have on model estimates of BC radiative forcing when vertical aerosol distributions are insufficiently constrained, and discuss possible applications of the present results for reducing inter-model differences.

  13. Vertical Structure and Sources of Aerosols in the Mediterranean Region (VESSAER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. C.; Junkermann, W.; Leon, J.; Pont, V.; Mallet, M.; Augustin, P.; Dulac, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Mediterranean region has been identified as one of the most prominent global "Hot-Spots" in future climate change projections [Giorgi and Lionello, 2008] and is particularly characterized by its vulnerability to changes in the water cycle. To this end, the VESSAER campaign (VErtical Structure and Sources of AERosols in the Mediterranean Region) was designed to characterize the different sources of aerosol in the Mediterranean Basin and assess their regional impact on cloud microphysical and radiative properties. VESSAER was conducted on the ENDURO-KIT ultra-light aircraft [W. Junkermann, 2001] in late June-early July 2012. Activities include ground observations as well as aerosol lidar and sunphotometer measurements in conjunction with the airborne measurements. The VESSAER campaign complements existing ChArMEx (http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/ ; PI: F. Dulac) and HyMeX (http://www.hymex.org/ ; PI: V. Ducroc and P. Drobinski) activities, which are the target of many European research institutes in 2012 and 2013. The main scientific goals during VESSAER are to investigate local versus long-range sources of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and their vertical stratification in the lower troposphere, use aerosol hygroscopicity to study their evolution due to atmospheric processes, and couple in-situ airborne measurements with ground-based remote sensing to determine aerosol direct radiative impacts over a larger spatial scale. The background aerosol concentrations within the boundary layer (BL) in Corsica are nearly 2000 cm-3 (Dp > 10 nm); 50 cm-3 (Dp > 300 nm). We were surprised to find that nearly all of these particles are CCN-active at 0.3% supersaturation and presume that ageing and/or cloud processing play a role in rendering the aerosol in the Mediterranean Basin more hygroscopic. The vertical profiles during VESSAER clearly show the long-range transport of dust from the Saharan Desert and pollution from the European continent -- which were the two

  14. The Importance of the Vertical Location of Aerosol Layers on Convective Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, Susan; Grant, Leah

    2014-05-01

    Enhanced aerosol concentrations appear to influence a number of the aspects of convective storms including the strength of the convective updraft, the intensity of the cold pool, and the microphysical and radiative characteristics of the convective anvil. However, in order for such influences to occur, aerosols need to be effectively ingested by the storm system of interest. The vertical location of an aerosol layer impacting a convective storm may influence how effectively aerosol are ingested by the storm system, and hence the degree to which the ingested aerosol subsequently influence storm microphysical and radiative processes. Furthermore, if the aerosol species impacting the storm are effective at absorbing solar radiation, heating within the aerosol layer enhances atmospheric stability, the level of which will be dictated by where the aerosol layer is located. Enhanced static stability may have negative impacts on the initial development of the convection of interest. Convective storms developing within environments of the same aerosol optical depth may therefore respond differently to aerosol indirect forcing by virtue of where the aerosol layer is vertically located. In this talk, the results of various high-resolution, cloud-resolving simulations will be presented, in which the sensitivity to the vertical location of the aerosol source on the convective development, aerosol ingestion efficiency, and subsequent microphysical and radiative properties are investigated. Microphysical budgets and storm trajectories will form an integral part of the analysis.

  15. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-05-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5-10 microg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m(3). The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction.

  16. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H.; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1 h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5–10 μg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m3. The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction. PMID:19879288

  17. Vertical profile measurements of lower troposphere ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Aplin, K. L.

    2014-11-01

    Vertical soundings of the atmospheric ion production rate have been obtained from Geiger counters integrated with conventional meteorological radiosondes. In launches made from Reading (UK) during 2013-2014, the Regener-Pfotzer ionisation maximum was at an altitude equivalent to a pressure of (63.1±2.4) hPa, or, expressed in terms of the local air density, (0.101±0.005) kg m-3. The measured ionisation profiles have been evaluated against the Usoskin-Kovaltsov model and, separately, surface neutron monitor data from Oulu. Model ionisation rates agree well with the observed cosmic ray ionisation below 20 km altitude. Above 10 km, the measured ionisation rates also correlate well with simultaneous neutron monitor data, although, consistently with previous work, measured variability at the ionisation maximum is greater than that found by the neutron monitor. However, in the lower atmosphere (below 5 km altitude), agreement between the measurements and simultaneous neutron monitor data is poor. For studies of transient lower atmosphere phenomena associated with cosmic ray ionisation, this indicates the need for in situ ionisation measurements and improved lower atmosphere parameterisations.

  18. Comparison of vertical aerosol extinction coefficients from in-situ and LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Herrmann, E.; Bucci, S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Di Liberto, L.; Di Donfrancesco, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weingartner, E.; Virtanen, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ~ 50-800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a LIDAR system provided aerosol extinction coefficients for a vertically resolved comparison between in-situ and remote sensing results. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20% was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 to 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ~ 10 local time) before the mixed layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ~ 12 local time) the ML was fully developed, resulting in constant extinction coefficients at all altitudes measured on the Zeppelin NT. LIDAR results captured these dynamic features well and good agreement was found for the extinction coefficients compared to the in-situ results, using fixed LIDAR ratios (LR) between 30 and 70 sr for the altitudes probed with the Zeppelin. These LR are

  19. Observations of Dust Using the NASA Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): New New Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Distribution From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth; Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Steven P.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William

    2003-01-01

    On January 12, 2003 NASA launched the first satellite-based lidar, the Geoscience Laser -Altimeter System (GLAS), onboard the ICESat spacecraft. The GLAS atmospheric measurements introduce a fundamentally new and important tool for understanding the atmosphere and climate. In the past, aerosols have only been studied from space using images gathered by passive sensors. Analysis of this passive data has lead to an improved understanding of aerosol properties, spatial distribution, and their effect on the earth's climate. However, these images do not show the aerosol's vertical distribution. As a result, a key piece of information has been missing. The measurements now obtained by GLAS will provide information on the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds, and improve our ability to study their transport processes and aerosol-cloud interactions. Here we show an overview of GLAS, provide an update of its current status, and present initial observations of dust profiles. In particular, a strategy of characterizing the height profile of dust plumes over source regions will be presented.

  20. Aerosol profiling by Raman lidar in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Nianwen; Yang, Shaobo; Xie, Yinhai; Zhu, Cunxiong

    2015-10-01

    Aerosol profiles at 607 nm over ranges from 2 to 20 km were obtained using Raman lidar in Nanjing, China. The measured aerosol extinction coefficient was largely stable at about 1.5-2.5 × 10-4 m-1 after noise and Rayleigh corrections were applied. The noise effect in Raman lidar aerosol measurements is analyzed, and a formula relating aerosol extinction coefficient error and noise is presented in detail. Simulation and experimental results are in good agreement, indicating that the noise-related calculation for the Raman lidar aerosol measurement error is reasonable.

  1. MPL-Net Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Vertical Distributions at Co-Located AERONET Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Spinhirne, James D.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar system was developed, the Micropulse Lidar (MPL). The MPL acquires signal profiles of backscattered laser light from aerosols and clouds. The signals are analyzed to yield multiple layer heights, optical depths of each layer, average extinction-to-backscatter ratios for each layer, and profiles of extinction in each layer. In 2000, several MPL sites were organized into a coordinated network, called MPL-Net, by the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) using funding provided by the NASA Earth Observing System. tn addition to the funding provided by NASA EOS, the NASA CERES Ground Validation Group supplied four MPL systems to the project, and the NASA TOMS group contributed their MPL for work at GSFC. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) also agreed to make their data available to the MPL-Net project for processing. In addition to the initial NASA and ARM operated sites, several other independent research groups have also expressed interest in joining the network using their own instruments. Finally, a limited amount of EOS funding was set aside to participate in various field experiments each year. The NASA Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project also provides funds to deploy their MPL during ocean research cruises. All together, the MPL-Net project has participated in four major field experiments since 2000. Most MPL-Net sites and field experiment locations are also co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network. (AERONET). Therefore, at these locations data is collected on both aerosol and cloud vertical structure as well as column optical depth and sky radiance. Real-time data products are now available from most MPL-Net sites. Our real-time products are generated at times of AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. The AERONET AOD is used as input to our

  2. Meridional gradients in aerosol vertical distribution over Indian Mainland: Observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prijith, S. S.; Suresh Babu, S.; Lakshmi, N. B.; Satheesh, S. K.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-year observations from the network of ground-based observatories (ARFINET), established under the project 'Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India' (ARFI) of Indian Space Research Organization and space-borne lidar 'Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization' (CALIOP) along with simulations from the chemical transport model 'Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport' (GOCART), are used to characterize the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols over the Indian landmass and its spatial structure. While the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction showed higher values close to the surface followed by a gradual decrease at increasing altitudes, a strong meridional increase is observed in the vertical spread of aerosols across the Indian region in all seasons. It emerges that the strong thermal convections cause deepening of the atmospheric boundary layer, which although reduces the aerosol concentration at lower altitudes, enhances the concentration at higher elevations by pumping up more aerosols from below and also helping the lofted particles to reach higher levels in the atmosphere. Aerosol depolarization ratios derived from CALIPSO as well as the GOCART simulations indicate the dominance of mineral dust aerosols during spring and summer and anthropogenic aerosols in winter. During summer monsoon, though heavy rainfall associated with the Indian monsoon removes large amounts of aerosols, the prevailing southwesterly winds advect more marine aerosols over to landmass (from the adjoining oceans) leading to increase in aerosol loading at lower altitudes than in spring. During spring and summer months, aerosol loading is found to be significant, even at altitudes as high as 4 km, and this is proposed to have significant impacts on the regional climate systems such as Indian monsoon.

  3. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Z.; Stier, P.; Johnson, C. E.; Mann, G. W.; Bellouin, N.; Bauer, S. E.; Bergman, T.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kokkola, H.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; van Noije, T.; Pringle, K. J.; von Salzen, K.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors, we investigate the effects of individual processes in one particular model (HadGEM3-UKCA), and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global mean profile and zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. Convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulphate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea-salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number, while the profiles of larger particles are controlled by the same processes as the component mass profiles, plus the size distribution of

  4. What Controls the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol? Relationships Between Process Sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and Inter-Model Variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN >3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN>100 nm) are controlled by the

  5. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Kokkola, Harri; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; van Noije, Twan; Pringle, Kirsty J.; von Salzen, Knut; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN > 3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN > 100 nm) are controlled by the

  6. Autonomous Ozone and Aerosol LIDAR Profiling of the Troposphere: A Synergistic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    LIDAR technology is an excellent tool to probe the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere at high spatial and temporal resolution. This provides the critical vertical context for the interpretation of ground-based chemistry measurements, airborne measurements and model/satellite verification and validation. In recent years, Environment Canada has designed several autonomous aerosol LIDAR systems for deployment across several regions of Canada. The current system builds on the successes of these autonomous LIDARS but using a synergistic approach by combining tropospheric ozone DIAL (Differential Absorption LIDAR) technology with simultaneous 3+2+1 aerosol LIDAR measurements. It operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week except during precipitation events. The system is operated remotely and the data are updated every hour to a website to allow near real-time capability. A few case studies are shown emphasizing the synergistic approach of coupling ozone and aerosol profiles to better understand air quality impacts on local and regional scales.

  7. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of particle number concentrations n50, dry considering dry aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (reservoir of CCN in the case of marine and continental non-desert aerosols), n100, dry (particles with dry radius > 100 nm, reservoir of desert dust CCN), and of n250, dry (particles with dry radius > 250 nm, reservoir of favorable INP), as well as profiles of the particle surface area concentration sdry (used in INP parameterizations) can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients σ with relative uncertainties of a factor of 1.5-2 in the case of n50, dry and n100, dry and of about 25-50 % in the case of n250, dry and sdry. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to distinguish and separate the optical properties of desert aerosols from non-desert aerosol such as continental and marine particles. We investigate the relationship between σ, measured at ambient atmospheric conditions, and n50, dry for marine and continental aerosols, n100, dry for desert dust particles, and n250, dry and sdry for three aerosol types (desert, non-desert continental, marine) and for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple CCN parameterization (with n50, dry or n100, dry as input) and available INP parameterization schemes (with n250, dry and sdry as input) we finally compute

  8. Combining Passive Polarimetric and Lidar Observations from TCAP to Vertically Partition a Multi-Modal Aerosol Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, B.; Ottaviani, M.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Chowdhary, J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Mack, T. L.; Hare, R. J.; Cleckner, C. S.; Rogers, R.; Mueller, D.; Burton, S. P.; Obland, M. D.; Scarino, A. J.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Fast, J. D.; Berg, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    The first airborne deployment associated with the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign was carried out on Cape Cod, Massachusetts during July 2012 using the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) and the NASA Langley B200. The first column located on Cape Cod has the surface based ARM Mobile Facility, which measures aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics, as its anchor point. The second column, 200 km to the East, was chosen to facilitate characterization of the large gradient of AOD near the coast of New England. The G-1 was equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to measure the size, composition and optics of aerosols, together with spectral Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) above the aircraft using the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research. The G1 generally flew at low altitude except when profiling the two columns. The B200, flew at ~ 9 km, above the G1, and operated the world's first airborne three backscatter (355, 532 and 1064 nm) and two extinction (355 and 532 nm) channel high-spectral-resolution lidar, HSRL-2 and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), which provides multi-angle multi-spectral observations of the intensity and polarization over a spectral range from 410 to 2260 nm. The TCAP measurements are ideal for remote sensing of aerosols since a dark ocean allows the full power of the passive intensity and polarization observations to be explored. RSP observations over the ocean have previously been used to retrieve the AOD, particle size and complex refractive index of aerosols, but it was noted that the vertical distribution of the aerosols could affect the accuracy of the retrieval. In this paper we combine HSRL-2 and RSP data to retrieve and partition a multi-modal aerosol model through the column. The lidar intensive variables (ratios of the lidar observations) that do not depend on aerosol load are used to constrain the microphysics of the aerosol modes. Where the classification technique presented

  9. Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosol Vertical Distributions above Svalbard, Norway using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Stalin, S.; Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Burkhart, J. F.; Quinn, P.; Storvold, R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2015 to investigate the processes controlling aerosol concentrations and radiative effects. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) on 9 flights totaling 19 flight hours. Measurements were made of particle number concentration and aerosol light absorption at three wavelengths, similar to those conducted in April 2011 (Bates et al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 2115-2120, 2013). A filter sample was collected on each flight for analyses of trace elements. Additional measurements in the aerosol payload in 2015 included aerosol size distributions obtained using a Printed Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS) and aerosol optical depth obtained using a four wavelength miniature Scanning Aerosol Sun Photometer (miniSASP). The data show most of the column aerosol mass and resulting optical depth in the boundary layer but frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (2000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Transport of these aerosol layers was assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion models. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  10. CART and GSFC raman lidar measurements of atmospheric aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles for EOS validation and ARM radiation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Turner, D. D.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Schwenner, G.; Evans, K. D.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Tooman, T.

    1998-01-01

    The aerosol retrieval algorithms used by the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) sensors on the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) AM-1 platform operate by comparing measured radiances with tabulated radiances that have been computed for specific aerosol models. These aerosol models are based almost entirely on surface and/or column averaged measurements and so may not accurately represent the ambient aerosol properties. Therefore, to validate these EOS algorithms and to determine the effects of aerosols on the clear-sky radiative flux, we have begun to evaluate the vertical variability of ambient aerosol properties using the aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured by the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Raman Lidars. Using the procedures developed for the GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL), we have developed and have begun to implement algorithms for the CART Raman Lidar to routinely provide profiles of aerosol extinction and backscattering during both nighttime and ,daytime operations. Aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles are computed for both lidar systems using data acquired during the 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). By integrating these aerosol extinction profiles, we derive measurements of aerosol optical thickness and compare these with coincident sun photometer measurements. We also use these measurements to measure the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio S(sub a) (i.e. 'lidar ratio'). Furthermore, we use the simultaneous water vapor measurements acquired by these Raman lidars to investigate the effects of water vapor on aerosol optical properties.

  11. Stratospheric aerosol profile retrievals from SCIAMACHY limb-scatter observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Florian; Von Savigny, PD Christian; Rozanov, Alexei; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Brinkhoff, Lena; Burrows, John

    2012-07-01

    Stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles are retrieved from SCIAMACHY/Envisat limb-scatter observations in the visible and near-IR spectral range. The retrieval scheme is based on an optimal estimation approach in combination with the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN and employs normalized and paired limb-radiance profiles at 470 nm and 750 nm. This contribution provides an overview of the retrieval approach adopted and includes first results on stratospheric aerosol time series spanning the entire duration of the Envisat mission, i.e. from fall 2002 to the present. The time series display obvious signatures of the volcanic eruptions as well as strong pyroCb events that occurred during the period studied. Comparison of the stratospheric extinction profiles with co-located SAGE II aerosol extinction profiles yields agreement of the global mean profiles within 20% between 15 and 35 km altitude.

  12. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höpner, F.; Bender, F. A.-M.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Praveen, P. S.; Bosch, C.; Ogren, J. A.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, Ö.; Ramanathan, V.

    2015-02-01

    A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX), conducted in February and March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH) in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV) to perform vertical in-situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption. These measurements were used together with surface-based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL) observations and aerosol in-situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles. Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. Mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717±604 cm-3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo-Gangetic Plain (2247±370 cm-3). Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Compared to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) conducted in winter 1999, elevated aerosol layers with increased aerosol number concentration were observed more frequently in 2012. However, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm)=8.5±4.2 Wm-1) was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999. By combining vertical in-situ measured particle absorption with scattering calculated with Mie-theory, layers with single-scattering albedo (SSA) values of specific source regions were derived and utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for dry conditions were found to be 0.94±0.02 and 0.91±0.02 for air masses from the Arabian Sea (and

  13. Effect of particle settling on lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Groß, Silke

    2016-04-01

    A large amount of desert aerosol is transported in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) westwards from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean. Lidar profiles of transported Saharan aerosol may contain some information about the vertically-resolved aerosol microphysics that could be used to characterize processes that affected the measured aerosol during transport. We present modelled lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosol assuming that initially the SAL is well-mixed and that there is no vertical mixing of air within the SAL as soon as it reaches the Atlantic. We consider Stokes gravitational settling of aerosol particles over the ocean. The lidar profiles are calculated using optical models for irregularly-shaped mineral dust particles assuming settling-induced particle removal as function of distance from the SAL top. Within the SAL we find a decrease of both the backscatter coefficients and the linear depolarization ratios with decreasing distance from the SAL top. For example, the linear depolarization ratio at a wavelength of 532nm decreases from 0.289 at 1000m to 0.256 at 200m and 0.215 at 100m below SAL top. We compare the modelled backscatter coefficients and linear depolarization ratios to ground-based lidar measurements performed during the SALTRACE field campaign in Barbados (Caribbean) and find agreement within the estimated uncertainties. We discuss the uncertainties of our modeling approach in our presentation. Assumed mineral dust particle shapes, assumed particle mixture properties, and assumptions about processes in the SAL over the continent and the ocean are important aspects to be considered. Uncertainties are relevant for the potential of lidar measurements of transported Saharan dust to learn something about processes occuring in the SAL during long-range transport. We also compare our modeling results to modeling results previously published in the literature.

  14. Studying the vertical aerosol extinction coefficient by comparing in situ airborne data and elastic backscatter lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Herrmann, Erik; Bucci, Silvia; Fierli, Federico; Cairo, Francesco; Gysel, Martin; Tillmann, Ralf; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Di Liberto, Luca; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Weingartner, Ernest; Virtanen, Annele; Mentel, Thomas F.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol particle optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ˜ 50 and 800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol particle size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a single wavelength polarization diversity elastic lidar system provided estimates of aerosol extinction coefficients using the Klett method to accomplish the inversion of the signal, for a vertically resolved comparison between in situ and remote-sensing results. Note, however, that the comparison was for the most part done in the altitude range where the overlap function is incomplete and accordingly uncertainties are larger. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20 % was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 and 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ˜ 10:00 LT - local time) before the mixing layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ˜ 12:00 LT) the ML was fully developed, resulting in

  15. Doppler Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Wind Profiles Using the Aerosol Double Edge Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, Savyasachee; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin

    2000-01-01

    The development of a ground based direct detection Doppler lidar based on the recently described aerosol double edge technique is reported. A pulsed, injection seeded Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm is used to make range resolved measurements of atmospheric winds in the free troposphere. The wind measurements are determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the laser signal backscattered from atmospheric aerosols. The lidar instrument and double edge method are described and initial tropospheric wind profile measurements are presented. Wind profiles are reported for both day and night operation. The measurements extend to altitudes as high as 14 km and are compared to rawinsonde wind profile data from Dulles airport in Virginia. Vertical resolution of the lidar measurements is 330 m and the rms precision of the measurements is a low as 0.6 m/s.

  16. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höpner, F.; Bender, F. A.-M.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Praveen, P. S.; Bosch, C.; Ogren, J. A.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, Ö.; Ramanathan, V.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX), conducted from 16 February to 30 March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH) in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV) to perform vertical in situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption coefficients. These measurements were used together with surface- based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL) observations and aerosol in situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles.Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. The mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717 ± 604 cm-3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo-Gangetic Plain (2247 ± 370 cm-3). Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. This feature is different compared to what was observed during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) conducted in winter 1999, where aerosol number concentrations generally decreased with height. In contrast, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm) = 8.5 ± 4.2 Wm-1) was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999.Layers with source region specific single-scattering albedo (SSA) values were derived by combining vertical in situ particle absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients calculated with Mie theory. These SSA layers were utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for 550 nm for dry

  17. Vertical profile of 137Cs in soil.

    PubMed

    Krstić, D; Nikezić, D; Stevanović, N; Jelić, M

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a vertical distribution of 137Cs in undisturbed soil was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Soil samples were taken from the surroundings of the city of Kragujevac in central Serbia during spring-summer of 2001. The sampling locations were chosen in such a way that the influence of soil characteristics on depth distribution of 137Cs in soil could be investigated. Activity of 137Cs in soil samples was measured using a HpGe detector and multi-channel analyzer. Based on vertical distribution of 137Cs in soil which was measured for each of 10 locations, the diffusion coefficient of 137Cs in soil was determined. In the next half-century, 137Cs will remain as the source of the exposure. Fifteen years after the Chernobyl accident, and more than 30 years after nuclear probes, the largest activity of 137Cs is still within 10 cm of the upper layer of the soil. This result confirms that the penetration of 137Cs in soil is a very slow process. Experimental results were compared with two different Green functions and no major differences were found between them. While both functions fit experimental data well in the upper layer of soil, the fitting is not so good in deeper layers. Although the curves obtained by these two functions are very close to each other, there are some differences in the values of parameters acquired by them. PMID:15388151

  18. Analysis of DIAL/HSRL aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles during the SEAC4RS campaign with an aerosol assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C. J.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Randles, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We retrieve aerosol concentrations and optical information from vertical profiles of airborne 532 nm extinction and 532 and 1064 nm backscatter measurements made during the SEAC4RS summer 2013 campaign. The observations are from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) on board the NASA DC-8. Instead of retrieving information about aerosol microphysical properties such as indexes of refraction, we seek information more directly applicable to an aerosol transport model - in our case the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) module used in the GEOS-5 Earth modeling system. A joint atmosphere/aerosol mini-reanalysis was performed for the SEAC4RS period using GEOS-5. The meteorological reanalysis followed the MERRA-2 atmospheric reanalysis protocol, and aerosol information from MODIS, MISR, and AERONET provided a constraint on the simulated aerosol optical depth (i.e., total column loading of aerosols). We focus on the simulated concentrations of 10 relevant aerosol species simulated by the GOCART module: dust, sulfate, and organic and black carbon. Our first retrieval algorithm starts with the SEAC4RS mini-reanalysis and adjusts the concentration of each GOCART aerosol species so that differences between the observed and simulated backscatter and extinction measurements are minimized. In this case, too often we are unable to simulate the observations by simple adjustment of the aerosol concentrations. A second retrieval approach adjusts both the aerosol concentrations and the optical parameters (i.e., assigned mass extinction efficiency) associated with each GOCART species. We present results from DC-8 flights over smoke from forest fires over the western US using both retrieval approaches. Finally, we compare our retrieved quantities with in-situ observations of aerosol absorption, scattering, and mass concentrations at flight altitude.

  19. The Aerosol Limb Imager: acousto-optic imaging of limb-scattered sunlight for stratospheric aerosol profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elash, B. J.; Bourassa, A. E.; Loewen, P. R.; Lloyd, N. D.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    The Aerosol Limb Imager (ALI) is an optical remote sensing instrument designed to image scattered sunlight from the atmospheric limb. These measurements are used to retrieve spatially resolved information of the stratospheric aerosol distribution, including spectral extinction coefficient and particle size. Here we present the design, development and test results of an ALI prototype instrument. The long-term goal of this work is the eventual realization of ALI on a satellite platform in low earth orbit, where it can provide high spatial resolution observations, both in the vertical and cross-track. The instrument design uses a large-aperture acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) to image the sunlit stratospheric limb in a selectable narrow wavelength band ranging from the visible to the near infrared. The ALI prototype was tested on a stratospheric balloon flight from the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) launch facility in Timmins, Canada, in September 2014. Preliminary analysis of the hyperspectral images indicates that the radiance measurements are of high quality, and we have used these to retrieve vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient from 650 to 1000 nm, along with one moment of the particle size distribution. Those preliminary results are promising and development of a satellite prototype of ALI within the Canadian Space Agency is ongoing.

  20. The Vertical Profile of Ocean Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, R. M.; Nikurashin, M.; McDougall, T. J.; Mashayek, A.

    2014-12-01

    The upwelling of bottom waters through density surfaces in the deep ocean is not possible unless the sloping nature of the sea floor is taken into account. The bottom--intensified mixing arising from interaction of internal tides and geostrophic motions with bottom topography implies that mixing is a decreasing function of height in the deep ocean. This would further imply that the diapycnal motion in the deep ocean is downward, not upwards as is required by continuity. This conundrum regarding ocean mixing and upwelling in the deep ocean will be resolved by appealing to the fact that the ocean does not have vertical side walls. Implications of the conundrum for the representation of ocean mixing in climate models will be discussed.

  1. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  2. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOEpatents

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  3. Vertical distribution of dimethylsulfide, sulfur dioxide, aerosol ions, and radon over the northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Berresheim, H.; Andreae, T. W.; Kritz, M. A.; Bates, T. S.

    1988-01-01

    The vertical distributions, in temperate latitudes, of dimethylsulfide (DMS), SO2, radon, methanesulfonate (MSA), nonsea-salt sulfate (nss-sulfate), and aerosol Na(+), NH4(+), and NO(-) ions were determined in samples collected by an aircraft over the northeast Pacific Ocean during May 3-12, 1985. DMS was also determined in surface seawater. It was found that DMS concentrations, both in seawater and in the atmospheric boundary layer, were significantly lower than the values reported previously for subtropical and tropical regions, reflecting the seasonal variability in the temperate North Pacific. The vertical profiles of DMS, MSA, SO2, and nss-sulfate were found to be strongly dependent on the convective stability of the atmosphere and on air mass origin. Biogenic sulfur emissions could account for most of the sulfur budget in the boundary layer, while the long-range transport of continentally derived air masses was mainly responsible for the elevated levels of both SO2 and nss-sulfate in the free troposphere.

  4. Vertical velocity in cirrus case obtained from wind profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Ran; Cox, Stephen K.

    1993-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in the climate and general circulation because they significantly modulate the radiation properties of the atmosphere. However understanding the processes that govern their presence is made difficult by their high altitude, variable thickness, complex microphysical structure, and relatively little knowledge of the vertical motion field. In the FIRE 2 (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) experiment, a 404 MHz wind profiler was set up to provide continuous measurements of clear air wind field at Parsons, Kansas. Simultaneously, the NOAA wind profiler network supplied a wider spacial scale observation. On 26 Nov. 1991, the most significant cirrus cloud phenomena during the experiment with a jet streak at 250 Mb occurred. Analyses of the vertical wind velocity are made by utilizing different methods based on wind profiler data, among them the direct measurements from CSU wind profiler and NOAA network wind profilers, VAD (Velocity Azimuth Display) technique and the kinematic method.

  5. Profile of heating rate due to aerosols using lidar and skyradiometer in SKYNET Hefei site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Liu, D.; Xie, C.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on climate due to their important role in modifying atmosphere energy budget. On global scale, the direct radiative forcing is estimated to be in the range of -0.9 to -0.1 Wm-2 for aerosols [1]. Yet, these estimates are subject to very large uncertainties because of uncertainties in spatial and temporal variations of aerosols. At local scales, as aerosol properties can vary spatially and temporally, radiative forcing due to aerosols can be also very different and it can exceed the global value by an order of magnitude. Hence, it is very important to investigate aerosol loading, properties, and radiative forcing due to them in detail on local regions of climate significance. Haze and dust events in Hefei, China are explored by Lidar and Skyradiometer. Aerosol optical properties including the AOD, SSA, AAE and size distribution are analysed by using the SKYRAD.PACK [2] and presented in this paper. Furthermore, the radiative forcing due to aerosols and the heating rate in the ATM are also calculated using SBDART model [3]. The results are shown that the vertical heating rate is tightly related to aerosol profile. References: 1. IPCC. 2007. Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basic. Contribution of Working Group I Contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report. Solomon S, Qing D H, Manning M, et al. eds., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, N Y, USA. 2. Nakajima, T., G. Tonna, R. Rao, Y. Kaufman, and B. Holben, 1996: Use of sky brightness measurements from ground for remote sensing of particulate poly dispersions, Appl. Opt., 35, 2672-2686. 3. Ricchiazzi et al 1998. SBDART: a research and teaching software tool for plane-parallel radiative transfer in the Earth's atmosphere,Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society,79,2101-2114.

  6. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of

  7. Comparing Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Profiles and Cloud Vertical Structure from Multiwavelength Raman Lidar Retrievals and Radiosounding Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Surós, Montserrat; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Markowicz, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    A study of comparison of water vapor mixing ratio profiles, relative humidity profiles, and cloud vertical structures using two different instruments, a multiwavelength Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman lidar and radiosoundings, is presented. The observations were taken by the lidar located in Warsaw center and the radiosoundings located about 30km to the North in Legionowo (Poland). We compared the ground-based remote sensing technology with in-situ method in order to improve knowledge about water content thought the atmosphere and cloud formation. The method used for retrieving the cloud vertical structure can be improved comparing the radiosonde results with the lidar observations, which show promising results.

  8. Temporal variability of aerosol optical thickness vertical distribution observed from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Travis D.; Zhang, Jianglong; Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2016-08-01

    Temporal variability in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) derived from the 0.532 µm aerosol extinction coefficient is described using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations over 8.5 years (June 2006 to December 2014). Temporal variability of CALIOP column-integrated AOT is largely consistent with total column AOT trends from several passive satellite sensors, such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor. Globally, a 0.0002 AOT per year positive trend in deseasonalized CALIOP total column AOT for daytime conditions is attributed to corresponding changes in near-surface (i.e., 0.0-0.5 km or 0.5-1.0 km above ground level (agl)) aerosol particle loading, while a -0.0006 AOT per year trend during nighttime is attributed to elevated (i.e., 1.0-2.0 km or >2.0 km agl) aerosols. Regionally, increasing daytime CALIOP AOTs are found over Southern Africa and India, mostly due to changes in aerosol loading at the 1.0-2.0 km and 0.0-0.5 km agl layers, respectively. Decreasing daytime CALIOP AOTs are observed over Northern Africa, Eastern U.S., and South America (due mostly to elevated aerosol loading), while the negative CALIOP AOT trends found over Eastern China, Europe, and Western U.S. are due mostly to aerosol layers nearer the surface. To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide both a globally comprehensive estimation of the temporal variation in aerosol vertical distribution and an insight into passive sensor column AOT trends in the vertical domain.

  9. Vertical distribution of aerosols in the vicinity of Mexico City during MILAGRO-2006 Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, P.A.; Kleinman, L.; Eichinger, W. E.; Holder, H.; Prueger, J.; Wang, J.

    2010-02-01

    On 7 March 2006, a mobile, ground-based, vertical pointing, elastic lidar system made a North-South transect through the Mexico City basin. Column averaged, aerosol size distribution (ASD) measurements were made on the ground concurrently with the lidar measurements. The ASD ground measurements allowed calculation of the column averaged mass extinction efficiency (MEE) for the lidar system (1064 nm). The value of column averaged MEE was combined with spatially resolved lidar extinction coefficients to produce total aerosol mass concentration estimates with the resolution of the lidar (1.5 m vertical spatial and 1 s temporal). Airborne ASD measurements from DOE G-1 aircraft made later in the day on 7 March 2006, allowed the evaluation of the assumptions of constant ASD with height and time used for estimating the column averaged MEE. The results showed that the aerosol loading within the basin is about twice what is observed outside of the basin. The total aerosol base concentrations observed in the basin are of the order of 200 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and the base levels outside are of the order of 100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The local heavy traffic events can introduce aerosol levels near the ground as high as 900 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The article presents the methodology for estimating aerosol mass concentration from mobile, ground-based lidar measurements in combination with aerosol size distribution measurements. An uncertainty analysis of the methodology is also presented.

  10. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the retrieval of vertical aerosol properties from combined lidar/radiometer data: development and distribution in EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Bril, A.; Goloub, P.; Tanré, D.; Pappalardo, G.; Wandinger, U.; Chaikovskaya, L.; Denisov, S.; Grudo, Y.; Lopatin, A.; Karol, Y.; Lapyonok, T.; Amiridis, V.; Ansmann, A.; Apituley, A.; Allados-Arboledas, L.; Binietoglou, I.; Boselli, A.; D'Amico, G.; Freudenthaler, V.; Giles, D.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Kokkalis, P.; Nicolae, D.; Oshchepkov, S.; Papayannis, A.; Perrone, M. R.; Pietruczuk, A.; Rocadenbosch, F.; Sicard, M.; Slutsker, I.; Talianu, C.; De Tomasi, F.; Tsekeri, A.; Wagner, J.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar/radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data by the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height-dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode. The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Intercomparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLNET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  11. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the retrieval of vertical aerosol properties from combined lidar/radiometer data: development and distribution in EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Bril, Andrey; Goloub, Philippe; Tanré, Didier; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Wandinger, Ulla; Chaikovskaya, Ludmila; Denisov, Sergey; Grudo, Jan; Lopatin, Anton; Karol, Yana; Lapyonok, Tatsiana; Amiridis, Vassilis; Ansmann, Albert; Apituley, Arnoud; Allados-Arboledas, Lucas; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Boselli, Antonella; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Freudenthaler, Volker; Giles, David; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Nicolae, Doina; Oshchepkov, Sergey; Papayannis, Alex; Perrone, Maria Rita; Pietruczuk, Alexander; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sicard, Michaël; Slutsker, Ilya; Talianu, Camelia; De Tomasi, Ferdinando; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Wagner, Janet; Wang, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar/radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data. The algorithm starts with the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode.The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Intercomparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLINET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  12. Measurements of the Vertical Structure of Aerosols and Clouds Over the Ocean Using Micro-Pulse LIDAR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Bates, David; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The determination of the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds over the ocean is needed for accurate retrievals of ocean color from satellites observations. The presence of absorbing aerosol layers, especially at altitudes above the boundary layer, has been shown to influence the calculation of ocean color. Also, satellite data must be correctly screened for the presence of clouds, particularly cirrus, in order to measure ocean color. One instrument capable of providing this information is a lidar, which uses pulses of laser light to profile the vertical distribution of aerosol and cloud layers in the atmosphere. However, lidar systems prior to the 1990s were large, expensive, and not eye-safe which made them unsuitable for cruise deployments. During the 1990s the first small, autonomous, and eye-safe lidar system became available: the micro-pulse lidar, or MPL. The MPL is a compact and eye-safe lidar system capable of determining the range of aerosols and clouds by firing a short pulse of laser light (523 nm) and measuring the time-of-flight from pulse transmission to reception of a returned signal. The returned signal is a function of time, converted into range using the speed of light, and is proportional to the amount of light backscattered by atmospheric molecules (Rayleigh scattering), aerosols, and clouds. The MPL achieves ANSI eye-safe standards by sending laser pulses at low energy (micro-J) and expanding the beam to 20.32 cm in diameter. A fast pulse-repetition-frequency (2500 Hz) is used to achieve a good signal-to-noise, despite the low output energy. The MPL has a small field-of-view (< 100 micro-rad) and signals received with the instrument do not contain multiple scattering effects. The MPL has been used successfully at a number of long-term sites and also in several field experiments around the world.

  13. Relationships among cloud occurrence frequency, overlap, and effective thickness derived from CALIPSO and CloudSat merged cloud vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Seiji; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Miller, Walter F.; Rose, Fred G.; Chen, Yan; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    A cloud frequency of occurrence matrix is generated using merged cloud vertical profiles derived from the satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and cloud profiling radar. The matrix contains vertical profiles of cloud occurrence frequency as a function of the uppermost cloud top. It is shown that the cloud fraction and uppermost cloud top vertical profiles can be related by a cloud overlap matrix when the correlation length of cloud occurrence, which is interpreted as an effective cloud thickness, is introduced. The underlying assumption in establishing the above relation is that cloud overlap approaches random overlap with increasing distance separating cloud layers and that the probability of deviating from random overlap decreases exponentially with distance. One month of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and CloudSat data (July 2006) support these assumptions, although the correlation length sometimes increases with separation distance when the cloud top height is large. The data also show that the correlation length depends on cloud top hight and the maximum occurs when the cloud top height is 8 to 10 km. The cloud correlation length is equivalent to the decorrelation distance introduced by Hogan and Illingworth (2000) when cloud fractions of both layers in a two-cloud layer system are the same. The simple relationships derived in this study can be used to estimate the top-of-atmosphere irradiance difference caused by cloud fraction, uppermost cloud top, and cloud thickness vertical profile differences.

  14. [Seasonal variations in the vertical distribution of aerosols during dry haze periods in regions around Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting-Ting; Qing, Yan; Geng, Fu-Hai; Chen, Yong-Hang; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Qiong; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2012-07-01

    Based on the onboard lidar data from CALIPSO satellite of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from January 2007 to November 2010, the vertical distribution of optical and micro-physical properties of aerosols around Shanghai during the haze periods when relative humidity less than 80% were revealed by analyzing the parameters of 532 nm total attenuated backscatter coefficient, volume depolarization ratio and total attenuated color ratio. The results showed that during dry haze periods, the scattering ability of lower troposphere (0-2 km) was the highest and the main constituents were regular aerosols. The scattering ability of the upper troposphere (8-10 km) was the lowest and the proportion of irregular aerosols was the highest among the five altitude layers. In addition, the scattering ability of the altitude range (2-8 km) was lower than that of the lower troposphere, and the scattering ability and irregularity of aerosols at different altitude levels within the range were close to each other. Fine particle aerosols were the dominant aerosols in altitude range of 0-10 km. To be noted, the proportion of fine particles decreased with increasing altitude within the altitude range of 2-8 km. The proportion of large and irregular aerosols were higher in spring, whereas the proportion of fine and regular aerosols were higher in summer. According to the analysis of a dry haze episode on May 7th, 2007, it was found that a mass of aerosols mainly distributed within the altitude range of 0-1.5 km and partially within the altitude range of 4.0-5.5 km. The HYSPLIT model was applied to analyze the sources of aerosols in the episode, and the results indicated that the dry haze was mainly caused not only by local emissions but also by the dust aerosols transported from Mongolia, the northwest and north of China by the airflow.

  15. Profiling structured beams using injected aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, N. D.; Starodub, Dmitri; Lomb, Lukas; Hampton, Christina Y.; Martin, Andrew V.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Rudek, Benedikt; Foucar, Lutz; Kimmel, Nils; Weidenspointner, Georg; Hauser, Günther; Holl, Peter; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Liang, MengNing; Hunter, Mark S.; Gumprecht, Lars; Coppola, Nicola; Wunderer, Cornelia; Graafsman, Heinz; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Ekeberg, Tomas; Hantke, Max; Fleckenstein, Holger; Hirsemann, Helmut; Nass, Karol; White, Thomas A.; Tobias, Herbert J.; Farquar, George R.; Benner, W. Henry; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Reich, Christian; Hartmann, Andreas; Soltau, Heike; Marchesini, Stefano; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Strueder, Lothar; Ullrich, Joachim; Bucksbaum, Philip; Hodgson, Keith O.; Frank, Mathias; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.; Bogan, Michael J.

    2012-10-01

    Profiling structured beams produced by X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) is crucial to both maximizing signal intensity for weakly scattering targets and interpreting their scattering patterns. Earlier ablative imprint studies describe how to infer the X-ray beam profile from the damage that an attenuated beam inflicts on a substrate. However, the beams in-situ profile is not directly accessible with imprint studies because the damage profile could be different from the actual beam profile. On the other hand, although a Shack-Hartmann sensor is capable of in-situ profiling, its lenses may be quickly damaged at the intense focus of hard X-ray FEL beams. We describe a new approach that probes the in-situ morphology of the intense FEL focus. By studying the translations in diffraction patterns from an ensemble of randomly injected sub-micron latex spheres, we were able to determine the non-Gaussian nature of the intense FEL beam at the Linac Coherent Light Source (SLAC National Laboratory) near the FEL focus. We discuss an experimental application of such a beam-profiling technique, and the limitations we need to overcome before it can be widely applied.

  16. Aerosols and Precipitation Retrievals over Eureka by Remote Sensing: Validation of Space Based Profiling Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaubey, J. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Hudak, D. R.; Rodriguez, P.; Ivanescu, L.; Eloranta, E.; Duck, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols and precipitation are among the agents responsible for the ongoing changes in the Arctic climate and the hydrological cycle. The seasonal variations of Arctic aerosols (Arctic haze for e.g.) are linked to the transport efficiency as well as precipitation (wet) scavenging. Aside from affecting aerosol concentrations, precipitation is an important hydrological variable that affects the moisture budget of the atmosphere. Aerosols, in turn, influence the vertical distribution of clouds and this induces changes in the precipitation pattern. The spatial and temporal sparsity of precipitation measurements over the Arctic region means that satellite remote sensing techniques take on an importance that considerably exceeds their role south of the Arctic circle. Radar reflectivity and snow profiles from CloudSat (in support of cloud and precipitation analyses) and backscattering measurements from CALIOP (investigations of aerosol and small cloud particle properties) can be used to study Arctic winter clouds and precipitation and the role of aerosols in their formation. In this study we attempt to validate satellite-based profiling retrievals of precipitation parameters using AHSRL (Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar), CRL (CANDAC Raman Lidar) and MMCR (Milli-Meter Cloud Radar) profiles acquired at the PEARL high-Arctic site in Eureka (80 °N, 86 °W), Nunavut, Canada. As part of the process of validating the profiling retrievals we aspire to learn more about the mechanisms controlling aerosol, cloud and precipitation inter-dynamics. In addition, ground-based, high-frequency observations of precipitation will be used for characterizing precipitation totals as well as the conditional probability of the type of precipitation (rain or snow) and thus to help understand and validate comparable information extracted from the satellite retrievals. We also aim to characterize different particle types using AHSRL and CRL depolarization profiles, MMCR Doppler velocity

  17. On the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols and Long-Range Transport Inferred from Calipso Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepte, Charles; Winker, David; Kittaka, Chieko

    Knowledge on the long-range transport and evolution of aerosols originating from natural and anthropogenic sources is important for understanding their impact on the composition of the atmosphere and the climate system. Over the past several decades a wealth of information on aerosol distributions has been obtained from ground-based instrument networks, dedicated field experiments, and passive remote sensing satellite instruments that has helped to establish the primary aerosol transport pathways over the globe. In many instances, these pathways are broadly reproduced geographically in different chemical-transport models. The models, however, have difficulties at times with accurately projecting the vertical distribution of aerosols, which can lead to significant discrepancies in the lifetimes of the modeled aerosols. This issue is compounded at high latitudes where observations are especially sparse. New measurements from the CALIPSO satellite mission can provide additional insight on the vertical distribution of aerosols over the globe. The mission is a joint effort between the United States (NASA) and France (CNES) and was launched on April 28, 2008 into the A-train satellite constellation. CALIPSO's primary instrument is a two-wavelength polarization-sensitive lidar operating at 532 and 1064 nm with a repetition rate of 20.16 Hz. Lidar observations in the lower troposphere (¡ 8 km) have a vertical resolution of 30 m for the 532 nm channel and 60 m for the 1064 channel. The instrument has been operational since early June 2006. The CALIPSO data set reveals a rich distribution of aerosols in clear and cloudy scenes for both day and night conditions. Information on aerosol type is also available based on their wavelength dependence and polarization characteristics. From these data, a climatology on the vertical and geographic distribution and optical characteristics of aerosols (and clouds) is being developed that can aid diagnostic studies of aerosol transport

  18. LIDAR Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 mass and chemical ...

  19. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevâg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Åyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The ability of 11 models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model intercomparison initiative (AeroCom II), is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded data set of aerosol extinction profiles built for this purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 subcontinental regions show that five models improved, whereas three degraded in reproducing the interregional variability in Zα0-6 km, the mean extinction height diagnostic, as computed from the CALIOP aerosol profiles over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models' performance remains highly variable, the simulation of the timing of the Zα0-6 km peak season has also improved for all but two models from AeroCom Phase I to Phase II. The biases in Zα0-6 km are smaller in all regions except Central Atlantic, East Asia, and North and South Africa. Most of the models now underestimate Zα0-6 km over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the performance and evolution of the individual models and for the intermodel diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties contributing to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  20. Retrievals of Profiles of Fine And Coarse Aerosols Using Lidar And Radiometric Space Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Tanre, Didier; Leon, Jean-Francois; Pelon, Jacques; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In couple of years we expect the launch of the CALIPSO lidar spaceborne mission designed to observe aerosols and clouds. CALIPSO will collect profiles of the lidar attenuated backscattering coefficients in two spectral wavelengths (0.53 and 1.06 microns). Observations are provided along the track of the satellite around the globe from pole to pole. The attenuated backscattering coefficients are sensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosol particles, their shape and size. However the information is insufficient to be mapped into unique aerosol physical properties and vertical distribution. Infinite number of physical solutions can reconstruct the same two wavelength backscattered profile measured from space. CALIPSO will fly in formation with the Aqua satellite and the MODIS spectro-radiometer on board. Spectral radiances measured by MODIS in six channels between 0.55 and 2.13 microns simultaneously with the CALIPSO observations can constrain the solutions and resolve this ambiguity, albeit under some assumptions. In this paper we describe the inversion method and apply it to aircraft lidar and MODIS data collected over a dust storm off the coast of West Africa during the SHADE experiment. It is shown that the product of the single scattering albedo, omega, and the phase function, P, for backscattering can be retrieved from the synergism between measurements avoiding a priori hypotheses required for inverting lidar measurements alone. The resultant value of (omega)P(180 deg.) = 0.016/sr are significantly different from what is expected using Mie theory, but are in good agreement with recent results obtained from lidar observations of dust episodes. The inversion is robust in the presence of noise of 10% and 20% in the lidar signal in the 0.53 and 1.06 pm channels respectively. Calibration errors of the lidar of 5 to 10% can cause an error in optical thickness of 20 to 40% respectively in the tested cases. The lidar calibration errors cause degradation in the

  1. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  2. In Situ Aerosol Profile Measurements and Comparisons with SAGE 3 Aerosol Extinction and Surface Area Profiles at 68 deg North

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Under funding from this proposal three in situ profile measurements of stratospheric sulfate aerosol and ozone were completed from balloon-borne platforms. The measured quantities are aerosol size resolved number concentration and ozone. The one derived product is aerosol size distribution, from which aerosol moments, such as surface area, volume, and extinction can be calculated for comparison with SAGE III measurements and SAGE III derived products, such as surface area. The analysis of these profiles and comparison with SAGE III extinction measurements and SAGE III derived surface areas are provided in Yongxiao (2005), which comprised the research thesis component of Mr. Jian Yongxiao's M.S. degree in Atmospheric Science at the University of Wyoming. In addition analysis continues on using principal component analysis (PCA) to derive aerosol surface area from the 9 wavelength extinction measurements available from SAGE III. Ths paper will present PCA components to calculate surface area from SAGE III measurements and compare these derived surface areas with those available directly from in situ size distribution measurements, as well as surface areas which would be derived from PCA and Thomason's algorithm applied to the four wavelength SAGE II extinction measurements.

  3. New approach for aerosol profiling with a lidar onboard an ultralight aircraft: application to the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chazette, Patrick; Sanak, Joseph; Dulac, François

    2007-12-15

    A new airborne instrumental payload has been designed for an ultralight aircraft to determine the vertical profile of aerosol optical properties. It is based on Lidar Aérosols UltraViolet Aéroporté (LAUVA), a compact backscattering lidar system emitting at the wavelength of 355 nm. We operated this airborne configuration in the Sahel from the city of Niamey (Niger) during the first campaign of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) in January-February 2006, when aerosols from both soil dust and savannah fires cause large visibility reductions. We take advantage of the lidar capability of pointing in different directions for retrieving the vertical profile of the aerosol backscatter to extinction ratio (BER). A synergy with a scatterometer (880 nm) and a ground-based sunphotometer allows us to further determine the vertical profile of Angström exponent (a). We identify three types of aerosol layers up to about 5 km below the free troposphere, dominated by biomass burning (BB) particles, mineral dust (D) particles, and a mixing between BB and D particles, respectively, associated with BER (a) values close to 0.008 sr(-1) (1.5), 0.025 sr(-1) (0), and 0.015 sr(-1) (0.4-1).

  4. Inter-comparison of CALIPSO and CloudSat retrieved profiles of aerosol and cloud microphysical parameters with aircraft profiles over a tropical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmakumari, B.; Harikishan, G.; Maheskumar, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Satellites play a major role in understanding the spatial and vertical distribution of aerosols and cloud microphysical parameters over a large area. However, the inherent limitations in satellite retrievals can be improved through inter-comparisons with airborne platforms. Over the Indian sub-continent, the vertical profiles retrieved from space-borne lidar such as CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) on board the satellite CALIPSO and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board the satellite CloudSat were inter- compared with the aircraft observations conducted during Cloud Aerosol Interactions and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX). In the absence of high clouds, both aircraft and CALIOP showed similar features of aerosol layering and water-ice cloud signatures. As CALIOP could not penetrate the thick clouds, the aerosol information below the cloud is missed. While the aircraft could measure high concentrations below the cloud base and above the low clouds in the presence of high clouds. The aircraft derived liquid water content (LWC) and droplet effective radii (Re) showed steady increase from cloud base to cloud top with a variable cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). While the CloudSat derived LWC, CDNC and Re showed increase from the cloud top to cloud base in contradiction to the aircraft measurements. The CloudSat profiles are underestimated as compared to the corresponding aircraft profiles. Validation of satellite retrieved vertical profiles with aircraft measurements is very much essential over the tropics to improve the retrieval algorithms and to constrain the uncertainties in the regional cloud parameterization schemes.

  5. Apparent abundance and vertical profiles of ozone from OMEGA measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, F.; Zasova, L.; Grassi, D.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Formisano, V.; Ignatiev, N.; Drossart, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Fouchet, T.; OMEGA Team

    In this work we study the vertical and seasonal distribution of O2 by means the 1.27 micron day glow emission in the spectra acquired by OMEGA, the imaging spectrometer on board the ESA mission Mars Express. Limb OMEGA observations have been used to retrieve the vertical distribution of O3 up to 20 km, applying an "onion peeling" procedure. The quenching effect due to the collisions with the CO2 have been taken into account using simultaneously vertical CO2 profiles obtained by the PFS LWC data. OMEGA nadir observations have been used to map the latitude, local time and seasonal distribution of the apparent ozone abundance in the Martian atmosphere and results are discussed. We acknowledge the ESA Headquarters and IFSI-INAF for support to Russian CoIs and the Russian Foundation of Basic Research for grant RFFI 04-02-16856a.

  6. Sensitivity of aerosol-induced effects on numerically simulated squall lines to the vertical distribution of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    The sensitivity of aerosol-induced enhancement of convective strength and precipitation to the vertical distribution is analyzed in the context of numerically simulated squall lines. Recent investigations have hypothesized and demonstrated that an increase in an aerosol loading may lead to enhanced vertical updrafts and potentially more precipitation in a variety of deep convective systems. One of the generally accepted hypotheses for such an enhancement in convective strength suggests that the predominant effect of an increase in aerosol loading is related to enhanced latent heat release in the mid to upper levels of the convective cores. This enhancement has been attributed to an increase in supercooled liquid water that tends to exist in clouds formed in more polluted environments and it is suggested that this water is lofted from below the freezing level to the mixed-phase region of the cloud where the latent heating effects are maximized. However, deep convective cores are quite strong and so a reduction in cloud droplet size due to enhanced aerosol number concentration (which reduces the terminal fall speed) ought to have a negligible effect on the trajectory of the droplets (since the updraft velocity is much larger than the terminal fall speed). Thus, it should be expected that low-level aerosol pollution would have little to no effect on latent heating rates aloft since the droplets will end up in the mixed-phase region regardless of size. Moreover, more recent investigations have shown that aerosol perturbations, especially in squall lines, can lead to less intense cold pools and thus a more optimal state according to RKW theory. Numerical simulations of idealized squall lines are performed to specifically analyze the sensitivity of the aforementioned effects to the vertical distribution of aerosols. The simulations suggest that low-level air tends to either be detrained at the bottom of the convective cores or remains in the convective cores throughout

  7. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films: an intrusive measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, Nicolas; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Caps, Hervé; Grasp Team

    2012-11-01

    Soap films are known to be the basic constituent of complex fluid objects such as bubbles and foams. In order for their weight to be counterbalanced, those objects need to exhibit vertical surface tension profiles, which can only exist due to the presence of surfactant molecules at their interfaces. We here present a method that aims to probe vertical soap films surface tension profiles by use of elasto-capillary deformations. Both cases of free-draining and entertained soap films are investigated, leading the spatio-temporal behavior of the surface tension. We show that this behavior is highly dependent on the nature of the surfactant used to create soap films, emphasizing the influence of the physico-chemistry on the global behavior of the system. We propose order of magnitude calculations, which are in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Vertical soil profiling using a galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach.

    PubMed

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S; Dabas, Michel

    2014-07-23

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument.

  9. Vertical soil profiling using a galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach.

    PubMed

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S; Dabas, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument. PMID:25057135

  10. Vertical Soil Profiling Using a Galvanic Contact Resistivity Scanning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I.; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S.; Dabas, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument. PMID:25057135

  11. Vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity that matches Schumann resonance observations.

    PubMed

    Nickolaenko, Alexander P; Galuk, Yuri P; Hayakawa, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity in the range from 2 to 98 km. The propagation constant of extremely low frequency (ELF) radio waves was computed for this profile by using the full wave solution. A high correspondence is demonstrated of the data thus obtained to the conventional standard heuristic model of ELF propagation constant derived from the Schumann resonance records performed all over the world. We also suggest the conductivity profiles for the ambient day and ambient night conditions. The full wave solution technique was applied for obtaining the corresponding frequency dependence of propagation constant relevant to these profiles. By using these propagation constants, we computed the power spectra of Schumann resonance in the vertical electric field component for the uniform global distribution of thunderstorms and demonstrate their close similarity in all the models. We also demonstrate a strong correspondence between the wave attenuation rate obtained for these conductivity profiles and the measured ones by using the ELF radio transmissions. PMID:26877906

  12. Relating Aerosol Profile and Column Measurements to Surface Concentrations: What Have We Learned from Discover-AQ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    One research goal of the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission was to determine sufficient column profile measurements to relate column integrated quantities such as Aerosol Optical Depth to surface concentrations. I will review the relationship between AOD and PM2.5 at the surface. DISCOVER-AQ in Baltimore, the San Joaquin Valley, Houston and Denver revealed quite different conditions for determining this relationship. In each case, the surface reflectivity made determination of aerosol optical depth challenging, but upward looking columns of aerosol optical depth from sunphotometers provided confirmation of the AOD results from space. In Baltimore, AOD fields reflected PM2.5 concentrations well. In California, however, the low boundary layer heights and dominance of nitrate and organic aerosols made the AOD fields less predictive of PM2.5. In California and Colorado, hydration of the aerosol varied dramatically with aerosol type (especially smoke and dust) and revealed that without an understanding of the degree of aerosol hydration with aerosol composition, the relationship between AOD and PM2.5 will continue to be a challenge. Model predictions in the Baltimore-Washington study are relatively disappointing in helping define the needed physics between the optical and microphysical properties. An overview of the measurements from DISCOVER-AQ which will help define the needed information in a more general case in the future will be given.

  13. TOMS Validation Based on Profiles of Aerosol Properties in the Lower Troposphere as Obtained with Light Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.; Maring, Hal; Savoie, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the University of Miami Aerosol Group (UMAG) in this project was to make measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol properties and aerosol optical depth using a light aircraft. The UMAG developed a light aircraft aerosol package (LAAP) that was used in light aircraft (Cessna 172) during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE). This field campaign took place on Puerto Rico during July 2000. Design details and results from the use of the LAAP were presented at TOMS Science team meetings on April 1998, April 1999, and May 2000. Results from the LAAP collected during the PRIDE Experiment were presented at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, December 2000. Some of the results from the LAAP collected during the PRIDE Experiment have been accepted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research in a "topical section" made up of papers from the PRIDE Program.

  14. Vertical NO2 Profile measurements in Hong Kong using DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenig, Mark; Bräu, Melanie; Zhu, Ying; Lipkowitsch, Ivo; Röttger, Clemens; Fat Lam, Yun

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation we describe our first measurements of vertical NO2 distributions in a street canyon in Hong Kong using different DOAS techniques. One approach is to use mobile cavity-enhanced DOAS (CE-DOAS) measurements on different floors of a high rise building to assemble a profile. In addition to this we use a ToTaL-DOAS (Topographic Target Light Scattering DOAS) approach to measure vertical and horizontal distributions of NO2 SCDs of the Hong Kong skyline including the building we used for the CE-DOAS measurements. As a third option to generate profile information, we use data from the Hong Kong Environmental Protection department (EPD) measurement stations. Each measurement location is at a different height and we used a concentration map we assembled using mobile CE-DOAS measurements which again had been corrected for diurnal variations using a continuously measuring LP-DOAS for horizontal extrapolation. We compare parameterized profiles from those three different methods and discuss how profile information can be used to make urban air quality monitoring more comparable.

  15. The GAW Aerosol Lidar Observation Network (GALION) as a source of near-real time aerosol profile data for model evaluation and assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, R. M.; Pappalardo, G.

    2010-12-01

    In 2007, the WMO Global Atmospheric Watch’s Science Advisory Group on Aerosols described a global network of lidar networks called GAW Aerosol Lidar Observation Network (GALION). GALION has a purpose of providing expanded coverage of aerosol observations for climate and air quality use. Comprised of networks in Asia (AD-NET), Europe (EARLINET and CIS-LINET), North America (CREST and CORALNET), South America (ALINE) and with contribution from global networks such as MPLNET and NDACC, the collaboration provides a unique capability to define aerosol profiles in the vertical. GALION is designed to supplement existing ground-based and column profiling (AERONET, PHOTONS, SKYNET, GAWPFR) stations. In September 2010, GALION held its second workshop and one component of discussion focussed how the network would integrate into model needs. GALION partners have contributed to the Sand and Dust Storm Warning and Analysis System (SDS-WAS) and to assimilation in models such as DREAM. This paper will present the conclusions of those discussions and how these observations can fit into a global model analysis framework. Questions of availability, latency, and aerosol parameters that might be ingested into models will be discussed. An example of where EARLINET and GALION have contributed in near-real time observations was the suite of measurements during the Eyjafjallajokull eruption in Iceland and its impact on European air travel. Lessons learned from this experience will be discussed.

  16. Use of ceilometers for aerosol profile measurements: a comment from AD-Net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Kai, Kenji; Kawai, Kei; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Matsui, Ichiro; Shimizu, Atsushi; Batdorj, Dashdondog

    2014-11-01

    Ceilometer instruments are simple backscatter lidar systems and are usually set in airports for detecting the base of clouds. The instrument can also measure aerosol vertical distribution. Since ceilometers barely detect the molecular backscatter signals, retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an issue. This study investigates applicability of ceilometers to retrieval of optical properties. We make an idealized signal profile with the lidar ratio of 50 sr and calculate the retrieval errors caused by 30% errors of lidar ratio. In the forward inversion, useable (small error) optical properties are backscattering coefficients and the retrieval errors are less than 15% if the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is less than 0.2. The initial backscattering coefficients must be determined from other instruments (e.g., multi-wavelength lidar). Whereas in the backward inversion, if the AOD of idealized signals is larger than 1.5, extinction coefficients converge to the true value (within 5% errors), regardless of lidar ratios and initial conditions. Since there is no need for the system constant or molecular backscatter in this method, ceilometers can be an effective tool for retrieving extinction coefficients of dense aerosols in East Asia.

  17. Lidar Aerosol Profiles Measured From Halifax During Summer 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, L.; Duck, T. J.; Doyle, J.; Harris, R.; Beauchamp, S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere were obtained with a high-power Raman Lidar from Halifax, Nova Scotia (44.63N, 63.58W) on the East Coast of Canada during Summer 2007. Observations throughout the troposphere at high temporal resolution were made possible by using a new dual-receiver setup. The lidar was operated in clear-sky conditions, and several long duration (> 80 hours) data sets were obtained. The measurements reveal the presence of boundary-layer aerosols during episodes of pollution transport from the Eastern US and Canada, and are compared with surface measurements of ozone and other species. Boundary layer development, entrainment and mixing are evident in the data. Structured plumes at higher altitudes are traced back to biomass burning events throughout North America. Aerosols were also observed on two occasions at 15 km in altitude, and are most likely due to pyroconvection. The measurements are being used to help understand transport and mixing processes, and to form a climatology of aerosol export from North America during the summer months.

  18. Radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclone derived from dropsondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yifang

    The scopes of this thesis research are two folds: the first one is to the construct the intensity-based composite radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclones (TC) using GPS-based dropsonde observations and the second one is to identify the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices against the dropsonde composites of TCs. The intensity-based dropsonde composites of TCs advances our understanding of the dynamic and thermal structure of TCs of different intensity along the radial direction in and above the boundary layer where lies the devastating high wind that causes property damages and storm surges. The identification of the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices in representing the radial-vertical profiles of TC of different intensity helps to improve numerical predictions of TCs since most operational TC forecast models need to utilize bogus vortices, such as Mathur vortices, to initialize TC forecasts and simulations. We first screen all available GPS dropsonde data within and round 35 named TCs over the tropical Atlantic basin from 1996 to 2010 and pair them with TC parameters derived from the best-track data provided by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and select 1149 dropsondes that have continuous coverage in the lower troposphere. The composite radial-vertical profiles of tangential wind speed, temperature, mixing ratio and humidity are based for each TC category ranging from "Tropical Storm" (TS) to "Hurricane Category 1" (H1) through "Hurricane Category 5" (H5). The key findings of the dropsonde composites are: (i) all TCs have the maximum tangential wind within 1 km above the ground and a distance of 1-2 times of the radius of maximum wind (RMW) at the surface; (ii) all TCs have a cold ring surrounding the warm core near the boundary layer at a distance of 1-3 times of the RMW and the cold ring structure gradually diminishes at a higher elevation where the warm core structure prevails along the radial direction; (iii) the existence of such shallow cold

  19. The E-PROFILE network of automatic LIDARS and ceilometers for operational monitoring of cloud base, aerosols and volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefele, Alexander; Martucci, Giovanni; Haffelin, Martial; Besson, Florence; Lehmann, Volker

    2014-05-01

    During the last years it has been shown that ceilometers are cost effective instruments for vertical profiling of aerosols with proven skills for volcanic plumes detection. As a reaction to the eruptions of the Icelandic volcanoes in 2010 and 2011 and upon recommendation of the COST ES0702 action EG-CLIMET, EUMETNET created the E-PROFILE activity as part of the observation programme which is supported by 18 national meteorological services. E-PROFILE is the continuation of the operational RADAR wind-profiler network E-WINPROF. The new objective of E-PROFILE is to integrate the approximately 700 ceilometers of the E-PROFILE country members into a European network providing vertical profiles for the monitoring of cloud base, aerosols and volcanic ash. A standardized calibration procedure is being developed in collaboration with the COST Action ES1303 TOPROF to provide profile information homogeneously across the network. The information will be distributed in real time and visualized on an interactive map. We present a detailed description of the activity and report on the current status of the development.

  20. Retrieving Latent Heat Vertical Structure Using Precipitation and Cloud Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Min, Q.; Wu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The latent heat (LH) released from tropical precipitation plays a critical role in driving regional and global atmosphere circulation. However, the vertical distribution of LH is one of most difficult parameters to be measured and has a large uncertainty in both residual diagnostic products and satellite retrievals. Most of current satellite LH products use limited observational information of precipitation and cloud profiles and highly depend on cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations. Our novel approach, distinguishing from existing schemes, is directly using observable precipitation and cloud profiles in combination with phase change partition parameterization of various kinds from the CRM simulations to produce the latent heating profiles. This hybrid latent heat algorithm separately deals with the condensation-evaporation heating (LHc_e), the deposition-sublimation heating (LHd_s) and the freezing-melting heating (LHf_m) for convective rain, stratiform rain, and shallow warm rain. Each component is based on physical processes, such as nucleation and auto conversion, by combining observable precipitation and cloud profiles. Although the proposed algorithm utilizes microphysical parameterizations from a specific CRM, the general LH vertical structure is primarily determined by the precipitation and cloud profiles observable from cloud and precipitation radars available at ground sites or from satellite platforms, and less sensitive to the specific CRM. The self consistency tests of this algorithm show good agreements with the CRM simulated LH at different spatial and temporal scales, even at simultaneous and pixel level. The applications of this algorithm are expected to provide new information for understanding the heating budget in the atmosphere and its impacts on the atmosphere circulations at various spatial and temporal scales.

  1. Vertical and Spatial Profiling of Arctic Black Carbon on the North Slope of Alaska 2015: Comparison of Model and Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Feng, Y.; Biraud, S.; Springston, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    One of the major issues confronting aerosol climate simulations of the Arctic and Antarctic Cryospheres is the lack of detailed data on the vertical and spatial distribution of aerosols with which to test these models. This is due, in part, to the inherent difficulty of conducting such measurements in extreme environments. One class of under measured radiative forcing agents in the Polar Region is the absorbing aerosol - black carbon and brown carbon. In particular, vertical profile information of BC is critical in reducing uncertainty in model assessment of aerosol radiative impact at high latitudes. During the summer of 2015, a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was deployed aboard the Department of Energy (DOE) Gultstream-1 (G-1) aircraft to measure refractory BC (rBC) concentrations as part of the DOE-sponsored ACME-V (ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements) campaign. This campaign was conducted from June through to mid-September along the North Slope of Alaska and was punctuated by vertical profiling over 5 sites (Atquasuk, Barrow, Ivotuk, Oliktok, and Toolik). In addition, measurement of CO, CO2 and CH4were also taken to provide information on the spatial and seasonal differences in GHG sources and how these sources correlate with BC. Lastly, these aerosol and gas measurements provide an important dataset to assess the representativeness of ground sites at regional scales. Comparisons between observations and a global climate model (CAM5) simulations will be agumented with a discussion on the capability of the model to capture observed monthly mean profiles of BC and stratified aerosol layers. Additionally, the ability of the SP2 to partition rBC-containing particles into nascent or aged species allows an evaluation of how well the CAM5 model captures aging of long distant transported carbonaceous aerosols. Finally model sensitivity studies will be aso be presented that investigated the relative importance of the different emission sectors to the summer Arctic

  2. Vertical variability of aerosol backscatter from an airborne-focused continuous-wave CO2 lidar at 9.1-microm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Jarzembski, M A; Srivastava, V; Rothermel, J

    1999-02-20

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements taken with a continuous-wave focused Doppler lidar at 9.1-microm wavelength were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean from 13 to 26 September 1995 as part of a NASA airborne mission. Backscatter variability was measured for approximately 52 flight hours, covering an equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 30,000 km in the troposphere. Some quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents at altitudes that ranged from approximately 0.1 to 12 km. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. A midtropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode near 3 x 10(-11) to 1 x 10(-10) m(-1) sr(-1) was obtained, which is consistent with those of previous airborne and ground-based data sets. PMID:18305690

  3. Evaluating the Use of MODIS AOD for Air Quality Determination by Comparison with the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Light Scattering Coefficient Obtained with a Balloon-Borne Nephelometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumlin, B.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The MODIS instruments aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites provide aerosol optical depth information for the entire Earth on a daily basis. Ideally, satellite measurements should correlate with ground-based measurements in order to be useful for air quality applications. Reno, Nevada, USA is a high desert city situated in the Great Basin. Its unique geography and proximity to urban and biomass burning aerosol sources make it an ideal candidate for aerosol research. In August 2011, the Reno Aerosol Characterization Experiment measured atmospheric aerosols with a ground-based Cimel CE-318 sun-photometer and in situ photoacoustic instrumentation to quantify aerosol concentrations at the surface and in the column. However, the results of these measurements indicated the existence of a more complex system of aerosol mixing above the atmospheric boundary layer than previously thought. In order to validate these measurements, an autonomous suite of instrumentation has been developed. This device is carried aloft by a weather balloon and utilizes a reciprocal nephelometer to obtain a high-resolution profile of the vertical distribution of aerosol light scattering coefficient, as well as instrumentation to record atmospheric variables such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and dew point. Position, course, speed, and altitude are logged with an onboard GPS module and correlated with atmospheric and aerosol measurements. Presented is the design and development of this new instrument, its comparison with proven laboratory instruments, data gathered from flights during August-November 2012, and its comparison to ground-based measurements and satellite data from the MODIS instruments.

  4. Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne; Berntsen, Terje; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Gimoux, Paul; Gong, Sunling; Horowitz, Larry W.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevag, Alf; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, Gunnar; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z-alpha) is defined to quantitatively assess the models' performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z-alpha climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z-alpha than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z-alpha is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z-alpha is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

  5. Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schultz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, G.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.

    2012-05-19

    The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z{sub a}) is defined to quantitatively assess the models performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z{sub a} climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z{sub a} than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z{sub a} is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z{sub a} is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

  6. Normalized vertical ice mass flux profiles from vertically pointing 8-mm-wavelength Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Brad W.; Kropfli, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    During the FIRE 2 (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment) project, NOAA's Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) operated its 8-mm wavelength Doppler radar extensively in the vertically pointing mode. This allowed for the calculation of a number of important cirrus cloud parameters, including cloud boundary statistics, cloud particle characteristic sizes and concentrations, and ice mass content (imc). The flux of imc, or, alternatively, ice mass flux (imf), is also an important parameter of a cirrus cloud system. Ice mass flux is important in the vertical redistribution of water substance and thus, in part, determines the cloud evolution. It is important for the development of cloud parameterizations to be able to define the essential physical characteristics of large populations of clouds in the simplest possible way. One method would be to normalize profiles of observed cloud properties, such as those mentioned above, in ways similar to those used in the convective boundary layer. The height then scales from 0.0 at cloud base to 1.0 at cloud top, and the measured cloud parameter scales by its maximum value so that all normalized profiles have 1.0 as their maximum value. The goal is that there will be a 'universal' shape to profiles of the normalized data. This idea was applied to estimates of imf calculated from data obtained by the WPL cloud radar during FIRE II. Other quantities such as median particle diameter, concentration, and ice mass content can also be estimated with this radar, and we expect to also examine normalized profiles of these quantities in time for the 1993 FIRE II meeting.

  7. Aerosol interactions between the surface and the atmosphere: Urban fluxes, forest canopy vertical exchange, and wintertime urban patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivicke, Rasa

    Atmospheric aerosols play a major role in regional atmospheric chemistry and air quality, while on a global scale, aerosol processes continue to represent the largest source of uncertainty related to climate change. An important aspect of understanding the role of aerosols in these areas is to document the vertical exchange of aerosols with the surface in both urban and rural landscapes since the vertical exchange represents important sources and sinks of aerosols on regional and global scales. In this dissertation, investigation of aerosol dynamics is described for three separate field studies. First, urban eddy covariance flux measurements were made from a building rooftop in Mexico City using a quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) to determine the fluxes of aerosol species to/from the urban landscape. Second, conditional sampling of fine particles in updrafts and downdrafts was performed above a pine forest in Colorado using a thermal desorption chemical ionization mass spectrometer (TD-CIMS) to investigate the relative strengths of sources and sinks for speciated aerosol in a forest environment. Third, the aerosol and gas phase pollutant patterns, measured in Boise, ID during wintertime inversion conditions, were analyzed with respect to the daily evolution of the planetary boundary layer depth and surface meteorological conditions. This dissertation describes the methods used for each of the three studies and summarizes the analysis of the results.

  8. Vertical profile of fog microphysics : a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnet, Frédéric; Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Mazoyer, Marie; Bourrianne, Thierry; Etcheberry, Jean-Michel; Gaillard, Brigitte; Legain, Dominique; Tzanos, Diane; Barrié, Joel; Barrau, Sébastien; Defoy, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and development of fogs result from the non-linear interaction of competing radiative, thermodynamic, microphysical and dynamical processes and the forecasting of their life cycle still remains a challenging issue. Several field campaigns have been carried out at the SIRTA observatory in the Paris suburb area (France). These experiments have shown that fog events exhibit large differences of the microphysical properties and various evolutions during their life cycle. To better understand relationships between the different processes and to validate numerical simulations it is necessary however to document the vertical profile of the fog microphysics. A CDP (Cloud Droplet Spectrometer) from DMT (Droplet Measurement Technology, Boulder, CO) has been modified to allow measurements of the droplet size distribution in fog layers with a tethered balloon. This instrumental set-up has been used during a field campaign during the winter 2013-214 in the Landes area in the South West of France. To validate the vertical profiles provided by the modified CDP, a mast was equipped with microphysical instruments at 2 altitude levels with an another CDP at 24 m and a Fog Monitor FM100 at 42 m. The instrumental set-up deployed during this campaign is presented. Data collected during a fog event that occurred during the night of 5-6 March 2014 are analysed. We show that microphysical properties such as droplet number concentration, LWC and mean droplet size, exhibit different time evolution during the fog life cycle depending on the altitude level. Droplet size distribution measurements are also investigated. They reveal sharp variations along the vertical close to the top of the fog layer. In addition it is shown that the shape of the size distributions at the top follows a time evolution typical of a quasi-adiabatic droplet growth.

  9. Reconstruction of the vertical electron density profile based on vertical TEC using the simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua; Yang, Guobin; Zhu, Peng; Nishioka, Michi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Zhou, Chen; Song, Huan; Lan, Ting; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to reconstruct the vertical electron density profile based on vertical Total Electron Content (TEC) using the simulated annealing algorithm. The present technique used the Quasi-parabolic segments (QPS) to model the bottomside ionosphere. The initial parameters of the ionosphere model were determined from both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza et al., 2014) and vertical TEC (vTEC). Then, the simulated annealing algorithm was used to search the best-fit parameters of the ionosphere model by comparing with the GPS-TEC. The performance and robust of this technique were verified by ionosonde data. The critical frequency (foF2) and peak height (hmF2) of the F2 layer obtained from ionograms recorded at different locations and on different days were compared with those calculated by the proposed method. The analysis of results shows that the present method is inspiring for obtaining foF2 from vTEC. However, the accuracy of hmF2 needs to be improved in the future work.

  10. North-south cross sections of the vertical aerosol distribution over the Atlantic Ocean from multiwavelength Raman/polarization lidar during Polarstern cruises

    PubMed Central

    Kanitz, T; Ansmann, A; Engelmann, R; Althausen, D

    2013-01-01

    Shipborne aerosol lidar observations were performed aboard the research vessel Polarstern in 2009 and 2010 during three north-south cruises from about 50°N to 50°S. The aerosol data set provides an excellent opportunity to characterize and contrast the vertical aerosol distribution over the Atlantic Ocean in the polluted northern and relatively clean southern hemisphere. Three case studies, an observed pure Saharan dust plume, a Patagonian dust plume east of South America, and a case of a mixed dust/smoke plume west of Central Africa are exemplarily shown and discussed by means of their optical properties. The meridional transatlantic cruises were used to determine the latitudinal cross section of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). Profiles of particle backscatter and extinction coefficients are presented as mean profiles for latitudinal belts to contrast northern- and southern-hemispheric aerosol loads and optical effects. Results of lidar observations at Punta Arenas (53°S), Chile, and Stellenbosch (34°S), South Africa, are shown and confirm the lower frequency of occurrence of free-tropospheric aerosol in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere. The maximum latitudinal mean AOT of 0.27 was found in the northern tropics (0– 15°N) in the Saharan outflow region. Marine AOT is typically 0.05 ± 0.03. Particle optical properties are presented separately for the marine boundary layer and the free troposphere. Concerning the contrast between the anthropogenically influenced midlatitudinal aerosol conditions in the 30– 60°N belt and the respective belt in the southern hemisphere over the remote Atlantic, it is found that the AOT and extinction coefficients for the vertical column from 0–5km (total aerosol column) and 1–5km height (lofted aerosol above the marine boundary layer) are a factor of 1.6 and 2 higher at northern midlatitudes than at respective southern midlatitudes, and a factor of 2.5 higher than at the clean marine southern

  11. Study of a subsurface fracture zone by vertical seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert R.; Turpening, Roger M.; Toksoz, M. Nafi

    Remotely estimating the properties of subsurface fracture zones is important in characterizing the structure of the shallow earth. We present a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) technique to make this fracture zone estimation and discuss the results of a VSP experiment performed in the upper 770 m of the Michigan Basin. Both P and SH waves were used to observe an explosively-fractured volume of Antrim shale. The experiment was divided into two parts: a "before" survey run on the unaltered rock, then an identical "after" survey executed across the fractured volume. A seismic velocity structure of the basin was calculated from the "before" survey. Comparison of the "after" observations to the "before" data, elucidated the fracture volume and its effective elastic parameters. From travel-time delays, amplitude attenuation, converted and scattered waves, we estimated the depth (395 m), shape (ellipsoidal), size (10 m × 20 m × 30 m) and porosity (20%) of the fracture zone.

  12. Remote Sensing the Vertical Profile of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius, Thermodynamic Phase, and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martins, J. V.; Marshak, A.; Remer, L. A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Fernandez-Borda, R.; Koren, I.; Correia, A. L.; Zubko, V.; Artaxo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key issue in the climate system, affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and their consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei. Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument) that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

  13. Vertical Distribution and Columnar Optical Properties of Springtime Biomass-Burning Aerosols over Northern Indochina during the 7-SEAS/BASELInE field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N. H.; Wang, S. H.; Welton, E. J.; Holben, B. N.; Tsay, S. C.; Giles, D. M.; Stewart, S. A.; Janjai, S.; Anh, N. X.; Hsiao, T. C.; Chen, W. N.; Lin, T. H.; Buntoung, S.; Chantara, S.; Wiriya, W.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the aerosol optical properties and vertical distributions in major biomass-burning emission area of northern Indochina were investigated using ground-based remote sensing (i.e., four Sun-sky radiometers and one lidar) during the Seven South East Asian Studies/Biomass-burning Aerosols & Stratocumulus Environment: Lifecycles & Interactions Experiment conducted during spring 2014. Despite the high spatial variability of the aerosol optical depth (AOD; which at 500 nm ranged from 0.75 to 1.37 depending on the site), the temporal variation of the daily AOD demonstrated a consistent pattern among the observed sites, suggesting the presence of widespread smoke haze over the region. Smoke particles were characterized as small (Ångström exponent at 440-870 nm of 1.72 and fine mode fraction of 0.96), strongly absorbing (single-scattering albedo at 440 nm of 0.88), mixture of black and brown carbon particles (absorption Ångström exponent at 440-870 nm of 1.5) suspended within the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Smoke plumes driven by the PBL dynamics in the mountainous region reached as high as 5 km above sea level; these plumes subsequently spread out by westerly winds over northern Vietnam, southern China, and the neighboring South China Sea. Moreover, the analysis of diurnal variability of aerosol loading and optical properties as well as vertical profile in relation to PBL development, fire intensity, and aerosol mixing showed that various sites exhibited different variability based on meteorological conditions, fuel type, site elevation, and proximity to biomass-burning sources. These local factors influence the aerosol characteristics in the region and distinguish northern Indochina smoke from other biomass-burning regions in the world.

  14. Titan's Aerosol and Stratospheric Ice Opacities Between 18 and 500 Micrometers: Vertical and Spectral Characteristics from Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie M.; Samuelson, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Vertical distributions and spectral characteristics of Titan's photochemical aerosol and stratospheric ices are determined between 20 and 560 per centimeter (500-18 micrometers) from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Results are obtained for latitudes of 15 N, 15 S, and 58 S, where accurate temperature profiles can be independently determined. In addition, estimates of aerosol and ice abundances at 62 N relative to those at 15 S are derived. Aerosol abundances are comparable at the two latitudes, but stratospheric ices are approximately 3 times more abundant at 62 N than at 15 S. Generally, nitrile ice clouds (probably HCN and HC3N), as inferred from a composite emission feature at approximately 160 per centimeter, appear to be located over a narrow altitude range in the stratosphere centered at approximately 90 km. Although most abundant at high northern latitudes, these nitrile ice clouds extend down through low latitudes and into mid southern latitudes, at least as far as 58 S. There is some evidence of a second ice cloud layer at approximately 60 km altitude at 58 S associated with an emission feature at approximately 80 per centimeter. We speculate that the identify of this cloud may be due to C2H6 ice, which in the vapor phase is the most abundant hydrocarbon (next to CH4) in the stratosphere of Titan. Unlike the highly restricted range of altitudes (50-100 km) associated with organic condensate clouds, Titan's photochemical aerosol appears to be well-mixed from the surface to the top of the stratosphere near an altitude of 300 km, and the spectral shape does not appear to change between 15 N and 58 S latitude. The ratio of aerosol-to-gas scale heights range from 1.3-2.4 at about 160 km to 1.1-1.4 at 300 km, although there is considerable variability with latitude, The aerosol exhibits a very broad emission feature peaking at approximately 140 per centimeter. Due to its extreme breadth and low wavenumber, we speculate that this feature may

  15. Global View of Aerosol Vertical Distributions from CALIPSO Lidar Measurements and GOCART Simulations: Regional and Seasonal Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Winker, David M.; Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Kittaka, Chieko; Diehl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This study examines seasonal variations of the vertical distribution of aerosols through a statistical analysis of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) lidar observations from June 2006 to November 2007. A data-screening scheme is developed to attain good quality data in cloud-free conditions, and the polarization measurement is used to separate dust from non-dust aerosol. The CALIPSO aerosol observations are compared with aerosol simulations from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) model and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The CALIPSO observations of geographical patterns and seasonal variations of AOD are generally consistent with GOCART simulations and MODIS retrievals especially near source regions, while the magnitude of AOD shows large discrepancies in most regions. Both the CALIPSO observation and GOCART model show that the aerosol extinction scale heights in major dust and smoke source regions are generally higher than that in industrial pollution source regions. The CALIPSO aerosol lidar ratio also generally agrees with GOCART model within 30% on regional scales. Major differences between satellite observations and GOCART model are identified, including (1) an underestimate of aerosol extinction by GOCART over the Indian sub-continent, (2) much larger aerosol extinction calculated by GOCART than observed by CALIPSO in dust source regions, (3) much weaker in magnitude and more concentrated aerosol in the lower atmosphere in CALIPSO observation than GOCART model over transported areas in midlatitudes, and (4) consistently lower aerosol scale height by CALIPSO observation than GOCART model. Possible factors contributing to these differences are discussed.

  16. Aerosol measurements in the IR: from limb to nadir?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, A.; Irion, F. W.; Mills, F. P.; Steele, H. M.; Gunson, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol concentration have been derived from the ATMOS solar occultation dataset. The EOS instrument TES has motivated studies of the feasibility of quantifying aerosols in nadir and limb emission measurements.

  17. A Multi-Instrument Approach for Characterizing the Vertical Structure of Aerosol Properties: Case Studies in the Pacific Basin Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Pueschel, R. F.; Fenn, M. A.; Browell, E. V.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    During February/March 1994, a series of aircraft-based aerosol measurements were carried out in the Pacific Basin troposphere using a differential absorption lidar system deployed by NASA Langley, and optical spectrometer probes and a wire-impactor system operated by NASA Ames. A modified Klett inversion algorithm was applied to extract altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering from the IR lidar signal. The algorithm that we have designed for this purpose utilizes the in situ aerosol measurements to normalize the lidar profile at the aircraft altitude and to supply the lidar ratio as a function of height. The lidar-derived aerosol backscattering coefficients were then compared to the backscattering coefficients calculated from the in situ measurements. During several local aircraft descents, we found good agreement between the remote lidar and in situ results for the absolute value of the aerosol backscattering coefficient and its altitude variation only when we allowed for several layers with different aerosol refractive indices. The agreement validates our lidar calibration method and provides an indication of the variation in aerosol refractive index as a function of altitude. Two of the three case studies performed in this paper reveal layers of anthropogenic aerosols transported long distances into the Pacific Basin troposphere. A third case implies the existence of a layer of dustlike aerosol particles in the lower troposphere, most likely of Asian origin.

  18. A multi-instrument approach for characterizing the vertical structure of aerosol properties: Case studies in the Pacific Basin troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Pueschel, R. F.; Fenn, M. A.; Browell, E. V.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-09-01

    During February/March 1994, a series of aircraft-based aerosol measurements were carried out in the Pacific Basin troposphere using a differential absorption lidar system deployed by NASA Langley, and optical spectrometer probes and a wire-impactor system operated by NASA Ames. A modified Klett inversion algorithm was applied to extract altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering from the IR lidar signal. The algorithm that we have designed for this purpose utilizes the in situ aerosol measurements to normalize the lidar profile at the aircraft altitude and to supply the lidar ratio as a function of height. The lidar-derived aerosol backscattering coefficients were then compared to the backscattering coefficients calculated from the in situ measurements. During several local aircraft descents, we found good agreement between the remote lidar and in situ results for the absolute value of the aerosol backscattering coefficient and its altitude variation only when we allowed for several layers with different aerosol refractive indices. The agreement validates our lidar calibration method and provides an indication of the variation in aerosol refractive index as a function of altitude. Two of the three case studies performed in this paper reveal layers of anthropogenic aerosols transported long distances into the Pacific Basin troposphere. A third case implies the existence of a layer of dustlike aerosol particles in the lower troposphere, most likely of Asian origin.

  19. A new method for evaluating the impact of vertical distribution on aerosol radiative forcing in general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuolo, M. R.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Takemura, T.

    2013-07-01

    The quantification and understanding of direct aerosol forcing is essential in the study of climate. One of the main issues that makes its quantification difficult is the lack of a complete comprehension of the role of the aerosol and clouds vertical distribution. This work aims at reducing the incertitude of aerosol forcing due to the vertical superposition of several short-lived atmospheric components, in particular different aerosols species and clouds. We propose a method to quantify the contribution of different parts of the atmospheric column to the forcing, and to evaluate model differences by isolating the effect of radiative interactions only. Any microphysical or thermo-dynamical interactions between aerosols and clouds are deactivated in the model, to isolate the effects of radiative flux coupling. We investigate the contribution of aerosol above, below and in clouds, by using added diagnostics in the aerosol-climate model LMDz. We also compute the difference between the forcing of the ensemble of the aerosols and the sum of the forcings from individual species, in clear-sky. This difference is found to be moderate on global average (14%) but can reach high values regionally (up to 100%). The non-additivity of forcing already for clear-sky conditions shows, that in addition to represent well the amount of individual aerosol species, it is critical to capture the vertical distribution of all aerosols. Nonlinear effects are even more important when superposing aerosols and clouds. Four forcing computations are performed, one where the full aerosol 3-D distribution is used, and then three where aerosols are confined to regions above, inside and below clouds respectively. We find that the forcing of aerosols depends crucially on the presence of clouds and on their position relative to that of the aerosol, in particular for black carbon (BC). We observe a strong enhancement of the forcing of BC above clouds, attenuation for BC below clouds, and a moderate

  20. Vertical Structure, Transport, and Mixing of Ozone and Aerosols Observed During NEAQS/ICARTT 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Hardesty, R. M.; Brewer, W. A.; Alvarez, R. J.; Sandberg, S. P.; Tucker, S. C.; Intrieri, J. M.; Marchbanks, R. D.; McCarty, B. J.; Banta, R. M.; Darby, L. S.; White, A. B.

    2005-12-01

    During the 2004 New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS), which was conducted within the framework of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) field experiment, airborne and shipborne lidar remote sensing instruments were deployed to characterize the 3-dimensional structure of ozone, aerosol, and low-level wind fields in the New England region. The 2004 measurements confirmed findings from the smaller-scale NEAQS 2002 experiment: the vertical structure and transport patterns of pollutant plumes from the Boston and New York City urban areas are strongly modified when they are advected over the Gulf of Maine. Because of strong vertical wind shear and a very stable atmosphere over the cold ocean water the plumes tend to get sheared apart and the resulting pieces of the plumes stay confined in layers aloft, isolated from the surface. Most notably, ozone concentrations aloft are very often significantly higher than ozone levels near the ocean surface. These elevated pollution plumes over the Gulf of Maine can affect air quality in coastal New England only when they are transported back over land. This can be accomplished by the large-scale flow or by local circulations such as the sea breeze. Once over land the elevated plumes may impact surface air quality by direct transport to higher terrain (e.g., Cadillac Mountain, ME) or by being fumigated down to the surface. Alternatively, but probably more rarely, an elevated pollution plume over the ocean may be mixed down to the surface by mechanically generated turbulence and then transported back to land within the marine boundary layer. We will use airborne and shipborne lidar remote sensing data to characterize the vertical distribution of ozone and aerosols over coastal New England, in particular the difference in plume structure over land and water. We will also show observational evidence for several of the processes described above that may mix down and transport

  1. Retrieving the aerosol lidar ratio profile by combining ground- and space-based elastic lidars.

    PubMed

    Feiyue, Mao; Wei, Gong; Yingying, Ma

    2012-02-15

    The aerosol lidar ratio is a key parameter for the retrieval of aerosol optical properties from elastic lidar, which changes largely for aerosols with different chemical and physical properties. We proposed a method for retrieving the aerosol lidar ratio profile by combining simultaneous ground- and space-based elastic lidars. The method was tested by a simulated case and a real case at 532 nm wavelength. The results demonstrated that our method is robust and can obtain accurate lidar ratio and extinction coefficient profiles. Our method can be useful for determining the local and global lidar ratio and validating space-based lidar datasets.

  2. Combining data from lidar and in situ instruments to characterize the vertical structure of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Pueschel, R. F.; Browell, E. V.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade, the quantification of tropospheric aerosol abundance, composition and radiative impacts has become an important research endeavor. For the most part, the interest in tropospheric aerosols is derived from questions related to the global and local (instantaneous) radiative forcing of climate due to these aerosols. One approach is to study local forcing under well-defined conditions, and to extrapolate such results to global scales. To estimate local aerosol forcing, appropriate radiative transfer models can be employed (e.g., the Fu-Liou radiative transfer code, [Fu and Liou, 1993]). In general, such models require information on derived aerosol properties [Toon, 1994]; namely the aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor (phase function), all of which appear in the equations of radiative transfer. In this paper, we report on a method that utilizes lidar data and in situ aerosol size distribution measurements to deduce the vertical structure of the aerosol complex index of refraction in the near IR, thus identifying the aerosol type. Together with aerosol size distributions obtained in situ, the aerosol refractive index can be used to calculate the necessary derived aerosol properties. The data analyzed here were collected during NASA's PEM West-B (Pacific Exploratory Mission) experiment, which took place in February/March 1994. The platform for the measurements was the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The primary goal of the PEM West missions [Browell et al., 1996] was the assessment of potential anthropogenic perturbations of the chemistry in the Pacific Basin troposphere. For this purpose the timing of PEM West-B corresponded to the seasonal peak in transport from the Asian continent into the Pacific basin [Merrill et al., in press]. This period normally occurs during Northern Hemisphere spring, when the Japan jet is well developed.

  3. Comparison of aerosol extinction profiles from lidar and SAGE II data at a tropical station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parameswaran, K.; Rose, K. O.; Murthy, B. V. K.; Osborn, M. T.; Mcmaster, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    Aerosol extinction profiles obtained from lidar data at Trivandrum (8.6 deg N, 77 deg E) are compared with corresponding Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II extinction profiles. The agreement between the two is found to be satisfactory. The extinction profiles obtained by both the experiments showed a prominent peak at 23-24 km altitude in the stratosphere. The study revealed large variability in upper tropospheric extinction with location (latitude).

  4. Relation of Cloud Occurrence Frequency, Overlap, and Effective Thickness Derived from CALIPSO and CloudSat Merged Cloud Vertical Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Seiji; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Miller, Walter F.; Rose, Fred G.; Chen, Yan; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    A cloud frequency of occurrence matrix is generated using merged cloud vertical profile derived from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The matrix contains vertical profiles of cloud occurrence frequency as a function of the uppermost cloud top. It is shown that the cloud fraction and uppermost cloud top vertical pro les can be related by a set of equations when the correlation distance of cloud occurrence, which is interpreted as an effective cloud thickness, is introduced. The underlying assumption in establishing the above relation is that cloud overlap approaches the random overlap with increasing distance separating cloud layers and that the probability of deviating from the random overlap decreases exponentially with distance. One month of CALIPSO and CloudSat data support these assumptions. However, the correlation distance sometimes becomes large, which might be an indication of precipitation. The cloud correlation distance is equivalent to the de-correlation distance introduced by Hogan and Illingworth [2000] when cloud fractions of both layers in a two-cloud layer system are the same.

  5. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  6. Vertical particle concentration profiles around urban office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, T. N.; He, C.; Morawska, L.; Knibbs, L. D.; Falk, M.

    2012-06-01

    Despite its role in determining both indoor and outdoor human exposure to anthropogenic particles, there is limited information describing vertical profiles of particle concentrations in urban environments, especially for ultrafine particles. Furthermore, the results of the few studies performed have been inconsistent. As such, this study aimed to assess the influence of vehicle emissions and nucleation formation on particle characteristics (particle number size distribution - PNSD and PM2.5 concentration) at different heights around three urban office buildings located next to busy roads in Brisbane, Australia, and place these results in the broader context of the existing literature. Two sets of instruments were used to simultaneously measure PNSD, particle number (PN) and PM2.5 concentrations, respectively, for up to three weeks at each building. The results showed that both PNSD and PM2.5 concentration around building envelopes were influenced by vehicle emissions and new particle formation, and that they exhibited variability across the three different office buildings. During nucleation events, PN concentration in size range of <30 nm and total PN concentration increased (7-65% and 5-46%, respectively), while PM2.5 concentration decreased (36-52%) with height. This study has shown an under acknowledged role for nucleation in producing particles that can affect large numbers of people, due to the high density and occupancy of urban office buildings and the fact that the vast majority of people's time is spent indoors. These findings highlight important new information related to the previously overlooked role of particle formation in the urban atmosphere and its potential effects on selection of air intake locations and appropriate filter types when designing or upgrading mechanical ventilation systems in urban office buildings. The results also serve to better define particle behaviour and variability around building envelopes, which has implications for

  7. Seasonal variations in Titan's stratosphere observed with Cassini/CIRS: temperature, trace molecular gas and aerosol mixing ratio profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, S.; Bézard, B.; Anderson, C.; Teanby, N.; Lebonnois, S.; Rannou, P.; de Kok, R.; T. CIRS Team

    2013-09-01

    Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009. General Circulation Models (e.g. [1]) predict strong modifications of the global circulation in this period, with formation of two circulation cells instead of the pole-to-pole cell that occurred during northern winter. This winter single cell, which had its descending branch at the north pole, was at the origin of the enrichment of molecular abundances and high stratopause temperatures observed by Cassini/CIRS at high northern latitudes (e.g., [2], [3], [4], [5]). The predicted dynamical seasonal variations after the equinox have strong impact on the spatial distributions of trace gas, temperature and aerosol abundances. We will present here an analysis of CIRS limbgeometry datasets acquired in 2010, 2011 and 2012 that we used to monitor the seasonal evolution of the vertical profiles of temperature, molecular (C2H2, C2H6, HCN, ...) and aerosol abundances.

  8. IO in the Lower Stratosphere and Vertical Profiles over the Tropical Eastern and Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, T. K.; Volkamer, R. M.; Baidar, S.; Dix, B. K.; Evans, M. J.; Carpenter, L.; Sherwen, T.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Atlas, E. L.; Pan, L.; Salawitch, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Iodine Monoxide (IO) is a halogen radical species that catalytically destroys ozone, modifies the atmosphere's oxidative capacity and is a precursor to aerosol particle formation and growth. Measurements of IO are generally scarce, and only very few observations have recently detected IO as widespread in the tropical free troposphere. Here we report on IO observations by the CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft during the CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics (CONTRAST) and Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogen species and Oxygenated VOC (TORERO) field campaigns. We have measured IO vertical profiles over the tropical and sub-tropical Western and Eastern Pacific Ocean, including a detection of IO in the UTLS and lower stratosphere. Our measurements indicate IO abundances that are 2-3 times higher in the Southern hemisphere than in the Northern hemisphere free troposphere. Measurements in the lower stratosphere and tropical UTLS provide the first quantification of IO in these layers by limb observations of scattered sunlight. We compare these observations with predictions from the global models CAMChem and GEOSChem.

  9. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the QC and splicing methodology for KSC's 50- and 915-MHz DRWP measurements that generates an extensive archive of vertically complete profiles from 0.20-18.45 km. The concurrent POR from each archive extends from April 2000 to December 2009. MSFC NE applies separate but similar QC processes to each of the 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives. DRWP literature and data examination provide the basis for developing and applying the automated and manual QC processes on both archives. Depending on the month, the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives retain 52-65% and 16-30% of the possible data, respectively. The 50- and 915-MHz DRWP QC archives retain 84-91% and 85-95%, respectively, of all the available data provided that data exist in the non- QC'ed archives. Next, MSFC NE applies an algorithm to splice concurrent measurements from both DRWP sources. Last, MSFC NE generates a composite profile from the (up to) five available spliced profiles to effectively characterize boundary layer winds and to utilize all possible 915-MHz DRWP measurements at each timestamp. During a given month, roughly 23,000-32,000 complete profiles exist from 0.25-18.45 km from the composite profiles' archive, and approximately 5,000- 27,000 complete profiles exist from an archive utilizing an individual 915-MHz DRWP. One can extract a variety of profile combinations (pairs, triplets, etc.) from this sample for a given application. The sample of vertically complete DRWP wind measurements not only gives launch vehicle customers greater confidence in loads and trajectory assessments versus using balloon output, but also provides flexibility to simulate different DOL situations across applicable altitudes. In addition to increasing sample size and providing more flexibility for DOL simulations in the vehicle design phase, the spliced DRWP database provides any upcoming launch vehicle program with the capability to utilize DRWP profiles on DOL to compute vehicle steering

  10. Reconstruction of Vertical Profile of Permittivity of Layered Media which is Probed Using Vertical Differential Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochanin, Gennadiy P.; Poyedinchuk, Anatoliy Y.; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla A.; Pochanina, Iryna Ye.

    2016-04-01

    Results of this research are intended to use at GPR investigations of layered media (for example, at roads' inspection) for the processing of collected data and reconstruction of dependence of permittivity on the depth. Recently, an antenna system with a vertical differential configuration of receiving module (Patent UA81652) for GPR was suggested and developed The main advantage of the differential antennas in comparison with bistatic antennas is a high electromagnetic decoupling between the transmitting and receiving modules. The new vertical differential configuration has an additional advantage because it allows collecting GPR data reflected by layered media without any losses of information about these layers [1] and, potentially, it is a more accurate instrument for the layers thickness measurements [2]. The developed antenna system is tested in practice with the GPR at asphalt thickness measurements [3] and shown an accuracy which is better than 0.5 cm. Since this antenna system is good for sounding from above the surface (air coupled technique), the mobile laboratory was equipped with the developed GPR [3]. In order to process big set of GPR data that collected during probing at long routes of the roads, for the data processing it was tested new algorithm of the inverse problem solution. It uses a fast algorithm for calculation of electromagnetic wave diffraction by non-uniform anisotropic layers [4]. The algorithm is based on constructing a special case solution to the Riccati equation for the Cauchy problem and enables a qualitative description of the wave diffraction by the electromagnetic structure of the type within a unitary framework. At this stage as initial data we used synthetic GPR data that were obtained as results of the FDTD simulation of the problem of UWB electromagnetic impulse diffraction on layered media. Differential and bistatic antenna configurations were tested at several different profiles of permittivity. Meanings of permittivity of

  11. GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate delineation of plume boundaries and vertical contaminant distribution are necessary in order to adequately characterize waste sites and determine remedial strategies to be employed. However, it is important to consider the sampling objectives, sampling methods, and sampl...

  12. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): a New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time data capability of the ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as air quality and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a summary of the science

  13. Vertical profiles of black carbon measured by a micro-aethalometer in summer in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Liang; Deng, Zhaoze; Xu, Xiaobin; Yan, Peng; Lin, Weili; Wang, Ying; Tian, Ping; Wang, Pucai; Pan, Weilin; Lu, Daren

    2016-08-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a dominant absorber in the visible spectrum and a potent factor in climatic effects. Vertical profiles of BC were measured using a micro-aethalometer attached to a tethered balloon during the Vertical Observations of trace Gases and Aerosols (VOGA) field campaign, in summer 2014 at a semirural site in the North China Plain (NCP). The diurnal cycle of BC vertical distributions following the evolution of the mixing layer (ML) was investigated for the first time in the NCP region. Statistical parameters including identified mixing height (Hm) and average BC mass concentrations within the ML (Cm) and in the free troposphere (Cf) were obtained for a selected dataset of 67 vertical profiles. Hm was usually lower than 0.2 km in the early morning and rapidly rose thereafter due to strengthened turbulence. The maximum height of the ML was reached in the late afternoon. The top of a full developed ML exceeded 1 km on sunny days in summer, while it stayed much lower on cloudy days. The sunset triggered the collapse of the ML, and a stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) gradually formed. Accordingly, the highest level Cm was found in the early morning and the lowest was found in the afternoon. In the daytime, BC was almost uniformly distributed within the ML and significantly decreased above the ML. During the field campaign, Cm averaged about 5.16 ± 2.49 µg m-3, with a range of 1.12 to 14.49 µg m-3, comparable with observational results in many polluted urban areas such as Milan in Italy and Shanghai in China. As evening approached, BC gradually built up near the surface and exponentially declined with height. In contrast to the large variability found both in Hm and Cm, Cf stayed relatively unaffected through the day. Cf was less than 10 % of the ground level under clean conditions, while it amounted to half of the ground level in some polluted cases. In situ measurements of BC vertical profiles would hopefully have an important implication for

  14. Use of In Situ Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Extinction, and Aerosol Size Distribution Measurements to Test a Method for Retrieving Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profiles From Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Stephen J.; Rissman, Tracey A.; Ellman, Robert; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Flynn, Connor; Wang, Jian; Ogren, John; Hudson, James; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; VanReken, Timothy; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-01-01

    If the aerosol composition and size distribution below cloud are uniform, the vertical profile of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration can be retrieved entirely from surface measurements of CCN concentration and particle humidification function and surface-based retrievals of relative humidity and aerosol extinction or backscatter. This provides the potential for long-term measurements of CCN concentrations near cloud base. We have used a combination of aircraft, surface in situ, and surface remote sensing measurements to test various aspects of the retrieval scheme. Our analysis leads us to the following conclusions. The retrieval works better for supersaturations of 0.1% than for 1% because CCN concentrations at 0.1% are controlled by the same particles that control extinction and backscatter. If in situ measurements of extinction are used, the retrieval explains a majority of the CCN variance at high supersaturation for at least two and perhaps five of the eight flights examined. The retrieval of the vertical profile of the humidification factor is not the major limitation of the CCN retrieval scheme. Vertical structure in the aerosol size distribution and composition is the dominant source of error in the CCN retrieval, but this vertical structure is difficult to measure from remote sensing at visible wavelengths.

  15. Optical and physical characteristics of Bay of Bengal aerosols during W-ICARB: Spatial and vertical heterogeneities in the marine atmospheric boundary layer and in the vertical column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, K. Krishna; Beegum, S. Naseema; Babu, S. Suresh; Smirnov, Alexander; John, Sherine Rachel; Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Narasimhulu, K.; Dutt, C. B. S.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of the continuous and collocated measurements of columnar spectral aerosol optical depths (AODs) and mass size distributions in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) over the Bay of Bengal (BoB), carried out from 27 December 2008 to 29 January 2009 during the Winter Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (W-ICARB), revealed distinct regional features in the spatial variations of the aerosol properties in the MABL and column. In general, AODs were high over the northern and northwestern parts of the BoB, with pockets of very high values, within which the AODs were as high as ˜0.8 while the smallest values (˜0.1) were observed over the northeastern BoB, off the Myanmar and Bangladesh coasts. Interestingly, though, this region had the highest Angstrom wavelength exponent α (˜1.5), notwithstanding the generally high values that prevailed over the eastern as well as northern coastal regions of India. Back trajectory analyses revealed the significant role of the advected aerosols in the observed spatial pattern. Within the MABL, high accumulation mode mass concentrations (MA) prevailed over the entire BoB with the accumulation fraction ranging from 0.6 to 0.95, whereas very high fine-mode (r < 0.1 μm) aerosol mass fractions (˜0.8) were observed over the northeastern and western coastal BoB adjoining the Indian mainland (where α was high to very high). The vertical distributions, inferred from the columnar and MABL properties as well as from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations data, revealed better homogeneity in the northeastern and eastern BoB, whereas significant heterogeneity was seen over other regions.

  16. Raman lidar profiling of water vapor and aerosols over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, R.A.

    2000-01-09

    The authors have developed and implemented automated algorithms to retrieve profiles of water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol backscattering, and aerosol extinction from Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar data acquired during both daytime and nighttime operations. The Raman lidar sytem is unique in that it is turnkey, automated system designed for unattended, around-the-clock profiling of water vapor and aerosols. These Raman lidar profiles are important for determining the clear-sky radiative flux, as well as for validating the retrieval algorithms associated with satellite sensors. Accurate, high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of water vapor are also required for assimilation into mesoscale models to improve weather forecasts. The authors have also developed and implemented routines to simultaneously retrieve profiles of relative humidity. These routines utilize the water vapor mixing ratio profiles derived from the Raman lidar measurements together with temperature profiles derived from a physical retrieval algorithm that uses data from a collocated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). These aerosol and water vapor profiles (Raman lidar) and temperature profiles (AERI+GOES) have been combined into a single product that takes advantage of both active and passive remote sensors to characterize the clear sky atmospheric state above the CART site.

  17. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a

  18. [Ultraviolet Mie lidar observations of aerosol extinction in a dust storm case over Macao].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiao-jun; Cheng, A Y S; Zhu, Jian-hua; Fong, S K; Chang, S W; Tam, K S; Viseu, A

    2012-03-01

    Atmospheric aerosol over Macao was monitored by using a 355 nm Mie scattering lidar during the dust event on March 22nd, 2010. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients were obtained and correlated with local PM10 concentration. The near-surface aerosol extinction coefficients have good agreement with PM10 concentration values. The aerosol extinction vertical profiles showed that there were distinct layers of dust aerosol concentration. The source and tracks of dust aerosol were analyzed by back-trajectory simulation. Observations showed that this lidar could run well even in dust storm episode, and it would help to further the study on aerosol properties over Macao. PMID:22582620

  19. Low profile, high load vertical rolling positioning stage

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Barraza, Juan

    1996-01-01

    A stage or support platform assembly for use in a synchrotron accurately positions equipment to be used in the beam line of the synchrotron. The support platform assembly includes an outer housing in which is disposed a lifting mechanism having a lifting platform or stage at its upper extremity on which the equipment is mounted. A worm gear assembly is located in the housing and is adapted to raise and lower a lifting shaft that is fixed to the lifting platform by an anti-binding connection. The lifting platform is moved vertically as the lifting shaft is moved vertically. The anti-binding connection prevents the shaft from rotating with respect to the platform, but does permit slight canting of the shaft with respect to the lifting platform so as to eliminate binding and wear due to possible tolerance mismatches. In order to ensure that the lifting mechanism does not move in a horizontal direction as it is moved vertically, at least three linear roller bearing assemblies are arranged around the outer-periphery of the lifting mechanism. One of the linear roller bearing assemblies can be adjusted so that the roller bearings apply a loading force against the lifting mechanism. Alternatively, a cam mechanism can be used to provide such a loading force.

  20. Lidar Observations of the Vertical Structure of Ozone and Aerosol during Wintertime High-Ozone Episodes Associated with Oil and Gas Exploration in the Uintah Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Langford, A. O.; Banta, R. M.; Alvarez, R. J.; Weickmann, A.; Sandberg, S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Brewer, A.; Hardesty, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Uintah Basin in northeast Utah has been experiencing extended periods of poor air quality in the winter months including very high levels of surface ozone. To investigate the causes of these wintertime ozone pollution episodes, two comprehensive studies were undertaken in January/February of 2012 and 2013. As part of these Uintah Basin Ozone Studies (UBOS), NOAA deployed its ground-based, scanning Tunable Optical Profiler for Aerosol and oZone (TOPAZ) lidar to document the vertical structure of ozone and aerosol backscatter from near the surface up to about 3 km above ground level (AGL). TOPAZ, along with a comprehensive set of chemistry and meteorological measurements, was situated in both years at the Horse Pool site at the northern edge of a large concentration of gas producing wells in the eastern part of the Uintah Basin. The 2012 study was characterized by unusually warm and snow-free condition and the TOPAZ lidar observed deep boundary layers (BL) and mostly well-mixed vertical ozone profiles at or slightly above tropospheric background levels. During UBOS 2013, winter weather conditions in the Uintah Basin were more typical with snow-covered ground and a persistent, shallow cold-pool layer. The TOPAZ lidar characterized with great temporal and spatial detail the evolution of multiple high-ozone episodes as well as cleanout events caused by the passage of synoptic-scale storm systems. Despite the snow cover, the TOPAZ observations show well-mixed afternoon ozone and aerosol profiles up to about 100 m AGL. After several days of pollutant buildup, BL ozone values reached 120-150 ppbv. Above the mixed layer, ozone values gradually decreased to tropospheric background values of around 50 ppbv throughout the several-hundred-meter-deep cold-pool layer and then stayed constant above that up to about 3 km AGL. During the ozone episodes, the lidar observations show no indication of either vertical or horizontal transport of high ozone levels to the surface, thus

  1. Vertically resolved separation of dust and other aerosol types by a new lidar depolarization method.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tao; Wang, Zhien; Ferrare, Richard A; Hostetler, Chris A; Yuan, Renmin; Zhang, Damao

    2015-06-01

    This paper developed a new retrieval framework of external mixing of the dust and non-dust aerosol to predict the lidar ratio of the external mixing aerosols and to separate the contributions of non-spherical aerosols by using different depolarization ratios among dust, sea salt, smoke, and polluted aerosols. The detailed sensitivity tests and case study with the new method showed that reliable dust information could be retrieved even without prior information about the non-dust aerosol types. This new method is suitable for global dust retrievals with satellite observations, which is critical for better understanding global dust transportation and for model improvements. PMID:26072778

  2. Comparison of stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment I (SAGE I) and Umkehr ozone profiles including a search for Umkehr aerosol effects

    SciTech Connect

    Newchurch, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    After briefly reviewing ozone depletion predictions from atmospheric models and results from trend analysis of Umkehr data, this paper outlines the Umkehr method for deducing the vertical profile of ozone and reviews the theoretical and empirical studies of the aerosol effect on Umkehr measurements. A brief description of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment I (SAGE I) is followed by a method for approximating the best representation of the conditions over the Umkehr ground site as seen by the SAGE I satellite. Using a spatially weighted average of SAGE I events derived from an autocorrelation analysis, the authors find 337 co-located SAGE I and Umkehr events. The approximate total column ozone measured by SAGE I is 5% higher than that measured by Umkehr on average. Most of this difference resides in Umkehr layer two, three, and four, while layers seven, eight, and nine contain small differences in average ozone content. Intercomparison with four other ozone studies indicates agreement between SAGE I and SBUV in most layers and at most Umkehr stations north of 30/sup 0/. However, significant differences in Umkehr layer eight between SAGE I and SBUV remain. Ozone differences between SAGE I and Umkehr are strong functions of both total column ozone and season in the lower layers but not in the upper layers.

  3. Use of temperature profiles beneath streams to determine rates of vertical ground-water flow and vertical hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapham, Wayne W.

    1989-01-01

    The use of temperature profiles beneath streams to determine rates of vertical ground-water flow and effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of sediments was evaluated at three field sites by use of a model that numerically solves the partial differential equation governing simultaneous vertical flow of fluid and heat in the Earth. The field sites are located in Hardwick and New Braintree, Mass., and in Dover, N.J. In New England, stream temperature varies from about 0 to 25 ?C (degrees Celsius) during the year. This stream-temperature fluctuation causes ground-water temperatures beneath streams to fluctuate by more than 0.1 ?C during a year to a depth of about 35 ft (feet) in fine-grained sediments and to a depth of about 50 ft in coarse-grained sediments, if ground-water velocity is 0 ft/d (foot per day). Upward flow decreases the depth affected by stream-temperature fluctuation, and downward flow increases the depth. At the site in Hardwick, Mass., ground-water flow was upward at a rate of less than 0.01 ft/d. The maximum effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site is 0.1 ft/d. Ground-water velocities determined at three locations at the site in New Braintree, Mass., where ground water discharges naturally from the underlying aquifer to the Ware River, ranged from 0.10 to 0.20 ft/d upward. The effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site ranged from 2.4 to 17.1 ft/d. Ground-water velocities determined at three locations at the Dover, N.J., site, where infiltration from the Rockaway River into the underlying sediments occurs because of pumping, were 1.5 ft/d downward. The effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying this site ranged from 2.2 to 2.5 ft/d. Independent estimates of velocity at two of the three sites are in general agreement with the velocities determined using temperature profiles. The estimates of velocities and conductivities derived from the

  4. Vertical Structure of Aerosols and Mineral Dust Transport Over the Bay of Bengal Using Multi-Satellite Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naduparambil Bharathan, L.

    2015-12-01

    Bay-of-Bengal (BoB), a small oceanic region Eat to Indian land mass, surrounded by heavily inhabited land masses, experiences different types of air-masses in different seasons of contrasting wind patterns, which makes it a region of large heterogeneity in the context of regional climate forcing due to atmospheric aerosols. Heterogeneity of aerosol system over the Bay of Bengal is mainly determined by three distinct source regions, which are east coast of India/central India, China/east Asia and Arabian region. Continental aerosols transported through higher elevations over BoB lead to significant impacts in regional climate by modifying the vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere and associated circulation dynamics. The study aims at a comprehensive understanding on the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of elevated aerosol over the BoB using the observations of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO). Being capable of short wave scattering and long wave absorption, mineral dust aerosols can affects the energetics of the atmosphere over any region.Owing to its influence on Indian monsoon rainfall and regional climate, the study aims to comprehend on the spatial and seasonal variation of mineral dust transport over the Bay of Bengal. vertical distribution of the dust extinction coefficient over the Bay of Bengal for all seasons, is derived, using a dust separation scheme that uses the depolarization measurements, a priori information on lidar ratio of dust, depolarization ratio of dust and that of non-dust aerosols. Being highly non-spherical, mineral dust significantly depolarize the radiation and possess distinct range of depolarization ratio. This property of dust is made use to identify and quantify dust over the study region. Seasonal variation of dust fraction over the Bay of Bengal is estimated seperately from CALIPSO back scattering coefficients

  5. Improved stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles from SCIAMACHY: validation and sample results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Savigny, C.; Ernst, F.; Rozanov, A.; Hommel, R.; Eichmann, K.-U.; Rozanov, V.; Burrows, J. P.; Thomason, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    Stratospheric aerosol extinction profiles have been retrieved from SCIAMACHY/Envisat measurements of limb-scattered solar radiation. The retrieval is an improved version of an algorithm presented earlier. The retrieved aerosol extinction profiles are compared to co-located aerosol profile measurements from the SAGE II solar occultation instrument at a wavelength of 525 nm. Comparisons were carried out with two versions of the SAGE II data set (version 6.2 and the new version 7.0). In a global average sense the SCIAMACHY and the SAGE II version 7.0 extinction profiles agree to within about 10 % for altitudes above 15 km. Larger relative differences (up to 40 %) are observed at specific latitudes and altitudes. We also find differences between the two SAGE II data versions of up to 40 % for specific latitudes and altitudes, consistent with earlier reports. Sample results on the latitudinal and temporal variability of stratospheric aerosol extinction and optical depth during the SCIAMACHY mission period are presented. The results confirm earlier reports that a series of volcanic eruptions is responsible for the increase in stratospheric aerosol optical depth from 2002 to 2012. Above about an altitude of 28 km, volcanic eruptions are found to have negligible impact in the period 2002-2012.

  6. Measuring the vertical distributions of the upper tropospheric and stratospheric dust with a LOAC aerosol counter under meteorological balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignelles, Damien; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Dulac, François; Coute, Benoit; Jeannot, Matthieu; Jegou, Fabrice; Olafsson, Haraldur; Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla

    2014-05-01

    France) and form Iceland. For this period of observation, the stratosphere is characterized by a 'background' aerosol content, i.e. free of any volcanic influence. In this context, we show that both liquid and solid particles are present, depending on the altitude and on the aerosol sizes. A series of one year of flight will be presented to highlight the trend in the aerosol content. Also, the analysis of individual profiles exhibits a strong variability in terms of concentration and composition both in the upper troposphere and in the stratosphere. Such variations are often linked with the aerosol composition. The reasons of such variability are investigated, in particular in terms of air mass origins and transport.

  7. Ceilometer for aerosol profiling: comparison with the multiwavelength in the frame of INTERACT (INTERcomparison of Aerosol and Cloud Tracking)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, Fabio; Vande Hey, Joshua; Rosoldi, Marco; Amato, Francesco; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    project. This work is the first time that three different commercial ceilometers with an advanced Raman lidar are compared over a period of six months. The comparison of the attenuated backscatter profiles from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar and three ceilometers (CHM15k, CS135s, CT25K) reveals differences due to the expected discrepancy in the SNR but also due to effect of changes in the ambient temperature on the short and mid-term stability of ceilometer calibration. A large instability of ceilometers in the incomplete overlap region has also been observed, making the use of a single overlap correction function for the whole duration of the campaign critical. Therefore, technological improvements of ceilometers towards their operational use in the monitoring of the atmospheric aerosol in the low and free troposphere are needed.

  8. Evaluation of modeled vertical aerosol distributions over east-Asia using in-situ and satellite data during summer 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quennehen, Boris; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Law, Kathy S.; Thomas, Jennie L.; Ancellet, Gérard; Bazureau, Ariane; Daskalakis, Nikos; Kim, Sang-Woo; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Zhu, Tong; Pelon, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    As part of the EU ECLIPSE project, which aims to quantify the climate impact of short lived climate forcers (SLCFs), including aerosols, black carbon and ozone, regional models are being used to evaluate global model performance for specific case studies. Here, we present results using regional WRF-Chem simulations over east-Asia. Results are compared to data from field campaigns which took place in summer 2008 and from long-term measurement stations. This study will, in a first step, evaluate the ability of the model to simulate aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, with a focus on pollution layers. In a second step, the radiative impact of such layers over east-Asia will be investigated as a function of their position relative to clouds. The WRF-Chem regional model was run using MOZART gas phase chemistry and the MOSAIC aerosol scheme and was evaluated against available measurements for the period August to September 2008. The model was run using ECLIPSE anthropogenic and GFEDv3.1 fire emissions for 2008, while initial and boundary conditions were specified from the TM4 global chemical transport model. The radiative impact of pollution aerosol layers has already been investigated but less is known about the influence of vertical layering in the atmosphere. Such layers might have different radiative impacts whether they are below or above clouds and in that sense, a better understanding of their spatial extent is critical. Information about pollution aerosol layers and clouds optical properties and positions over East-Asia are determined using observations from CALIPSO. The radiative impact of these layers is simulated and compared to the observations. In addition to satellite observations, model results are evaluated against trace gas and aerosol data from aircraft campaigns over eastern Asia in summer 2008 (e.g., CAREBEIJING and CAPMEX) and ground-based measurements (e.g., NIES and ABC). In this study, we assess aerosol total concentrations and size

  9. Influence of particles shape on the vertical profile of blowing snow concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vionnet, Vincent; Trouvilliez, Alexandre; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    In alpine regions, blowing snow events strongly influence the temporal and spatial evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. In Antarctica, blowing snow is an essential surface mass balance process and plays a non-negligible role in the annual accumulation. The vertical profile of blowing snow concentration determines the quantity of snow transported in turbulent suspension. A power law is often used to represent this vertical profile. It serves as an analytical solution representing an equilibrium between vertical turbulent diffusion and gravitational settling. In this work, we study how the exponent of the power law depends on the type of transported particles. Vertical profiles of blowing snow concentration have been collected at the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (French Alps) in 2011 and 2012 and near the research station of Cap Prud'homme (Antarctica) in 2010 and 2011. We used mechanical gauges (butterfly nets) and optical devices (Snow Particles Counters). Profiles collected during blowing snow events with precipitation have been corrected to account for the contribution of snowfall. Results show that profiles collected during blowing snow without snowfall differ from the corrected profiles collected during snowfall. At a given wind speed, particles transported during snowfall have a lower settling velocity than particles transported without snowfall. This difference confirms earlier observations (Takahashi, 1985) and can be explained by the change of drag coefficient between dendritic and rounded particles. This difference pertains several hours after the end of the snowfall illustrating the fragmentation of snow grains during blowing snow events.

  10. Measurements of Stratospheric Pinatubo Aerosol Extinction Profiles by a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abo, Makoto; Nagasawa, Chikao

    1992-01-01

    The Raman lidar has been used for remote measurements of water vapor, ozone and atmospheric temperature in the lower troposphere because the Raman cross section is three orders smaller than the Rayleigh cross section. We estimated the extinction coefficients of the Pinatubo volcanic aerosol in the stratosphere using a Raman lidar. If the precise aerosol extinction coefficients are derived, the backscatter coefficient of a Mie scattering lidar will be more accurately estimated. The Raman lidar has performed to measure density profiles of some species using Raman scattering. Here we used a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser for transmitter and received nitrogen vibrational Q-branch Raman scattering signal. Ansmann et al. (1990) derived tropospherical aerosol extinction profiles with a Raman lidar. We think that this method can apply to dense stratospheric aerosols such as Pinatubo volcanic aerosols. As dense aerosols are now accumulated in the stratosphere by Pinatubo volcanic eruption, the error of Ramen lidar signal regarding the fluctuation of air density can be ignored.

  11. CALIBRATION OF A VERTICAL-SCAN LONG TRACE PROFILER AT MSFC.

    SciTech Connect

    GUBAREV,M.; KESTER,T.; TAKACS,P.Z.

    2001-07-31

    The long trace profiler (LTP) is the instrument of choice for the surface figure measurement of grazing incidence mirrors. The modification of conventional LTP, the vertical-scan LTP, capable of measuring the surface figure of replicated shell mirrors is now in operation at Marshall Space Flight Center. A few sources of systematic error for vertical-scan LTP are discussed. Status of systematic error reduction is reported.

  12. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, Michael; Muñoz-Esparza, Domingo; Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Knoth, Oswald; Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Tegen, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) with ASAM (All Scale Atmospheric Model) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. This method is now also validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment) field campaign is used for both model initialization and comparisons. Several sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Additional simulation cases deal with modified surface characteristics and their impacts on the simulation results. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure and accurately reproduces the development of the daytime convective boundary layer measured by the Raman lidar.

  13. Midlatitude sporadic-E layers and vertical metallic ion drift profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royrvik, O.

    1983-02-01

    An investigation of the relationship between the occurrence of midlatitude sporadic-E-layers and convergent points in the ion drift profiles has been made using the 430 MHz incoherent scatter radar at the Arecibo Observatory. Electron concentration profiles were obtained using a 13 baud Barker coded pulse yielding 600 m range resolution, while a 5-pulse sequence with 2.4 km range resolution was used to obtain line-of-sight ion drift velocities. With some exceptions, observed sporadic-E layers occur near convergent points in the vertical metallic ion drift profile, and vertical motions of these layers follow the vertical motions of the convergent point. A sudden increase in the altitude of a sporadic-E layer has been observed. This is attributed to the disappearance of the convergent point, releasing the layer, followed by an ascent of the layer to the closest overlying convergent point.

  14. Retrieval of Vertical Ozone Profile Using Satellite Solar Occultation Method and Tests of its Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hi-Ku; Yoon, Young-Jun; Park, Jae H.; Lee, Kwang Mok; Tatsuya, Yokota

    1998-06-01

    Recently measurements of atmospheric trace gases from satellite are vigorous. So the development of its data processing algorithm is important. In this study, retrieval of vertical ozone profile from the atmospheric transmittance measured by satellite solar occultation method and its sensitivity to temperature and pressure are investigated. The measured transmittance from satellite is assumed to be given by the limb path transmittance simulated using annual averaged Umkehr data for Seoul. The limb path transmittance between wavelengths 9.89micro m and 10.02micro m is simulated with respect to tangent heights using the ozone data of HALOE SIDS(Hallogen Occultation Experiment Simulated Instrument Data Set) as an initial profile. Other input data such as pressure and temperature are also from HALOE SIDS. Vertical ozone profile is correctly retrieved from the measured transmittance by onion-peeling method from 50km to 11km tangent heights with the vertical resolution of 3km. The bias error of +/- 0.001 in measured transmittance, the forced error of +/- 3K in each layer temperature, and the forced +/- 3% error in each layer pressure are assumed for sensitivity tests. These errors are based on the ADEOS/ILAS error limitation. The error in ozone amount ranges from -6.5% to +6.9% due to transmittance error, from -9.5% to +10.5% due to temperature error, and from -5.1% to +5.4% due to pressure error, respectively. The present study suggests that accurate vertical ozone profile can be retrieved from satellite solar occultation method. Accuracy of vertical temperature profile is especially important in the retrieval of vertical ozone profile.

  15. Tropospheric mercury vertical profiles between 500 and 10 000 m in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, Andreas; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Pirrone, Nicola; Bieser, Johannes; Bödewadt, Jan; Esposito, Giulio; Slemr, Franz; van Velthoven, Peter F. J.; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of the vertical distribution of atmospheric mercury (Hg) plays an important role in determining the transport and cycling of mercury. However, measurements of the vertical distribution are rare, because airborne measurements are expensive and labour intensive. Consequently, only a few vertical Hg profile measurements have been reported since the 1970s. Besides the Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container (CARIBIC) observations, the latest vertical profile over Europe was measured in 1996. Within the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project, four vertical profiles were taken on board research aircraft (CASA-212) in August 2013 in background air over different locations in Slovenia and Germany. Each vertical profile consists of at least seven 5 min horizontal flight sections from 500 m above ground to 3000 m a.s.l. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and total gaseous mercury (TGM) were measured with Tekran 2537X and Tekran 2537B analysers. In addition to the mercury measurements, SO2, CO, O3, NO, and NO2, basic meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, relative humidity) have been measured. Additional ground-based mercury measurements at the GMOS master site in Waldhof, Germany and measurements onboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft were used to extend the profile to the ground and upper troposphere respectively. No vertical gradient was found inside the well-mixed boundary layer (variation of less than 0.1 ng m-3) at different sites, with GEM varying from location to location between 1.4 and 1.6 ng m-3 (standard temperature and pressure, STP: T = 273.15 K, p = 1013.25 hPa). At all locations GEM dropped to 1.3 ng m-3 (STP) when entering the free troposphere and remained constant at higher altitudes. The combination of the vertical profile, measured on 21 August 2013 over Leipzig, Germany, with the CARIBIC measurements during ascent and descent to Frankfurt Airport, Germany, taken at

  16. An analysis of the vertical structure equation for arbitrary thermal profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1987-01-01

    The vertical structure equation is a singular Sturm-Liouville problem whose eigenfunctions describe the vertical dependence of the normal modes of the primitive equations linearized about a given thermal profile. The eigenvalues give the equivalent depths of the modes. The spectrum of the vertical structure equation and the appropriateness of various upper boundary conditions, both for arbitrary thermal profiles were studied. The results depend critically upon whether or not the thermal profile is such that the basic state atmosphere is bounded. In the case of a bounded atmosphere it is shown that the spectrum is always totally discrete, regardless of details of the thermal profile. For the barotropic equivalent depth, which corresponds to the lowest eigen value, upper and lower bounds which depend only on the surface temperature and the atmosphere height were obtained. All eigenfunctions are bounded, but always have unbounded first derivatives. It was proved that the commonly invoked upper boundary condition that vertical velocity must vanish as pressure tends to zero, as well as a number of alternative conditions, is well posed. It was concluded that the vertical structure equation always has a totally discrete spectrum under the assumptions implicit in the primitive equations.

  17. Tropospheric mercury vertical profiles between 500 and 10 000 m in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, A.; Ebinghaus, R.; Pirrone, N.; Bieser, J.; Bödewadt, J.; Esposito, G.; Slemr, F.; van Velthoven, P. F. J.; Zahn, A.; Ziereis, H.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the vertical distribution of atmospheric mercury (Hg) are rare, because airborne measurements are expensive and labour intensive. Consequently, only a few vertical Hg profile measurements have been reported since the 1970s. Besides the CARIBIC passenger aircraft observations, the latest vertical profile over Europe was measured in 1996. Within the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project four vertical profiles were taken on board research aircraft (CASA-212) in August 2013 in background air over different locations in Slovenia and Germany. Each vertical profile consists of at least seven 5 min horizontal flight sections from 500 m above ground to 3000 m a.s.l. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) was measured with a Tekran 2537X analyser and a Lumex RA-915-AM. Total gaseous mercury (TGM) was measured using a Tekran 2537B analyser and gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) was sampled onto 8 denuders for post flight analysis (one for each profile, three during the transfer flights, and two blanks). In addition to the mercury measurements, SO2, CO, O3, NO, NO2, as well as basic meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, relative humidity) have been measured. Additional ground based speciated mercury measurements at the GMOS master site in Waldhof (Germany) were used to extend the profile to the ground. No vertical gradient was found inside the well mixed boundary layer (variation by less than 0.1 ng m-3) at different sites with GEM varying from location to location between 1.4 and 1.6 ng m-3 (STP; standard conditions: p = 1013.25 hPa, T = 273.15 K). At all locations GEM dropped to 1.3 ng m-3 (STP) when entering the free troposphere and remained constant at higher altitudes. The combination of the vertical profile, measured on 21 August 2013, over Leipzig (Germany) with the CARIBIC measurements during ascent and descent to Frankfurt airport (Germany) at approximately the same time provide a unique central European vertical profile from inside the

  18. Measurements of the vertical profile of water vapor abundance in the Martian atmosphere from Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, J. T.; Mccleese, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the Pressure Modulator Infrared Radiometer (PMIRR) capabilities along with how the vertical profiles of water vapor will be obtained. The PMIRR will employ filter and pressure modulation radiometry using nine spectral channels, in both limb scanning and nadir sounding modes, to obtain daily, global maps of temperature, dust extinction, condensate extinction, and water vapor mixing ratio profiles as a function of pressure to half scale height or 5 km vertical resolution. Surface thermal properties will also be mapped, and the polar radiactive balance will be monitored.

  19. Generation of optimum vertical profiles for an advanced flight management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Waters, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    Algorithms for generating minimum fuel or minimum cost vertical profiles are derived and examined. The option for fixing the time of flight is included in the concepts developed. These algorithms form the basis for the design of an advanced on-board flight management system. The variations in the optimum vertical profiles (resulting from these concepts) due to variations in wind, takeoff mass, and range-to-destination are presented. Fuel savings due to optimum climb, free cruise altitude, and absorbing delays enroute are examined.

  20. Profile and Morphology of Fungal Aerosols Characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM)

    PubMed Central

    Afanou, Komlavi Anani; Straumfors, Anne; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Skaar, Ida; Hjeljord, Linda; Skare, Øivind; Green, Brett James; Tronsmo, Arne; Eduard, Wijnand

    2016-01-01

    Fungal aerosols consist of spores and fragments with diverse array of morphologies; however, the size, shape, and origin of the constituents require further characterization. In this study, we characterize the profile of aerosols generated from Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, and Penicillium chrysogenum grown for 8 weeks on gypsum boards. Fungal particles were aerosolized at 12 and 20 L min−1 using the Fungal Spore Source Strength Tester (FSSST) and the Stami particle generator (SPG). Collected particles were analyzed with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). We observed spore particle fraction consisting of single spores and spore aggregates in four size categories, and a fragment fraction that contained submicronic fragments and three size categories of larger fragments. Single spores dominated the aerosols from A. fumigatus (median: 53%), while the submicronic fragment fraction was the highest in the aerosols collected from A. versicolor (median: 34%) and P. chrysogenum (median: 31%). Morphological characteristics showed near spherical particles that were only single spores, oblong particles that comprise some spore aggregates and fragments (<3.5 μm), and fiber-like particles that regroup chained spore aggregates and fragments (>3.5 μm). Further, the near spherical particles dominated the aerosols from A. fumigatus (median: 53%), while oblong particles were dominant in the aerosols from A. versicolor (68%) and P. chrysogenum (55%). Fiber-like particles represented 21% and 24% of the aerosols from A. versicolor and P. chrysogenum, respectively. This study shows that fungal particles of various size, shape, and origin are aerosolized, and supports the need to include a broader range of particle types in fungal exposure assessment. PMID:26855468

  1. Transport of magnetic flux and the vertical structure of accretion discs - II. Vertical profile of the diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilet, Jérôme; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the radial transport of magnetic flux in a thin accretion disc, the turbulence being modelled by effective diffusion coefficients (viscosity and resistivity). Both turbulent diffusion and advection by the accretion flow contribute to flux transport, and they are likely to act in opposition. We study the consequences of the vertical variation of the diffusion coefficients, due to a varying strength of the turbulence. For this purpose, we consider three different vertical profiles of these coefficients. The first one is aimed at mimicking the turbulent stress profile observed in numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in stratified discs. This enables us to confirm the robustness of the main result of Paper I obtained for uniform diffusion coefficients that, for weak magnetic fields, the contribution of the accretion flow to the transport velocity of magnetic flux is much larger than the transport velocity of mass. We then consider the presence of a dead zone around the equatorial plane where the physical resistivity is high while the turbulent viscosity is low. We find that it amplifies the previous effect: weak magnetic fields can be advected orders of magnitude faster than mass, for dead zones with a large vertical extension. The ratio of advection to diffusion, determining the maximum inclination of the field at the surface of the disc, is however not much affected. Finally, we study the effect of a non-turbulent layer at the surface of the disc, which has been suggested as a way to reduce the diffusion of the magnetic flux. We find that the reduction of the diffusion requires the conducting layer to extend below the height at which the magnetic pressure equals the thermal pressure. As a consequence, if the absence of turbulence is caused by the large-scale magnetic field, the highly conducting layer is inefficient at reducing the diffusion.

  2. Vertical Transport of Aerosol Particles across Mountain Topography near the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. J.; Schill, S.; Freeman, S.; Bertram, T. H.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Transport of aerosol particles is known to affect air quality and is largely dependent on the characteristic topography of the surrounding region. To characterize this transport, aerosol number distributions were collected with an Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS, DMT) during the 2015 NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) in and around the Los Angeles Basin in Southern California. Increases in particle number concentration and size were observed over mountainous terrain north of Los Angeles County. Chemical analysis and meteorological lagrangian trajectories suggest orographic lifting processes, known as the "chimney effect". Implications for spatial transport and distribution will be discussed.

  3. Computer programs for generation and evaluation of near-optimum vertical flight profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Waters, M. H.; Patmore, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Two extensive computer programs were developed. The first, called OPTIM, generates a reference near-optimum vertical profile, and it contains control options so that the effects of various flight constraints on cost performance can be examined. The second, called TRAGEN, is used to simulate an aircraft flying along an optimum or any other vertical reference profile. TRAGEN is used to verify OPTIM's output, examine the effects of uncertainty in the values of parameters (such as prevailing wind) which govern the optimum profile, or compare the cost performance of profiles generated by different techniques. A general description of these programs, the efforts to add special features to them, and sample results of their usage are presented.

  4. An overview of the first decade of PollyNET: an emerging network of automated Raman-polarization lidars for continuous aerosol profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Holger; Kanitz, Thomas; Engelmann, Ronny; Althausen, Dietrich; Heese, Birgit; Komppula, Mika; Preißler, Jana; Tesche, Matthias; Ansmann, Albert; Wandinger, Ulla; Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marinou, Eleni; Seifert, Patric; Hofer, Julian; Skupin, Annett; Schneider, Florian; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Foth, Andreas; Bley, Sebastian; Pfüller, Anne; Giannakaki, Eleni; Lihavainen, Heikki; Viisanen, Yrjö; Hooda, Rakesh Kumar; Nepomuceno Pereira, Sérgio; Bortoli, Daniele; Wagner, Frank; Mattis, Ina; Janicka, Lucja; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Achtert, Peggy; Artaxo, Paulo; Pauliquevis, Theotonio; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Prakesh Sharma, Ved; Gideon van Zyl, Pieter; Beukes, Johan Paul; Sun, Junying; Rohwer, Erich G.; Deng, Ruru; Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Zamorano, Felix

    2016-04-01

    A global vertically resolved aerosol data set covering more than 10 years of observations at more than 20 measurement sites distributed from 63° N to 52° S and 72° W to 124° E has been achieved within the Raman and polarization lidar network PollyNET. This network consists of portable, remote-controlled multiwavelength-polarization-Raman lidars (Polly) for automated and continuous 24/7 observations of clouds and aerosols. PollyNET is an independent, voluntary, and scientific network. All Polly lidars feature a standardized instrument design with different capabilities ranging from single wavelength to multiwavelength systems, and now apply unified calibration, quality control, and data analysis. The observations are processed in near-real time without manual intervention, and are presented online at http://polly.tropos.de/. The paper gives an overview of the observations on four continents and two research vessels obtained with eight Polly systems. The specific aerosol types at these locations (mineral dust, smoke, dust-smoke and other dusty mixtures, urban haze, and volcanic ash) are identified by their Ångström exponent, lidar ratio, and depolarization ratio. The vertical aerosol distribution at the PollyNET locations is discussed on the basis of more than 55 000 automatically retrieved 30 min particle backscatter coefficient profiles at 532 nm as this operating wavelength is available for all Polly lidar systems. A seasonal analysis of measurements at selected sites revealed typical and extraordinary aerosol conditions as well as seasonal differences. These studies show the potential of PollyNET to support the establishment of a global aerosol climatology that covers the entire troposphere.

  5. [Monitoring and analysis of vertical profile of atmospheric HONO, NO2 in boundary layer of Beijing].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-Wu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Fang, Jing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Dou, Ke; Qin, Min; Si, Fu-Qi

    2011-04-01

    Based on the scanning differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system, field measurement of vertical profiles of HONO and NO2 was performed continuously from Aug. 27, 2007 to Sep. 4, 2007 in Chaoyang District of Beijing, and their vertical profiles were analyzed. Based on the acquired data, the typical vertical variation characteristics of HONO, NO2 and the ratio HONO/NO2 were discussed, and the possible formation sources of HONO were studied. The results indicated that the decrease of HONO with height was faster than the decrease of NO2. The study found good correlation between NO2 and HONO, as well as between the ratio HONO/NO2 and vapor, respectively. Therefore, the authors' conclusion is that HONO was formed by heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surfaces or near ground and then transported to higher altitudes. PMID:21714264

  6. Development of an angular scanning system for sensing vertical profiles of soil electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent soil electrical conductivity (EC**a**) is typically mapped to define soil spatial variability within an agricultural field. Knowledge of the vertical variability of EC**a** is desired to define site-specific behavior of the soil profile. A Pneumatic Angular Scanning System (PASS) was develo...

  7. From the shape of the vertical profile of in vivo fluorescence to Chlorophyll-a concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignot, A.; Claustre, H.; D'Ortenzio, F.; Xing, X.; Poteau, A.; Ras, J.

    2011-04-01

    In vivo fluorescence of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) is a potentially useful property to study the vertical distribution of phytoplankton biomass. However the technique is presently not fully exploited as it should be, essentially because of the difficulties in converting the fluorescence signal into an accurate Chl-a concentration. These difficulties arise noticeably from natural variations in the Chl-a fluorescence relationship, which is under the control of community composition as well as of their nutrient and light status. As a consequence although vertical profiles of fluorescence are likely the most recorded biological property in the open ocean, the corresponding large databases are underexploited. Here with the aim to convert a fluorescence profile into a Chl-a concentration profile, we test the hypothesis that the Chl-a concentration can be gathered from the sole knowledge of the shape of the fluorescence profile. We analyze a large dataset from 18 oceanographic cruises conducted in case-1 waters from the highly stratified hyperoligotrophic waters (surface Chl-a = 0.02 mg m-3) of the South Pacific Gyre to the eutrophic waters of the Benguela upwelling (surface Chl-a = 32 mg m-3) and including the very deep mixed waters in the North Atlantic (Mixed Layer Depth = 690 m). This dataset encompasses more than 700 vertical profiles of Chl-a fluorescence as well as accurate estimations of Chl-a by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Two typical fluorescence profiles are identified, the uniform profile, characterized by a homogeneous layer roughly corresponding to the mixed layer, and the non-uniform profile, characterized by the presence of a Deep Chlorophyll Maximum. Using appropriate mathematical parameterizations, a fluorescence profile is subsequently represented by 3 or 5 shape parameters for uniform or non-uniform profiles, respectively. For both situations, an empirical model is developed to predict the "true" Chl-a concentration from these shape

  8. From the shape of the vertical profile of in vivo fluorescence to Chlorophyll-a concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignot, A.; Claustre, H.; D'Ortenzio, F.; Xing, X.; Poteau, A.; Ras, J.

    2011-08-01

    In vivo fluorescence of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) is a potentially useful property to study the vertical distribution of phytoplankton biomass. However the technique is presently not fully exploited as it should be, essentially because of the difficulties in converting the fluorescence signal into an accurate Chl-a concentration. These difficulties arise noticeably from natural variations in the Chl-a fluorescence relationship, which is under the control of community composition as well as of their nutrient and light status. As a consequence, although vertical profiles of fluorescence are likely the most recorded biological property in the open ocean, the corresponding large databases are underexploited. Here with the aim to convert a fluorescence profile into a Chl-a concentration profile, we test the hypothesis that the Chl-a concentration can be gathered from the sole knowledge of the shape of the fluorescence profile. We analyze a large dataset from 18 oceanographic cruises conducted in case-1 waters from the highly stratified hyperoligotrophic waters (surface Chl-a = 0.02 mg m-3) of the South Pacific Gyre to the eutrophic waters of the Benguela upwelling (surface Chl-a = 32 mg m-3) and including the very deep mixed waters in the North Atlantic (Mixed Layer Depth = 690 m). This dataset encompasses more than 700 vertical profiles of Chl-a fluorescence as well as accurate estimations of Chl-a by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Two typical fluorescence profiles are identified, the uniform profile, characterized by a homogeneous layer roughly corresponding to the mixed layer, and the non-uniform profile, characterized by the presence of a Deep Chlorophyll Maximum. Using appropriate mathematical parameterizations, a fluorescence profile is subsequently represented by 3 or 5 shape parameters for uniform or non-uniform profiles, respectively. For both situations, an empirical model is developed to predict the "true" Chl-a concentration from these shape

  9. NO 2 vertical profiles retrieved from ground-based measurements during spring 1999 in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Stella M. L.; Farahani, E.; Strong, K.; Bassford, M. R.; Preston, K. E.; McLinden, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    During the 1990s, Arctic stratospheric temperatures were lower and the breakup of the Arctic vortex occurred later than has been observed in earlier decades. These cold winters have been followed by significant ozone loss. A clear identification of all the processes involved in springtime Arctic ozone depletion is complicated by the strong coupling between transport, formation of solid and liquid aerosols, and halogen activation. One of the key chemical species in the photochemistry of ozone is NO 2. As the role of NO 2 is strongly dependent on altitude, it is desirable to know not only the NO 2 total column, but also its vertical distribution. We have a portable UV-Vis grating spectrometer that was deployed at Eureka, Canada (80.1°N, 86.4°W) in spring 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2003, and at Resolute Bay, Canada (74.7°N, 94.6°W) in spring 2002. Eureka is part of the Arctic primary station of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change. Among other species, the spectrometer measures stratospheric NO 2 through observation of sunlight scattered from the zenith sky during twilight. Due to the scattering geometry, the NO 2 slant column increases with solar zenith angle (SZA), making it possible to retrieve information about the vertical distribution of NO 2 from the observed slant column variation with SZA. In this paper, we use the optimal estimation technique with a formal characterization of the errors to retrieve NO 2 concentration profiles from slant column observations made at Eureka during March and April 1999. Such measurements can also be used in the validation of NO 2 profile measurements made by satellite instruments.

  10. Coarse-fine vertical scanning based optical profiler for structured surface measurement with large step height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Liu, Xiaojun; Lei, Zili; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiao; Chen, Liangzhou; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    White light interference (WLI) optical profiler had been used widely for structured surface measurement. To achieve high measuring accuracy, piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) was usually used as the vertical scanning unit, which was normally less than 100um and only for small range structured surface measurement. With the development of advanced manufacturing technology, precision structured surfaces with large step height were appearing. To satisfy the measurement requirements of this kind of precision structured surfaces, WLI optical profiler with large range had to be developed. In this paper, an optical profiler was proposed, in which a coarse-fine vertical scanning system was adopted to expand its measurement range to 10mm while its resolution still at nanometer level.

  11. Seasonal Variations in Titan's Stratosphere Observed with Cassini/CIRS: Temperature, Trace Molecular Gas and Aerosol Mixing Ratio Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Anderson, C. M.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N.

    2012-01-01

    Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009. General Circulation Models (e.g. Lebonnois et al., 2012) predict strong modifications of the global circulation in this period, with formation of two circulation cells instead of the pole-to-pole cell that occurred during northern winter. This winter single cell, which had its descending branch at the north pole, was at the origin of the enrichment of molecular abundances and high stratopause temperatures observed by Cassini/CIRS at high northern latitudes (e.g. Achterberg et al., 2011, Coustenis et al., 2010, Teanby et al., 2008, Vinatier et al., 2010). The predicted dynamical seasonal variations after the equinox have strong impact on the spatial distributions of trace gas, temperature and aerosol abundances. We will present here an analysis of CIRS limb-geometry datasets acquired in 2010 and 2011 that we used to monitor the seasonal evolution of the vertical profiles of temperature, molecular (C2H2, C2H6, HCN, ..) and aerosol abundances.

  12. CO2 vertical profile retrieval from ground-based IR atmospheric spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravian, Kobra; Loehnert, Ulrich; Turner, David; Ebell, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    CO2 vertical profile retrieval from ground-based IR atmospheric spectra In this study, we developed an algorithm for retrieving the CO2 vertical profile from atmospheric ground-based zenith spectra in the mid IR. Providing the CO2 profile from continuous (24h/day) ground-based spectra would be a great potential for studying the carbon cycle, the evaluation of satellite measurements or the assessment of numerical models, which forecast the near-surface CO2 flux. In order to retrieve the CO2 profile, we used observations of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) that was installed at the JOYCE (Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution), Germany in 2012. AERI measures downwelling infrared radiances from 520 cm-1 (3.3 μm) to 3020 cm-1 (19 μm) with a spectral resolution of 1 cm-1 and a temporal resolution of 1 minute. In a first step, we performed sensitivity studies for finding the most-suited spectral bands with highest sensitivity to the mean column amount of CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR). Then an algorithm, known as AERIoe (Turner and Löhnert 2014), was applied to retrieve the mean column amount of CO2 VMR using simulated radiances in clear sky cases. AERIoe is a variational retrieval algorithm to provide information on Temperature, humidity, trace gases and clouds. The simulated AERI radiances were generated by a line by line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) using model temperature, humidity and CO2 profile. The retrieval results of mean column amount of CO2 VMR are in good agreement with the true ones. In addition to the mean column amount, we modified AERIoe to retrieve the CO2 vertical profile. First results reveal that there is more than 1 degree of freedom for CO2 profile. We will show results how the retrieval method is refined to optimally exploit the information on the CO2 profile contained in the AERI measurements.

  13. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of space vehicle loads and trajectories during design requires a large sample of wind profiles at the altitudes where winds affect the vehicle. Traditionally, this altitude region extends from near 8-14 km to address maximum dynamic pressure upon ascent into space, but some applications require knowledge of measured wind profiles at lower altitudes. Such applications include crew capsule pad abort and plume damage analyses. Two Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) systems exist at the United States Air Force (USAF) Eastern Range and at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kennedy Space Center. The 50-MHz DRWP provides wind profiles every 3-5 minutes from roughly 2.5-18.5 km, and five 915-MHz DRWPs provide wind profiles every 15 minutes from approximately 0.2-3.0 km. Archived wind profiles from all systems underwent rigorous quality control (QC) processes, and concurrent measurements from the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives were spliced into individual profiles that extend from about 0.2-18.5 km. The archive contains combined profiles from April 2000 to December 2009, and thousands of profiles during each month are available for use by the launch vehicle community. This paper presents the details of the QC and splice methodology, as well as some attributes of the archive.

  14. Experimental study of vertical stress profiles of a confined granular bed under static and dynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mandato, S; Cuq, B; Ruiz, T

    2012-07-01

    In a wet agglomeration process inside a low shear mixer, the blade function is to induce i) homogenization of the liquid sprayed on the powder surface and ii) a stress field able to transfer the mechanical energy at the particle scale. In this work we study the mechanical state of a confined powder bed through the analysis of stress distributions (by force measurements) in a rectangular cell in two cases: for a classical model powder (i.e. glass beads) and a complex powder (i.e. wheat semolina). Two types of vertical stress profiles are obtained according to the type of measurements carried out in the powder bed, either locally (at different positions in the cell) or globally (at the entire base). The global vertical stress profile follows Janssen's model and the local vertical stress profile highlights a critical length, identified as the percolation threshold of the force network, and a shielding length near the bottom, which is similar to an influence length of the side walls. In the context of wet agglomeration, the results allow to consider the role of the characteristic lengths in the mixing bowl under vertical mechanical solicitation. PMID:22772594

  15. Multi-wavelength profiles of aerosol backscatter over Lauder, New Zealand, 24 November 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Rosen, J. M.; Kjome, N. T.; Mcgee, T. J.; Gross, M. R.; Singh, U. N.; Ferrare, R. F.; Kimvilakani, P.; Uchino, O.; Nagai, T.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous profiles of aerosol backscatter ratio were measured over Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S, 170 deg E) on the night of November 24, 1992. Instrumentation comprised two complementary lidar systems and a backscattersonde, to give measurements at wavelengths 351, 490, 532, and 940 nm. The data from the lidars and the backscattersonde were self-consistent, enabling the wavelength dependence of aerosol backscatter to be determined as a function of altitude. This wavelength-dependence is a useful parameter in radiative transfer calculations. In the stratosphere, the average wavelength exponent between 351 and 940 nm was -1.23 +/- 0.1, which was in good agreement with values derived from measured physical properties of aerosols.

  16. Vertical motion of near-surface aerosols close to breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienert, Barry; Porter, John; Sharma, Shiv

    2005-10-01

    We have used two-dimensional correlation on two-dimensional extinction cross-sections measured by a scanning lidar to determine the velocity structure of the salt-spray aerosols. The lidar scans were collected over a reef at Bellows Beach, on the Northeast side of Oahu, Hawaii. The resulting velocity streamlines suggest that lifting of sea-spray aerosols as high as 200 m occurs in the vicinity of opposing horizontal roll vortices. The velocities vary rapidly over distances of less than 500 m and show a complex pattern which is inadequately represented by conventional anemometer measurements.

  17. The effect of vertical velocity probability distribution shape on cloud activation of aerosols: off-line calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonttila, J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Räisänen, P.; Kokkola, H.; Järvinen, H.

    2012-04-01

    Off-line calculations of cloud activation of aerosols using a probability density function (PDF) for vertical velocity (w) are performed. The focus is on the variation of the shape of the PDF using two functional formulations: the Normal distribution PDF and the Pearson type IV PDF. The Normal distribution provides a familiar example, as it has been widely used to approximate vertical velocity distributions in numerous applications, including climate models. Pearson type IV distribution provides an alternative that, to our knowledge, has not been employed before to describe the vertical velocity PDF. The advantage of the Pearson distribution is its versatility in representing skewed and more peaked distribution shapes compared to the Normal distribution, though this is obtained at the expense of increased mathematical complexity. The experiments are performed using a box model, in which the environmental conditions, including the aerosol size distribution (bi-modal) and chemical composition (ammonium-sulphate particles) are prescribed as constants. Measured size distributions comprising clean and polluted cases are used. Cloud activation of aerosols is calculated by integrating over the positive side of the PDF of w, which yields the mean number of activated particles (Nact). The mean, variance, and skewness of the PDFs along with the type of the PDF itself are altered in order to explore the effect of the PDF shape on the activation process. All experiments are repeated for three well-documented activation parameterizations: Lin & Leaitch, Abdul-Razzak & Ghan and Fountoukis & Nenes. The results show that for symmetric distributions of w (skewness = 0) there is a maximum difference of 10-15 % in Nact between the cases with w given by the Normal distribution, and the more peaked Pearson distribution. The largest differences are seen for the most polluted cases. Nact in clean cases will saturate rather quickly with respect to the maximum supersaturation and, hence

  18. Improved parameterization for the vertical flux of dust aerosols emitted by an eroding soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The representation of the dust cycle in atmospheric circulation models hinges on an accurate parameterization of the vertical dust flux at emission. However, existing parameterizations of the vertical dust flux vary substantially in their scaling with wind friction velocity, require input parameters...

  19. First results of the PML monitor of atmospheric turbulence profile with high vertical resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziad, A.; Blary, F.; Borgnino, J.; Fanteï-Caujolle, Y.; Aristidi, E.; Martin, F.; Lantéri, H.; Douet, R.; Bondoux, E.; Mékarnia, D.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: Future extremely large telescopes will certainly be equipped with wide-field adaptive optics systems. The optimization of the performances of these techniques requires a precise specification of the different components of these AO systems. Most of these technical specifications are related to the atmospheric turbulence parameters, particularly the profile of the refractive index structure constant CN2(h). A new monitor called Profiler of Moon Limb (PML) for the extraction of the CN2(h) profile with high vertical resolution and its first results are presented. Methods: The PML instrument uses an optical method based on the observation of the Moon limb through two subapertures. The use of the lunar limb leads to a continuum of double stars allowing a scan of the whole atmosphere with high resolution in altitude. Results: The first prototype of the PML has been installed at Dome C in Antarctica and the first results of the PML are presented and compared to radio-sounding balloon profiles. In addition to the CN2(h) profile obtained with high vertical resolution, PML is also able to provide other atmospheric turbulence parameters such as the outer scale profile, the total seeing, and the isoplanatic and isopistonic angles.

  20. Long-term impacts of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing; Niu, F.; Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yangang; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol has complex effects on clouds and precipitation that may augment or offset each other contingent upon a variety of variables. As a result, its long-term impact on climate is largely unknown. Using 10 years of the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) measurements, strong aerosol effects of climatologically significance are detected. With increasing total aerosol number concentration (condensation nucleus, CN) measured near the ground, both cloud top height and precipitation change systematically for mix-phase clouds of warm-base (cloud base <1km) and cold-top (above the freezing level), but not for pure liquid and ice clouds. Cloud thickness can increase systematically with the CN concentration by up to a factor of 2. The response of precipitation to CN depends on cloud liquid water path (LWP). As CN increases, rain occurs more frequently for high LWP but less frequently for low LWP. Such strong signals of aerosol long-term impact on cloud and precipitation have not been reported and have significant implications for climate change studies, especially concerning regional and global climate change induced by pollution.

  1. Seasonal Variations In Titan’s Stratosphere Observed With Cassini/CIRS: Temperature, Trace Molecular Gas And Aerosol Mixing Ratio Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, B.; Anderson, C.; Teanby, N.; de Kok, R.; Actherberg, R.; Coustenis, A.; CIRS Team

    2012-10-01

    Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009. General Circulation Models predict strong modifications of the global circulation in this period, with formation of two circulation cells instead of the pole-to-pole cell that occurred during northern winter. This winter single cell, which had its descending branch at the north pole, was at the origin of the enrichment of molecular abundances and high stratopause temperatures observed by Cassini/CIRS at high northern latitudes. The predicted dynamical seasonal variations after the equinox have strong impact on the spatial distributions of trace gas, temperature and aerosol abundances. We will present here an analysis of CIRS limb-geometry datasets acquired in 2010, 2011 and 2012 that we used to monitor the seasonal evolution of the vertical profiles of temperature, molecular (C2H2, C2H6, HCN, ...) and aerosol abundances.

  2. Ground-based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertical resolution absolute humidity profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Verdejo, María; Crewell, Susanne; Löhnert, Ulrich; Orlandi, Emiliano; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity profiles is important for many applications, e.g., assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. Nowadays there are a wide variety of ground-based sensors for atmospheric humidity profiling. Unfortunately there is no single instrument able to provide a measurement with complete vertical coverage, high vertical and temporal resolution and good performance under all weather conditions, simultaneously. For example, Raman lidar (RL) measurements can provide water vapor with a high vertical resolution, albeit with limited vertical coverage, due to sunlight contamination and the presence of clouds. Microwave radiometers (MWRs) receive water vapor information throughout the troposphere, though their vertical resolution is poor. In this work, we present an MWR and RL system synergy, which aims to overcome the specific sensor limitations. The retrieval algorithm combining these two instruments is an optimal estimation method (OEM), which allows for an uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information, taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied to a 2-month field campaign around Jülich (Germany), focusing on clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyze the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity uncertainty is reduced above the last usable lidar range by a factor of ˜ 2 with respect to the case where only RL measurements are used. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom per signal reveal that most information is gained above the usable lidar range, especially important during daytime when the lidar vertical coverage is limited. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using

  3. Observed changes in the vertical profile of stratopheric nitrous oxide at Thule, Greenland, February - March 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmons, Louisa K.; Reeves, John M.; Shindell, Drew T.; Dezafra, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a ground-based mm-wave spectrometer, we have observed stratospheric N2O over Thule, Greenland (76.3 N, 68.4 W) during late February and March, 1992. Vertical profiles of mixing ratio ranging from 16 to 50 km were recovered from molecular emission spectra. The profiles of early March show an abrupt increase in the lower-stratosphere N2O mixing ratio similar to the spring-to-summer change associated with the break up of the Antarctic polar vortex. This increase is correlated with changes in potential vorticity, air temperature, and ozone mixing ratio.

  4. GFIT2: an experimental algorithm for vertical profile retrieval from near-IR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Brian J.; Sherlock, Vanessa; Toon, Geoff; Wunch, Debra; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2016-08-01

    An algorithm for retrieval of vertical profiles from ground-based spectra in the near IR is described and tested. Known as GFIT2, the algorithm is primarily intended for CO2, and is used exclusively for CO2 in this paper. Retrieval of CO2 vertical profiles from ground-based spectra is theoretically possible, would be very beneficial for carbon cycle studies and the validation of satellite measurements, and has been the focus of much research in recent years. GFIT2 is tested by application both to synthetic spectra and to measurements at two Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) sites. We demonstrate that there are approximately 3° of freedom for the CO2 profile, and the algorithm performs as expected on synthetic spectra. We show that the accuracy of retrievals of CO2 from measurements in the 1.61μ (6220 cm-1) spectral band is limited by small uncertainties in calculation of the atmospheric spectrum. We investigate several techniques to minimize the effect of these uncertainties in calculation of the spectrum. These techniques are somewhat effective but to date have not been demonstrated to produce CO2 profile retrievals with sufficient precision for applications to carbon dynamics. We finish by discussing ongoing research which may allow CO2 profile retrievals with sufficient accuracy to significantly improve the scientific value of the measurements from that achieved with column retrievals.

  5. Vertical dissipation profiles and the photosphere location in thin and slim accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, A.; Abramowicz, M. A.; Bursa, M.; Kluźniak, W.; Różańska, A.; Straub, O.

    2009-07-01

    As several authors in the past, we calculate optically thick but geometrically thin (and slim) accretion disk models and perform a ray-tracing of photons in the Kerr geometry to calculate the observed disk continuum spectra. Previously, it was common practice to ray-trace photons assuming that they are emitted from the Kerr geometry equatorial plane, z = 0. We show that the continuum spectra calculated with this assumption differ from these calculated under the assumption that photons are emitted from the actual surface of the disc, z = H(r). This implies that a knowledge of the location of the thin disk effective photosphere is relevant for calculating the continuum emission. In this paper we investigate, in terms of a simple model, a possible influence of the (unknown, and therefore assumed ad hoc) vertical dissipation profiles on the vertical structure of the disk and thus on the location of the effective photosphere, and on the observed continuum spectra. For disks with moderate and high mass accretion rates (dot m > 0.01 dot m_C), we find that the photosphere location in the inner, radiation pressure dominated, disk region (where most of the radiation comes from) does not depend on the dissipation profile and therefore emerging disk spectra are insensitive to the choice of the dissipation function. For lower accretion rates, the photosphere location depends on the assumed vertical dissipation profile down to the disk inner edge, but the dependence is very weak and thus of minor importance. We conclude that the continuum spectra of optically thick accretion disks around black holes should be calculated with ray-tracing from the effective photosphere and that, fortunately, the choice of a particular vertical dissipation profile does not substantially influence the calculated emission.

  6. Characters analysis of the atmospheric turbulence vertical distribution profile over desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuehong; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Feng, Shuang-lian; Wu, Ming

    2012-10-01

    The atmospheric refractive index structure constant is an important parameter of atmospheric turbulence intensity. It was measured using AZZ10 micro-thermalmeter over desert where is a little or no vegetation cover. The vertical profile were investigated by analysis of experimental data over desert with 0~30km height range. And structure characteristics of atmospheric turbulence were given. Results can supply technological support for laser engineering applications to select suitable testing time and time-interval.

  7. A New Airborne Lidar for Remote Sensing of Canopy Fluorescence and Vertical Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ounis, A.; Bach, J.; Mahjoub, A.; Daumard, F.; Moya, I.; Goulas, Y.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of a new lidar system for airborne remote sensing of chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) and vertical profile of canopies. By combining laserinduced fluorescence (LIF), sun-induced fluorescence (SIF) and canopy height distribution, the new instrument will low the simultaneous assessment of gross primary production (GPP), photosynthesis efficiency and above ground carbon stocks. Technical issues of the lidar development are discussed and expected performances are presented.

  8. Vertical level selection for temperature and trace gas profile retrievals using IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, R. A.; Dudhia, A.; Ventress, L. J.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents a new iterative method for optimally selecting a vertical retrieval grid based on the location of the information while accounting for inter-level correlations. Sample atmospheres initially created to parametrise the Radiative Transfer Model for the Television Infrared Observation Satellite Operational Vertical Sounder (RTTOV) forward model are used to compare the presented iterative selection method with two other common approaches, which are using levels of equal vertical spacing and selecting levels based on the cumulative trace of the averaging kernel matrix (AKM). This new method is shown to outperform compared methods for simulated profile retrievals of temperature, H2O, O3, CH4, and CO with the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). However, the benefits of using the more complicated iterative approach compared to the simpler cumulative trace method are slight and may not justify the added effort for the cases studied, but may be useful in other scenarios where temperature and trace gases have strong vertical gradients with significant estimate sensitivity. Furthermore, comparing retrievals using a globally optimised static grid vs. a locally adapted one shows that a static grid performs nearly as well for retrievals of O3, CH4, and CO. However, developers of temperature and H2O retrieval schemes may at least consider using adaptive or location specific vertical retrieval grids.

  9. Ceilometer aerosol profiling versus Raman lidar in the frame of the INTERACT campaign of ACTRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, F.; Amato, F.; Vande Hey, J.; Pappalardo, G.

    2015-05-01

    Despite their differences from more advanced and more powerful lidars, the low construction and operation cost of ceilometers (originally designed for cloud base height monitoring) has fostered their use for the quantitative study of aerosol properties. The large number of ceilometers available worldwide represents a strong motivation to investigate both the extent to which they can be used to fill in the geographical gaps between advanced lidar stations and also how their continuous data flow can be linked to existing networks of the more advanced lidars, like EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network). In this paper, multi-wavelength Raman lidar measurements are used to investigate the capability of ceilometers to provide reliable information about atmospheric aerosol properties through the INTERACT (INTERcomparison of Aerosol and Cloud Tracking) campaign carried out at the CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory (760 m a.s.l., 40.60° N, 15.72° E), in the framework of the ACTRIS (Aerosol Clouds Trace gases Research InfraStructure) FP7 project. This work is the first time that three different commercial ceilometers with an advanced Raman lidar are compared over a period of 6 months. The comparison of the attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar and three ceilometers (CHM15k, CS135s, CT25K) reveals differences due to the expected discrepancy in the signal to noise ratio (SNR) but also due to changes in the ambient temperature on the short and mid-term stability of ceilometer calibration. Therefore, technological improvements are needed to move ceilometers towards operational use in the monitoring of atmospheric aerosols in the low and free troposphere.

  10. Ceilometer aerosol profiling vs. Raman lidar in the frame of INTERACT campaign of ACTRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, F.; Amato, F.; Vande Hey, J.; Pappalardo, G.

    2014-12-01

    Despite their differences from more advanced and more powerful lidars, the low construction and operation cost of ceilometers, originally designed for cloud base height monitoring, has fostered their use for the quantitative study of aerosol properties. The large number of ceilometers available worldwide represents a strong motivation to investigate both the extent to which they can be used to fill in the geographical gaps between advanced lidar stations and also how their continuous data flow can be linked to existing networks of the more advanced lidars, like EARLINET (European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork). In this paper, multi-wavelength Raman lidar measurements are used to investigate the capability of ceilometers to provide reliable information about atmospheric aerosol content through the INTERACT (INTERcomparison of Aerosol and Cloud Tracking) campaign carried out at the CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory (760 m a.s.l., 40.60° N, 15.72° E), in the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosol Clouds Trace gases Research InfraStructure) FP7 project. This work is the first time that three different commercial ceilometers with an advanced Raman lidar are compared over a period of six months. The comparison of the attenuated backscatter profiles from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar and three ceilometers (CHM15k, CS135s, CT25K) reveals differences due to the expected discrepancy in the SNR but also due to effect of changes in the ambient temperature on the short and mid-term stability of ceilometer calibration. A large instability of ceilometers in the incomplete overlap region has also been observed, making the use of a single overlap correction function for the whole duration of the campaign critical. Therefore, technological improvements of ceilometers towards their operational use in the monitoring of the atmospheric aerosol in the low and free troposphere are needed.

  11. Aerosol profiling using the ceilometer network of the German Meteorological Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flentje, H.; Heese, B.; Reichardt, J.; Thomas, W.

    2010-08-01

    The German Meteorological Service (DWD) operates about 52 lidar ceilometers within its synoptic observations network, covering Germany. These affordable low-power lidar systems provide spatially and temporally high resolved aerosol backscatter profiles which can operationally provide quasi 3-D distributions of particle backscatter intensity. Intentionally designed for cloud height detection, recent significant improvements allow following the development of the boundary layer and to detect denser particle plumes in the free tropospere like volcanic ash, Saharan dust or fire smoke. Thus the network builds a powerful aerosol plume alerting and tracking system. If auxiliary aerosol information is available, the particle backscatter coefficient, the extinction coefficient and even particle mass concentrations may be estimated, with however large uncertainties. Therefore, large synergistic benefit is achieved if the ceilometers are linked to existing lidar networks like EARLINET or integrated into WMO's envisioined Global Aerosol Lidar Observation Network GALION. To this end, we demonstrate the potential and limitations of ceilometer networks by means of three representative aerosol episodes over Europe, namely Sahara dust, Mediterranean fire smoke and, more detailed, the Icelandic Eyjafjoll volcano eruption from mid April 2010 onwards. The DWD (Jenoptik CHM15k) lidar ceilometer network tracked the Eyjafjoll ash layers over Germany and roughly estimated peak extinction coefficients and mass concentrations on 17 April of 4-6(± 2) 10-4 m-1 and 500-750(± 300) μg/m-3, respectively, based on co-located aerosol optical depth, nephelometer (scattering coefficient) and particle mass concentration measurements. Though large, the uncertainties are small enough to let the network suit for example as aviation advisory tool, indicating whether the legal flight ban threshold of presently 2 mg/m3 is imminent to be exceeded.

  12. Vertical profiles of dust and ozone in the Martian atmosphere deduced from solar occultation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blamont, J. E.; Chassefiere, E.; Goutail, J. P.; Mege, B.; Nunes-Pinharanda, M.; Souchon, G.; Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Krysko, A. A.; Moroz, V. I.

    1991-02-01

    The vertical distribution of the ozone content and of the aerosols in the Martian atmosphere at the equinox and near the equator was studied with the aid of a biaxial pointing device, a microprocessor-controlled flat mirror of elliptical shape. An upper limit of 5 x 10 to the 7th mol/cu cm for ozone was obtained above an altitude of 30 km. For the aerosols, a semiquantitative distribution has been obtained between 10 and 50 km of altitude. The scale height is nearly equal to the atmospheric scale height in the 10-20 km region where mixing seems to predominate, and falls rapidly to a thickness of about 2 km at 30 km. In 10 percent of the occultations, a stratified haze has been detected between 40 and 50 km. The particle radius of cloud constituents is estimated and optical thickness per kilometer of these hazes at peak extinction are approximated. An eddy diffusion coefficient and a mixing ratio are estimated for clouds assumed to be at equilibrium.

  13. A general framework for modelling the vertical organic matter profile in mineral and organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, Maarten; Ahrens, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM) within the mineral soil and surface organic layer is an important property of terrestrial ecosystems that affects carbon and nutrient cycling and soil heat and moisture transport. The overwhelming majority of models of SOM dynamics are zero-dimensional, i.e. they do not resolve heterogeneity of SOM concentration along the vertical profile. In recent years, however, a number of new vertically explicit SOM models or vertically explicit versions of existing models have been published. These models describe SOM in units of concentration (mass per unit volume) by means of a reactive-transport model that includes diffusion and/or advection terms for SOM transport, and vertically resolves SOM inputs and factors that influence decomposition. An important assumption behind these models is that the volume of soil elements is constant over time, i.e. not affected by SOM dynamics. This assumption only holds if the SOM content is negligible compared to the mineral content. When this is not the case, SOM input or loss in a soil element may cause a change in volume of the element rather than a change in SOM concentration. Furthermore, these volume changes can cause vertical shifts of material relative to the surface. This generally causes material in an organic layer to gradually move downward, even in absence of mixing processes. Since the classical reactive-transport model of the SOM profile can only be applied to the mineral soil, the surface organic layer is usually either treated separately or not explicitly considered. We present a new and elegant framework that treats the surface organic layer and mineral soil as one continuous whole. It explicitly accounts for volume changes due to SOM dynamics and changes in bulk density. The vertical shifts resulting from these volume changes are included in an Eulerian representation as an additional advective transport flux. Our approach offers a more elegant and realistic

  14. Retrieving vertical profiles of water-cloud droplet effective radius: Algorithm modification and preliminary application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fu-Lung; Li, Zhanqing

    2003-12-01

    [2002] proposed a new cloud microphysics retrieval technique that can estimate the vertical profile of droplet effective radius (DER) for water clouds using multispectral near-infrared (NIR) measurements. The underlying principle of the retrieval technique is that radiance measurements at distinct multi-NIR wavelengths possess different penetration depths inside the cloud and this conveys certain information on the DER vertical profile (DVP). However, this information is insufficient to retrieve any shape of DVP and thus a linear DVP was assumed. In this study, three DVPs are examined: (1) as in [2002], a linear DVP proportional to the in-cloud optical depth, (2) a linear DVP proportional to the height within the cloud, and (3) a DVP where the liquid water content (LWC) within the cloud varies linearly with height. The latter two assumptions are in closer conformity with in-situ observations. Algorithms that can retrieve both the DVP and cloud liquid water path (LWP) are presented. The cloud LWPs derived based on the retrieved DVPs are more sound than those obtained from assuming a vertical-constant DER profile. To enhance the DVP retrievals, a split-window technique is presented to better estimate the amount of above-cloud precipitable water (PW). The retrieval algorithms are applied to the MODIS Level-1B 1-km data and presently tested for two stratiform cloud cases observed over the north-central Oklahoma where independent cloud microphysics data are available from the United States Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Good agreements in the retrieved DER profile, LWP, and above-cloud PW are found in a preliminary demonstration of the new approach. Sensitivity of the retrieved DER profile to uncertainties in the above-cloud PW and surface albedos is also discussed.

  15. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Kittaka, C.; Vaughn, M. A.; Remer, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    We derive aerosol extinction profiles from airborne and space-based lidar backscatter signals by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), with no need to rely on assumptions about aerosol type or lidar ratio. The backscatter data were acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The HSRL also simultaneously measures aerosol extinction coefficients independently using the high spectral resolution lidar technique, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the retrieval. We retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from both HSRL and CALIOP attenuated backscatter data constrained with HSRL, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer column AOT. The resulting profiles are compared with the aerosol extinction measured by HSRL. Retrievals are limited to cases where the column aerosol thickness is greater than 0.2 over land and 0.15 over water. In the case of large AOT, the results using the Aqua MODIS constraint over water are poorer than Aqua MODIS over land or Terra MODIS. The poorer results relate to an apparent bias in Aqua MODIS AOT over water observed in August 2007. This apparent bias is still under investigation. Finally, aerosol extinction coefficients are derived from CALIPSO backscatter data using AOT from Aqua MODIS for 28 profiles over land and 9 over water. They agree with coincident measurements by the airborne HSRL to within +/-0.016/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of land points and within +/-0.028/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of ocean points.

  16. Atmospheric dust charging, vertical profiles and optical properties measured in the Arabian Peninsula during the DREAME campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Sabbah, I.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Al-Abbadi, N.; Rogers, G.

    2010-05-01

    Polarimetric observations of atmospheric Saharan dust over the Canary Islands have provided strong evidence for the presence of vertically aligned particles. The alignment was thought to be due to the electric field present because of dust charging. It was concluded that the charging and consequent partial alignment could be a common feature of atmospheric mineral dust layers, influencing the optical properties of dust layers and possibly also dust transport (Atmos. Chem. Phys. 7, 6161, 2007). We show preliminary results from the DREAME campaign, aimed at investigating these phenomena. DREAME used simultaneous and collocated measurements from specially developed aerosol radiosondes, and ground-based sun photometers and electric field meters. The radiosondes provided vertical profiles of dust size distribution and electric charge density, in addition to standard meteorological parameters (Ulanowski et al. EGU 2010, AS3.16). The electric field was measured in Kuwait between late April and November 2009, and at Solar Village (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia) between May and June 2009. The measurements were supplemented by satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. Similar measurements but without electric field meters were carried out on Cape Verde Islands in August 2009 (Nicoll et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7). The electric field measured on the ground in Kuwait showed strong variability, particularly in the presence of atmospheric dust, when polarity reversals from the normal positive potential gradient (PG) clear-sky pattern were frequently observed. In the absence of clouds the negative PG excursions were often down to -800 V/m and reached -1300 V/m. The PG was strongly correlated with the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the sun photometer: the correlation coefficient was about -0.51 at visible and near infra-red wavelengths and a few percent less in the UV. Slightly lower correlation was present for satellite AOT: -0.4 for MODIS AOT at 550 nm, and -0.3 for OMI AOT at 483.5 nm

  17. Vertical distribution of agriculture crop residue burning aerosol observed by space-borne lidar CALIOP - A case study over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A. K.; Shibata, T.

    2011-12-01

    Agriculture crop residue burning is one of the important sources of trace gas emissions and aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB). It is also one of the main causes for dense atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) formation over South Asian region. Present study deals with spatial and vertical variability of aerosol optical and microphysical properties during the crop residue burning season (October and November) over the IGB. MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) fire location data and MODIS AOD data confirms the crop residue burning activities over irrigated cropland of the IGB during October and November, 2009. Large values (> 0.7) of MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) backscatter (>0.006 km-1 sr-1 below 1.0 km altitude) are suggesting enhanced atmospheric pollution associated with agriculture crop residue burning. The increase in tropospheric columnar NO2 and surface CO concentration during October and November also emphasized the significant contribution of crop residue burning activities in enhanced anthropogenic pollution over the IGB. Vertical distribution of backscatter coefficients showed trapping of biomass (crop residues) burning aerosol within boundary layer. Spatial variation of aerosol backscatter and AOD showed large value above north-west part of IGB, major area of crop residue burning activities. The results of this study will be very useful in quantification of optical properties of atmospheric brown clouds and its effect on climate.

  18. Vertical carbon-14 profiles for resolving spatial variability in recharge in arid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Cameron; Cook, Peter G.; Harrington, Glenn A.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater age tracers are often measured to help constrain estimates of groundwater recharge, especially in arid environments where other methods are unsuitable. However multiple processes can influence the shape of vertical tracer profiles in an aquifer including (1) variation in tracer input concentrations from the unsaturated zone, (2) the role of diffusion in transporting tracer into the aquifer when fluxes are low and (3) spatial variability in recharge. This study demonstrates the influence of spatially variable recharge and spatially variable carbon-14 (14C) activities in the unsaturated zone on vertical 14C profiles in groundwater. Through groundwater flow and solute transport modelling, we demonstrate that recharge estimated from single point measurements of 14C may be wrong more than an order of magnitude when unsaturated zone 14C activities and recharge vary spatially. We then present a case study from the Ti Tree Basin in arid central Australia, where detailed profiles of 14C activity in unsaturated zone gas and groundwater have been measured, and spatial variability in unsaturated zone 14C is observed (ranging from 54 to 106 pMC above the watertable). Through modelling our data, we show that when unsaturated zone 14C activities are known, measurement of the 14C profile can help constrain estimates of recharge and its spatial variability. This approach improves our understanding of groundwater flow in the Ti Tree Basin, by showing mountain front recharge to be an important mechanism.

  19. Statistical Characteristics of Aerosol Extinction Coefficient Profile in East Asia from CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuejin; Zhou, Junhao; Zhou, Yongbo

    2016-06-01

    Aerosol extinction coefficient profile (ECP) is important in radiative transfer modeling, however, knowledge of ECP in some area has not been clearly recognized. To get a full understanding of statistical characteristics of ECP in three Asian regions: the Mongolian Plateau, the North China Plain and the Yellow Sea, CALIPSO aerosol product in 2012 is processed by conventional statistical methods. Orbit averaged ECP turns out to be mainly exponential and Gaussian patterns. Curve fitting shows that the two ECP patterns account for more than 50 percent of all the samples, especially in the Yellow Sea where the frequency of occurrence even reaches over 80 percent. Parameters determining fitting curves are provided consequently. To be specific, Gaussian pattern is the main ECP distribution in the Mongolian Plateau and the Yellow Sea, and exponential pattern predominates in the North China Plain. Besides, aerosol scale height reaches its maximum in summer and in the Mongolian Plateau. Meanwhile, the uplifting and deposition of dust during transportation are potentially explanations to the occurrence of Gaussian ECP. The results have certain representativeness, and contribute to reducing uncertainties of aerosol model in relevant researches.

  20. Single-Particle Black Carbon Aerosol Verticle Profiles From the Boundary Layer to the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J. P.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Laurel, W. A.; Thomson, D. S.; Kok, G. L.; Baumgardner, D.; Wilson, J. C.; Lopez, J.; Aikin, K.; Jost, H.; Thompson, T. L.; Reeves, J. M.; Lowenstein, M.

    2005-12-01

    A single-particle soot photometer (SP2) was flown on a NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft in November 2004 from Houston, TX. The SP2 uses laser-induced incandescence to directly measure the mass of individual black-carbon (BC) particles in the mass range of ~0.3-300 fg. Scattered light is used to size non-absorbing aerosols in the range of ~150 - 700 nm diameter. Data from two mid-latitude flights has been used to generate size distributions and profiles of both aerosol types from the boundary layer to the lower stratosphere. Results for scattering aerosol concentrations are in good agreement with typical particle spectrometer measurements in the same region. Mass mixing ratios of BC between 5 and 18.7 km were roughly an order of magnitude lower than typical values as reported with wire impactor measurements and as predicted by two global BC models. The impact of this discrepancy on estimates of direct radiative forcing of BC aerosol will also be discussed.

  1. Ceilometer Aerosol Profiling versus Raman Lidar in the Frame of Interact Campaign of Actris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, F.; Amato, F.; Rosoldi, M.; Vande Hey, J.; Pappalardo, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, multi-wavelength Raman lidar measurements are used to investigate the capability of ceilometers to provide reliable information about atmospheric aerosol properties through the INTERACT (INTERcomparison of Aerosol and Cloud Tracking) campaign carried out at the CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory (760 m a.s.l., 40.60 N, 15.72 E), in the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosol Clouds Trace gases Research InfraStructure) FP7 project. This work is the first time that three different commercial ceilometers with an advanced Raman lidar are compared over a period of six month. The comparison of the attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar and three ceilometers (CHM15k, CS135s, CT25K) reveals differences due to the expected discrepancy in the SNR but also due to effect of changes in the ambient temperature on the stability of ceilometer calibration over short and mid-term. Technological improvements of ceilometers towards their operational use in the monitoring of the atmospheric aerosol in the low and free troposphere are likely needed.

  2. First characterization and validation of FORLI-HNO3 vertical profiles retrieved from IASI/Metop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsmans, Gaétane; Langerock, Bavo; Wespes, Catherine; Hannigan, James W.; Hase, Frank; Kerzenmacher, Tobias; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Schneider, Matthias; Smale, Dan; Hurtmans, Daniel; De Mazière, Martine; Clerbaux, Cathy; Coheur, Pierre-François

    2016-09-01

    Knowing the spatial and seasonal distributions of nitric acid (HNO3) around the globe is of great interest and allows us to comprehend the processes regulating stratospheric ozone, especially in the polar regions. Due to its unprecedented spatial and temporal sampling, the nadir-viewing Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is capable of sounding the atmosphere twice a day globally, with good spectral resolution and low noise. With the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) algorithm, we are retrieving, in near real time, columns as well as vertical profiles of several atmospheric species, among which is HNO3. We present in this paper the first characterization of the FORLI-HNO3 profile products, in terms of vertical sensitivity and error budgets. We show that the sensitivity of IASI to HNO3 is highest in the lower stratosphere (10-20 km), where the largest amounts of HNO3 are found, but that the vertical sensitivity of IASI only allows one level of information on the profile (degrees of freedom for signal, DOFS; ˜ 1). The sensitivity near the surface is negligible in most cases, and for this reason, a partial column (5-35 km) is used for the analyses. Both vertical profiles and partial columns are compared to FTIR ground-based measurements from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) to characterize the accuracy and precision of the FORLI-HNO3 product. The profile validation is conducted through the smoothing of the raw FTIR profiles by the IASI averaging kernels and gives good results, with a slight overestimation of IASI measurements in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) at the six chosen stations (Thule, Kiruna, Jungfraujoch, Izaña, Lauder and Arrival Heights). The validation of the partial columns (5-35 km) is also conclusive with a mean correlation of 0.93 between IASI and the FTIR measurements. An initial survey of the HNO3 spatial and seasonal variabilities obtained from IASI

  3. Characteristics of ozone vertical profile observed in the boundary layer around Beijing in autumn.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Xiujuan; Meng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In the autumn of 2008, the vertical profiles of ozone and meteorological parameters in the low troposphere (0-1000 m) were observed at two sites around Beijing, specifically urban Nanjiao and rural Shangdianzi. At night and early morning, the lower troposphere divided into two stratified layers due to temperature inversion. Ozone in the lower layer showed a large gradient due to the titration of NO. Air flow from the southwest brought ozone-rich air to Beijing, and the ozone profiles were marked by a continuous increase in the residual layer at night. The accumulated ozone in the upper layer played an important role in the next day's surface peak ozone concentration, and caused a rapid increase in surface ozone in the morning. Wind direction shear and wind speed shear exhibited different influences on ozone profiles and resulted in different surface ozone concentrations in Beijing.

  4. Vertical Profiles as Observational Constraints on Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in an Agricultural Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusede, S.; Diskin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    We use diurnal variability in near-surface N2O vertical profiles to derive N2O emission rates. Our emissions estimates are ~3 times greater than are accounted for by inventories, a discrepancy in line with results from previous studies using different approaches. We quantify the surface N2O concentration's memory of local surface emissions on previous days to be 50-90%. We compare measured profiles both over and away from a dense N2O source region in the San Joaquin Valley, finding that profile shapes, diurnal variability, and changes in integrated near-surface column abundances are distinct according to proximity to source areas. To do this work, we use aircraft observations from the wintertime DISCOVER-AQ project in California's San Joaquin Valley, a region of intense agricultural activity.

  5. Vertically-resolved profiles of mass concentrations and particle backscatter coefficients of Asian dust plumes derived from lidar observations of silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Noh, Youngmin; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Young J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a method to retrieve vertically-resolved profiles of dust mass concentrations by analyzing Raman lidar signals of silicon dioxide (quartz) at 546nm. The observed particle plumes consisted of mixtures of East Asian dust with anthropogenic pollution. Our method for the first time allows for extracting the contribution of the aerosol component "pure dust" contained in the aerosol type "polluted dust". We also propose a method that uses OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) and the mass concentrations profiles of dust in order to derive profiles of backscatter coefficients of pure dust in mixed dust/pollution plumes. The mass concentration of silicon dioxide (quartz) in the atmosphere can be estimated from the backscatter coefficient of quartz. The mass concentration of dust is estimated by the weight percentage (38-77%) of mineral quartz in Asian dust. The retrieved dust mass concentrations are classified into water soluble, nucleation, accumulation, mineral-transported and coarse mode according to OPAC. The mass mixing ratio of 0.018, 0.033, 0.747, 0.130 and 0.072, respectively, is used. Dust extinction coefficients at 550nm were calculated by using OPAC and prescribed number concentrations for each of the 5 components. Dust backscatter coefficients were calculated from the dust extinction coefficients on the basis of a lidar ratio of 45±3sr at 532nm. We present results of quartz-Raman measurements carried out on the campus of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (35.10°N, 126.53°E) on 15, 16, and 21 March 2010.

  6. Wintertime vertical profiles of air pollutants over a suburban area in central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Lung; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Tu, Chia-Ying; Cheng, Wan-Li; Lin, Min-Der

    Using a tethered balloon, vertical air pollutant concentrations (CO, SO 2, NO, NO 2 and O 3) were measured in central Taiwan during field campaigns in the winters of 1999 and 2001. Modified novel lightweight sampling equipment was used to take samples at heights of 1, 13, 100, 300, 500 and 1200 m. A balloon was launched every 3 h and in total there were 133 flights during the three campaigns. The data were collected in order to examine the temporal and vertical variations of pollutants. The average daytime profiles showed greater vertical convection mixing in unstable circumstances. The characteristics of shapes and time behavior of profiles are reported. Except for a slight decrease near the ground and strong photochemical reactions at clear daytime, titration of O 3 by NO was observed at all altitudes in the atmospheric boundary layer during these campaigns. Ground level ozone may be contributed by downward mixing from above. A fair correlation appeared between the maximum ozone concentration at the surface during the daytime ( C¯0 Max) and average ozone concentration above the NBL ( C¯a NBL). A linear regression equation is shown as C¯0 Max=29+0.91 C¯a NBL.

  7. Complex vertical layering and mixing of aerosols over the eastern Mediterranean: active and passive remote sensing at the Cyprus University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, R.-E.; Nisantzi, A.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.; Ansmann, A.; Schwarz, A.; Basart, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Aerosols can have a complicated influence on climate conditions, directly as well as indirectly via cloud formation. The southeastern Mediterranean region can be characterized as a cross road of aerosols originating from European, Asian and African continents. Complex vertical aerosol distributions are frequently detected over Cyprus by means of active remote sensing. Observations of such complex aerosol layering and comparison of the measurements with aerosol products of regional and global atmospheric transport models are required to improve our understanding of life cycles of aerosol mixtures and their impact on climate as well as on satellite remote sensing products. In this study, a case of an intense desert dust outbreak from Syria and Saudi Arabia towards the eastern Mediterranean in September 2011 is presented. The observations used in this study were performed with a 532-nm polarization Lidar and a sun/sky AERONET photometer operated at 8 channels from 340 to 1640 nm wavelength. Both instruments belong to remote sensing station of the Cyprus Technical University at Limassol, Cyprus (34°N, 33°E). The lofted dust plume was doped with air masses that crossed sources of biomass burning smoke and anthropogenic pollution. In addition, the shallow marine boundary layer over the Mediterranean Sea and over Limassol became mixed with the anthropogenic haze by sea breeze circulations. The case study demonstrates the potential of combined lidar/photometer observations to deliver detailed vertically resolved information of the aerosol characteristics in terms of particle optical and microphysical properties, separately for the spherical particle fraction as well as for the non-spherical aerosol mode.

  8. Variability of the vertical profile of wind speed: characterization at various time scales and analytical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdier, Bénédicte; Plougonven, Riwal; Drobinski, Philippe; Dupont, Jean-Charles

    2014-05-01

    Wind measurements are key for the wind resource assessment. But as wind turbines get higher, wind measurement masts are often lower than the future wind turbine hub height. Therefore one of the first steps in the energy yield assessment is the vertical extrapolation of wind measurements. Such extrapolation is often done by approximating the vertical profile of wind speed with an analytical expression: either a logarithmic law which has a theoretical basis in Monin-Obukhov similarity theory; or a power law which is empirical. The present study analyzes the variability of the wind profile and how this variability affects the results of the vertical extrapolation methods. The study is conducted with data from the SIRTA observatory, 20km south of Paris (France). A large set of instrumentation is available, including sonic anemometers at 10 and 30 meters, a LIDAR measuring wind speeds from 40 to 200 meters and a SODAR measuring wind speeds starting from 100m up to 1km. The comparison between the instruments enables to characterize the measurements uncertainties. The observations show that close to the ground the wind is stronger during daytime and weaker at night while higher, around 150 m, the wind is weaker during daytime and stronger at night. Indeed the wind shear has a pronounced diurnal cycle. The vertical extrapolation methods currently used in the industry do not usually take into account the strong variability of the wind profile. The often fit the parameters of the extrapolation law, not on each time step, but on time-averaged profiles. The averaging period may be the whole measurement period or some part of it: there may be one constant parameter computed on the wind profile that was averaged on the whole year of measures, or the year of measures may be divided into a small number of cases (for example into night or daytime data, or into 4 seasons) and the parameter is adjusted for each case. The study analyzes thoroughly the errors generated by both

  9. Long-Term Mean Vertical Motion over the Tropical Pacific: Wind-Profiling Doppler Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, K. S.; McAfee, J. R.; Carter, D. A.; Ecklund, W. L.; Riddle, A. C.; Reid, G. C.; Balsley, B. B.

    1991-12-01

    Measurement from Christmas Island (2^circN, 157^circW) of long-term mean vertical motions in the tropical atmosphere using very-high-frequency wind-profiling Doppler radar show that there is a transition from downward motion in the free troposphere to upward motion in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The observations in the free troposphere are consistent with a balance between adiabatic and diabatic heating and cooling rates in a clear atmosphere. Comparison of the results at Christmas Island during El Nino and non-El Nino conditions with earlier results obtained for stratiform rain conditions over Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, show that cirrus clouds in the vicinity of the tropopause likely play an important role in determining the sense and magnitude of vertical motions in this region. These results have implications for the exchange of mass between the troposphere and stratosphere over the tropics.

  10. A simple deep-towed vertical array for high-resolution reflection seismic profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herber, R.; Nuppenau, V.; Weigel, W.; Wong, H. K.

    1986-06-01

    A simple, low cost, deep-towed system for high-resolution reflection seismic profiling is described. It consists of a vertical array with two hydrophones having a separation of 2.2 m and rigidly mounted onto streamlined tow bodies. Improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio is attained by simple stacking of the hydrophone outputs after signal conditioning and travel time corrections. The suppression of side echoes and surface reflections is achieved by an analog procedure which in effect improves the directional characteristics of the array. A circuit for automatic gain control is included to enhance weak signals as well as to suppress ringing. Results in Kiel Bay and over the crest of the Jan Mayen Ridge (northern Atlantic) suggest that this simple vertical array may supplement air gun systems better than conventional, surface pinger-type equipment.

  11. Long-Term Mean Vertical Motion over the Tropical Pacific: Wind-Profiling Doppler Radar Measurements.

    PubMed

    Gage, K S; McAfee, J R; Carter, D A; Ecklund, W L; Riddle, A C; Reid, G C; Balsley, B B

    1991-12-20

    Measurement from Christmas Island (2 degrees N, 157 degrees W) of long-term mean vertical motions in the tropical atmosphere using very-high-frequency wind-profiling Doppler radar show that there is a transition from downward motion in the free troposphere to upward motion in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The observations in the free troposphere are consistent with a balance between adiabatic and diabatic heating and cooling rates in a clear atmosphere. Comparison of the results at Christmas Island during El Niño and non-El Niño conditions with earlier results obtained for stratiform rain conditions over Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, show that cirrus clouds in the vicinity of the tropopause likely play an important role in determining the sense and magnitude of vertical motions in this region. These results have implications for the exchange of mass between the troposphere and stratosphere over the tropics.

  12. Comparison of glyoxal, BrO, and IO vertical profiles derived from both ground-based and airborne MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Sean; Volkamer, Rainer; Baidar, Sunil; Dix, Barbara; Koenig, Theodore; Ortega, Ivan; Sinreich, Roman; van Roozendael, Michel; Hendrick, Francois; Kinnison, Doug

    2015-04-01

    The information content of ground-based MAX-DOAS retrievals is assessed by collocated aircraft measurements for a ship MAX-DOAS setup over the Eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (TORERO RF17), and a mountain-top MAX-DOAS setup at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (CONTRAST RF17). During both case studies the CU airborne MAX-DOAS (AMAX-DOAS) instrument aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft measured profiles of glyoxal, BrO, and IO with 12-20 degrees of freedom and up to 500 m vertical resolution. The TORERO field campaign took place in 2012, while CONTRAST in 2014; both campaigns covered the months of January and February. Additional measurements aboard the aircraft helped to provide information/validation of the AMAX-DOAS derived profiles, such as in-situ water vapor from the Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser hygrometer (VCSEL), in-situ hydrocarbon measurements from the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), and aerosol information constrained by the Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS). The AMAX-DOAS profiles are compared with ground-based MAX-DOAS inversions. The latter explores the effect of using either the measured differential slant column density (dSCD) or SCD as input to the optimal estimation inversion, where SCD = dSCD + SCD_ref. SCD_ref is the residual column amount of the trace gas contained within the reference spectrum. For the AMAX-DOAS data, the values of SCD_ref were actively minimized, while SCD_ref is usually unknown for ground-based MAX-DOAS retrievals. In absence of independent measurements to constrain SCD_ref, the current state-of-the-art with ground-based MAX-DOAS applications is to use dSCDs as input to the inversion. Here we assess the effect of uncertain SCD_ref for ground-based MAX-DOAS profiles in form of a sensitivity study. Additionally for the ground-based data, different methods are compared for the determination of SCD_ref: 1) the collocated aircraft profiles described above present the opportunity to forward calculate the SCD

  13. Vertical distribution of optical parameters of aerosol, evaluation of rain rate and rain drop size by using the pal system, at guwahati

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, M.; Barbara, A. K.; Baishya, R.; Takeuchi, N.

    The paper gives in brief, the features of a Portable Automated Lidar (PAL) set up, fabricated and operated at Guwahati (260N and 920 E) a subtropical station, for monitoring of aerosol, cloud and precipitation features and then describes the method adopted for profiling of aerosol and determination of rain rate as well as drop sizes with coupled observation from distrometer and radiosonde. The PAL generates 532 nm laser pulses of 10 ns duration of high repetition rate of 1-2 kHz. The backscattered signals from atmospheric constituents collected by a telescope of diameter 20 cm., and amplified with a Photo Multiplier Tube (PMT), are then processed in Lab View environment by a software for, extracting aerosol and cloud features. For checking and correcting the alignment affected by temperature, provisions are also introduced for easy adjustment of horizontal and vertical axes. In this approach we have evaluated system constant C, from the lidar backscattered signal itself, for an assumed lidar ratio as a first approach, and with extinction co-efficient determined experimentally. Here, the lidar is put for probing the atmosphere horizontally, when we may assume the atmosphere to be homogeneous along the FOV of the lidar. However, as horizontal in-homogeneity of the atmosphere cannot be ruled out, the paper illustrates the type of profiles adopted for such analysis and the lidar being situated in a semi rural area, a methodical screening approach adopted for selection of echograms free from shoot and fossil burning by product is described. Once the backscatter power with distance is known from the selected lidar outputs, σ is evaluated from the slope of the profile associating ``ratio of backscatter power to transmitter power'' with distance r. The methods taken up for realization of β value and then determination of C are elaborated in the paper. The lidar ratio S, is assumed from reported results as a first reference value. This parameter S is then checked for its

  14. Vertical Tracer Concentration Profiles Measured During the Joint Urban 2003 Dispersion Study

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, Julia E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Allwine, Eugene J.

    2007-12-01

    An atmospheric tracer dispersion study known as Joint Urban 2003 was conducted in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma during the summer of 2003. As part of this field program, vertical concentration profiles were measured at approximately 1 km from downtown tracer gas release locations. These profiles indicated that the urban landscape was very effective in mixing the plume vertically. The height of the plume centerline (as determined by the maximum concentration over the depth of the measurements) for any specific 30 min period varied over the 65 m measurement range. Most of the variations in tracer concentration observed in the profile time series were related to changes in wind direction as opposed to changes in turbulence. As a simple analysis tool for emergency response, maximum normalized concentration curves were developed with 5-minute averaged measurements. These curves give the maximum concentration (normalized by the release rate) that would be observed as a function of downwind distance in an urban area. The 5-min data resulted in greater concentrations than predicted with a simple Gaussian plume model. However, the curve compared well with results from a computational fluid dynamics simulation. This dispersion dataset is a valuable asset not only for refining air quality models, but also for developing new tools for emergency response personnel in the event of a toxic release.

  15. Profiles of flow discharged from vertical rotating pipes: A contrast between inviscid liquid and granular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Kubitschek, J. P.; Medina, A.

    2008-11-01

    The stability of viscous rotating liquid columns and their application to rotating viscous liquid jets aligned under gravity is reviewed. Experiments on stable viscous fluid flow discharged from rotating vertical pipes exhibit very weak contraction. We present an elementary liquid jet analysis to understand this phenomenon. Indeed, our inviscid model of a slender rotating inviscid liquid jet shows that rotation suppresses contraction. Next we study the comparable problem for granular flow. Our model for noncohesive granular flow emanating from a vertical pipe rotating about its central axis, valid for sufficiently large rotation rate, shows that the granular profiles blossom rather than contract. The profiles of both the liquid and granular jets depend on the same dimensionless parameters—an exit Froude number Fr0 and an exit swirl parameter χ0. The limitations of both models are discussed. Experimental data for granular jet profiles compare well with the collision-free granular flow model in its range of applicability. A criterion for the rotation rate at which particles adjacent to the inner wall of the rotating pipe cease to flow is also given and compared to experiment.

  16. Evaluation strategies for vertical profiles of physical properties simulated by multilayer snowpack models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Samuel; Hagenmuller, Pascal; Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Multilayer snowpack models aim at representing processes responsible for the layering of a one-dimensional snowpack, and its time evolution. Their evaluation should ideally not only rely on observations of vertically integrated properties (depth, albedo, snow water equivalent, surface temperature) but also vertical profiles of properties such as density, liquid water content, specific surface area, penetration resistance etc. However, even at well-documented sites where meteorological conditions are monitored with the highest possible accuracy, the direct comparison of simulated and observed profiles has proven challenging. This is due, not only to intrinsic model errors and snow observation uncertainties, which are classically considered, but also to errors of the meteorological observations used to drive the snowpack models and snowpack heterogeneity. These sources of errors stratigraphic mismatches, i.e. a layer at the same depth in the simulated and observed snowpack may not necessarily correspond to the same stratigraphic horizon. In addition, such errors accumulate during the course of a snow season. Altogether, this makes it particularly difficult to disentangle errors due to the snowpack model itself (which is the primary goal of such comparisons) from other sources of errors. This presentation will review various approaches already developed (e.g. Lehning and Fierz, CRST 2001) and introduce yet-to-implement methods, with the aim to provide a framework allowing improved comparisons between observed and simulated snow profiles, which is a long-lasting need of the snow modelling community.

  17. LASE measurements of aerosols and water vapor during TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Melfi, Harvey; Whiteman, David N.; Schwenner, Geary; Evans, Keith D.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Hignett, Philip; Holben, Brent N.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.

  18. Vertical and horizontal corneal epithelial thickness profiles determined by ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chixin; Wang, Jianhua; Cui, Lele; Shen, Meixiao; Yuan, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To measure vertical and horizontal thickness profiles of the central and peripheral corneal epithelium and determine if daytime changes occur. Methods Forty eyes of 20 normal subjects were imaged by ultra-high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography to profile the corneal epithelial thickness from the edge of Bowman’s layer to the central cornea across the vertical and horizontal meridians. Measurements were made at 10:00 AM and again at 6, 8 hours later. Results The baseline vertical meridional epithelial thickness was thinnest, 42.9±4.1 μm, at the edge of Bowman’s layer in the superior region. It increased in thickness (p<0.01), towards the central cornea. The central epithelium averaged 52.5±2.4 μm, becoming thickest, 55.2±2.5 μm, in the inferior pericentral region. It thinned towards the inferior periphery, reaching 51.3±5.1 μm at the edge of Bowman’s layer (p<0.01). Along the horizontal meridian, the epithelium was thickest at the nasal side, 58.6±5.1 μm, and temporal side, 59.3±6.6 μm, near the edges of Bowman’s layer. It thinned towards the central cornea. There were no significant changes in the epithelial thickness at any location over 8 hours. Conclusion Epithelial thickness varied over the horizontal and vertical meridians and appeared stable during the daytime. PMID:22357393

  19. Multifractal analysis of vertical profiles of soil penetration resistance at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, G. M.; Silva, E. F. F.; Montenegro, A. A. A.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2013-07-01

    Soil penetration resistance (PR) is widely used as an indirect indicator of soil strength. Soil PR is linked to basic soil properties and correlated to root growth and plant production, and as such it is extensively used as a practical tool for assessing soil compaction and to evaluate the effects of soil management. This study investigates how results from multifractal analysis can quantify key elements of depth-dependent soil PR profiles and how this information can be used at the field scale. We analysed multifractality of 50 PR vertical profiles, measured from 0 to 60 cm depth and randomly located on a 6.5 ha sugar cane field in northeastern Brazil. The scaling property of each profile was typified by singularity, and Rényi spectra estimated by the method of moments. The Hurst exponent was used to parameterize the autocorrelation of the vertical PR data sets. The singularity and Rènyi spectra showed that the vertical PR data sets exhibited a well-defined multifractal structure. Hurst exponent values were close to 1, ranging from 0.944 to 0.988, indicating strong persistence in PR variation with soil depth. Also, the Hurst exponent was negatively and significantly correlated to coefficient of variation (CV), skewness and maximum values of the depth-dependent PR. Multifractal analysis added valuable information to describe the spatial arrangement of depth-dependent penetrometer data sets, which was not taken into account by classical statistical indices. Multifractal parameters were mapped over the experimental field and compared with mean and maximum values of PR. Combination of spatial variability survey and multifractal analysis appear to be useful to manage soil compaction.

  20. A look inside the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield through vertical seismic profiling.

    PubMed

    Chavarria, J Andres; Malin, Peter; Catchings, Rufus D; Shalev, Eylon

    2003-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby microearthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids.

  1. A Look Inside the San Andreas fault at Parkfield Through Vertical Seismic Profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavarria, J.A.; Malin, P.; Catchings, R.D.; Shalev, E.

    2003-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby micro-earthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids.

  2. Altitude profile of aerosols on Mars from measurements of its thermal radiation on limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, V. I.; Titov, D. V.; Gektin, Yu. M.; Naraeva, M. K.; Selivanov, A. S.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal (range 7 - 13 micrometers) radiation of Mars with the high space resolution (approximately 2 km) were made by the TERMOSKAN experiment of the Phobos mission. Some of the results were published earlier but only the surface radiation was analyzed in detail. However some part of these measurements was made near the limb of the planet. The atmosphere gives an important input here in the planetary thermal radiation. Beyond the limb the atmosphere is the only source. The task of this work is to estimate some characteristics of the atmosphere using brightness profiles of the thermal radiation near the limb. An appropriate model of the temperature profile T(h) is necessary for such an analysis. A set of T(h) models (nominal, maximal and minimal) was defined using various sources including MARSGRAM, Viking-1 lander data, its theoretical considerations and boundary layer models. On the next step the possible input of the atmospheric gaseous emissions (wing of CO2 15 micrometer band) was estimated. It was found that even for the maximal T(h) this input is no more than a few percents of the measured radiation beyond the limb. Consequently the aerosols are responsible for almost all measured emission. The analysis of the observed profile showed that these aerosols have two components: (1) exponential with the scale height about 10 km and (2) some layered structure (two layers with maxima about 23 and 33 km consisted probably of ice).

  3. Vertical structure and optical properties of Titan's aerosols from radiance measurements made inside and outside the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doose, Lyn R.; Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, Martin G.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2016-05-01

    Prompted by the detection of stratospheric cloud layers by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS; see Anderson, C.M., Samuelson, R.E. [2011]. Icarus 212, 762-778), we have re-examined the observations made by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) in the atmosphere of Titan together with two constraints from measurements made outside the atmosphere. No evidence of thin layers (<1 km) in the DISR image data sets is seen beyond the three previously reported layers at 21 km, 11 km, and 7 km by Karkoschka and Tomasko (Karkoschka, E., Tomasko, M.G. [2009]. Icarus 199, 442-448). On the other hand, there is evidence of a thicker layer centered at about 55 km. A rise in radiance gradients in the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS) data below 55 km indicates an increase in the volume extinction coefficient near this altitude. To fit the geometric albedo measured from outside the atmosphere the decrease in the single scattering albedo of Titan's aerosols at high altitudes, noted in earlier studies of DISR data, must continue to much higher altitudes. The altitude of Titan's limb as a function of wavelength requires that the scale height of the aerosols decrease with altitude from the 65 km value seen in the DISR observations below 140 km to the 45 km value at higher altitudes. We compared the variation of radiance with nadir angle observed in the DISR images to improve our aerosol model. Our new aerosol model fits the altitude and wavelength variations of the observations at small and intermediate nadir angles but not for large nadir angles, indicating an effect that is not reproduced by our radiative transfer model. The volume extinction profiles are modeled by continuous functions except near the enhancement level near 55 km altitude. The wavelength dependence of the extinction optical depth is similar to earlier results at wavelengths from 500 to 700 nm, but is smaller at shorter wavelengths and larger toward longer wavelengths. A Hapke

  4. Investigation of seasonal dynamics of β- and γ-radiation Helds vertical profile in the surface atmospheric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabkina, K. S.; Kondratyeva, A. G.; Nagorskiy, P. M.; Yakovleva, V. S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the seasonal dynamics of β- and γ-radiation field vertical profile in the surface atmospheric layer study. The findings revealed the following: a) significant seasonal variation in vertical distribution characteristics fields β- and γ-radiation b) reduced β-radiation flux density and γ-radiation dose with increasing height is maintained in the range of spring and fall, namely, starting with snow melt and finishing its setting; c) distortion vertical profile in the winter season, an inverse relationship β-flux density and dose rate of γ-radiation from the heights above the earth's surface was registered.

  5. Demonstration of Aerosol Property Profiling by Multi-wavelength Lidar Under Varying Relative Humidity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.N.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskii, M.; Andrews, E.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser for profiling aerosol physical parameters in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) under varying conditions of relative humidity (RH) is studied. The lidar quantifies three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients and from these optical data the particle parameters such as concentration, size and complex refractive index are retrieved through inversion with regularization. The column-integrated, lidar-derived parameters are compared with results from the AERONET sun photometer. The lidar and sun photometer agree well in the characterization of the fine mode parameters, however the lidar shows less sensitivity to coarse mode. The lidar results reveal a strong dependence of particle properties on RH. The height regions with enhanced RH are characterized by an increase of backscattering and extinction coefficient and a decrease in the Angstrom exponent coinciding with an increase in the particle size. We present data selection techniques useful for selecting cases that can support the calculation of hygroscopic growth parameters using lidar. Hygroscopic growth factors calculated using these techniques agree with expectations despite the lack of co-located radiosonde data. Despite this limitation, the results demonstrate the potential of multi-wavelength Raman lidar technique for study of aerosol humidification process.

  6. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kittaka, C.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R. R.; Cook, A. L.; Haper, D. B.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol extinction profiles are derived from backscatter data by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), for example from coincident MODIS observations and without reliance on a priori assumptions about aerosol type or optical properties. The backscatter data were acquired with the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The HSRL also simultaneously measures extinction independently, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the constrained retrieval of extinction from backscatter. We will show constrained extinction retrievals using various sources of column AOT, and examine comparisons with the HSRL extinction measurements and with a similar retrieval using data from the CALIOP lidar on the CALIPSO satellite.

  7. Cloud vertical structure, radiative heating profile and diurnal variation during TOGA COARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Taotao

    This thesis consists of two parts: (1) the vertical structure of clouds and radiative heating during TOGA COARE and (2) diurnal variations during TOGA COARE. The purpose of the first part (Chapter 1) is to determine a realistic gridded (1 degree by 1 degree) cloud vertical structure and radiative heating profile for the Intensive Flux Array (IFA) during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE). First, we deduce the cloud vertical structure from the sounding data using an improved relative humidity (RH) threshold method. The RH threshold is height-dependent and is tuned by three surface and TOA observations of clouds: the Micropulse Lidar (MPL), the High-Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Then, a modified CCM3 Column Radiation Model (CRM) is used to calculate the radiative heating profiles. The modification of the CRM replaces the model microphysics with the observed microphysics profiles. The calculated radiation budgets are shown to be consistent with the surface and top of the atmosphere (TOA) observations and are much better than those of the standard version of the CRM. The purpose of the second part (Chapter 2) is to test different diurnal variation mechanisms, that have been proposed in previous studies, by using the abundant observational data obtained during TOGA COARE. The preliminary findings are: (1) The stratiform precipitation lags the convective precipitation, suggesting that the effect of the life cycle of the mesoscale convective systems (MCS) is important to the midnight rainfall maximum; i.e., the stratiform component helps to shift the maximum toward midnight. This supports the MCS life cycle mechanism. (2) This study supports the direct radiation-convection interaction mechanism and emphasize that the variation is strongly affected by the variation of upper-level clouds. (3) The current study does not, however, support the

  8. Vertical geochemical profiling of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiasong; Barcelona, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Soil samples were collected at a site contaminated with jet fuel at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, and were analyzed for aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic acid metabolites, and phospholipid ester-linked fatty acids (PLFA). Vertically, concentrations of alkylbenzenes (with C1-C4 substitutions) ranged from less than 1.0 to 21.69 {mu}g/kg away from water table to 2605.96 {mu}g/kg in samples taken at water table in the contaminated areas. Contaminant concentration decreased to less than 1.0 {mu}g/kg in downgradient zone. Aromatic acid metabolites identified include o-, m-, and p-toluic acid, 2,4-, 2,5-, 3,5-, 2,6- and 3,4- dimethylbenzoic acid, and 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoic acid. The contaminant profiles paralleled to the concentration profiles of alkylbenzenes, suggesting that the production of aromatic acid was associated with the microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. PLFA ranging from C{sub 12} to C{sub 20} were determined in soil samples, including saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. The only polyenoic acid detected was 18:2w6, a biomarker for protozoa. The total microbial biomass calculated from PLFA showed varied profiles within wells at different depths as well as at different wells at similar depths indicating considerable microbial heterogeneity in the subsurface over depths or lateral distance. The PLFA profiles also suggested a dominant anaerobic and aerobic microbial community in the aquifer solids.

  9. The far-ultraviolet main auroral emission at Jupiter - Part 2: Vertical emission profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfond, B.; Gustin, J.; Gérard, J.-C.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A.; Palmaerts, B.; Badman, S. V.; Khurana, K. K.; Tao, C.

    2015-10-01

    The aurorae at Jupiter are made up of many different features associated with a variety of generation mechanisms. The main auroral emission, also known as the main oval, is the most prominent of them as it accounts for approximately half of the total power emitted by the aurorae in the ultraviolet range. The energy of the precipitating electrons is a crucial parameter to characterize the processes at play which give rise to these auroral emissions, and the altitude of the emissions directly depends on this energy. Here we make use of far-UV (FUV) images acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope and spectra acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to measure the vertical profile of the main emissions. The altitude of the brightness peak as seen above the limb is ~ 400 km, which is significantly higher than the 250 km measured in the post-dusk sector by Galileo in the visible domain. However, a detailed analysis of the effect of hydrocarbon absorption, including both simulations and FUV spectral observations, indicates that FUV apparent vertical profiles should be considered with caution, as these observations are not incompatible with an emission peak located at 250 km. The analysis also calls for spectral observations to be carried out with an optimized geometry in order to remove observational ambiguities.

  10. Validation of vertical profile from atmosphere using ATOVS products and its impact over Indian region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahandru, Riddhi; Kumar, Adarsh; Mitra, Ashim kumar

    This research paper summarizes the validation of atmospheric vertical profile using NOAA(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)/ MetOp satellite derived data over India with radiosonde observations over a span of 8 months. NOAA's International Advanced Television and Infrared Observations satellite Vertical Sounder (ATOVS) processing package (IAPP) obtains temperature and moisture profiles in different pressure levels ranging from 1000hpa to 10hpa from real time direct broadcast (DB) receiving system installed at India Meteorological department. Different pressure levels were substituted to the same pressure levels for calculations of standard deviation, bias and RMSE (root mean square error) The sounder derived products like Total precipitable water vapor (TPW) and Lifting index(LI) from NOAA Satellite was also validated with radiosonde data which provided significant results for weather forecasting. The validation shows that the sounder provides unique information about the state of atmosphere and monitoring the convective environment for severe weather forecasting In addition to this, case study on severe weather events was analyzed using ATOVS products.

  11. High-latitude topside ionospheric vertical electron density profile changes in response to large magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter; Fung, Shing F.

    2016-05-01

    Large magnetic-storm-induced changes were detected in high-latitude topside vertical electron density profiles Ne(h) in a database of profiles and digital topside ionograms, from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program, that enabled Ne(h) profiles to be obtained in nearly the same region of space before, during, and after a major magnetic storm (Dst < -100 nT). Storms where Ne(h) profiles were available in the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere had better coverage of solar wind parameters than storms with available Ne(h) profiles in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere. Large Ne(h) changes were observed during all storms, with enhancements and depletions sometimes near a factor of 10 and 0.1, respectively, but with substantial differences in the responses in the two hemispheres. Large spatial and/or temporal Ne(h) changes were often observed during Dst minimum and during the storm recovery phase. The storm-induced Ne(h) changes were the most pronounced and consistent in the Northern Hemisphere in that large enhancements were observed during winter nighttime and large depletions during winter and spring daytime. The limited available cases suggested that these Northern Hemisphere enhancements increased with increases of the time-shifted solar wind velocity v, magnetic field B, and with more negative values of the B components except for the highest common altitude (1100 km) of the profiles. There was also some evidence suggesting that the Northern Hemisphere depletions were related to changes in the solar wind parameters. Southern Hemisphere storm-induced enhancements and depletions were typically considerably less with depletions observed during summer nighttime conditions and enhancements during summer daytime and fall nighttime conditions.

  12. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R.L.; Brutsaert, W.

    2003-01-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, w_pm???2, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with w_pm???2 was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on w_pm???2 and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of w_pm???2 versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  13. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers.

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R. L.; Brutsaert, W.; Environmental Research; Cornell Univ.

    2003-11-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, {omega}'{sup 2}, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with {omega}'{sup 2} was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on {omega}'{sup 2} and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of {omega}'{sup 2} versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  14. One year of vertical wind profiles measurements at a Mediterranean coastal site of South Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Avolio, Elenio; Federico, Stefano; Gullì, Daniel; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    In order to develop wind farms projects is challenging to site them on coastal areas both onshore and offshore as suitable sites. Developing projects need high quality databases under a wide range of atmospheric conditions or high resolution models that could resolve the effect of the coastal discontinuity in the surface properties. New parametrizations are important and high quality databases are also needed for formulating them. Ground-based remote sensing devices such as lidars have been shown to be functional for studying the evolution of the vertical wind structure coastal atmospheric boundary layer both on- and offshore. Here, we present results from a year of vertical wind profiles, wind speed and direction, monitoring programme at a site located in the Italian Calabria Region, Central Mediterranean, 600m from the Thyrrenian coastline, where a Lidar Doppler, ZephIr (ZephIr ltd) has been operative since July 2013. The lidar monitors wind speed and direction from 10m up to 300m at 10 vertical levels with an average of 10 minutes and it is supported by a metmast providing: Atmospheric Pressure, Solar Radiation, Precipitation, Relative Humidity, Temperature,Wind Speed and Direction at 10m. We present the characterization of wind profiles during one year period according to the time of the day to transition periods night/day/night classified relating the local scale, breeze scale, to the large scale conditions. The dataset is also functional for techniques for short-term prediction of wind for the renewable energy integration in the distribution grids. The site infrastructure is funded within the Project "Infrastructure of High Technology for Environmental and Climate Monitoring" (I-AMICA) (PONa3_00363) by the Italian National Operative Program (PON 2007-2013) and European Regional Development Fund. Real-time data are show on http://www.i-amica.it/i-amica/?page_id=1122.

  15. Tropical Forest Biomass Estimation from Vertical Fourier Transforms of Lidar and InSAR Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Goncalves, F.; Drake, J.; Hensley, S.; Chapman, B. D.; Michel, T.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Dutra, L.; Graca, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Structural forest biomass estimation from lidar or interferometric SAR (InSAR) has demonstrated better performance than radar-power-based approaches for the higher biomasses (>150 Mg/ha) found in tropical forests. Structural biomass estimation frequently regresses field biomass to some function of forest height. With airborne, 25-m footprint lidar data and fixed-baseline C-band InSAR data over tropical wet forests of La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, we compare the use of Fourier transforms of vertical profiles at a few frequencies to the intrinsically low-frequency “average height”. RMS scatters of Fourier-estimated biomass about field-measured biomass improved by 40% and 20% over estimates base on average height from lidar and fixed-baseline InSAR, respectively. Vertical wavelengths between 14 and 100 m were found to best estimate biomass. The same airborne data acquisition over La Selva was used to generate many 10’s of repeat-track L-band InSAR baselines with time delays of 1-72 hours, and vertical wavelengths of 5-100 m. We will estimate biomass from the Fourier transforms of L-band radar power profiles (InSAR complex coherence). The effects of temporal decorrelation will be modeled in the Fourier domain to try to model and reduce their impact. Using L-band polarimetric interferometry, average heights will be estimated as well and biomass regression performance compared to the Fourier transform approach. The more traditional approach of using L-band radar polarimetry will also be compared to structural biomass estimation.

  16. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, M.; Muñoz-Esparza, D.; Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.

    2015-08-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ~ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the formation of the daytime convective plume and the mean vertical wind structure.

  17. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, M.; Muñoz-Esparza, D.; Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.; Knoth, O.; Haarig, M.; Ansmann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind and Raman lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure. Additionally, the model results accurately reproduce the

  18. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  19. Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J E; Blair, F H; Bisson, S E; Turner, D D

    1998-07-20

    We describe an operational, self-contained, fully autonomous Raman lidar system that has been developed for unattended, around-the-clock atmospheric profiling of water vapor, aerosols, and clouds. During a 1996 three-week intensive observational period, the system operated during all periods of good weather (339 out of 504 h), including one continuous five-day period. The system is based on a dual-field-of-view design that provides excellent daytime capability without sacrificing nighttime performance. It is fully computer automated and runs unattended following a simple, brief (~5-min) start-up period. We discuss the theory and design of the system and present detailed analyses of the derivation of water-vapor profiles from the lidar measurements. PMID:18285967

  20. Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J E; Blair, F H; Bisson, S E; Turner, D D

    1998-07-20

    We describe an operational, self-contained, fully autonomous Raman lidar system that has been developed for unattended, around-the-clock atmospheric profiling of water vapor, aerosols, and clouds. During a 1996 three-week intensive observational period, the system operated during all periods of good weather (339 out of 504 h), including one continuous five-day period. The system is based on a dual-field-of-view design that provides excellent daytime capability without sacrificing nighttime performance. It is fully computer automated and runs unattended following a simple, brief (~5-min) start-up period. We discuss the theory and design of the system and present detailed analyses of the derivation of water-vapor profiles from the lidar measurements.

  1. Sampling the Vertical Moisture Structure of an Atmospheric River Event Using Airborne GPS Radio Occultation Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J. S.; Malloy, K.; Murphy, B.; Sussman, J.; Zhang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are of high concern in California, bringing significant rain to the region over extended time periods of up to 5 days, potentially causing floods, and more importantly, contributing to the Sierra snowpack that provides much of the regional water resources. The CalWater project focuses on predicting the variability of the West Coast water supply, including improving AR forecasting. Unfortunately, data collection over the ocean remains a challenge and impacts forecasting accuracy. One novel technique to address this issue includes airborne GPS radio occultation (ARO), using broadcast GPS signals from space to measure the signal ray path bending angle and refractivity to retrieve vertical water vapor profiles. The Global Navigation Satellite System Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) system was developed for this purpose for recording and processing high-sample rate (10MHz) signals in the lower troposphere. Previous studies (Murphy et al, 2014) have shown promising results in acquiring airborne GPS RO data, comparing it to dropsondes and numerical weather models. CalWater launched a field campaign in the beginning of 2015 which included testing GISMOS ARO on the NOAA GIV aircraft for AR data acquisition, flying into the February 6th AR event that brought up to 35 cm of rain to central California. This case study will compare airborne GPS RO refractivity profiles to the NCEP-NCAR final reanalysis model and dropsonde profiles. We will show the data distribution and explain the sampling characteristics, providing high resolution vertical information to the sides of the aircraft in a manner complementary to dropsondes beneath the flight track. We will show how this method can provide additional reliable data during the development of AR storms.

  2. Can Vertical Profiles of Tropospheric Methane on Titan Be Derived from Radio-Occultation Soundings?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Maroui, E. A.; Schinder, P. J.; French, R. G.; Rappaport, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    The intensity of the received signal at Earth in the radio occultations of Titan is attenuated both by refractive defocusing and pressure-induced absorption from N2-N2 and CH4-N2 pairs. Because the absorption strength is different for the two sets of pairs, matching the retrieved absorptivity profile can in principle yield the vertical variation in gaseous methane in the troposphere. There are two factors that make this difficult. The first is the propagation of noise in the phase and amplitude of the received signal in the absorption retrieval. The phase data is first inverted to retrieve vertical profiles of refractivity, from which the refractive defocusing is calculated. This is then subtracted from the observed. intensity attenuation of the received signal to generate a profile of atmospheric absorption. The second problem is the uncertainty in the pressure-induced absorption coefficients. Laboratory data at radio wavelengths is only available near room temperature (see, e.g., [1] for N2-N2), and the extrapolation to the low temperatures in Titan's troposphere is not well established. Ab initio calculations by Borysow et al. [2, 3] provide absorption coefficients at low temperatures and long wavelengths, but their accuracy has come into question. We present examples from Cassini radio occultations of Titan to illustrate the difficulties. For methane mole fractions in the lower troposphere comparable to that inferred from the Huygens probe (approximately 0.05), it will be difficult to separate the contributions of N2-N2 collisions from those of N2-CH4, collisions to the retrieved absorption. However, higher concentrations of CH4 and/or a higher signal-to-noise ratio from a future uplink experiment could result in a successful separation of the two components. However, key to this are highly accurate estimates of the absorption from a combination of laboratory measurements at love temperatures and long wavelengths, and possibly improved theoretical calculations.

  3. Vertical radar profiles for the calibration of unsaturated flow models under dynamic water table conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Gallotti, L.; Ventura, V.; Andreotti, G.

    2003-04-01

    The identification of flow and transport characteristics in the vadose zone is a fundamental step towards understanding the dynamics of contaminated sites and the resulting risk of groundwater pollution. Borehole radar has gained popularity for the monitoring of moisture content changes, thanks to its apparent simplicity and its high resolution characteristics. However, cross-hole radar requires closely spaced (a few meters), plastic-cased boreholes, that are rarely available as a standard feature in sites of practical interest. Unlike cross-hole applications, Vertical Radar Profiles (VRP) require only one borehole, with practical and financial benefits. High-resolution, time-lapse VRPs have been acquired at a crude oil contaminated site in Trecate, Northern Italy, on a few existing boreholes originally developed for remediation via bioventing. The dynamic water table conditions, with yearly oscillations of roughly 5 m from 6 to 11 m bgl, offers a good opportunity to observe via VRP a field scale drainage-imbibition process. Arrival time inversion has been carried out using a regularized tomographic algorithm, in order to overcome the noise introduced by first arrival picking. Interpretation of the vertical profiles in terms of moisture content has been based on standard models (Topp et al., 1980; Roth et al., 1990). The sedimentary sequence manifests itself as a cyclic pattern in moisture content over most of the profiles. We performed preliminary Richards' equation simulations with time varying later table boundary conditions, in order to estimate the unsaturated flow parameters, and the results have been compared with laboratory evidence from cores.

  4. Final Technical Report. Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar measurement of atmospheric aerosols for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, Richard A.

    2002-08-19

    Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are required for determination of the effects of aerosols on the clear-sky radiative flux. Since recent studies have demonstrated the inability to compute these profiles on surface aerosol measurements alone, vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties must be acquired to compute aerosol radiative effects throughout the entire atmospheric column. Following the recommendation of the ARM Aerosol Working Group, the investigator developed, evaluated, and implemented algorithms for the CART Raman Lidar to provide profiles of aerosol extinction and backscattering. By virtue of its ability to measure vertical profiles of both aerosol extinction and water vapor simultaneously in the same scattering volume, we used the resulting profiles from the CART Raman Lidar to investigate the impact of water vapor and relative humidity on aerosol extinction throughout the column on a continuous and routine basis. The investigator used these the CART Raman Lidar aerosol extinction and backscattering profiles to evaluate the vertical variability of aerosol extinction and the extinction/backscatter ratio over the ARM SGP site.

  5. Vertical Cloud Climatology During TC4 Derived from High-Altitude Aircraft Merged Lidar and Radar Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, Dennis; Tian, Lin; Hart, William; Li, Lihua; McGill, Matthew; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft lidar works by shooting laser pulses toward the earth and recording the return time and intensity of any of the light returning to the aircraft after scattering off atmospheric particles and/or the Earth s surface. The scattered light signatures can be analyzed to tell the exact location of cloud and aerosol layers and, with the aid of a few optical assumptions, can be analyzed to retrieve estimates of optical properties such as atmospheric transparency. Radar works in a similar fashion except it sends pulses toward earth at a much larger wavelength than lidar. Radar records the return time and intensity of cloud or rain reflection returning to the aircraft. Lidar can measure scatter from optically thin cirrus and aerosol layers whose particles are too small for the radar to detect. Radar can provide reflection profiles through thick cloud layers of larger particles that lidar cannot penetrate. Only after merging the two instrument products can accurate measurements of the locations of all layers in the full atmospheric column be achieved. Accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of clouds is important information for understanding the Earth/atmosphere radiative balance and for improving weather/climate forecast models. This paper describes one such merged data set developed from the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment based in Costa Rica in July-August 2007 using the nadir viewing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and the Cloud Radar System (CRS) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Statistics were developed concerning cloud probability through the atmospheric column and frequency of the number of cloud layers. These statistics were calculated for the full study area, four sub-regions, and over land compared to over ocean across all available flights. The results are valid for the TC4 experiment only, as preferred cloud patterns took priority during mission planning. The TC4 Study Area was a very cloudy region, with cloudy

  6. Seasonal and vertical distribution of Phyllophaga cuyabana (Moser)(Coleoptera: Melolonthidae) in the soil profile.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lenita J; Farias, José R B; Hoffmann-Campo, Clara B; Amaral, Maria L B do; Garcia, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    Phyllophaga cuyabana (Moser) temporal and vertical distribution patterns were evaluated in the soil profile, in order to subsidize methodology for population sampling, aiming at its management. In insect surveys carried out during three years, in Boa Esperança County, State of Parana, Brazil, Phyllophaga cuyabana was univoltine, with little overlap of the larval stages. Population peaked during December-February, but declined during the colder months, when larvae were in diapause. Different developmental stages exploited distinct soil depths. Eggs and early first instars tended to concentrate between 5 cm and 10 cm deep, but they spread more uniformly through the soil profile, reaching depths up to 30 cm, as they developed. Adults and eggs occurred in the spring (October to December) when active larvae also started to be observed; feeding larvae occurred up to late-April between 0 to 15 cm deep. Diapausing larvae and pupae were observed from early fall to early spring, mostly from 15 cm to 30 cm deep. Throughout the year, the number of insects in the soil (up to 40 cm deep) showed a positive functional relationship with air temperature and evapotranspiration. The relationship of percent distribution of larvae in the soil profile and soil temperature, however, was positive only above 10 cm. To estimate the insect population from November to April, samples can be collected until 20 cm deep; from May to October, however, samplings should be deeper, up to 30 cm.

  7. Evaluating the salinity distribution of a shallow coastal aquifer by vertical multielectrode profiling (Denmark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbs Poulsen, Søren; Rømer Rasmussen, Keld; Bøie Christensen, Niels; Christensen, Steen

    2010-02-01

    A monitoring system, including five groups of piezometers and five vertical multielectrode profiling probes (VMEP), has been installed in an aquifer beneath a coastal dune in Denmark. In order to assess the salinity distribution within the aquifer, geoelectrical data were gathered in March, June and September 2008, by measuring a dipole-dipole and gradient array using multielectrode profiling. Interpretation of the processed resistivity data was performed by regularized inversion using a one-dimensional, horizontally layered model of formation resistivity. The standard deviation on estimated layer log-resistivity was 0.01-0.03. By estimating two parameters of a power function, observed fluid conductivities derived from samples of porewater were related to corresponding estimated formation resistivities. The conductivity profiles correlate with a winter situation in March with high sea level, active recharge and significant wave activity, causing increased hydraulic heads, a thicker freshwater lens and salt water overlying freshwater close to the sea. In June, the thickness of the freshwater lens is reduced due to less recharge and prevailing offshore winds, imposing density-stable conditions and a sharper transition between fresh and brackish water. During the autumn, aquifer recharge is enhanced and hydraulic heads increase, resulting in a thicker freshwater lens.

  8. Wavelength dependent near-range lidar profiling of smog aerosol over Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Marinou, Eleni; Engelmann, Ronny; Costa Surós, Montserrat; Kottas, Mickael; Baars, Holger; Janicka, Lucja; Solomos, Stavros; Heese, Birgit; Kumala, Wojciech; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Amiridis, Vassilis; Balis, Dimitris; Althausen, Dietrich; Wandinger, Ulla; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the ACTRIS2 JRA1 field campaign focusing on joint remote and in-situ sensing of absorbing aerosols has been conducted in Athens (http://actris-athens.eu). In the frame of the ACTRIS2 BL-Smog TNA, co-located measurements of the near-range lidar receiver (NARLa) of the University of Warsaw with the multi-wavelength PollyXT lidar of the National Observatory of Athens were performed. The excellent capacities of the PollyXT-NOA lidar, equipped with eight far-range channels (355, 355s, 387, 407, 532, 532s, 607, and 1064nm) and two near-range channels (532 and 607 nm), were enhanced by integrating the NARLa for simultaneous observations. By using the NARLa, equipped with the elastic channels (355 and 532nm) and Raman channels (387 and 607nm), the wavelength dependence of the aerosol particles properties within boundary layer was captured. The dominant conditions observed during the JRA1 period were the fresh winter smog layers occurring in lowermost boundary layer over Athens. NARLa provided profiles as close to surface as 50m, thus the data obtained in the near-range were used for the incomplete overlap region of the far-field channels. With NARLa we assessed the overlap at 355 and 532nm wavelengths and concluded on the possibility of using the single near-range 532 nm channel for the overlap correction in both VIS and UV channels of the PollyXT-NOA. As a result, the obtained lidar profiles are expected to be more consistent with the sunphotometer measurements. In the future, the GARRLiC code can be applied on the synergy of combined near and far range lidar profiles with AERONET data sets in order to study improvement on the inversion results.

  9. Multiple Frequency Contrast Source Inversion Method for Vertical Electromagnetic Profiling: 2D Simulation Results and Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghe; Song, Linping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous multiple frequency contrast source inversion (CSI) method is applied to reconstructing hydrocarbon reservoir targets in a complex multilayered medium in two dimensions. It simulates the effects of a salt dome sedimentary formation in the context of reservoir monitoring. In this method, the stabilized biconjugate-gradient fast Fourier transform (BCGS-FFT) algorithm is applied as a fast solver for the 2D volume integral equation for the forward computation. The inversion technique with CSI combines the efficient FFT algorithm to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication and the stable convergence of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI in the iteration process. As a result, this method is capable of making quantitative conductivity image reconstruction effectively for large-scale electromagnetic oil exploration problems, including the vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEP) survey investigated here. A number of numerical examples have been demonstrated to validate the effectiveness and capacity of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI method for a limited array view in VEP.

  10. Algorithmic identification of limnological features in vertical profiles from the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietsma, T.; Collingsworth, P.; Minsker, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    High volume collection of environmental data in digital format presents a range of challenges for the researcher, from quality control and data management to efficient interpretation of the signal and the development of requisite information technology skills. These challenges have been termed the "data deluge". To aid in efficient data interpretation, we describe several algorithmic approaches for feature identification in signal streams, including gradient estimation, spectral analysis, and the hidden Markov model. These approaches are calibrated and evaluated over vertical temperature profiles from the Great Lakes obtained through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. To demonstrate the value of this data science approach, we describe how the algorithms can be integrated with the historical sampling record to yield an expert system that assists field technicians with adaptive sampling.

  11. Technique for Obtaining Vertical Profiles of Backscattering and Extinction Cross Sections Using Slant Path Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, J. D.; Herman, B. M.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for solving for vertical profiles of atmospheric particulate extinction and backscattering cross-sections utilizing monostatic lidar slant path measurements. The method is an extension of work by Fernald. It is shown that the number of assumptions necessary for an iterative solution of extinction and backscattering cross sections can be reduced if lidar slant path measurements are used to solve directly for optical depths. The technique is useful only if sufficiently accurate lidar measurements are available. With highly accurate measurements it is also possible to solve directly for extinction cross sections without an iterative solution of a transcendental equation if the proper reduction scheme is used. The required accuracy is discussed and results showing the effect of errors are presented.

  12. Assessment of an Antrim Oil Shale fracture zone by vertical seismic profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Toksoez, M.N.; Turpening, R.M.; Stewart, R.R.

    1980-09-01

    This report presents the results of a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) experiment performed in the upper 2500 feet (770 m) of the Michigan Basin. Both P and SH waves were used. The experiment was divided into two parts: a before survey run on the virgin rock, then an after survey across an explosively fractured volume of Antrim Oil Shale, centered at 1300 ft (400 m). From the before VSP survey, a velocity structure of the basin was calculated. Comparison of the after observations to the before elucidated the fracture volume and elastic parameters. Travel time delays, amplitude attenuation, converted and diffracted waves provided consistent information on the depth (1300 ft), shape (ellipsoid) and size (10 m x 20 m x 30 m) of the fractured volume.

  13. An Algorithm to Estimate the Heating Budget from Vertical Hydrometeor Profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Lang, Stephen; McCumber, Michael; Adler, Robert; Penc, Richard

    1990-12-01

    A simple algorithm to estimate the latent heating of cloud systems from their vertical hydrometer profiles is proposed. The derivation as well as the validation of the algorithm is based on output generated by a non-hydrostatic cloud model with parameterized microphysical processes. Mature and decaying stages of a GATE squall-type convective system have been tested. The algorithm-derived heating budget is in reasonable agreement with the budget predicted by the cloud model. The input to the proposed algorithm can be obtained from either a rain retrieval technique based on information from multichannel passive microwave signals or a kinematic cloud model based on information from Doppler radar wind fields and radar reflectivity patterns. Such an application would have significant implications for spaceborne remote sensing and the large-scale weather prediction data assimilation problem.

  14. Characterizing leaf area index (LAI) and vertical foliage profile (VFP) over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Ganguly, S.; Zhang, G.; Hofton, M. A.; Nelson, R. F.; Dubayah, R.

    2016-01-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and vertical foliage profile (VFP) are among the important canopy structural variables. Recent advances in lidar remote sensing technology have demonstrated the capability of accurately mapping LAI and VFP over large areas. The primary objective of this study was to derive and validate a LAI and VFP product over the contiguous United States (CONUS) using spaceborne waveform lidar data. This product was derived at the footprint level from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) using a biophysical model. We validated GLAS-derived LAI and VFP across major forest biomes using airborne waveform lidar. The comparison results showed that GLAS retrievals of total LAI were generally accurate with little bias (r2 = 0.67, bias = -0.13, RMSE = 0.75). The derivations of GLAS retrievals of VFP within layers were not as accurate overall (r2 = 0.36, bias = -0.04, RMSE = 0.26), and these varied as a function of height, increasing from understory to overstory - 0 to 5 m layer: r2 = 0.04, bias = 0.09, RMSE = 0.31; 10 to 15 m layer: r2 = 0.53, bias = -0.08, RMSE = 0.22; and 15 to 20 m layer: r2 = 0.66, bias = -0.05, RMSE = 0.20. Significant relationships were also found between GLAS LAI products and different environmental factors, in particular elevation and annual precipitation. In summary, our results provide a unique insight into vertical canopy structure distribution across North American ecosystems. This data set is a first step towards a baseline of canopy structure needed for evaluating climate and land use induced forest changes at the continental scale in the future, and should help deepen our understanding of the role of vertical canopy structure in terrestrial ecosystem processes across varying scales.

  15. Characterizing Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Vertical Foliage Profile (VFP) over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Ganguly, S.; Zhang, G.; Hofton, M. A.; Nelson, R. F.; Dubayah, R.

    2015-08-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and vertical foliage profile (VFP) are among the important canopy structural variables. Recent advances in lidar remote sensing technology have demonstrated the capability of accurately mapping LAI and VFP over large areas. The primary objective of this study was to derive and validate a LAI and VFP product over the contiguous United States using spaceborne waveform lidar data. This product was derived at the footprint level from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) using a biophysical model. We validated GLAS derived LAI and VFP across major forest biomes using airborne waveform lidar. The comparison results showed that GLAS retrievals of total LAI were generally accurate with little bias (r2 = 0.67, bias = -0.13, RMSE = 0.75). The derivations of GLAS retrievals of VFP within layers was not as accurate overall (r2 = 0.36, bias = -0.04, RMSE = 0.26), and these varied as a function of height, increasing from understory to overstory -0 to 5 m layer: r2 = 0.04, bias = 0.09, RMSE = 0.31; 10 to 15 m layer: r2 = 0.53, bias = -0.08, RMSE = 0.22; and 15 to 20 m layer: r2 = 0.66, bias =-0.05, RMSE = 0.20. Significant relationships were also found between GLAS LAI products and different environmental factors, in particular elevation and annual precipitation. In summary, our results provide a unique insight into vertical canopy structure distribution across North American ecosystems. This data set is a first step towards a baseline of canopy structure needed for evaluating climate and land use induced forest changes at continental scale in the future and should help deepen our understanding of the role of vertical canopy structure on terrestrial ecosystem processes across varying scales.

  16. Computation of vertical profiles of longwave radiative cooling over the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Perry G.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1995-01-01

    An important quantity whose magnitude has not been throughly examined is the vertical distribution of heating in the Tropics. The details of the vertical distribution of heating have a significant impact on a number of phenomena, including the 30-60 day oscillation, sometimes known as the intraseasonal oscillation. Prior attempts to establish the structure of the heating relied on limited field data or assimilated data, coupled with climatological radiative heating parameters. The availability of high quality global-scale datasets has made it possible to make more accurate calculations than were possible a few years ago. An important component of the apparent heat budget is the longwave radiative cooling, which in this paper is found by using the ECMWF/WCRP/TOGA Archive 2 and ISCCP C1 datasets, together with a well-established parameterization scheme. A method is developed that can be used to estimate the vertical structure of cloud amounts based on top-of-atmosphere cloud observations, and the results are used with a wide-band longwave parameterization to produce longwave cooling rates over the tropical Pacific Ocean. Outgoing longwave radiation is calculated and compared the ERBE results. The calculated values are generally higher than those from ERBE, though the spatial distributions are similar. Some significant problems exist with the ECMWF upper-tropospheric water vapor amounts, which could imply uncertainties of 0.5 C/day in the calculated cooling rates. This is comparable to the differences associated with the minimum or random overlap assumptions used to generate cloud profiles.

  17. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heating in TRMM: Validation and Assimilation in the GEOS Data Assimilation System. [Year 2001 Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ming-Hua

    2001-01-01

    I have derived the vertical profiles of apparent heating Q and Q2 by using 3-hourly balloon sounding data from the ARM SGP sounding array for three IOPs in 2000. These IOPs cover the periods from 3/1 to 3/22, from 9/25 to 10/8, and from 11/27 to 12/22. These heating profiles will be collocated with the TRMM heating profiles for validation studies once the TRMM profiles become available to the investigators. I have also produced the objective analyses of Q1, Q2 and forcing fields for the international GCSS Case 3 Intercomparison project. The GSFC CRM participated in study, based on which TRMM heating profiles are derived. I have also studied to assimilate the vertical heating profile by constraining the cloud-base mass flux in the cumulus convection scheme using the CCM3. I first derive the vertical heating profile for each convective plume of unit cloud-base mass flux. The observed heating profile form ARM is then de-convoluted to derive the cloud base mass fluxes of all individual plumes. These fluxes are compared with those derived from the quasi-equilibrium hypothesis. They are shown to improve many other aspects of the model behavior.

  18. An evaluation and comparison of vertical profile data from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A statistical evaluation is used to compared vertical profiles of temperature and moisture derived from VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) with three different algorithms to that of corresponding rawinsonde measurements for a clear cold environment. To account for time and space discrepancies between the data sets, rawinsonde data were adjusted to be representative of the satellite sounding times. Both rawinsonde and satellite sounding data were objectively analyzed onto a mesoscale grid. These grid point values were compared at 50 mb pressure increments from the surface up to 100 mb. The data were analyed for horizontal and vertical structure, representatives of derived parameters, and significant departure (improvement) from the apriori (first guess) information. Results indicate some rather strong temperature and moisture biases exist in the satellite soundings. Temperature biases of 1 to 4 C and dewpoint biases of 2 to 6 C generally occur in layers where strong inversions are present and vary with time as these atmospheric features evolve. The biases also changes as a function retrieval scheme suggesting limitations and restrictions on the applications of the various techniques. Standard temperature deviations range from 1 to 2 C for each retrieval scheme with maximum values around 800 and 400 mb. Derived parameters (precipitable water and thickness) suffer from similar biases, though to a somewhat lesser extent. Gradients of basic and derived parameters are generally weaker but have good horizontal structure where magnitudes of the parameters are relatively strong. Integrated thermal (temperature) and moisture (precipitable water) parameters show mixed results.

  19. Use of vertical electrical resistivity profiles to characterize the riverbed of losing-disconnected rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Sebastien; Davis, Aaron; Crosbie, Russell; Taylor, Andrew; Munday, Tim

    2014-05-01

    There are few field techniques available to estimate infiltration rates from losing-disconnected rivers, where infiltration rates are often constrained by the presence of clay layers with a low hydraulic conductivity. It is hypothesized that, in this environment, the bulk of the infiltration would occur in 'hotspots' where the clay layer is thin or absent. Infiltration was estimated over a 2 km section of Billabong Creek (Murray-Darling Basin, Australia) using vertical electrical sounding (VES) resistivity to characterize the continuity and thickness of the riverbed clay layer. Both a towed in-river survey over the whole study reach and three fixed array measurements at the shoreline at selected areas were used. Using locations with measured high and low resistivity, the resistivity profiles were constrained by coring the riverbed to measure vertical variations in riverbed texture, porewater content and porewater salinity. The VES showed that the clay layer was continuous along the study reach and varied in thickness between 1 m and >4 m. Using a simple steady-state model, infiltration rates along the study reach were estimated to vary between 1700 and 7800 m3 km-1 year-1, with an average of 3400 m3 km-1 year-1. This methodology can provide independent estimates of infiltration rates at a scale suitable for the calibration of regional groundwater models.

  20. Total fluoride in Guangdong soil profiles, China: spatial distribution and vertical variation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L; Zhang, H H; Xia, B; Xu, D R

    2007-04-01

    A total of 260 soil profiles were reported to investigate the fluoride distribution and vertical variation in Guangdong province. The soil fluoride contents followed an approximately lognormal distribution. Although the soil fluoride geometric mean concentration of 407 mg/kg is lower than that of China, its content varied from 87 to 2860 mg/kg. An upper baseline concentration of 688 mg/kg was estimated for surface soils. In A-, B-, and C-horizon soil fluoride spatial distribution presented similar patterns that high fluoride concentration mainly located in limestone, purple shale, and sandshale areas, indicated that soil fluoride spatial distribution was primarily dependent on the regional bedrock properties rather than anthropogenic inputs. From A- to C- horizon soil fluoride geometric mean concentration had an increasing tendency of 407, 448, and 465 mg/kg. This vertical variation was the result of the intensive eluviation under the subtropical hydrothermal condition, and had closely related with soil properties, such as lower organic matters and clay content variations. Moreover, the soil degradation and erosion was also an important pathway of soil fluoride movement, as a result the soil fluoride exported into surface and groundwaters would reach about 4.1x10(4) t year-1 in the study area.

  1. Vertical profile of δ18OOO from the middle stratosphere to lower mesosphere from SMILES spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T. O.; Sagawa, H.; Yoshida, N.; Kasai, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Ozone is known to have large oxygen isotopic enrichments of about 10% in the middle stratosphere; however, there have been no reports of ozone isotopic enrichments above the middle stratosphere. We derived an enrichment δ18OOO in the stratosphere and the lower mesosphere from observations of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) using a retrieval algorithm optimized for the isotopic ratio. The retrieval algorithm includes (i) an a priori covariance matrix constrained by oxygen isotopic ratios in ozone, (ii) an optimization of spectral windows for ozone isotopomers and isotopologues, and (iii) common tangent height information for all windows. The δ18OOO by averaging the SMILES measurements at the latitude range of 20 to 40° N from February to March in 2010 with solar zenith angle < 80° was 13% (at 32 km) with the systematic error of about 5%. SMILES and past measurements were in good agreement, with δ18OOO increasing with altitude between 30 and 40 km. The vertical profile of δ18OOO obtained in this study showed an increase and a decrease with altitude in the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. The δ18OOO peak, 18%, is found at the stratopause. The δ18OOO has a positive correlation with temperature in the range of 220-255 K, indicating that temperature can be a dominant factor to control the vertical profile of δ18OOO in the stratosphere and mesosphere. This is the first report of the observation of δ18OOO over a wide altitude range extending from the stratosphere to the mesosphere (28-57 km).

  2. Qualitative comparison of concurrent vertical optical turbulence profiles from an aircraft and balloons over White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowlin, Scott R.; Hahn, Ila L.; Hugo, Ronald J.; Bishop, Kenneth P.

    1999-08-01

    We report simultaneous balloon-borne thermosonde/airborne constant-current anemometer measurements made over a portion of White Sands Missile Range, NM. For the first time, vertical profiles of the refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) data generated from shallow slant aircraft flight paths are compared to the balloons vertical Cn2 distributions. We discuss possible adverse effects of meteorology and atmospheric velocity fluctuations. We present conclusions and make recommendations for future similar experimental efforts.

  3. Vertical Profiles of SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands: MAX-DOAS Measurements and Comparison to in-situ Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zoe; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the levels of industrially emitted gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands is essential to making quality environmental management decisions but is currently limited due to scarcity of top-down quantification studies. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) , important tropospheric trace gas pollutants, contributes to improved knowledge of these pollutants' levels, vertical distributions and chemical transformations. A mini-MAX-DOAS instrument measured spectra at multiple viewing elevation angles in order to retrieve NO2 and SO2 differential slant column densities (dSCDs) at an Environment Canada research site north of Fort McMurray, Alberta in the fall of 2013. For the first time in the oil sands, tropospheric vertical profiles of NO2 and SO2 were retrieved by applying the optimal estimation technique to the MAX-DOAS measurements. The DOAS fit retrievals of SO2 dSCDs were validated by comparison with retrievals obtained with a quartz calibration cell with known SO2 SCD placed in front of the MAX-DOAS telescope at multiple elevation angles on a clean day. Retrieved SO2 dSCDs varied significantly from the true value depending on the chosen wavelength fitting interval. At the lowest wavelength intervals, interference by stray light and O3 differential structures significantly reduced dSCDs and caused an elevation angle dependence. These results indicate that MAX-DOAS dSCD retrieval settings, particularly for weak absorbers with differential absorption structures in low-intensity spectral regions, must be chosen carefully in order to achieve the most accurate results. Tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) and vertical profile retrievals of NO2, SO2 and aerosol extinction during significant pollution events will be illustrated. Trace gas vertical profiles exhibited significant variability between days and at different times of day and were often spatially

  4. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this analysis, a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model is developed based on the nearly global SAGE 1 satellite observations in the non-volcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980. Zonally averaged profiles of the 1.0 micron aerosol extinction for the tropics and the mid- and high-altitudes for both hemispheres are obtained and presented in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. In addition, analytic expressions for these seasonal global zonal means, as well as the yearly global mean, are determined according to a third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set. This proposed background stratospheric aerosol model can be useful in modeling studies of stratospheric aerosols and for simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  5. Using the IODP Expedition 312 Vertical Seismic Profile to Investigate Sub-basement Reflections in Multi-Channel Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Swift, S. A.; Stephen, R. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) initiated drilling at Site 1256D in the Guatemala Basin, about 1000km off the East Pacific Rise to penetrate plutonic rocks, anticipated to be relatively shallow in this region formed at an ultra- fast spreading rate. IODP Expedition E312 successfully drilled into gabbros at ~ 1150m in basement. Multi- channel seismic traces, although not processed for the purpose, show weak laterally-coherent sub-basement reflections at borehole depths (Hallenborg et. al., Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol 108 No. B11, 2532, 2003). Synthetic reflectivity seismograms were computed using a Ricker wavelet and impedance profiles from borehole sonic logs. They strongly suggest the presence of significant sub-basement amplitude peaks - although attenuation has not been modeled. Zero-offset vertical seismic profiles were processed to investigate the authenticity of these reflections and interpret the geological features that caused them. A dual scheme of the median filtering and F-K dip filtering was used. Down-going energy is clearly identified but negligible up-going energy is visible over random noise. The absence of geophones above the basement prevents comparison of basement reflections with sub-basement ones, so that a critical energy level above the noise could be established to identify up-going energy. The negative results are consistent with the topography of geological horizons on horizontal scales less than the Fresnel Zone (~ 300m). This expedition is the first penetration through volcanic extrusives and dikes into plutonic basement. In such a setting, sub-basement reflections, if present, would have been accurately measured. Absence of such clear and comprehensible observations in this area strongly suggests that lava flows and igneous contacts in upper ocean crust have significant topography on lateral scales < 300 m due to igneous and tectonic processes.

  6. Study of aerosol microphysical properties profiles retrieved from ground-based remote sensing and aircraft in-situ measurements during a Saharan dust event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Veselovskii, I.; Lyamani, H.; Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Titos, G.; Andrey, J.; Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an analysis of mineral dust optical and microphysical properties obtained from different retrieval techniques applied to active and passive remote sensing measurements, including a comparison with simultaneous in-situ aircraft measurements. Data were collected in a field campaign performed during a mineral dust outbreak a Granada, Spain, experimental site (37.16° N, 3.61° W, 680 m a.s.l.) on the 27 June 2011. Column-integrated properties are provided by sun- and star-photometry which allows a continuous evaluation of the mineral dust optical properties during both day and night-time. Both the Linear Estimation and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) inversion algorithms are applied for the retrieval of the column-integrated microphysical particle properties. In addition, vertically-resolved microphysical properties are obtained from a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system included in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network), by using both LIRIC (Lidar Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm during daytime and an algorithm applied to the Raman measurements based on the regularization technique during night-time. LIRIC retrievals reveal several dust layers between 3 and 5 km a.s.l. with volume concentrations of the coarse spheroid mode up to 60 μm3 cm-3. The combined use of the regularization and LIRIC methods reveals the night-to-day evolution of the vertical structure of the mineral dust microphysical properties and offers complementary information to that from column-integrated variables retrieved from passive remote sensing. Additionally, lidar depolarization profiles and LIRIC retrieved volume concentration are compared with aircraft in-situ measurements. This study presents for the first time a comparison of both volume concentration and dust particle polarization ratios measured with in-situ and remote sensing techniques. Results for the depolarization measurements in the dust layer indicate reasonable agreement within the

  7. Vertical geochemical profiling of an aquifer contaminated with JP-4 fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiasong; Barcelona, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Soil samples were collected at a site contaminated with jet fuel at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan, and were analyzed for aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic acid metabolites, and phospholipid ester-linked fatty acids (PLFA). Vertically in the source zone contaminant concentrations of alkylbenzenes (with C1-C4 substitutions) ranged from less than 1.0 to 21.69 {mu}g/kg away from water table to 2605.96 {mu}g/kg in samples taken at water table. Contamination decreased to less than 1.0 {mu}g/kg in downgradient zone. Aromatic acids of the fuel contaminants identified include o-, m-, and p-toluic acid, 2,5-, 3,5-, 2,6- and 3,4-dimethylbenzoic acid, and 2,4,6-trimethylbenzoic acid, suggesting that the aromatic acid production was associated with the microbial degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. PLFA ranging from C{sub 12} to C{sub 20} were determined in soil samples, including saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. The only polyenic acid detected was 18:2w6, a biomarker for protozoa. The total microbial biomass calculated from PLFA in aquifer solid samples showed varied profiles with depth as well as at different locations at similar depths indicating considerable microbial heterogeneity in the subsurface over distance of less than 2 meters. The PLFA profiles also suggested that anaerobic and aerobic microbial communities dominate the biomass in the aquifer solids.

  8. Vertical Profiles of NOx, O3, and Volatile Organic Compounds in a Deciduous Forest Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobson, B. T.; Wallace, H. W.; Erickson, M. H.; Pressley, S. N.; Rausch, J. L.; O'Donnell, K.

    2010-12-01

    Vertical profiles of traces gases were made through a deciduous forest canopy as part of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiments (CABINEX) conducted in July-August, 2009 at the University of Michigan Biological Station. Measurements of O3, NO, NO2 and VOCs were made from three heights: 6 m, the top of the forest canopy at 20 m, and at a height of 34 m. O3 was continuously monitored from each of these heights. NOx and VOC measurements switched between these sampling heights every 10 minutes. VOCs were measured using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Measured VOCs include formaldehyde and methylhydroperoxide as well as isoprene and monoterpenes. NO and NO2 were continuously measured using a two channel chemiluminescent instrument. NOx mixing ratios were often significantly greater at the 6 m sampling height compared to the top of the canopy, suggesting NOx emissions from the forest floor. A difference of 50 pptv or greater was measured 44% of the time and frequently observed at night and during the morning. Approximately 40% of the time the differences were less than 10 pptv, implying a well mixed environment. The NOX and VOC profiles and their diel behavior will be presented to illustrate the importance of surface sources and sinks on trace gas mixing ratios within a forest canopy.

  9. Analytical solution for the vertical profile of daily production in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovač, Žarko; Platt, Trevor; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Morović, Mira

    2016-05-01

    Photosynthesis parameters are routinely estimated from in vitro measurements of primary production under constant light reaching each incubation bottle, by fitting a photosynthesis-irradiance function to the measurements. Here we take one such function and integrate it in time for variable light input, similar to natural conditions, to obtain the analytical solution for the vertical profile of daily phytoplankton production in the field. This solution is then fitted to in situ measurements of primary production profiles in the same manner as a photosynthesis-irradiance function is fitted to in vitro measurements under controlled and constant light conditions to retrieve the photosynthesis-irradiance parameters. The method is tested on the Hawaii Ocean Time-series data set. The solution explained 97.88% of the variance in measured normalized production at individual depths. The recovered parameters were then used to model the normalized daily water-column production. The model explained 99.21% of variance in normalized watercolumn production of the entire data set. The seasonal cycle of the photosynthesis parameters recovered with the analytical solution was further studied for the Hawaii Ocean Time-series. With respect to the photosynthesis parameter determination, the solution bridges the gap between classical photosynthesis-irradiance measurements under controlled light conditions and in situ measurements which are made under natural, variable light conditions. It presents a new tool for the estimation of photosynthesis parameters from in situ measurements of primary production.

  10. A study on characterization of stratospheric aerosol and gas parameters with the spacecraft solar occultation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    Spacecraft remote sensing of stratospheric aerosol and ozone vertical profiles using the solar occultation experiment has been analyzed. A computer algorithm has been developed in which a two step inversion of the simulated data can be performed. The radiometric data are first inverted into a vertical extinction profile using a linear inversion algorithm. Then the multiwavelength extinction profiles are solved with a nonlinear least square algorithm to produce aerosol and ozone vertical profiles. Examples of inversion results are shown illustrating the resolution and noise sensitivity of the inversion algorithms.

  11. Comparing the Cloud Vertical Structure Derived from Several Methods Based on Radiosonde Profiles and Ground-based Remote Sensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Suros, M.; Calbo, J.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-08-27

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, is an important characteristic in order to describe the impact of clouds in a changing climate. In this work several methods to estimate the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering number and position of cloud layers, with a ground based system which is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ on the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study these methods are applied to 125 radiosonde profiles acquired at the ARM Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of year 2009 and endorsed by GOES images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The overall agreement for the methods ranges between 44-88%; four methods produce total agreements around 85%. Further tests and improvements are applied on one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low resolution vertical profiles, which could be useful in atmospheric modeling. The total agreement, even when using low resolution profiles, can be improved up to 91% if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  12. Marli: Mars Lidar for Global Wind Profiles and Aerosol Profiles from Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Guzewich, S. D.; Smith, M. D.; Riris, H.; Sun, X.; Gentry, B. M.; Yu, A.; Allan, G. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Analysis Group's Next Orbiter Science Analysis Group (NEXSAG) has recently identified atmospheric wind measurements as one of 5 top compelling science objectives for a future Mars orbiter. To date, only isolated lander observations of martian winds exist. Winds are the key variable to understand atmospheric transport and answer fundamental questions about the three primary cycles of the martian climate: CO2, H2O, and dust. However, the direct lack of observations and imprecise and indirect inferences from temperature observations leave many basic questions about the atmospheric circulation unanswered. In addition to addressing high priority science questions, direct wind observations from orbit would help validate 3D general circulation models (GCMs) while also providing key input to atmospheric reanalyses. The dust and CO2 cycles on Mars are partially coupled and their influences on the atmospheric circulation modify the global wind field. Dust absorbs solar infrared radiation and its variable spatial distribution forces changes in the atmospheric temperature and wind fields. Thus it is important to simultaneously measure the height-resolved wind and dust profiles. MARLI provides a unique capability to observe these variables continuously, day and night, from orbit.

  13. Vertical profiling of methane and carbon dioxide using high resolution near-infrared heterodyne spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Alexander; Klimchuk, Artem; Churbanov, Dmitry; Pereslavtseva, Anastasia; Spiridonov, Maxim; Nadezhdinskyi, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    We present new method of monitoring greenhouse gases using spectroscopic observations of solar radiation passed through the atmosphere with spectral resolution ΛvδΛ up to 108. Such a high resolution is achieved by heterodyne technique and allows to retrieve full information about spectral line shape which, in turn, is used to distinguish contribution of different atmospheric layers to the resulting absorption. Weak absorption line at 6056.5 cm-1 was selected for CO2 measurements and a quartet of lines centered at 6057 cm-1for CH4. The instrument setup includes Sun tracker with a microtelescope and chopper, diode DFB laser used as a local oscillator, a bundle of single mode optical fibers that provides medium for radiation transfer and beam coupling, reference cell with depressurized methane for LO frequency stabilization, and Fabry-Perot etalon for LO frequency calibration. A commercial p-i-n diode with squared detector replaces a mixer and IF spectrometer, providing measurement of heterodyne beating within a bandpass of few MHz, which determines the effective spectral resolution of the instrument. Spectral coverage within narrow range (about 1 cm-1) is provided by ramping the LO frequency based on feedback from the reference channel. Observations of Sun in the Moscow region have resulted for the first time in measurements of the atmospheric transmission near 1.65 μm with sub-Doppler spectral resolution. In order to retrieve vertical profiles of methane and carbon dioxide we developed the inversion algorithm implementing Tikhonov regularization approach. With measured transmission having S/N ratio of 100 or higher, the uncertainty of CH4 profile is about 10 ppb, with the uncertainty of CO2 profile at 1 ppm. This techniques is promising an affordable opportunity or widespread monitoring of greenhouse gases and may be implemented on existing ground-based stations. This work has been supported by the grant of Russian Ministry of education and science #11.G34.31.0074

  14. Vertical profiles of N2O5 along with CH4, N2O, and H2O in the late Arctic winter retrieved from MIPAS-B infrared limb emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, G.; von Clarmann, T.; Oelhaf, H.; Fischer, H.

    1995-11-01

    Vertical profiles of N2O5, CH4, N2O, and H2O inside the arctic vortex were retrieved from nighttime infrared limb emission spectra obtained during a flight of the Michelson interferometer for passive atmospheric sounding, balloonborne version (MIPAS-B) Fourier spectrometer from Kiruna (Sweden, 68°N) on March 14/15, 1992, as part of the European Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Experiment. Spectra were analyzed by a nonlinear multiparameter least squares fitting procedure in combination with an onion-peeling retrieval algorithm. The N2O5 results were derived from the intensity of the v12 band near 8 μm. These data represent the first ever reported N2O5 profile inside the polar vortex. Between 21.5 and 31.7 km altitude, N2O5 mixing ratios from 0.38 to 0.74 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) were inferred. Below 21.5 km there is a steep decrease in the mixing ratio toward values lower than 0.07 ppbv at 18.9 and 16.1 km. This discontinuity in the vertical profile correlates in altitude with the bulk of the Pinatubo aerosol layer inside the arctic vortex. N2O5 concentrations are calculated as a function of time since local sunset by using initial NO2 concentrations, O3 concentrations, aerosol surface area densities, and reaction rate coefficients, as found in the literature; calculated N2O5 concentrations are consistent with the MIPAS results. These suggest efficient heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 having taken place on sulphate aerosol particles. Retrieved CH4 and N2O profiles reflect the subsided polar vortex air.

  15. AROTAL Ozone and Temperature Vertical Profile Measurements from the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Thomas J.; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Hoegy, Walter; Burris, John; Silbert, Donald; Heaps, William; Neuber, R.; Trepte, C. R.

    2004-01-01

    The AROTAL instrument (Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature and Aerosol Lidar) - a collaboration between scientists at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and Langley Research Center - was flown on the NASA DC-8 during the SOLVE II Campaign during January and February, 2003. The flights were flown from the Arena Arctica in Kiruna, Sweden. We report measurements of temperature and ozone profiles showing approximately a 600 ppbv loss in ozone near 17.5 km, over the time frame of the aircraft campaign. Comparisons of ozone profiles from AROTAL are made with the SAGE III instrument.

  16. Improvement of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from micro rain radar using 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, E.; Baldini, L.; Roberto, N.; Gatlin, P.; Tokay, A.

    2016-03-01

    A measurement scheme aimed at investigating precipitation properties based on collocated disdrometer and profiling instruments is used in many experimental campaigns. Raindrop size distribution (RSD) estimated by disdrometer is referred to the ground level; the collocated profiling instrument is supposed to provide complementary estimation at different heights of the precipitation column above the instruments. As part of the Special Observation Period 1 of the HyMeX (Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment) project, conducted between 5 September and 6 November 2012, a K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) were installed close to each other at a site in the historic center of Rome (Italy). The raindrop size distributions collected by 2D video disdrometer are considered to be fairly accurate within the typical sizes of drops. Vertical profiles of raindrop sizes up to 1085 m are estimated from the Doppler spectra measured by the micro rain radar with a height resolution of 35 m. Several issues related to vertical winds, attenuation correction, Doppler spectra aliasing, and range-Doppler ambiguity limit the performance of MRR in heavy precipitation or in convection, conditions that frequently occur in late summer or in autumn in Mediterranean regions. In this paper, MRR Doppler spectra are reprocessed, exploiting the 2DVD measurements at ground to estimate the effects of vertical winds at 105 m (the most reliable MRR lower height), in order to provide a better estimation of vertical profiles of raindrop size distribution from MRR spectra. Results show that the reprocessing procedure leads to a better agreement between the reflectivity computed at 105 m from the reprocessed MRR spectra and that obtained from the 2DVD data. Finally, vertical profiles of MRR-estimated RSDs and their relevant moments (namely median volume diameter and reflectivity) are presented and discussed in order to investigate the

  17. Merging OSIRIS, SAGE II and MLS Vertical Ozone Profiles for the Determination of Long Term Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenstein, D. A.; Lloyd, N.; Bourassa, A. E.; Roth, C.; Rieger, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The OSIRIS instrument has been in operation onboard the Odin spacecraft since the autumn of 2001. Since that time OSIRIS has routinely measured spectrally dispersed limb-scattered sunlight from which vertical ozone profiles have been derived. The length of the OSIRIS ozone data record makes it a valuable resource for the analysis of long term trends. However, on its own it is not of sufficient length to capture all of the relevant signatures required to completely understand important changes in the vertical distribution of ozone. In particular the 1997 turnaround is not captured within the OSIRIS time series. For this reason it is important that the OSIRIS measurements be combined, or merged, with other data records like the SAGE II time series before a full analysis can be performed. This paper is focused on the merged SAGE II - OSIRIS time series and the resulting trends. It has been recently noted that the post 1997 positive trends at around 40 km that have been derived from this time series are higher than those calculated using other merged data sets. In this paper we will detail our efforts to understand why this is so. We will present analyses related to instrument drift, sampling biases and sensitivity to the method used to determine long term trends. Included along with the thorough analysis of the SAGE II - OSIRIS merged time series is an analysis of a SAGE II - MLS time series combined using the exact same method. Similarities and differences in the results derived from the two merged time series will also be discussed.

  18. Leaf morphology and photosynthetic adjustments among deciduous broad-leaved trees within the vertical canopy profile.

    PubMed

    Koike, T; Kitao, M; Maruyama, Y; Mori, S; Lei, T T

    2001-08-01

    Photosynthetic acclimation of deciduous broad-leaved tree species was studied along a vertical gradient within the canopy of a multi-species deciduous forest in northern Japan. We investigated variations in (1) local light regime and CO2 concentration ([CO2]), and (2) morphological (area, thickness and area per mass), biochemical (nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations) and physiological (light-saturated photosynthetic rate) attributes of leaves of seven major species on three occasions (June, August and October). We studied early successional species, alder (Alnus hirsuta (Spach) Rupr.) and birch (Betula platyphylla var. japonica (Miq.) Hara); gap phase species, walnut (Juglans ailanthifolia Carrière) and ash (Fraxinus mandshurica var. japonica Rupr.); mid-successional species, basswood (Tilia japonica (Miq.) Simonk.) and elm (Ulmus davidiana var. japonica (Rehd.) Nakai); and the late-successional species, maple (Acer mono Bunge). All but maple initiated leaf unfolding from the lower part of the crown. The [CO2] within the vertical profile ranged from 320-350 ppm in the upper canopy to 405-560 ppm near the ground. The lowest and highest ambient [CO2] occurred during the day and during the night, respectively. This trend was observed consistently during the summer, but not when trees were leafless. Chlorophyll concentration was positively related to maximum photosynthetic rate within, but not among, species. Leaf senescence started from the inner part of the crown in alder and birch, but started either in the outer or top portion of the canopy of ash, basswood and maple. Chlorophyll (Chl) to nitrogen ratio in leaves increased with decreasing photon flux density. However, Chl b concentration in all species remained stable until the beginning of leaf senescence. Maximum photosynthetic rates observed in sun leaves of early successional species, gap phase or mid-successional species, and late successional species were 12.5-14.8 micromol m(-2) s(-1), 4.1-7.8 micromol

  19. [Research on source profile of aerosol organic compounds in leather plant].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo-Guang; Zhou, Yan; Feng, Zhi-Cheng; Liu, Hui-Xuan

    2009-04-15

    Through investigating current air pollution condition for PM10 in every factories of different style leather plants in Pearl River Delta, characteristic profile of semi-volatile organic compounds in PM10 emitted from leather factories and their contents were researched by using ultrasonic and gas chromatography and mass spectrum technology. The 6 types of organic compounds containing 46 species in total were found in the collected samples, including phenyl compounds, alcohols, PAHs, acids, esters and amides. The concentrations of PM10 in leather tanning plant, leather dying plant and man-made leather plant were 678.5, 454.5, 498.6 microgm x m(-3) respectively, and concentration of organic compounds in PM10 were 10.04, 6.89, 14.21 microg x m(-3) in sequence. The more important type of pollutants in each leather plants had higher contribution to total organic mass as follows, esters and amides in tanning plants profile account for 43.47% and 36.51% respectively; esters and alcohols in dying plants profiles account for 52.52% and 16.16% respectively; esters and amide in man-made leather plant have the highest content and account for 57.07% and 24.17% respectively. In the aerosol organic source profiles of tested leather plants, 9-octadecenamide was the abundant important species with the weight of 26.15% in tanning plant, and Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate was up to 44.19% in the dying plant, and Bis(2-ethylhexyl) maleate and 1-hydroxy-piperidine had obviously higher weight in man-made plant than the other two plants.

  20. Constraining Early Cenozoic exhumation of the British Isles with vertical profile modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doepke, Daniel; Cogné, Nathan; Chew, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite decades of research is the Early Cenozoic exhumation history of Ireland and Britain still poorly understood and subject to contentious debate (e.g., Davis et al., 2012 and subsequent comments). One reason for this debate is the difficultly of constraining the evolution of onshore parts of the British Isles in both time and space. The paucity of Mesozoic and Cenozoic onshore outcrops makes direct analysis of this time span difficult. Furthermore, Ireland and Britain are situated at a passive margin, where the amount of post-rift exhumation is generally very low. Classical thermochronological tools are therefore near the edge of their resolution and make precise dating of post-rift cooling events challenging. In this study we used the established apatite fission track and (U-Th-Sm)/He techniques, but took advantage of the vertical profile approach of Gallagher et al. (2005) implemented in the QTQt modelling package (Gallagher, 2012), to better constrain the thermal histories. This method allowed us to define the geographical extent of a Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary cooling event and to show that it was centered around the Irish Sea. Thus, we argue that this cooling event is linked to the underplating of hot material below the crust centered on the Irish Sea (Jones et al., 2002; Al-Kindi et al., 2003), and demonstrate that such conclusion would have been harder, if not impossible, to draw by modelling the samples individually without the use of the vertical profile approach. References Al-Kindi, S., White, N., Sinha, M., England, R., and Tiley, R., 2003, Crustal trace of a hot convective sheet: Geology, v. 31, no. 3, p. 207-210. Davis, M.W., White, N.J., Priestley, K.F., Baptie, B.J., and Tilmann, F.J., 2012, Crustal structure of the British Isles and its epeirogenic consequences: Geophysical Journal International, v. 190, no. 2, p. 705-725. Jones, S.M., White, N., Clarke, B.J., Rowley, E., and Gallagher, K., 2002, Present and past influence of the Iceland

  1. Vertical AMS variation within basalt flow profiles from the Xitle volcano (Mexico) as indicator of heterogeneous strain in lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Miranda, C. I.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; González-Rangel, J. A.; Gogitchaishvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Kontny, A.

    2016-02-01

    The within-flow vertical variation of anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of three basaltic flow profiles from the Xitle volcano were investigated in relation to the lava flow-induced shear strain. Rock magnetic properties and opaque microscopy studies have shown that the magnetic mineralogy is dominated by Ti-poor magnetite with subtle vertical variations in grain size distribution: PSD grains dominate in a thin bottommost zone, and from base to top from PSD-MD to PSD-SD grains are found. The vertical variation of AMS principal direction patterns permitted identification of two to three main lava zones, some subdivided into subzones. The lower zone is very similar in all profiles with the magnetic foliation dipping toward the flow source, whereas the upper zone has magnetic foliation dipping toward the flow direction or alternates between dipping against and toward the flow direction. The K1 (maximum AMS axis) directions tend to be mostly parallel to the flow direction in both zones. The middle zone shows AMS axes diverging among profiles. We present heterogeneous strain ellipse distribution models for different flow velocities assuming similar viscosity to explain the AMS directions and related parameters of each zone. Irregular vertical foliations and transverse to flow lineation of a few samples at the bottommost and topmost part of profiles suggest SD inverse fabric, levels of intense friction, or degassing effects in AMS orientations.

  2. Temperatures and aerosol opacities of the Mars atmosphere at aphelion: Validation and inter-comparison of limb sounding profiles from MRO/MCS and MGS/TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, James H.; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Kass, David M.; Kleinböhl, Armin; Schofield, John T.; Heavens, Nicholas G.; McCleese, Daniel J.; Benson, Jennifer; Hinson, David P.; Bandfield, Joshua L.

    2015-05-01

    are dissimilar; TES profiles exhibit colder temperatures when TES water ice opacities are greater than those observed by MCS. Our comparisons reveal a possible systematic offset of TES and MCS temperatures at the highest altitudes resolved in the TES retrievals; TES temperatures are consistently colder than the corresponding MCS temperatures at pressures ⩽ 1 Pa (altitudes ⩾ 58 km). We otherwise find no evidence of systematic bias between TES limb sounding and MCS retrieved atmospheric quantities between 610 Pa and 1 Pa. Inter-annual variability is noted in comparisons of latitudinal temperature gradients from 55 to 70°N, in the amplitude of inversions linked with thermal tides in the middle atmosphere, and in the abundance and vertical distribution of water ice aerosols from 55 to 70°N during the aphelion season.

  3. Relating Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth in the Summertime Continental Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Attwood, A. R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Brown, S. S.; McComiskey, A. C.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Carlton, A. G.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), the column-integrated ambient aerosol light extinction, is determined from satellite and ground-based remote sensing measurements. AOD is the parameter most often used to validate earth system model simulations of aerosol mass. Relating aerosol mass to AOD, however, is problematic due to issues including aerosol water uptake as a function of relative humidity (RH) and the complicated relationship between aerosol physicochemical properties and light extinction. Measurements of aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical properties help to constrain the relationship between aerosol mass and optical depth because aerosol extinction at ambient RH is a function of the abundance, composition and size distribution of the aerosol. We use vertical profiles of humidity and dry aerosol extinction observed in the southeastern United States (U.S.) to examine the relationship between submicron aerosol mass concentration and extinction at ambient RH. We show that the κ-Köhler parameterization directly, and without additional Mie calculations, describes the change in extinction with varying RH as a function of composition for both aged aerosols typical of the polluted summertime continental boundary layer and the biomass burning aerosols we encountered. We calculate how AOD and the direct radiative effect in the eastern U.S. have likely changed due to trends in aerosol composition in recent decades. We also examine the sensitivity of AOD to the RH profile and to aerosol composition, size distribution and abundance.

  4. Smooth and Vertical Profile Dry Etching of Si Using XeF2 Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro; Ohtsuki, Hideo; Koyama, Fumio

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrated the discharge of XeF2 plasma and investigated the dry etching process of Si using XeF2 plasma. A vertical etching profile and a smooth etched surface, which satisfy the requirements for optical device fabrication, were obtained. The etching rate of Si was 0.7 µm/min at 1 Pa and 100 W. It was found that the RF power dependences of the emission intensities of Xe, F, and XeF were similar to that of the etching rate of Si. The etching rate ratio of Si to SiO2 in the XeF2 plasma etching process was approximately 10, which was much larger than that in the CF4/O2 plasma etching process. We believe that XeF2 plasma etching is a very simple and useful process for Si-based optical devices such as photonic crystals, narrow optical waveguides, and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabrication.

  5. Optimization of the vertical flight profile on the flight management system for green aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix Patron, Roberto Salvador

    To reduce aircraft's fuel consumption, a new method to calculate flight trajectories to be implemented in commercial Flight Management Systems has been developed. The aircraft's model was obtained from a flight performance database, which included experimental flight data. The optimized trajectories for three different commercial aircraft have been analyzed and developed in this thesis. To obtain the optimal flight trajectory that reduces the global flight cost, the vertical and the LNAV profiles have been studied and analyzed to find the aircraft's available speeds, possible flight altitudes and alternative horizontal trajectories that could reduce the global fuel consumption. A dynamic weather model has been implemented to improve the precision of the algorithm. This weather model calculates the speed and direction of wind, and the outside air temperature from a public weather database. To reduce the calculation time, different time-optimization algorithms have been implemented, such as the Golden Section search method, and different types of genetic algorithms. The optimization algorithm calculates the aircraft trajectory considering the departure and arrival airport coordinates, the aircraft parameters, the in-flight restrictions such as speeds, altitudes and WPs. The final output is given in terms of the flight time, fuel consumption and global flight cost of the complete flight. To validate the optimization algorithm results, the software FlightSIM RTM has been used. This software considers a complete aircraft aerodynamic model for its simulations, giving results that are accurate and very close to reality.

  6. Vertical profiles of pollutant gases measured with passive DOAS in the Po Valley devoted to satellite and chemical model data comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masieri, S.; Petritoli, A.; Kostadinov, I.; Bortoli, D.; Premuda, M.; Ravegnani, F.; Giovanelli, G.

    2009-04-01

    whose profile depends strongly on altitude [7][8]. Due to this it is also possible gain information about the atmospheric aerosol profile to set better the parameters in AMF Calculation, and then retrieve gas concentration's profiles. The NO2 concentrations measured were in the range of 0.5-25 ppb, as we expect for summer periods in rural area. GAMES (Gas Aerosol Modelling Evaluation System) model [9] was used in this work to have a reference about vertical distribution of gases (the model provides concentration profiles along 4km of altitude, with 11 growing thickness levels). Result of comparison with profile caculate by the model and profile calulate by the Multi-axis DOAS technique, is presented and then it is compared with Satellite column retrieved (with our satellite Data processor) from SCIAMACHY sensor (onboard on ENVISAT platform) and (directly NO2 Tropospheric Vertical Column provided by KNMI) from OMI (onboard on AURA platform). Good agreements between used series are shown and improvements for this methodology are discussed. One month of measurement has been taken in consideration starting from 15 May to 15 June of 2007. Vertical structure of most important trace gases calculated with model has strong correlation with the off-axis DOAS one (in some cases with R2=0,8), so better understanding of profiles and chemistry behaviour can be studied. The experience acquired within QUITSAT activity appears valuable contribution for enlargement of the DOAS applications what concern atmospheric chemistry studies, operative monitoring of the air quality over regional scale as well as satellite data validation. Deployed approaches are not restricted to NO2 but could be applied to other gases e.g. ozone, formaldehyde etc.. Key words: Off axis DOAS, NO2, CTM, AMF, gas profiles, satellite data validation, 1 2. BIBLIOGRAPHY [1] F. Evangelisti, A. Baroncelli, P. Bonasoni, G. Giovanelli, And F. Ravegnani, "Differential optical absorption spectrometer for measurement of

  7. Comparison of Aerosol Backscatter and Extinction Profiles Based on the Earlinet Database and the Single Calculus Chain for Thessaloniki Greece (2001-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voudouri, K.; Siomos, N.; Giannakaki, E.; Amiridis, V.; d'Amico, G.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles derived by the Single Calculus Chain (SCC) algorithm, which was developed within the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) are compared with profiles derived by the operational inversion algorithm of Thessaloniki. Measurements performed during the period 2001-2014, that have already been uploaded in the EARLINET database, are considered in this study. The objective of this study is to verify, for the case of Thessaloniki, the consistency of the climatology of the aerosol profiles based on SCC and the EARLINET database data respectively. In this paper we show example comparisons for each lidar product submitted in the official database.

  8. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to heavily underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model's low bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ˜ 2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day-1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond differently

  9. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day-1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond differently

  10. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2016-01-18

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to heavily underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model's low bias is due to aerosol extinctions below  ∼  2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over Southmore » Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to −0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and

  11. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to heavily underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model's low bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to

  12. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2015-06-19

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AOD and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond

  13. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2015-06-19

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AODmore » and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day−1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond

  14. Aerosol Lidar and MODIS Satellite Comparisons for Future Aerosol Loading Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell; Szykman, James; Severance, Kurt; Chu, D. Allen; Rosen, Rebecca; Al-Saadi, Jassim

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the concentration and distribution of atmospheric aerosols using both airborne lidar and satellite instruments is a field of active research. An aircraft based aerosol lidar has been used to study the distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the California Central Valley and eastern US coast. Concurrently, satellite aerosol retrievals, from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, were take over the Central Valley. The MODIS Level 2 aerosol data product provides retrieved ambient aerosol optical properties (e.g., optical depth (AOD) and size distribution) globally over ocean and land at a spatial resolution of 10 km. The Central Valley topography was overlaid with MODIS AOD (5x5 sq km resolution) and the aerosol scattering vertical profiles from a lidar flight. Backward air parcel trajectories for the lidar data show that air from the Pacific and northern part of the Central Valley converge confining the aerosols to the lower valley region and below the mixed layer. Below an altitude of 1 km, the lidar aerosol and MODIS AOD exhibit good agreement. Both data sets indicate a high presence of aerosols near Bakersfield and the Tehachapi Mountains. These and other results to be presented indicate that the majority of the aerosols are below the mixed layer such that the MODIS AOD should correspond well with surface measurements. Lidar measurements will help interpret satellite AOD retrievals so that one day they can be used on a routine basis for prediction of boundary layer aerosol pollution events.

  15. Moving Toward Continuous Satellite Monitoring of PM2.5 Using the GOES Aerosol/Smoke Product (GASP) and Aircraft Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, J. W.; Kondragunta, S.; Anderson, D. C.; Arkinson, H.; Brent, L. C.; Goldberg, D.; He, H.; Liaskos, C.; Ring, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Carpenter, S.; Ciren, P.; Xu, C.

    2012-12-01

    The NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) makes measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) every 30 minutes during daylight hours. Those measurements then feed the Automated Smoke Detection and Tracking algorithm that uses fire counts, trajectory modeling and pattern recognition to identify fire plumes, especially in the western U.S. Tying these satellite measurements to surface measurements of fine particles (PM2.5) would be a considerable benefit to the air quality community and to people who live in areas with elevated fine particle concentrations. Currently, these retrievals are useful in identifying areas of elevated PM2.5 concentrations and in forecasting PM2.5 by federal, state and local agencies, but are largely limited to qualitative measures of fine particle loading. Among other issues, layers of fine particles well above ground level, cloud contamination, and particle growth by addition of water in areas of high relative humidity are examples of barriers to a direct relationship between surface PM2.5 and satellite AOD. We have identified a path forward by using aircraft profiles to determine the vertical distribution of aerosol scattering in the atmosphere. In addition, long-term measurements of scattering and rapid measurements of PM2.5 at ground-based field sites have provided a relationship between scattering and mass. Simultaneous measurements of relative humidity and temperature allow one to calculate scattering the particles would have in a dry environment and relate that to fine particle mass measurements. A relationship between rapid scattering measurements and much slower PM2.5 mass measurements is then developed, which is used to tie rapid aircraft measurements of scattering to mass. In turn, aircraft profiles are then used to tie column measurements to those at the ground and to identify cases when satellite retrievals are likely to fail. The resulting algorithm should apply throughout much of the eastern U.S., so long

  16. Ground-based Measurements of Vertical Profiles and Columns of Atmospheric Trace Gases Over Toronto Using a New High-Resolution Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiacek, A.; Yashcov, D.; Strong, K.; Boudreau, L.; Rochette, L.; Roy, C.

    2002-12-01

    The University of Toronto Atmospheric Observatory (TAO) has recently been established at Toronto, Canada. TAO includes several instruments, with a DA8 Fourier Transform Spectrometer (DA8 FTS, manufactured by ABB Bomem Inc., Québec, Canada) serving as the primary instrument at the facility. The geographic position of TAO (43.66°N, 79.40°W) makes it well suited for long-term measurements of mid-latitude stratospheric ozone and related species, while its urban setting enables measurements of tropospheric pollution. The DA8 FTS is based on a Michelson interferometer with a maximum optical path difference of 250 cm, providing a maximum unapodized resolution of 0.0026 cm-1. It is currently equipped with KBr and CaF2 beamsplitters, and InSb and HgCdTe detectors, for coverage of the spectral range from 700 to 4100 cm-1. A new heliostat (manufactured by Aim Controls Inc., California, USA) provides active solar tracking, collecting the incoming solar radiation and directing it into the FTS. The TAO DA8 FTS incorporates a new optical design recently developed by ABB Bomem Inc., which results in a fixed optical axis through the beamsplitter (and a fixed focal point on the detector) as well as a more stable modulation efficiency. The new instrument optics will be discussed. Next, the performance of the instrument will be examined in the context of standard NDSC (Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change) trace gas column and vertical profile retrieval techniques, which use least squares fitting algorithms (SFIT, SFIT2). TAO has been operational (weather permitting) since October 2001. We have been retrieving columns and vertical profiles of HCl, HF, CH4, OCS, C2H6, CO, N2O and NO2 since May 2002. A detailed error analysis of retrieved columns and vertical profiles has been undertaken for the above species. Future plans for the TAO FTS include comparing our measurements with satellite measurements made by MOPITT, OSIRIS, and the upcoming ACE and MAESTRO instruments

  17. Sensitivity Analysis on Fu-Liou-Gu Radiative Transfer Model for different lidar aerosol and cloud profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, Simone; Madonna, Fabio; Rosoldi, Marco; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol and cloud impact on climate change is evaluated in terms of enhancement or reduction of the radiative energy, or heat, available in the atmosphere and at the Earth's surface, from the surface (SFC) to the Top Of the Atmosphere (TOA) covering a spectral range from the UV (extraterrestrial shortwave solar radiation) to the far-IR (outgoing terrestrial longwave radiation). Systematic Lidar network measurements from permanent observational sites across the globe are available from the beginning of this current millennium. From the retrieved lidar atmospheric extinction profiles, inputted in the Fu-Liou-Gu (FLG) Radiative Transfer code, it is possible to evaluate the net radiative effect and heating rate of the different aerosol species and clouds. Nevertheless, the lidar instruments may use different techniques (elastic lidar, Raman lidar, multi-wavelength lidar, etc) that translate into uncertainty of the lidar extinction retrieval. The goal of this study is to assess, applying a MonteCarlo technique and the FLG Radiative Transfer model, the sensitivity in calculating the net radiative effect and heating rate of aerosols and clouds for the different lidar techniques, using both synthetic and real lidar data. This sensitivity study is the first step to implement an automatic algorithm to retrieve the net radiative forcing effect of aerosols and clouds from the long records of aerosol measurements available in the frame of EARLINET and MPLNET lidar networks.

  18. Holistic aerosol evaluation using synthesized aerosol aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson-Parris, Duncan; Reddington, Carly; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip; Carslaw, Ken; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Despite ongoing efforts there are still large uncertainties in aerosol concentrations and loadings across many commonly used GCMs. This in turn leads to large uncertainties in the contributions of the direct and indirect aerosol forcing on climate. However, constraining these fields using earth observation data, although providing global coverage, is problematic for many reasons, including the large uncertainties in retrieving aerosol loadings. Additionally, the inability to retrieve aerosols in or around cloudy scenes leads to further sampling biases (Gryspeerdt 2015). Many in-situ studies have used regional datasets to attempt to evaluate the model uncertainties, but these are unable to provide an assessment of the models ability to represent aerosols properties on a global scale. Within the Global Aerosol Synthesis and Science Project (GASSP) we have assembled the largest collection of quality controlled, in-situ aircraft observations ever synthesized to a consistent format. This provides a global set of in-situ measurements of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Black Carbon (BC), amongst others. In particular, the large number of vertical profiles provided by this aircraft data allows us to investigate the vertical structure of aerosols across a wide range of regions and environments. These vertical distributions are particularly valuable when investigating the dominant processes above or below clouds where remote sensing data is not available. Here we present initial process-based assessments of the BC lifetimes and vertical distributions of CCN in the HadGEM-UKCA and ECHAM-HAM models using this data. We use point-by-point based comparisons to avoid the sampling issues associated with comparing spatio-temporal aggregations.

  19. Stratospheric aerosols and climatic change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, B.; Pollack, J. B.; Summers, A.; Toon, O. B.; Sagan, C.; Van Camp, W.

    1976-01-01

    Generated primarily by volcanic explosions, a layer of submicron silicate particles and particles made of concentrated sulfuric acids solution is present in the stratosphere. Flights through the stratosphere may be a future source of stratospheric aerosols, since the effluent from supersonic transports contains sulfurous gases (which will be converted to H2SO4) while the exhaust from Space Shuttles contains tiny aluminum oxide particles. Global heat balance calculations have shown that the stratospheric aerosols have made important contributions to some climatic changes. In the present paper, accurate radiative transfer calculations of the globally-averaged surface temperature (T) are carried out to estimate the sensitivity of the climate to changes in the number of stratospheric aerosols. The results obtained for a specified model atmosphere, including a vertical profile of the aerosols, indicate that the climate is unlikely to be affected by supersonic transports and Space Shuttles, during the next decades.

  20. Demonstration of Aerosol Property Profiling by Multiwavelength Lidar Under Varying Relative Humidity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veselovskii, I.; Whiteman, D. N.; Kolgotin, A.; Andrews, E.; Korenskii, M.

    2009-01-01

    During the months of July-August 2007 NASA conducted a research campaign called the Tropical Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment. Vertical profiles of ozone were measured daily using an instrument known as an ozonesonde, which is attached to a weather balloon and launch to altitudes in excess of 30 km. These ozone profiles were measured over coastal Las Tablas, Panama (7.8N, 80W) and several times per week at Alajuela, Costa Rica (ION, 84W). Meteorological systems in the form of waves, detected most prominently in 100-300 in thick ozone layer in the tropical tropopause layer, occurred in 50% (Las Tablas) and 40% (Alajuela) of the soundings. These layers, associated with vertical displacements and classified as gravity waves ("GW," possibly Kelvin waves), occur with similar stricture and frequency over the Paramaribo (5.8N, 55W) and San Cristobal (0.925, 90W) sites of the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) network. The gravity wave labeled layers in individual soundings correspond to cloud outflow as indicated by the tracers measured from the NASA DC-8 and other aircraft data, confirming convective initiation of equatorial waves. Layers representing quasi-horizontal displacements, referred to as Rossby waves, are robust features in soundings from 23 July to 5 August. The features associated with Rossby waves correspond to extra-tropical influence, possibly stratospheric, and sometimes to pollution transport. Comparison of Las Tablas and Alajuela ozone budgets with 1999-2007 Paramaribo and San Cristobal soundings shows that TC4 is typical of climatology for the equatorial Americas. Overall during TC4, convection and associated meteorological waves appear to dominate ozone transport in the tropical tropopause layer.

  1. Comparing the cloud vertical structure derived from several methods based on radiosonde profiles and ground-based remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Surós, M.; Calbó, J.; González, J. A.; Long, C. N.

    2014-08-01

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, are important characteristics in order to describe the impact of clouds on climate. In this work, several methods for estimating the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering the number and position of cloud layers, with a ground-based system that is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ in the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study, these methods are applied to 193 radiosonde profiles acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of the year 2009 and endorsed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The perfect agreement (i.e., when the whole CVS is estimated correctly) for the methods ranges between 26 and 64%; the methods show additional approximate agreement (i.e., when at least one cloud layer is assessed correctly) from 15 to 41%. Further tests and improvements are applied to one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low-resolution vertical profiles, like those from the outputs of reanalysis methods or from the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Global Telecommunication System. The perfect agreement, even when using low-resolution profiles, can be improved by up to 67% (plus 25% of the approximate agreement) if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  2. Application of a new vertical profiling tool (ESASS) for sampling groundwater quality during hollow-stem auger drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Flanagan, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    A new tool called ESASS (Enhanced Screen Auger Sampling System) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The use of ESASS, because of its unique U.S. patent design (U.S. patent no. 7,631,705 B1), allows for the collection of representative, depth-specific groundwater samples (vertical profiling) in a quick and efficient manner using a 0.305-m long screen auger during hollow-stem auger drilling. With ESASS, the water column in the flights above the screen auger is separated from the water in the screen auger by a specially designed removable plug and collar. The tool fits inside an auger of standard inner diameter (82.55 mm). The novel design of the system constituted by the plug, collar, and A-rod allows the plug to be retrieved using conventional drilling A-rods. After retrieval, standard-diameter (50.8 mm) observation wells can be installed within the hollow-stem augers. Testing of ESASS was conducted at one waste-disposal site with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination and at two reference sites with no known waste-disposal history. All three sites have similar geology and are underlain by glacial, stratified-drift deposits. For the applications tested, ESASS proved to be a useful tool in vertical profiling of groundwater quality. At the waste site, PCE concentrations measured with ESASS profiling at several depths were comparable (relative percent difference <25%) to PCE concentrations sampled from wells. Vertical profiling with ESASS at the reference sites illustrated the vertical resolution achievable in the profile system; shallow groundwater quality varied by a factor of five in concentration of some constituents (nitrate and nitrite) over short (0.61 m) distances. Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation ?? 2011, National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  3. Application of a new vertical profiling tool (ESASS) for sampling groundwater quality during hollow-stem auger drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.; Flanagan, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    A new tool called ESASS (Enhanced Screen Auger Sampling System) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The use of ESASS, because of its unique U.S. patent design (U.S. patent no. 7,631,705 B1), allows for the collection of representative, depth-specific groundwater samples (vertical profiling) in a quick and efficient manner using a 0.305-m long screen auger during hollow-stem auger drilling. With ESASS, the water column in the flights above the screen auger is separated from the water in the screen auger by a specially designed removable plug and collar. The tool fits inside an auger of standard inner diameter (82.55 mm). The novel design of the system constituted by the plug, collar, and A-rod allows the plug to be retrieved using conventional drilling A-rods. After retrieval, standard-diameter (50.8 mm) observation wells can be installed within the hollow-stem augers. Testing of ESASS was conducted at one waste-disposal site with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination and at two reference sites with no known waste-disposal history. All three sites have similar geology and are underlain by glacial, stratified-drift deposits. For the applications tested, ESASS proved to be a useful tool in vertical profiling of groundwater quality. At the waste site, PCE concentrations measured with ESASS profiling at several depths were comparable (relative percent difference <25%) to PCE concentrations sampled from wells. Vertical profiling with ESASS at the reference sites illustrated the vertical resolution achievable in the profile system; shallow groundwater quality varied by a factor of five in concentration of some constituents (nitrate and nitrite) over short (0.61 m) distances.

  4. Numerical simulation of advection fog formation on multi-disperse aerosols due to combustion-related pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of multi-disperse distribution of the aerosol population are presented. Single component and multi-component aerosol species on the condensation/nucleation processes which affect the reduction in visibility are described. The aerosol population with a high particle concentration provided more favorable conditions for the formation of a denser fog than the aerosol population with a greater particle size distribution when the value of the mass concentration of the aerosols was kept constant. The results were used as numerical predictions of fog formation. Two dimensional observations in horizontal and vertical coordinates, together with time-dependent measurements were needed as initial values for the following physical parameters: (1)wind profiles; (2) temperature profiles; (3) humidity profiles; (4) mass concentration of aerosol particles; (5) particle size distribution of aerosols; and (6) chemical composition of aerosols. Formation and dissipation of advection fog, thus, can be forecasted numerically by introducing initial values obtained from the observations.

  5. Vertical profile and components of marine planktonic archaea in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Oceean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, S.; Amano (Sato), C.; Uchida, M.; Utsumi, M.

    2011-12-01

    Ocean was carried out during a cruise, with R/V Mirai from September to October 2008 (MR08-04). We focused on 3 stations located in Mendeleyev Ridge, Northwind Ridge and Canada Basin. CARD-FISH and clone library techniques targeted on archaeal specific 16S rRNA gene were used to investigate vertical profile of marine planktonic archaeal abundance and characterize their community structure. The results showed that their community structure comprised Group I Crenarchaeota, Group II, III and IV Euryarchaeota. Group I Crenarchaeota outnumbered Group II Euryarchaeota through the water column (0.0064-2.5 x 104 and 0.0038-1.3 x 104 cells/mL, respectively). Although their abundance decreased exponentially with depth, Group I Crenarchaeota relative abundance of the toltal bacteria were high in > 200 m depth at all station. Besides, Group III Euryarchaeota sequences were more frequently detected than other oceans (24 of 115 sequences; 20.9%). It could be said that Group III Euryarchaeota is more predominant in this ocean. Moreover, it was observed that vertical profile of their abundance and components were different depending on the stations and depth.

  6. Aerosol Profile Measurements from the NASA Langley Research Center Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, John W.; Roers, Raymond R.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Since achieving first light in December of 2005, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) has been involved in seven field campaigns, accumulating over 450 hours of science data across more than 120 flights. Data from the instrument have been used in a variety of studies including validation and comparison with the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite mission, aerosol property retrievals combining passive and active instrument measurements, aerosol type identification, aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud top and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height determinations. Measurements and lessons learned from the HSRL are leading towards next-generation HSRL instrument designs that will enable even further studies of aerosol intensive and extensive parameters and the effects of aerosols on the climate system. This paper will highlight several of the areas in which the NASA Airborne HSRL is making contributions to climate science.

  7. The effects of increasing atmospheric ozone on biogenic monoterpene profiles and the formation of secondary aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Delia M.; Tiiva, Päivi; Miettinen, Pasi; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Kokkola, Harri; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Laaksonen, Ari; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    Monoterpenes are biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) which play an important role in plant adaptation to stresses, atmospheric chemistry, plant-plant and plant-insect interactions. In this study, we determined whether ozonolysis can influence the monoterpenes in the headspace of cabbage. The monoterpenes were mixed with an air-flow enriched with 100, 200 or 400 ppbv of ozone (O 3) in a Teflon chamber. The changes in the monoterpene and O 3 concentrations, and the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) were determined during ozonolysis. Furthermore, the monoterpene reactions with O 3 and OH were modelled using reaction kinetics equations. The results showed that all of the monoterpenes were unequally affected: α-thujene, sabinene and D-limonene were affected to the greatest extend, whereas the 1,8-cineole concentration did not change. In addition, plant monoterpene emissions reduced the O 3 concentration by 12-24%. The SOA formation was dependent on O 3 concentration. At 100 ppbv of O 3, virtually no new particles were formed but clear SOA formation was observed at the higher ozone concentrations. The modelled results showed rather good agreements for α-pinene and 1,8-cineole, whereas the measured concentrations were clearly lower compared to modelled values for sabinene and limonene. In summary, O 3-quenching by monoterpenes occurs beyond the boundary layer of leaves and results in a decreased O 3 concentration, altered monoterpene profiles and SOA formation.

  8. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Menzel, W. Paul; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Gao, Bo-Cai; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Steven A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Pincus, Robert; Hubanks, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an earth-viewing sensor that flies on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively. MODIS scans a swath width of 2330 km that is sufficiently wide to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. MODIS provides images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 pm with spatial resolutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to en- able advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric properties. Twenty-six bands are used to derive atmospheric properties such as cloud mask, atmospheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties. In this paper we describe each of these atmospheric data products, including characteristics of each of these products such as file size, spatial resolution used in producing the product, and data availability.

  9. SAM II aerosol profile measurements, Poker Flat, Alaska; July 16-19, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Grams, G. W.; Herman, B. M.; Pepin, T. J.; Russell, P. B.; Swissler, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    SAM II satellite measurements during the July 1979 Poker Flat mission, yielded an aerosol extinction coefficient of 0.0004/km at 1.0 micron wavelength, in the region of the stratospheric aerosol mixing ratio peak (12-16 km). The stratospheric aerosol optical depth for these data, calculated from the tropopause through 30 km, is approximately 0.001. These results are consistent with the average 1979 summertime values found throughout the Arctic.

  10. LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles during the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kooi, S. A.; Butler, C. F.; Notari, A.; Hair, J. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Ismail, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field experiment, which was conducted during June-July 2015 over the central and southern plains. LASE is an active remote sensor that employs the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to measure range resolved profiles of water vapor and aerosols above and below the aircraft. The DC-8 conducted nine local science flights from June 30- July 14 where LASE sampled water vapor and aerosol fields in support of the PECAN primary science objectives relating to better understanding nocturnal Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs), Convective Initiation (CI), the Low Level Jet (LLJ), bores, and to compare different airborne and ground based measurements. LASE observed large spatial and temporal variability in water vapor and aerosol distributions in advance of nocturnal MCSs, across bores resulting from MCS outflow boundaries, and across the LLJ associated with the development of MCSs and CI. An overview of the LASE data collected during the PECAN field experiment will be presented where emphasis will be placed on variability of water vapor profiles in the vicinity of severe storms and intense convection in the central and southern plains. Preliminary comparisons show good agreement between coincident LASE and radiosonde water vapor profiles. In addition, an advanced water vapor DIAL system being developed at NASA Langley will be discussed.

  11. EFFECTS OF NITROGEN PHOTOABSORPTION CROSS SECTION RESOLUTION ON MINOR SPECIES VERTICAL PROFILES IN TITAN’S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mandt, K. E.; Greathouse, T. K.; Plessis, S.

    2015-03-01

    The significant variations in both measured and modeled densities of minor species in Titan’s atmosphere call for the evaluation of possible influencing factors in photochemical modeling. The effect of nitrogen photoabsorption cross section selection on the modeled vertical profiles of minor species is analyzed here, with particular focus on C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and HCN. Our results show a clear impact of cross sections used on all neutral and ion species studied. Affected species include neutrals and ions that are not primary photochemical products, including species that do not even contain nitrogen. The results indicate that photochemical models that employ low-resolution cross sections may significantly miscalculate the vertical profiles of minor species. Such differences are expected to have important implications for Titan’s overall atmospheric structure and chemistry.

  12. Ensemble-Based Assimilation of Aerosol Observations in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchard, V.; Da Silva, A.

    2016-01-01

    MERRA-2 is the latest Aerosol Reanalysis produced at NASA's Global Modeling Assimilation Office (GMAO) from 1979 to present. This reanalysis is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model radiatively coupled to GOCART aerosols and includes assimilation of bias corrected Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from AVHRR over ocean, MODIS sensors on both Terra and Aqua satellites, MISR over bright surfaces and AERONET data. In order to assimilate lidar profiles of aerosols, we are updating the aerosol component of our assimilation system to an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) type of scheme using ensembles generated routinely by the meteorological assimilation. Following the work performed with the first NASA's aerosol reanalysis (MERRAero), we first validate the vertical structure of MERRA-2 aerosol assimilated fields using CALIOP data over regions of particular interest during 2008.

  13. Local fluctuations of ozone from 16 km to 45 km deduced from in situ vertical ozone profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreau, G.; Robert, C.

    1994-01-01

    A vertical ozone profile obtained by an in situ ozone sonde from 16 km to 45 km, has allowed to observe local ozone concentration variations. These variations can be observed, thanks to a fast measurement system based on a UV absorption KrF excimer laser beam in a multipass cell. Ozone standard deviation versus altitude calculated from the mean is derived. Ozone variations or fluctuations are correlated with the different dynamic zones of the stratosphere.

  14. Vertical profiles of ozone, VOCs and meteorological parameters in within and outside of Mexico City during the MILAGRO field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, C.; Greenberg, J.; Bueno, E.; Bernabe, R.; Aguilar, J.; Blanco, S.; Wöhrnschimmel, H.; Guenther, A.; Cardenas, B.; Turnipseed, A.

    2007-05-01

    High ozone levels with maxima over 250 ppb have been an air quality problem in Mexico City for more than a decade. This ozone is produced in the daytime by photochemical reactions, initiated by its precursors, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of solar ultraviolet radiation. The objective of this work is to contribute to the understanding of the evolution of these air pollutants at different heights of the boundary layer by means of vertical profile measurements. Ozone, VOCs and meteorological vertical profiles were determined in Northern Mexico City (T0 site) using a tethered balloon for 10 days during the MILAGRO field Campaign 2006, between 4 AM and 4 PM. Measurements were done up to 1000 meter above ground (ozone and meteorological parameters) and up to 200 m above ground for VOCs. VOCs samples were collected during 4 minutes in canisters and analyzed with GC-FID to identify 13 species (ethane, propane, propylene, butane, acetylene, pentane, hexane, heptane, benzene, octane, toluene, nonane and o-xylene). For 4 of the days, VOC integrated samples were also taken using personal pumps and absorbent cartridges at height between 200 and 1000 m. Sample cartridges were analyzed by GC-MS for volatile organic compounds (n-butane, i-pentane, n- pentane, benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, o-xylene, m&p-xylene, 1,2,4-tri-methyl-benzene and C3-benzenes). Ozone vertical profiles, frequently presented high concentrations above 400 m in the early morning. During the daytime, more homogeneous profiles indicate an increased vertical mixing. VOCs profiles show similar concentrations for all heights at dawn. In the morning, highest concentrations were determined at a height of about 100 meter, whereas at noon and in the afternoon concentrations decreased with height. Comparing VOC concentrations during the course of a day, highest values are measured in the morning. The highest VOC concentrations were propane, butane, and toluene. For some

  15. Retrieval of carbon dioxide vertical profiles from solar occultation observations and associated error budgets for ACE-FTS and CASS-FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sioris, C. E.; Boone, C. D.; Nassar, R.; Sutton, K. J.; Gordon, I. E.; Walker, K. A.; Bernath, P. F.

    2014-07-01

    An algorithm is developed to retrieve the vertical profile of carbon dioxide in the 5 to 25 km altitude range using mid-infrared solar occultation spectra from the main instrument of the ACE (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment) mission, namely the Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The main challenge is to find an atmospheric phenomenon which can be used for accurate tangent height determination in the lower atmosphere, where the tangent heights (THs) calculated from geometric and timing information are not of sufficient accuracy. Error budgets for the retrieval of CO2 from ACE-FTS and the FTS on a potential follow-on mission named CASS (Chemical and Aerosol Sounding Satellite) are calculated and contrasted. Retrieved THs have typical biases of 60 m relative to those retrieved using the ACE version 3.x software after revisiting the temperature dependence of the N2 CIA (collision-induced absorption) laboratory measurements and accounting for sulfate aerosol extinction. After correcting for the known residual high bias of ACE version 3.x THs expected from CO2 spectroscopic/isotopic inconsistencies, the remaining bias for tangent heights determined with the N2 CIA is -20 m. CO2 in the 5-13 km range in the 2009-2011 time frame is validated against aircraft measurements from CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container), CONTRAIL (Comprehensive Observation Network for Trace gases by Airline), and HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations), yielding typical biases of -1.7 ppm in the 5-13 km range. The standard error of these biases in this vertical range is 0.4 ppm. The multi-year ACE-FTS data set is valuable in determining the seasonal variation of the latitudinal gradient which arises from the strong seasonal cycle in the Northern Hemisphere troposphere. The annual growth of CO2 in this time frame is determined to be 2.6 ± 0.4 ppm year-1, in agreement with the currently accepted global growth rate based on

  16. Retrieval of Vertical LAI Profiles Over Tropical Rain Forests using Waveform Lidar at La Selva, Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Hao; Dubayah, Ralph; Swatantra, Anu; Hofton, Michelle; Sheldon, Sage; Clark, David B.; Blair, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the potential of waveform lidar in mapping the vertical and spatial distributions of leaf area index (LAI) over the tropical rain forest of La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Vertical profiles of LAI were derived at 0.3 m height intervals from the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) data using the Geometric Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) model. Cumulative LAI profiles obtained from LVIS were validated with data from 55 ground to canopy vertical transects using a modular field tower to destructively sample all vegetation. Our results showed moderate agreement between lidar and field derived LAI (r2=0.42, RMSE=1.91, bias=-0.32), which further improved when differences between lidar and tower footprint scales (r2=0.50, RMSE=1.79, bias=0.27) and distance of field tower from lidar footprint center (r2=0.63, RMSE=1.36, bias=0.0) were accounted for. Next, we mapped the spatial distribution of total LAI across the landscape and analyzed LAI variations over different land cover types. Mean values of total LAI were 1.74, 5.20, 5.41 and 5.62 over open pasture, secondary forests, regeneration forests after selective-logging and old-growth forests respectively. Lastly, we evaluated the sensitivities of our LAI retrieval model to variations in canopy/ground reflectance ratio and to waveform noise such as induced by topographic slopes. We found for both, that the effects were not significant for moderate LAI values (about 4). However model derivations of LAI might be inaccurate in areas of high-slope and high LAI (about 8) if ground return energies are low. This research suggests that large footprint waveform lidar can provide accurate vertical LAI profile estimates that do not saturate even at the high LAI levels in tropical rain forests and may be a useful tool for understanding the light transmittance within these canopies.

  17. Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

    2012-07-19

    The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

  18. Modified power law equations for vertical wind profiles. [in investigation of windpower plant siting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Richards, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    In an investigation of windpower plant siting, equations are presented and evaluated for a wind profile model which incorporates both roughness and wind speed effects, while retaining the basic simplicity of the Hellman power law. These equations recognize the statistical nature of wind profiles and are compatible with existing analytical models and recent wind profile data. Predictions of energy output based on the proposed profile equations are 10% to 20% higher than those made with the 1/7 power law. In addition, correlation between calculated and observed blade loads is significantly better at higher wind speeds when the proposed wind profile model is used than when a constant power model is used.

  19. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noersomadi; Tsuda, T.

    2016-02-01

    We retrieved temperature (T) profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI) method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20-27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt-Väisälä frequency squared (N2) near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs) with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total) potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO) retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p) for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a) 90-150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b) 170-230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30-50° N in region (a), and 50-70° N in region (b), which was related to the topography. At 30-50° N in region (b), EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to convective activity. The ratio of EpT to the

  20. OPTIM: Computer program to generate a vertical profile which minimizes aircraft fuel burn or direct operating cost. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A profile of altitude, airspeed, and flight path angle as a function of range between a given set of origin and destination points for particular models of transport aircraft provided by NASA is generated. Inputs to the program include the vertical wind profile, the aircraft takeoff weight, the costs of time and fuel, certain constraint parameters and control flags. The profile can be near optimum in the sense of minimizing: (1) fuel, (2) time, or (3) a combination of fuel and time (direct operating cost (DOC)). The user can also, as an option, specify the length of time the flight is to span. The theory behind the technical details of this program is also presented.

  1. Compact airborne Raman lidar for profiling aerosol, water vapor and clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Zhien; Cai, Yong; Wechsler, Perry; Kuestner, William; Burkhart, Matthew; Welch, Wayne

    2014-08-25

    A compact airborne Raman lidar system, which can perform water vapor and aerosol measurements both during nighttime and daytime is described. The system design, setup and the data processing methods are described in the paper. The Raman lidar was tested on University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft (UWKA) during the Wyoming King Air PBL Exploratory Experiment (KAPEE) in 2010. An observation showing clouds, aerosols and a dry line is presented to illustrate the lidar detection capabilities. Comparisons of the water vapor and aerosol measurements using the Raman lidar and other in situ airborne instruments show good agreement. PMID:25321266

  2. Compact airborne Raman lidar for profiling aerosol, water vapor and clouds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Zhien; Cai, Yong; Wechsler, Perry; Kuestner, William; Burkhart, Matthew; Welch, Wayne

    2014-08-25

    A compact airborne Raman lidar system, which can perform water vapor and aerosol measurements both during nighttime and daytime is described. The system design, setup and the data processing methods are described in the paper. The Raman lidar was tested on University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft (UWKA) during the Wyoming King Air PBL Exploratory Experiment (KAPEE) in 2010. An observation showing clouds, aerosols and a dry line is presented to illustrate the lidar detection capabilities. Comparisons of the water vapor and aerosol measurements using the Raman lidar and other in situ airborne instruments show good agreement.

  3. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  4. Stratospheric NO2 vertical profile retrieved from ground-based Zenith-Sky DOAS observations at Kiruna, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Hendrick, François; Pukite, Janis; Van Roozendael, Michel; Platt, Ulrich; Raffalski, Uwe; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Stratospheric NO2 destroys ozone and acts as a buffer against halogen-catalyzed ozone loss through the formation of reservoir species (ClONO2, BrONO2). Since the importance of both mechanisms depends on the altitude, the investigation of stratospheric NO2 vertical distribution can provide more insight into the role of nitrogen compounds in the destruction of ozone. Here we present stratospheric NO2 vertical profiles retrieved from twilight ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations at Kiruna, Sweden (68.84°N, 20.41°E) covering 1997 - 2013 periods. This instrument observes zenith scattered sunlight. The sensitivity for stratospheric trace gases is highest during twilight due to the maximum altitude of the scattering profile and the light path through the stratosphere, which vary with the solar zenith angle. The profiling algorithm, based on the Optimal Estimation Method, has been developed by IASB-BIRA and successfully applied at other stations (Hendrick et al., 2004). The basic principle behind this profiling approach is that during twilight, the mean Rayleigh scattering altitude scans the stratosphere rapidly, providing height-resolved information on the absorption by stratospheric NO2. In this study, the long-term evolution of the stratospheric NO2 profile at polar latitude will be investigated. Hendrick, F., B. Barret, M. Van Roozendael, H. Boesch, A. Butz, M. De Mazière, F. Goutail, C. Hermans, J.-C. Lambert, K. Pfeilsticker, and J.-P. Pommereau, Retrieval of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric profiles from ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible observations: Validation of the technique through correlative comparisons, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 4, 2091-2106, 2004

  5. Vertical Profile Measurements of Formaldehyde and NO2 by means of the CU Airborne Multi-Axis DOAS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetjen, H.; Baidar, S.; Coburn, S.; Ortega, I.; Dix, B. K.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The University of Colorado airborne multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument was operated on board the NOAA twin otter research aircraft to measure column abundances of reactive trace gases (e.g., NO2, formaldehyde, glyoxal, O4, BrO, and IO) during the CalNEx and CARES campaigns in California in May to July, 2010. Column observations of reactive trace gases provide means to bridge spatial scales between ground-based measurements, and satellite observations, and enable a more direct comparison with atmospheric models. However, the CU AMAX-DOAS features a novel telescope to collect scattered sunlight under discrete viewing angles providing the opportunity to obtain profile information of trace gases as well. This telescope was installed in a pylon pointing out of the side window of the aircraft and allows to flexibly scan most angles in front of the aircraft from the zenith to nadir geometry (only limited by the window openings in the pylon) as well as backwards down to about minus 20°. A motion compensation system is included to actively adjust the pointing of the telescope to compensate for aircraft angular movements in the vertical. Two spectrometers have been deployed covering wavelength ranges from 350-720 nm with a spectral resolution of ~2 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and 330-470 nm with 0.7 nm FWHM. The recorded spectra are analyzed with the well-known DOAS method to retrieve so-called slant column densities (SCDs) of absorbers. Sets of SCDs recorded at different viewing angles are converted into a vertical profile through experimentally constrained inverse modeling of radiative transfer. The angular scanning pattern of the telescope, as well as the flight plan was optimized to characterize the horizontal and vertical distribution of the trace gases. Especially, the variation of the flight altitude in combination with the scanning of different angles provides a powerful tool to obtain the detailed vertical

  6. Estimation of raindrop drop size distribution vertical profile from simultaneous micro rain radar and 2D video disdrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, Elisa; Baldini, Luca; Roberto, Nicoletta; Montopoli, Mario; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Gatlin, Patrick; Tokay, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Experimental field campaigns of rain precipitation usually require the coexistence of several ground and satellite based observations in order to guarantee a more complete analysis of the collected case studies at the various spatial and temporal scales of interest. In the framework of the Ground Validation programme of the NASAA/JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, several climate regions of the Earth have been interested by various field campaigns involving experimental setup which include one or more ground based disdrometers and profilers. In such situation a typical implementation of the measurement scheme consists of a pair of K-band vertically pointing micro rain radar (MRR) and a 2D video disdrometer (2DVD) installed close each other. Since 2DVD estimates are referred to the ground level, the co-located MRR is supposed to provide complementary vertical profiles of drop size distribution (DSD) measurements. However, if not properly processed MRR and 2DVD raw data can lead to erroneous interpretations of the underlying microphysics. In this work, we investigate some typical issues occurring when dealing with MRR and 2DVD observations proposing techniques to ensure the adequate data quality required in typical field validation campaigns. More in detail, MRR is an affordable continuous wave frequency-modulated radar (CWFM) typically used at vertical incidence. In the MMR configuration used, DSD profiles are estimated from Doppler spectra determined by drops falling at different velocities and at different heights from 1000 meters almost up to the ground level with a vertical resolution of 35 meters and time resolution up to 10 seconds. The importance of the microphysical measurements from MRR are related to the effects of the vertical gradients of rain precipitation at the sub-resolution scale of the measurements based remote sensing instruments such as those provided by the dual frequency radar of GPM as well as by ground based weather radars

  7. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  8. High resolution profiles of vertical particulate organic matter export off Cape Blanc, Mauritania: Degradation processes and ballasting effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iversen, Morten Hvitfeldt; Nowald, Nicolas; Ploug, Helle; Jackson, George A.; Fischer, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    Vertical carbon fluxes between the surface and 2500 m depth were estimated from in situ profiles of particle size distributions and abundances me/asured off Cape Blanc (Mauritania) related to deep ocean sediment traps. Vertical mass fluxes off Cape Blanc were significantly higher than recent global estimates in the open ocean. The aggregates off Cape Blanc contained high amounts of ballast material due to the presence of coccoliths and fine-grained dust from the Sahara desert, leading to a dominance of small and fast-settling aggregates. The largest changes in vertical fluxes were observed in the surface waters (<250 m), and, thus, showing this site to be the most important zone for aggregate formation and degradation. The degradation length scale ( L), i.e. the fractional degradation of aggregates per meter settled, was estimated from vertical fluxes derived from the particle size distribution through the water column. This was compared with fractional remineralization rate of aggregates per meter settled derived from direct ship-board measurements of sinking velocity and small-scale O 2 fluxes to aggregates measured by micro-sensors. Microbial respiration by attached bacteria alone could not explain the degradation of organic matter in the upper ocean. Instead, flux feeding from zooplankton organisms was indicated as the dominant degradation process of aggregated carbon in the surface ocean. Below the surface ocean, microbes became more important for the degradation as zooplankton was rare at these depths.

  9. Global Aerosol Distributions Derived From the CALIPSO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittaka, C.; Winker, D.; Omar, A.; Liu, Z.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C.

    2008-12-01

    Since June 2006, CALIPSO continues to provide routine and systematic measurements of lidar backscatter at two wavelengths, 532 and 1064 nm. As an active sensor, the quality of the measurement is nearly insensitive to surface properties allowing quantitative measurements in regions that are problematic to passive sensors. In particular, aerosol and cloud observations in the polar regions and desert areas are possible with the CALIPSO lidar through the different seasons of a year. The CALIPSO level 2 products, which include aerosol and cloud vertical profiles along tracks, reveal, for the first time, the multi-layer structure of aerosols and clouds on a global scale. This allows not only a depiction of aerosols in relation to clouds, but also the investigation of the interaction between aerosols and clouds. In this study, we present global distributions of aerosol in terms of season, layer height, aerosol species, and in relation to clouds using two years of CALIPSO observations. The CALIPSO aerosol extinction data sets under clear sky are evaluated against the AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the MODIS AOD collection 5 data sets. The agreement and discrepancies from these comparisons are characterized regionally and investigated using other CALIPSO observable and retrieved parameters. Furthermore, aerosols above clouds and in the vicinity of clouds are examined on a global scale. The implications for aerosol radiative forcing are discussed, highlighting the new and interesting aerosol features obtained from CALIPSO observations.

  10. Autonomous system for vertical profiling of the marine environment at a moored station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskii, A. G.; Zatsepin, A. G.; Soloviev, V. A.; Tsibulsky, A. L.; Shvoev, D. A.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents new results of the research and development project on the moored profiler Aqualog aimed at multidisciplinary studies and ecological monitoring of the marine environment. The data on the profiler's operation are summarized based upon the field experiments in the northeastern Black Sea in 2011. An important scientific result obtained by using the profiler during the experiments was the discovery of the countercurrent below the Black Sea Rim Current in the layer between the 500 m and 900 m depth.

  11. Effects of a nonuniform vertical profile of chlorophyll concentration on remote-sensing reflectance of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Stramski, Dariusz

    2005-03-20

    Numerical simulations of radiative transfer were used to examine the effects of a nonuniform vertical profile of the inherent optical properties of the water column associated with the vertical profile of chlorophyll concentration, Chl(z), on the spectral remote-sensing reflectance, Rrs(gamma), of the ocean. Using the Gaussian function that describes the Chl(z) profile, we simulated a relatively broad range of open-ocean conditions characterized by the presence of a subsurface Chl maximum at depths greater than or equal to 20 m. The simulations for a vertically nonuniform Chl(z) were compared with reference simulations for a homogeneous ocean whose Chl was identical to the surface Chl of inhomogeneous cases. The range of values for the Gaussian parameters that produce significant differences in Rrs(gamma) (> 5%) was determined. For some vertical structures of Chl(z) considered, the magnitude of Rrs(gamma) and the blue-to-green band ratios of Rrs(gamma) differ significantly from the reference values of homogeneous ocean (> 70% in extreme cases of low surface chlorophyll of 0.02 mg m(-3) and shallow pigment maximum at 20 m). The differences are small or negligible when the nonuniform profiles are characterized by a surface Chl greater than 0.4 mg m(-3) or a depth of Chl maximum greater than 45 m (65 m in extremely clear waters with a surface Chl of 0.02 mg m(-3) or less). The comparison of modeling results with the current algorithm for retrieving the global distribution of chlorophyll from satellite imagery of ocean color suggests that strong effects of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum on reflectance at low surface chlorophyll concentrations can lead to a severalfold overestimation in the algorithm-derived surface chlorophyll. Examples of field data from the Sea of Japan and the north polar Atlantic Ocean are used to illustrate various nonuniform pigment profiles and their effect on the blue-to-green ratio of Rrs(gamma).

  12. Combined SAGE II-GOMOS ozone profile data set for 1984-2011 and trend analysis of the vertical distribution of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrölä, E.; Laine, M.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Päivärinta, S.-M.; Tukiainen, S.; Zawodny, J.; Thomason, L.

    2013-11-01

    We have studied data from two satellite occultation instruments in order to generate a high vertical resolution homogeneous ozone time series of 26 yr. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II solar occultation instrument and the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument measured ozone profiles in the stratosphere and mesosphere from 1984-2005 and 2002-2012, respectively. Global coverage, good vertical resolution, and the self-calibrating measurement method make data from these instruments valuable for the detection of changes in vertical distribution of ozone over time. As both instruments share a common measurement period from 2002-2005, it is possible to inter-calibrate the data sets. We investigate how well these measurements agree with each other and combine all the data to produce a new stratospheric ozone profile data set. Above 55 km, SAGE II measurements show much less ozone than the GOMOS nighttime measurements as a consequence of the well-known diurnal variation of ozone in the mesosphere. Between 35-55 km, SAGE II sunrise and sunset measurements differ from GOMOS' measurements to different extents. Sunrise measurements show 2% less ozone than GOMOS, whereas sunset measurements show 4% more ozone than GOMOS. Differences can be explained qualitatively by the diurnal variation of ozone in the stratosphere recently observed by SMILES and modeled by chemical transport models. Between 25-35 km, SAGE II sunrise and sunset measurements and GOMOS measurements agree within 1%. The observed ozone bias between collocated measurements of SAGE II sunrise/sunset and GOMOS night measurements is used to align the two data sets. The combined data set covers the time period 1984-2011, latitudes 60° S-60° N, and the altitude range of 20-60 km. Profile data are given on a 1 km vertical grid, and with a resolution of 1 month in time and 10° in latitude. The combined ozone data set is analyzed by fitting a time series model to the

  13. Combined SAGE II-GOMOS ozone profile data set 1984-2011 and trend analysis of the vertical distribution of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrölä, E.; Laine, M.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Päivärinta, S.-M.; Tukiainen, S.; Zawodny, J.; Thomason, L.

    2013-04-01

    We have studied data from two satellite occultation instruments in order to generate a high vertical resolution homogeneous ozone time series of 26 yr. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experimen (SAGE) II solar occultation instrument from 1984-2005 and the Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars instrument (GOMOS) from 2002-2012 measured ozone profiles in the stratosphere and mesosphere. Global coverage, good vertical resolution and the self calibrating measurement method make data from these instruments valuable for the detection of changes in vertical distribution of ozone over time. As both instruments share a common measurement period from 2002-2005, it is possible to intercalibrate the data sets. We investigate how well these measurements agree with each other and combine all the data to produce a new stratospheric ozone profile data set. Above 55 km SAGE II measurements show much less ozone than the GOMOS nighttime measurements as a consequence of the well-known diurnal variation of ozone in the mesosphere. Between 35-55 km SAGE II sunrise and sunset measurements differ from each other. Sunrise measurements show 2% less ozone than GOMOS whereas sunset measurements show 4% more ozone than GOMOS. Differences can be explained qualitatively by the diurnal variation of ozone in the stratosphere recently observed by SMILES and modelled by chemical transport models. For 25-35 km SAGE II sunrise and sunset and GOMOS agree within 1%. The observed ozone bias between collocated measurements of SAGE II sunrise/sunset and GOMOS night measurements is used to align the two data sets. The combined data set covers the time period 1984-2011, latitudes 60° S-60° N and the altitude range of 20-60 km. Profile data are given on a 1 km vertical grid, and with a resolution of one month in time and ten degrees in latitude. The combined ozone data set is analyzed by fitting a time series model to the data. We assume a linear trend with an inflexion point (so-called "hockey

  14. Sub-grid Parameterization of Cumulus Vertical Velocities for Climate and Numerical Weather Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, William; Donner, Leo

    2015-04-01

    Microphysical and aerosol processes determine the magnitude of climate forcing by aerosol-cloud interactions, are central aspects of cloud-climate feedback, and are important elements in weather systems for which accurate forecasting is a major goal of numerical weather prediction. Realistic simulation of these processes demands not only accurate microphysical and aerosol process representations but also realistic simulation of the vertical motions in which the aerosols and microphysics act. Aerosol activation, for example, is a strong function of vertical velocity. Cumulus parameterizations for climate and numerical weather prediction models have recently begun to include vertical velocities among the statistics they predict. These vertical velocities have been subject to only limited evaluation using observed vertical velocities. Deployments of multi-Doppler radars and dual-frequency profilers in recent field campaigns have substantially increased the observational base of cumulus vertical velocities, which for decades had been restricted mostly to GATE observations. Observations from TWP-ICE (Darwin, Australia) and MC3E (central United States) provide previously unavailable information on the vertical structure of cumulus vertical velocities and observations in differing synoptic contexts from those available in the past. They also provide an opportunity to independently evaluate cumulus parameterizations with vertical velocities tuned to earlier GATE observations. This presentation will compare vertical velocities observed in TWP-ICE and MC3E with cumulus vertical velocities using the parameterization in the GFDL CM3 climate model. Single-column results indicate parameterized vertical velocities are frequently greater than observed. Errors in parameterized vertical velocities exhibit similarities to vertical velocities explicitly simulated by cloud-system resolving models, and underlying issues in the treatment of microphysics may be important for both. The

  15. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data.

    PubMed

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N(2)-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  16. The relationship between latent heating, vertical velocity, and precipitation processes: The impact of aerosols on precipitation in organized deep convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2016-06-01

    A high-resolution, two-dimensional cloud-resolving model with spectral-bin microphysics is used to study the impact of aerosols on precipitation processes in both a tropical oceanic and a midlatitude continental squall line with regard to three processes: latent heating (LH), cold pool dynamics, and ice microphysics. Evaporative cooling in the lower troposphere is found to enhance rainfall in low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration scenarios in the developing stages of a midlatitude convective precipitation system. In contrast, the tropical case produced more rainfall under high CCN concentrations. Both cold pools and low-level convergence are stronger for those configurations having enhanced rainfall. Nevertheless, latent heat release is stronger (especially after initial precipitation) in the scenarios having more rainfall in both the tropical and midlatitude environment. Sensitivity tests are performed to examine the impact of ice and evaporative cooling on the relationship between aerosols, LH, and precipitation processes. The results show that evaporative cooling is important for cold pool strength and rain enhancement in both cases. However, ice microphysics play a larger role in the midlatitude case compared to the tropics. Detailed analysis of the vertical velocity-governing equation shows that temperature buoyancy can enhance updrafts/downdrafts in the middle/lower troposphere in the convective core region; however, the vertical pressure gradient force (PGF) is of the same order and acts in the opposite direction. Water loading is small but of the same order as the net PGF-temperature buoyancy forcing. The balance among these terms determines the intensity of convection.

  17. High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density-Profile Changes in Response to Large Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter; Fung, Shing F.

    2015-01-01

    Large magnetic-storm induced changes have been detected in high-latitude topside vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). The investigation was based on the large database of topside Ne(h) profiles and digital topside ionograms from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program available from the NASA Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) at http://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov/isis/isis-status.html. This large database enabled Ne(h) profiles to be obtained when an ISIS satellite passed through nearly the same region of space before, during, and after a major magnetic storm. A major goal was to relate the magnetic-storm induced high-latitude Ne(h) profile changes to solar-wind parameters. Thus an additional data constraint was to consider only storms where solar-wind data were available from the NASA/SPDF OMNIWeb database. Ten large magnetic storms (with Dst less than -100 nT) were identified that satisfied both the Ne(h) profile and the solar-wind data constraints. During five of these storms topside ionospheric Ne(h) profiles were available in the high-latitude northern hemisphere and during the other five storms similar ionospheric data were available in the southern hemisphere. Large Ne(h) changes were observed during each one of these storms. Our concentration in this paper is on the northern hemisphere. The data coverage was best for the northern-hemisphere winter. Here Ne(h) profile enhancements were always observed when the magnetic local time (MLT) was between 00 and 03 and Ne(h) profile depletions were always observed between 08 and 10 MLT. The observed Ne(h) deviations were compared with solar-wind parameters, with appropriate time shifts, for four storms.

  18. Initial Verification of GEOS-4 Aerosols Using CALIPSO and MODIS: Scene Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Colarco, Peter R.; Hlavka, Dennis; Levy, Robert C.; Vaughan, Mark A.; daSilva, Arlindo

    2007-01-01

    A-train sensors such as MODIS and MISR provide column aerosol properties, and in the process a means of estimating aerosol type (e.g. smoke vs. dust). Correct classification of aerosol type is important because retrievals are often dependent upon selection of the right aerosol model. In addition, aerosol scene classification helps place the retrieved products in context for comparisons and analysis with aerosol transport models. The recent addition of CALIPSO to the A-train now provides a means of classifying aerosol distribution with altitude. CALIPSO level 1 products include profiles of attenuated backscatter at 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization at 532 nm. Backscatter intensity, wavelength ratio, and depolarization provide information on the vertical profile of aerosol concentration, size, and shape. Thus similar estimates of aerosol type using MODIS or MISR are possible with CALIPSO, and the combination of data from all sensors provides a means of 3D aerosol scene classification. The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System general circulation model and data assimilation system (GEOS-4) provides global 3D aerosol mass for sulfate, sea salt, dust, and black and organic carbon. A GEOS-4 aerosol scene classification algorithm has been developed to provide estimates of aerosol mixtures along the flight track for NASA's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) satellite lidar. GLAS launched in 2003 and did not have the benefit of depolarization measurements or other sensors from the A-train. Aerosol typing from GLAS data alone was not possible, and the GEOS-4 aerosol classifier has been used to identify aerosol type and improve the retrieval of GLAS products. Here we compare 3D aerosol scene classification using CALIPSO and MODIS with the GEOS-4 aerosol classifier. Dust, smoke, and pollution examples will be discussed in the context of providing an initial verification of the 3D GEOS-4 aerosol products. Prior model verification has only been attempted with surface mass

  19. Estimating Oceanic Primary Production Using Vertical Irradiance and Chlorophyll Profiles from Ocean Gliders in the North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Victoria S; Smyth, Timothy J; Martin, Adrian P; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Thompson, Andrew F; Damerell, Gillian; Painter, Stuart C

    2015-10-01

    An autonomous underwater vehicle (Seaglider) has been used to estimate marine primary production (PP) using a combination of irradiance and fluorescence vertical profiles. This method provides estimates for depth-resolved and temporally evolving PP on fine spatial scales in the absence of ship-based calibrations. We describe techniques to correct for known issues associated with long autonomous deployments such as sensor calibration drift and fluorescence quenching. Comparisons were made between the Seaglider, stable isotope ((13)C), and satellite estimates of PP. The Seaglider-based PP estimates were comparable to both satellite estimates and stable isotope measurements.

  20. Vertical profiles of CO and CH4 in the lower and middle troposphere over the Eastern United States January 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, H. G., Jr.; Condon, E. P.

    1979-01-01

    Samples of tropospheric air were obtained over the Eastern United States during January of 1978. These samples were analyzed by gas chromatography using flame ionization detection to produce vertical profiles of carbon monoxide and methane from the surface to 8 km. The carbon monoxide mixing ratios at 35 deg N and 45 deg N agree with previously published values; however, the mixing ratio at 25 deg N was significantly lower than most published values. The methane mixing ratio was weakly dependent on latitude and has an average value of 1.64 ppm.

  1. Estimating Oceanic Primary Production Using Vertical Irradiance and Chlorophyll Profiles from Ocean Gliders in the North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Victoria S; Smyth, Timothy J; Martin, Adrian P; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Thompson, Andrew F; Damerell, Gillian; Painter, Stuart C