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Sample records for aerosol vertical structure

  1. Case Studies of the Vertical Structure of the Direct Shortwave Aerosol Radiative Forcing During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Browell, E. V.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol-induced radiative flux changes in the Earth's troposphere affects local heating rates and thereby convective processes, the formation and lifetime of clouds, and hence the distribution of chemical constituents. We present observationally-based estimates of the vertical structure of direct shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for two case studies from the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) which took place on the US East coast in July 1996. The aerosol radiative forcings are computed using the Fu-Liou broadband radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical properties used in the radiative transfer simulations are calculated from independent vertically-resolved estimates of the complex aerosol indices of refraction in two to three distinct vertical layers, using profiles of in situ particle size distributions measured aboard the University of Washington research aircraft. Aerosol single-scattering albedos at 450 nm thus determined range from 0.9 to 0.985, while the asymmetry factor varies from 0.6 to 0.8. The instantaneous shortwave aerosol radiative forcings derived from the optical profiles of the aerosols are of the order of -36 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere and about -56 W/sq m at the surface for both case studies.

  2. Case Studies of the Vertical Structure of the Direct Shortwave Aerosol Radiative Forcing During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Browell, E. V.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol-induced radiative flux changes in the Earth's troposphere affects local heating rates and thereby convective processes, the formation and lifetime of clouds, and hence the distribution of chemical constituents. We present observationally based estimates of the vertical structure of direct shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for two case studies from the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) which took place on the U.S. east coast in July 1996. The aerosol radiative forcings are computed using the Fu-Liou broadband radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical properties used in the radiative transfer simulations are calculated from independent vertically resolved estimates of the complex aerosol indices of refraction in two to three distinct vertical layers, using profiles of in situ particle size distributions measured aboard the University of Washington research aircraft. Aerosol single-scattering albedos at 450 nm thus determined range from 0.9 to 0.985, while the asymmetry factor varies from 0.6 to 0.8. The instantaneous shortwave aerosol radiative forcings derived from the optical properties of the aerosols are of the order of -36 Wm(exp -2) at the top of the atmosphere and about -56 Wm(exp -2) at the surface for both case studies.

  3. Vertical aerosol structure and aerosol mixed layer heights determined with scanning shipborne lidars during the TexAQS II study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, B. J.; Senff, C. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Eberhard, W. L.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Machol, J.; Brewer, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    The NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL) deployed the Ozone Profiling Atmospheric LIDAR (OPAL) on the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the summer of 2006 for the Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS II). Calibrated aerosol backscatter profiles were determined from data collected at the 355 nm wavelength using a modified Klett retrieval method. OPAL employs a unique scan sequence that consists of staring at multiple elevation angles between 2 and 90 degrees, which is repeated approx. every 90 sec. Blending the data from the various elevation angles allows to extend the aerosol backscatter profiles down to near the surface (approximately 10 meters ASL), while maintaining a high spatial resolution (5 meters). Successful application of this technique requires the aerosol distribution to be sufficiently horizontally homogeneous over several kilometers. Estimates of aerosol mixed layer height were determined by applying a Haar wavelet transform method to detect the gradient that is often present at the top of the boundary layer. Co-located on the R/V Ronald H. Brown, was NOAA/ESRL's High Resolution Doppler LIDAR (HRDL). Aerosol mixed layer heights were also estimated using the data from the 2 micron Doppler LIDAR. A comparison of the mixed layer heights as determined from each LIDAR's observations was used to choose the height of the layer likely connected with the surface. The vertical structure of aerosols in the lower troposphere, in particular the presence of aerosol layers above the boundary layer, is important in understanding radiative effects of aerosols. We will present aerosol backscatter structure in the lower troposphere encountered during the TexAQS II study as well as a comparison of relative aerosol content in the free troposphere compared to that within the boundary layer.

  4. The Vertical Structure, Sources, and Evolution of Aerosols in the Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Greg; Bourrianne, Thierry; Léon, Jean-François; Pont, Véronique; Mallet, Marc; Lambert, Dominique; Augustin, Patrick; Dulac, François; Junkermann, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The VESSAER campaign (VErtical Structure and Sources of AERosols in the Mediterranean Region) was designed to characterize the different sources of aerosol in the Mediterranean Basin and assess the regional impact of aerosol on cloud microphysical and radiative properties. VESSAER was conducted on an ultra-light aircraft in summer 2012. Research activities included ground-based observations in the central and northern regions of Corsica, as well as aerosol lidar and sunphotometer measurements near the eastern coast. The main scientific goals were to investigate local versus long-range sources of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and their vertical stratification in the lower troposphere, study evolution and ageing due to atmospheric processes, and determine aerosol direct radiative impacts over a larger spatial scale. The background aerosol concentrations (D > 0.01 um) within the boundary layer in Corsica were nearly 2000 cm^-3 and increased to ca. 104 cm^-3 during pollution events when back-trajectories originated from coastal areas in France and Italy and the Po Valley. Nearly all of these particles were CCN-active at 0.38% supersaturation, indicating a relatively hygroscopic aerosol. Vertical profiles of aerosol hygroscopicity revealed that ageing (with respect to CCN-activity) of European emissions occurred exclusively in the boundary layer. Within two days, the European emissions had become hygroscopic, probably a result of cloud processing. In contrast, aerosol hygroscopicity did not change as a function of transport time in elevated aerosol layers, suggesting that photochemical ageing of less hygroscopic material is relatively slow compared to ageing processes in the boundary layer. The vertical profiles clearly showed the long-range transport of dust from the Saharan Desert and pollution from the European continent, which were the two major sources of aerosol during the campaign. Two of the research flights coincided with CALIPSO overpasses, when

  5. Changes in the shape of cloud ice water content vertical structure due to aerosol variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, Steven T.; Delanoë, Julien; Bardeen, Charles G.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Huang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Changes in the shape of cloud ice water content (IWC) vertical structure due to variations in Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depths (AODs), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) absorptive aerosol optical depths (AAODs), and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) CO (an absorptive aerosol proxy) at 215 hPa are calculated in the Tropics during 2007-2010 based upon an analysis of DARDAR IWC profiles for deep convective clouds. DARDAR profiles are a joint retrieval of CloudSat-CALIPSO data. Analysis is performed for 12 separate regions over land and ocean, and carried out applying MODIS AOD fields that attempt to correct for 3-D cloud adjacency effects. The 3-D cloud adjacency effects have a small impact upon our particular calculations of aerosol-cloud indirect effects. IWC profiles are averaged for three AOD bins individually for the 12 regions. The IWC average profiles are also normalized to unity at 5 km altitude in order to study changes in the shape of the average IWC profiles as AOD increases. Derivatives of the IWC average profiles, and derivatives of the IWC shape profiles, in percent change per 0.1 change in MODIS AOD units, are calculated separately for each region. Means of altitude-specific probability distribution functions, which include both ocean and land IWC shape regional derivatives, are modest, near 5 %, and positive to the 2σ level between 11 and 15 km altitude. Similar analyses are carried out for three AAOD and three CO bins. On average, the vertical profiles of the means of the derivatives based upon the profile shapes over land and ocean are smaller for the profiles binned according to AAOD and CO values, than for the MODIS AODs, which include both scattering and absorptive aerosol. This difference in character supports the assertion that absorptive aerosol can inhibit cloud development.

  6. Vertical structure and size distributions of Martian aerosols from solar occultation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Blamont, J. E.; Krasnopol'skii, V. A.; Korablev, O. I.; Atreya, S. K.; West, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Phobos 2 spectrometer measurements of solar occultations close to the evening terminator have furnished data on the vertical structure of the Martian aerosols near the northern spring equinox. Since the thermal structure derived from saturated IR profiles of water vapor does not allow the reaching of the CO2 frost point at cloud altitudes, said clouds' particles may be formed by H2O ice. Dust was also monitored at two wavelengths; it is assumed that the dust particles are levitated by eddy mixing. A parallel is drawn between these thin clouds and the polar mesospheric clouds observed on earth.

  7. Vertical Structure and Sources of Aerosols in the Mediterranean Region (VESSAER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. C.; Junkermann, W.; Leon, J.; Pont, V.; Mallet, M.; Augustin, P.; Dulac, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Mediterranean region has been identified as one of the most prominent global "Hot-Spots" in future climate change projections [Giorgi and Lionello, 2008] and is particularly characterized by its vulnerability to changes in the water cycle. To this end, the VESSAER campaign (VErtical Structure and Sources of AERosols in the Mediterranean Region) was designed to characterize the different sources of aerosol in the Mediterranean Basin and assess their regional impact on cloud microphysical and radiative properties. VESSAER was conducted on the ENDURO-KIT ultra-light aircraft [W. Junkermann, 2001] in late June-early July 2012. Activities include ground observations as well as aerosol lidar and sunphotometer measurements in conjunction with the airborne measurements. The VESSAER campaign complements existing ChArMEx (http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/ ; PI: F. Dulac) and HyMeX (http://www.hymex.org/ ; PI: V. Ducroc and P. Drobinski) activities, which are the target of many European research institutes in 2012 and 2013. The main scientific goals during VESSAER are to investigate local versus long-range sources of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and their vertical stratification in the lower troposphere, use aerosol hygroscopicity to study their evolution due to atmospheric processes, and couple in-situ airborne measurements with ground-based remote sensing to determine aerosol direct radiative impacts over a larger spatial scale. The background aerosol concentrations within the boundary layer (BL) in Corsica are nearly 2000 cm-3 (Dp > 10 nm); 50 cm-3 (Dp > 300 nm). We were surprised to find that nearly all of these particles are CCN-active at 0.3% supersaturation and presume that ageing and/or cloud processing play a role in rendering the aerosol in the Mediterranean Basin more hygroscopic. The vertical profiles during VESSAER clearly show the long-range transport of dust from the Saharan Desert and pollution from the European continent -- which were the two

  8. Vertical Structure, Transport, and Mixing of Ozone and Aerosols Observed During NEAQS/ICARTT 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Hardesty, R. M.; Brewer, W. A.; Alvarez, R. J.; Sandberg, S. P.; Tucker, S. C.; Intrieri, J. M.; Marchbanks, R. D.; McCarty, B. J.; Banta, R. M.; Darby, L. S.; White, A. B.

    2005-12-01

    During the 2004 New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS), which was conducted within the framework of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) field experiment, airborne and shipborne lidar remote sensing instruments were deployed to characterize the 3-dimensional structure of ozone, aerosol, and low-level wind fields in the New England region. The 2004 measurements confirmed findings from the smaller-scale NEAQS 2002 experiment: the vertical structure and transport patterns of pollutant plumes from the Boston and New York City urban areas are strongly modified when they are advected over the Gulf of Maine. Because of strong vertical wind shear and a very stable atmosphere over the cold ocean water the plumes tend to get sheared apart and the resulting pieces of the plumes stay confined in layers aloft, isolated from the surface. Most notably, ozone concentrations aloft are very often significantly higher than ozone levels near the ocean surface. These elevated pollution plumes over the Gulf of Maine can affect air quality in coastal New England only when they are transported back over land. This can be accomplished by the large-scale flow or by local circulations such as the sea breeze. Once over land the elevated plumes may impact surface air quality by direct transport to higher terrain (e.g., Cadillac Mountain, ME) or by being fumigated down to the surface. Alternatively, but probably more rarely, an elevated pollution plume over the ocean may be mixed down to the surface by mechanically generated turbulence and then transported back to land within the marine boundary layer. We will use airborne and shipborne lidar remote sensing data to characterize the vertical distribution of ozone and aerosols over coastal New England, in particular the difference in plume structure over land and water. We will also show observational evidence for several of the processes described above that may mix down and transport

  9. Aerosol structure and vertical distribution in a multi-source dust region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Tang, Congguo; Han, Yongxiang

    2012-01-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosols was directly observed under various atmospheric conditions in the free troposphere using surface micro-pulse lidar (MPL4) at the Zhangye Station (39.08 degrees N, 100.27 degrees E) in western China in the spring of 2008. The study shows that the aerosol distribution over Zhangye can be vertically classified into upper, middle and lower layers with altitudes of 4.5 to 9 km, 2.5 to 4.5 km, and less than 2.5 km, respectively. The aerosol in the upper layer originated from the external sources at higher altitude regions, from far desert regions upwind of Zhangye or transported from higher atmospheric layers by free convection, and the altitude of this aerosol layer decreased with time; the aerosols in the middle and lower layers originated from both external and local sources. The aerosol extinction coefficients in the upper and lower layers decreased with altitude, whereas the coefficient in the middle layer changed only slightly, which suggests that aerosol mixing occurs in the middle layer. The distribution of aerosols with altitude has three features: a single peak that forms under stable atmospheric conditions, an exponential decrease with altitude that occurs under unstable atmospheric conditions, and slight change in the mixed layer. Due to the impact of the top of the atmospheric boundary layer, the diurnal variation in the aerosol extinction coefficient has a single peak, which is higher in the afternoon and lower in the morning. PMID:23513689

  10. Combining data from lidar and in situ instruments to characterize the vertical structure of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Pueschel, R. F.; Browell, E. V.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade, the quantification of tropospheric aerosol abundance, composition and radiative impacts has become an important research endeavor. For the most part, the interest in tropospheric aerosols is derived from questions related to the global and local (instantaneous) radiative forcing of climate due to these aerosols. One approach is to study local forcing under well-defined conditions, and to extrapolate such results to global scales. To estimate local aerosol forcing, appropriate radiative transfer models can be employed (e.g., the Fu-Liou radiative transfer code, [Fu and Liou, 1993]). In general, such models require information on derived aerosol properties [Toon, 1994]; namely the aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor (phase function), all of which appear in the equations of radiative transfer. In this paper, we report on a method that utilizes lidar data and in situ aerosol size distribution measurements to deduce the vertical structure of the aerosol complex index of refraction in the near IR, thus identifying the aerosol type. Together with aerosol size distributions obtained in situ, the aerosol refractive index can be used to calculate the necessary derived aerosol properties. The data analyzed here were collected during NASA's PEM West-B (Pacific Exploratory Mission) experiment, which took place in February/March 1994. The platform for the measurements was the NASA DC-8 aircraft. The primary goal of the PEM West missions [Browell et al., 1996] was the assessment of potential anthropogenic perturbations of the chemistry in the Pacific Basin troposphere. For this purpose the timing of PEM West-B corresponded to the seasonal peak in transport from the Asian continent into the Pacific basin [Merrill et al., in press]. This period normally occurs during Northern Hemisphere spring, when the Japan jet is well developed.

  11. Vertical Structure of Aerosols and Mineral Dust Transport Over the Bay of Bengal Using Multi-Satellite Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naduparambil Bharathan, L.

    2015-12-01

    Bay-of-Bengal (BoB), a small oceanic region Eat to Indian land mass, surrounded by heavily inhabited land masses, experiences different types of air-masses in different seasons of contrasting wind patterns, which makes it a region of large heterogeneity in the context of regional climate forcing due to atmospheric aerosols. Heterogeneity of aerosol system over the Bay of Bengal is mainly determined by three distinct source regions, which are east coast of India/central India, China/east Asia and Arabian region. Continental aerosols transported through higher elevations over BoB lead to significant impacts in regional climate by modifying the vertical thermal structure of the atmosphere and associated circulation dynamics. The study aims at a comprehensive understanding on the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of elevated aerosol over the BoB using the observations of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO). Being capable of short wave scattering and long wave absorption, mineral dust aerosols can affects the energetics of the atmosphere over any region.Owing to its influence on Indian monsoon rainfall and regional climate, the study aims to comprehend on the spatial and seasonal variation of mineral dust transport over the Bay of Bengal. vertical distribution of the dust extinction coefficient over the Bay of Bengal for all seasons, is derived, using a dust separation scheme that uses the depolarization measurements, a priori information on lidar ratio of dust, depolarization ratio of dust and that of non-dust aerosols. Being highly non-spherical, mineral dust significantly depolarize the radiation and possess distinct range of depolarization ratio. This property of dust is made use to identify and quantify dust over the study region. Seasonal variation of dust fraction over the Bay of Bengal is estimated seperately from CALIPSO back scattering coefficients

  12. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the "effective" aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  13. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the 'effective' aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  14. New Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Structure from Space using the NASA Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): Applications for Aerosol Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, E. J.; Spinhime, J.; Palm, S.; Hlavka, D.; Hart, W.; Ginoux, P.; Chin, M.; Colarco, P.

    2004-01-01

    In the past, satellite measurements of aerosols have only been possible using passive sensors. Analysis of passive satellite data has lead to an improved understanding of aerosol properties, spatial distribution, and their effect on the earth,s climate. However, direct measurement of aerosol vertical distribution has not been possible using only the passive data. Knowledge of aerosol vertical distribution is important to correctly assess the impact of aerosol absorption, for certain atmospheric correction procedures, and to help constrain height profiles in aerosol transport models. On January 12,2003 NASA launched the first satellite-based lidar, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), onboard the ICESat spacecraft. GLAS is both an altimeter and an atmospheric lidar, and obtains direct measurements of aerosol and cloud heights. Here we show an overview of GLAS, provide an update of its current status, and discuss how GLAS data will be useful for modeling efforts. In particular, a strategy of using GLAS to characterize the height profile of dust plumes over source regions will be presented, along with initial results. Such information can be used to validate and improve output from aerosol transport models. Aerosol height profile comparisons between GLAS and transport models will be shown for regions downwind of aerosol sources. We will also discuss the feasibility of assimilating GLAS profiles into the models in order to improve their output.

  15. New Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Structure from Space Using the NASA Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): Applications for Aerosol Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Ginoux, Paul; Colarco, Peter; Chin, Mian; Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Steven P.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William

    2003-01-01

    In the past, satellite measurements of aerosols have only been possible using passive sensors. Analysis of passive satellite data has lead to an improved understanding of aerosol properties, spatial distribution, and their effect on the earth s climate. However, direct measurement of aerosol vertical distribution has not been possible using only the passive data. Knowledge of aerosol vertical distribution is important to correctly assess the impact of aerosol absorption, for certain atmospheric correction procedures, and to help constrain height profiles in aerosol transport models. On January 12,2003 NASA launched the first satellite-based lidar, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), onboard the ICESat spacecraft. GLAS is both an altimeter and an atmospheric lidar, and obtains direct measurements of aerosol and cloud heights. Here we show an overview of GLAS, provide an update of its current status, and discuss how GUS data will be useful for modeling efforts. In particular, a strategy of using GLAS to characterize the height profile of dust plumes over source regions will be presented, along with initial results. Such information can be used to validate and improve output from aerosol transport models. Aerosol height profile comparisons between GLAS and transport models will be shown for regions downwind of aerosol sources. We will also discuss the feasibility of assimilating GLAS profiles into the models in order to improve their output,

  16. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, M.; Muñoz-Esparza, D.; Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.; Knoth, O.; Haarig, M.; Ansmann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind and Raman lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure. Additionally, the model results accurately reproduce the

  17. Measurements of the Vertical Structure of Aerosols and Clouds Over the Ocean Using Micro-Pulse LIDAR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Bates, David; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The determination of the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds over the ocean is needed for accurate retrievals of ocean color from satellites observations. The presence of absorbing aerosol layers, especially at altitudes above the boundary layer, has been shown to influence the calculation of ocean color. Also, satellite data must be correctly screened for the presence of clouds, particularly cirrus, in order to measure ocean color. One instrument capable of providing this information is a lidar, which uses pulses of laser light to profile the vertical distribution of aerosol and cloud layers in the atmosphere. However, lidar systems prior to the 1990s were large, expensive, and not eye-safe which made them unsuitable for cruise deployments. During the 1990s the first small, autonomous, and eye-safe lidar system became available: the micro-pulse lidar, or MPL. The MPL is a compact and eye-safe lidar system capable of determining the range of aerosols and clouds by firing a short pulse of laser light (523 nm) and measuring the time-of-flight from pulse transmission to reception of a returned signal. The returned signal is a function of time, converted into range using the speed of light, and is proportional to the amount of light backscattered by atmospheric molecules (Rayleigh scattering), aerosols, and clouds. The MPL achieves ANSI eye-safe standards by sending laser pulses at low energy (micro-J) and expanding the beam to 20.32 cm in diameter. A fast pulse-repetition-frequency (2500 Hz) is used to achieve a good signal-to-noise, despite the low output energy. The MPL has a small field-of-view (< 100 micro-rad) and signals received with the instrument do not contain multiple scattering effects. The MPL has been used successfully at a number of long-term sites and also in several field experiments around the world.

  18. Influence of aerosol vertical distribution on radiative budget and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Michou, Martine; Saint-Martin, David; Watson, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols interact with shortwave and longwave radiation with ensuing consequences on radiative budget and climate. Aerosols are represented in climate models either using an interactive aerosol scheme including prognostic aerosol variables, or using climatologies, such as monthly aerosol optical depth (AOD) fields. In the first case, aerosol vertical distribution can vary rapidly, at a daily or even hourly scale, following the aerosol evolution calculated by the interactive scheme. On the contrary, in the second case, a fixed aerosol vertical distribution is generally imposed by climatological profiles. The objective of this work is to study the impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol radiative forcing, with ensuing effects on climate. Simulations have thus been carried out using CNRM-CM, which is a global climate model including an interactive aerosol scheme representing the five main aerosol species (desert dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black carbon and organic matter). Several multi-annual simulations covering the past recent years are compared, including either the prognostic aerosol variables, or monthly AOD fields with different aerosol vertical distributions. In the second case, AOD fields directly come from the first simulation, so that all simulations have the same integrated aerosol loads. The results show that modifying the aerosol vertical distribution has a significant impact on radiative budget, with consequences on global climate. These differences, highlighting the importance of aerosol vertical distribution in climate models, probably come from the modification of atmospheric circulation induced by changes in the heights of the different aerosols. Besides, nonlinear effects in the superposition of aerosol and clouds reinforce the impact of aerosol vertical distribution, since aerosol radiative forcing depends highly upon the presence of clouds, and upon the relative vertical position of aerosols and clouds.

  19. A Multi-Instrument Approach for Characterizing the Vertical Structure of Aerosol Properties: Case Studies in the Pacific Basin Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Pueschel, R. F.; Fenn, M. A.; Browell, E. V.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    During February/March 1994, a series of aircraft-based aerosol measurements were carried out in the Pacific Basin troposphere using a differential absorption lidar system deployed by NASA Langley, and optical spectrometer probes and a wire-impactor system operated by NASA Ames. A modified Klett inversion algorithm was applied to extract altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering from the IR lidar signal. The algorithm that we have designed for this purpose utilizes the in situ aerosol measurements to normalize the lidar profile at the aircraft altitude and to supply the lidar ratio as a function of height. The lidar-derived aerosol backscattering coefficients were then compared to the backscattering coefficients calculated from the in situ measurements. During several local aircraft descents, we found good agreement between the remote lidar and in situ results for the absolute value of the aerosol backscattering coefficient and its altitude variation only when we allowed for several layers with different aerosol refractive indices. The agreement validates our lidar calibration method and provides an indication of the variation in aerosol refractive index as a function of altitude. Two of the three case studies performed in this paper reveal layers of anthropogenic aerosols transported long distances into the Pacific Basin troposphere. A third case implies the existence of a layer of dustlike aerosol particles in the lower troposphere, most likely of Asian origin.

  20. Verification of the naval oceanic vertical aerosol model during FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, K. L.; Deleeuw, G.; Gathman, S. G.; Jensen, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    The value of Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model (NOVAM) is illustrated for estimating the non-uniform and non-logarithmic extinction profiles, based on a severe test involving conditions close to and beyond the limits of applicability of NOVAM. A more comprehensive evaluation of NOVAM from the FIRE data is presented, which includes a clear-air case. For further evaluation more data are required on the vertical structure of the extinction in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), preferably for different meteorological conditions and in different geographic areas (e.g., ASTEX).

  1. Vertical Profile of Aerosol Properties at Pico Mountain, Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Dzepina, K.; Hueber, J.; China, S.; Sharma, N.

    2013-12-01

    Pico Mountain (2325m asl) is a dormant volcano in the archipelago of the Azores1500 km west of Lisbon, Portugal in the North Atlantic. It differs from typical mountain ranges such as the Alps or the Rockies, which are large and present a complex orography. Pico Mountain has a simple cone-like structure with only one main peak and is thousands of kilometers away from any other significant mountain range. In summer months, it is typical for air masses to move around the mountain rather than traveling up its face. This implies that often the peak of the mountain lies above the marine boundary layer in the free troposphere, while the lower part of the mountain is affected by marine clouds and marine air-masses. An atmospheric monitoring station, the Pico Mountain Observatory was established in 2001 in the summit caldera of the volcano at 2225m above sea level. The observatory is far from large populations or pollution sources, which makes the station ideal to study atmospheric gases and aerosols transported over long-ranges in the free troposphere. The station is reachable only by foot following a steep and strenuous hiking trail. In the summer of 2013 we began to collect vertical profiles of aerosol by carrying an instrumented backpack up to the summit of the mountain, with the goal of studying the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols from the marine boundary layer to the free troposphere. The backpack was carried from the base of trail at 1200m asl. The backpack was equipped with the following instruments: 1. Nephelometer to measure light scattering from aerosol 2. 2-size optical particle counter (300-500 nm) 3. Portable micro-aethalometer to measure absorbing aerosols 4. SEM/TEM sampler to collect particles for off-line electron microscopy analysis 5. Battery powered data logger to measure relative humidity, temperature and pressure 6. GPS tracking device We provide a preliminary analysis of data collected in 2013 to gain insight on the vertical distribution

  2. Lidar Observations of the Vertical Structure of Ozone and Aerosol during Wintertime High-Ozone Episodes Associated with Oil and Gas Exploration in the Uintah Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Langford, A. O.; Banta, R. M.; Alvarez, R. J.; Weickmann, A.; Sandberg, S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Brewer, A.; Hardesty, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Uintah Basin in northeast Utah has been experiencing extended periods of poor air quality in the winter months including very high levels of surface ozone. To investigate the causes of these wintertime ozone pollution episodes, two comprehensive studies were undertaken in January/February of 2012 and 2013. As part of these Uintah Basin Ozone Studies (UBOS), NOAA deployed its ground-based, scanning Tunable Optical Profiler for Aerosol and oZone (TOPAZ) lidar to document the vertical structure of ozone and aerosol backscatter from near the surface up to about 3 km above ground level (AGL). TOPAZ, along with a comprehensive set of chemistry and meteorological measurements, was situated in both years at the Horse Pool site at the northern edge of a large concentration of gas producing wells in the eastern part of the Uintah Basin. The 2012 study was characterized by unusually warm and snow-free condition and the TOPAZ lidar observed deep boundary layers (BL) and mostly well-mixed vertical ozone profiles at or slightly above tropospheric background levels. During UBOS 2013, winter weather conditions in the Uintah Basin were more typical with snow-covered ground and a persistent, shallow cold-pool layer. The TOPAZ lidar characterized with great temporal and spatial detail the evolution of multiple high-ozone episodes as well as cleanout events caused by the passage of synoptic-scale storm systems. Despite the snow cover, the TOPAZ observations show well-mixed afternoon ozone and aerosol profiles up to about 100 m AGL. After several days of pollutant buildup, BL ozone values reached 120-150 ppbv. Above the mixed layer, ozone values gradually decreased to tropospheric background values of around 50 ppbv throughout the several-hundred-meter-deep cold-pool layer and then stayed constant above that up to about 3 km AGL. During the ozone episodes, the lidar observations show no indication of either vertical or horizontal transport of high ozone levels to the surface, thus

  3. Vertical structure and optical properties of Titan's aerosols from radiance measurements made inside and outside the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doose, Lyn R.; Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, Martin G.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2016-05-01

    Prompted by the detection of stratospheric cloud layers by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS; see Anderson, C.M., Samuelson, R.E. [2011]. Icarus 212, 762-778), we have re-examined the observations made by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) in the atmosphere of Titan together with two constraints from measurements made outside the atmosphere. No evidence of thin layers (<1 km) in the DISR image data sets is seen beyond the three previously reported layers at 21 km, 11 km, and 7 km by Karkoschka and Tomasko (Karkoschka, E., Tomasko, M.G. [2009]. Icarus 199, 442-448). On the other hand, there is evidence of a thicker layer centered at about 55 km. A rise in radiance gradients in the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS) data below 55 km indicates an increase in the volume extinction coefficient near this altitude. To fit the geometric albedo measured from outside the atmosphere the decrease in the single scattering albedo of Titan's aerosols at high altitudes, noted in earlier studies of DISR data, must continue to much higher altitudes. The altitude of Titan's limb as a function of wavelength requires that the scale height of the aerosols decrease with altitude from the 65 km value seen in the DISR observations below 140 km to the 45 km value at higher altitudes. We compared the variation of radiance with nadir angle observed in the DISR images to improve our aerosol model. Our new aerosol model fits the altitude and wavelength variations of the observations at small and intermediate nadir angles but not for large nadir angles, indicating an effect that is not reproduced by our radiative transfer model. The volume extinction profiles are modeled by continuous functions except near the enhancement level near 55 km altitude. The wavelength dependence of the extinction optical depth is similar to earlier results at wavelengths from 500 to 700 nm, but is smaller at shorter wavelengths and larger toward longer wavelengths. A Hapke

  4. Meridional gradients in aerosol vertical distribution over Indian Mainland: Observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prijith, S. S.; Suresh Babu, S.; Lakshmi, N. B.; Satheesh, S. K.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-year observations from the network of ground-based observatories (ARFINET), established under the project 'Aerosol Radiative Forcing over India' (ARFI) of Indian Space Research Organization and space-borne lidar 'Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization' (CALIOP) along with simulations from the chemical transport model 'Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport' (GOCART), are used to characterize the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols over the Indian landmass and its spatial structure. While the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction showed higher values close to the surface followed by a gradual decrease at increasing altitudes, a strong meridional increase is observed in the vertical spread of aerosols across the Indian region in all seasons. It emerges that the strong thermal convections cause deepening of the atmospheric boundary layer, which although reduces the aerosol concentration at lower altitudes, enhances the concentration at higher elevations by pumping up more aerosols from below and also helping the lofted particles to reach higher levels in the atmosphere. Aerosol depolarization ratios derived from CALIPSO as well as the GOCART simulations indicate the dominance of mineral dust aerosols during spring and summer and anthropogenic aerosols in winter. During summer monsoon, though heavy rainfall associated with the Indian monsoon removes large amounts of aerosols, the prevailing southwesterly winds advect more marine aerosols over to landmass (from the adjoining oceans) leading to increase in aerosol loading at lower altitudes than in spring. During spring and summer months, aerosol loading is found to be significant, even at altitudes as high as 4 km, and this is proposed to have significant impacts on the regional climate systems such as Indian monsoon.

  5. Analysis of aerosol vertical distribution and variability in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qianshan; Li, Chengcai; Mao, Jietai; Lau, Alexis Kai-Hon; Chu, D. A.

    2008-07-01

    Aerosol vertical distribution is an important piece of information to improve aerosol retrieval from satellite remote sensing. Aerosol extinction coefficient profile and its integral form, aerosol optical depth (AOD), as well as atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height and haze layer height can be derived using lidar measurements. In this paper, we used micropulse lidar measurements acquired from May 2003 to June 2004 to illustrate seasonal variations of AOD and ABL height in Hong Kong. On average, about 64% of monthly mean aerosol optical depths were contributed by aerosols within the mixing layer (with a maximum (˜76%) in November and a minimum (˜55%) in September) revealing the existence of large abundance of aerosols above ABL due to regional transport. The characteristics of seasonal averaged aerosol profiles over Hong Kong in the study period are presented to illustrate seasonal phenomena of aerosol transport and associated meteorological conditions. The correlation between AOD and surface extinction coefficient, as found, is generally poor (r2 ˜0.42) since elevated aerosol layers increase columnar aerosol abundance but not extinction at surface. The typical aerosol extinction profile in the ABL can be characterized by a low value near the surface and values increased with altitude reaching the top of ABL. When aerosol vertical profile is assumed, surface extinction coefficient can be derived from AOD using two algorithms, which are discussed in detail in this paper. Preliminary analysis showed that better estimates of the extinction coefficient at the ground level could be obtained using two-layer aerosol extinction profiles (r2 ˜0.78, slope ˜0.82, and intercept ˜0.15) than uniform profiles of extinction with height within the ABL (r2 ˜0.65, slope ˜0.27, and intercept ˜0.03). The improvement in correlation is promising on mapping satellite retrieved AOD to surface aerosol extinction coefficient for urban and regional environmental studies on air

  6. Decoration of vertical graphene with aerosol nanoparticles for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; Ren, Ren; Zhou, Guihua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-08-01

    A facile method was demonstrated to decorate aerosol Ag nanoparticles onto vertical graphene surfaces using a mini-arc plasma reactor. The vertical graphene was directly grown on a sensor electrode using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The aerosol Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Then, the nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of vertical graphene through the assistance of an electric field. Based on our observation, nonagglomerated Ag nanoparticles formed in the gas phase and were assembled onto vertical graphene sheets. Nanohybrids of Ag nanoparticle-decorated vertical graphene were characterized for ammonia gas detection at room temperature. The vertical graphene served as the conductance channel, and the conductance change upon exposure to ammonia was used as the sensing signal. The sensing results show that Ag nanoparticles significantly improve the sensitivity, response time, and recovery time of the sensor.

  7. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Man Sing; Nichol, Janet E.; Lee, Kwon Ho

    2009-01-01

    The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future. PMID:22408531

  8. Vertical Distribution of Dust and Water Ice Aerosols from CRISM Limb-geometry Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael Doyle; Wolff, Michael J.; Clancy, Todd; Kleinbohl, Armin; Murchie, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    [1] Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb enables the vertical distribution of both dust and water ice aerosols to be retrieved. More than a dozen sets of CRISM limb observations have been taken so far providing pole-to-pole cross sections, spanning more than a full Martian year. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations taking into account multiple scattering from aerosols and the spherical geometry of the limb observations. Both dust and water ice vertical profiles often show a significant vertical structure for nearly all seasons and latitudes that is not consistent with the well-mixed or Conrath-v assumptions that have often been used in the past for describing aerosol vertical profiles for retrieval and modeling purposes. Significant variations are seen in the retrieved vertical profiles of dust and water ice aerosol as a function of season. Dust typically extends to higher altitudes (approx. 40-50km) during the perihelion season than during the aphelion season (<20km), and the Hellas region consistently shows more dust mixed to higher altitudes than other locations. Detached water ice clouds are common, and water ice aerosols are observed to cap the dust layer in all seasons.

  9. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  10. Effect of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol-radiation interaction: A theoretical prospect.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amit Kumar; Koren, Ilan; Rudich, Yinon

    2015-10-01

    This study presents a theoretical investigation of the effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the aerosol radiative effect (ARE). Four aerosol composition models (dust, polluted dust, pollution and pure scattering aerosols) with varying aerosol vertical profiles are incorporated into a radiative transfer model. The simulations show interesting spectral dependence of the ARE on the aerosol layer height. ARE increases with the aerosol layer height in the ultraviolet (UV: 0.25-0.42 μm) and thermal-infrared (TH-IR: 4.0-20.0 μm) regions, whereas it decreases in the visible-near infrared (VIS-NIR: 0.42-4.0 μm) region. Changes in the ARE with aerosol layer height are associated with different dominant processes for each spectral region. The combination of molecular (Rayleigh) scattering and aerosol absorption is the key process in the UV region, whereas aerosol (Mie) scattering and atmospheric gaseous absorption are key players in the VIS-NIR region. The longwave emission fluxes are controlled by the environmental temperature at the aerosol layer level. ARE shows maximum sensitivity to the aerosol layer height in the TH-IR region, followed by the UV and VIS-NIR regions. These changes are significant even in relatively low aerosol loading cases (aerosol optical depth ∼0.2-0.3). Dust aerosols are the most sensitive to altitude followed by polluted dust and pollution in all three different wavelength regions. Differences in the sensitivity of the aerosol type are explained by the relative strength of their spectral absorption/scattering properties. The role of surface reflectivity on the overall altitude dependency is shown to be important in the VIS-NIR and UV regions, whereas it is insensitive in the TH-IR region. Our results indicate that the vertical distribution of water vapor with respect to the aerosol layer is an important factor in the ARE estimations. Therefore, improved estimations of the water vapor profiles are needed for the further reduction in

  11. LIDAR Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM2.5 and PM10 mass and chemical ...

  12. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  13. Global profiles of the direct aerosol effect using vertically resolved aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Pappas, Vasilios; Matsoukas, Christos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In general, aerosols cause cooling of the surface and the planet, while they warm the atmosphere due to scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. The importance of vertically resolved direct radiative effect (DRE) and heating/cooling effects of aerosols is strong, while large uncertainties still lie with their magnitudes. In order to be able to quantify them throughout the atmosphere, a detailed vertical profile of the aerosol effect is required. Such data were made available recently by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. CALIOP is the first polarization lidar to fly in space and has been acquiring unique data on aerosols and clouds since June 2006. The aim of this study is to investigate both the vertically resolved geographic and seasonal variation of the DRE due to aerosols. The vertical profile of DRE under all-sky and clear-sky conditions is computed using the deterministic spectral radiative transfer model FORTH. From the DRE, the effect on atmospheric heating/cooling rate profiles due to aerosols can also be derived. We use CALIOP Level 2-Version 3 Layer aerosol optical depth data as input to our radiation transfer model, for a period of 3 complete years (2007-2009). These data are provided on a 5 km horizontal resolution and in up to 8 vertical layers and have been regridded on our model horizontal and vertical resolutions. We use cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), while the aerosol asymmetry factor and single scattering albedo are taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model computations are performed on a monthly, 2.5°× 2.5° resolution on global scale, at 40

  14. Comparison of Aerosol Classification From Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris a.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of aerosol composition and vertical distribution is crucial for assessing the impact of aerosols on climate. In addition, aerosol classification is a key input to CALIOP aerosol retrievals, since CALIOP requires an inference of the lidar ratio in order to estimate the effects of aerosol extinction and backscattering. In contrast, the NASA airborne HSRL-1 directly measures both aerosol extinction and backscatter, and therefore the lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio). Four aerosol intensive properties from HSRL-1 are combined to infer aerosol type. Aerosol classification results from HSRL-1 are used here to validate the CALIOP aerosol type inferences.

  15. Aerosols in the arid southwestern United States - Measurements of mass loading, volatility, size distribution, absorption characteristics, black carbon content, and vertical structure to 7 km above sea level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnick, R. G.; Fernandez, G.; Martinez-Andazola, E.; Hinds, B. D.; Hansen, A. D. A.; Fuller, K.

    1993-02-01

    A variety of methods and sensors including quartz fiber filter samplers, hi-vol samplers, ground-based and aircraft-mounted light-scattering aerosol counters, an aerosol counter equipped with a heated inlet, and an aethalometer are used to determine near-surface and lower tropospheric aerosol characteristics at several remote sites near Orogrande, New Mexico. The results of these measurements, which were taken sporadically over the last 15 yr, suggest that regardless of season, aerosol consists of two modes - a submicron fraction composed primarily of ammonium/acid sulfates and elemental black carbon and a supermicron fraction composed mainly of quartz and clay minerals of soil origin. Limited aircraft measurements in the lowest few kilometers of the troposphere reveal a well-mixed aerosol for a neutral atmospheric condition, and a significant decrease in aerosol concentration with altitude for a stable atmospheric condition.

  16. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measurements and the results of the first step. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of the size distribution, refractive index (real and imaginary parts), extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor. Sensitivity tests were conducted by applying the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the simulated sky radiometer and lidar data for vertical profiles of three different aerosols, continental average, transported dust, and pollution aerosols. The vertical profiles of the size distribution, extinction coefficient, and asymmetry factor were well estimated in all cases. The vertical profiles of the refractive index and single-scattering albedo of transported dust, but not those of transported pollution aerosol, were well estimated. To demonstrate the performance and validity of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, we applied the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the actual measurements at Tsukuba, Japan. The detailed vertical structures of the aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate of transported dust and smoke were investigated. Examination of the relationship between the solar heating rate and the aerosol optical properties showed that the vertical profile of the asymmetry factor played an important role in creating vertical variation in the solar heating rate. We then compared the columnar optical properties retrieved with the SKYLIDAR algorithm to those produced with the more established scheme SKYRAD.PACK, and the surface solar irradiance calculated from the SKYLIDAR

  17. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  18. Aromatic Structure in Simulates Titan Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Hudson, R. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Moore, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) between 560 and 20 per centimeter (approximately 18 to 500 micrometers) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's ice abundances, as well as those of the aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km [1]. The aerosol has a broad emission feature centered approximately at 140 per centimeter (71 micrometers). As seen in Figure 1, this feature cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs [2]. The far-IR is uniquely qualified for investigating low-energy vibrational motions within the lattice structures of COITIDlex aerosol. The feature observed by CIRS is broad, and does not likely arise from individual molecules, but rather is representative of the skeletal movements of macromolecules. Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, benzene (C6H6) has been detected in the atmosphere at ppm levels as well as ions that may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [3]. We speculate that the feature may be a blended composite that can be identified with low-energy vibrations of two-dimensional lattice structures of large molecules, such as PAHs or nitrogenated aromatics. Such structures do not dominate the composition of analog materials generated from CH4 and N2 irradiation. We are performing studies forming aerosol analog via UV irradiation of aromatic precursors - specifically C6H6 - to understand how the unique chemical architecture of the products will influence the observable aerosol characteristics. The optical and chemical properties of the aromatic analog will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures, with a focus on the as-yet unidentified far-IR absorbance feature. Preliminary results indicate that the photochemically-formed aromatic aerosol has distinct chemical composition, and may incorporate nitrogen either into the ring structure or adjoined chemical groups. These compositional differences are

  19. Seasonal variation of vertical distribution of aerosol single scattering albedo over Indian sub-continent: RAWEX aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Babu, S.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the vertical distribution of aerosols and its seasonality (especially the single scattering albedo, SSA) extensive profiling of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients have been carried out using an instrumented aircraft from seven base stations spread across the Indian mainland during winter 2012 and spring/pre-monsoon 2013 under the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment (RAWEX). Spatial variation of the vertical profiles of the asymmetry parameter, the wavelength exponent of the absorption coefficient and the single scattering albedo, derived from the measurements, are used to infer the source characteristics of winter and pre-monsoon aerosols as well as the seasonality of free tropospheric aerosols. The relatively high value of the wavelength exponent of absorption coefficient over most of the regions indicates the contribution from biomass burning and dust aerosols up to lower free tropospheric altitudes. A clear enhancement in aerosol loading and its absorbing nature is seen at lower free troposphere levels (above the planetary boundary layer) over the entire mainland during spring/pre-monsoon season compared to winter, whereas concentration of aerosols within the boundary layer showed a decrease from winter to spring. This could have significant implications on the aerosol heating structure over the Indian region and hence the regional climate.

  20. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired large datasets of aerosol extinction (532nm), backscatter (532 and 1064nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064nm) profiles during 349 science flights in 19 field missions across North America since 2006. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio"), aerosol depolarization ratios, and backscatter color ratio measurements from HSRL-1 are scale-invariant parameters that depend on aerosol type but not concentration. These four aerosol intensive parameters are combined to qualitatively classify HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate composition types. The classification methodology uses models formed from "training cases" with known aerosol type. The remaining measurements are then compared with these models using the Mahalanobis distance. Aerosol products from the CALIPSO satellite include aerosol type information as well, which is used as input to the CALIPSO aerosol retrieval. CALIPSO aerosol types are inferred using a mix of aerosol loading-dependent parameters, estimated aerosol depolarization, and location, altitude, and surface type information. The HSRL instrument flies beneath the CALIPSO satellite orbit track, presenting the opportunity for comparisons between the HSRL aerosol typing and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask Aerosol Subtype product, giving insight into the performance of the CALIPSO aerosol type algorithm. We find that the aerosol classification from the two instruments frequently agree for marine aerosols and pure dust, and somewhat less frequently for pollution and smoke. In addition, the comparison suggests that the CALIPSO polluted dust type is overly inclusive, encompassing cases of dust combined with marine aerosol as well as cases without much evidence of dust. Qualitative classification of aerosol type combined with quantitative profile measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction has many useful

  1. Influence of the aerosol vertical distribution on the retrievals of aerosol optical depth from satellite radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Ana Lía; Sokolik, Irina N.; Toon, Owen B.

    2000-11-01

    We investigate the importance of the layered vertical distribution of absorbing and non-absorbing tropospheric aerosols for the retrieval of the aerosol optical depth from satellite radiances measured at visible wavelengths at a single viewing angle. We employ lidar and in-situ measurements of aerosol extinction coefficients and optical depths to model radiances which would have been observed by a satellite. Then, we determine the aerosol optical depth that would produce the observed radiance under various sets of assumptions which are often used in current retrieval algorithms. We demonstrate that, in the presence of dust or other absorbing aerosols, the retrieved aerosol optical depth can underestimate or overestimate the observed optical depth by a factor of two or more depending on the choice of an aerosol optical model and the relative position of different aerosol layers. The presence of undetected clouds provides a further complication.

  2. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Artamonova, Maria S.; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2013-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regionalmore » sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  3. The vertical distribution of Martian aerosol particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    Using approximately 410 limb-viewing observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), we retrieve the vertical distribution of Martian dust and water ice aerosol particle sizes. We find that dust particles have an effective radius of 1.0 µm over much of the atmospheric column below 40 km throughout the Martian year. This includes the detached tropical dust layers detected in previous studies. Little to no variation with height is seen in dust particle size. Water ice clouds within the aphelion cloud belt exhibit a strong sorting of particle size with height, however, and the effective radii range from >3 µm below 20 km to near 1.0 µm at 40 km altitude. Conversely, water ice clouds in the seasonal polar hoods show a near-uniform particle size with an effective radius of approximately 1.5 µm throughout the atmospheric column.

  4. Deriving Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Sizes from TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Smith, M. D.; McConnochie, T. H.; Flittner, D. E.; Fouchet, T.

    2011-12-01

    Vertical variations in aerosol particle sizes can have a dramatic effect in their net impact on the state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. Recent analyses of data from the Spectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instruments offer some long overdue progress in constraining this aspect of aerosols. However, significantly more work remains to be done along these lines in order to better constrain and inform modern dynamical simulations of the Martian atmosphere. Thus, the primary goal of our work is to perform retrievals of particle size as a function of altitude for both dust and water ice aerosols. The choice of the TES dataset, with pole-to-pole coverage over a period of nearly three martian years, provides the crucial systematic temporal and spatial sampling. Additional leverage on the particle size will be obtained by using both solarband bolometry and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Our presentation will include: 1) A summary of our limb radiative transfer comparison/validation exercises which include Monte Carlo, Gauss-Seidel, and discrete-ordinate algorithms (including the plane-parallel source function approximation). 2) The initial results of the application of our particle size retrieval scheme to the TES observations of the 2001 planet encircling dust event. 3) A few test applications to the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) radiance profiles (enabled by the recent solarband radiometric calibration by Bandfield and collaborators). 4) Our plans for additional retrievals (aphelion cloud season, lower optical depth locations and seasons, etc.) and the distribution of the derived profiles.

  5. The Importance of the Vertical Location of Aerosol Layers on Convective Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, Susan; Grant, Leah

    2014-05-01

    Enhanced aerosol concentrations appear to influence a number of the aspects of convective storms including the strength of the convective updraft, the intensity of the cold pool, and the microphysical and radiative characteristics of the convective anvil. However, in order for such influences to occur, aerosols need to be effectively ingested by the storm system of interest. The vertical location of an aerosol layer impacting a convective storm may influence how effectively aerosol are ingested by the storm system, and hence the degree to which the ingested aerosol subsequently influence storm microphysical and radiative processes. Furthermore, if the aerosol species impacting the storm are effective at absorbing solar radiation, heating within the aerosol layer enhances atmospheric stability, the level of which will be dictated by where the aerosol layer is located. Enhanced static stability may have negative impacts on the initial development of the convection of interest. Convective storms developing within environments of the same aerosol optical depth may therefore respond differently to aerosol indirect forcing by virtue of where the aerosol layer is vertically located. In this talk, the results of various high-resolution, cloud-resolving simulations will be presented, in which the sensitivity to the vertical location of the aerosol source on the convective development, aerosol ingestion efficiency, and subsequent microphysical and radiative properties are investigated. Microphysical budgets and storm trajectories will form an integral part of the analysis.

  6. Vertical profiles of aerosol radiative forcing - a comparison of AEROCOM phase 2 model submissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosols in the earth's atmosphere affect the radiation balance of the planet. The radiative forcing (RF) induced by a given aerosol burden is however sensitive to its vertical density profile, in addition to aerosol optical properties, cloud distributions and surface albedo. Differences in vertical profiles are thought to be among the causes for the large intermodel differences in RF of the aerosol direct effect. As part of the AEROCOM phase 2 direct radiative forcing experiment, this study compares 3D concentration fields of black carbon from fossil fuel burning (BC) and sulphate (SO4) from a set of major global climate models. The participating models were run using a prescribed set of emissions of aerosol and aerosol precursors and the same meteorological year. We assume that model differences due to the aerosol vertical profile can be factored out from other differences such as aerosol physics, radiative transfer or ground albedo. We consequently analyse model RF variability using profiles of normalized RF (radiative forcing per unit mass, NDRF) calculated from a single model. This tool allows us to quantify the fraction of the intermodel variability due to differences in aerosol vertical profiles. We show that there are still significant differences between both modelled vertical density profiles, treatment of aerosol physics and other factors influencing the RF profiles.

  7. Vertical profile and aerosol size distribution measurements in Iceland (LOAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Vignelles, Damien; Verdier, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Cold climate and high latitudes regions contain important dust sources where dust is frequently emitted, foremost from glacially-derived sediments of riverbeds or ice-proximal areas (Arnalds, 2010; Bullard, 2013). Iceland is probably the most active dust source in the arctic/sub-arctic region (Dagsson-Waldhauserova, 2013). The frequency of days with suspended dust exceeds 34 dust days annually. Icelandic dust is of volcanic origin; it is very dark in colour and contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles. Such properties allow even large particles to be easily transported long distances. Thus, there is a need to better understand the spatial and temporal variability of these dusts. Two launch campaigns of the Light Optical Aerosols Counter (LOAC) were conducted in Iceland with meteorological balloons. LOAC use a new optical design that allows to retrieve the size concentrations in 19 size classes between 0.2 and 100 microm, and to provide an estimate of the main nature of aerosols. Vertical stratification and aerosol composition of the subarctic atmosphere was studied in detail. The July 2011 launch represented clean non-dusty season with low winds while the November 2013 launch was conducted during the high winds after dusty period. For the winter flight (performed from Reykjavik), the nature of aerosols strongly changed with altitude. In particular, a thin layer of volcanic dust was observed at an altitude of 1 km. Further LOAC measurements are needed to understand the implication of Icelandic dust to the Arctic warming and climate change. A new campaign of LAOC launches is planned for May 2014. Reference: Arnalds, O., 2010. Dust sources and deposition of aeolian materials in Iceland. Icelandic Agricultural Sciences 23, 3-21. Bullard, J.E., 2013. Contemporary glacigenic inputs to the dust cycle. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 38, 71-89. Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P., Arnalds O., Olafsson H. 2013. Long-term frequency and characteristics of dust storm events in

  8. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Gysel, Martin; Rubach, Florian; Mentel, Thomas F.; Goger, Brigitta; Poulain, Laurent; Schlag, Patrick; Miettinen, Pasi; Pajunoja, Aki; Virtanen, Annele; Klein Baltink, Henk; Bas Henzing, J. S.; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Weingartner, Ernest; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol particles hygroscopic properties, their mixing state as well as chemical composition were measured above northern Italy and the Netherlands. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; for chemical composition) and a white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS; for hygroscopic growth) were deployed on a Zeppelin NT airship within the PEGASOS project. This allowed one to investigate the development of the different layers within the planetary boundary layer (PBL), providing a unique in situ data set for airborne aerosol particles properties in the first kilometre of the atmosphere. Profiles measured during the morning hours on 20 June 2012 in the Po Valley, Italy, showed an increased nitrate fraction at ˜ 100 m above ground level (a.g.l.) coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth compared to ˜ 700 m a. g. l. This result was derived from both measurements of the aerosol composition and direct measurements of the hygroscopicity, yielding hygroscopicity parameters (κ) of 0.34 ± 0.12 and 0.19 ± 0.07 for 500 nm particles, at ˜ 100 and ˜ 700 m a. g. l., respectively. The difference is attributed to the structure of the PBL at this time of day which featured several independent sub-layers with different types of aerosols. Later in the day the vertical structures disappeared due to the mixing of the layers and similar aerosol particle properties were found at all probed altitudes (mean κ ≈ 0.18 ± 0.07). The aerosol properties observed at the lowest flight level (100 m a. g. l.) were consistent with parallel measurements at a ground site, both in the morning and afternoon. Overall, the aerosol particles were found to be externally mixed, with a prevailing hygroscopic fraction. The flights near Cabauw in the Netherlands in the fully mixed PBL did not feature altitude-dependent characteristics. Particles were also externally mixed and had an even larger hygroscopic fraction compared to the results in Italy. The mean κ from

  9. Vertical Distribution of Aerosols and Water Vapor Using CRISM Limb Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; CRISM Science; Operations Teams

    2011-12-01

    Near-infrared spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide a useful tool for probing atmospheric structure. Specifically, the observed radiance as a function of wavelength and height above the limb allows the vertical distribution of both dust and ice aerosols to be retrieved. These data serve as an important supplement to the aerosol profiling provided by the MRO/MCS instrument allowing independent validation and giving additional information on particle physical and scattering properties through multi-wavelength studies. A total of at least ten CRISM limb observations have been taken so far covering a full Martian year. Each set of limb observations nominally contains about four dozen scans across the limb giving pole-to-pole coverage for two orbits at roughly 100 and 290 W longitude over the Tharsis and Syrtis/Hellas regions, respectively. At each longitude, limb scans are spaced roughly 10 degrees apart in latitude, with a vertical spatial resolution on the limb of roughly 800 m. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations. We compute synthetic CRISM limb spectra using a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer code that accounts for multiple scattering from aerosols and accounts for spherical geometry of the limb observations by integrating the source functions along curved paths in that coordinate system. Retrieved are 14-point vertical profiles for dust and water ice aerosols with resolution of 0.4 scale heights between one and six scale heights above the surface. After the aerosol retrieval is completed, the abundances of CO2 (or surface pressure) and H2O gas are retrieved by matching the depth of absorption bands at 2000 nm for carbon dioxide and at 2600 nm for water vapor. In addition to the column abundance of water vapor, limited information on its vertical structure can also be retrieved depending on the signal available

  10. Vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei, aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and scattering across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Brock, C. A.; Gordon, T. D.; Lack, D.; Law, D. C.; Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Richardson, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The evolutions of vertical distributions of aerosol chemical, microphysical, hygroscopic, and optical properties present fundamental challenges to the understanding of ground-level air quality and radiative transfer, and few datasets exist to date for evaluation of atmospheric models. Data collected from recent NASA and NOAA field campaigns in the California Central Valley (DISCOVER-AQ), southeast United States (SENEX, SEAC4RS) and Texas (DISCOVER-AQ) allow for a unique opportunity to constrain vertical profiles of climate-relevant aerosol properties. This work presents in-situ aircraft measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and derivations of aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and light scattering. Aerosol hygroscopicity is derived from CCN and aerosol measurements. Inorganic water uptake is calculated from aerosol composition using ISORROPIA, a chemical thermodynamic model, while organic water uptake is calculated from organic hygroscopicity. Aerosol scattering closure is performed between scattering from water uptake calculations and in-situ scattering measurements.

  11. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    The ACTRIS-2 project, funded by Horizon 2020, addresses the scope of integrating state-of-the-art European ground-based stations for long term observations of aerosols, clouds and short lived gases, capitalizing on the work of FP7-ACTRIS. It aims at achieving the construction of a user-oriented RI, unique in the EU-RI landscape for providing 4-D integrated high-quality data from near-surface to high altitude (vertical profiles and total-column) which are relevant to climate and air-quality research. ACTRIS-2 develops and implements, in a large network of stations in Europe and beyond, observational protocols that permit the harmonization of collected data and their dissemination. ACTRIS secures provision and dissemination of a unique set of data and data-products that would not otherwise be available with the same level of quality and standardization. This results from a 10-year plus effort in constructing a research infrastructure capable of responding to community needs and requirements, and has been engaged since the start of the FP5 EU commission program. ACTRIS ensures compliance with reporting requirements (timing, format, traceability) defined by the major global observing networks. EARLINET (European Aerosol research Lidar NETwork), the aerosol vertical profiling component of ACTRIS, is providing since May 2000 vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter over Europe. A new structure of the EARLINET database has been designed in a more user oriented approach reporting new data products which are more effective for specific uses of different communities. In particular, a new era is starting with the Copernicus program during which the aerosol vertical profiling capability will be fundamental for assimilation and validation purposes. The new data products have been designed thanks to a strong link with EARLINET data users, first of all modeling and satellite communities, established since the beginning of EARLINET and re-enforced within ACTRIS2

  12. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Volume from High Spectral Resolution Infrared Transmission Measurements: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, Annmarie; Kahn, Brian H.; Mills, Franklin P.; Irion, Fredrick W.; Steele, Helen M.; Gunson, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment are utilized to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density and extinction coefficient. Following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991, the ATMOS spectra obtained on three Space Shuttle missions (1992, 1993, and 1994) provide a unique opportunity to study the global stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer shortly after a major volcanic eruption and periodically during the decay phase. Synthetic sulfate aerosol spectra are fit to the observed spectra, and a global fitting inversion routine is used to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density. Vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density for the three missions over portions of the globe are presented, with the peak in aerosol volume density occurring from as low as 10 km (polar latitudes) to as high as 20 km (subtropical latitudes). Derived aerosol volume density is as high as 2-3.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-10% in 1992, decreasing to 0.2-0.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-20% in 1994, in agreement with other experiments. Vertical extinction profiles derived from ATMOS are compared with profiles from Improved Stratospheric And Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) and Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) that coincide in space and time and show good general agreement. The uncertainty of the ATMOS vertical profiles is similar to CLAES and consistently smaller than ISAMS at similar altitudes.

  13. Radiosonde aerosol counter for vertical profiling of atmospheric dust layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Rogers, G.

    2010-05-01

    A low-cost, miniature aerosol particle counter has been developed, intended for use with balloon-borne meteorological radiosondes. It is particularly suitable for airborne mineral dust measurements. Ambient air is drawn into the counter using a diaphragm pump at a rate of 0.5 litre per minute. The counter detects particles in the airstream using a diode laser and a photodiode. Output from the photodiode is digitised into 5 size bins, with minimum particle diameters equivalent to 0.6, 1.4, 2.6, 5.4 and 10.6 micrometers. The counter is interfaced to a Vaisala RS92 radiosonde, which transmits data from the counter together with meteorological parameters and GPS-derived position to a ground based receiver at 1 Hz rate. Statistically significant particle size distributions can be obtained once a second for number concentrations down to about 100,000 particle per litre (within the measured size range), or correspondingly less at lower temporal resolutions. At the same time, the counter is capable of measuring dust number concentrations exceeding a million per litre without incurring significant errors. Soundings during the DREAME campaign in Kuwait (Ulanowski et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) and on Cape Verde Islands (Nicoll et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) provided dust concentration profiles with a typical vertical resolution of 4 m. Comparisons with integrated dust column size distribution measurements from AERONET sun photometers showed good agreement in two out of three cases where near-simultaneous retrievals were available. Optical thickness calculations based on the size distributions measured in Kuwait, with the assumption that the dust particles were prolate spheroids, agreed with the AERONET optical thickness at 675 nm to within 15%.

  14. Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosol Vertical Distributions above Svalbard, Norway using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Stalin, S.; Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Burkhart, J. F.; Quinn, P.; Storvold, R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2015 to investigate the processes controlling aerosol concentrations and radiative effects. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) on 9 flights totaling 19 flight hours. Measurements were made of particle number concentration and aerosol light absorption at three wavelengths, similar to those conducted in April 2011 (Bates et al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 2115-2120, 2013). A filter sample was collected on each flight for analyses of trace elements. Additional measurements in the aerosol payload in 2015 included aerosol size distributions obtained using a Printed Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS) and aerosol optical depth obtained using a four wavelength miniature Scanning Aerosol Sun Photometer (miniSASP). The data show most of the column aerosol mass and resulting optical depth in the boundary layer but frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (2000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Transport of these aerosol layers was assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion models. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  15. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions. PMID:26257345

  16. Study of vertical profiles of aerosols using tethersonde over Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R. K.; Sinha, P. R.; Sreenivasan, S.; Subba Rao Jonnalagadda, Venkata

    Characterization of the physical, chemical and the optical properties of aerosol along with their spatial and temporal variations due to short residence time of few days to about a week, has received significant attention because of their critical role in the atmospheric radiation budget and the climate change. Since of the globe is covered by oceans, the measurement of aerosols, their altitude profiles and long range transport remains a challenge. We conducted the first ever in-situ measurements of size-segregated vertical profiles of aerosol in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) over the Bay of Bengal (BoB) using tethersonde. The observations were made at five different locations during the winter Integrated Campaign of Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget. We present spatial distribution and the vertical behaviour of marine aerosols.

  17. Impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol direct radiative effect and heating rate in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Vasileios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Koras Carracca, Mario; Kinne, Stefan; Vardavas, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    It is now well-established that aerosols cause an overall cooling effect at the surface and a warming effect within the atmosphere. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), both positive and negative forcing can be found, depending on a number of other factors, such as surface albedo and relative position of clouds and aerosols. Whilst aerosol surface cooling is important due to its relation with surface temperature and other bio-environmental reasons, atmospheric heating is of special interest as well having significant impacts on atmospheric dynamics, such as formation of clouds and subsequent precipitation. The actual position of aerosols and their altitude relative to clouds is of major importance as certain types of aerosol, such as black carbon (BC) above clouds can have a significant impact on planetary albedo. The vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds has recently drawn the attention of the aerosol community, because partially can account for the differences between simulated aerosol radiative forcing with various models, and therefore decrease the level of our uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing, which is one of our priorities set by IPCC. The vertical profiles of aerosol optical and physical properties have been studied by various research groups around the world, following different methodologies and using various indices in order to present the impact of aerosols on radiation on different altitudes above the surface. However, there is still variability between the published results as to the actual effect of aerosols on shortwave radiation and on heating rate within the atmosphere. This study uses vertical information on aerosols from the Max Planck Aerosol Climatology (MAC-v1) global dataset, which is a combination of model output with quality ground-based measurements, in order to provide useful insight into the vertical profile of atmospheric heating for the Mediterranean region. MAC-v1 and the science behind this aerosol dataset have already

  18. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

    2009-05-05

    This project focused on: 1) evaluating the performance of the DOE ARM SGP Raman lidar system in measuring profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and 2) the use of the Raman lidar measurements of aerosol and water vapor profiles for assessing the vertical distribution of aerosols and water vapor simulated by global transport models and examining diurnal variability of aerosols and water vapor. The highest aerosol extinction was generally observed close to the surface during the nighttime just prior to sunrise. The high values of aerosol extinction are most likely associated with increased scattering by hygroscopic aerosols, since the corresponding average relative humidity values were above 70%. After sunrise, relative humidity and aerosol extinction below 500 m decreased with the growth in the daytime convective boundary layer. The largest aerosol extinction for altitudes above 1 km occurred during the early afternoon most likely as a result of the increase in relative humidity. The water vapor mixing ratio profiles generally showed smaller variations with altitude between day and night. We also compared simultaneous measurements of relative humidity, aerosol extinction, and aerosol optical thickness derived from the ARM SGP Raman lidar and in situ instruments on board a small aircraft flown routinely over the ARM SGP site. In contrast, the differences between the CARL and IAP aerosol extinction measurements are considerably larger. Aerosol extinction derived from the IAP measurements is, on average, about 30-40% less than values derived from the Raman lidar. The reasons for this difference are not clear, but may be related to the corrections for supermicron scattering and relative humidity that were applied to the IAP data. The investigators on this project helped to set up a major field mission (2003 Aerosol IOP) over the DOE ARM SGP site. One of the goals of the mission was to further evaluate the aerosol and water vapor retrievals from this lidar system

  19. Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Profiles and Optical Properties during INDOEX 1999 Using Micro-Pulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.; Gordon, Howard R.; Johnson, James E.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    lower troposphere) calculates extinction near the surface in agreement with the ship-level measurements only when the MBL aerosols are well mixed with aerosols above. Finally, a review of the MPL extinction profiles showed that the model of aerosol vertical extinction developed during an earlier INDOEX field campaign (at the Maldives) did not correctly describe the true vertical distribution over the greater Indian Ocean region. Using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions, a new model of aerosol vertical extinction was determined for marine atmospheres over the Indian Ocean. A new model of aerosol vertical extinction for polluted marine atmospheres was also developed using the average extinction profile and AOD obtained during marine conditions influenced by continental aerosols.

  20. Measurements of atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions above Svalbard, Norway, using unmanned aerial systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Johnson, J. E.; Corless, A.; Brechtel, F. J.; Stalin, S. E.; Meinig, C.; Burkhart, J. F.

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway, in April 2011 during the Cooperative Investigation of Climate-Cryosphere Interactions campaign (CICCI). Measurements were made of the particle number concentration and the aerosol light absorption coefficient at three wavelengths. A filter sample was collected on each flight at the altitude of maximum particle number concentration. The filters were analyzed for major anions and cations. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). A total of 18 flights were flown during the campaign totaling 38 flight hours. The data show frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (1000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Air mass histories of these aerosol layers were assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion modeling. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  1. Measurements of atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions above Svalbard, Norway using unmanned aerial systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Johnson, J. E.; Corless, A.; Brechtel, F. J.; Stalin, S. E.; Meinig, C.; Burkhart, J. F.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2011 during the Cooperative Investigation of Climate-Cryosphere Interactions campaign (CICCI). Measurements were made of the particle number concentration and the aerosol light absorption coefficient at three wavelengths. A filter sample was collected on each flight at the altitude of maximum particle number concentration. The filters were analyzed for major anions and cations. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). A total of 18 flights were flown during the campaign totaling 38 flight hours. The data show frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (1000 cm-3 and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Air mass histories of these aerosol layers were assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion modeling. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  2. Dependence of the effect of aerosols on cirrus clouds on background vertical velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo

    2012-07-01

    Cirrus clouds cover approximately 20-25% of the globe and thus play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget. This important role in the radiation budget played by cirrus clouds indicates that aerosol effects on cirrus clouds can have a substantial impact on the variation of global radiative forcing if the ice-water path (IWP) changes. This study examines the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) through changes in the IWP for cirrus cloud cases. This study also examines the dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions in cirrus clouds on the large-scale vertical motion. We use a cloud-system resolving model (CSRM) coupled with a double-moment representation of cloud microphysics. Intensified interactions among the cloud ice number concentration (CINC), deposition and dynamics play a critical role in the IWP increases due to aerosol increases from the preindustrial (PI) level to the present-day (PD) level with a low large-scale vertical velocity. Increased aerosols lead to an increased CINC, providing an increased surface area for water vapor deposition. The increased surface area leads to increased deposition despite decreased supersaturation with increasing aerosols. The increased deposition causes an increased depositional heating which produces stronger updrafts, and these stronger updrafts lead to the increased IWP. However, with a high large-scale vertical velocity, the effect of increased CINC on deposition was not able to offset the effect of decreasing supersaturation with increasing aerosols. The effect of decreasing supersaturation on deposition dominant over that of increasing CINC leads to smaller deposition and IWP at high aerosol with the PD aerosol than at low aerosol with the PI aerosol. The conversion of ice crystals to aggregates through autoconversion and accretion plays a negligible role in the IWP responses to aerosols, as does the sedimentation of aggregates. The sedimentation of ice crystals plays a more important role in the IWP response to

  3. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  4. MPL-Net Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Vertical Distributions at Co-Located AERONET Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Spinhirne, James D.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar system was developed, the Micropulse Lidar (MPL). The MPL acquires signal profiles of backscattered laser light from aerosols and clouds. The signals are analyzed to yield multiple layer heights, optical depths of each layer, average extinction-to-backscatter ratios for each layer, and profiles of extinction in each layer. In 2000, several MPL sites were organized into a coordinated network, called MPL-Net, by the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) using funding provided by the NASA Earth Observing System. tn addition to the funding provided by NASA EOS, the NASA CERES Ground Validation Group supplied four MPL systems to the project, and the NASA TOMS group contributed their MPL for work at GSFC. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) also agreed to make their data available to the MPL-Net project for processing. In addition to the initial NASA and ARM operated sites, several other independent research groups have also expressed interest in joining the network using their own instruments. Finally, a limited amount of EOS funding was set aside to participate in various field experiments each year. The NASA Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project also provides funds to deploy their MPL during ocean research cruises. All together, the MPL-Net project has participated in four major field experiments since 2000. Most MPL-Net sites and field experiment locations are also co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network. (AERONET). Therefore, at these locations data is collected on both aerosol and cloud vertical structure as well as column optical depth and sky radiance. Real-time data products are now available from most MPL-Net sites. Our real-time products are generated at times of AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. The AERONET AOD is used as input to our

  5. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  6. Vertical distribution of aerosols in the vicinity of Mexico City during MILAGRO-2006 Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, P.A.; Kleinman, L.; Eichinger, W. E.; Holder, H.; Prueger, J.; Wang, J.

    2010-02-01

    On 7 March 2006, a mobile, ground-based, vertical pointing, elastic lidar system made a North-South transect through the Mexico City basin. Column averaged, aerosol size distribution (ASD) measurements were made on the ground concurrently with the lidar measurements. The ASD ground measurements allowed calculation of the column averaged mass extinction efficiency (MEE) for the lidar system (1064 nm). The value of column averaged MEE was combined with spatially resolved lidar extinction coefficients to produce total aerosol mass concentration estimates with the resolution of the lidar (1.5 m vertical spatial and 1 s temporal). Airborne ASD measurements from DOE G-1 aircraft made later in the day on 7 March 2006, allowed the evaluation of the assumptions of constant ASD with height and time used for estimating the column averaged MEE. The results showed that the aerosol loading within the basin is about twice what is observed outside of the basin. The total aerosol base concentrations observed in the basin are of the order of 200 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and the base levels outside are of the order of 100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The local heavy traffic events can introduce aerosol levels near the ground as high as 900 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The article presents the methodology for estimating aerosol mass concentration from mobile, ground-based lidar measurements in combination with aerosol size distribution measurements. An uncertainty analysis of the methodology is also presented.

  7. Long-term aerosol study on continental scale through EARLINET vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Linne, Holger; Wandinger, Ulla

    2015-04-01

    Lidar techniques offer the opportunity for investigating the aerosol vertical profiles, which is an important information for climatological, meteorological and air quality issues. EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) has been providing aerosol optical properties vertical profiles over Europe since May 2000. Long-term aerosol observations performed within EARLINET allows a climatological study of aerosol properties over Europe. All EARLINET stations perform almost simultaneously measurements three times per week following a scheduling established in 2000. Besides these climatological measurements, additional measurements are performed in order to monitor special events (as volcanic eruptions and desert dust intrusion), for satellite data evaluation and integrated studies and during intensive measurements campaigns. Aerosol optical properties vertical profiles are freely available at www.earlinet.org and through ACRIS data center http://www.actris.net/. This data are currently published on the CERA database with an associated doi number. Based mainly on Raman technique, EARLINET stations typically provide direct measurement of extinction profiles, and therefore of the aerosol optical depth (AOD), a key parameter for understanding the aerosol role on radiation budget. The free troposphere contribution to AOD and altitude of lofted layers are provided thanks to the vertical profiling capability of lidar technique. The representativeness of EARLINET regular scheduling for climatological studies is investigating through the comparison with AERONET and MODIS measurements. We find that the regular measurements schedule is typically sufficient for climatological studies. In addition lidar punctual measurements are representative for a larger area (1°x1°) in a climatological sense. Long term analysis of EARLINET profiles shows that the AOD in generally decreasing over Europe in agreement with both passive-sensors and in situ measurements. Mean vertical

  8. Vertical profiles of aerosol volume from high-spectral-resolution infrared transmission measurements. I. Methodology.

    PubMed

    Eldering, A; Irion, F W; Chang, A Y; Gunson, M R; Mills, F P; Steele, H M

    2001-06-20

    The wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction in the 800-1250-cm(-1) region has been derived from ATMOS (atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy) high-spectral-resolution IR transmission measurements. Using models of aerosol and cloud extinction, we have performed weighted nonlinear least-squares fitting to determine the aerosol-volume columns and vertical profiles of stratospheric sulfate aerosol and cirrus cloud volume. Modeled extinction by use of cold-temperature aerosol optical constants for a 70-80% sulfuric-acid-water solution shows good agreement with the measurements, and the derived aerosol volumes for a 1992 occultation are consistent with data from other experiments after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The retrieved sulfuric acid aerosol-volume profiles are insensitive to the aerosol-size distribution and somewhat sensitive to the set of optical constants used. Data from the nonspherical cirrus extinction model agree well with a 1994 mid-latitude measurement indicating the presence of cirrus clouds at the tropopause. PMID:18357329

  9. Aerosol vertical distribution, optical properties and transport over Corsica (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léon, J.-F.; Augustin, P.; Mallet, M.; Bourrianne, T.; Pont, V.; Dulac, F.; Fourmentin, M.; Lambert, D.; Sauvage, B.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the aerosol vertical distribution observed in the western Mediterranean between February and April 2011 and between February 2012 and August 2013. An elastic backscattering lidar was continuously operated at a coastal site in the northern part of Corsica Island (Cap Corse) for a total of more than 14 000 h of observations. The aerosol extinction coefficient retrieved from cloud-free lidar profiles are analyzed along with the SEVIRI satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD). The SEVIRI AOD was used to constrain the retrieval of the aerosol extinction profiles from the lidar range-corrected signal and to detect the presence of dust or pollution aerosols. The daily average AOD at 550 nm is 0.16 (±0.09) and ranges between 0.05 and 0.80. A seasonal cycle is observed with minima in winter and maxima in spring-summer. High AOD days (above 0.3 at 550 nm) represent less than 10% of the totality of daily observations and correspond to the large scale advection of desert dust from Northern Africa or pollution aerosols from Europe. The respective origin of the air masses is confirmed using FLEXPART simulations in the backward mode. Dust events are characterized by a large turbid layer between 2 and 5 km height while pollution events show a lower vertical development with a thick layer below 3 km in altitude. However low level dust transport is also reported during spring while aerosol pollution layer between 2 and 4 km height has been also observed. We report an effective lidar ratio at 355 nm for pollution aerosols 68 (±13) Sr while it is 63 (±18) Sr for dust. The daily mean AOD at 355 nm for dust events is 0.61 (±0.14) and 0.71 (±0.16) for pollution aerosols events.

  10. [A floating-dust case study based on the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Deng, Jun-Ying; Shi, Lan-Hong; Chen, Yong-Hang; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-03-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties of a typical floating-dust event on October 19, 2009 in Shanghai was analyzed by using Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL) and the CALIPSO satellite. The results showed that the floating-dust aerosol mainly existed below 2 km of height. The floating-dust aerosol backscatter coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.015 km(-1) x sr(-1), and the MPL extinction coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.32 km(-1). The MPL data showed that the aerosol extinction coefficient first increased and then decreased during the floating-dust event. At the same time, the aerosol layer was constantly lifting. The CALIPSO data showed that a large number of small particles were suspended in air at a height of below 2 km, while the big particles always stayed near the ground (0-0.5 km). At the height of 2-10 km, there was only few aerosols; in the range of 4-6 km, there was a mixture of particles with regular and irregular shapes. The vertical distribution of CALIPSO 532 nm total attenuated backscatter coefficient and MPL normalized relative backscatter signal was basically the same, but the extinction coefficient values gained by them were different. Observations by CALIPSO and MPL together could be more comprehensive and objective for monitoring floating-dust in Shanghai. PMID:24881367

  11. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  12. Analysis of atmospheric vertical profiles in the presence of desert dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M. J.; Obregón, M. A.; Pereira, S.; Salgueiro, V.; Potes, M.; Couto, F. T.; Salgado, R.; Bortoli, D.; Silva, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The present work aims at studying a very recent episode of desert dust transport that affected Iberia in mid May 2015. The dust aerosols were detected over Évora, where a varied set of instrumentation for aerosol measurements is installed, including: a CIMEL sunphotometer integrated in AERONET, a Raman Lidar and a TEOM monitor, as well as ceilometer and a microwave radiometer (profiler). The aerosol occurrence, detected using the columnar, vertically-resolved and in situ measurements, was characterized by a fairly high aerosol optical thickness that reached a value of 1.0 at 440 nm and showed mass concentration peaks at the surface of the order of 100 μg/m3. Subsequently, the tropospheric vertical profiles of humidity and temperature obtained with the passive microwave (MW) radiometer are analysed in order to distinguish possible modifications that can be connected with the transport of desert dust. Modelling results are also examined and the total, SW and LW radiative forcings are investigated, taking into account the different vertical profiles obtained during the desert dust occurrence. It is found that the differences in the atmospheric profiles mostly affect the LW radiative forcing, with an underestimation of about 30% when the actual vertical profile is not considered.

  13. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  14. Vertical Aerosol Backscatter Variability from an Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements using a continuous wave focused Doppler lidar at 9.1 micron wavelength were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean during 13 - 26 September, 1995 as part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on board the NASA DC8 aircraft. Backscatter variability was measured for approximately 52 flight hours, covering equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 25,000 km in the troposphere. Quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents which ranged between approximately 0.1 to 12.0 km altitude. Aerosol haze layers were encountered at different altitudes. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and over ocean were observed. A mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was found with modal value approximately 1O(exp -10)/m/sr, consistent with previous airborne and ground-based datasets.

  15. Comparison of Aerosol Classification Results from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Measurements and the Calipso Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Froyd, K. D.; Omar, A.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the vertical profile, composition, concentration, and size of aerosols is required for assessing the direct impact of aerosols on radiation, the indirect effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation, and attributing these effects to natural and anthropogenic aerosols. Because anthropogenic aerosols are predominantly submicrometer, fine mode fraction (FMF) retrievals from satellite have been used as a tool for deriving anthropogenic aerosols. Although column and profile satellite retrievals of FMF have been performed over the ocean, such retrievals have not yet been been done over land. Consequently, uncertainty in satellite estimates of the anthropogenic component of the aerosol direct radiative forcing is greatest over land, due in large part to uncertainties in the FMF. Satellite measurements have been used to detect and evaluate aerosol impacts on clouds; however, such efforts have been hampered by the difficulty in retrieving vertically-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration, which is the most direct parameter linking aerosol and clouds. Recent studies have shown correlations between average satellite derived column aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and in situ measured CCN. However, these same studies, as well as others that use detailed airborne in situ measurements have noted that vertical variability of the aerosol distribution, impacts of relative humidity, and the presence of coarse mode aerosols such as dust introduce large uncertainties in such relations.

  16. Sensitivity of aerosol-induced effects on numerically simulated squall lines to the vertical distribution of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    The sensitivity of aerosol-induced enhancement of convective strength and precipitation to the vertical distribution is analyzed in the context of numerically simulated squall lines. Recent investigations have hypothesized and demonstrated that an increase in an aerosol loading may lead to enhanced vertical updrafts and potentially more precipitation in a variety of deep convective systems. One of the generally accepted hypotheses for such an enhancement in convective strength suggests that the predominant effect of an increase in aerosol loading is related to enhanced latent heat release in the mid to upper levels of the convective cores. This enhancement has been attributed to an increase in supercooled liquid water that tends to exist in clouds formed in more polluted environments and it is suggested that this water is lofted from below the freezing level to the mixed-phase region of the cloud where the latent heating effects are maximized. However, deep convective cores are quite strong and so a reduction in cloud droplet size due to enhanced aerosol number concentration (which reduces the terminal fall speed) ought to have a negligible effect on the trajectory of the droplets (since the updraft velocity is much larger than the terminal fall speed). Thus, it should be expected that low-level aerosol pollution would have little to no effect on latent heating rates aloft since the droplets will end up in the mixed-phase region regardless of size. Moreover, more recent investigations have shown that aerosol perturbations, especially in squall lines, can lead to less intense cold pools and thus a more optimal state according to RKW theory. Numerical simulations of idealized squall lines are performed to specifically analyze the sensitivity of the aforementioned effects to the vertical distribution of aerosols. The simulations suggest that low-level air tends to either be detrained at the bottom of the convective cores or remains in the convective cores throughout

  17. Vertical transport of ozone in the upper and lower troposphere during INDOEX: Radiative effects of aerosols and dynamic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, J.; Andres-Hernandez, M. D.; Dickerson, R. R.; Smit, H.; Wittrock, F.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    The variations of different meteorological parameters and trace gas mixing ratios (rel. Hum., Temp., O3) in the lower troposphere over the Indian Ocean have been analysed. The measurements were performed in February-April 1999 during a ship cruise as a part of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX). During the campaign air parcels from the surrounding areas of the Bay of Bengal were encountered corresponding with a clearly structured vertical distribution of O3 in the lower troposphere (20 ppbv O3 at sea level, 80 ppbv O3 between 2 and 3 km). The remarkable vertical O3 structure vanished due to the moist convection associated to a 24 hours rain event and re-established directly afterwards. The responsible processes for the strong stability of the lower troposphere will be discussed, with special regards to the absorption of solar radiation by aerosols. Therefore, a radiative transfer model (SCIATRAN) has been used to calculate warming rates caused by the absorption of aerosols. Furthermore, the role of macro- and meso-scale processes on the vertical and horizontal distribution of O3 has been qualitatively investigated by using back trajectories, O3 soundings, and tropospheric columns of O3, NO2, and HCHO derived from satellite based measurements. Possible sources of O3 above the southern hemispheric Indian Ocean will be discussed. In addition, some questions concerning the stability of the atmosphere over the ocean will be raised.

  18. Influence of atmospheric parameters on vertical profiles and horizontal transport of aerosols generated in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Van Eijk, A. M. J.; Piazzola, J.

    2013-10-01

    The vertical and horizontal transport of aerosols generated over the surf zone is discussed. Experimental data were collected during the second campaign of the Surf Zone Aerosol Experiment that took place in Duck NC (USA) in November 2007. The Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method was used to analyze the vertical concentration gradients, and allowed separating the surf aerosols from aerosols advected from elsewhere. The numerical Marine Aerosol Concentration Model (MACMod) supported the analysis by confirming that the concentration gradients are more pronounced under stable conditions and that aerosol plumes are then more confined to the surface. The model also confirmed the experimental observations made during two boat runs along the offshore wind vector that surf-generated aerosols are efficiently advected out to sea over several tens of kilometers.

  19. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  20. Development of ATLID-MSI synergy for retrieving the vertical profiles of aerosol components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Nishizawa, T.; Higurashi, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Oikawa, E.

    2014-12-01

    EarthCARE is an earth observation satellite and will be launched in 2016. Using its two sensors, ATLID (High spectral resolution lidar) and MSI (Multi-spectral imager), we are developing the synergy algorithm to retrieve the vertical profiles of extinction coefficients at 355 nm of four aerosol components (Water-soluble, black carbon, dust, and sea-salt particles), and the column mean of mode radii of water-soluble and dust particles. The ATLID data are extinction coefficient, backscatter coefficient, and depolarization ratio for total aerosols at 355 nm. The MSI data are radiances at 670 and 865 nm. The dry volume concentrations of four aerosol components at each altitude and the mode radii of water-soluble and dust particles in the column are simultaneously optimized to ATLID and MSI data by the gauss newton method. After the optimization, the vertical profiles of the extinction coefficient at 355 nm of four aerosol components are obtained. The size distributions of four aerosol components are assumed to be a lognormal distribution. The refractive indices of four aerosol components are given from previously observational studies. The humidity growth is considered for water-soluble and sea-salt particles. The volume concentration and the mode radius of the sea-salt particle are parameterized using the surface wind speed on the ocean. We assumed that the shape of the water-soluble, black carbon, and sea-salt particles are spherical, and the shape of the dust particle is spheroidal. We tested the algorithm using the ATLID and MSI data simulated using clean, dust-transported, and smoke-transported aerosols. The extinction coefficients of each component at 355 nm are retrieved well. The mode radius of water-soluble and dust particles were somehow overestimated.

  1. Vertical Distribution of Gases and Aerosols in Titan's Atmosphere Observed by VIMS/Cassini Solar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Vinatier, Sandrine; Sicardy, Bruno; Bézard, Bruno; Sotin, Christophe; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matt; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We present the vertical distribution of gaseous species and aerosols in Titan's atmosphere through the analysis of VIMS solar occultations. We employ the infrared channel of VIMS, which covers the 1 - 5 μm wavelength range. VIMS occultations can provide good vertical resolution (~10 km) and an extended altitude range (from 70 to 700 km), complementing well the information from other Cassini instruments. VIMS has retrieved 10 solar occultations up to now. They are distributed through the whole Cassini mission and they probe different latitudes in both hemispheres. Two main gases can be observed by VIMS occultations: methane, through its bands at 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 and 3.3 μm, and CO, at 4.7 μm. We can extract methane's abundance between 70 and 750 km and CO's between 70 and 180 km. Regarding aerosols, the VIMS altitude range allows to get information on the properties of both the main haze and the detached layer. Aerosols also affect the transmittance through their spectral signatures. In particular, a spectral signature at 3.4 μm that was attributed to aerosols was recently discovered by the analysis of the first VIMS occultation. We will monitor the latitudinal and temporal variations of the 3.4 μm feature through various occultations. A change in the global circulation regime of Titan sets in with the approaching to the vernal equinox, and a strong decrease of the altitude of the detached layer between the winter solstice and the equinox has indeed been observed. The temporal coverage of VIMS occultations allows the study the effect of these variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical and spectral properties.

  2. Seismic Behaviour of Vertical Mass Isolated Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nekooei, M.; Ziyaeifar, M.

    2008-07-08

    In this paper, the seismic behaviour of vertical mass isolated structures against the earthquake is studied. These structures are assumed to be consisted of two subsystems. Mass subsystem possesses low lateral stiffness but carries the major part of mass of the system. Stiffness subsystem, however, controls the deformation of the mass subsystem and attributes with much higher stiffness. The isolator layer is, therefore, located in between the mass and the stiffness subsystems and assumed to be a viscous damper layer. The analytical model used for this investigation is a dual mass-spring model which is an extended form of the three element Maxwell model. In this study, the ability of mass isolation techniques in reducing earthquake effects on buildings with two approaches, parametric and numerical approaches, is shown. In the parametric approach, by definition an isolation factor for structure and determination the dynamic characteristics of system, the relative optimum value of the isolator damping coefficient is obtained. The results provide an insight on role of relative stiffness and mass ratio of the two subsystems. Finally, in the numerical approach, the spectral responses of these structures due to the earthquake are investigated. The results show a noticeable decrease in earthquake input force to vertical mass isolated structures in comparison with non-isolated structures.

  3. Vertical Profiles of Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Condensation Nuclei, Optical Aerosol, Aerosol Optical Properties, and Aerosol Volatility Measured from Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, T.; Snider, J. R.; Vali, G.

    1998-01-01

    Under the support of this grant a balloon-borne gondola containing a variety of aerosol instruments was developed and flown from Laramie, Wyoming, (41 deg N, 105 deg W) and from Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S, 170 deg E). The gondola includes instruments to measure the concentrations of condensation nuclei (CN), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), optically detectable aerosol (OA.) (r greater than or equal to 0.15 - 2.0 microns), and optical scattering properties using a nephelometer (lambda = 530 microns). All instruments sampled from a common inlet which was heated to 40 C on ascent and to 160 C on descent. Flights with the CN counter, OA counter, and nephelometer began in July 1994. The CCN counter was added in November 1994, and the engineering problems were solved by June 1995. Since then the flights have included all four instruments, and were completed in January 1998. Altogether there were 20 flights from Laramie, approximately 5 per year, and 2 from Lauder. Of these there were one or more engineering problems on 6 of the flights from Laramie, hence the data are somewhat limited on those 6 flights, while a complete data set was obtained from the other 14 flights. Good CCN data are available from 12 of the Laramie flights. The two flights from Lauder in January 1998 were successful for all measurements. The results from these flights, and the development of the balloon-bome CCN counter have formed the basis for five conference presentations. The heated and unheated CN and OA measurements have been used to estimate the mass fraction of the aerosol volatile, while comparisons of the nephelometer measurements were used to estimate the light scattering, associated with the volatile aerosol. These estimates were calculated for 0.5 km averages of the ascent and descent data between 2.5 km and the tropopause, near 11.5 km.

  4. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Kokkola, Harri; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; van Noije, Twan; Pringle, Kirsty J.; von Salzen, Knut; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN > 3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN > 100 nm) are controlled by the

  5. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Z.; Stier, P.; Johnson, C. E.; Mann, G. W.; Bellouin, N.; Bauer, S. E.; Bergman, T.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kokkola, H.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; van Noije, T.; Pringle, K. J.; von Salzen, K.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors, we investigate the effects of individual processes in one particular model (HadGEM3-UKCA), and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global mean profile and zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. Convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulphate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea-salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number, while the profiles of larger particles are controlled by the same processes as the component mass profiles, plus the size distribution of

  6. What Controls the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol? Relationships Between Process Sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and Inter-Model Variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN >3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN>100 nm) are controlled by the

  7. How well can we Measure the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (MOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to-date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(sub ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well proven and new aerosol instrumentation, devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from 6 different instuments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, ground-based Raman lidar and 2 ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in-situ measured sigma(sub ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002 - 0.004 K/m equivalent to 12-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(sub ep)(lambda) are higher. An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system looking at the collective results from 6 field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(sub ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(sub ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(sub ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated with measuring the tropospheric vertical profile of the ambient aerosol extinction with current state of-the art instrumentation is 15-20% at visible wavelengths and potentially larger in

  8. Vertical cloud structure of Jupiter's equatorial plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Hord, C.

    1985-01-01

    Multiple-scattering radiative transfer calculations were used to deduce the vertical cloud structure (VCS) of Jupiter's equatorial region. The VCS model of the equatorial plumes is obtained through an analysis of Voyager images of the 6190-A methane band and the 6000-A continuum, and ground-based 8900-A methane band images. The VCS of the equatorial plumes is found to be consistent with the hypothesis that the plumes are caused by upwelling at the ammonia condensation level produced by buoyancy due to latent heat release from the condensation of water clouds nearly three scale heights below the plumes.

  9. Three-dimensional structure of aerosol in China: A perspective from multi-satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianping; Liu, Huan; Wang, Fu; Huang, Jingfeng; Xia, Feng; Lou, Mengyun; Wu, Yerong; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Xie, Tao; Zhaxi, Yangzong; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-09-01

    Using eight years (2006-2014) of passive (MODIS/Aqua and OMI/Aura) and active (CALIOP/CALIPSO) satellite measurements of aerosols, we yield a three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the frequency of occurrence (FoO) of aerosols over China. As an indicator of the vertical heterogeneity of aerosol layers detected by CALIOP, two types of Most Probable Height (MPH), including MPH_FoO and MPH_AOD, are deduced. The FoO of "Total Aerosol" reveals significant geographical dependence. Eastern China showed much stronger aerosol FoD than northwestern China. The FoO vertical structures of aerosol layer are strongly dependent on altitudes. Among the eight typical ROIs analyzed, aerosol layers over the Gobi Desert have the largest occurrence probability located at an altitude as high as 2.83 km, as compared to 1.26 km over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei. The diurnal variation (nighttime-daytime) in MPH_AOD varies from an altitude as low as 0.07 km over the Sichuan basin to 0.27 km over the Gobi Desert, whereas the magnitude of the diurnal variation in terms of MPH_AOD is six times as large as the MPH_FoO, mostly attributable to the day/night lidar SNR difference. Also, the 3D distribution of dust and smoke aerosols was presented. The multi-sensor synergized 3D observations of dust aerosols, frequently observed in the zonal belt of 38°N-45°N, is markedly different from that of smoke aerosols that are predominantly located in the eastern and southern parts. The 3D FoO distribution of dust indicates a west-to-east passageway of dust originating from the westernmost Taklimakan Desert all the way to North China Plain (NCP). The findings from the multi-sensor synergetic observations greatly improved our understanding on the long-range aerosol dispersion, transport and passageway over China.

  10. Vertical distribution and radiative effects of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol over West Africa during DABEX

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ben; Heese, B.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Chazette, P.; Jones, A.; Bellouin, N.

    2008-09-12

    This paper presents measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction coefficient over West Africa, during the Dust and Biomass burning aerosol Experiment (DABEX) / African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis dry season Special Observing period zero (AMMA-SOP0). In situ aircraft measurements from the UK FAAM aircraft are compared with two ground based lidars (POLIS and ARM MPL) and an airborne lidar on an ultra-light aircraft. In general mineral dust was observed at low altitudes (up to 2km) and a mixture of biomass burning aerosol and dust was observed at altitudes of 2-5km. The study exposes difficulties associated with spatial and temporal variability when inter-comparing aircraft and ground measurements. Averaging over many profiles provided a better means of assessing consistent errors and biases associated with in situ sampling instruments and retrievals of lidar ratios. Shortwave radiative transfer calculations and a 3-year simulation with the HadGEM2-A climate model show that the radiative effect of biomass burning aerosol is somewhat sensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosol. Results show a 15% increase in absorption of solar radiation by elevated biomass burning aerosol when the observed low-level dust layer is included as part of the background atmospheric state in the model. This illustrates that the radiative forcing of anthropogenic absorbing aerosol is sensitive to the treatment of other aerosol species and that care is needed in simulating natural aerosols assumed to exist in the pre-industrial, or natural state of the atmosphere.

  11. The Temporal Structure of Vertical Arm Movements

    PubMed Central

    Gaveau, Jérémie; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates how the CNS deals with the omnipresent force of gravity during arm motor planning. Previous studies have reported direction-dependent kinematic differences in the vertical plane; notably, acceleration duration was greater during a downward than an upward arm movement. Although the analysis of acceleration and deceleration phases has permitted to explore the integration of gravity force, further investigation is necessary to conclude whether feedforward or feedback control processes are at the origin of this incorporation. We considered that a more detailed analysis of the temporal features of vertical arm movements could provide additional information about gravity force integration into the motor planning. Eight subjects performed single joint vertical arm movements (45° rotation around the shoulder joint) in two opposite directions (upwards and downwards) and at three different speeds (slow, natural and fast). We calculated different parameters of hand acceleration profiles: movement duration (MD), duration to peak acceleration (D PA), duration from peak acceleration to peak velocity (D PA-PV), duration from peak velocity to peak deceleration (D PV-PD), duration from peak deceleration to the movement end (D PD-End), acceleration duration (AD), deceleration duration (DD), peak acceleration (PA), peak velocity (PV), and peak deceleration (PD). While movement durations and amplitudes were similar for upward and downward movements, the temporal structure of acceleration profiles differed between the two directions. More specifically, subjects performed upward movements faster than downward movements; these direction-dependent asymmetries appeared early in the movement (i.e., before PA) and lasted until the moment of PD. Additionally, PA and PV were greater for upward than downward movements. Movement speed also changed the temporal structure of acceleration profiles. The effect of speed and direction on the form of acceleration

  12. Comparison of vertical aerosol extinction coefficients from in-situ and LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Herrmann, E.; Bucci, S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Di Liberto, L.; Di Donfrancesco, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weingartner, E.; Virtanen, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ~ 50-800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a LIDAR system provided aerosol extinction coefficients for a vertically resolved comparison between in-situ and remote sensing results. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20% was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 to 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ~ 10 local time) before the mixed layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ~ 12 local time) the ML was fully developed, resulting in constant extinction coefficients at all altitudes measured on the Zeppelin NT. LIDAR results captured these dynamic features well and good agreement was found for the extinction coefficients compared to the in-situ results, using fixed LIDAR ratios (LR) between 30 and 70 sr for the altitudes probed with the Zeppelin. These LR are

  13. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Angevine, W. M.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; de Gouw, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M. G.; Huey, G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Mikoviny, T.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-02-01

    Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during the summertime from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO). Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10% larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD), was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10% to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2-3 times greater than winter) over the southeastern United States. In contrast to this hypothesis, the modest enhancement we observed in the transition layer was not dominated by OA and was not a large fraction of the summertime AOD.

  14. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2013-03-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (absorption bands at 360, 477, 577, 632 nm) simultaneously in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique as it (1) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view from aircraft movements in real time (<0.35° accuracy), and (2) includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD) below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent. The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and CARES (Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study) air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCD (below the aircraft) maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground-based MAX-DOAS instruments (slope = 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86). As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477 nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the

  15. Vertical transport and processing of aerosols in a mixed-phase convective cloud and the feedback on cloud development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Carslaw, K. S.; Feingold, G.

    2005-01-01

    A modelling study of vertical transport and processing of sulphate aerosol by a mixed-phase convective cloud, and the feedback of the cloud-processed aerosols on the development of cloud microphysical properties and precipitation is presented. An axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with bin-resolved microphysics and aqueousphase chemistry is developed and is used to examine the relative importance of microphysical and chemical processes on the aerosol budget, the fate of the aerosol material inside hydrometeors, and the size distributions of cloud-processed sulphate aerosols. Numerical simulations are conducted for a moderately deep convective cloud observed during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiments. The results show that aerosol particles that have been transported from the boundary layer, detrained, and then re-entrained at midcloud levels account for a large fraction of the aerosol inside hydrometeors (~40% by mass). Convective transport by the simulated cloud enhances upper-tropospheric aerosol number and mass concentrations by factors of 2-3 and 3-4, respectively. Sensitivity studies suggest that, for the simulated case, aqueous chemistry does not modify the evolution of the cloud significantly. Finally, ice-phase hydrometeor development is very sensitive to aerosol concentrations at midcloud levels. The latter result suggests that the occurrence of mid-tropospheric aerosol layers that have been advected through long-range transport could strongly affect cloud microphysical processes and precipitation formation.

  16. Vertical motion of near-surface aerosols close to breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienert, Barry; Porter, John; Sharma, Shiv

    2005-10-01

    We have used two-dimensional correlation on two-dimensional extinction cross-sections measured by a scanning lidar to determine the velocity structure of the salt-spray aerosols. The lidar scans were collected over a reef at Bellows Beach, on the Northeast side of Oahu, Hawaii. The resulting velocity streamlines suggest that lifting of sea-spray aerosols as high as 200 m occurs in the vicinity of opposing horizontal roll vortices. The velocities vary rapidly over distances of less than 500 m and show a complex pattern which is inadequately represented by conventional anemometer measurements.

  17. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Particle Sizes using MGS/TES and MRO/MCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Smith, M. D.; Benson, J. L.; McConnochie, T. H.; Pankine, A.

    2012-12-01

    Vertical variations in aerosol particle sizes often have a dramatic impact on the state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. Recent analyses of data from the Spectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM), the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) instruments offer some long overdue progress in constraining this aspect of aerosols. However, significantly more work remains to be done along these lines in order to better constrain and inform modern dynamical simulations of the Martian atmosphere. Thus, the primary goal of our work is to perform retrievals of particle size as a function of altitude for both dust and water ice aerosols. The choice of the TES and MCS dataset, with pole-to-pole coverage over a period of nearly eight martian years, provides the crucial systematic temporal and spatial sampling. Our presentation will include: 1) A summary of our limb radiative transfer algorithms and retrieval schemes; 2) The initial results of the application of our particle size retrieval scheme to the 2001 TES and 2007 MCS observations of those planet encircling dust events; 3) Near-term plans for for additional retrievals (aphelion cloud season, lower optical depth locations and seasons, etc.); 4) Location of the archive to be used for the distribution of the derived profiles and associated retrieval metadata.

  18. Vertical structure of recent Arctic warming.

    PubMed

    Graversen, Rune G; Mauritsen, Thorsten; Tjernström, Michael; Källén, Erland; Svensson, Gunilla

    2008-01-01

    Near-surface warming in the Arctic has been almost twice as large as the global average over recent decades-a phenomenon that is known as the 'Arctic amplification'. The underlying causes of this temperature amplification remain uncertain. The reduction in snow and ice cover that has occurred over recent decades may have played a role. Climate model experiments indicate that when global temperature rises, Arctic snow and ice cover retreats, causing excessive polar warming. Reduction of the snow and ice cover causes albedo changes, and increased refreezing of sea ice during the cold season and decreases in sea-ice thickness both increase heat flux from the ocean to the atmosphere. Changes in oceanic and atmospheric circulation, as well as cloud cover, have also been proposed to cause Arctic temperature amplification. Here we examine the vertical structure of temperature change in the Arctic during the late twentieth century using reanalysis data. We find evidence for temperature amplification well above the surface. Snow and ice feedbacks cannot be the main cause of the warming aloft during the greater part of the year, because these feedbacks are expected to primarily affect temperatures in the lowermost part of the atmosphere, resulting in a pattern of warming that we only observe in spring. A significant proportion of the observed temperature amplification must therefore be explained by mechanisms that induce warming above the lowermost part of the atmosphere. We regress the Arctic temperature field on the atmospheric energy transport into the Arctic and find that, in the summer half-year, a significant proportion of the vertical structure of warming can be explained by changes in this variable. We conclude that changes in atmospheric heat transport may be an important cause of the recent Arctic temperature amplification. PMID:18172495

  19. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Gysel, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Goger, B.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Miettinen, P.; Pajunoja, A.; Virtanen, A.; Bialek, J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne measurements of the aerosol hygroscopic and optical properties as well as chemical composition were performed in the Netherlands and northern Italy on board of a Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012. The vertical changes in aerosol properties during the development of the mixing layer were studied. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 95% relative humidity were determined using the white-light humidified optical particles spectrometer (WHOPS) for dry diameters of 300 and 500 nm particles. These measurements were supplemented by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and an aethalometer providing information on the aerosol chemical composition. Several vertical profiles between 100 and 700 m a.g. were flown just after sunrise close to the San Pietro Capofiume ground station in the Po Valley, Italy. During the early morning hours the lowest layer (newly developing mixing layer) contained a high nitrate fraction (20%) which was coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth. In the layer above (residual layer) small nitrate fractions of ~ 2% were measured as well as low GFs. After full mixing of the layers, typically around noon and with increased temperature, the nitrate fraction decreased to 2% at all altitudes and led to similar hygroscopicity values as found in the residual layer. These distinct vertical and temporal changes underline the importance of airborne campaigns to study aerosol properties during the development of the mixed layer. The aerosol was externally mixed with 22 and 67% of the 500 nm particles in the range GF < 1.1 and GF > 1.5, respectively. Contributors to the non-hygroscopic mode in the observed size range are most likely mineral dust and biological material. Mean hygroscopicity parameters (κ) were 0.34, 0.19 and 0.18 for particles in the newly forming mixing layer, residual layer and fully mixed layer, respectively. These results agree well with those from chemical analysis which found values of κ = 0.27, 0.21 and 0

  20. Atmospheric Aerosol and Thermal Structure in the Boundary Layer Over the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Warren B.

    1973-01-01

    A field study using a mobile lidar was recently conducted in the L. A. Basin, California, to (1) examine the relationship between the vertical aerosol and the thermal structure, and (2) map the vertical aerosol structure in the atmospheric boundary layer over the basin. These data are needed for use in the development of a mixing-depth submodel required for photochemical air Quality simulation models. Toward these ends, a series of lidar aerosol measurements in conjunction with balloon and aircraft temperature soundings were taken at a site in El Monte, and in a mobile mode along a 90-mile freeway loop between El Monte, Santa Monica, and Long Beach. The lidar data are presented in the form of time-height and distance-height cross sections. The results indicate that, although aerosol concentrations are frequently present above the base of the marine inversion, these are generally in stratified layers in contrast to the more uniform nature of the lower convective layer, permitting the mixing depth to be distinguished on this basis. The lidar-derived mixing depths are well correlated (within 100 m) with daytime temperature inversions. Other significant features shown by the lidar data include large Basin-wide mixing-depth variations, waves with amplitudes of 200-300 m and wavelengths of 1000-1500 m on the lower aerosol layer, and apparent aerosol "chimneys" with overrunning in the vicinity of convergence zones.

  1. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration. PMID:26421659

  2. A sensitivity study on the retrieval of aerosol vertical profiles using the oxygen A-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colosimo, S. F.; Natraj, V.; Sander, S. P.; Stutz, J.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric absorption in the O2 A-band (12 950-13 200 cm-1) offers a unique opportunity to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from space-borne measurements due to the large dynamic range of optical thickness in that spectral region. Absorptions in strong O2 lines are saturated; therefore, any radiance measured in these lines originates from scattering in the upper part of the atmosphere. Outside of O2 lines, or in weak lines, the atmospheric column absorption is small, and light penetrates to lower atmospheric layers, allowing for the quantification of aerosols and other scatterers near the surface. While the principle of aerosol profile retrieval using O2 A-band absorption from space is well known, a thorough quantification of the information content, i.e., the amount of vertical profile information that can be obtained, and the dependence of the information content on the spectral resolution of the measurements, has not been thoroughly conducted. Here, we use the linearized vector radiative transfer model VLIDORT to perform spectrally resolved simulations of atmospheric radiation in the O2 A-band in the presence of aerosol for four different generic scenarios: Urban, Highly polluted, Elevated layer, and Marine-Arctic. The high-resolution radiances emerging from the top of the atmosphere are degraded to different spectral resolutions, simulating spectrometers with different resolving powers. We use optimal estimation theory to quantify the information content in the aerosol profile retrieval with respect to different aerosol parameters and instrument spectral resolutions. The simulations show that better spectral resolution generally leads to an increase in the total amount of information that can be retrieved, with the number of degrees of freedom (DoF) varying between 0.34-2.11 at low resolution (5 cm-1) to 3.43-5.92 at high resolution (0.05 cm-1) for the four different cases. A particularly strong improvement was found in the retrieval of tropospheric

  3. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Angevine, W. M.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D.; de Gouw, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M. G.; Holloway, J. S.; Huey, G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Mikoviny, T.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. These vertical profiles were collected over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during the summer of 2013 as part of two separate field studies: the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study and the Study of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS). Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO). Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10 % larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD), was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10 % to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary aerosol aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2-3 times greater than winter) over the southeastern United States. The first study attributes the layer aloft to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) while

  4. Vertical distribution of optical and micro-physical properties of ambient aerosols during dry haze periods in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonghang; Liu, Qiong; Geng, Fuhai; Zhang, Hua; Cai, Changjie; Xu, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Hao

    2012-04-01

    Based on the lidar data obtained from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), the vertical distributions of aerosols are revealed during dry haze periods in the Shanghai vicinity by analyzing the optical and micro-physical parameters including total attenuated backscatter coefficient (TABC), volume depolarization ratio (VDR) and total attenuated color ratio (TACR). The preliminary conclusion is that when dry haze occurs in the Shanghai vicinity, smoke and maritime aerosols are the major types in summer and autumn and aerosols might be affected by long-distance transport of dust in spring; lower troposphere below 2 km is the layer polluted most severely and aerosol scattering with relatively irregular shape is much stronger than that of aerosols with relatively regular shape within 2-10 km in middle and upper troposphere; relatively large aerosols appear more frequently in lower (0-2 km) and middle troposphere (2-6 km) than those in upper troposphere (6-10 km). In addition, HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model is applied to analyze the aerosol sources during two typical episodes. The results indicate that the middle and upper troposphere in the Shanghai vicinity are affected by the long-distance transport of dusts from northwest of China or other upstream regions. The high aerosol concentrations in the Shanghai vicinity are mainly caused not only by local human activities but also by the long-distance transport from other places.

  5. Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution and associated radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Youfei; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor; Cribb, Maureen

    2012-08-01

    Four years of columnar aerosol optical properties and a one-year vertical profiles of aerosol particle extinction coefficient at 527 nm are analyzed at Taihu in the central Yangtze River Delta region in eastern China. Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution, and influence on shortwave radiation and heating rates were investigated. Multiyear variations of aerosol optical depths (AOD), Ångstrom exponents, single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (ASY) are analyzed, together with the vertical profile of aerosol extinction. AOD is largest in summer and smallest in winter. SSAs exhibit weak seasonal variation with the smallest values occurring during winter and the largest during summer. The vast majority of aerosol particles are below 2 km, and about 62%, 67%, 67% and 83% are confined to below 1 km in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. Five-day back trajectory analyses show that the some aerosols aloft are traced back to northern/northwestern China, as far as Mongolia and Siberia, in spring, autumn and winter. The presence of dust aerosols were identified based on the linear depolarization measurements together with other information (i.e., back trajectory, precipitation, aerosol index). Dust strongly impacts the vertical particle distribution in spring and autumn, with much smaller effects in winter. The annual mean aerosol direct shortwave radiative forcing (efficiency) at the bottom, top and within the atmosphere are -34.8 ± 9.1 (-54.4 ± 5.3), -8.2 ± 4.8 (-13.1 ± 1.5) and 26.7 ± 9.4 (41.3 ± 4.6) W/m2 (Wm-2 τ-1), respectively. The mean reduction in direct and diffuse radiation reaching surface amount to 109.2 ± 49.4 and 66.8 ± 33.3 W/m2, respectively. Aerosols significantly alter the vertical profile of solar heating, with great implications for atmospheric stability and dynamics within the lower troposphere.

  6. A new method for evaluating the impact of vertical distribution on aerosol radiative forcing in general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuolo, M. R.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Takemura, T.

    2013-07-01

    The quantification and understanding of direct aerosol forcing is essential in the study of climate. One of the main issues that makes its quantification difficult is the lack of a complete comprehension of the role of the aerosol and clouds vertical distribution. This work aims at reducing the incertitude of aerosol forcing due to the vertical superposition of several short-lived atmospheric components, in particular different aerosols species and clouds. We propose a method to quantify the contribution of different parts of the atmospheric column to the forcing, and to evaluate model differences by isolating the effect of radiative interactions only. Any microphysical or thermo-dynamical interactions between aerosols and clouds are deactivated in the model, to isolate the effects of radiative flux coupling. We investigate the contribution of aerosol above, below and in clouds, by using added diagnostics in the aerosol-climate model LMDz. We also compute the difference between the forcing of the ensemble of the aerosols and the sum of the forcings from individual species, in clear-sky. This difference is found to be moderate on global average (14%) but can reach high values regionally (up to 100%). The non-additivity of forcing already for clear-sky conditions shows, that in addition to represent well the amount of individual aerosol species, it is critical to capture the vertical distribution of all aerosols. Nonlinear effects are even more important when superposing aerosols and clouds. Four forcing computations are performed, one where the full aerosol 3-D distribution is used, and then three where aerosols are confined to regions above, inside and below clouds respectively. We find that the forcing of aerosols depends crucially on the presence of clouds and on their position relative to that of the aerosol, in particular for black carbon (BC). We observe a strong enhancement of the forcing of BC above clouds, attenuation for BC below clouds, and a moderate

  7. A new method for evaluating the impact of vertical distribution on aerosol radiative forcing in general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuolo, M. R.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Takemura, T.

    2014-01-01

    The quantification and understanding of direct aerosol forcing is essential in the study of climate. One of the main issues that makes its quantification difficult is the lack of a complete understanding of the role of the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds. This work aims at reducing the uncertainty of aerosol top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) forcing due to the vertical superposition of several short-lived atmospheric components, in particular different aerosol species and clouds. We propose a method to quantify the contribution of different parts of the atmospheric column to the TOA forcing as well as to evaluate the contribution to model differences that is exclusively due to different spatial distributions of aerosols and clouds. We investigate the contribution of aerosol above, below and in clouds by using added diagnostics in the aerosol-climate model LMDz. We also compute the difference between the TOA forcing of the ensemble of the aerosols and the sum of the forcings from individual species in clear sky. This difference is found to be moderate for the global average (14%) but can reach high values regionally (up to 100%). Nonlinear effects are even more important when superposing aerosols and clouds. Four forcing computations are performed: one where the full aerosol 3-D distribution is used, and then three where aerosols are confined to regions above, inside and below clouds, respectively. We find that the TOA forcing of aerosols depends crucially on the presence of clouds and on their position relative to that of the aerosol, in particular for black carbon (BC). We observe a strong enhancement of the TOA forcing of BC above clouds, attenuation for BC below clouds, and a moderate enhancement when BC is found within clouds. BC above clouds accounts for only about 30% of the total BC optical depth but for 55% of the forcing, while forcing efficiency increases by a factor of 7.5 when passing from below to above clouds. The different behaviour of forcing

  8. Studying the vertical aerosol extinction coefficient by comparing in situ airborne data and elastic backscatter lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Herrmann, Erik; Bucci, Silvia; Fierli, Federico; Cairo, Francesco; Gysel, Martin; Tillmann, Ralf; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Di Liberto, Luca; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Weingartner, Ernest; Virtanen, Annele; Mentel, Thomas F.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol particle optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ˜ 50 and 800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol particle size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a single wavelength polarization diversity elastic lidar system provided estimates of aerosol extinction coefficients using the Klett method to accomplish the inversion of the signal, for a vertically resolved comparison between in situ and remote-sensing results. Note, however, that the comparison was for the most part done in the altitude range where the overlap function is incomplete and accordingly uncertainties are larger. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20 % was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 and 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ˜ 10:00 LT - local time) before the mixing layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ˜ 12:00 LT) the ML was fully developed, resulting in

  9. Vertical profiling of aerosol particles and trace gases over the central Arctic Ocean during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupiszewski, P.; Leck, C.; Tjernström, M.; Sjogren, S.; Sedlar, J.; Graus, M.; Müller, M.; Brooks, B.; Swietlicki, E.; Norris, S.; Hansel, A.

    2013-12-01

    Unique measurements of vertical size-resolved aerosol particle concentrations, trace gas concentrations and meteorological data were obtained during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS, www.ascos.se), an International Polar Year project aimed at establishing the processes responsible for formation and evolution of low-level clouds over the high Arctic summer pack ice. The experiment was conducted from on board the Swedish icebreaker Oden, and provided both ship- and helicopter-based measurements. This study focuses on the vertical helicopter profiles and onboard measurements obtained during a three-week period when Oden was anchored to a drifting ice floe, and sheds light on the characteristics of Arctic aerosol particles and their distribution throughout the lower atmosphere. Distinct differences in aerosol particle characteristics within defined atmospheric layers are identified. Within the lowermost couple hundred metres, transport from the marginal ice zone (MIZ), condensational growth and cloud processing develop the aerosol population. During two of the four representative periods defined in this study, such influence is shown. At altitudes above about 1 km, long-range transport occurs frequently. However, only infrequently does large-scale subsidence descend such air masses to become entrained into the mixed layer in the high Arctic, and therefore long-range transport plumes are unlikely to directly influence low-level stratiform cloud formation. Nonetheless, such plumes can influence the radiative balance of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) by influencing formation and evolution of higher clouds, as well as through precipitation transport of particles downwards. New particle formation was occasionally observed, particularly in the near-surface layer. We hypothesize that the origin of these ultrafine particles could be in biological processes, both primary and secondary, within the open leads between

  10. Vertical profiling of aerosol particles and trace gases over the central Arctic Ocean during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupiszewski, P.; Leck, C.; Tjernström, M.; Sjogren, S.; Sedlar, J.; Graus, M.; Müller, M.; Brooks, B.; Swietlicki, E.; Norris, S.; Hansel, A.

    2013-04-01

    Unique measurements of vertical size resolved aerosol particle concentrations, trace gas concentrations and meteorological data were obtained during the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS, http://www.ascos.se), an International Polar Year project aimed at establishing the processes responsible for formation and evolution of low-level clouds over the high Arctic summer pack ice. The experiment was conducted from onboard the Swedish icebreaker Oden, and provided both ship- and helicopter-based measurements. This study focuses on the vertical helicopter profiles and onboard measurements obtained during a three-week period when Oden was anchored to a drifting ice floe, and sheds light on the characteristics of Arctic aerosol particles and their distribution throughout the lower atmosphere. Distinct differences in aerosol particle characteristics within defined atmospheric layers are identified. Near the surface (lowermost couple hundred meters), transport from the marginal ice zone (MIZ), if sufficiently short (less than ca. 2 days), condensational growth and cloud-processing develop the aerosol population. During two of the four representative periods defined in this study, such influence is shown. At altitudes above about 1 km, long-range transport occurs frequently. However, only infrequently does large-scale subsidence descend such air masses to become entrained into the mixed layer in the high Arctic, and therefore they are unlikely to directly influence low-level stratiform cloud formation. Nonetheless, long-range transport plumes can influence the radiative balance of the PBL by influencing formation and evolution of higher clouds, as well as through precipitation transport of particles downwards. New particle formation was occasionally observed, particularly in the near-surface layer. We hypothesize that the origin of these ultrafine particles can be from biological processes, both primary and secondary

  11. Influence of the vertical absorption profile of mixed Asian dust plumes on aerosol direct radiative forcing over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Lee, Kwonho; Kim, Kwanchul; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Dong Ho

    2016-08-01

    We estimate the aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) and heating rate profiles of mixed East Asian dust plumes in the solar wavelength region ranging from 0.25 to 4.0 μm using the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients and single-scattering albedos (SSA) were derived from measurements with a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system. The data are used as input parameters for our radiative transfer calculations. We considered four cases of radiative forcing in SBDART: 1. dust, 2. pollution, 3. mixed dust plume and the use of vertical profiles of SSA, and 4. mixed dust plumes and the use of column-averaged values of SSA. In our sensitivity study we examined the influence of SSA and aerosol layer height on our results. The ADRF at the surface and in the atmosphere shows a small dependence on the specific shape of the aerosol extinction vertical profile and its light-absorption property for all four cases. In contrast, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the ADRF is largely affected by the vertical distribution of the aerosols extinction. This effect increases if the light-absorption capacity (decrease of SSA) of the aerosols increases. We find different radiative effects in situations in which two layers of aerosols had different light-absorption properties. The largest difference was observed at the TOA for an absorbing aerosol layer at high altitude in which we considered in one case the vertical profile of SSA and in another case the column-averaged SSA only. The ADRF at the TOA increases when the light-absorbing aerosol layer is located above 3 km altitude. The differences between height-resolved SSA, which can be obtained from lidar data, and total layer-mean SSA indicates that the use of a layer-mean SSA can be rather misleading as it can induce a large error in the calculation of the ADRF at the TOA, which in turn may cause errors in the vertical profiles of heating rates.

  12. Titan's Aerosol and Stratospheric Ice Opacities Between 18 and 500 Micrometers: Vertical and Spectral Characteristics from Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie M.; Samuelson, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Vertical distributions and spectral characteristics of Titan's photochemical aerosol and stratospheric ices are determined between 20 and 560 per centimeter (500-18 micrometers) from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). Results are obtained for latitudes of 15 N, 15 S, and 58 S, where accurate temperature profiles can be independently determined. In addition, estimates of aerosol and ice abundances at 62 N relative to those at 15 S are derived. Aerosol abundances are comparable at the two latitudes, but stratospheric ices are approximately 3 times more abundant at 62 N than at 15 S. Generally, nitrile ice clouds (probably HCN and HC3N), as inferred from a composite emission feature at approximately 160 per centimeter, appear to be located over a narrow altitude range in the stratosphere centered at approximately 90 km. Although most abundant at high northern latitudes, these nitrile ice clouds extend down through low latitudes and into mid southern latitudes, at least as far as 58 S. There is some evidence of a second ice cloud layer at approximately 60 km altitude at 58 S associated with an emission feature at approximately 80 per centimeter. We speculate that the identify of this cloud may be due to C2H6 ice, which in the vapor phase is the most abundant hydrocarbon (next to CH4) in the stratosphere of Titan. Unlike the highly restricted range of altitudes (50-100 km) associated with organic condensate clouds, Titan's photochemical aerosol appears to be well-mixed from the surface to the top of the stratosphere near an altitude of 300 km, and the spectral shape does not appear to change between 15 N and 58 S latitude. The ratio of aerosol-to-gas scale heights range from 1.3-2.4 at about 160 km to 1.1-1.4 at 300 km, although there is considerable variability with latitude, The aerosol exhibits a very broad emission feature peaking at approximately 140 per centimeter. Due to its extreme breadth and low wavenumber, we speculate that this feature may

  13. Polarimetric method of estimation of vertical aerosol distribution in application to observations of ozone and NO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elansky, Nikolay F.; Kadyshevich, Elena A.; Savastyuk, Vladimir V.

    1994-01-01

    The degree of polarization of skylight at the zenith during twilight depends on the aerosol content in the atmosphere. The long-term observations at the high-mountain research station 'Kislovodsk' (North Caucasus) have shown that the variation of the degree of polarization after the eruption of the El Chichon volcano can serve as the effective parameter characterizing the vertical aerosol stratification in the atmosphere. The results of the measurements are confirmed by the numerical calculations. The algorithm of the retrieval of the vertical aerosol distribution on the base of the measurements of the degree of polarization is proposed. This method can be applied for the increasing of the precision of O3, NO2, and other gas content measurements.

  14. A sensitivity study on the retrieval of aerosol vertical profiles using the oxygen A-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele Colosimo, Santo; Natraj, Vijay; Sander, Stanley P.; Stutz, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric absorption in the O2 A-band (12 950-13 200 cm-1) offers a unique opportunity to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from space-borne measurements due to the large dynamic range of optical thickness in that spectral region. Absorptions in strong O2 lines are saturated; therefore, any radiance measured in these lines originates from scattering in the upper part of the atmosphere. Outside of O2 lines, or in weak lines, the atmospheric column absorption is small, and light penetrates to lower atmospheric layers, allowing for the quantification of aerosols and other scatterers near the surface.

    While the principle of aerosol profile retrieval using O2 A-band absorption from space is well-known, a thorough quantification of the information content, i.e., the amount of vertical profile information that can be obtained, and the dependence of the information content on the spectral resolution of the measurements, has not been thoroughly conducted. Here, we use the linearized vector radiative transfer model VLIDORT to perform spectrally resolved simulations of atmospheric radiation in the O2 A-band for four different aerosol extinction profile scenarios: urban (urban-rural areas), highly polluted (megacity areas with large aerosol extinction), elevated layer (identifying elevated plumes, for example for biomass burning) and low extinction (representative of small aerosol extinction, such as vegetated, marine and arctic areas). The high-resolution radiances emerging from the top of the atmosphere measurements are degraded to different spectral resolutions, simulating spectrometers with different resolving powers. We use optimal estimation theory to quantify the information content in the aerosol profile retrieval with respect to different aerosol parameters and instrument spectral resolutions. The simulations show that better spectral resolution generally leads to an increase in the total amount of information that can be retrieved, with the number of

  15. Measurements of Vertical Profiles of Turbulence, Temperature, Ozone, Aerosols, and BrO over Sea Ice and Tundra Snowpack during BROMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepson, P.; Caulton, D.; Cambaliza, M. L.; Dhaniyala, S.; Fuentes, J. D.; General, S.; Halfacre, J. W.; Nghiem, S. V.; Perez Perez, L.; Peterson, P. K.; Platt, U.; Pohler, D.; Pratt, K. A.; Simpson, W. R.; Stirm, B.; Walsh, S. J.; Zielcke, J.

    2012-12-01

    During the BROMEX field campaign of March 2012, we conducted measurements of boundary layer structure, ozone, BrO and aerosol, from a light, twin-engine aircraft during eleven flights originating from Barrow, AK. Flights were conducted over the sea ice in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, and over the tundra from Barrow to the Brooks Range, with vertical profiles covering altitudes from the surface to 3.5km in the free troposphere. Flights over the course of one month allowed a variety of sea ice conditions, including open water, nilas, first year sea ice, and frost flowers, to be examined over the Chukchi Sea. Atmospheric turbulence was measured using a calibrated turbulence probe, which will enable characterization of both the structure and turbulence of the Arctic boundary layer. Ozone was measured using a 2B UV absorption instrument. A GRIMM optical particle counter was used to measure 0.25-4 μm sized aerosol particles. The MAX-DOAS instrument enabled measurements of BrO vertical profiles. The aircraft measurements can be used to connect the surface measurements of ozone and BrO from the "Icelander" buoys, and the surface sites at Barrow, with those measured on the aircraft. Here we will discuss the spatial variability/coherence in these data. A major question that will be addressed using these data is the extent to which bromine is activated through reactions at the snowpack/ice surface versus the surface of aerosols. Here we will present a preliminary analysis of the relationships between snow/ice surface types, aerosol size-resolved number concentrations, and the vertical profiles of ozone and BrO.

  16. Vertical distribution of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficient measured by a CCD side-scattering lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Ma, Xiaomin; Shi, Bo; Shan, Huihui; Zhao, Ming; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2015-09-01

    The near-ground aerosols have the most impact on the human beings. Its fine spatial and temporal distribution, with which the environmental and meteorological departments concern themselves most, has not been elaborated very well due to the unavailable measurement tools. We present the continuous observations of the vertical profile of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficients by employing our self-developed side-scattering lidar system based on charge-coupled device camera. During the experimental period from April 2013 to August 2014, four catalogs of aerosol backscattering coefficient profiles are found in the near ground. The continuous measurement is revealed by the contour plots measured during the whole night. These experimental results indicate that the aerosol backscattering coefficients in near ground are inhomogeneous and vary with altitude and time, which are very useful for the model researchers to study the regional air pollution and its climate impact.

  17. Vertical distribution of dimethylsulfide, sulfur dioxide, aerosol ions, and radon over the northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Berresheim, H.; Andreae, T. W.; Kritz, M. A.; Bates, T. S.

    1988-01-01

    The vertical distributions, in temperate latitudes, of dimethylsulfide (DMS), SO2, radon, methanesulfonate (MSA), nonsea-salt sulfate (nss-sulfate), and aerosol Na(+), NH4(+), and NO(-) ions were determined in samples collected by an aircraft over the northeast Pacific Ocean during May 3-12, 1985. DMS was also determined in surface seawater. It was found that DMS concentrations, both in seawater and in the atmospheric boundary layer, were significantly lower than the values reported previously for subtropical and tropical regions, reflecting the seasonal variability in the temperate North Pacific. The vertical profiles of DMS, MSA, SO2, and nss-sulfate were found to be strongly dependent on the convective stability of the atmosphere and on air mass origin. Biogenic sulfur emissions could account for most of the sulfur budget in the boundary layer, while the long-range transport of continentally derived air masses was mainly responsible for the elevated levels of both SO2 and nss-sulfate in the free troposphere.

  18. Confinement and Structural Changes in Vertically Aligned Dust Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Truell

    2013-10-01

    In physics, confinement is known to influence collective system behavior. Examples include coulomb crystal variants such as those formed from ions or dust particles (classical), electrons in quantum dots (quantum) and the structural changes observed in vertically aligned dust particle systems formed within a glass box placed on the lower electrode of a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) rf reference cell. Recent experimental studies have expanded the above to include the biological domain by showing that the stability and dynamics of proteins confined through encapsulation and enzyme molecules placed in inorganic cavities such as those found in biosensors are also directly influenced by their confinement. In this paper, the self-assembly and subsequent collective behavior of structures formed from n, charged dust particles interacting with one another and located within a glass box placed on the lower, powered electrode of a GEC rf reference cell is discussed. Self-organized formation of vertically aligned one-dimensional chains, two-dimensional zigzag structures, and three-dimensional helical structures of triangular, quadrangular, pentagonal, hexagonal, and heptagonal symmetries are shown to occur. System evolution is shown to progress from one-dimensional chain structures, through a zigzag transition to a two-dimensional, spindle like structures, and then to various three-dimensional, helical structures exhibiting various symmetries. Stable configurations are shown to be strongly dependent upon system confinement. The critical conditions for structural transitions as well as the basic symmetry exhibited by the one-, two-, and three-dimensional structures that subsequently develop will be shown to be in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Multi-Summer Climatology of Cumuli at SGP site: Vertical Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Berg, Larry K.

    2011-10-01

    We perform a case study for estimating the impact of the vertical distribution of cloud fraction on the normalized cloud radiative forcing (CRF) using a decade-long (2000-2009) high resolution dataset of cloud macrophysical and radiative properties. This dataset is developed for fair-weather cumuli (FWC) observed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The design of the case study reduces effects associated with non-cloud factors, such as the diurnal changes of aerosol loading and solar zenith angle. The results of the case study suggest that the impact of the vertical cloud structure can be substantial. Therefore, taking into account the vertical distribution of clouds would be beneficial for more comprehensive parameterizations aimed to portray the complex interactions between clouds and radiation more accurately

  20. Observations of Dust Using the NASA Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS): New New Measurements of Aerosol Vertical Distribution From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth; Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Steven P.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William

    2003-01-01

    On January 12, 2003 NASA launched the first satellite-based lidar, the Geoscience Laser -Altimeter System (GLAS), onboard the ICESat spacecraft. The GLAS atmospheric measurements introduce a fundamentally new and important tool for understanding the atmosphere and climate. In the past, aerosols have only been studied from space using images gathered by passive sensors. Analysis of this passive data has lead to an improved understanding of aerosol properties, spatial distribution, and their effect on the earth's climate. However, these images do not show the aerosol's vertical distribution. As a result, a key piece of information has been missing. The measurements now obtained by GLAS will provide information on the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds, and improve our ability to study their transport processes and aerosol-cloud interactions. Here we show an overview of GLAS, provide an update of its current status, and present initial observations of dust profiles. In particular, a strategy of characterizing the height profile of dust plumes over source regions will be presented.

  1. On the vertical structure of seasonal, interannual and intraseasonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    The vertical structure of the height and wind fields associated with the seasonal, interannual, and intraseasonal cycles is documented by making use of global ECMWF operational analyses for seven pressure levels (1000-100 mb) and spanning a 10 year period (1980-89). The role of tropical convection is examined for each of these time scales. The seasonal cycle is described through the structure of the geopotential height field standing waves, the vertical structure of the first seven wavenumbers of the rotational and divergent winds, and latitude/time cross-sections for the vertical structure of the planetary waves. The change in the vertical structure from the internal mode combinations found in the tropics to a dominant external mode of the extratropics occurs rapidly and within 10[degrees] of the convective source regions. Extensive use is made of a primitive equation (PE) model to explore the extent to which tropical heating might influence the extratropical vertical structure. The PE response indicates the possibility that 25-40[degrees] of the Northern Hemisphere and 30-55% of the Southern Hemisphere kinematic vertical structure could be the result of tropical heating. Two significant El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events occur during this 10 year period and their vertical structures are examined. The intraseasonal oscillation is composited for three seasons. A link between this oscillation and tropical convection is only clearly established during the convective phase. Composite cases for each season are selected to be in phase with one another and during times when the convective phase of the intraseasonal oscillation is strong. When convective regions in the composites are collocated with those present in the seasonal average, the kinematic vertical structure is dominated by the two deepest vertical modes. This is different for other locations, where the convection in the composites does not coincide with regions of convection in the seasonal average.

  2. Vertical structure of the Jovian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.H.

    1986-03-01

    The equatorial and tropical regions of Jupiter are presently treated in light of an inhomogeneous atmospheric model that encompasses both polarizing aerosols and methane gas, in keeping with Pioneer polarimetry and photometry data as well as the methane band data obtained by West (1979). The relative strengths of weak and strong methane bands are addressed by a two-cloud model with overlying stratospheric haze. For all the regions considered, the best fit for polarization measurements is a negatively polarizing ammonia cloud beneath a positively polarizing haze. Unlike the nearby features, the equatorial region and the Great Red Spot have a negative polarization at 80-deg phase angle, implying less gas above the clouds in these regions. 18 references.

  3. Polarimetric remote sensing in oxygen A and B bands: sensitivity study and information content analysis for vertical profile of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shouguo; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analysis is conducted to reveal the information content of aerosol vertical profile in space-borne measurements of the backscattered radiance and degree of linear polarization (DOLP) in oxygen (O2) A and B bands. Assuming a quasi-Gaussian shape for aerosol vertical profile characterized by peak height H and half width γ (at half maximum), the Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model (UNL-VRTM) is used to simulate the Stokes four-vector elements of upwelling radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and their Jacobians with respect to H and γ. Calculations for different aerosol types and different combinations of H and γ values show that the wide range of gas absorption optical depth in O2 A and B band enables the sensitivity of backscattered DOLP and radiance at TOA to the aerosol layer at different altitudes. Quantitatively, DOLP in O2 A and B bands is found to be more sensitive to H and γ than radiance, especially over the bright surfaces (with large visible reflectance). In many O2 absorption wavelengths, the degree of freedom of signal (DFS) for retrieving H (or γ) generally increases with H (and γ) and can be close to unity in many cases, assuming that the composite uncertainty from surface and aerosol scattering properties as well as measurements is less than 5 %. Further analysis demonstrates that DFS needed for simultaneous retrieval of H and γ can be obtained from a combined use of DOLP measurements at ˜ 10-100 O2 A and B absorption wavelengths (or channels), depending on the specific values of H. The higher the aerosol layer, the fewer number of channels for DOLP measurements in O2 A and B bands are needed for characterizing H and γ. Future hyperspectral measurements of DOLP in O2 A and B bands are needed to continue studying their potential and their combination with radiance and DOLP in atmospheric window channels for retrieving the vertical profiles of aerosols, especially highly scattering aerosols, over land.

  4. Vertical Distribution of Gases and Aerosols in Titan’s Atmosphere Observed by VIMS/Cassini Solar Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Vinatier, S.; Sicardy, B.; Bézard, B.; Sotin, C.; Nicholson, P. D.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K.; Buratti, B.; Clark, R.

    2012-10-01

    We present the vertical distribution of gaseous species and aerosols in Titan’s atmosphere through the analysis of VIMS solar occultations. We employ the infrared channel of VIMS, which covers the 1 - 5 µm wavelength range. VIMS occultations can provide good vertical resolution ( 10 km) and an extended altitude range (from 70 to 700 km), complementing well the information from other Cassini instruments. VIMS has retrieved 8 solar occultations up to now. They are distributed through the whole Cassini mission and they probe different latitudes in both hemispheres. Two main gases can be observed by VIMS occultations: methane, through its bands at 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.3 and 3.3 µm, and CO, at 4.7 µm. We can extract methane’s abundance between 70 and 700 km and CO’s between 70 and 180 km. Regarding aerosols, the VIMS altitude range allows to get information on the properties of both the main haze and the detached layer. Aerosols also affect the transmittance through their spectral signatures. In particular, a spectral signature at 3.4 µm that was attributed to aerosols was recently discovered by the analysis of the first VIMS occultation. We will monitor the latitudinal and temporal variations of the 3.4 µm feature through various occultations. A change in the global circulation regime of Titan sets in with the approaching to the vernal equinox, and a strong decrease of the altitude of the detached layer between the winter solstice and the equinox has indeed been observed. The temporal coverage of VIMS occultations allows the study the effect of these variations in the vertical distribution of aerosol optical and spectral properties.

  5. Vertical fine structure observations in the eastern equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.P.

    1981-11-20

    Measurements of vertical displacement and horizontal velocity finestructure near the equator at 110/sup 0/W in the eastern Pacific Ocean are reported. Profiles were scaled to a constant Bruent-Vaeisaelae frequency ocean (N/sub 0/ = 1 cph) in accordance with a WKBJ approximation. A total of 57 CTD casts between 3/sup 0/N and 3/sup 0/S taken during five cruises in 1979 were analyzed. Results show an equatorial enhancement of vertical displacement is similar variance for vertical wavelengths longer than 50 sdbar (stretched decibars). This enhancement is similar to that which has been reported at 125/sup 0/W and 179/sup 0/E. Difference between locations can be accounted for by the observed temporal variability at 110/sup 0/W. Coherence between vertical displacement profiles separated in time by dealys of 2 hours to 120 hour indicate that the high wave number structures were largely associated with time scales of 4 days and less. Meridionally, vertical structures longer than 300 sdbar were coherent within 50 km of the equator. We interpret this vertical displacement fine structure enhancement as high wave number equatorially trapped inertial-gravity waves. The velocity fine structure measurements in July 1979 also indicate equatorially enhanced horizontal kinetic energy for vertical wave lengths longer than 100 sdbar. The velocity structures persisted over the 56 hour of measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy exceeded zonal energy; however, the two components were coherent. We interpret these velocity structures as inertial-gravity waves which were produced off the equator and are propagating through the equatorial region.

  6. The vertical structure of Arctic haze as determined from airborne net-flux radiometer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, T. P.; Valero, F. P. J.

    1984-01-01

    From net-flux radiometer measurements and model results, the vertical layer structure is deduced of the Arctic haze encountered during two of the AGASP flights. The total value of the absorption optical depth is found to be on the order of 0.065 for both flights, with the majority of the absorbing aerosol concentrated in the lowest 1.6 km of the atmosphere. A comparison of these results with measurements of the carbon concentration leads to a value of the specific absorption of carbon of 24 sq m g. While higher than expected, this value is shown to be consistent with an internally-mixed aerosol of carbon cores and sulfate shells.

  7. Vertically resolved separation of dust and other aerosol types by a new lidar depolarization method.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tao; Wang, Zhien; Ferrare, Richard A; Hostetler, Chris A; Yuan, Renmin; Zhang, Damao

    2015-06-01

    This paper developed a new retrieval framework of external mixing of the dust and non-dust aerosol to predict the lidar ratio of the external mixing aerosols and to separate the contributions of non-spherical aerosols by using different depolarization ratios among dust, sea salt, smoke, and polluted aerosols. The detailed sensitivity tests and case study with the new method showed that reliable dust information could be retrieved even without prior information about the non-dust aerosol types. This new method is suitable for global dust retrievals with satellite observations, which is critical for better understanding global dust transportation and for model improvements. PMID:26072778

  8. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the SEUS during the SENEX and SEAC4RS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Day, D. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M.; Holloway, J. S.; Huey, L. G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Campuzano Jost, P.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow cumulus convection enhances vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and creates a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. Two recent studies have proposed that an elevated layer of enhanced organic aerosol over the southeastern United States (SEUS) could explain the discrepancy in the summertime enhancement of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and summertime enhancement of surface measurements of aerosol mass. We investigate the vertical profile of aerosol over the SEUS during the summertime using in situ aircraft-based measurements of aerosol from the SENEX and SEAC4RS studies. During shallow cumulus convection over the SEUS, we found that aerosol and trace gas concentration in the transition layer are diluted by cleaner air from the free troposphere, and the absolute aerosol loading decreases with altitude in the transition layer. However, after normalizing the vertical profiles to the CO boundary layer enhancement to correct for the dilution, the aerosol mass, volume, and extinction relative to the boundary layer CO enhancement is ~20% greater in the transition layer than in the mixed layer. The enhancement of aerosol loading suggests production of aerosol mass in the transition layer, although biomass burning could also be the source of the enhancement. The median composition of the aerosol in the mixed layer is ~70% organics and ~18% sulfate, while it is 65% organics and 23% sulfate in the transition layer. The composition of the aerosol enhancement in the transition layer is roughly equal parts sulfate and organics by mass. The enhancement of aerosol extinction in the transition layer is not sufficient to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD over SEUS.

  9. Comparing Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Profiles and Cloud Vertical Structure from Multiwavelength Raman Lidar Retrievals and Radiosounding Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Surós, Montserrat; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Markowicz, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    A study of comparison of water vapor mixing ratio profiles, relative humidity profiles, and cloud vertical structures using two different instruments, a multiwavelength Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman lidar and radiosoundings, is presented. The observations were taken by the lidar located in Warsaw center and the radiosoundings located about 30km to the North in Legionowo (Poland). We compared the ground-based remote sensing technology with in-situ method in order to improve knowledge about water content thought the atmosphere and cloud formation. The method used for retrieving the cloud vertical structure can be improved comparing the radiosonde results with the lidar observations, which show promising results.

  10. The potential of LIRIC to validate the vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration estimated by an air quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Filoglou, Maria; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyros; Melas, Dimitris; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Balis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by a retrieval algorithm that uses combined sunphotometer and LIDAR data (LIRIC) were used in order to validate the mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. LIDAR and CIMEL measurements of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki were used for this validation.The aerosol mass concentration profiles of the fine and coarse mode derived by CAMx were compared with the respective profiles derived by the retrieval algorithm. For the coarse mode particles, forecasts of the Saharan dust transportation model BSC-DREAM8bV2 were also taken into account. Each of the retrieval algorithm's profiles were matched to the models' profile with the best agreement within a time window of four hours before and after the central measurement. OPAC, a software than can provide optical properties of aerosol mixtures, was also employed in order to calculate the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values for 355nm and 532nm for each of the model's profiles aiming in a comparison with the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values derived by the retrieval algorithm for each measurement. The comparisons between the fine mode aerosol concentration profiles resulted in a good agreement between CAMx and the retrieval algorithm, with the vertical mean bias error never exceeding 7 μgr/m3. Concerning the aerosol coarse mode concentration profiles both CAMx and BSC-DREAM8bV2 values are severely underestimated, although, in cases of Saharan dust transportation events there is an agreement between the profiles of BSC-DREAM8bV2 model and the retrieval algorithm.

  11. How Well do State-of-the-Art Techniques Measuring the Vertical Profile of Tropospheric Aerosol Extinction Compare?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R.; Flynn, C.; Elleman, R.; Covert, D.; Strawa, A.; Welton, E.; Turner, D.; Jonsson, H.; Redemann, J.; Eilers, J.; Ricci, K.; Hallar, A. G.; Clayton, M.; Michalsky, J.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B.; Barnard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The recent Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (AIOP, May 2003) yielded one of the best measurement sets obtained to date to assess our ability to measure the vertical profile of ambient aerosol extinction sigma(ep)(lambda) in the lower troposphere. During one month, a heavily instrumented aircraft with well-characterized aerosol sampling ability carrying well-proven and new aerosol instrumentation devoted most of the 60 available flight hours to flying vertical profiles over the heavily instrumented ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF). This allowed us to compare vertical extinction profiles obtained from six different instruments: airborne Sun photometer (AATS-14), airborne nephelometer/absorption photometer, airborne cavity ring-down system, groundbased Raman lidar, and two ground-based elastic backscatter lidars. We find the in situ measured sigma(ep)(lambda) to be lower than the AATS-14 derived values. Bias differences are 0.002-0.004 Km!1 equivalent to 13-17% in the visible, or 45% in the near-infrared. On the other hand, we find that with respect to AATS-14, the lidar sigma(ep)(lambda) are higher: Bias differences are 0.004 Km(-1) (13%) and 0.007 Km(-1) (24%) for the two elastic backscatter lidars (MPLNET and MPLARM, lambda = 523 nm) and 0.029 Km(-1) (54%) for the Raman lidar (lambda = 355 nm). An unnoticed loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar had occurred leading up to AIOP, and we expect better agreement from the recently restored system. Looking at the collective results from six field campaigns conducted since 1996, airborne in situ measurements of sigma(ep)(lambda) tend to be biased slightly low (17% at visible wavelengths) when compared to airborne Sun photometer sigma(ep)(lambda). On the other hand, sigma(ep)(lambda) values derived from lidars tend to have no or positive biases. From the bias differences we conclude that the typical systematic error associated

  12. Biogenic VOC oxidation and organic aerosol formation in an urban nocturnal boundary layer: aircraft vertical profiles in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Brock, C. A.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Atlas, E.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, R.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehshenfeld, F. C.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2013-11-01

    Organic compounds are a large component of aerosol mass, but organic aerosol (OA) sources remain poorly characterized. Recent model studies have suggested nighttime oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons as a potentially large OA source, but analysis of field measurements to test these predictions is sparse. We present nighttime vertical profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, VOCs and aerosol composition measured during low approaches of the NOAA P-3 aircraft to airfields in Houston, TX. This region has large emissions of both biogenic hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides. The latter category serves as a source of the nitrate radical, NO3, a key nighttime oxidant. Biogenic VOCs (BVOC) and urban pollutants were concentrated within the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), which varied in depth from 100-400 m. Despite concentrated NOx at low altitude, ozone was never titrated to zero, resulting in rapid NO3 radical production rates of 0.2-2.7 ppbv h-1 within the NBL. Monoterpenes and isoprene were frequently present within the NBL and underwent rapid oxidation (up to 1 ppbv h-1), mainly by NO3 and to a lesser extent O3. Concurrent enhancement in organic and nitrate aerosol on several profiles was consistent with primary emissions and with secondary production from nighttime BVOC oxidation, with the latter equivalent to or slightly larger than the former. Some profiles may have been influenced by biomass burning sources as well, making quantitative attribution of organic aerosol sources difficult. Ratios of organic aerosol to CO within the NBL ranged from 14 to 38 μg m-3 OA/ppmv CO. A box model simulation incorporating monoterpene emissions, oxidant formation rates and monoterpene SOA yields suggested overnight OA production of 0.5 to 9 μg m-3.

  13. Transport, vertical structure and radiative properties of dust events in southeast China determined from ground and space sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Y.; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor J.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Cribb, Maureen

    2011-11-01

    Two dust events were detected over the Yangtze Delta region of China during March 14-17 and April 25-26 in 2009 where such dust events are uncommon. The transport behavior, spatio-temporal evolution, vertical structure, direct radiative effects, as well as induced heating rates, are investigated using a combination of ground-based and satellite-based measurements, a back-trajectory analysis, an aerosol model and a radiative transfer model.

  14. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevâg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Åyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The ability of 11 models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model intercomparison initiative (AeroCom II), is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded data set of aerosol extinction profiles built for this purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 subcontinental regions show that five models improved, whereas three degraded in reproducing the interregional variability in Zα0-6 km, the mean extinction height diagnostic, as computed from the CALIOP aerosol profiles over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models' performance remains highly variable, the simulation of the timing of the Zα0-6 km peak season has also improved for all but two models from AeroCom Phase I to Phase II. The biases in Zα0-6 km are smaller in all regions except Central Atlantic, East Asia, and North and South Africa. Most of the models now underestimate Zα0-6 km over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the performance and evolution of the individual models and for the intermodel diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties contributing to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  15. Precipitating cloud vertical structure derived from passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian D.; Liberti, Gian L.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for the retrieval of cloud vertical structure from passive microwave radiometry is demonstrated by using passive microwave radiometry observations made during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. The procedure uses a set of cloud radiative models, with each model consisting of five vertical layers, specifying a distinct cloud vertical structure in terms of the near-surface parameters. The retrieval procedure is separated into two tasks (1) retrieving a set of geophysical parameters for each cloud radiative model and (2) finding which of the cloud radiative models and its associated retrieved parameters best fit the observed geophysical conditions. It is shown that this retrieval technique can detect differences and similarities between precipitating systems.

  16. Biogenic VOC oxidation and organic aerosol formation in an urban nocturnal boundary layer: aircraft vertical profiles in Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Brock, C. A.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Atlas, E.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, R.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Fehshenfeld, F. C.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2013-05-01

    Organic compounds are a large component of aerosol mass, but organic aerosol (OA) sources remain poorly characterized. Recent model studies have suggested nighttime oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons as a potentially large OA source, but analysis of field measurements to test these predictions is sparse. We present nighttime vertical profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, VOCs and aerosol composition measured during low approaches of the NOAA P-3 aircraft to airfields in Houston, TX. This region has large emissions of both biogenic hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides. The latter serves as a source of the nitrate radical, NO3, a key nighttime oxidant. Biogenic VOCs (BVOC) and urban pollutants were concentrated within the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), which varied in depth from 100-400 m. Despite concentrated NOx at low altitude, ozone was never titrated to zero, resulting in rapid NO3 radical production rates of 0.2-2.7ppbv h-1 within the NBL. Monoterpenes and isoprene were frequently present within the NBL and underwent rapid oxidation (up to 1ppbv h-1), mainly by NO3 and to a lesser extent O3. Concurrent enhancement in organic and nitrate aerosol on several profiles was consistent with primary emissions and with secondary production from nighttime BVOC oxidation, with the latter equivalent to or slightly larger than the former. Ratios of organic aerosol to CO within the NBL ranged from 14 to 38 μg m-3 OA/ppmv CO. A box model simulation incorporating monoterpene emissions, oxidant formation rates and monoterpene SOA yields suggested overnight OA production of 0.5 to 9 μg m-3.

  17. Remote Sensing of Vertical Distributions of Smoke Aerosol Off the Coast of Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Haywood, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hart, W.; Schmid, B.

    2003-01-01

    In 2004 NASA plans to launch the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations- CALIPSO mission, with a two-wavelength lidar aboard. CALIPSO will fly in formation with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite. Here we present inversions of combined aircraft lidar and MODIS data to study the properties of smoke off the southwest coast of Southern Africa. The inversion derives profiles of the aerosol extinction due to fine and coarse particles. Comparisons with three sets of airborne in situ measurements show excellent agreement of the aerosol extinction profiles; however the inversion derives smaller spectral dependence of the extinction than the in situ measurements. The inversion is sensitive to the aerosol backscattering-to-extinction ratio (BER). Due to nonsphericity of the coarse aerosols, the range of BERs of the smoke aerosol is 0.014 to 0.021 sr(sup -l) for the fine and coarse particles at 0.53 and 1.06 pm wavelengths, which do not differ much from the value for dust (0.016 sr(sup -1)) at these wavelengths.

  18. Continental pollution in the western Mediterranean basin: vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gases measured over the sea during TRAQA 2012 and SAFMED 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Doppler, L.; Gaimoz, C.; Grand, N.; Ancellet, G.; Raut, J.-C.; Beekmann, M.; Borbon, A.; Sartelet, K.; Attié, J.-L.; Ravetta, F.; Formenti, P.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we present airborne observations of aerosol and trace gases obtained over the sea in the western Mediterranean basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity) and SAFMED (Secondary Aerosol Formation in the MEDiterranean) campaigns in summer 2012 and 2013. A total of 23 vertical profiles were measured up to 5000 m above sea level over an extended area (40-45° N and 2° W-12° E) including the Gulf of Genoa, southern France, the Gulf of Lion, and the Spanish coast. During TRAQA and SAFMED the study area experienced a wide range of meteorological conditions which favoured pollution export from different sources located around the basin. Also, several events of dust outflows were measured during the campaigns. Observations from the present study show that continental pollution largely affects the western Mediterranean both close to coastal regions and in the open sea as far as ~ 250 km from the coastline. The measured aerosol scattering coefficient varies between ~ 20 and 120 Mm-1, while carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) mixing ratios are in the range of 60-165 and 30-85 ppbv, respectively. Pollution reaches 3000-4000 m in altitude and presents a very complex and highly stratified structure characterized by fresh and aged layers both in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere. Within pollution plumes the measured particle concentration in the Aitken (0.004-0.1 μm) and accumulation (0.1-1.0 μm) modes is between ~ 30 and 5000-6000 scm-3 (standard cm-3), which is comparable to the aerosol concentration measured in continental areas under pollution conditions. Additionally, our measurements indicate the presence of highly concentrated Aitken layers (10 000-15 000 scm-3) observed both close to the surface and in the free troposphere, possibly linked to the influence of new particle formation (NPF) episodes over the basin.

  19. Saharan Desert Dust Sources: New Insights Based on Aerosol Vertical Profiles Retrieved from Thermal Infrared Measurements by IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbussche, S.; Kumps, N.; Vandaele, A. C.; De Maziere, M.

    2015-06-01

    Desert dust is a major actor in the climate and one of the least characterized with respect to its radiative forcing, both direct and indirect. Studies of dust atmospheric load and sources are therefore of great scientific interest. In the last years, we have developed and improved a retrieval strategy to obtain desert dust aerosols vertical profiles, from thermal infrared measurements by IASI. This strategy has been used to process significant amount of IASI data above North Africa. This dataset allows a new insight in the study of Saharan desert dust sources: it provides twice a day, at interesting times considering the dust emission diurnal cycle, vertical profiles of desert dust (not only optical depth), making possible to distinguish local emissions from transported dust.

  20. The vertical structure and thickness of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Burns, J. A.; Durisen, R. H.; Hamill, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    An explanation for the vertical structure and thickness of Saturn's rings compatible with observational data is presented. The model of the rings as being many particles thick is shown to be possible, with random particle motions preventing the complete flattening of the system and a gaussian distribution of particle density with vertical displacement. The model prediction of a maximum ring thickness of tens of meters, however, is in conflict with observations of ring thickness of at least 0.8 km at ring-plane passage. It is shown that perturbations to ring particle orbits caused by the sun and Saturn's large satellites may produce long- and short-period coherent vertical ring displacements and a nonlinear displacement of the ring plane from the equatorial plane with radial distance, leading to an apparent edge-on thickness of a few hundred meters.

  1. Assessment of aerosol's mass concentrations from measured linear particle depolarization ratio (vertically resolved) and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemuc, A.; Vasilescu, J.; Talianu, C.; Belegante, L.; Nicolae, D.

    2013-11-01

    Multi-wavelength depolarization Raman lidar measurements from Magurele, Romania are used in this study along with simulated mass-extinction efficiencies to calculate the mass concentration profiles of different atmospheric components, due to their different depolarization contribution to the 532 nm backscatter coefficient. Linear particle depolarization ratio (δpart) was computed using the relative amplification factor and the system-dependent molecular depolarization. The low depolarizing component was considered as urban/smoke, with a mean δpart of 3%, while for the high depolarizing component (mineral dust) a mean δpart of 35% was assumed. For this study 11 months of lidar measurements were analysed. Two study cases are presented in details: one for a typical Saharan dust aerosol intrusion, 10 June 2012 and one for 12 July 2012 when a lofted layer consisting of biomass burning smoke extended from 3 to 4.5 km height. Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds software package (OPAC) classification and conversion factors were used to calculate mass concentrations. We found that calibrated depolarization measurements are critical in distinguishing between smoke-reach aerosol during the winter and dust-reach aerosol during the summer, as well as between elevated aerosol layers having different origins. Good agreement was found between lidar retrievals and DREAM- Dust REgional Atmospheric Model forecasts in cases of Saharan dust. Our method was also compared against LIRIC (The Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code) and very small differences were observed.

  2. Assessment of aerosol's mass concentrations from measured linear particle depolarization ratio (vertically resolved) and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemuc, A.; Vasilescu, J.; Talianu, C.; Belegante, L.; Nicolae, D.

    2013-06-01

    Multiwavelength depolarization Raman lidar measurements from Magurele, Romania are used in this study along with simulated mass-extinction efficiencies to calculate the mass concentrations profiles of different atmospheric components, due to their different depolarization contribution to the 532 nm backscatter coefficient. Linear particle depolarization ratio (δpart) was computed using the relative amplification factor and the system-dependent molecular depolarization. The low depolarizing component was considered as urban/smoke, with a mean δpart of 3%, while for the high depolarizing component (mineral dust) a mean δpart of 35% was assumed. For this study 11 months of lidar measurements were analyzed. Two study cases are presented in details: one for a typical Saharan dust aerosol intrusion, 10 June 2012 and one for 12 July 2012 when a lofted layer consisting of biomass burning smoke extended from 3 to 4.5 km height. Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds software package (OPAC) classification and conversion factors were used to calculate mass concentrations. We found that calibrated depolarization measurements are critical to distinguish between smoke-reach aerosol during the winter and dust-reach aerosol during the summer, as well as between elevated aerosol layers having different origins. Good agreement was found between lidar retrievals and DREAM- Dust REgional Atmospheric Model forecasts in cases of Saharan dust. Our method was also compared against LIRIC (The Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code) and very small differences were observed.

  3. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  4. Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities and aerosol optical properties form MAXDOAS measurements in Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Nan; Van. Roozendael, Michel; Ding, Aijun; Zhou, Bin; Hendrick, François; Shen, Yicheng; Wang, Tin; Valks, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important environmental problems in developing Asian countries like China. Due to huge consumption of fossil fuels and rapid increase of traffic emissions in the past decades, many regions in China have been experiencing heavy air pollution. The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region includes the mega-city Shanghai and the well-industrialized and urbanized areas of Zhejiang Province and Jiangsu Province, with over ten large cities, such as Hangzhou, Suzhou and Nanjing. Covering only 2% land area, this region produces over 20% of China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) which makes it the most densely populated region and one of the most polluted regions in China. For instance, there more than 60% of a year was haze days with poor visibility in Shanghai over the last few years. In the YRD region, knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of the source and transport of air pollutants because only few measurement studies have been conducted. MAX-DOAS measurements were performed in Shanghai city center and Wujiang (border of Shanghai and Jiangsu Province) from 2010 to 2012 and in Nanjing (capital of Jiangsu Province) from April 2013. A retrieval algorithm, based on an on-line implementation of the radiative transfer code LIDORT and the optimal estimation technique, has been used to provide information on aerosol extinction vertical profiles. The total aerosol optical depths (AODs) calculated from the retrieved profiles were compared to MODIS, AERONET and local PM measurements. The aerosol information was input to LIDORT to calculate NO2 air mass factors. The retrieved tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) were compared to in-situ and satellite NO2 measurements.

  5. Improved parameterization for the vertical flux of dust aerosols emitted by an eroding soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The representation of the dust cycle in atmospheric circulation models hinges on an accurate parameterization of the vertical dust flux at emission. However, existing parameterizations of the vertical dust flux vary substantially in their scaling with wind friction velocity, require input parameters...

  6. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, N.; Filioglou, M.; Poupkou, A.; Liora, N.; Dimopoulos, S.; Melas, D.; Chaikovsky, A.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC), that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E) from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  7. Structural and Electrical Investigation of C60-Graphene Vertical Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanpyo; Lee, Tae Hoon; Santos, Elton J G; Jo, Pil Sung; Salleo, Alberto; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-06-23

    Graphene, with its unique electronic and structural qualities, has become an important playground for studying adsorption and assembly of various materials including organic molecules. Moreover, organic/graphene vertical structures assembled by van der Waals interaction have potential for multifunctional device applications. Here, we investigate structural and electrical properties of vertical heterostructures composed of C60 thin film on graphene. The assembled film structure of C60 on graphene is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which reveals a uniform morphology of C60 film on graphene with a grain size as large as 500 nm. The strong epitaxial relations between C60 crystal and graphene lattice directions are found, and van der Waals ab initio calculations support the observed phenomena. Moreover, using C60-graphene heterostructures, we fabricate vertical graphene transistors incorporating n-type organic semiconducting materials with an on/off ratio above 3 × 10(3). Our work demonstrates that graphene can serve as an excellent substrate for assembly of molecules, and attained organic/graphene heterostructures have great potential for electronics applications. PMID:26027690

  8. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the retrieval of vertical aerosol properties from combined lidar/radiometer data: development and distribution in EARLINET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Bril, Andrey; Goloub, Philippe; Tanré, Didier; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Wandinger, Ulla; Chaikovskaya, Ludmila; Denisov, Sergey; Grudo, Jan; Lopatin, Anton; Karol, Yana; Lapyonok, Tatsiana; Amiridis, Vassilis; Ansmann, Albert; Apituley, Arnoud; Allados-Arboledas, Lucas; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Boselli, Antonella; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Freudenthaler, Volker; Giles, David; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Nicolae, Doina; Oshchepkov, Sergey; Papayannis, Alex; Perrone, Maria Rita; Pietruczuk, Alexander; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sicard, Michaël; Slutsker, Ilya; Talianu, Camelia; De Tomasi, Ferdinando; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Wagner, Janet; Wang, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code) algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar/radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data. The algorithm starts with the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode.The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Intercomparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLINET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  9. Long-term impacts of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing; Niu, F.; Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yangang; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol has complex effects on clouds and precipitation that may augment or offset each other contingent upon a variety of variables. As a result, its long-term impact on climate is largely unknown. Using 10 years of the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) measurements, strong aerosol effects of climatologically significance are detected. With increasing total aerosol number concentration (condensation nucleus, CN) measured near the ground, both cloud top height and precipitation change systematically for mix-phase clouds of warm-base (cloud base <1km) and cold-top (above the freezing level), but not for pure liquid and ice clouds. Cloud thickness can increase systematically with the CN concentration by up to a factor of 2. The response of precipitation to CN depends on cloud liquid water path (LWP). As CN increases, rain occurs more frequently for high LWP but less frequently for low LWP. Such strong signals of aerosol long-term impact on cloud and precipitation have not been reported and have significant implications for climate change studies, especially concerning regional and global climate change induced by pollution.

  10. Structural polarization conversion in integrated optical vertically stacked ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, Caterina; Edoardo Campanella, Carlo; Nicola Armenise, Mario

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we report the structural polarization conversion effect occurring in an integrated optics device formed by two vertically stacked ring resonators excited through an underlying bus waveguide. We demonstrate that the vertical propagation of light, due to evanescent coupling, is enhanced by the resonant behavior of the device and the polarization state of a horizontally polarized input wave tends to be rotated within the device. In particular, a gradual polarization rotation can be observed when passing from one propagation plane to another, due to the geometry of the structure. This effect has been explained by taking into account all the physical mechanisms, which contribute to the polarization conversion. Although numerical results of general validity have been obtained, we also considered, as an example, silicon nitride technology due to its intrinsic features related to low cost and reduced technological problems.

  11. Left auditory cortex specialization for vertical harmonic structure of chords.

    PubMed

    Passynkova, Natalia; Sander, Kerstin; Scheich, Henning

    2005-12-01

    The representation of consonant and dissonant chords in the auditory cortex was investigated using low-noise functional magnetic resonance imaging and different experimental paradigms to separate the effects of vertical harmony from those of other musical features. The results revealed higher activation by consonant compared with dissonant chords in the left posterior auditory cortex, suggesting contributions of mechanisms of encoding the acoustical chord structure rather than mechanisms based on sequential integration of chords. PMID:16597802

  12. Continental pollution in the Western Mediterranean Basin: vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gases measured over the sea during TRAQA 2012 and SAFMED 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Doppler, L.; Gaimoz, C.; Grand, N.; Ancellet, G.; Raut, J.-C.; Beekmann, M.; Borbon, A.; Sartelet, K.; Attié, J.-L.; Ravetta, F.; Formenti, P.

    2015-03-01

    In this study we present airborne observations of aerosol and trace gases obtained over the sea in the Western Mediterranean Basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity) and SAFMED (Secondary Aerosol Formation in the MEDiterranean) campaigns in summers 2012 and 2013. A total of 23 vertical profiles were measured up to 5000 m a.s.l. over an extended area (40-45° N latitude and 2° W-12° E longitude) including the Gulf of Genoa, Southern France, the Gulf of Lion, and the Spanish coast. TRAQA and SAFMED successfully measured a wide range of meteorological conditions which favoured the pollution export from different sources located around the basin. Also, several events of dust outflows were measured during the campaigns. Observations from the present study indicate that continental pollution largely affects the Western Mediterranean both close to coastal regions and in the open sea as far as ~250 km from the coastline. Aerosol layers not specifically linked with Saharan dust outflows are distributed ubiquitously which indicates quite elevated levels of background pollution throughout the Western Basin. The measured aerosol scattering coefficient varies between ~20 and 120 M m-1, while carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) mixing ratios are in the range of 60-170 and 30-85 ppbv, respectively. Pollution reaches 3000-4000 m in altitude and presents a very complex and highly stratified structure characterized by fresh and aged layers both in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere. Within pollution plumes the measured particle concentration in the Aitken (0.004-0.1 μm) and accumulation (0.1-1.0 μm) modes is between ˜ 100 and 5000-6000 s cm-3 (standard cm-3), which is comparable to the aerosol concentration measured in continental urban areas. Additionally, our measurements indicate the presence of highly concentrated Aitken layers (10 000-15 000 s cm-3) observed both close to the surface and in the free troposphere, possibly linked to the influence of new

  13. A skeleton model for the MJO with refined vertical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thual, Sulian; Majda, Andrew J.

    2016-05-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of variability in the tropical atmosphere on intraseasonal timescales and planetary spatial scales. The skeleton model is a minimal dynamical model that recovers robustly the most fundamental MJO features of (I) a slow eastward speed of roughly 5 {ms}^{-1}, (II) a peculiar dispersion relation with dω /dk ≈ 0, and (III) a horizontal quadrupole vortex structure. This model depicts the MJO as a neutrally-stable atmospheric wave that involves a simple multiscale interaction between planetary dry dynamics, planetary lower-tropospheric moisture and the planetary envelope of synoptic-scale activity. Here we propose and analyse an extended version of the skeleton model with additional variables accounting for the refined vertical structure of the MJO in nature. The present model reproduces qualitatively the front-to-rear vertical structure of the MJO found in nature, with MJO events marked by a planetary envelope of convective activity transitioning from the congestus to the deep to the stratiform type, in addition to a front-to-rear structure of moisture, winds and temperature. Despite its increased complexity the present model retains several interesting features of the original skeleton model such as a conserved energy and similar linear solutions. We further analyze a model version with a simple stochastic parametrization for the unresolved details of synoptic-scale activity. The stochastic model solutions show intermittent initiation, propagation and shut down of MJO wave trains, as in previous studies, in addition to MJO events with a front-to-rear vertical structure of varying intensity and characteristics from one event to another.

  14. Export industry structure upgrading and China's vertical specialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yinghua

    2011-10-01

    We computed the ratio of China's vertical specialization with revising method of Hummels et al. (2001). We found that China's export has the traits of processing trade, and Asian countries are the main exporter of intermediate goods to China; there is strong positive relationship between export ratio and ratio of China's vertical specialization, indicates that importing of intermediate goods play an important role in China's industry upgrading, China's comparative advantage of export still lies in low price of labor; even if China's production still locates in low value added stage in international supply chain, but China has began to advance its industry structure, and change the mode of production and trade that rely processing trade too much.

  15. Transport, vertical structure and radiative properties of dust events in southeast China determined from ground and space sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Youfei; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor; Welton, E. J.; Cribb, Mareen

    2011-11-01

    Two dust events were detected over the Yangtze Delta region of China during March 14-17 and April 25-26 in 2009 where such dust events are uncommon. The transport behavior, spatio-temporal evolution, vertical structure, direct radiative effects, as well as induced heating rates, are investigated using a combination of ground-based and satellite-based measurements, a back-trajectory analysis, an aerosol model and a radiative transfer model. Back-trajectories, wind fields and aerosol model analyses show that the first dust originated in northern/northwestern China and the second generated in the Taklimakan desert in northwest China, and traveled across the Hexi corridor and Loess Plateau to the Yangtze Delta region (the so-called "dust corridor"). The mean lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio (LR) during the two dust events was 38.7 ± 10.4 sr and 42.7 ± 15.2 sr, respectively. The mean aerosol depolarization ratio ( δa) for the first dust event was 0.16 ± 0.07, with a maximum value of 0.32. For the second, the mean δa was around 0.19 ± 0.06, with a maximum value of 0.29. Aerosol extinction coefficient and δa profiles for the two events were similar: two aerosol layers consisting of dust aerosols and a mixture of dust and anthropogenic pollution aerosols. The topmost aerosol layer is above 3.5 km. The maximum mean aerosol extinction coefficients were 0.5 km -1 and 0.54 km -1 at about 0.7 km and 1.1 km, respectively. Significant effects of cooling at the surface and heating in the atmosphere were found during these dust events. Diurnal mean shortwave radiative forcings (efficiencies) at the surface, the top-of-the-atmosphere and within the atmosphere were -36.8 (-80.0), -13.6 (-29.6) and 23.2 (50.4) W m -2, respectively, during the first dust event, and -48.2 (-70.9), -21.4 (-31.5) and 26.8 (39.4) W m -2, respectively, during the second dust event. Maximum heating rates occurred at 0.7 km during the first dust event and at 1.1 km during the second dust event

  16. Meridional trends in Neptune’s background aerosol structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luszcz-Cook, Statia H.; de Kleer, Katherine; de Pater, Imke; Adamkovics, Mate; Hammel, Heidi B.

    2015-11-01

    We will present retrieval results for Neptune’s aerosol structure in regions free of discrete cloud features, using data from the Keck OSIRIS integral field spectrograph and a two layer model for the aerosols. We use a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to perform a thorough search of the parameter space; this analysis reveals a substantial decrease in the optical depth of the upper aerosol layer with increasing distance from the equator, similar to what is observed for the “upper haze” of Uranus in a simple two-cloud model (e.g., de Kleer et al. 2015). We also tentatively identify an increase in the optical depth of the deeper aerosol layer from the equator to the south pole, opposite to what is observed for Uranus but in agreement with the conclusions of Karkoschka & Tomasko (2011) for Neptune from HST-STIS spectroscopy. Finally, we will present our constraints on Neptune’s methane profile and its latitude dependence, and discuss the significance of these results in terms of Neptune’s global circulation.

  17. Structural magnetic loss of vertical aligned carbon fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng

    2013-06-01

    The electromagnetic spectroscopy of vertical aligned carbon fibres (VACF) reinforced epoxy resin has been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The composite was prepared by conventional epoxy polymerization. The results indicate VACF could possess magnetic loss and the structural magnetic properties could be tailored by adjusting the forest structure. The corresponding mechanism of the structural magnetic properties is proposed by the Faradays' law of induction. The structural magnetism is further confirmed by measuring VACF reinforced Al2O3 composites in 1073 K environment. The measurement agrees well with the trend predicted by the parallel fibres model. These results represent a crucial step towards high temperature microwave absorber design and open a new avenue for realizing magnetic losses in the dielectric material.

  18. Aerosol chemistry and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer: insights on the relevant role of nitrate from case studies in Milan (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curci, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    Observations of the aerosol vertical profile reveal the formation of elevated aerosol layers within and above the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Those layers may have chemical composition significantly different from that observed near the ground, and the knowledge about the role they play in the budget of the ground-level particulate matter is still incomplete. Here we investigate this aspect combining chemical and physical aerosol measurements with WRF/Chem model simulations. The observations were collected in the Milan urban area (Northern Italy) during summer of 2007 and winter of 2008. We find that an important player in shaping the upper aerosol layers is particulate nitrate, which may reach higher values in the upper PBL (up to 30% of the aerosol mass) than the lower. The nitrate formation process is predicted to be largely driven by the relative humidity vertical profile, that may trigger efficient aqueous nitrate formation when exceeding the ammonium nitrate deliquescence point. Secondary PM2.5 produced in the upper half of the PBL may contribute up to 7-8 μg m-3 (or 25%) to ground level concentrations on hourly basis. A large potential role is also found to be played by the residual aerosol layer above the PBL, which may occasionally contribute up to 10-12 μg m-3(or 40%) to hourly ground level PM2.5 concentrations during the morning.

  19. Vertical distribution of agriculture crop residue burning aerosol observed by space-borne lidar CALIOP - A case study over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A. K.; Shibata, T.

    2011-12-01

    Agriculture crop residue burning is one of the important sources of trace gas emissions and aerosol loading over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB). It is also one of the main causes for dense atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) formation over South Asian region. Present study deals with spatial and vertical variability of aerosol optical and microphysical properties during the crop residue burning season (October and November) over the IGB. MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) fire location data and MODIS AOD data confirms the crop residue burning activities over irrigated cropland of the IGB during October and November, 2009. Large values (> 0.7) of MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) backscatter (>0.006 km-1 sr-1 below 1.0 km altitude) are suggesting enhanced atmospheric pollution associated with agriculture crop residue burning. The increase in tropospheric columnar NO2 and surface CO concentration during October and November also emphasized the significant contribution of crop residue burning activities in enhanced anthropogenic pollution over the IGB. Vertical distribution of backscatter coefficients showed trapping of biomass (crop residues) burning aerosol within boundary layer. Spatial variation of aerosol backscatter and AOD showed large value above north-west part of IGB, major area of crop residue burning activities. The results of this study will be very useful in quantification of optical properties of atmospheric brown clouds and its effect on climate.

  20. Airborne DOAS measurements in Arctic: vertical distributions of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, A.; van Roozendael, M.; Theys, N.; Fayt, C.; Hermans, C.; Quennehen, B.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Ancellet, G.; Pommier, M.; Pelon, J.; Burkhart, J.; Stohl, A.; de Mazière, M.

    2011-05-01

    We report airborne differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of aerosol extinction and NO2 tropospheric profiles performed off the North coast of Norway in April 2008. The DOAS instrument was installed on the Safire ATR-42 aircraft during the POLARCAT-France spring campaign and recorded scattered light spectra in near-limb geometry using a scanning telescope. We use O4 slant column measurements to derive the aerosol extinction at 360 nm. Regularization is based on the maximum a posteriori solution, for which we compare a linear and a logarithmic approach. The latter inherently constrains the solution to positive values and yields aerosol extinction profiles more consistent with independently measured size distributions. Two soundings are presented, performed on 8 April 2008 above 71° N, 22° E and on 9 April 2008 above 70° N, 17.8° E. The first profile shows aerosol extinction and NO2 in the marine boundary layer with respective values of 0.04±0.005 km-1 and 1.9±0.3 × 109 molec cm-3. A second extinction layer of 0.01±0.003 km-1 is found at 4 km altitude. During the second sounding, clouds prevented us to retrieve profile parts under 3 km altitude but a layer with enhanced extinction (0.025±0.005 km-1) and NO2 (1.95±0.2 × 109 molec cm-3) is clearly detected at 4 km altitude. From CO and ozone in-situ measurements complemented by back-trajectories, we interpret the measurements in the free troposphere as, for the first sounding, a mix between stratospheric and polluted air from Northern Europe and for the second sounding, polluted air from Central Europe containing NO2. Considering the boundary layer measurements of the first flight, modeled source regions indicate closer sources, especially the Kola Peninsula smelters, which can explain the NO2 enhancement not correlated with a CO increase at the same altitude.

  1. Airborne DOAS measurements in Arctic: vertical distributions of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, A.; van Roozendael, M.; Theys, N.; Fayt, C.; Hermans, C.; Quennehen, B.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Ancellet, G.; Pommier, M.; Pelon, J.; Burkhart, J.; Stohl, A.; de Mazière, M.

    2011-09-01

    We report on airborne Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of aerosol extinction and NO2 tropospheric profiles performed off the North coast of Norway in April 2008. The DOAS instrument was installed on the Safire ATR-42 aircraft during the POLARCAT-France spring campaign and recorded scattered light spectra in near-limb geometry using a scanning telescope. We use O4 slant column measurements to derive the aerosol extinction at 360 nm. Regularization is based on the maximum a posteriori solution, for which we compare a linear and a logarithmic approach. The latter inherently constrains the solution to positive values and yields aerosol extinction profiles more consistent with independently measured size distributions. We present results from two soundings performed on 8 April 2008 above 71° N, 22° E and on 9 April 2008 above 70° N, 17.8° E. The first profile shows aerosol extinction and NO2 in the marine boundary layer with respective values of 0.04 ± 0.005 km-1 and 1.9 ± 0.3 × 109 molec cm-3. A second extinction layer of 0.01 ± 0.003 km-1 is found at 4 km altitude where the NO2 concentration is 0.32 ± 0.2 × 109 molec cm-3. During the second sounding, clouds prevent retrieval of profile parts under 3 km altitude but a layer with enhanced extinction (0.025 ± 0.005 km-1) and NO2 (1.95 ± 0.2 × 109 molec cm-3) is clearly detected at 4 km altitude. From CO and ozone in-situ measurements complemented by back-trajectories, we interpret the measurements in the free troposphere as, for the first sounding, a mix between stratospheric and polluted air from Northern Europe and for the second sounding, polluted air from Central Europe containing NO2. Considering the boundary layer measurements of the first flight, modeled source regions indicate closer sources, especially the Kola Peninsula smelters, which can explain the NO2 enhancement not correlated with a CO increase at the same altitude.

  2. Modeling Electrical Structure of the Artificial Charged Aerosol Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydenko, S.; Iudin, D.; Klimashov, V.; Kostinskiy, A. J.; Syssoev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The electric structure of the unipolar charged aerosol cloud is considered. The cloud of the volume about 30 cubic meters is generated in the open atmosphere by the original aeroelectrical facility consisting of the source of the aquated ions and the high-voltage discharger. Representing the charge density distribution as a superposition of regular and irregular parts, a model of the electrical structure of the cloud is developed. The regular part is calculated under the stationary current approximation taking into account the source current structure, the shape of the cloud, and results of the multi-point measurements of the electric field and conductivity in the vicinity of the cloud. The irregular part describes random spatiotemporal fluctuations of the charge density which are assumed to be proportional to the aerosol number density. It is shown that a quasi-electrostatic field of the charged aerosol is characterized by significant spatial fluctuations showing the scale invariance. The mean-square fluctuations of the voltage between different parts of the cloud are proportional to the square root of its linear dimensions and may reach significant values even in the absence of the regular field. The basic parameters of the fluctuating spatial structure of the electric field inside the charged aerosol cloud are estimated. It is shown that the charge density fluctuations could lead to a significant (up to 2,5 times) local enhancement of the electric field as compared to the field of the regular part of the charge density. The above effect could serve as one of the important mechanisms of the spark initiation.

  3. The fine structure of the vertical lobe of octopus brain.

    PubMed

    Gray, E G

    1970-07-30

    Although much is known about the structural organization and connexions of the various lobes of the octopus brain from light microscopy, this is the first attempt at a detailed analysis of one of the lobes- the vertical lobe, with the electron microscope. The vertical lobe consists of five lobules. The median superior frontal (MSF) axons enter each lobule from the MSF lobe. The MSF axons contain both microtubules and neurofilaments. The varicosities of the MSF axons contain both agranular and dense-cored vesicles and synapse with trunks of the amacrine cells. These trunks run together in bundles termed amacrine tracts into the centres of the lobules. The amacrine trunks contain microtubules but no neurofilaments. The trunks contain large and small agranular synaptic vesicles and synapse with what are in all probability branches of the trunks of the large cells. These trunks contain microtubules but no neurofilaments. They run out through the bases of the lobules probably without forming synaptic contacts within the lobule. Fibres signalling 'pain' (nocifensor) enter the lobules from below. They can be recognized by their content of neurofilaments. Their terminals contain numerous very small synaptic vesicles and a few larger and dense-cored ones. These 'pain' fibres appear to synapse mostly with processes of the large cells. J. Z. Young has shown that the vertical lobe is especially concerned with the integrative action of the visual system, linked with the chemo-tactile system. Electron microscopy supports Young's suggestion that the superior frontal and interconnected vertical lobe systems constitute a loop which could sustain a positive feed-back mechanism (MSF -- amacrine -- large cell -- lateral superior frontal -- MSF) while the 'pain' (nocifensor) input could exert a suppressor (inhibitory) effect on the loop by its action on the large cells. PMID:22408833

  4. Vertical structures induced by embedded moonlets in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Holger; Seiß, Martin; Salo, Heikki; Spahn, Frank

    2015-05-01

    We study the vertical extent of propeller structures in Saturn's rings (i) by extending the model of Spahn and Sremčević (Spahn, F., Sremčević, M. [2000]. Astron. Astrophys., 358, 368-372) to include the vertical direction and (ii) by performing N-body box simulations of a perturbing moonlet embedded into the rings. We find that the gravitational interaction of ring particles with a non-inclined moonlet does not induce considerable vertical excursions of ring particles, but causes a considerable thermal motion in the ring plane. We expect ring particle collisions to partly convert the lateral induced thermal motion into vertical excursions of ring particles in the course of a quasi-thermalization. The N-body box simulations lead to maximal propeller heights of about 0.6-0.8 Hill radii of the embedded perturbing moonlet. Moonlet sizes estimated by this relation are in good agreement with size estimates from radial propeller scalings for the propellers Blériot and Earhart. For large propellers, the extended hydrodynamical propeller model predicts an exponential propeller height relaxation, confirmed by N-body box simulations of non-self gravitating ring particles. Exponential cooling constants, calculated from the hydrodynamical propeller model agree fairly well with values from fits to the tail of the azimuthal height decay of the N-body box simulations. From exponential cooling constants, determined from shadows cast by the propeller Earhart and imaged by the Cassini spacecraft, we estimate collision frequencies of about 6 collisions per particle per orbit in the propeller gap region and about 11 collisions per particle per orbit in the propeller wake region.

  5. Complex vertical layering and mixing of aerosols over the eastern Mediterranean: active and passive remote sensing at the Cyprus University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, R.-E.; Nisantzi, A.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.; Ansmann, A.; Schwarz, A.; Basart, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Aerosols can have a complicated influence on climate conditions, directly as well as indirectly via cloud formation. The southeastern Mediterranean region can be characterized as a cross road of aerosols originating from European, Asian and African continents. Complex vertical aerosol distributions are frequently detected over Cyprus by means of active remote sensing. Observations of such complex aerosol layering and comparison of the measurements with aerosol products of regional and global atmospheric transport models are required to improve our understanding of life cycles of aerosol mixtures and their impact on climate as well as on satellite remote sensing products. In this study, a case of an intense desert dust outbreak from Syria and Saudi Arabia towards the eastern Mediterranean in September 2011 is presented. The observations used in this study were performed with a 532-nm polarization Lidar and a sun/sky AERONET photometer operated at 8 channels from 340 to 1640 nm wavelength. Both instruments belong to remote sensing station of the Cyprus Technical University at Limassol, Cyprus (34°N, 33°E). The lofted dust plume was doped with air masses that crossed sources of biomass burning smoke and anthropogenic pollution. In addition, the shallow marine boundary layer over the Mediterranean Sea and over Limassol became mixed with the anthropogenic haze by sea breeze circulations. The case study demonstrates the potential of combined lidar/photometer observations to deliver detailed vertically resolved information of the aerosol characteristics in terms of particle optical and microphysical properties, separately for the spherical particle fraction as well as for the non-spherical aerosol mode.

  6. The Tropical Convective Spectrum. Part 1; Archetypal Vertical Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Cecil, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    A taxonomy of tropical convective and stratiform vertical structures is constructed through cluster analysis of 3 yr of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) "warm-season" (surface temperature greater than 10 C) precipitation radar (PR) vertical profiles, their surface rainfall, and associated radar-based classifiers (convective/ stratiform and brightband existence). Twenty-five archetypal profile types are identified, including nine convective types, eight stratiform types, two mixed types, and six anvil/fragment types (nonprecipitating anvils and sheared deep convective profiles). These profile types are then hierarchically clustered into 10 similar families, which can be further combined, providing an objective and physical reduction of the highly multivariate PR data space that retains vertical structure information. The taxonomy allows for description of any storm or local convective spectrum by the profile types or families. The analysis provides a quasi-independent corroboration of the TRMM 2A23 convective/ stratiform classification. The global frequency of occurrence and contribution to rainfall for the profile types are presented, demonstrating primary rainfall contribution by midlevel glaciated convection (27%) and similar depth decaying/stratiform stages (28%-31%). Profiles of these types exhibit similar 37- and 85-GHz passive microwave brightness temperatures but differ greatly in their frequency of occurrence and mean rain rates, underscoring the importance to passive microwave rain retrieval of convective/stratiform discrimination by other means, such as polarization or texture techniques, or incorporation of lightning observations. Close correspondence is found between deep convective profile frequency and annualized lightning production, and pixel-level lightning occurrence likelihood directly tracks the estimated mean ice water path within profile types.

  7. Vertical Structure of Magnetized Accretion Disks around Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizano, S.; Tapia, C.; Boehler, Y.; D'Alessio, P.

    2016-01-01

    We model the vertical structure of the magnetized accretion disks that are subject to viscous and resistive heating and irradiation by the central star. We apply our formalism to the radial structure of the magnetized accretion disks that are threaded by the poloidal magnetic field dragged during the process of star formation, which was developed by Shu and coworkers. We consider disks around low-mass protostars, T Tauri, and FU Orionis stars, as well as two levels of disk magnetization: {λ }{sys}=4 (strongly magnetized disks) and {λ }{sys}=12 (weakly magnetized disks). The rotation rates of strongly magnetized disks have large deviations from Keplerian rotation. In these models, resistive heating dominates the thermal structure for the FU Ori disk, and the T Tauri disk is very thin and cold because it is strongly compressed by magnetic pressure; it may be too thin compared with observations. Instead, in the weakly magnetized disks, rotation velocities are close to Keplerian, and resistive heating is always less than 7% of the viscous heating. In these models, the T Tauri disk has a larger aspect ratio, which is consistent with that inferred from observations. All the disks have spatially extended hot atmospheres where the irradiation flux is absorbed, although most of the mass (˜90%-95%) is in the disk midplane. With the advent of ALMA one expects direct measurements of magnetic fields and their morphology at disk scales. It will then be possible to determine the mass-to-flux ratio of magnetized accretion disks around young stars, an essential parameter for their structure and evolution. Our models contribute to the understanding of the vertical structure and emission of these disks.

  8. Vertical structure of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ssessanga, Nicholas; Kim, Yong Ha; Kim, Eunsol

    2015-11-01

    We develop an algorithm of computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) to infer information on the vertical and horizontal structuring of electron density during nighttime medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs). To facilitate digital CIT we have adopted total electron contents (TEC) from a dense Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver network, GEONET, which contains more than 1000 receivers. A multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique was utilized with a calibrated IRI-2012 model as an initial solution. The reconstructed F2 peak layer varied in altitude with average peak-to-peak amplitude of ~52 km. In addition, the F2 peak layer anticorrelated with TEC variations. This feature supports a theory in which nighttime MSTID is composed of oscillating electric fields due to conductivity variations. Moreover, reconstructed TEC variations over two stations were reasonably close to variations directly derived from the measured TEC data set. Our tomographic analysis may thus help understand three-dimensional structure of MSTIDs in a quantitative way.

  9. Influences of vertical transport and scavenging on aerosol particle surface area and radon decay product concentrations at the Jungfraujoch (3454 m above sea level)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; GäGgeler, H. W.; Jost, D. T.; Nyeki, S.; Schwikowski, M.

    2000-08-01

    Concentrations of the aerosol particle surface area (SA) and aerosol-attached radon decay products 214Pb and 212Pb have been measured by means of an aerosol and a radon epiphaniometer at the Jungfraujoch research station (JFJ; 3454 m above sea level, Switzerland). These parameters exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle with minimum values in winter and maximum values in summer. In summer, pronounced diurnal variations with a maximum at 1800 LST are often present. Highest concentrations and most pronounced diurnal variations occur during anticyclonic weather conditions in summer. Thermally driven vertical transport over alpine topography is responsible for this observation. During this synoptic condition, concentrations vary greatly with the 500 hPa wind direction, exhibiting low concentrations for NW-N winds and high concentrations for weak or S-SW winds. Lead-214 and SA are highly correlated during anticyclonic conditions, indicating transport equivalence of the gaseous 214Pb precursor, 222Rn, and of aerosol particles. When cyclonic lifting is the dominant vertical transport, wet scavenging of aerosol particles can explain the weak correlation of 214Pb and SA. This conclusion is corroborated by the 214Pb/SA ratio, being twice as high during cyclonic than during anticyclonic conditions. Lead-212 is a tracer for the influence of surface contact on a local scale due to its short lifetime of 15.35 hours. The analysis of this parameter suggests that high-alpine surfaces play an important role in thermally driven transport to the JFJ.

  10. Evaluating the Use of MODIS AOD for Air Quality Determination by Comparison with the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Light Scattering Coefficient Obtained with a Balloon-Borne Nephelometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumlin, B.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The MODIS instruments aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites provide aerosol optical depth information for the entire Earth on a daily basis. Ideally, satellite measurements should correlate with ground-based measurements in order to be useful for air quality applications. Reno, Nevada, USA is a high desert city situated in the Great Basin. Its unique geography and proximity to urban and biomass burning aerosol sources make it an ideal candidate for aerosol research. In August 2011, the Reno Aerosol Characterization Experiment measured atmospheric aerosols with a ground-based Cimel CE-318 sun-photometer and in situ photoacoustic instrumentation to quantify aerosol concentrations at the surface and in the column. However, the results of these measurements indicated the existence of a more complex system of aerosol mixing above the atmospheric boundary layer than previously thought. In order to validate these measurements, an autonomous suite of instrumentation has been developed. This device is carried aloft by a weather balloon and utilizes a reciprocal nephelometer to obtain a high-resolution profile of the vertical distribution of aerosol light scattering coefficient, as well as instrumentation to record atmospheric variables such as temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and dew point. Position, course, speed, and altitude are logged with an onboard GPS module and correlated with atmospheric and aerosol measurements. Presented is the design and development of this new instrument, its comparison with proven laboratory instruments, data gathered from flights during August-November 2012, and its comparison to ground-based measurements and satellite data from the MODIS instruments.

  11. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; Novak, Jeff M.; Halvorson, Ardell D.; Arriaga, Francisco; Lightle, David T.; Hoover, Amber; Emerson, Rachel; Barbour, Nancy W.

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg⁻¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ⁻¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha⁻¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha⁻¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  12. Vertical structure models of the 1990 equatorial disturbance on Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, D. M.; Barnet, Christopher Dwight; Beebe, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    In September 1990, an atmospheric disturbance in the form of an abnormally high albedo area developed in the equatorial region of Saturn. Events of this nature are exceedingly rare for this planet as they have been detected in the equatorial region on only two other occasions in over a century. In ongoing monitoring of the atmospheres of the outer planets, CCD imaging observations of Saturn by New Mexico State University's Tortugas Mountain Station were made before, during, and after the disturbance's formation through both broad-band filters and narrow-band visible/near-IR filters centered in methane absorption bands. Also, multispectral Hubble Space Telescope observations were made within weeks of the event and later in 1991. These observations were calibrated and scans of reflectivity at constant latitude are being modeled with a vertically inhomogeneous, multiple scattering model previously used to model Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt brightening event in 1989. In addition, the reflectivity of the disturbance as a function of the scattering angles is being obtained so as to model this feature's vertical structure in particular. A preliminary report of the modeling results will be presented.

  13. Vertical structure models of the 1990 equatorial disturbance on Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, D. M.; Barnet, Christopher Dwight; Beebe, R. F.

    1993-03-01

    In September 1990, an atmospheric disturbance in the form of an abnormally high albedo area developed in the equatorial region of Saturn. Events of this nature are exceedingly rare for this planet as they have been detected in the equatorial region on only two other occasions in over a century. In ongoing monitoring of the atmospheres of the outer planets, CCD imaging observations of Saturn by New Mexico State University's Tortugas Mountain Station were made before, during, and after the disturbance's formation through both broad-band filters and narrow-band visible/near-IR filters centered in methane absorption bands. Also, multispectral Hubble Space Telescope observations were made within weeks of the event and later in 1991. These observations were calibrated and scans of reflectivity at constant latitude are being modeled with a vertically inhomogeneous, multiple scattering model previously used to model Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt brightening event in 1989. In addition, the reflectivity of the disturbance as a function of the scattering angles is being obtained so as to model this feature's vertical structure in particular. A preliminary report of the modeling results will be presented.

  14. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Jane M. F. Johnson; Douglas L. Karlen; Garold L. Gresham; Keri B. Cantrell; David W. Archer; Brian J. Wienhold; Gary E. Varvel; David A. Laird; John Baker; Tyson E. Ochsner; Jeff M. Novak; Ardell D. Halvorson; Francisco Arriaga; David T. Lightle; Amber Hoover; Rachel Emerson; Nancy W. Barbour

    2014-11-01

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the ear averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg?¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ?¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha?¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha?¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.

  15. Vertical distribution of structural components in corn stover

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Jane M. F.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Cantrell, Keri B.; Archer, David W.; Wienhold, Brian J.; Varvel, Gary E.; Laird, David A.; Baker, John; Ochsner, Tyson E.; et al

    2014-11-17

    In the United States, corn (Zea mays L.) stover has been targeted for second generation fuel production and other bio-products. Our objective was to characterize sugar and structural composition as a function of vertical distribution of corn stover (leaves and stalk) that was sampled at physiological maturity and about three weeks later from multiple USA locations. A small subset of samples was assessed for thermochemical composition. Concentrations of lignin, glucan, and xylan were about 10% greater at grain harvest than at physiological maturity, but harvestable biomass was about 25% less due to stalk breakage. Gross heating density above the earmore » averaged 16.3 ± 0.40 MJ kg⁻¹, but with an alkalinity measure of 0.83 g MJ⁻¹, slagging is likely to occur during gasification. Assuming a stover harvest height of 10 cm, the estimated ethanol yield would be >2500 L ha⁻¹, but it would be only 1000 L ha⁻¹ if stover harvest was restricted to the material from above the primary ear. Vertical composition of corn stover is relatively uniform; thus, decision on cutting height may be driven by agronomic, economic and environmental considerations.« less

  16. Dependence of the drizzle growth process on the cloud top height and its relevance to the aerosol vertical profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, K.; Suzuki, K.

    2013-12-01

    Transitional processes among cloud droplets, drizzle and raindrops are still uncertain and more efforts are required for the better understanding. In this situation, difference in the drizzle growth process was examined according to the cloud top height using the CloudSat and MODIS synergetic datasets. From the CloudSat products such as 2B-GEOPROF, 2B-TAU, ECMWF-AUX, only one-layered water clouds whose top temperatures were warmer than 273K were extracted over China (a circular area having a diameter of 1800km of the center at 35°N and 120°E) and over ocean (a circular area having a diameter of 1500km of the center at 35°N and 150°E). Then a threshold of 3km of the cloud top height was adopted to divide the extracted clouds into upper and lower cases. First, the probability distribution functions (PDF) of the cloud droplet number density (Nc) and the effective particle radius (Re) were calculated for these four cases (land/ocean/upper/lower). Nc was obtained assuming the adiabatic liquid water content from MODIS-derived cloud optical depth and Re. Oceanic clouds had fewer Nc than land clouds, and almost the same for upper and lower cases. Land clouds had more Nc for the lower case than for the higher case. On the other hand, oceanic clouds had larger Re than land clouds, and almost the same for upper and lower cases. Land clouds had smaller Re for the lower case than for the higher case. These results quite agreed with our existing knowledge on the vertical profile of the aerosol number concentration over ocean (pristine) and land (polluted). Although the number of aerosol particles is fewer and almost the same regardless of the height over the ocean, it is more near the surface and it rapidly decreases according to the height over the land. Next, examining PDF of the radar reflectivity (Ze), we found that although PDFs of Ze were almost the same for oceanic clouds regardless of the cloud top height, PDF of land lower clouds were less frequent at around from

  17. Exploring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca

    While in external or high-redshift galaxies we can only measure integrated stellar properties at best, the Milky Way offers us the unique opportunity to study its individual baryonic components, including stars. We use oscillations measured in red giant stars by the Kepler satellite to derive stellar ages and explore the vertical age structure across few kpc of the Milky Way disc. We find that old stars dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the plane a rich zoology of ages exists. The age distribution of stars shows a smooth distribution over the last 10 Gyr, which together with a flat age-metallicity relation is consistent with a quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about two.

  18. Exploring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Stello, Dennis; Huber, Daniel; Serenelli, Aldo; Schoenrich, Ralph; Asplund, Martin; Feltzing, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    While in external or high-redshift galaxies we can only measure integrated stellar properties at best, the Milky Way offers us the unique opportunity to study its individual baryonic components, including stars. We use oscillations measured in giant stars by the Kepler satellite to derive stellar ages and explore the vertical age structure across few kpc of the Milky Way disc. We find that old stars dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the plane a rich zoology of ages exists. The age distribution of stars shows a smooth decline over the last 10 Gyr, which together with a flat age-metallicity relation is consistent with a quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about two.

  19. The vertical structure and thickness of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Durisen, R. H.; Burns, J. A.; Hamill, P.

    1979-01-01

    The steady state thickness and vertical structure of Saturn's rings are discussed with regard to whether a collapse to a monolayer due to particle collisions may be prevented by various mechanisms. The differences between thick rings and wavy monolayers are outlined and used to show that such coherent perturbations to the rings as satellite and solar gravitational effects would produce a wavy monolayer while such dispersive mechanisms as meteoroid impact, radiation pressure, Kepler shear and radial spreading, which would produce the random particle motions necessary to maintain a thick layer, are probably insignificant. Given a typical power law distribution of particle sizes, it is found that gravitational scattering of small particles by large ones would maintain a ring thickness of several times the radius of the largest particles. A steady state ring thickness of 20 to 50 meters, derived from energy considerations, would imply a maximum particle size of a few meters.

  20. Pulsed terahertz time domain spectroscopy of vertically structured photoconductive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulks, R.; Rihani, S.; Beere, H. E.; Evans, M. J.; Ritchie, D. A.; Pepper, M.

    2010-02-01

    We present a terahertz (THz) photoconductive emitter structure, which employs a n-doped layer underneath a low-temperature-grown GaAs region to enable the THz transient to couple vertically through a defined mesa. A nonlinear bias dependence is observed, yielding an order in magnitude improvement in power for a mesa device with a 100 μm2 area over a conventional planar control reference device at 32 V and 5 mW illumination power. We relate the bias dependence of the THz signal to the breakdown voltage observed in the current-voltage characteristic. Reducing the antenna gap size through reducing the thickness of the low temperature-GaAs region below 1 μm shows a large improvement in the bandwidth of the device, with an enhancement of the normalized intensity between 0.2 to 2 THz for a bow-tie antenna geometry.

  1. Dynamics of a vertical cavity quantum cascade phonon laser structure

    PubMed Central

    Maryam, W.; Akimov, A. V.; Campion, R. P.; Kent, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Driven primarily by scientific curiosity, but also by the potential applications of intense sources of coherent sound, researchers have targeted the phonon laser (saser) since the invention of the optical laser over 50 years ago. Here we fabricate a vertical cavity structure designed to operate as a saser oscillator device at a frequency of 325 GHz. It is based on a semiconductor superlattice gain medium, inside a multimode cavity between two acoustic Bragg reflectors. We measure the acoustic output of the device as a function of time after applying electrical pumping. The emission builds in intensity reaching a steady state on a timescale of order 0.1 μs. We show that the results are consistent with a model of the dynamics of a saser cavity exactly analogous to the models used for describing laser dynamics. We also obtain estimates for the gain coefficient, steady-state acoustic power output and efficiency of the device. PMID:23884078

  2. Vertical Structure of Magnetized Accretion Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, Carlos; Lizano, Susana

    2016-01-01

    We model the vertical structure of magnetized accretion disks subject to viscous and resistive heating, and irradiation by the central star. We apply our formalism to the radial structure of magnetized accretion disks threaded by a poloidal magnetic field dragged during the process of star formation developed by Shu and coworkers. We consider disks around low mass protostars, T Tauri, and FU Orionis stars. We consider two levels of disk magnetization, λsys = 4 (strongly magnetized disks), and λsys = 12 (weakly magnetized disks). The rotation rates of strongly magnetized disks have large deviations from Keplerian rotation. In these models, resistive heating dominates the thermal structure for the FU Ori disk. The T Tauri disk is very thin and cold because it is strongly compressed by magnetic pressure; it may be too thin compared with observations. Instead, in the weakly magnetized disks, rotation velocities are close to Keplerian, and resistive heating is always less than 7% of the viscous heating. In these models, the T Tauri disk has a larger aspect ratio, consistent with that inferred from observations. All the disks have spatially extended hot atmospheres where the irradiation flux is absorbed, although most of the mass (~ 90 - 95 %) is in the disk midplane.

  3. Orbit on demand - Structural analysis finds vertical launchers weigh less

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Cruz, C. I.; Jackson, L. R.; Naftel, J. C.; Wurster, K. E.; Cerro, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Structural considerations arising from favored design concepts for the next generation on-demand launch vehicles are explored. The two emerging concepts are a two stage fully reusable vertical take-off vehicle (V-2) and a horizontal take-off, two stage subsonic boost launch vehicle (H-2-Sub). Both designs have an 1100 n. mi. cross-range capability, with the V-2 orbiter having small wings with winglets for hypersonic trim and the H-2-Sub requiring larger, swept wings. The rockets would be cryogenic, while airbreathing initial boosters would be either turbofans, turbojets and/or ramjets. Dynamic loading is lower in the launch of a V-2. The TPS is a critical factor due to thinner leading edges than on the Shuttle and may require heat-pipe cooling. Airframe structures made of metal matrix composites have passed finite element simulations of projected loads and can now undergo proof-of-concept tests, although whisker-reinforced materials may be superior once long-whisker technology is developed.

  4. North-south cross sections of the vertical aerosol distribution over the Atlantic Ocean from multiwavelength Raman/polarization lidar during Polarstern cruises

    PubMed Central

    Kanitz, T; Ansmann, A; Engelmann, R; Althausen, D

    2013-01-01

    Shipborne aerosol lidar observations were performed aboard the research vessel Polarstern in 2009 and 2010 during three north-south cruises from about 50°N to 50°S. The aerosol data set provides an excellent opportunity to characterize and contrast the vertical aerosol distribution over the Atlantic Ocean in the polluted northern and relatively clean southern hemisphere. Three case studies, an observed pure Saharan dust plume, a Patagonian dust plume east of South America, and a case of a mixed dust/smoke plume west of Central Africa are exemplarily shown and discussed by means of their optical properties. The meridional transatlantic cruises were used to determine the latitudinal cross section of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). Profiles of particle backscatter and extinction coefficients are presented as mean profiles for latitudinal belts to contrast northern- and southern-hemispheric aerosol loads and optical effects. Results of lidar observations at Punta Arenas (53°S), Chile, and Stellenbosch (34°S), South Africa, are shown and confirm the lower frequency of occurrence of free-tropospheric aerosol in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere. The maximum latitudinal mean AOT of 0.27 was found in the northern tropics (0– 15°N) in the Saharan outflow region. Marine AOT is typically 0.05 ± 0.03. Particle optical properties are presented separately for the marine boundary layer and the free troposphere. Concerning the contrast between the anthropogenically influenced midlatitudinal aerosol conditions in the 30– 60°N belt and the respective belt in the southern hemisphere over the remote Atlantic, it is found that the AOT and extinction coefficients for the vertical column from 0–5km (total aerosol column) and 1–5km height (lofted aerosol above the marine boundary layer) are a factor of 1.6 and 2 higher at northern midlatitudes than at respective southern midlatitudes, and a factor of 2.5 higher than at the clean marine southern

  5. Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schultz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, G.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.

    2012-05-19

    The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z{sub a}) is defined to quantitatively assess the models performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z{sub a} climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z{sub a} than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z{sub a} is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z{sub a} is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

  6. Application of the CALIOP Layer Product to Evaluate the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Estimated by Global Models: AeroCom Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Breon, Francois-Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne; Berntsen, Terje; Chin, Mian; Collins, William D.; Dentener, Frank; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Gimoux, Paul; Gong, Sunling; Horowitz, Larry W.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevag, Alf; Koch, Dorothy; Krol, Maarten; Myhre, Gunnar; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    The CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) layer product is used for a multimodel evaluation of the vertical distribution of aerosols. Annual and seasonal aerosol extinction profiles are analyzed over 13 sub-continental regions representative of industrial, dust, and biomass burning pollution, from CALIOP 2007-2009 observations and from AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models) 2000 simulations. An extinction mean height diagnostic (Z-alpha) is defined to quantitatively assess the models' performance. It is calculated over the 0-6 km and 0-10 km altitude ranges by weighting the altitude of each 100 m altitude layer by its aerosol extinction coefficient. The mean extinction profiles derived from CALIOP layer products provide consistent regional and seasonal specificities and a low inter-annual variability. While the outputs from most models are significantly correlated with the observed Z-alpha climatologies, some do better than others, and 2 of the 12 models perform particularly well in all seasons. Over industrial and maritime regions, most models show higher Z-alpha than observed by CALIOP, whereas over the African and Chinese dust source regions, Z-alpha is underestimated during Northern Hemisphere Spring and Summer. The positive model bias in Z-alpha is mainly due to an overestimate of the extinction above 6 km. Potential CALIOP and model limitations, and methodological factors that might contribute to the differences are discussed.

  7. Waterspout - an Atmospheric Aerosol Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rantsev-Kartinov, V.A.

    2005-10-31

    An aerosol -- capillary electrostatic model of a waterspout is submitted. The waterspout is treated as a long-living filament of aerosol plasma, which is formed at electric breakdown of interval between a charged cloud and a vertically floating cylinder, which is individual block of ocean's skeletal structures of revealed recently by author.

  8. Study of the vertical structure of Saturn's atmosphere using HST/WFPC2 images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Molina, A.; Grodent, D.; Gérard, J. C.; Dols, V.

    2004-06-01

    We have studied the vertical structure of hazes at six different latitudes (-60°, -50°, -30°, -10°, +30°, and +50°) on Saturn's atmosphere. For that purpose we have compared the results of our forward radiative transfer model to limb-to-limb reflectivity scans at four different wavelengths (230, 275, 673.2, and 893 nm). The images were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in September 1997, during fall on Saturn's northern hemisphere. The spatial distribution of particles appears to be very variable with latitude both in the stratosphere and troposphere. For the latitude range +50° to -50°, an atmospheric structure consisting of a stratospheric haze and a tropospheric haze interspersed by clear gas regions has been found adequate to explain the center to limb reflectivities at the different wavelengths. This atmospheric structure has been previously used by Ortiz et al. (1996, Icarus 119, 53-66) and Stam et al. (2001, Icarus 152, 407-422). In this work the top of the tropospheric haze is found to be higher at the southern latitudes than at northern latitudes. This hemispherical asymmetry seems to be related to seasonal effects. Different latitudes experience different amount of solar insolation that can affect the atmospheric structure as the season varies with time. The haze optical thickness is largest (about 30 at 673.2 nm) at latitudes ±50 and -10 degrees, and smallest (about 18) at ±30 degrees. The stratospheric haze is found to be optically thin at all studied latitudes from -50 to +50 degrees being maximum at -10° ( τ=0.033). At -60° latitude, where the UV images show a strong darkening compared to other regions on the planet, the cloud structure is remarkably different when compared to the other latitudes. Here, aerosol and gas are found to be uniformly mixed down to the 400 mbar level.

  9. On the vertical structure of damped steady circulation in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, J. E.; Stevens, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the vertical structure of steady motion in a dissipative tropical atmosphere forced by steady isolated diabatic heating. Vertical modes appropriate to the problem are obtained, and the forcing is projected onto these modes. With the use of an analytic expression obtained by Gill (1980) for the horizontal structure, these modes are summed to obtain the amplitude and the vertical structure of the response in the region to the east of the heating.

  10. ON THE VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF THE PROTOLUNAR DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, William R.

    2012-01-10

    The vertical structure of a post-impact, pre-lunar disk is examined. We adopt the equations introduced by Thompson and Stevenson for a silicate disk in two-phase equilibrium (vapor plus liquid) and derive an analytical solution to the system. This largely reproduces their low-gas mass fraction, x << 1, profiles of the disk but is also employed to examine higher x cases. The latter are generally gravitationally stable and are used to develop a stratified disk model consisting of a gravitationally unstable magma layer surrounded by a stable, primarily vapor atmosphere. Initially, the atmosphere contains the majority of the disk mass, while the surface density of the magma layer is determined by requiring its viscous energy dissipation supply the disk's radiation budget. The magma layer viscously spreads on a {approx}50 yr timescale during which vapor continuously condenses into droplets that settle to the layer, maintaining its surface density and dissipation rate. Material flowing outward, past the Roche boundary, can become incorporated into accreting moonlets, and this supply persists until the vapor reservoir is depleted in {approx}250 yr.

  11. Exhaled Aerosol Pattern Discloses Lung Structural Abnormality: A Sensitivity Study Using Computational Modeling and Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A.; Kim, JongWon; Mckee, Edward; Lin, En-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background Exhaled aerosol patterns, also called aerosol fingerprints, provide clues to the health of the lung and can be used to detect disease-modified airway structures. The key is how to decode the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and retrieve the lung structural information for a non-invasive identification of respiratory diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, a CFD-fractal analysis method was developed to quantify exhaled aerosol fingerprints and applied it to one benign and three malign conditions: a tracheal carina tumor, a bronchial tumor, and asthma. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 30 L/min were simulated, with exhaled distributions recorded at the mouth. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to simulate respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Aerosol morphometric measures such as concentration disparity, spatial distributions, and fractal analysis were applied to distinguish various exhaled aerosol patterns. Findings Utilizing physiology-based modeling, we demonstrated substantial differences in exhaled aerosol distributions among normal and pathological airways, which were suggestive of the disease location and extent. With fractal analysis, we also demonstrated that exhaled aerosol patterns exhibited fractal behavior in both the entire image and selected regions of interest. Each exhaled aerosol fingerprint exhibited distinct pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, lacunarity, and multifractal spectrum. Furthermore, a correlation of the diseased location and exhaled aerosol spatial distribution was established for asthma. Conclusion Aerosol-fingerprint-based breath tests disclose clues about the site and severity of lung diseases and appear to be sensitive enough to be a practical tool for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases with structural abnormalities. PMID:25105680

  12. Vertical Profiles of Light-Absorbing Aerosol: A Combination of In-situ and AERONET Observations during NASA DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Corr, C.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Hudgins, C.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols plays a vital role in utilizing spaceborne, column-integrated satellite observations. The properties and distribution of light-absorbing aerosol are particularly uncertain despite significant air quality and climate ramifications. Advanced retrieval algorithms are able to derive complex aerosol properties (e.g., wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo) from remote-sensing measurements, but quantitative relationships to surface conditions remain a challenge. Highly systematic atmospheric profiling during four unique deployments for the NASA DISCOVER-AQ project (Baltimore, MD, 2011; San Joaquin Valley, CA, 2013; Houston, TX, 2013; Denver, CO, 2014) allow statistical assessment of spatial, temporal, and source-related variability for light-absorbing aerosol properties in these distinct regions. In-situ sampling in conjunction with a dense network of AERONET sensors also allows evaluation of the sensitivity, limitations, and advantages of remote-sensing data products over a wide range of conditions. In-situ aerosol and gas-phase observations were made during DISCOVER-AQ aboard the NASA P-3B aircraft. Aerosol absorption coefficients were measured by a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). Approximately 200 profiles for each of the four deployments were obtained, from the surface (25-300m altitude) to 5 km, and are used to calculate absorption aerosol optical depths (AAODs). These are quantitatively compared to AAOD derived from AERONET Level 1.5 retrievals to 1) explore discrepancies between measurements, 2) quantify the fraction of AAOD that exists directly at the surface and is often missed by airborne sampling, and 3) evaluate the potential for deriving ground-level black carbon (BC) concentrations for air quality prediction. Aerosol size distributions are used to assess absorption contributions from mineral dust, both at the surface and aloft. SP2 (Single Particle Soot

  13. Radiative budget in the presence of multi-layered aerosol structures in the framework of AMMA SOP-0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents radiative transfer calculations performed over Niamey in the UV-Visible range over the period 26th January 1st February during the African Multidisciplinary Monsoon Analysis (AMMA) international program. Climatic effects of aerosols along the vertical column have required an accurate determination of their optical properties, which are presented in for a variety of instrumented platforms: Ultralight aircraft, Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) research aircraft, AERONET station. Measurements highlighted the presence of a multi-layered structure of mineral dust located below and biomass-burning particles in the more elevated layers. Radiative forcing was affected by both the scattering and absorption effects governed by the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI). The best agreement between our results and AERONET optical thicknesses, ground-based extinction measurements and NO2 photolysis rate coefficient was found using the synergy between all the instrumented platforms. The corresponding averaged ACRI were 1.53 (±0.04) 0.047i (±0.006) and 1.52 (±0.04) 0.008i (±0.001) for biomass-burning and mineral dust aerosols, respectively. Biomass-burning aerosols were characterized by single-scattering albedo ranging from 0.78 to 0.82 and asymmetry parameter ranging from 0.71 to 0.73. For dust aerosols, single-scattering albedo (asymmetry parameter) ranged from 0.9 to 0.92 (0.73 to 0.75). The solar energy depletion at the surface is shown to be ~ -21.2 (±1.7) W/m2 as a daily average. At the TOA, the radiative forcing appeared slightly negative but very close to zero (~ -1.4 W/m2). The corresponding atmospheric radiative forcing was found to be ~19.8 (±2.3) W/m2. Mineral dust located below a more absorbing layer act as an increase in surface reflectivity of ~3 4%. The radiative forcing is also shown to be highly sensitivity the optical features of the different aerosol layers (ACRI, optical thickness and aerosol vertical

  14. Radiative budget in the presence of multi-layered aerosol structures in the framework of AMMA SOP-0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents radiative transfer calculations performed over Niamey in the UV-Visible range over the period 26th January 1st February 2006 during the African Multidisciplinary Monsoon Analysis (AMMA) international program. Climatic effects of aerosols along the vertical column have required an accurate determination of their optical properties, which are presented here for a variety of instrumented platforms: Ultralight aircraft, Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) research aircraft, AERONET station. Measurements highlighted the presence of a multi-layered structure of mineral dust located below and biomass-burning particles in the more elevated layers. Radiative forcing was affected by both the scattering and absorption effects governed by the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI). The best agreement between our results and AERONET optical thicknesses, ground-based extinction measurements and NO2 photolysis rate coefficient was found using the synergy between all the instrumented platforms. The corresponding averaged ACRI at 355 nm were 1.53 (±0.04) -0.047i (±0.006) and 1.52 (±0.04) -0.008i (±0.001) for biomass-burning and mineral dust aerosols, respectively. Biomass-burning aerosols were characterized by single-scattering albedo ranging from 0.78 to 0.82 and asymmetry parameter ranging from 0.71 to 0.73. For dust aerosols, single-scattering albedo (asymmetry parameter) ranged from 0.9 to 0.92 (0.73 to 0.75). The solar energy depletion at the surface is shown to be ~-21.2 (±1.7) W/m2 as a daily average. At the TOA, the radiative forcing appeared slightly negative but very close to zero (~-1.4 W/m2). The corresponding atmospheric radiative forcing was found to be ~19.8 (±2.3) W/m2. Mineral dust located below a more absorbing layer act as an increase in surface reflectivity of ~3 4%. The radiative forcing is also shown to be highly sensitive to the optical features of the different aerosol layers (ACRI, optical thickness and aerosol

  15. Vertical structure of foggy haze over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area in January 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Feng; Xu, Jun; He, Youjiang; Dang, Hongyan; Yang, Xuezhen; Meng, Fan

    2016-08-01

    In January 2013, frequent episodes of intense air pollution occurred in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area (BTH), China. Besides the occurrence of region-wide dry haze pollution, foggy haze conditions also developed across the region on numerous days, lasting into the afternoon. Synergistic analysis, using multisatellite datasets, air sounding and surface meteorological observations, indicated that there was a vertical overlap of fog and aerosol layers during the foggy haze episodes in the region. Fog appeared at a low level of the atmosphere. The altitude of the upper boundary of the fog differed across the region, but it was always below 1 km. The aerosol layer that closely contacted with the top of the underlying fog was rather dense, having a high concentration comparable to that during severe pollution on the ground. Above the dense aerosol layer, aerosol with a concentration equivalent to that of moderate pollution stretched up to an altitude of 2 km. Beyond that, a tenuous aerosol layer extended 5 km into the atmosphere. This overlapping of fog and haze layers frequently occurred across the region in January 2013. The occurrence of a foggy haze over BTH could worsen the regional air quality, and its appearance across this region would have notable effects on the radiation balance.

  16. Dependence of air masses type on PBL vertical structure retrieved at the Mace Head station during EUCAARI campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, Conor; Martucci, Giovanni; O'Dowd, Colin

    2010-05-01

    During the EUCAARI Intensive Observing Period held at the Mace Head GAW station from mid-May to mid-June, 2008, the PBL depth has been continuously measured by two ceilometers (Vaisala CL31 and Jenoptik CHM15K) and a microwave radiometer (RPG-HATPRO). The Lidar-Ceilometer, through the gradients in aerosol backscatter profiles, and the microwave profiler, through gradients in the specific humidity profiles, were used to remotely-sense the boundary layer structure. An automatic, newly developed Temporal Height-Tracking (THT) algorithm (Martucci et al., 2010) have been applied to both type of instruments data to retrieve the 2-layered structure of the local marine boundary layer. The two layers are defined as a lower, well mixed layer, i.e. the surface mixed layer, and the layer occupying the region below the free Troposphere inversion, i.e. the decoupled residual or convective layer. A categorization of the incoming air masses has been performed based on their origins and been used to asses the correlation with the PBL depths. The study confirmed the dependence of PBL vertical structure on different air masses and different type of advected aerosol.

  17. Validation of GOMOS-Envisat vertical profiles of O3, NO2, NO3, and aerosol extinction using balloon-borne instruments and analysis of the retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenaël; Brogniez, Colette; Catoire, Valery; Fussen, Didier; Goutail, Florence; Oelhaf, Hermann; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Roscoe, Howard K.; Wetzel, Gerald; Chartier, Michel; Robert, Claude; Balois, Jean-Yves; Verwaerde, Christian; Auriol, Frédérique; François, Philippe; Gaubicher, Bertrand; Wursteisen, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    The UV-visible Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument onboard Envisat performs nighttime measurements of ozone, NO2, NO3 and of the aerosol extinction, using the stellar occultation method. We have conducted a validation exercise using various balloon-borne instruments in different geophysical conditions from 2002 to 2006, using GOMOS measurements performed with stars of different magnitudes. GOMOS and balloon-borne vertical columns in the middle stratosphere are in excellent agreement for ozone and NO2. Some discrepancies can appear between GOMOS and balloon-borne vertical profiles for the altitude and the amplitude of the concentration maximum. These discrepancies are randomly distributed, and no bias is detected. The accuracy of individual profiles in the middle stratosphere is 10 % for ozone and 25 % for NO2. On the other hand, the GOMOS NO3 retrieval is difficult and no direct validation can be conducted. The GOMOS aerosol content is also well estimated, but the wavelength dependence can be better estimated if the aerosol retrieval is performed only in the visible domain. We can conclude that the GOMOS operational retrieval algorithm works well and that GOMOS has fully respected its primary objective for the study of the trends of species in the middle stratosphere, using the profiles in a statistical manner. Some individual profiles can be partly inaccurate, in particular in the lower stratosphere. Improvements could be obtained by reprocessing some GOMOS transmissions in case of specific studies in the middle and lower stratosphere when using the individual profiles.

  18. Mediterranean desert dust outbreaks and their vertical structure based on remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, A.; Basart, S.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Marinou, E.; Amiridis, V.; Kazadzis, S.; Pey, J.; Querol, X.; Jorba, O.; Gassó, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2015-10-01

    The main aim of the present study is to describe the vertical structure of the intense Mediterranean dust outbreaks, based on the use of satellite and surface-based retrievals/measurements. Strong and extreme desert dust (DD) episodes are identified at 1° × 1° spatial resolution, over the period March 2000-February 2013, through the implementation of an updated objective and dynamic algorithm. According to the algorithm, strong DD episodes occurring at a specific place correspond to cases in which the daily aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550 nm) exceeds or equals the long-term mean AOD550 nm (Mean) plus two standard deviations (SD) value being smaller than Mean + 4 · SD. Extreme DD episodes correspond to cases in which the daily AOD550 nm value equals or exceeds Mean + 4 · SD. For the identification of DD episodes additional optical properties (Ångström exponent, fine fraction, effective radius and Aerosol Index) derived by the MODIS-Terra & Aqua (also AOD retrievals), OMI-Aura and EP-TOMS databases are used as inputs. According to the algorithm using MODIS-Terra data, over the period March 2000-February 2013, strong DD episodes occur more frequently (up to 9.9 episodes yr-1) over the western Mediterranean while the corresponding frequencies for the extreme ones are smaller (up to 3.3 episodes yr-1, central Mediterranean Sea). In contrast to their frequency, dust episodes are more intense (AODs up to 4.1), over the central and eastern Mediterranean Sea, off the northern African coasts. Slightly lower frequencies and higher intensities are found when the satellite algorithm operates based on MODIS-Aqua retrievals, for the period 2003-2012. The performance of the satellite algorithm is assessed against surface-based daily data from 109 sun-photometric (AERONET) and 22 PM10 stations. The agreement between AERONET and MODIS AOD is satisfactory (R = 0.505 - 0.75) improving considerably when MODIS level 3 retrievals with higher sub-grid spatial

  19. One Year of Doppler Lidar Observations Characterizing Boundary Layer Wind, Turbulence, and Aerosol Structure During the Indianapolis Flux Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardesty, R. M.; Brewer, A.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Salmon, O. E.; Heimburger, A. M. F.; Davis, K. J.; Lauvaux, T.; McGowan, L. E.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Sarmiento, D. P.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Iraci, L. T.; Hillyard, P. W.; Podolske, J. R.; Gurney, K. R.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Song, Y.; Turnbull, J. C.; Whetstone, J. R.; Possolo, A.; Prasad, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) is aimed at improving methods for estimation of greenhouse gas emissions at urban scales. INFLUX observational components include several-times-per-month aircraft measurements of gas concentrations and meteorological parameters, as well as a number of towers observing CO2, CH4, and CO and a single continuously operating Doppler lidar to estimate wind, turbulence and aerosol structure in the boundary layer. The observations are used to develop top-down emissions estimates from the aircraft measurements and as input to inversion models. The Doppler lidar provides information on boundary layer structure for both the aircraft and inversion studies. A commercial Doppler lidar characterized by low pulse energy and high pulse repetition rate has operated for well over a year at a site NE of downtown Indianapolis. The lidar produces profiles of horizontal wind speed, vertical velocity variance, and aerosol structure two to three times per hour. These data are then used to investigate boundary layer mixing and thickness and horizontal transport as inputs for the flux calculations. During its one year deployment the lidar generally operated reliably with few outages. Comparisons with aircraft spirals over the site and with the NOAA High Resolution research Doppler lidar deployed to Indianapolis for one month during May, 2014, were used to assess the performance of the INFLUX lidar. Measurements agreed quite well when aerosol loading was sufficient for lidar observations throughout the boundary layer. However, low aerosol loading during some periods limited the range of the lidar and precluded characterization of the full boundary layer. We present an overall assessment of the commercial Doppler lidar for providing the needed information on boundary layer structure for emission estimations, and show variability of the boundary layer observations over diurnal, seasonal, and annual cycles. Recommendations on system design changes to

  20. Mediterranean intense desert dust outbreaks and their vertical structure based on remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, Antonis; Basart, Sara; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Marinou, Eleni; Amiridis, Vassilis; Kazadzis, Stelios; Pey, Jorge; Querol, Xavier; Jorba, Oriol; Gassó, Santiago; Baldasano, José Maria

    2016-07-01

    The main aim of the present study is to describe the vertical structure of the intense Mediterranean dust outbreaks, based on the use of satellite and surface-based retrievals/measurements. Strong and extreme desert dust (DD) episodes are identified at 1° × 1° spatial resolution, over the period March 2000-February 2013, through the implementation of an updated objective and dynamic algorithm. According to the algorithm, strong DD episodes occurring at a specific place correspond to cases in which the daily aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550 nm) exceeds or equals the long-term mean AOD550 nm (Mean) plus two standard deviations (SD), which is also smaller than Mean+4 × SD. Extreme DD episodes correspond to cases in which the daily AOD550 nm value equals or exceeds Mean+4 × SD. For the identification of DD episodes, additional optical properties (Ångström exponent, fine fraction, effective radius and aerosol index) derived by the MODIS-Terra & Aqua (also AOD retrievals), OMI-Aura and EP-TOMS databases are used as inputs. According to the algorithm using MODIS-Terra data, over the period March 2000-February 2013, strong DD episodes occur more frequently (up to 9.9 episodes year-1) over the western Mediterranean, while the corresponding frequencies for the extreme ones are smaller (up to 3.3 episodes year-1, central Mediterranean Sea). In contrast to their frequency, dust episodes are more intense (AODs up to 4.1), over the central and eastern Mediterranean Sea, off the northern African coasts. Slightly lower frequencies and higher intensities are found when the satellite algorithm operates based on MODIS-Aqua retrievals, for the period 2003-2012. The consistency of the algorithm is successfully tested through the application of an alternative methodology for the determination of DD episodes, which produced similar features of the episodes' frequency and intensity, with just slightly higher frequencies and lower intensities. The performance of the

  1. A new method for estimating aerosol mass flux in the urban surface layer using LAS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Renmin; Luo, Tao; Sun, Jianning; Liu, Hao; Fu, Yunfei; Wang, Zhien

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol greatly influences human health and the natural environment, as well as the weather and climate system. Therefore, atmospheric aerosol has attracted significant attention from society. Despite consistent research efforts, there are still uncertainties in understanding its effects due to poor knowledge about aerosol vertical transport caused by the limited measurement capabilities of aerosol mass vertical transport flux. In this paper, a new method for measuring atmospheric aerosol vertical transport flux is developed based on the similarity theory of surface layer, the theory of light propagation in a turbulent atmosphere, and the observations and studies of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index (AERI). The results show that aerosol mass flux can be linked to the real and imaginary parts of the atmospheric equivalent refractive index structure parameter (AERISP) and the ratio of aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI. The real and imaginary parts of the AERISP can be measured based on the light-propagation theory. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration to the imaginary part of the AERI can be measured based on the measurements of aerosol mass concentration and visibility. The observational results show that aerosol vertical transport flux varies diurnally and is related to the aerosol spatial distribution. The maximum aerosol flux during the experimental period in Hefei City was 0.017 mg m-2 s-1, and the mean value was 0.004 mg m-2 s-1. The new method offers an effective way to study aerosol vertical transport in complex environments.

  2. Characterizing the Vertical Profile of Aerosol Particle Extinction and Linear Depolarization over Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent: The 2007-2009 View from CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Jianglong; Tackett, Jason L.; Chew, Boon Ning; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Aoki, Kazuma; Winker, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Vertical profiles of 0.532 µm aerosol particle extinction coefficient and linear volume depolarization ratio are described for Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent. Quality-screened and cloud-cleared Version 3.01 Level 2 NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 5-km Aerosol Profile datasets are analyzed from 2007 to 2009. Numerical simulations from the U.S. Naval Aerosol Analysis and Predictive System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multi-angle Imaging Spectro- Radiometer quality-assured datasets, combined with regional ground-based lidar measurements, are considered for assessing CALIOP retrieval performance, identifying bias, and evaluating regional representativeness. CALIOP retrievals of aerosol particle extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are high over land and low over open waters relative to NAAPS (0.412/0.312 over land for all data points inclusive, 0.310/0.235 when the per bin average is used and each is treated as single data points; 0.102/0.151 and 0.086/0.124, respectively, over ocean). Regional means, however, are very similar (0.180/0.193 for all data points and 0.155/0.159 when averaged per normalized bin), as the two factors offset one another. The land/ocean offset is investigated, and discrepancies attributed to interpretation of particle composition and a-priori assignment of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio") necessary for retrieving the extinction coefficient from CALIOP signals. Over land, NAAPS indicates more dust present than CALIOP algorithms are identifying, indicating a likely assignment of a higher lidar ratio representative of more absorptive particles. NAAPS resolvesmore smoke overwater than identified with CALIOP, indicating likely usage of a lidar ratio characteristic of less absorptive particles to be applied that biases low AOD there. Over open waters except within the Bay of Bengal

  3. Measuring the vertical distributions of the upper tropospheric and stratospheric dust with a LOAC aerosol counter under meteorological balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignelles, Damien; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Dulac, François; Coute, Benoit; Jeannot, Matthieu; Jegou, Fabrice; Olafsson, Haraldur; Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla

    2014-05-01

    The aerosol issue is in a constant growing. At ground, the airborne particles in boundary layer represent a real risk for population and must be control. In the middle troposphere, aerosols play an important role in the microphysics and meteorology, the heterogeneous chemistry is not well understood. In the stratosphere, several teams of researchers have shown that solid aerosols might exist, the question of the dynamic of these solid aerosol in the stratosphere is open. The aim was to develop an instrument that it can make measurements from the ground to the middle stratosphere. This instrument must be able to be put under meteorological balloons, which represent the worst conditions for the development of such instruments in terms of weight, resistance under large variations of temperature and pressure, autonomy and cost if we consider that something throw under a meteorological balloon can be lost after the fly. In the consideration of these conditions, we have developed a new instrument able to make such kind of measurements. This instrument is call LOAC for Light Optical Aerosol Counter. LOAC provides the concentration and size distribution of aerosols on 19 channels from 0.2 μm to 50.0 μm every ten seconds, and determine the main nature of particles (carbonaceous aerosol, mineral, droplets of water or sulfuric acid) in relation with a large range of samples in laboratory. The physical technique is based on the observation of the scattered light by particles at two angles. LOAC is light enough (1 kilogram) to be placed under a meteorological balloon that is very easy to launch such balloons. The goal is to perform a large number of flights to gather information about the dust distribution in stratosphere and to understand the various mechanisms controlling their spatial and temporal variability. About 25 flights with have been performed in the stratosphere with the LOAC above the Mediterranean Sea, from south of Paris, from Aire-Sur-l'Adour (South-West of

  4. Vertical variations of aerosols and the effects responded to the emission control: application of lidar ceilometer in Beijing during APEC, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Zhu, X.; Hu, B.; Xin, J.; Wang, L.; Münkel, C.; Mao, G.; Wang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    During the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, a reduction of air pollution sources was coordinated to ensure good air quality in Beijing and the surrounding provinces and cities. By investigating variations in air pollution during this period, the effects of local emissions and regional transport can be better understood and the information can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of emission reduction strategies and provide a theoretical basis to guide future emission reduction strategies. From 15 October to 30 November 2014, the height of the atmospheric mixing layer and the aerosol attenuated backscattering coefficient profile were observed online using a lidar ceilometer. By investigating the correlation between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) data near the surface and attenuated backscattering coefficients measured by the lidar ceilometer as well as the correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and attenuated backscattering coefficients of the 0 to 4500 m column, we found that the attenuated backscattering coefficient measured by the lidar ceilometer is highly correlated with the PM2.5 concentration and AOD (correlation coefficients of 0.89 and 0.86, respectively). This result demonstrates the reliability of the vertical profile of aerosols measured by the lidar ceilometer. By analyzing the atmospheric backscattering profile, we found that during the initial stage of pollution accumulation, which is affected by transport of southerly jet flows at low altitude, the attenuated backscattering coefficient of atmospheric aerosols from 0 to 1500 m was greatly enhanced by approximately 1.4 Mm-1 sr-1 (140%). At the peak pollution stage, the height of the mixing layer gradually decreased, the ratio of CO/SO2 gradually increased and emissions were dominated by local emissions. The attenuated backscattering coefficient of aerosols from 0 to 300 m suddenly increased, and the aerosols near surface had the highest value (approximately 14 Mm-1 sr-1

  5. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  6. Vertical Structure of Ozone Over the Gulf of Maine Observed During NEAQS 2002: Implications for Air Quality in New England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J.; Eberhard, W. L.; McCarty, B. J.; White, A. B.; Angevine, W. M.; Williams, E. J.; Goldan, P. D.

    2003-12-01

    The main objective of the 2002 New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS) was to characterize and understand the chemical and meteorological processes that contribute to high-pollution events in northern New England, particularly in coastal areas of New Hampshire and Maine. The primary measurement platform of this study was the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown, which spent about three weeks in July and August of 2002 in the Gulf of Maine and was equipped with an extensive set of chemical and meteorological sensors. Researchers at the NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory deployed a vertically pointed lidar on the Ronald H. Brown to characterize the vertical structure of ozone and aerosols over the Gulf of Maine and to assess the representativeness of in situ chemical and aerosol measurements aboard the ship for the entire marine boundary layer. The lidar measurements showed that most of the time, particularly during onshore flow, ozone values at around 300 m MSL were significantly higher than at the surface, indicating that the surface and the marine boundary layer aloft were decoupled due to strongly suppressed vertical mixing in the stable atmosphere over the Gulf of Maine. Intermittent vertical mixing caused by mechanical turbulence was observed on a few occasions resulting in transient ozone spikes at the surface as ozone-rich air was mixed down. Under offshore flow conditions and when the Ronald H. Brown was close to shore, similar ozone values were registered aloft and at the surface, providing evidence that the convectively mixed boundary layer air coming off the land remained well-mixed over the coastal waters. Trajectory analysis using data from land-based and shipborne wind profilers was employed to track the elevated ozone plumes observed with the lidar. Back trajectories revealed that the high-ozone plumes encountered off the coast of northern New England originated predominantly in the Boston and New York City areas. In several cases, these high

  7. Venus - Vertical structure of stratospheric hazes from Mariner 10 pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleary, B.

    1975-01-01

    An 'optical barometer' technique for determining the altitudes of haze in the stratosphere of Venus is presented wherein the Rayleigh-scattering component is derived by comparing orange and UV brightness profiles for nearby Mariner 10 television-picture pairs. The derived scale height for CO2 gas is 4.2 km, corresponding to a temperature of 200 K, in good agreement with radio occultation data. The optical barometer yields a pressure of 4 mb for the level at which the slant-path optical depth at the limb is unity. This level corresponds to a distance from the center of Venus equal to 6131 km, which is accurate to within 1 km provided that there is no appreciable contribution to the brightness by Rayleigh-scattering aerosols which mimic CO2 gas. It is possible that the limb haze layering observed between 6130 and 6140 km could be correlated with temperature inversions detected by the Mariner 5 radio-occultation experiment. A model is proposed wherein the concentration of particles increases rapidly with an effective scale height of about 2 km as one descends about 10 km from the limb haze to the main polarization cloud deck.

  8. Role of vertical mixing originating from small vertical scale structures above and within the equatorial thermocline in an OGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Wataru; Richards, Kelvin J.; Luo, Jing-Jia

    2012-11-01

    Recent high vertical resolution measurements show small vertical scale structures (SVSs) are present in the flow above and within the equatorial thermocline and that these structures contribute significantly to ocean mixing. The SVSs are typically unresolved in OGCMs and thus their impact needs to be parameterized. We investigate the impact of the mixing induced by the SVSs on the state of the equatorial Pacific in an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). As a first step to determine the importance of the SVS induced mixing we introduce an enhanced mixing within and above the equatorial thermocline. It is found that this enhanced mixing reduces the stratification above the thermocline, and sharpens the thermocline through the Phillips effect. The sharpened thermocline limits the exchange of heat across the thermocline and traps the surface heating above the thermocline. The reduced stratification leads to less cooling of the mixed layer through entrainment, a reduced annual cycle and an increase in the annual mean of the sea surface temperature (SST) in the eastern equatorial cold tongue. The depth dependency in enhanced SVS mixing is crucial to its impact; when the enhanced mixing is applied throughout the depth of the ocean (as has been done usually in previous studies,) the cold tongue SST is cooled further. In the western equatorial Pacific, where the thermocline is deeper, SVS enhanced mixing induces a colder SST. We also find that the SVS mixing reduces the eddy kinetic energy associated with the tropical instability waves through a reduction of the meridional and vertical shear of the equatorial currents and temperature gradient.

  9. Numerical solution of the vertical structure equation in the normal mode method. [in meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, Y. K.; Chang, L. P.

    1985-01-01

    In the present model of multilayered stability stratification, aimed at obtaining the analytic eigensolutions of the vertical structure equation, each layer is characterized by its own static stability value. By requiring continuity of pressure and vertical velocity across each interface level, and by imposing suitable upper and lower boundary conditions, matching eigensolutions are obtained in terms of the Bessel functions. Attention is given to an explicit example of a double-layered stratified atmosphere which demonstrates the mathematical manipulations involved; the resultant vertical structure functions are used to check the accuracy of the numerical solutions by the finite difference and finite element methods.

  10. Electrospray neutralization process and apparatus for generation of nano-aerosol and nano-structured materials

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, Charles L.; Morozov, Victor; Vsevolodov, Nikolai N.

    2010-08-17

    The claimed invention describes methods and apparatuses for manufacturing nano-aerosols and nano-structured materials based on the neutralization of charged electrosprayed products with oppositely charged electrosprayed products. Electrosprayed products include molecular ions, nano-clusters and nano-fibers. Nano-aerosols can be generated when neutralization occurs in the gas phase. Neutralization of electrospan nano-fibers with molecular ions and charged nano-clusters may result in the formation of fibrous aerosols or free nano-mats. Nano-mats can also be produced on a suitable substrate, forming efficient nano-filters.

  11. Mediterranean intense desert dust outbreaks and their vertical structure based on remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, Antonis; Basart, Sara; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Marinou, Eleni; Amiridis, Vassilis; Kazadzis, Stelios; Pey, Jorge; Querol, Xavier; Jorba, Oriol; Gassó, Santiago; Baldasano, José Maria

    2016-07-01

    The main aim of the present study is to describe the vertical structure of the intense Mediterranean dust outbreaks, based on the use of satellite and surface-based retrievals/measurements. Strong and extreme desert dust (DD) episodes are identified at 1° × 1° spatial resolution, over the period March 2000-February 2013, through the implementation of an updated objective and dynamic algorithm. According to the algorithm, strong DD episodes occurring at a specific place correspond to cases in which the daily aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550 nm) exceeds or equals the long-term mean AOD550 nm (Mean) plus two standard deviations (SD), which is also smaller than Mean+4 × SD. Extreme DD episodes correspond to cases in which the daily AOD550 nm value equals or exceeds Mean+4 × SD. For the identification of DD episodes, additional optical properties (Ångström exponent, fine fraction, effective radius and aerosol index) derived by the MODIS-Terra & Aqua (also AOD retrievals), OMI-Aura and EP-TOMS databases are used as inputs. According to the algorithm using MODIS-Terra data, over the period March 2000-February 2013, strong DD episodes occur more frequently (up to 9.9 episodes year-1) over the western Mediterranean, while the corresponding frequencies for the extreme ones are smaller (up to 3.3 episodes year-1, central Mediterranean Sea). In contrast to their frequency, dust episodes are more intense (AODs up to 4.1), over the central and eastern Mediterranean Sea, off the northern African coasts. Slightly lower frequencies and higher intensities are found when the satellite algorithm operates based on MODIS-Aqua retrievals, for the period 2003-2012. The consistency of the algorithm is successfully tested through the application of an alternative methodology for the determination of DD episodes, which produced similar features of the episodes' frequency and intensity, with just slightly higher frequencies and lower intensities. The performance of the

  12. Vertical Structure of Advection-dominated Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra Zeraatgari, Fateme; Abbassi, Shahram

    2015-08-01

    We solve the set of hydrodynamic equations for optically thin advection-dominated accretion flows by assuming a radially self-similar spherical coordinate system (r,θ ,φ ). The disk is considered to be in steady state and axisymmetric. We define the boundary conditions at the pole and the equator of the disk and, to avoid singularity at the rotation axis, the disk is taken to be symmetric with respect to this axis. Moreover, only the {τ }rφ component of the viscous stress tensor is assumed, and we have set {v}θ =0. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the variation of dynamical quantities of the flow in the vertical direction by finding an analytical solution. As a consequence, we found that the advection parameter, {f}{adv}, varies along the θ direction and reaches its maximum near the rotation axis. Our results also show that, in terms of the no-outflow solution, thermal equilibrium still exists and consequently advection cooling can balance viscous heating.

  13. Vertical and Horizontal Vegetation Structure across Natural and Modified Habitat Types at Mount Kilimanjaro.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Gemma; Ensslin, Andreas; Hemp, Andreas; Fischer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In most habitats, vegetation provides the main structure of the environment. This complexity can facilitate biodiversity and ecosystem services. Therefore, measures of vegetation structure can serve as indicators in ecosystem management. However, many structural measures are laborious and require expert knowledge. Here, we used consistent and convenient measures to assess vegetation structure over an exceptionally broad elevation gradient of 866-4550 m above sea level at Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Additionally, we compared (human)-modified habitats, including maize fields, traditionally managed home gardens, grasslands, commercial coffee farms and logged and burned forests with natural habitats along this elevation gradient. We distinguished vertical and horizontal vegetation structure to account for habitat complexity and heterogeneity. Vertical vegetation structure (assessed as number, width and density of vegetation layers, maximum canopy height, leaf area index and vegetation cover) displayed a unimodal elevation pattern, peaking at intermediate elevations in montane forests, whereas horizontal structure (assessed as coefficient of variation of number, width and density of vegetation layers, maximum canopy height, leaf area index and vegetation cover) was lowest at intermediate altitudes. Overall, vertical structure was consistently lower in modified than in natural habitat types, whereas horizontal structure was inconsistently different in modified than in natural habitat types, depending on the specific structural measure and habitat type. Our study shows how vertical and horizontal vegetation structure can be assessed efficiently in various habitat types in tropical mountain regions, and we suggest to apply this as a tool for informing future biodiversity and ecosystem service studies. PMID:26406985

  14. Vertical and Horizontal Vegetation Structure across Natural and Modified Habitat Types at Mount Kilimanjaro

    PubMed Central

    Rutten, Gemma; Ensslin, Andreas; Hemp, Andreas; Fischer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In most habitats, vegetation provides the main structure of the environment. This complexity can facilitate biodiversity and ecosystem services. Therefore, measures of vegetation structure can serve as indicators in ecosystem management. However, many structural measures are laborious and require expert knowledge. Here, we used consistent and convenient measures to assess vegetation structure over an exceptionally broad elevation gradient of 866–4550m above sea level at Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Additionally, we compared (human)-modified habitats, including maize fields, traditionally managed home gardens, grasslands, commercial coffee farms and logged and burned forests with natural habitats along this elevation gradient. We distinguished vertical and horizontal vegetation structure to account for habitat complexity and heterogeneity. Vertical vegetation structure (assessed as number, width and density of vegetation layers, maximum canopy height, leaf area index and vegetation cover) displayed a unimodal elevation pattern, peaking at intermediate elevations in montane forests, whereas horizontal structure (assessed as coefficient of variation of number, width and density of vegetation layers, maximum canopy height, leaf area index and vegetation cover) was lowest at intermediate altitudes. Overall, vertical structure was consistently lower in modified than in natural habitat types, whereas horizontal structure was inconsistently different in modified than in natural habitat types, depending on the specific structural measure and habitat type. Our study shows how vertical and horizontal vegetation structure can be assessed efficiently in various habitat types in tropical mountain regions, and we suggest to apply this as a tool for informing future biodiversity and ecosystem service studies. PMID:26406985

  15. Holistic aerosol evaluation using synthesized aerosol aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson-Parris, Duncan; Reddington, Carly; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip; Carslaw, Ken; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Despite ongoing efforts there are still large uncertainties in aerosol concentrations and loadings across many commonly used GCMs. This in turn leads to large uncertainties in the contributions of the direct and indirect aerosol forcing on climate. However, constraining these fields using earth observation data, although providing global coverage, is problematic for many reasons, including the large uncertainties in retrieving aerosol loadings. Additionally, the inability to retrieve aerosols in or around cloudy scenes leads to further sampling biases (Gryspeerdt 2015). Many in-situ studies have used regional datasets to attempt to evaluate the model uncertainties, but these are unable to provide an assessment of the models ability to represent aerosols properties on a global scale. Within the Global Aerosol Synthesis and Science Project (GASSP) we have assembled the largest collection of quality controlled, in-situ aircraft observations ever synthesized to a consistent format. This provides a global set of in-situ measurements of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Black Carbon (BC), amongst others. In particular, the large number of vertical profiles provided by this aircraft data allows us to investigate the vertical structure of aerosols across a wide range of regions and environments. These vertical distributions are particularly valuable when investigating the dominant processes above or below clouds where remote sensing data is not available. Here we present initial process-based assessments of the BC lifetimes and vertical distributions of CCN in the HadGEM-UKCA and ECHAM-HAM models using this data. We use point-by-point based comparisons to avoid the sampling issues associated with comparing spatio-temporal aggregations.

  16. The relationship between latent heating, vertical velocity, and precipitation processes: The impact of aerosols on precipitation in organized deep convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2016-06-01

    A high-resolution, two-dimensional cloud-resolving model with spectral-bin microphysics is used to study the impact of aerosols on precipitation processes in both a tropical oceanic and a midlatitude continental squall line with regard to three processes: latent heating (LH), cold pool dynamics, and ice microphysics. Evaporative cooling in the lower troposphere is found to enhance rainfall in low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration scenarios in the developing stages of a midlatitude convective precipitation system. In contrast, the tropical case produced more rainfall under high CCN concentrations. Both cold pools and low-level convergence are stronger for those configurations having enhanced rainfall. Nevertheless, latent heat release is stronger (especially after initial precipitation) in the scenarios having more rainfall in both the tropical and midlatitude environment. Sensitivity tests are performed to examine the impact of ice and evaporative cooling on the relationship between aerosols, LH, and precipitation processes. The results show that evaporative cooling is important for cold pool strength and rain enhancement in both cases. However, ice microphysics play a larger role in the midlatitude case compared to the tropics. Detailed analysis of the vertical velocity-governing equation shows that temperature buoyancy can enhance updrafts/downdrafts in the middle/lower troposphere in the convective core region; however, the vertical pressure gradient force (PGF) is of the same order and acts in the opposite direction. Water loading is small but of the same order as the net PGF-temperature buoyancy forcing. The balance among these terms determines the intensity of convection.

  17. Vertical variations in the turbulent structure over vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfieri, J. G.; Kustas, W. P.; Prueger, J. H.; Hipps, L.

    2015-12-01

    Due to their highly-structured canopy, turbulent characteristics within and above vineyards, may not conform to those exhibited by other agricultural and natural ecosystems. As a result, the current generation of land surface models may not adequately describe the turbulent exchange of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and the surface over vineyards. Using data collected during 2014 as a part of the Grape Remote Sensing Atmospheric Profiling and Evapotranspiration Experiment (GRAPEX), an ongoing multi-agency field campaign conducted in the Central Valley of California, this study sought to characterize the variations in the turbulent structure over vineyards. Focusing on unstable daytime conditions, the study compared the turbulent structure at three above-canopy heights: 2.5 m, 3.75 m, and 8 m, agl. Both wavelet and Fourier-based spectral analysis of the wind velocity components indicates a strong tendency for the spectral peak to broaden and shift to lower frequencies as the measurement height increases. Also, beginning with the highest-frequency eddies, the turbulent structure at differing heights become increasingly decoupled as the distance between the measurements increases. In other terms, eddies contributing to a measurement at one height act independently of similarly-sized eddies at another height. As a result, the overall correlation between the turbulent flows measured at differing heights decreases exponential with increasing separation distance. While this effect was seen for all of the periods analyzed, the magnitude of the effect does appear to vary in response to the direction of the wind relative to the vineyard rows.

  18. Intra- and inter-tidal variability of the vertical current structure in the Marsdiep basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, J. J.; Ridderinkhof, H.; Maas, L. R. M.; van Aken, H. M.

    2015-02-01

    The vertical structure of the along-stream current in the main channel of the periodically-stratified estuarine Marsdiep basin is investigated by combining velocity measurements collected during three different seasons with a one-dimensional water column model. The observed vertical shears in the lowest part of the water column are greater during ebb than during flood due to an asymmetry in drag coefficient (i.e. bed friction), which is most likely determined by the surrounding complex bathymetry. This asymmetry is usually not incorporated in models. Furthermore, a mid-depth velocity maximum is observed and simulated during early and late flood which is generated by along-stream and cross-stream tidal straining, respectively. Negative shears are present in the upper part of the water column during flood, which correlate well with the along-stream salinity gradient. The mid-depth velocity maximum during late flood results in an early current reversal in the upper part of the water column. The elevated vertical shears during ebb are able to reduce vertical stratification induced by along-stream tidal straining, whereas cross-stream tidal straining during late flood promotes the generation of vertical stratification. The simulations suggest that these processes are most important during spring tide conditions. This study has demonstrated that an asymmetry in bed friction and the presence of density gradients both have a strong impact on the vertical structure of along-stream velocity in the Marsdiep basin.

  19. The impact of temperature vertical structure on trajectory modeling of stratospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Dessler, A. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Randel, W. J.; Kim, J.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Lagrangian trajectories driven by reanalysis meteorological fields are frequently used to study water vapor (H2O) in the stratosphere, in which the tropical cold-point temperatures regulate the amount of H2O entering the stratosphere. Therefore, the accuracy of temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is of great importance for understanding stratospheric H2O abundances. Currently, most reanalyses, such as the NASA MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective - analysis for Research and Applications), only provide temperatures with ~ 1.2 km vertical resolution in the TTL, which has been argued to miss finer vertical structure in the tropopause and therefore introduce uncertainties in our understanding of stratospheric H2O. In this paper, we quantify this uncertainty by comparing the Lagrangian trajectory prediction of H2O using MERRA temperatures on standard model levels (traj.MER-T) to those using GPS temperatures at finer vertical resolution (traj.GPS-T), and those using adjusted MERRA temperatures with finer vertical structures induced by waves (traj.MER-Twave). It turns out that by using temperatures with finer vertical structure in the tropopause, the trajectory model more realistically simulates the dehydration of air entering the stratosphere. But the effect on H2O abundances is relatively minor: compared with traj.MER-T, traj.GPS-T tends to dry air by ~ 0.1 ppmv, while traj.MER-Twave tends to dry air by 0.2-0.3 ppmv. Despite these differences in absolute values of predicted H2O and vertical dehydration patterns, there is virtually no difference in the interannual variability in different runs. Overall, we find that a tropopause temperature with finer vertical structure has limited impact on predicted stratospheric H2O.

  20. Effects of the Hawaiian Islands on the vertical structure of low-level clouds from CALIPSO lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-Wu; Xie, Shang-Ping; Zhang, Su-Ping

    2015-01-01

    steady northeast trade winds impinge on the Hawaiian Islands, producing prominent island wakes of multispatial scales from tens to thousands of kilometers. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) reveal rich three-dimensional structures of low-level clouds that are induced by the islands, distinct from the background environment. The cloud frequency peaks between 1.5 and 2.0 km in cloud top elevation over the windward slopes of the islands of Kauai and Oahu due to orographic lifting and daytime island heating. In the nighttime near-island wake of Kauai, CALIPSO captures a striking cloud hole below 1.6 km as the cold advection from the island suppresses low-level clouds. The cyclonic eddy of the mechanical wake behind the island of Hawaii favors the formation of low-level clouds (below 2.5 km), and the anticyclonic eddy suppresses the low-level cloud formation, indicative of the dynamical effect on the vertical structure of low-level clouds. In the long Hawaiian wake due to air-sea interaction, low-level clouds form over both the warmer and colder waters, but the cloud tops are 400-600 m higher over the warm than the cold waters. In addition, the day-night differences and the sensitivity of low-level clouds to the background trade wind inversion height are also studied.

  1. An analysis of the vertical structure equation for arbitrary thermal profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1989-01-01

    The vertical structure equation is a singular Sturm-Liouville problem whose eigenfunctions describe the vertical dependence of the normal modes of the primitive equations linearized about a given thermal profile. The eigenvalues give the equivalent depths of the modes. The spectrum of the vertical structure equation and the appropriateness of various upper boundary conditions, both for arbitrary thermal profiles were studied. The results depend critically upon whether or not the thermal profile is such that the basic state atmosphere is bounded. In the case of a bounded atmosphere it is shown that the spectrum is always totally discrete, regardless of details of the thermal profile. For the barotropic equivalent depth, which corresponds to the lowest eigen value, upper and lower bounds which depend only on the surface temperature and the atmosphere height were obtained. All eigenfunctions are bounded, but always have unbounded first derivatives. It was proved that the commonly invoked upper boundary condition that vertical velocity must vanish as pressure tends to zero, as well as a number of alternative conditions, is well posed. It was concluded that the vertical structure equation always has a totally discrete spectrum under the assumptions implicit in the primitive equations.

  2. An analysis of the vertical structure equation for arbitrary thermal profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1987-01-01

    The vertical structure equation is a singular Sturm-Liouville problem whose eigenfunctions describe the vertical dependence of the normal modes of the primitive equations linearized about a given thermal profile. The eigenvalues give the equivalent depths of the modes. The spectrum of the vertical structure equation and the appropriateness of various upper boundary conditions, both for arbitrary thermal profiles were studied. The results depend critically upon whether or not the thermal profile is such that the basic state atmosphere is bounded. In the case of a bounded atmosphere it is shown that the spectrum is always totally discrete, regardless of details of the thermal profile. For the barotropic equivalent depth, which corresponds to the lowest eigen value, upper and lower bounds which depend only on the surface temperature and the atmosphere height were obtained. All eigenfunctions are bounded, but always have unbounded first derivatives. It was proved that the commonly invoked upper boundary condition that vertical velocity must vanish as pressure tends to zero, as well as a number of alternative conditions, is well posed. It was concluded that the vertical structure equation always has a totally discrete spectrum under the assumptions implicit in the primitive equations.

  3. Dependence of Hurricane intensity and structures on vertical resolution and time-step size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Lin; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2003-09-01

    In view of the growing interests in the explicit modeling of clouds and precipitation, the effects of varying vertical resolution and time-step sizes on the 72-h explicit simulation of Hurricane Andrew (1992) are studied using the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU/NCAR) mesoscale model (i.e., MM5) with the finest grid size of 6 km. It is shown that changing vertical resolution and time-step size has significant effects on hurricane intensity and inner-core cloud/precipitation, but little impact on the hurricane track. In general, increasing vertical resolution tends to produce a deeper storm with lower central pressure and stronger three-dimensional winds, and more precipitation. Similar effects, but to a less extent, occur when the time-step size is reduced. It is found that increasing the low-level vertical resolution is more efficient in intensifying a hurricane, whereas changing the upper-level vertical resolution has little impact on the hurricane intensity. Moreover, the use of a thicker surface layer tends to produce higher maximum surface winds. It is concluded that the use of higher vertical resolution, a thin surface layer, and smaller time-step sizes, along with higher horizontal resolution, is desirable to model more realistically the intensity and inner-core structures and evolution of tropical storms as well as the other convectively driven weather systems.

  4. Helical structures in vertically aligned dust particle chains in a complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Truell W; Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin S

    2013-05-01

    Self-assembly of structures from vertically aligned, charged dust particle bundles within a glass box placed on the lower, powered electrode of a Gaseous Electronics Conference rf reference cell were produced and examined experimentally. Self-organized formation of one-dimensional vertical chains, two-dimensional zigzag structures, and three-dimensional helical structures of triangular, quadrangular, pentagonal, hexagonal, and heptagonal symmetries are shown to occur. System evolution is shown to progress from a one-dimensional chain structure, through a zigzag transition to a two-dimensional, spindlelike structure, and then to various three-dimensional, helical structures exhibiting multiple symmetries. Stable configurations are found to be dependent upon the system confinement, γ(2)=(ω(0h)/ω(0v))(2) (where ω(0h,v) are the horizontal and vertical dust resonance frequencies), the total number of particles within a bundle, and the rf power. For clusters having fixed numbers of particles, the rf power at which structural phase transitions occur is repeatable and exhibits no observable hysteresis. The critical conditions for these structural phase transitions as well as the basic symmetry exhibited by the one-, two-, and three-dimensional structures that subsequently develop are in good agreement with the theoretically predicted configurations of minimum energy determined employing molecular dynamics simulations for charged dust particles confined in a prolate, spheroidal potential as presented theoretically by Kamimura and Ishihara [Kamimura and Ishihara, Phys. Rev. E 85, 016406 (2012)]. PMID:23767642

  5. Optimal GPS/accelerometer integration algorithm for monitoring the vertical structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Jian; Han, Houzeng

    2014-11-01

    The vertical structural dynamics is a crucial factor for structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil structures such as high-rise buildings, suspension bridges and towers. This paper presents an optimal GPS/accelerometer integration algorithm for an automated multi-sensor monitoring system. The closed loop feedback algorithm for integrating the vertical GPS and accelerometer measurements is proposed based on a 5 state extended KALMAN filter (EKF) and then the narrow moving window Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis is applied to extract structural dynamics. A civil structural vibration is simulated and the analysed result shows the proposed algorithm can effectively integrate the online vertical measurements produced by GPS and accelerometer. Furthermore, the accelerometer bias and scale factor can also be estimated which is impossible with traditional integration algorithms. Further analysis shows the vibration frequencies detected in GPS or accelerometer are all included in the integrated vertical defection time series and the accelerometer can effectively compensate the short-term GPS outages with high quality. Finally, the data set collected with a time synchronised and integrated GPS/accelerometer monitoring system installed on the Nottingham Wilford Bridge when excited by 15 people jumping together at its mid-span are utilised to verify the effectiveness of this proposed algorithm. Its implementations are satisfactory and the detected vibration frequencies are 1.720 Hz, 1.870 Hz, 2.104 Hz, 2.905 Hz and also 10.050 Hz, which is not found in GPS or accelerometer only measurements.

  6. High-Resolution Vertical Observation of Intracellular Structure Using Magnetically Responsive Microplates.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Tetsuhiko; Onoe, Hiroaki; Tottori, Soichiro; Aonuma, Hiroka; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kamiya, Koki; Ishihara, Hirotaka; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    A vertical confocal observation system capable of high-resolution observation of intracellular structure is demonstrated. The system consists of magnet-active microplates to rotate, incline, and translate single adherent cells in the applied magnetic field. Appended to conventional confocal microscopes, this system enables high-resolution cross-sectional imaging with single-molecule sensitivity in single scanning. PMID:27185344

  7. Horizontal and Vertical Structures: The Dynamics of Organization in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.; Underhile, Ric; Wall, Andrew F.

    2007-01-01

    The organization of institutions of higher education has been seen as operating with ambiguous purposes in vertically oriented structures that are only loosely connected. The rationale for this ambiguity is twofold: (1) to allow for creative thinking, and (2) to respect--and even encourage--the autonomy of different disciplines. But ambiguity of…

  8. Ensemble-Based Assimilation of Aerosol Observations in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchard, V.; Da Silva, A.

    2016-01-01

    MERRA-2 is the latest Aerosol Reanalysis produced at NASA's Global Modeling Assimilation Office (GMAO) from 1979 to present. This reanalysis is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model radiatively coupled to GOCART aerosols and includes assimilation of bias corrected Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from AVHRR over ocean, MODIS sensors on both Terra and Aqua satellites, MISR over bright surfaces and AERONET data. In order to assimilate lidar profiles of aerosols, we are updating the aerosol component of our assimilation system to an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) type of scheme using ensembles generated routinely by the meteorological assimilation. Following the work performed with the first NASA's aerosol reanalysis (MERRAero), we first validate the vertical structure of MERRA-2 aerosol assimilated fields using CALIOP data over regions of particular interest during 2008.

  9. Coarse-fine vertical scanning based optical profiler for structured surface measurement with large step height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Liu, Xiaojun; Lei, Zili; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiao; Chen, Liangzhou; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    White light interference (WLI) optical profiler had been used widely for structured surface measurement. To achieve high measuring accuracy, piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) was usually used as the vertical scanning unit, which was normally less than 100um and only for small range structured surface measurement. With the development of advanced manufacturing technology, precision structured surfaces with large step height were appearing. To satisfy the measurement requirements of this kind of precision structured surfaces, WLI optical profiler with large range had to be developed. In this paper, an optical profiler was proposed, in which a coarse-fine vertical scanning system was adopted to expand its measurement range to 10mm while its resolution still at nanometer level.

  10. Synthesis and structural characterization of vertical ferromagnetic MnAs/semiconducting InAs heterojunction nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, Ryutaro; Hara, Shinjiro; Kabamoto, Kyohei; Fujimagari, Hiromu

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to synthesize vertical ferromagnetic/semiconducting heterojunction nanowires by combing the catalyst-free selective-area growth of InAs nanowires and the endotaxial nanoclustering of MnAs and to structurally and magnetically characterize them. MnAs penetrates the InAs nanowires to form nanoclusters. The surface migration length of manganese adatoms on the nanowires, which is estimated to be 600 nm at 580 °C, is a key to the successful fabrication of vertical MnAs/InAs heterojunction nanowires with atomically abrupt heterointerfaces.

  11. A STUDY ON APPLICABILITY OF GROUND RESPONSE ACCELERATION METHOD TO DEEP VERTICAL UNDERGROUND STRUCTURES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Mai; Shiba, Yukio; Watanabe, Kazuaki

    This paper discusses the applicability of ground response acceleration method to seismic analysis for deep vertical underground structures. To examine the applicability, an analysis of relationships between response of ground and the shaft was conducted. It was found from the analysis that vertical axial stress of the shaft was not correspond with shear stress of ground. Accordingly, it was concluded that the axial stress was not evaluated correctly by the existing method. Therefore, to extend the applicability of the method, ground responses correlated with the axial stress were analyzed and a new method using these ground responses was proposed.

  12. Optical and Structural Properties of Aerosols Emitted from Open Biomass Burning (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Lewis, K.; Gyawali, M.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M. K.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Arnott, W. P.

    2010-12-01

    Open biomass burning including wildland fires and agricultural burning emits substantial quantities of carbonaceous aerosols into the atmosphere. Fuel, soil, and atmospheric conditions largely determine the combustion phase. High temperature flaming combustion emits black aerosols, generally consisting of fractal-like chain aggregates that have a high black carbon content and therefore strongly absorb visible light. Low temperature, smoldering combustion, on the other hand, emits fairly white aerosols, often consisting of near-spherical particles that have high organic carbon content. While this organic carbon is traditionally considered to cause negligent absorption of visible light, more recent studies have shown that organic carbon from biomass burning often contains brown carbon. Brown carbon is a component of organic carbon, optically defined by its increasing light absorption toward shorter wavelengths. The physical characteristics of biomass combustion aerosol particles are determined by a combination of their morphology, monomer size, and shape, all of which can be determined from electron microscopy and image analysis. Here, we review optical and structural properties of aerosols emitted from open biomass burning with a focus on relevance for radiative forcing and climate change and satellite remote sensing. This review is followed by a discussion of measurements and modeling of brown carbon optical properties, of associated metrics such as the Ångström absorption coefficient, and of future research needs.

  13. Surface ozone-aerosol behaviour and atmospheric boundary layer structure in Saharan dusty scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adame, Jose; Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Sorrribas, Mar; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel; Toledo, Daniel; Yela, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    A research campaign was performed for the AMISOC (Atmospheric Minor Species relevant to the Ozone Chemistry) project at El Arenosillo observatory (southwest Spain) in May-June 2012. The campaign focused on the impact of Saharan dust intrusions at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and ozone-aerosol interactions. In-situ and remote-sensing techniques for gases and aerosols were used moreover to modelling analyses. Meteorology features, ABL structures and evolution, aerosol profiling distributions and aerosol-ozone interactions on the surface were analysed. Two four-day periods were selected according to non-dusty (clean conditions) and dusty (Saharan dust) situations. In both scenarios, sea-land breezes developed in the lower atmosphere, but differences were found in the upper levels. Results show that surface temperatures were greater than 3°C and humidity values were lower during dusty conditions than non-dusty conditions. Thermal structures on the surface layer (estimated using an instrument on a 100 m tower) show differences, mainly during nocturnal periods with less intense inversions under dusty conditions. The mixing layer during dusty days was 400-800 m thick, less than observed on non-dusty days. Dust also disturbed the typical daily ABL evolution. Stable conditions were observed during the early evening during intrusions. Aerosol extinction on dusty days was 2-3 times higher, and the dust was confined between 1500 and 5500 m. Back trajectory analyses confirmed that the dust had an African origin. On the surface, the particle concentration was approximately 3.5 times higher during dusty events, but the local ozone did not exhibit any change. The arrival of Saharan dust in the upper levels impacted the meteorological surface, inhibited the daily evolution of the ABL and caused an increase in aerosol loading on the surface and at higher altitudes; however, no dust influence was observed on surface ozone.

  14. Orbiting lidar simulations. I - Aerosol and cloud measurements by an independent-wavelength technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Morley, B. M.; Livingston, J. M.; Grams, G. W.; Patterson, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Aerosol and cloud measurements have been simulated for a Space Shuttle lidar. Expected errors - in signal, transmission, density, and calibration - are calculated algebraically and checked by simulating measurements and retrievals using random-number generators. By day, vertical structure is retrieved for tenuous clouds, Saharan aerosols, and boundary layer aerosols (at 0.53 and 1.06 micron) as well as strong volcanic stratospheric aerosols (at 0.53 micron). By night, all these constituents are retrieved plus upper tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols (at 1.06 micron), mesospheric aerosols (at 0.53 micron), and noctilucent clouds (at 1.06 and 0.53 micron). The vertical resolution was 0.1-0.5 km in the troposphere, 0.5-2.0 km above, except 0.25-1.0 km in the mesospheric cloud and aerosol layers; horizontal resolution was 100-2000 km.

  15. Validation of aerosol and cloud layer structures from the space-borne lidar CALIOP using a ground-based lidar in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Berthier, S.; Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.; Dulac, F.; Yoon, S.-C.

    2008-07-01

    We present initial validation results of the space-borne lidar CALIOP onboard CALIPSO satellite using coincidental observations from a ground-based lidar in Seoul National University (SNU), Seoul, Korea (37.46° N, 126.95° E). We analyze six selected cases between September 2006 and February 2007, including 3 daytime and 3 night-time observations and covering different types of clear and cloudy atmospheric conditions. Apparent scattering ratios calculated from the two lidar measurements of total attenuated backscatter at 532 nm show similar aerosol and cloud layer structures both under cloud-free conditions and in cases of multiple aerosol layers underlying semi-transparent cirrus clouds. Agreement on top and base heights of cloud and aerosol layers is generally within 0.10 km, particularly during night-time. This result confirms that the CALIPSO science team algorithms for the discrimination of cloud and aerosol as well as for the detection of layer top and base altitude provide reliable information in such atmospheric conditions. This accuracy of the planetary boundary layer top height under cirrus cloud appears, however, limited during daytime. Under thick cloud conditions, however, information on the cloud top (bottom) height only is reliable from CALIOP (ground-based lidar) due to strong signal attenuations. However, simultaneous space-borne CALIOP and ground-based SNU lidar (SNU-L) measurements complement each other and can be combined to provide full information on the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds. An aerosol backscatter-to-extinction ratio (BER) estimated from lidar and sunphotometer synergy at the SNU site during the CALIOP overpass is assessed to be 0.023±0.004 sr-1 (i.e. a lidar ratio of 43.2±6.2 sr) from CALIOP and 0.027±0.006 sr-1 (37.4±7.2 sr) from SNU-L. For aerosols within the planetary boundary layer under cloud-free conditions, the aerosol extinction profiles from both lidars are in agreement within about 0.02 km-1. Under semi

  16. The Vertical Structure of Major Meteorological Features on Jupiter: The Great Red Spot and White Ovals BC and DE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Carlson, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-spectral imagery of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and two White ovals acquired by the Galileo/NIMS are used to constrain the spatial variability of the vertical aerosol structure and the distribution of ammonia in and around these most-prominent anti-cyclonic features. All three features exhibit a high-altitude core spanning about 3/4 of their visual size when viewed with moderate absorption wavelengths, indicating a bulk elliptical, "wedding cake" shape in their overall three-dimensional cloud structure. A distinctive spiral pattern within the GRS core is seen in moderate methane and hydrogen absorption bandpasses. This pattern - which has been modelled to show a 2 km variation in cloudtop pressure within the GRS - is inconsistent with a different spiral-shaped pattern observed in ammonia-sensitive wavelengths, thus indicating spatial variability not only in the column abundance of ammonia within the GRS, but in its mixing ratio as well. White Ovals BC and DE were observed in February 1997, just a year before their unusual merger into a single feature. At the time of these observations, the centers of the two anti-cyclones were about 16 degrees apart, separated by a complex cyclonic feature which exhibited unusual spatial variability in its appearance in images acquired at ammonia-sensitive wavelengths. In particular, the northern half of this feature has the largest ammonia column abundance seen within the environs around the white ovals, indicating unusual variability in either cloud structure/altitude and/or ammonia humidity within the cyclone.

  17. CVD growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride for vertical hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO2, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems. - Abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO{sub 2}, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems.

  18. Intercomparison of aerosol extinction profiles retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieß, U.; Klein Baltink, H.; Beirle, S.; Clémer, K.; Hendrick, F.; Henzing, B.; Irie, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Li, A.; Moerman, M. M.; van Roozendael, M.; Shaiganfar, R.; Wagner, T.; Wang, Y.; Xie, P.; Yilmaz, S.; Zieger, P.

    2016-07-01

    A first direct intercomparison of aerosol vertical profiles from Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations, performed during the Cabauw Intercomparison Campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) in summer 2009, is presented. Five out of 14 participants of the CINDI campaign reported aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) as deduced from observations of differential slant column densities of the oxygen collision complex (O4) at different elevation angles. Aerosol extinction vertical profiles and AOT are compared to backscatter profiles from a ceilometer instrument and to sun photometer measurements, respectively. Furthermore, the near-surface aerosol extinction coefficient is compared to in situ measurements of a humidity-controlled nephelometer and dry aerosol absorption measurements. The participants of this intercomparison exercise use different approaches for the retrieval of aerosol information, including the retrieval of the full vertical profile using optimal estimation and a parametrised approach with a prescribed profile shape. Despite these large conceptual differences, and also differences in the wavelength of the observed O4 absorption band, good agreement in terms of the vertical structure of aerosols within the boundary layer is achieved between the aerosol extinction profiles retrieved by the different groups and the backscatter profiles observed by the ceilometer instrument. AOTs from MAX-DOAS and sun photometer show a good correlation (R>0.8), but all participants systematically underestimate the AOT. Substantial differences between the near-surface aerosol extinction from MAX-DOAS and from the humidified nephelometer remain largely unresolved.

  19. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne E.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-06-28

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth’s energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically-based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect using analytic representations of droplet nucleation, cloud and aerosol vertical structure, and horizontal variability in cloud water and aerosol concentration. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of aerosol indirect effects that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates are found to be sensitive to several uncertain parameters, including the preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the size of the primary particles, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Aerosol indirect effects are surprisingly linear in emissions. This simple model provides a much stronger physical basis for representing aerosol indirect effects than previous representations in integrated assessment models designed to quickly explore the parameter space of emissions-climate interactions. The model also produces estimates that depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models.

  20. Inter-comparison of MAX-DOAS Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Extinction, SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands with LIDAR Data and GEM-MACH Air Quality Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Zoe; Friess, Udo; Strawbridge, Kevin; Whiteway, James; Aggarwal, Monika; Makar, Paul; Li, Shao-Meng; O'Brien, Jason; Baray, Sabour; Schnitzler, Elijah; Olfert, Jason S.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Understanding industrial emissions of trace gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands is essential to maintaining air quality standards and informing public policy. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of trace gases can improve knowledge of pollutant levels, vertical distribution and chemical transformation. During an intensive air measurement campaign to study emissions, transport, transformation and deposition of oil sands air pollutants from August to September of 2013, a MAX-DOAS instrument was deployed at a site north of Fort McMurray, Alberta to determine the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, NO2 and SO2 through retrieval from the MAX-DOAS spectral measurements using an optimal estimation method. The large complement of data collected from multiple instruments deployed during this field campaign provides a unique opportunity to validate and characterize the performance of the MAX-DOAS vertical profile retrievals. Aerosol extinction profiles determined from two Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instruments, one collocated and the other on a Twin Otter aircraft that flew over the site during the study, will be compared to the MAX-DOAS aerosol extinction profile retrievals. Vertical profiles of NO2 and SO2 retrieved from the MAX-DOAS measurements will be further compared with the composite vertical profiles measured from the flights of a second aircraft, the NRC-Convair 580, over the field site during the same measurement period. Finally, the MAX-DOAS retrieved tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of SO2 and NO2 will be compared to the predicted VCDs from Environment and Climate Change Canada's Global Environmental Multi-scale - Modelling Air quality and Chemistry (GEM-MACH) air quality model over the grid cell containing the field site. Emission estimates of SO2 from the major oil mining facility Syncrude Mildred Lake using the MAX-DOAS VCD results, validated through the detailed characterization above

  1. Improving Canopy Vertical Structure Measurements with Dual-Wavelength Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Strahler, A. H.; Schaaf, C.; Jupp, D. L. B.; Howe, G.; Hewawasam, K.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E. J.; Yang, X.; Yao, T.

    2015-12-01

    Forest canopy structure regulates radiation interception through the canopy, affects the canopy microclimate, and consequently influences the energy, water, and carbon fluxes between soil, vegetation and atmosphere through its interaction with leaf physiological functioning. To observe vertical canopy forest structure in finer and more accurate detail, we retrieved vertical profiles of leaf and woody components separately with a terrestrial laser scanner, the Dual-Wavelength Echidna Lidar (DWEL). DWEL scans of a hardwood site at the Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts, USA, in early May and in late September in 2014, revealed the spatial heterogeneity of the canopy vertical structure of the two vegetation components: leaves and woody materials. The DWEL collects simultaneous scans of forests with two lasers at different wavelengths, 1064 nm (NIR) and 1548 nm (SWIR). Power returned from leaves is much lower than from woody materials such as trunks and branches at the SWIR wavelength due to the liquid water absorption by leaves, whereas returned power at the NIR wavelength is similar from both leaves and woody materials. This spectral contrast between leaves and woody materials, along with spatial context information. discriminates leaves and woody materials accurately in 3-D space, thus allowing the measurement of separate leaf and woody area profiles. We also captured the change in the canopy vertical structure over the seven years by a comparison between the current measurements by the DWEL in 2014 and past measurements in 2007 at the same site by the DWEL's predecessor, a single-wavelength terrestrial lidar, the Echidna Validation Instrument. The comparison also demonstrates the advantage of dual-wavelength laser scanning by the DWEL for canopy structure measurements.

  2. Post-volcanic stratospheric aerosol decay as measured by lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Fuller, W. H., Jr.; Swissler, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper summarizes and discusses results of lidar observations, at Hampton (Virginia), of the stratospheric aerosol vertical distribution for a period of 22 months (October 1974 to July 1976) after the volcanic eruption of the Volcan de Fuego in Guatemala. Data are presented in terms of lidar scattering ratio, vertically integrated aerosol backscattering, layer structure and location, and rawinsonde temperature profiles as a function of time. The results reveal a sudden increase in the stratospheric aerosol content after the volcanic eruption as well as its subsequent decline. There exists a high degree of correlation between the integrated aerosol backscattering and the tropopause height such that as one decreases the other increases and vice versa. Rapid decay of the stratospheric aerosol is found to occur over the late winter to early spring period.

  3. Study of the Mediterranean desert dust outbreaks' vertical structure based on a synergistic use of satellite and ground retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, Antonis; Basart, Sara; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Pey, Jorge; Querol, Xavier; Amiridis, Vasilis; Jorba, Oriol; Gasso, Santiago; Baldasano, Jose Maria

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean basin is frequently affected by dust outbreaks originating from the north African and Middle East deserts. These outbreaks reveal strong spatial and temporal variability which is mainly determined by the prevailing synoptic conditions. Aiming to their description, a synergistic use of various measurements can be the optimal approach. The scope of the present study is to describe the 3D structure of Mediterranean dust outbreaks through a synergistic use of various satellite observations. For this purpose, daily retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD550nm), Ångström exponent (α), effective radius (reff), aerosol index (AI) and fine fraction (FF) were taken by the MODIS-Terra/Aqua (Collection 051), EP-TOMS and OMI-Aura databases. These data are used as inputs to an objective and dynamic algorithm which identifies and classifies desert dust (DD) episodes into strong and extreme ones, in each 1° x 1° grid cell, over the periods 2000-2013 and 2003-2012. However, the specific satellite retrievals refer to the whole atmospheric column and thus are not able to provide information at different heights. In order to address this issue, coincident CALIOP-CALIPSO observations have been aggregated and averaged for 16 layers up to 8km, equally spaced in vertical terms. During the period 2000-2013, strong and extreme DD episodes occurred more frequently over the western (9.9 episodes/year) and central parts (3.3 episodes/year) of the Mediterranean. Although the episodes taking place in the eastern Mediterranean are less frequent, they appear to be the most intense, with maximum intensities up to 1.3 and 3.0 (in terms of AOD) for strong and extreme ones, respectively. Based on the CALIPSO retrievals, dust aerosol layers extend from 0.5 to 4.5km above sea level (a.s.l.) near to the northern African coasts, gradually getting narrower up to the 40o N parallel. Dust particles can be uplifted even higher, up to 8km, between the parallels of 33o N and 37o N. In

  4. Efficiency and flow structure of vertical-axis turbines with an upstream deflecting plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daegyoum; Gharib, Morteza

    2012-11-01

    The power generation and flow structure of straight-bladed vertical-axis turbines with an upstream deflector are investigated experimentally in tunnel facilities. When an upstream deflecting plate is normal to flow direction, a region of low velocity is formed in its near-wake. However, the flow speed outside the near-wake region becomes higher than the free-stream speed. Since blades outside the wake encounter higher flow velocity, they can rotate with higher torque and rotating speed compared to the case without an upstream deflector, which results in power output increase. Here, we study the effect of deflector position and width on the efficiency of vertical turbines. We also discuss the flow structure generated by the deflector system. This research is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore foundation.

  5. Vertical structure of surface gravity waves propagating over a sloping seabed: Theory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Qingping; Hay, Alex E.; Bowen, Anthony J.

    2003-08-01

    Theoretical predictions of the vertical structure of wave motion over a sloping seabed are compared with field observations close to the bed in the nearshore zone. Of particular interest is the effect of the local slope on the magnitude and phase of the vertical velocity. Field measurements of near-bed velocity profiles on a 2° bed slope were obtained using a coherent Doppler profiler. The surface elevation was measured by a colocated, upward looking, acoustic sounder. Results are presented from two intervals of different wave energy levels during a storm event: for wave height/water depth ratios smaller than 0.3 and for Ursell numbers smaller than 0.6. The local comparisons of magnitude and phase between the vertical velocity and surface elevation measurements are in good agreement with linear theory for a sloping bed, but differ greatly from that for a horizontal bottom, especially in the lower water column. The sloping bottom, however, has little effect on the horizontal velocity. Linear theory appears to adequately describe the transfer function between the surface elevation and the near-bed velocities, not only at the peak frequencies but also at their harmonics. However, in relatively shallow water the local transformations of free and forced waves at the harmonic frequencies are indistinguishable in the lower water column. Therefore, given surface elevation measurements at a particular location (which reflect the integrated effects of nonlinearities associated with wave shoaling), the vertical structure of the third moments of velocity fields estimated from linear theory is in reasonable agreement with the observations. Both theory and observations show that the skewness and asymmetry of the vertical velocity are subject to significant bottom slope effects, whereas those of horizontal velocity are not.

  6. Influence of a high aerosol concentration on the thermal structure of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, M. N.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Kadygrov, E. N.

    2006-12-01

    The influence of increased concentrations of submicron aerosol produced by forest fires on thermal characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in Moscow and its remote vicinity (the town of Zvenigorod) are analyzed on the basis of regular remote measurements of the ABL temperature profile with the use of MTP-5 profilers. In the air basin of a large city, additional aerosol and accompanying pollutants in early morning hours (at small heights of the Sun) most frequently did not cause substantial changes in the ABL thermal structure. In the locality remote from the megalopolis (Zvenigorod), the atmospheric pollution by aerosol led to noticeable changes in the ABL thermal characteristics. Especially strong changes were observed in the daytime, during the maximum supply of solar radiation. In morning hours, the heating rate of the lower 100-m layer of the polluted air exceeded the heating rate of a relatively pure air by more than one degree. In higher layers, the differences between the rates of temperature changes in a relatively clean atmosphere and in an atmosphere polluted by aerosol (in the suburb) were insignificant.

  7. Sea Spray Aerosol Structure and Composition Using Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The composition and surface properties of atmospheric aerosol particles largely control their impact on climate by affecting their ability to uptake water, react heterogeneously, and nucleate ice in clouds. However, in the vacuum of a conventional electron microscope, the native surface and internal structure often undergo physicochemical rearrangement resulting in surfaces that are quite different from their atmospheric configurations. Herein, we report the development of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy where laboratory generated sea spray aerosol particles are flash frozen in their native state with iterative and controlled thermal and/or pressure exposures and then probed by electron microscopy. This unique approach allows for the detection of not only mixed salts, but also soft materials including whole hydrated bacteria, diatoms, virus particles, marine vesicles, as well as gel networks within hydrated salt droplets—all of which will have distinct biological, chemical, and physical processes. We anticipate this method will open up a new avenue of analysis for aerosol particles, not only for ocean-derived aerosols, but for those produced from other sources where there is interest in the transfer of organic or biological species from the biosphere to the atmosphere. PMID:26878061

  8. Modelling Aerosol Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, B. K.; Jones, D. P.; Gallagher, M. W.; McFiggans, G. B.; Watkins, A. P.

    2009-04-01

    Flow patterns within an urban street canyon are influenced by various micrometeorological factors. It also represents an environment where pollutants such as aerosols accumulate to high levels due to high volumes of traffic. As adverse health effects are being attributed to exposure to aerosols, an investigation of the dispersion of aerosols within such environments is of growing importance. In particular, one is concerned with the vertical structure of the aerosol concentration, the ventilation characteristics of the street canyon and the influence of aerosol microphysical processes. Due to the inherent heterogeneity of the aerosol concentrations within the street canyon and the lack of spatial resolution of measurement campaigns, these issues are an on-going debate. Therefore, a modelling tool is required to represent aerosol dispersion patterns to provide insights to results of past measurement campaigns. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models are able to predict detailed airflow patterns within urban geometries. This capability may be further extended to include aerosol dispersion, by an Euler-Euler multiphase approach. To facilitate the investigation, a two-dimensional, multiphase CFD tool coupled with the k-epsilon turbulence model and with the capability of modelling mixed convection flow regimes arising from both wind driven flows and buoyancy effects from heated walls was developed. Assuming wind blowing perpendicularly to the canyon axis and treating aerosols as a passive scalar, an attempt will be made to assess the sensitivities of aerosol vertical structure and ventilation characteristics to the various flow conditions. Numerical studies were performed using an idealized 10m by 10m canyon to represent a regular canyon and 10m by 5m to represent a deep one. An aerosol emission source was assigned on the centerline of the canyon to represent exhaust emissions. The vertical structure of the aerosols would inform future directives regarding the

  9. Main eddy vertical structures observed in the four major Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegliasco, Cori; Chaigneau, Alexis; Morrow, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    In the four major Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS), mesoscale eddies are known to modulate the biological productivity and transport near-coastal seawater properties toward the offshore ocean, however little is known about their main characteristics and vertical structure. This study combines 10 years of satellite-altimetry data and Argo float profiles of temperature and salinity, and our main goals are (i) to describe the main surface characteristics of long-lived eddies formed in each EBUS and their evolution, and (ii) to depict the main vertical structure of the eddy-types that coexist in these regions. A clustering analysis of the Argo profiles surfacing within the long-lived eddies of each EBUS allows us to determine the proportion of surface and subsurface-intensified eddies in each region, and to describe their vertical structure in terms of temperature, salinity and dynamic height anomalies. In the Peru-Chile Upwelling System, 55% of the sampled anticyclonic eddies (AEs) have subsurface-intensified maximum temperature and salinity anomalies below the seasonal pycnocline, whereas 88% of the cyclonic eddies (CEs) are surface-intensified. In the California Upwelling System, only 30% of the AEs are subsurface-intensified and all of the CEs show maximum anomalies above the pycnocline. In the Canary Upwelling System, ˜40% of the AEs and ˜60% of the CEs are subsurface-intensified with maximum anomalies extending down to 800 m depth. Finally, the Benguela Upwelling System tends to generate ˜40-50% of weak surface-intensified eddies and ˜50-60% of much stronger subsurface-intensified eddies with a clear geographical distribution. The mechanisms involved in the observed eddy vertical shapes are discussed.

  10. Advanced BCD technology with vertical DMOS based on a semi-insulation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kui, Ma; Xinghua, Fu; Jiexin, Lin; Fashun, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A new semi-insulation structure in which one isolated island is connected to the substrate was proposed. Based on this semi-insulation structure, an advanced BCD technology which can integrate a vertical device without extra internal interconnection structure was presented. The manufacturing of the new semi-insulation structure employed multi-epitaxy and selectively multi-doping. Isolated islands are insulated with the substrate by reverse-biased PN junctions. Adjacent isolated islands are insulated by isolation wall or deep dielectric trenches. The proposed semi-insulation structure and devices fixed in it were simulated through two-dimensional numerical computer simulators. Based on the new BCD technology, a smart power integrated circuit was designed and fabricated. The simulated and tested results of Vertical DMOS, MOSFETs, BJTs, resistors and diodes indicated that the proposed semi-insulation structure is reasonable and the advanced BCD technology is validated. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61464002), the Science and Technology Fund of Guizhou Province (No. Qian Ke He J Zi [2014]2066), and the Dr. Fund of Guizhou University (No. Gui Da Ren Ji He Zi (2013)20Hao).

  11. Vertical tilt structure of East Asian trough and its interannual variation mechanism in boreal winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shangfeng; Chen, Xiaolong; Wei, Ke; Chen, Wen; Zhou, Tianjun

    2014-02-01

    Vertical tilt structure of the East Asian trough (EAT) and its interannual variation mechanism in boreal winter are studied using NCEP/NCAR, ERA40, and NCEP/DOE reanalyses. A vertical tilt index (VTI) is defined as the mean slope of vertical trough line on the longitude-height cross section to describe the tilting extent of the EAT, with high index indicating a more west-tilted trough and vice versa. The VTI series derived from the three reanalysis datasets are highly correlated with each other during the corresponding periods. A significant positive correlation is found between the VTI and the zonal range of the vertical trough line. Based on the close relation, a possible physical mechanism is proposed to explain the interannual variation of VTI. It demonstrates that positive (negative) temperature anomalies within the mean zonal range of the EAT result in expansion (contraction) of the zonal range and lead to high (low) VTI years. The composite analyses based on the three reanalysis datasets well support the proposed mechanism. Furthermore, the general relationship between the VTI and the zonal temperature gradient is discussed based on the proposed mechanism. It is revealed that the asymmetric change of temperature gradient on the western and eastern sides of the EAT plays an important role in the variation of VTI, which suggests that the tilting extent of the EAT is strongly affected by the two-order zonal change of temperature instead of the zonal temperature gradient (i.e., one-order change). Climate variability not only in the simultaneous winter but also in the following spring and summer over East Asia is closely related to the variation of the VTI. This study on the vertical tilting of the EAT may enrich knowledge of the East Asian winter monsoon and the climate variability over East Asia and may be helpful in improving the regional climate prediction in East Asia.

  12. Dynamics of a vertical riser with weak structural nonlinearity excited by wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keber, Marko; Wiercigroch, Marian

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of a weak structural nonlinearity on the dynamical behaviour of a vertical offshore riser subjected to vortex-induced vibration (VIV). Coupling of the riser dynamics with the flow of the surrounding fluid is achieved by attaching a wake oscillator to a reduced model of the structure, which is obtained through the application of the invariant manifold technique for the derivation of nonlinear normal modes. By comparing the free responses of the linear and the nonlinear structure, it was found that the structural nonlinearity has a stiffening effect on the oscillation of the riser, which becomes more pronounced when the internal flow is incorporated into the model. Consequently, in the coupled system, the response is considerably modified for the structure as well as for the fluid variable.

  13. VERTICAL STRUCTURE AND CORONAL POWER OF ACCRETION DISKS POWERED BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL-INSTABILITY TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we consider two outstanding intertwined problems in modern high-energy astrophysics: (1) the vertical-thermal structure of an optically thick accretion disk heated by the dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and (2) determining the fraction of the accretion power released in the corona above the disk. For simplicity, we consider a gas-pressure-dominated disk and assume a constant opacity. We argue that the local turbulent dissipation rate due to the disruption of the MRI channel flows by secondary parasitic instabilities should be uniform across most of the disk, almost up to the disk photosphere. We then obtain a self-consistent analytical solution for the vertical thermal structure of the disk, governed by the balance between the heating by MRI turbulence and the cooling by radiative diffusion. Next, we argue that the coronal power fraction is determined by the competition between the Parker instability, viewed as a parasitic instability feeding off of MRI channel flows, and other parasitic instabilities. We show that the Parker instability inevitably becomes important near the disk surface, leading to a certain lower limit on the coronal power. While most of the analysis in this paper focuses on the case of a disk threaded by an externally imposed vertical magnetic field, we also discuss the zero net flux case, in which the magnetic field is produced by the MRI dynamo itself, and show that most of our arguments and conclusions should be valid in this case as well.

  14. The vertical structure of shadow-zone arrivals at long range in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Van Uffelen, Lora J; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Rudnick, Daniel L

    2009-06-01

    Multimegameter-range acoustic data obtained by bottom-mounted receivers show significant acoustic energy penetrating several hundred meters into geometric shadow zones below cusps (caustics) of timefronts computed using climatological databases [B. D. Dushaw et al., IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 24, 202-214 (1999)]. This penetration is much larger than predicted by diffraction theory. Because these receivers are horizontal arrays, they do not provide information on the vertical structure of the shadow-zone arrivals. Acoustic data from two vertical line array receivers deployed in close proximity in the North Pacific Ocean, together virtually spanning the water column, show the vertical structure of the shadow-zone arrivals for transmissions from broadband 250-Hz sources moored at the sound-channel axis (750 m) and slightly above the surface conjugate depth (3000 m) at ranges of 500 and 1000 km. Comparisons to parabolic equation simulations for sound-speed fields that do not include significant internal-wave variability show that early branches of the measured timefronts consistently penetrate as much as 500-800 m deeper into the water column than predicted. Subsequent parabolic equation simulations incorporating sound-speed fluctuations consistent with the Garrett-Munk internal-wave spectrum at full strength accurately predict the observed energy level to within 3-4-dB rms over the depth range of the shadow-zone arrivals. PMID:19507939

  15. Vertical Structure and Coronal Power of Accretion Disks Powered by Magnetorotational-instability Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we consider two outstanding intertwined problems in modern high-energy astrophysics: (1) the vertical-thermal structure of an optically thick accretion disk heated by the dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and (2) determining the fraction of the accretion power released in the corona above the disk. For simplicity, we consider a gas-pressure-dominated disk and assume a constant opacity. We argue that the local turbulent dissipation rate due to the disruption of the MRI channel flows by secondary parasitic instabilities should be uniform across most of the disk, almost up to the disk photosphere. We then obtain a self-consistent analytical solution for the vertical thermal structure of the disk, governed by the balance between the heating by MRI turbulence and the cooling by radiative diffusion. Next, we argue that the coronal power fraction is determined by the competition between the Parker instability, viewed as a parasitic instability feeding off of MRI channel flows, and other parasitic instabilities. We show that the Parker instability inevitably becomes important near the disk surface, leading to a certain lower limit on the coronal power. While most of the analysis in this paper focuses on the case of a disk threaded by an externally imposed vertical magnetic field, we also discuss the zero net flux case, in which the magnetic field is produced by the MRI dynamo itself, and show that most of our arguments and conclusions should be valid in this case as well.

  16. The impact of volcanic aerosol on the Northern Hemisphere stratospheric polar vortex: mechanisms and sensitivity to forcing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, M.; Krüger, K.; Bittner, M.; Timmreck, C.; Schmidt, H.

    2014-06-01

    the polar vortex responses to past eruptions, or predicting the response to future eruptions, depends on accurate representation of the space-time structure of the volcanic aerosol forcing.

  17. High-power narrow-vertical-divergence photonic band crystal laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Yejin; Zheng, Wanhua; Wang, Yufei; Qi, Aiyi

    2014-12-08

    900 nm longitudinal photonic band crystal (PBC) laser diodes with optimized epitaxial structure are fabricated. With a same calculated fundamental-mode divergence, stronger mode discrimination is achieved by a quasi-periodic index modulation in the PBC waveguide than a periodic one. Experiments show that the introduction of over 5.5 μm-thick PBC waveguide contributes to only 10% increment of the internal loss for the laser diodes. For broad area PBC lasers, output powers of 5.75 W under continuous wave test and over 10 W under quasi-continuous wave test are reported. The vertical divergence angles are 10.5° at full width at half maximum and 21.3° with 95% power content, in conformity with the simulated angles. Such device shows a prospect for high-power narrow-vertical-divergence laser emission from single diode laser and laser bar.

  18. Formulation of human-structure interaction system models for vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprani, Colin C.; Ahmadi, Ehsan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, human-structure interaction system models for vibration in the vertical direction are considered. This work assembles various moving load models from the literature and proposes extension of the single pedestrian to a crowd of pedestrians for the FE formulation for crowd-structure interaction systems. The walking pedestrian vertical force is represented as a general time-dependent force, and the pedestrian is in turn modelled as moving force, moving mass, and moving spring-mass-damper. The arbitrary beam structure is modelled using either a formulation in modal coordinates or finite elements. In each case, the human-structure interaction (HSI) system is first formulated for a single walking pedestrian and then extended to consider a crowd of pedestrians. Finally, example applications for single pedestrian and crowd loading scenarios are examined. It is shown how the models can be used to quantify the interaction between the crowd and bridge structure. This work should find use for the evaluation of existing and new footbridges.

  19. Dynamic Characteristics of Vertically Coupled Structures and the Design of a Decoupled Micro Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bumkyoo; Lee, Seung-Yop; Kim, Taekhyun; Baek, Seog Soon

    2008-01-01

    In a vertical type, vibratory gyroscope, the coupled motion between reference (driving) and sensing vibrations causes the zero-point output, which is the unwanted sensing vibration without angular velocity. This structural coupling leads to an inherent discrepancy between the natural frequencies of the reference and the sensing oscillations, causing curve veering in frequency loci. The coupled motion deteriorates sensing performance and dynamic stability. In this paper, the dynamic characteristics associated with the coupling phenomenon are theoretically analyzed. The effects of reference frequency and coupling factor on the rotational direction and amplitude of elliptic oscillation are determined. Based on the analytical studies on the coupling effects, we propose and fabricate a vertically decoupled vibratory gyroscope with the frequency matching.

  20. Forced vibration analysis of rotating structures with application to vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobitz, D. W.

    Predictive methods for the dynamic analysis of wind turbine systems are important for assessing overall structural integrity and fatigue life. For the former, the identification of resonance points (spectral analysis) is of primary concern. For the latter forced vibration analysis is necessary. These analyses are complicated by the fact that, for a spinning turbine, the stress-producing deformations take place in both fixed and rotating reference systems simultaneously. As an example, the tower of a horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) must be analyzed in a fixed frame, and the rotor in a rotating one. Forced vibration analysis is further complicated in that accurate models need to be developed for aeroload prediction. Methods which are available for forced vibration analysis of both horizontal and vertical axis machines are identified and the method which was developed for vertical axis wind turbines is emphasized, with some comparisons of the predictions to experimental data.

  1. Vertical structure and variation of currents observed in autumn in the Korea Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Choi, Byoung-Ju

    2015-06-01

    To observe vertical structure and temporal variations of currents in the Tsushima Warm Current region of the Korea Strait, a moored buoy system was deployed in autumn 2009. The moored buoy system measured vertical profiles of current, temperature, and salinity for 24 days and a background hydrographic survey was performed. Along-strait northeastward currents were dominant in the upper layer (8-35 m). The mean current veers counterclockwise from 48 m to 74 m as much as 50°, and its speed is reduced with depth. There were distinct northward onshore currents near the bottom (65-80 m). It was demonstrated that thermal wind relation holds in the inclined pycnocline layer, which generates the counterclockwise veering current structure. Density gradient along the strait is a main factor producing the cross-strait onshore current component below the upper-layer and the cross-strait density gradient reduces the along-strait current component with depth. Previous studies have never focused on the effect of the along-strait density structure on current structure. The first Empirical Orthogonal Function mode (CM1) of current variability explains 70% of local current variations and its vertical structure is close to the mean current structure. The correlation analysis among variations of CM1 current, slope of sea level anomaly (SSLA) and local wind anomaly revealed that the variation of CM1 current is mainly related to the variation of SSLA across the strait (c-SSLA), which is known to be controlled by remote and local wind forcing. Similarity between vertical structures of mean and CM1 current suggests that thermal wind relation is the main dynamics maintaining the counterclockwise turning of CM1 current below the upper layer although the upperlayer CM1 current is controlled by c-SSLA through barotropic geostrophic relation. Time series of temperature and salinity indicate that the thermohaline front between Korean Coastal Water and Tsushima Warm Current Water meanders in

  2. Study of the Tropospheric Aerosol Structure Under Changing of the Air Mass Type from Lidar Observations in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilova, S. V.; Balin, Yu. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Penner, I. É.

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol optical characteristics in the main tropospheric layers are investigated based on joint interpretation of data of multi-frequency lidar sensing (110 sessions) and results of modeling of back air mass trajectories. Methodical problems for separating layers with different scattering properties and estimating their vertical boundaries are considered. Three optical criteria are simultaneously used to distinguish aerosol layers from cloud formations, including the gradient of the backscattering coefficient, optical depth, and the depolarization ratio. High values of the lidar ratio (66 sr) and of the Angstrom exponent (1.62) in the shortwavelength spectral range are observed in the boundary layer for Arctic transport. At the same time, low values of these optical parameters are characteristic for Asian transport: the lidar ratio is 54 sr and the Angstrom exponent is 1.1, which is explained by different relative contributions of the coarse and fine aerosol fractions to the air mass.

  3. Spatially resolved methane band photometry of Jupiter. III - Cloud vertical structures for several axisymmetric bands and the Great Red Spot

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.A.; Tomasko, M.G.

    1980-02-01

    The paper presents cloud structure models for Jupiter's Great Red Spot, Equatorial and North Tropical Zones, North and South Temperate Zones, and North and South Polar Regions. The models are based on images of Jupiter in three methane bands and nearby continuum radiative transfer calculations include multiple scattering and absorption from three aerosol layers. The model results include the transition in the upper-cloud altitude to 3 km lower altitude from the tropical zones to temperate zones and polar regions, a N/S asymmetry in cloud thickness in the tropical and temperature zones, and the presence of aerosols up to about 0.3 bar in the Great Red Spot and Equatorial Zone. It is concluded that polarization data are sensitive to aerosols in and above the upper cloud layer but insensitive to deeper cloud structure.

  4. Spatially resolved methane band photometry of Jupiter. III - Cloud vertical structures for several axisymmetric bands and the Great Red Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents cloud structure models for Jupiter's Great Red Spot, Equatorial and North Tropical Zones, North and South Temperate Zones, and North and South Polar Regions. The models are based on images of Jupiter in three methane bands and nearby continuum; radiative transfer calculations include multiple scattering and absorption from three aerosol layers. The model results include the transition in the upper-cloud altitude to 3 km lower altitude from the tropical zones to temperate zones and polar regions, a N/S asymmetry in cloud thickness in the tropical and temperature zones, and the presence of aerosols up to about 0.3 bar in the Great Red Spot and Equatorial Zone. It is concluded that polarization data are sensitive to aerosols in and above the upper cloud layer but insensitive to deeper cloud structure.

  5. Vertical Moist Thermodynamic Structure and Spatial-Temporal Evolution of the MJO in AIRS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Baijun; Waliser, Duane E.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Yung, Yuk L.; Wang, Bin

    2006-01-01

    The atmospheric moisture and temperature profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit on the NASA Aqua mission, in combination with the precipitation from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), are employed to study the vertical moist thermodynamic structure and spatial-temporal evolution of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). The AIRS data indicate that, in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, the temperature anomaly exhibits a trimodal vertical structure: a warm (cold) anomaly in the free troposphere (800-250 hPa) and a cold (warm) anomaly near the tropopause (above 250 hPa) and in the lower troposphere (below 800 hPa) associated with enhanced (suppressed) convection. The AIRS moisture anomaly also shows markedly different vertical structures as a function of longitude and the strength of convection anomaly. Most significantly, the AIRS data demonstrate that, over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, the enhanced (suppressed) convection is generally preceded in both time and space by a low-level warm and moist (cold and dry) anomaly and followed by a low-level cold and dry (warm and moist) anomaly. The MJO vertical moist thermodynamic structure from the AIRS data is in general agreement, particularly in the free troposphere, with previous studies based on global reanalysis and limited radiosonde data. However, major differences in the lower-troposphere moisture and temperature structure between the AIRS observations and the NCEP reanalysis are found over the Indian and Pacific Oceans, where there are very few conventional data to constrain the reanalysis. Specifically, the anomalous lower-troposphere temperature structure is much less well defined in NCEP than in AIRS for the western Pacific, and even has the opposite sign anomalies compared to AIRS relative to the wet/dry phase of the MJO in the Indian Ocean. Moreover, there are well-defined eastward-tilting variations of moisture with height in AIRS over the

  6. Structural-dynamic-response characteristics of Darrieus vertical-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    Operational experience at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) has indicated that a variety of dynamic issues can affect structural performance of the system. The observation and analysis of structural dynamic responses in the VAWT have been divided among three major aspects of the system; namely rotor vibrations, torsional response of the drive train, and transverse vibrations of the cables. This division is not arbitrary, but is rather because the response of these subsystems can be accurately decoupled from each other in most circumstances. This paper will present only a brief summary of the efforts now underway at SNL in the area of structural dynamics. The emphasis will be on discussing the status of our analytical tools, the quantity and quality of existing experimental confirmation data, and the implications structural dynamic issues have on rotor design.

  7. The Effect of Crystal Structure on the Morphology of Marine Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucci, A.; Kanters, R. M.; Veghte, D. P.; Freedman, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Particle morphology impacts atmospheric processes and climate through its consequences for aerosol radiative properties, ice nucleation, and heterogeneous chemistry. To investigate the morphology of laboratory proxies for marine aerosol particles, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were used to study dry particles composed of mixtures of sodium chloride, sodium bromine, and sodium iodide. Our SAED patterns show that NaCl is a single crystal, while NaBr and NaI are polycrystalline. In particles composed of internal mixtures of sodium chloride and sodium bromide, we observe that particles form partially engulfed structures in which both components are single crystals. In contrast, particles composed of sodium chloride and sodium iodide form core-shell structures in which the sodium chloride component is a single crystal and the sodium iodide is polycrystalline. Our results suggest that the morphology and crystallinity of internally mixed particles are determined by the difference in lattice spacing of the two components. We have also extended our studies to investigate other species of marine and continental relevance. In addition, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as a proxy for natural surfactants found in the ocean and significantly disrupted the particle morphology. Through these investigations of particle morphology, better physical and chemical parameters for aerosols can be developed, which will allow us to more accurately predict future changes to the climate.

  8. The Structural Changes of Tropical Cyclones Upon Interaction with Vertical Wind Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Elizabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    The Fourth Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4) provided a unique opportunity to observe the distributions and document the roles of important atmospheric factors that impact the development of the core asymmetries and core structural changes of tropical cyclones embedded in vertical wind shear. The state-of-the-art instruments flown on the NASA DC-8 and ER-2, in addition to those on the NOAA aircraft, provided a unique set of observations that documented the core structure throughout the depth of the tropical cyclone. These data have been used to conduct a combined observational and modeling study using a state-of-the-art, high- resolution mesoscale model to examine the role of the environmental vertical wind shear in producing tropical cyclone core asymmetries, and the effects on the structure and intensity of tropical cyclones.The scientific objectives of this study were to obtain in situ measurements that would allow documentation of the physical mechanisms that influence the development of the asymmetric convection and its effect on the core structure of the tropical cyclone.

  9. Analysis of the Molecules Structure and Vertical Electron Affinity of Organic Gas Impact on Electric Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Juntao; Xiao, Dengming; Zhao, Xiaoling; Deng, Yunkun

    2016-05-01

    It is necessary to find an efficient selection method to pre-analyze the gas electric strength from the perspective of molecule structure and the properties for finding the alternative gases to sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). As the properties of gas are determined by the gas molecule structure, the research on the relationship between the gas molecule structure and the electric strength can contribute to the gas pre-screening and new gas development. In this paper, we calculated the vertical electron affinity, molecule orbits distribution and orbits energy of gas molecules by the means of density functional theory (DFT) for the typical structures of organic gases and compared their electric strengths. By this method, we find part of the key properties of the molecule which are related to the electric strength, including the vertical electron affinity, the lowest unoccupied molecule orbit (LUMO) energy, molecule orbits distribution and negative-ion system energy. We also listed some molecule groups such as unsaturated carbons double bonds (C=C) and carbonitrile bonds (C≡N) which have high electric strength theoretically by this method. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51177101 and 51337006)

  10. The vertical structure of the Saharan boundary layer: Observations and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carreras, L.; Parker, D. J.; Marsham, J. H.; Rosenberg, P.; Marenco, F.; Mcquaid, J.

    2012-04-01

    The vertical structure of the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL) is investigated with the use of aircraft data from the Fennec observational campaign, and high-resolution large-eddy model (LEM) simulations. The SABL is one of the deepest on Earth, and crucial in controlling the vertical redistribution and long-range transport of dust in the Sahara. The SABL is typically made up of an actively growing convective region driven by high sensible heating at the surface, with a deep, near-neutrally stratified Saharan residual layer (SRL) above it, which is mostly well mixed in humidity and temperature and reaches a height of ~500hPa. These two layers are usually separated by a weak (≤1K) temperature inversion, making the vertical structure very sensitive to the surface fluxes. Large-eddy model (LEM) simulations initialized with radiosonde data from Bordj Bardji Mokhtar (BBM), southern Algeria, are used to improve our understanding of the turbulence structure of the stratification of the SABL, and any mixing or exchanges between the different layers. The model can reproduce the typical SABL structure from observations, and a tracer is used to illustrate the growth of the convective boundary layer into the residual layer above. The heat fluxes show a deep entrainment zone between the convective region and the SRL, potentially enhanced by the combination of a weak lid and a neutral layer above. The horizontal variability in the depth of the convective layer was also significant even with homogeneous surface fluxes. Aircraft observations from a number of flights are used to validate the model results, and to highlight the variability present in a more realistic setting, where conditions are rarely homogeneous in space. Stacked legs were performed to get an estimate of the mean flux profile of the boundary layer, as well as the variations in the vertical structure of the SABL with heterogeneous atmospheric and surface conditions. Regular radiosondes from BBM put

  11. Horizontal-vertical structure in the visual comparison of rigidly transformed patterns.

    PubMed

    Kahn, J I; Foster, D H

    1986-11-01

    Visual recognition of patterns reflected or rotated through 180 degrees (point-inverted) depends critically on their positional symmetry and separation in the field. A possible explanatory scheme suggested a description of internal pattern representation structures and simple internal operations that naturally involved a horizontal-vertical reference system. Predictions of the scheme were tested here in three experiments. Subjects made same-different judgments on pairs of random-dot patterns briefly presented in various arrangements and related by reflection, point-inversion, or identity transformation, or paired at random. Experiment 1 tested reflected patterns and verified the importance of orientation of the reflection axis relative to display-configuration axis. Experiment 2 demonstrated an oblique effect of configuration on performance with reflected patterns, but not with identical or point-inverted patterns. Experiment 3 demonstrated a vertical shift effect of configuration on performance with point-inverted patterns, but not with identical or reflected patterns. We concluded that in same-different pattern comparisons, a horizontal-vertical reference system appears fundamental in determining the nature of and operations upon internal pattern representations. PMID:2946799

  12. Seasonal variation of aerosol vertical distributions in the middle and lower troposphere in Beijing and surrounding area during haze periods based on CALIPSO observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Ma, Xiaojun; Jin, Hongchun; Chen, Yonghang; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Hua; Cai, Changjie; Wang, Yuhui; Li, Hao

    2014-11-01

    The data from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite was used to analyze the aerosol micro-physical properties over Beijing and surrounding area during haze periods from 2007 to 2008 in this paper. The results showed as follows. The values of TABC (total attenuated backscatter coefficient) for aerosols accounted for about 25% with varying altitudes. The aerosol scattering ability little changed from 0-4 km, showing that the aerosol layer evenly distribute. At different altitude ranges (0-1, 1-2, 2-3 and 3-4 km above ground level), values of TABC almost concentrate in the range of 2.5×10-3 -4.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1. In spring, summer and winter, aerosol scattering has the similar variation, with the maximum of TABC ranging from 3.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1 to 4.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1, while the maximum of TABC in autumn is from 1.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1 to 2.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1. Aerosol shape and size are characterized by VDR (volume depolarization ratio) and TACR (total attenuated color ratio). Aerosols with VDR greater than 10% were more than the ones with VDR less than 10% at the same altitude range. Notably, aerosols with smaller VDR (0-10%) appeared more frequently in autumn than those in the other three seasons. For each altitude range, aerosols with TACR ranging from 0-0.2 contributed much more than those with TACR ranging from 1.8-2.0. The size of aerosols in summer was the largest and that in autumn was the smallest in middle and lower troposphere.

  13. Joule heating of the ITER TF cold structure: Effects of vertical control coil currents and ELMS

    SciTech Connect

    Radovinsky, A.; Pillsbury, R.D. Jr.

    1993-11-09

    The toroidal field coil and support structures for ITER are maintained at cryogenic temperatures. The time-varying currents in the poloidal field coil system will induce eddy currents in these structures. The associated Joule dissipation will cause local heating and require heat removal which will show up as a load on the cryogenic system. Studies of Joule heating of the ITER TF cold structure (TFCS) due to the currents in the poloidal field coil system are presented. The two regimes considered in this study are the plasma vertical stability control and the Edge Loss Mode (ELM) events. The 3-D, thin-shell, eddy current program, EDDYCUFF was used to analyze the eddy currents and Joule losses in the cold structure. The current versus time scenarios were defined. Four control coil options were studied. All schemes use coils external to the TF cold structure. Analyses of power depositions during the plasma vertical stability control were performed for each of the four options. For each of these options three different recovery times were assumed. The times were 3, 1, and 1/3 seconds. Sets of four sequential ELMs, as well as isolated ELMs have been studied for various sets of active PF coils. The results showed that the lowest average power dissipation in the TF cold structure occurs when a subset of PF2 and PF7 are active, and all the other PF coils are passive. The general conclusion is that to minimize power dissipation in the TF cold structure it is preferable that only coils PF2 and PF7 are active. The other coils (PF3-PF6) should be passive and driven by a condition of constant flux. It is recommended in particular, that coils PF3 and PF5 be allowed to change currents to conserve flux, since they provide the maximum shielding of the TFCS from the fields caused by the active coils.

  14. Vertical structure of radar reflectivity in deep intense convective clouds over the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Shailendra; Bhat, G. S.

    2015-04-01

    This study is based on 10 years of radar reflectivity factor (Z) data derived from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) measurements. We define two types of convective cells, namely, cumulonimbus towers (CbTs) and intense convective clouds (ICCs), essentially following the methodology used in deriving the vertical profiles of radar reflectivity (VPRR). CbT contains Z≥ 20 dBZ at 12 km height with its base height below 3 km. ICCs belong to the top 5% reflectivity population at 3 km and 8 km altitude. Regional differences in the vertical structure of convective cells have been explored for two periods, namely, JJAS (June, July, August and September) and JFM (January, February and March) months. Frequency of occurrences of CbTs and ICCs depend on the region. Africa and Latin America are the most productive regions for the CbTs while the foothills of Western Himalaya contain the most intense profiles. Among the oceanic areas, the Bay of Bengal has the strongest vertical profile, whereas Atlantic Ocean has the weakest profile during JJAS. During JFM months, maritime continent has the strongest vertical profile whereas western equatorial Indian Ocean has the weakest. Monsoon clouds lie between the continental and oceanic cases. The maximum heights of 30 and 40 dBZ reflectivities (denoted by MH30 and MH40, respectively) are also studied. MH40 shows a single mode and peaks around 5.5 km during both JJAS and JFM months. MH30 shows two modes, around 5 km and between 8 km and 10 km, respectively. It is also shown that certain conclusions such as the area/region with the most intense convective cells, depend of the reference height used in defining a convective cell.

  15. Method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological structures from a vertical bore

    DOEpatents

    Summers, David A.; Barker, Clark R.; Keith, H. Dean

    1982-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological strata from a vertical position. The geological structures intended to be penetrated in this fashion are coal seams, as for in situ gasification or methane drainage, or in oil-bearing strata for increasing the flow rate from a pre-existing well. Other possible uses for this device might be for use in the leaching of uranium ore from underground deposits or for introducing horizontal channels for water and steam injections.

  16. The Vertical Structure of Nuclear Starburst Disks: Testing a Model of AGN Obscuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.; Gohil, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear starburst disks are Eddington-limited, radiation pressure supported disks that may be active in the nuclear environment of active galaxies (ULIRGS and AGNs). Earlier analytical models suggested that, under certain conditions, these disks may be geometrically thick on pc-scales, and thus could be a viable source for AGN obscuration, partcularly at z≤1, when gas factions in galaxies are still significant. Here, we present early results from numerical 2D models of nuclear starburst disks where the vertical structure is calculated explicitly from solving the hydrostatic balance and radiative transfer equations. We quantitatively assess under which conditions the starburst disk may present substantial obscuring columns for AGN observations.

  17. Quantifying forest vertical structure to determine bird habitat quality in the Greenbelt Corridor, Denton, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, Shiho

    This study presents the integration of light detection and range (LiDAR) and hyperspectral remote sensing to create a three-dimensional bird habitat map in the Greenbelt Corridor of the Elm Fork of the Trinity River. This map permits to examine the relationship between forest stand structure, landscape heterogeneity, and bird community composition. A biannual bird census was conducted at this site during the breeding seasons of 2009 and 2010. Census data combined with the three-dimensional map suggest that local breeding bird abundance, community structure, and spatial distribution patterns are highly influenced by vertical heterogeneity of vegetation surface. For local breeding birds, vertical heterogeneity of canopy surface within stands, connectivity to adjacent forest patches, largest forest patch index, and habitat (vegetation) types proved to be the most influential factors to determine bird community assemblages. Results also highlight the critical role of secondary forests to increase functional connectivity of forest patches. Overall, three-dimensional habitat descriptions derived from integrated LiDAR and hyperspectral data serve as a powerful bird conservation tool that shows how the distribution of bird species relates to forest composition and structure at various scales.

  18. Department of Energy (DOE) research program in structural analysis of vertical-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, W.N.

    1982-01-01

    The Darrieus-type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) presents a variety of unusual structural problems to designers. The level of understanding of these structural problems governs, to a large degree, the success or failure of today's rotor designs. A survey is presented of the technology available for rotor structural design with emphasis on the DOE research program now underway. Itemizations are included of the major strucural issues unique to the VAWT along with discussion of available analysis techniques for each problem area. It is concluded that tools are available to at least approximately address the most important problems. However, experimental data for confirmation is rather limited in terms of volume and the range of rotor configurations tested.

  19. Tropospheric Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical, Microphysical and Concentration Properties in the Frame of the Hygra-CD Campaign (Athens, Greece 2014): A Case Study of Long-Range Transport of Mixed Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannis, Alexandros; Argyrouli, Athina; Müller, Detlef; Tsaknakis, Georgios; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Kazadzis, Stelios; Solomos, Stavros; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2016-06-01

    Combined multi-wavelength aerosol Raman lidar and sun photometry measurements were performed during the HYGRA-CD campaign over Athens, Greece during May-June 2014. The retrieved aerosol optical properties (3 aerosol backscatter at 355-532-1064 nm and 2 aerosol extinction profiles at 355-532 nm) were used as input to an inversion code to retrieve the aerosol microphysical properties (effective radius reff and number concentration N) using regularization techniques. Additionally, the volume concentration profile was derived for fine particles using the LIRIC code. In this paper we selected a complex case study of long-range transport of mixed aerosols (biomass burning particles mixed with dust) arriving over Athens between 10-12 June 2014 in the 1.5-4 km height. Between 2-3 km height we measured mean lidar ratios (LR) ranging from 45 to 58 sr (at 355 and 532 nm), while the Ångström exponent (AE) aerosol extinction-related values (355nm/532nm) ranged between 0.8-1.3. The retrieved values of reff and N ranged from 0.19±0.07 to 0.22±0.07 μm and 460±230 to 2200±2800 cm-3, respectively. The aerosol linear depolarization ratio (δ) at 532 nm was lower than 5-7% (except for the Saharan dust cases, where δ~10-15%).

  20. A comprehensive NMR structural study of Titan aerosol analogs: Implications for Titan's atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    Titan has a thick atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane. Complex organic chemistry induced by solar ultraviolet radiation and energetic particles, takes place in Titan's upper atmosphere, producing an optically thick reddish brown carbon based haze encircling this moon. The chemistry in Titan's atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood in spite of a great many efforts being made. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of the 13C and 15N labeled, simulated Titan haze aerosols (tholin) by NMR and identified several dominant small molecules in the tholin. Here we report our expanded structural investigation of the bulk of the tholin by more comprehensive NMR study. The NMR results show that the tholin materials are dominated by heavily nitrogenated compounds, in which the macromolecular structures are highly branched polymeric or oligomeric compounds terminated in methyl, amine, and nitrile groups. The structural characteristic suggest that the tholin materials are formed via different copolymerization or incorporation mechanisms of small precursors, such as HCN, CH2dbnd NH, NH3 and C2H2. This study helps to understand the formation process of nitrogenated organic aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and their prebiotic implications.

  1. A mesoscale gravity-wave event observed during CCOPE. IV - Stability analysis and Doppler-derived wave vertical structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E.; Einaudi, F.; Dorian, Paul B.; Lang, Stephen; Heymsfield, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of the results of a detailed study of the vertical structure of mesoscale gravity waves conducted during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) is presented. Pressure perturbation fields derived from the Doppler wind fields are compared with the vertical structure of eigenfunctions resulting from a solution to the Taylor-Goldstein linear wave equation for an atmosphere whose mean state is described by vertical profiles obtained from a representative CCOPE sounding. An analysis of the potential for shear instability is also performed on all of the soundings taken on this day to assess the representativeness of the one chosen for the linear theoretical analysis.

  2. Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

    2012-07-19

    The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

  3. Vertical Profiles of Light Scattering, Light Absorption, and Single Scattering Albedo during the Dry, Biomass Burning Season in Southern Africa and Comparisons of In Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, Brian I.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Schmid, Beat; Redermann, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol light scattering, light absorption, and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0)) are presented for a number of locations in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season. Features of the profiles include haze layers, clean air slots, and marked decreases in light scattering in passing from the boundary layer into the free troposphere. Frequency distributions of omega (sub 0) reflect the strong influence of smoke from biomass burning. For example, during a period when heavy smoke was advected into the region from the north, the mean value of omega (sub 0) in the boundary layer was 0.81 +/- 0.02 compared to 0.89 +/- 0.03 prior to this intrusion. Comparisons of layer aerosol optical depths derived from the in situ measurements with those measured by a Sun photometer aboard the aircraft show excellent agreement.

  4. Structure and photoluminescence properties of carbon nanotip-vertical graphene nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. B.; Zhu, K.; Ostrikov, K.; Shao, R. W.; Zheng, K.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the effective enhancement and tuning of photoluminescence (PL) by combining vertical graphene nanoflakes (VGs) and carbon nanotips (CNTPs). The VGs are grown on the vertical CNTPs by hot filament chemical vapor deposition in the methane environment, where the CNTPs are synthesized on silicon substrates by CH4-H2-N2 plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The results of field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate that the VGs can be grown on the CNTP and silicon substrate surfaces with the orientation perpendicular to the surfaces of CNTPs and silicon substrates. The PL properties of VG, CNTP, and CNTP-VG structures are studied using a 325 nm line of He-Cd laser as the excitation source. The PL results indicate that the PL of VGs is enhanced by the CNTPs due to the increasing density of PL emitters, while the PL properties of the nanohybrid system can be tuned. Furthermore, the potential applications of CNTP-VG structures in optoelectronic devices are analyzed. These results contribute to the design of functional graphene-based materials and the development of next-generation optoelectronic devices.

  5. A numerical investigation of the wake structure of vertical axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaras, Elias; Posa, Antonio; Leftwich, Megan

    2014-11-01

    Recent field-testing has shown that vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) in wind farm configurations have the potential to reach higher power densities, when compared to the more widespread horizontal axis turbines. A critical component in achieving this goal is a good understanding of the wake structure and how it is influenced by operating conditions. In the present study the Large-Eddy Simulation technique is adopted to characterize the wake of a small vertical axis wind turbine and to explore its dependence on the value of its Tip Speed Ratio (TSR). It will be shown that its wake significantly differs from that of a spinning cylinder, often adopted to model this typology of machines: the displacement of the momentum deficit towards the windward side follows the same behavior, but turbulence is higher on the leeward side. An initial increase of the momentum deficit is observed moving downstream, with central peaks in the core of the near wake for both momentum and turbulent kinetic energy, especially at lower TSRs. No back-flow is produced downstream of the turbine. The interaction between blades is stronger at higher values of the TSR, while the production of coherent structures is enhanced at lower TSRs, with large rollers populating the leeward side of the wake.

  6. Vertical structure of ionization irregularities observed by HF vertical sounding in the lower E region in the presence of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Elisabeth

    1987-06-01

    An acoustic wave produced by a strong explosion at ground level induces in the lower E region partial reflections of the electromagnetic pulses transmitted by a vertical HF sounder at a few kilometers from the source point. Such reflections materialize the vertical path of the acoustic wave during about 40 km below the maximum of the E layer. They give continuous informations on the ionized medium with an altitude resolution determined by the speed of the acoustic wave and the repetition frequency of the sounding pulses of around 12 m. Their amplitude is of the order of 30 dB below the amplitude of the total reflected echoes but during short time range of the order of 0.2-1 s strong amplitude enhancements suggest an irregular small scale structure superimposed on the decreasing gradient of the lower E layer. The vertical scale of these irregularities varies from 150 to 500 m. Their structure and their relation with the studied acoustic wave are discussed.

  7. Microphysical, chemical and optical aerosol properties in the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikas, Ülle; Reinart, Aivo; Pugatshova, Anna; Tamm, Eduard; Ulevicius, Vidmantas

    2008-11-01

    The microphysical structure, chemical composition and prehistory of aerosol are related to the aerosol optical properties and radiative effect in the UV spectral range. The aim of this work is the statistical mapping of typical aerosol scenarios and adjustment of regional aerosol parameters. The investigation is based on the in situ measurements in Preila (55.55° N, 21.00° E), Lithuania, and the AERONET data from the Gustav Dalen Tower (58 N, 17 E), Sweden. Clustering of multiple characteristics enabled to distinguish three aerosol types for clear-sky periods: 1) clean maritime-continental aerosol; 2) moderately polluted maritime-continental aerosol; 3) polluted continental aerosol. Differences between these types are due to significant differences in aerosol number and volume concentration, effective radius of volume distribution, content of SO 4- ions and Black Carbon, as well as different vertical profiles of atmospheric relative humidity. The UV extinction, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the Ångstrom coefficient α increased with the increasing pollution. The value α = 1.96 was observed in the polluted continental aerosol that has passed over central and eastern Europe and southern Russia. Reduction of the clear-sky UV index against the aerosol-free atmosphere was of 4.5%, 27% and 41% for the aerosol types 1, 2 and 3, respectively.

  8. Aeroelastic effects in the structural dynamic analysis of vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Aeroelastic effects impact the structural dynamic behavior of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) in two major ways. First the stability phenomena of flutter and divergence are direct results of the aeroelasticity of the structure. Secondly, aerodynamic damping can be important for predicting response levels particularly near resonance but also for off resonance conditions. The inclusion of the aeroelasticity is carried out by modifying the damping and stiffness matrices in the NASTRAN finite element code. Through the use of a specially designed preprocessor which reads the usual NASTRAN input deck and adds appropriate cards to it the incorporation of the aeroelastic effects has been made relatively transparent to the user NASTRAN flutter predictions are validated using field measurements and the effect of aerodynamic damping is demonstrated through an application to the Test Bed VAWT being designed at Sandia.

  9. Structural design of the Sandia 34-M Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, as the lead DOE laboratory for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) development, is currently designing a 34-meter diameter Darrieus-type VAWT. This turbine will be a research test bed which provides a focus for advancing technology and validating design and fabrication techniques in a size range suitable for utility use. Structural data from this machine will allow structural modeling to be refined and verified for a turbine on which the gravity effects and stochastic wind loading are significant. Performance data from it will allow aerodynamic modeling to be refined and verified. The design effort incorporates Sandia's state-of-the-art analysis tools in the design of a complete machine. This paper describes the analytic tools we are using, summarizes the conceptual design procedure and presents portions of our detailed design as it exists in September 1984.

  10. Aeroelastic effects in the structural dynamic analysis of vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1986-04-01

    Aeroelastic effects impact the structural dynamic behavior of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWRs) in two major ways. First, the stability phenomena of flutter and divergence are direct results of the aeroelasticity of the structure. Secondly, aerodynamic damping can be important for predicting response levels, particularly near resonance, but also for off-resonance conditions. The inclusion of the aeroelasticity is carried out by modifying the damping and stiffness matrices in the NASTRAN finite element code. Through the use of a specially designed preprocessor, which reads the usual NASTRAN input deck and adds appropriate cards to it, the incorporation of the aeroelastic effects has been made relatively transparent to the user. NASTRAN flutter predictions are validated using field measurements and the effect of aerodynamic damping is demonstrated through an application to the Test Bed VAWT being designed at Sandia.

  11. Advanced Fluid--Structure Interaction Techniques in Application to Horizontal and Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Artem

    During the last several decades engineers and scientists put significant effort into developing reliable and efficient wind turbines. As a wind power production demands grow, the wind energy research and development need to be enhanced with high-precision methods and tools. These include time-dependent, full-scale, complex-geometry advanced computational simulations at large-scale. Those, computational analysis of wind turbines, including fluid-structure interaction simulations (FSI) at full scale is important for accurate and reliable modeling, as well as blade failure prediction and design optimization. In current dissertation the FSI framework is applied to most challenging class of problems, such as large scale horizontal axis wind turbines and vertical axis wind turbines. The governing equations for aerodynamics and structural mechanics together with coupled formulation are explained in details. The simulations are performed for different wind turbine designs, operational conditions and validated against field-test and wind tunnel experimental data.

  12. Estimates of the Tropospheric Vertical Structure of Neptune Based on Microwave Radiative Transfer Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBoer, David R.; Steffes, Paul G.

    1996-01-01

    A radiative transfer model incorporating, among other things, the recently measured centimeter wavelength opacity of H2S, the full line catalog of PH3, and absorption due to CO has been developed to study the tropospheric vertical structure of Neptune. To match radio-telescope observations, subsolar amounts of NH3 and supersolar amounts of H2S are found to be needed, as has been previously noted. To match both the measured microwave emission and the measured opacity at 13 cm and 6.3 bars by Voyager 2, an H2S dominant atmosphere (H2S/NH3 approximately equals 40) with enhanced PH3 (15 x solar) or NH3 supersaturation with respect to the putative NH4SH cloud (400 ppbv) seems to be indicated. Due to the possible importance of PH3 opacity, it is suggested that measurements of its opacity could aid in resolving some of the outstanding ambiguities concerning Neptune's tropospheric structure.

  13. A model of diurnally forced vertical current structure near 30° latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Peter D.

    1989-11-01

    At 30° latitude, the inertial frequency is equal to the frequency of the diurnal tide, or diurnal winds such as a sea breeze. The extension of Ekman's (1905, Arkiv foer Matematik, Astronomi och Fysik, 2, 11) theory to incorporate oscillatory forcing indicates that at the latitude where the inertial and forcing frequencies are the same, the sense of rotation of the current profile with depth will change. The coastal-ocean model of BATTISTI and CLARKE (1982, Journal of Physical Oceanography, 12, 8-16) is extended to include cross-shore wind stress and a constant eddy viscosity model of vertical current structure. The model is used to demonstrate the latitude-dependence of the tidally and wind-forced current structure near 30° latitude. The results are best interpreted in a fixed reference frame, rather than the rotating f-plane.

  14. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-02-01

    Every year the monsoonal circulation over the Indian subcontinent gives rise to a variety of cloud types that differ considerably in their ability to heat or cool the atmosphere. These clouds in turn affect monsoon dynamics via their radiative impacts, both at the surface and in the atmosphere. New generation of satellites carrying active radar and lidar sensors are allowing realistic quantification of cloud radiative heating (CRH) by resolving the vertical structure of the atmosphere in an unprecedented detail. Obtaining this information is a first step in closing the knowledge gap in our understanding of the role that different clouds play as regulators of the monsoon and vice versa. Here, we use collocated CloudSat-CALIPSO data sets to understand following aspects of cloud-radiation interactions associated with Indian monsoon circulation. (1) How does the vertical distribution of CRH evolve over the Indian continent throughout monsoon season? (2) What is the absolute contribution of different clouds types to the total CRH? (3) How do active and break periods of monsoon affect the distribution of CRH? And finally, (4) what are the net radiative effects of different cloud types on surface heating? In general, the vertical structure of CRH follows the northward migration and the retreat of monsoon from May to October. It is found that the alto- and nimbostratus clouds intensely warm the middle troposphere and equally strongly cool the upper troposphere. Their warming/cooling consistently exceeds ±0.2 K day-1 (after weighing by vertical cloud fraction) in monthly mean composites throughout the middle and upper troposphere respectively, with largest impact observed in June, July and August. Deep convective towers cause considerable warming in the middle and upper troposphere, but strongly cool the base and inside of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Such cooling is stronger during active (-1.23 K day-1) monsoon conditions compared to break periods (-0.36 K day-1

  15. Vertical structure of Jupiter's troposphere from nonlinear simulations of long-lived vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarreta, Jon; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín

    2008-07-01

    Numerical simulations of jovian vortices at tropical and temperate latitudes, under different atmospheric conditions, have been performed using the EPIC code [Dowling, T.E., Fisher, A.S., Gierasch, P.J., Harrington, J., LeBeau, R.P., Santori, C.M., 1998. Icarus 132, 221-238] to simulate the high-resolution observations of motions and of the lifetimes presented in a previous work [Legarreta, J., Sánchez-Lavega, A., 2005. Icarus 174, 178-191] and infer the vertical structure of Jupiter's troposphere. We first find that in order to reproduce the longevity and drift rate of the vortices, the Brunt-Väisälä frequency of the atmosphere in the upper troposphere (pressures P˜1 to 7 bar) should have a lower limit value of 5×10 s, increasing upward up to 1.25×10 s at pressures P˜0.5 bar (latitudes between 15° and 45° in both hemispheres). Second, the vortices drift also depend on the vertical structure of the zonal wind speed in the same range of altitudes. Simulations of the slowly drifting Southern hemisphere vortices (GRS, White Ovals and anticyclones at 40° S) require a vertically-constant zonal-wind with depth, but Northern hemisphere vortices (cyclonic "barges" and anticyclones at 19, 41 and 45° N) require decreasing winds at a rate of ˜5 m s -1 per scale height. However vortices drifting at a high speed, close to or in the peak of East or West jets and in both hemispheres, require the wind speed slightly increasing with depth, as is the case for the anticyclones at 20° S and at 34° N. We deduce that the maximum absolute vertical shear of the zonal wind from P˜1 bar up to P˜7 bar in these jets is ˜15 m s -1 per scale height. Intense vortices with tangential velocity at their periphery ˜100 m s -1 tend to decay asymptotically to velocities ˜40 to 60 m s -1 with a characteristic time that depends on the vortex intensity and static stability of the atmosphere. The vortices adjust their tangential velocity to the averaged peak to peak velocity of the

  16. Sensitivity of top-down CO source estimates to the modeled vertical structure in atmospheric CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Jones, D. B. A.; Worden, H. M.; Henze, D. K.

    2015-02-01

    We assessed the sensitivity of regional CO source estimates to the modeled vertical CO distribution by assimilating multi-spectral MOPITT (Measurements of Pollution In The Troposphere) V5J CO retrievals with the GEOS-Chem model. We compared the source estimates obtained by assimilating the CO profiles and the surface layer retrievals from June 2004 to May 2005. Because the surface layer retrievals are less sensitive to CO in the free troposphere, it is expected that they should provide constraints in the CO source estimates that are less sensitive to the vertical structure of CO in the free troposphere. The inferred source estimates all suggest a reduction in CO emissions in the tropics and subtropics, and an increase in the extratropics over the a priori estimates. The tropical decreases were particularly pronounced for regions where the biogenic source of CO was dominant, suggesting an overestimate of the a priori isoprene source of CO in the model. We found that the differences between the regional source estimates inferred from the profile and surface layer retrievals for 2004-2005 were small, generally less than 10% for the main continental regions, except for estimates for southern Asia, North America, and Europe. Because of discrepancies in convective transport in the model, the CO source estimates for India and southeastern Asia inferred from the CO profiles were significantly higher than those estimated from the surface layer retrievals during June-August 2004. On the other hand, the profile inversion underestimated the CO emissions from North America and Europe compared to the assimilation of the surface layer retrievals. We showed that vertical transport of air from the North American and European boundary layers is slower than from other continental regions, and thus air in the free troposphere from North America and Europe in the model is more chemically aged, which could explain the discrepancy between the source estimates inferred from the profile

  17. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-01-01

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures have been widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures. PMID:26040539

  18. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-06-04

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures are widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures.

  19. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-06-04

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures are widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use ofmore » the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures.« less

  20. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-01-01

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures have been widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures. PMID:26040539

  1. The structural evolution of magnesium acetate complex in aerosols by FTIR-ATR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shu-Feng; Wu, Chang-Qin; Zhang, Qing-Nuan; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2015-05-01

    The structural evolution of magnesium acetate complex in aerosols with the relative humidity (RH) has been studied by ATR-FTIR technique. When the RH is higher than 66%, the ν4 band lies at 929 cm-1 meaning the free CH3COO- ions in Mg(CH3COO)2 droplets. At the 66% RH, ν4 band positioned at 939 cm-1, accompanying the ν8 band shift to 1554 cm-1, which indicats that the free CH3COO- ions are bounded to Mg2+ ions to form [Mg(H2O)5(CH3COO)]+ species. At the 57.7% RH, the ν8-COO band shifts to 1556 cm-1 accompanying the ν3 band at 1421 cm-1 and the appearance of shoulder at 1452 cm-1, which suggests the formation of chain-structure connected by the bridging bidentate of Mg2(CH3COO)4(H2O)2. In the region of 57.7-18.7% RH, the shoulder at 1452 cm-1 increases with the decrease in RH, showing the increase of Mg2(CH3COO)4(H2O)2. From the water-content, the water-transfer from and to the surface of the aerosols became limited, showing the aerosols enter the gel state. Below 18.7%RH, water-loss becomes rapid and the ν8 band performs blue-shift. At 3.8%RH, the ν8 band positioned at 1581 cm-1, showing the anhydrous Mg(CH3COO)2 solid, which can be reflected by the ν4 band at 947 cm-1. During the humidification process, the reverse structural evolution can be found.

  2. Photochemical aerosols on Titan and the giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R.

    2015-10-01

    Our ideas about the nature of photochemical aerosols on Titan and the giant planets is evolving thanks to new data coming in from the Cassini spacecraft, ground-based and space-based telescopes, and theory and modeling. Aerosol formation begins at altitudes around 1000 km on Titan and around 800 km above the 1-bar pressure level in the polar thermospheres of Jupiter and Saturn where auroral energy is available to form ions and radicals. We have evidence that hydrocarbon chemistry is important in aerosol formation for all of these bodies and we believe that hydrazine on Jupiter and phosphine on Saturn may lead to aerosol production. Aeroso ls have a fractal aggregate structure on Titan and in the polar regions of Jupiter and Saturn. Their vertical and horizontal distributions reflect a balance between local production and horizontal and vertical transport governed by eddies and jets. They are important for radiative energy balance in ways that have only recently come to light.

  3. Estimating Forest Vertical Structure from Multialtitude, Fixed-Baseline Radar Interferometric and Polarimetric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.; Law, Beverly E.; Siqueira, Paul R.

    2000-01-01

    Parameters describing the vertical structure of forests, for example tree height, height-to-base-of-live-crown, underlying topography, and leaf area density, bear on land-surface, biogeochemical, and climate modeling efforts. Single, fixed-baseline interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) normalized cross-correlations constitute two observations from which to estimate forest vertical structure parameters: Cross-correlation amplitude and phase. Multialtitude INSAR observations increase the effective number of baselines potentially enabling the estimation of a larger set of vertical-structure parameters. Polarimetry and polarimetric interferometry can further extend the observation set. This paper describes the first acquisition of multialtitude INSAR for the purpose of estimating the parameters describing a vegetated land surface. These data were collected over ponderosa pine in central Oregon near longitude and latitude -121 37 25 and 44 29 56. The JPL interferometric TOPSAR system was flown at the standard 8-km altitude, and also at 4-km and 2-km altitudes, in a race track. A reference line including the above coordinates was maintained at 35 deg for both the north-east heading and the return southwest heading, at all altitudes. In addition to the three altitudes for interferometry, one line was flown with full zero-baseline polarimetry at the 8-km altitude. A preliminary analysis of part of the data collected suggests that they are consistent with one of two physical models describing the vegetation: 1) a single-layer, randomly oriented forest volume with a very strong ground return or 2) a multilayered randomly oriented volume; a homogeneous, single-layer model with no ground return cannot account for the multialtitude correlation amplitudes. Below the inconsistency of the data with a single-layer model is followed by analysis scenarios which include either the ground or a layered structure. The ground returns suggested by this preliminary analysis seem

  4. The vertical structure of upper ocean variability at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain during 2012-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damerell, Gillian M.; Heywood, Karen J.; Thompson, Andrew F.; Binetti, Umberto; Kaiser, Jan

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the characterization of variability in temperature, salinity and oxygen concentration, including the vertical structure of the variability, in the upper 1000 m of the ocean over a full year in the northeast Atlantic. Continuously profiling ocean gliders with vertical resolution between 0.5 and 1 m provide more information on temporal variability throughout the water column than time series from moorings with sensors at a limited number of fixed depths. The heat, salt and dissolved oxygen content are quantified at each depth. While the near surface heat content is consistent with the net surface heat flux, heat content of the deeper layers is driven by gyre-scale water mass changes. Below ˜150m, heat and salt content display intraseasonal variability which has not been resolved by previous studies. A mode-1 baroclinic internal tide is detected as a peak in the power spectra of water mass properties. The depth of minimum variability is at ˜415m for both temperature and salinity, but this is a depth of high variability for oxygen concentration. The deep variability is dominated by the intermittent appearance of Mediterranean Water, which shows evidence of filamentation. Susceptibility to salt fingering occurs throughout much of the water column for much of the year. Between about 700-900 m, the water column is susceptible to diffusive layering, particularly when Mediterranean Water is present. This unique ability to resolve both high vertical and temporal variability highlights the importance of intraseasonal variability in upper ocean heat and salt content, variations that may be aliased by traditional observing techniques.

  5. Turbulence vertical structure of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbieu, C.; Lohou, F.; Lothon, M.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Couvreux, F.; Durand, P.; Pino, D.; Patton, E. G.; Nilsson, E.; Blay-Carreras, E.; Gioli, B.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the decay of planetary boundary layer (PBL) turbulence in the afternoon, from the time the surface buoyancy flux starts to decrease until sunset. Dense observations of mean and turbulent parameters were acquired during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field experiment by several meteorological surface stations, sounding balloons, radars, lidars and two aircraft during the afternoon transition. We analysed a case study based on some of these observations and large-eddy simulation (LES) data focusing on the turbulent vertical structure throughout the afternoon transition. The decay of turbulence is quantified through the temporal and vertical evolution of (1) the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), (2) the characteristic length scales of turbulence and (3) the shape of the turbulence spectra. A spectral analysis of LES data, airborne and surface measurements is performed in order to characterize the variation in the turbulent decay with height and study the distribution of turbulence over eddy size. This study highlights the LES ability to reproduce the turbulence evolution throughout the afternoon. LESs and observations agree that the afternoon transition can be divided in two phases: (1) a first phase during which the TKE decays at a low rate, with no significant change in turbulence characteristics, and (2) a second phase characterized by a larger TKE decay rate and a change in spectral shape, implying an evolution of eddy size distribution and energy cascade from low to high wave number. The changes observed either in TKE decay (during the first phase) or in the vertical wind spectra shape (during the second phase of the afternoon transition) occur first in the upper region of the PBL. The higher within the PBL, the stronger the spectra shape changes.

  6. Thermal Emission Spectrometer Results: Mars Atmospheric Thermal Structure and Aerosol Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Infrared spectra returned by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are well suited for retrieval of the thermal structure and the distribution of aerosols in the Martian atmosphere. Combined nadir- and limb-viewing spectra allow global monitoring of the atmosphere up to 0.01 mbar (65 km). We report here on the atmospheric thermal structure and the distribution of aerosols as observed thus far during the mapping phase of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. Zonal and temporal mean cross sections are used to examine the seasonal evolution of atmospheric temperatures and zonal winds during a period extending from northern hemisphere mid-summer through vernal equinox (L(sub s) = 104-360 deg). Temperature maps at selected pressure levels provide a characterization of planetary-scale waves. Retrieved atmospheric infrared dust opacity maps show the formation and evolution of regional dust storms during southern hemisphere summer. Response of the atmospheric thermal structure to the changing dust loading is observed. Maps of water-ice clouds as viewed in the thermal infrared are presented along with seasonal trends of infrared water-ice opacity. Uses of these observations for diagnostic studies of the dynamics of the atmosphere are discussed.

  7. Response of rocky invertebrate diversity, structure and function to the vertical layering of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, María; Tajadura, Javier; Gorostiaga, José María; Saiz-Salinas, José Ignacio

    2014-06-01

    Macroalgae comprise a prominent part of the rocky benthos where many invertebrates develop, and are believed to be undergoing severe declines worldwide. In order to investigate how the vegetation structure (crustose, basal and canopy layers) contributes to the diversity, structure and function of benthic invertebrates, a total of 31 subtidal transects were sampled along the northeast Atlantic coast of Spain. Significant positive relationships were found between the canopy layer and faunal abundance, taxonomic diversity and functional group diversity. Canopy forming algae were also related to epiphytic invertebrates, medium size forms, colonial strategy and suspensivores. By contrast, basal algae showed negative relationships with all variables tested except for detritivores. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (DISTLM) point to crustose as well as canopy layers as the best link between seaweeds and invertebrate assemblage structure. A close relationship was found between taxonomic and functional diversities. In general, low levels of taxonomic redundancy were detected for functional groups correlated with vegetation structure. A conceptual model based on the results is proposed, describing distinct stages of invertebrate assemblages in relation to the vertical structure of vegetation.

  8. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  9. Expanding Curtain Observations of Cloud Vertical Structure and Layering to Model-Relevant Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S.; Bankert, R.; Forsythe, J.; Mitrescu, C.; Reinke, D.; Austin, R.

    2007-12-01

    Clouds, representing perhaps the most obvious physical manifestations of atmospheric dynamics at work, remain in many ways an enigmatic and unifying intellectual challenge to researchers of all disciplines within the atmospheric sciences. Given the universally acknowledged importance of cloud systems in determining the state of current and future climate through radiative, chemical, dynamic, and thermodynamic processes tied intimately to the hydrological cycle, it is no wonder that so much recent attention has been given to better understanding the non-linear feedbacks involving clouds and ways to improve their handling in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In terms of operational community interests, knowledge of cloud vertical structure, ceiling (cloud base) height, and phase is key to aviation safety assurance in the private, commercial, and defense-agency sectors alike. The launch of the NASA Earth System Science Pathfinder CloudSat (cloud radar; 3 mm wavelength) mission in 2006 changed forever the way we view cloud systems from the space platform--providing vertically-resolved 'cuts' through the cloudy troposphere. The Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) system resolves nearly all radiatively significant cloud structures present in the column at vertical resolutions sufficient to afford scientists the opportunity to examine new hypotheses on cloud formation (leading potentially to new/improved cloud process parameterizations) and make observationally-based discoveries bordering on the frontiers of our current understanding. At the same time, the non-scanning nature of the CPR (providing so-called 'curtain' observations) represents in some respects a frustrating tease to the potential of a three-dimensional scanning system, relegating its utility to the realms of research as opposed to full spatial environmental characterization and data assimilation. This research examines ways to extend via statistical methods the curtain slices provided by CloudSat into the

  10. A study on cut-off low vertical structure and precipitation in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcù, F.; Carrassi, A.; Medaglia, C. M.; Prodi, F.; Mugnai, A.

    2007-04-01

    Cut-off lows are common features of Mediterranean meteorology in warm months and are often related to severe weather. The present work introduces a classification of cut-off episodes, based on the vertical extension of the depression and the presence of a linked surface vortex, also analyzing precipitation patterns. Ten years of warm-season ERA-40 reanalysis, available every six hours on a 2.5° × 2.5° grid, are processed to extract a database of cut-off lows and surface cyclones, along with the related total and convective precipitation at the ground. The high temporal resolution of the dataset permits a detailed characterization of short lasting events, so far poorly analyzed. The results show the relative abundance (41% of the total) of cut-off events lasting less than 24 hrs, sharing most of the characteristics of longer living cut-off in terms of structures and precipitation pattern. A large part of the 273 events identified in our database, about 54%, appear as high level signatures of depressions extending through a large portion of the troposphere, and in 38% of cases a well defined cyclonic structure is found at the ground. Most of these events carry precipitation, with relatively high rain-rates over wide areas, with well developed frontal rain bands. Among the cut-off events without a deep vertical structure (46%), about half do not produce precipitation, while the others produce relatively high rain-rates, although confined to small areas, indicating the presence of convective systems developing beneath the cut-offlow system. Such precipitation patterns are also confirmed at smaller scales by cloud resolving model runs. Finally, cut-off lows characterized by relatively high potential vorticity values in the mid-upper troposphere seem to have the potential for precipitation.

  11. Impact of photonic crystals on LED light extraction efficiency: approaches and limits to vertical structure designs

    SciTech Connect

    Matioli, Elison; Weisbuch, Claude

    2010-08-19

    The enhancement of the extraction efficiency in light emitting diodes (LEDs) through the use of photonic crystals (PhCs) requires a structure design that optimizes the interaction of the guided modes with the PhCs. The main optimization parameters are related to the vertical structure of the LED, such as the thickness of layers, depth of the PhCs, position of the quantum wells as well as the PhC period and fill factor. We review the impact of the vertical design of different approaches of PhC LEDs through a theoretical and experimental standpoint, assessing quantitatively the competing mechanisms that act over each guided mode. Three approaches are described to overcome the main limitation of LEDs with surface PhCs, i.e. the insufficient interaction of low order guided modes with the PhCs. The introduction of an AlGaN confining layer in such structure is shown to be effective in extracting a fraction of the optical energy of low order modes; however, this approach is limited by the growth of the lattice mismatched AlGaN layer on GaN. The second approach, based on thin-film LEDs with PhCs, is limited by the presence of an absorbing reflective metal layer close to the guided modes that plays a major role in the competition between PhC extraction and metal dissipation. Finally, we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically the superior extraction of the guided light in embedded PhC LEDs due to the higher interaction between all optical modes and the PhCs, which resulted in a close to unity extraction efficiency for this device. The use of high-resolution angle-resolved measurements to experimentally determine the PhC extraction parameters was an essential tool for corroborating the theoretical models and quantifying the competing absorption and extraction mechanisms in LEDs.

  12. Modal structure of chemical mass size distribution in the high Arctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillamo, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Aurela, Minna; MäKelä, Timo; Maenhaut, Willy; Leek, Caroline

    2001-11-01

    Chemical mass size distributions of aerosol particles were measured in the remote marine boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean as part of the Atmospheric Research Program on the Arctic Ocean Expedition 1996 (AOE-96). An inertial impaction method was used to classify aerosol particles into different size classes for subsequent chemical analysis. The particle chemical composition was determined by ion chromatography and by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. Continuous particle size spectra were extracted from the raw data using a data inversion method. Clear and varying modal structures for aerosols consisting of primary sea-salt particles or of secondary particles related to dimethyl sulfide emissions were found. Concentration levels of all modes decreased rapidly when the distance from open sea increased. In the submicrometer size range the major ions found by ion chromatography were sulfate, methane sulfonate, and ammonium. They had most of the time a clear Aitken mode and one or two accumulation modes, with aerodynamic mass median diameters around 0.1 μm, 0.3 μm, and between 0.5-1.0 μm, respectively. The overall submicron size distributions of these three ions were quite similar, suggesting that they were internally mixed over most of this size range. The corresponding modal structure was consistent with the mass size distributions derived from the particle number size distributions measured with a differential mobility particle sizer. The Aitken to accumulation mode mass ratio for nss-sulfate and MSA was substantially higher during clear skies than during cloudy periods. Primary sea-salt particles formed a mode with an aerodynamic mass median diameter around 2 μm. In general, the resulting continuous mass size distributions displayed a clear modal structure consistent with our understanding of the two known major source mechanisms. One is the sea-salt aerosol emerging from seawater by bubble bursting. The other is related to

  13. VERTICAL KINK OSCILLATION OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE STRUCTURE IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Cho, K.-S.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2014-12-20

    Vertical transverse oscillations of a coronal magnetic rope, observed simultaneously in the 171 Å and 304 Å bandpasses of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), are detected. The oscillation period is about 700 s and the displacement amplitude is about 1 Mm. The oscillation amplitude remains constant during the observation. Simultaneous observation of the rope in the bandpasses corresponding to the coronal and chromospheric temperatures suggests that it has a multi-thermal structure. Oscillatory patterns in 171 Å and 304 Å are coherent, which indicates that the observed kink oscillation is collective, in which the rope moves as a single entity. We interpret the oscillation as a fundamental standing vertically polarized kink mode of the rope, while the interpretation in terms of a perpendicular fast wave could not be entirely ruled out. In addition, the arcade situated above the rope and seen in the 171 Å bandpass shows an oscillatory motion with the period of about 1000 s.

  14. Vertical Structure and Dynamics of the Beaufort Gyre Subsurface Layer from ADCP Obervations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. J.; Krishfield, R. A.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.; Timmermans, M. L. E.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the Beaufort Gyre Observing System (BGOS), several Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) have been maintained at moorings in different locations in the Canada Basin since 2005 to measure upper ocean velocities and sea ice motion. The ADCP data have been analyzed to better understand relationships among different components of forcing driving the sea ice and upper ocean layer including: winds, tides, and horizontal and vertical density gradients in the ocean. Specific attention is paid to data processing and analysis to separate inertial and tidal motions in these regions in the vicinity of the critical latitudes. In addition, we describe the dynamic characteristics of halocline eddies and estimate their kinetic energy and their role in the total energy balance in this region. Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) data are used in conjunction with the ADCP measurements to identify relationships between T-S and vertical velocity structures in the mixed layer and deeper. Seasonal and interannual variability in all parameters are also discussed and causes of observed changes are suggested.

  15. Vertical structure of wave-current turbulence within coral-reef colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    We present in situ measurements of waves, currents, and turbulence to study the vertical structure of turbulence within a channel that is surrounded by coral-reef colonies of a fringing reef in Hobihu, Nan-Wan Bay, southern Taiwan. Turbulence was measured using a dual velocimetry technique, and wave bias contamination in the turbulence is controlled using ogive curve testing of the turbulent shear stress (TSS). The observed turbulent dissipation rate is approximately 5 times greater than simultaneous observations over the nearby sandy bottom site, which indicates stronger mixing in the coral reef than on sandy bottoms. The low ratio of the TSS to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and sweeping events indicate that energetic momentum is transported downward into the channel of the coral-reef canopies. The observed value of turbulent dissipation rate exceeds the shear production rate, which suggests that transport terms or other source terms might be important. Direct evaluation of the transport terms suggests that vertical turbulent transport and advection are significant mechanisms that diffuse and convect the TKE downward into the channel. The observed TSS can be described well by the Prandtl-von Kármán eddy viscosity model and a two-equation turbulent model. This study may contribute to other theoretical, observational, and numerical studies in pursuing more understanding and modeling for turbulent mixing of wave-current flows in coastal zones.

  16. Vertical structure of turbulence within a depression surrounded by coral reef colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Turbulence is important in coral reefs but is difficult to measure in the field. In this paper, I present in situ measurements of waves, currents, and turbulence to study the vertical structure of turbulence within a depression (curved channel) that is surrounded by coral reef colonies on a fringing reef in Hobihu, Nan-Wan Bay, southern Taiwan. Turbulence was measured using a dual-velocimetry technique, and wave bias contamination in the turbulence is controlled using ogive curve testing of the turbulent shear stress (TSS). The observed turbulent dissipation rate ( ɛ) is approximately five times greater than simultaneous observations over the nearby sandy bottom site, which indicates stronger mixing within the coral reef than on sandy bottoms. The low ratio of the TSS to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and sweeping events indicate that energetic momentum is transported downward into the depression of the coral reef canopies. The observed value of ɛ exceeds the shear production rate, which suggests that transport terms or other source terms might be important. Direct evaluation of the transport terms suggests that vertical turbulent transport and advection are significant mechanisms that diffuse and convect the TKE downward into the depression. The observed TSS can be described well by the Prandtl-von Kármán eddy viscosity model and a two-equation turbulence model, which suggests that it is possible to develop a physically based model to quantify nutrient uptake and mass transfer in coral reefs under complex wave-current coastal flows.

  17. Effect of Flow and Fluid Structures on the Performance of Vertical River Hydrokinetic Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birjandi, Amir Hossein

    Field and laboratory measurements characterize the performance of vertical axis hydrokinetic turbines operating in uniform and non-uniform inflow conditions for river applications. High sampling frequency velocity measurements, taken at 200 Hz upstream of a stopped and operating 25-kW H-type vertical axis hydrokinetic turbine in the Winnipeg River, show the existence of large eddies with an order of magnitude of the turbine's diameter. Scaling laws allow modeling river conditions in the laboratory for more detailed investigations. A small-scale, 30 cm diameter, squirrel-cage vertical turbine designed, manufactured and equipped with a torque and position sensors is investigated for the detail behavior of the turbine subjected to different inflow conditions in a laboratory setting to study the effect of flow and fluid structures. The adjustable design of the laboratory turbine enables operations with different solidities, 0.33 and 0.67, and preset pitch angles, 0°, +/-2.5°, +/-5° and +/-10°. Tests are first performed with uniform inflow condition to measure the sensitivity of the turbine to solidity, preset pitch angle, free-surface, and Reynolds number to obtain the optimum operating conditions. During the free-surface testing a novel dimensionless coefficient, clearance coefficient, is introduced that relates the change in turbine efficiency with change in the free-surface height. High-speed imaging at 500 fps of semi-submerged blades visualizes the vortex-shedding pattern behind the blades and air entrainment. High-speed imaging results of large eddy pattern behind the vertical turbine are consistent with theory and measurements. Subsequently, cylinders of different diameters create non-uniform inflow conditions in the water tunnel by placing them at different longitudinal and lateral locations upstream of the model turbine. Thus, the effects of non-uniform inflow generated under controlled settings shows the impact of eddies and wake on the turbine

  18. Vertical Structure of Ice Cloud Layers From CloudSat and CALIPSO Measurements and Comparison to NICAM Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Seung-Hee; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Kato, Seiji; Satoh, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    The shape of the vertical profile of ice cloud layers is examined using 4 months of CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) global measurements taken on January, April, July, and October 2007. Ice clouds are selected using temperature profiles when the cloud base is located above the 253K temperature level. The obtained ice water content (IWC), effective radius, or extinction coefficient profiles are normalized by their layer mean values and are expressed in the normalized vertical coordinate, which is defined as 0 and 1 at the cloud base and top heights, respectively. Both CloudSat and CALIPSO observations show that the maximum in the IWC and extinction profiles shifts toward the cloud bottom, as the cloud depth increases. In addition, clouds with a base reaching the surface in a high-latitude region show that the maximum peak of the IWC and extinction profiles occurs near the surface, which is presumably due to snow precipitation. CloudSat measurements show that the seasonal difference in normalized cloud vertical profiles is not significant, whereas the normalized cloud vertical profile significantly varies depending on the cloud type and the presence of precipitation. It is further examined if the 7 day Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) simulation results from 25 December 2006 to 1 January 2007 generate similar cloud profile shapes. NICAM IWC profiles also show maximum peaks near the cloud bottom for thick cloud layers and maximum peaks at the cloud bottom for low-level clouds near the surface. It is inferred that oversized snow particles in the NICAM cloud scheme produce a more vertically inhomogeneous IWC profile than observations due to quick sedimentation.

  19. Assessment of aerosol optical property and radiative effect for the layer decoupling cases over the northern South China Sea during the 7-SEAS/Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Shantanu Kumar; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lolli, Simone; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chantara, Somporn; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The aerosol radiative effect can be modulated by the vertical distribution and optical properties of aerosols, particularly when aerosol layers are decoupled. Direct aerosol radiative effects over the northern South China Sea (SCS) were assessed by incorporating an observed data set of aerosol optical properties obtained from the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS)/Dongsha Experiment into a radiative transfer model. Aerosol optical properties for a two-layer structure of aerosol transport were estimated. In the radiative transfer calculations, aerosol variability (i.e., diversity of source region, aerosol type, and vertical distribution) for the complex aerosol environment was also carefully quantified. The column-integrated aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm was 0.1-0.3 for near-surface aerosols and increased 1-5 times in presence of upper layer biomass-burning aerosols. A case study showed the strong aerosol absorption (single-scattering albedo (ω) ≈ 0.92 at 440 nm wavelength) exhibited by the upper layer when associated with predominantly biomass-burning aerosols, and the ω (≈0.95) of near-surface aerosols was greater than that of the upper layer aerosols because of the presence of mixed type aerosols. The presence of upper level aerosol transport could enhance the radiative efficiency at the surface (i.e., cooling) and lower atmosphere (i.e., heating) by up to -13.7 and +9.6 W m-2 per AOD, respectively. Such enhancement could potentially modify atmospheric stability, can influence atmospheric circulation, as well as the hydrological cycle over the tropical and low-latitude marginal northern SCS.

  20. Structure and dissolution of L-leucine-coated salbutamol sulphate aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Raula, Janne; Seppälä, Jukka; Malm, Jari; Karppinen, Maarit; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2012-06-01

    L-Leucine formed different crystalline coatings on salbutamol sulphate aerosol particles depending on the saturation conditions of L-leucine. The work emphasizes a careful characterization of powders where structural compartments such as crystal size and particle coating may affect the performance of drug when administered. The sublimation of L-leucine from the aerosol particles took place 90°C lower temperature than the bulk L-leucine which was attributed to result from the sublimation of L-leucine from nano-sized crystalline domains. The dissolution slowed down and initial dissolution rate decreased with increasing L-leucine content. Decreasing crystalline domains to nano-scale improve heat and mass transfer which was observed as the lowered decomposition temperature of the drug salbutamol sulphate and the sublimation temperature of surface material L-leucine as well as the altered dissolution characteristics of the drug. The structure of the coated drug particles was studied by means of thermal analysis techniques (DSC and TG), and the dissolution of salbutamol sulphate was studied as an on-line measurement in a diffusion cell. PMID:22562614

  1. Modeling the influence of alkane molecular structure on secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Aumont, Bernard; Camredon, Marie; Mouchel-Vallon, Camille; La, Stéphanie; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Madronich, Sasha

    2013-01-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) emitted to the atmosphere are expected to be a substantial source of SOA. These emitted IVOC constitute a complex mixture including linear, branched and cyclic alkanes. The explicit gas-phase oxidation mechanisms are here generated for various linear and branched C10-C22 alkanes using the GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) and SOA formation is investigated for various homologous series. Simulation results show that both the size and the branching of the carbon skeleton are dominant factors driving the SOA yield. However, branching appears to be of secondary importance for the particle oxidation state and composition. The effect of alkane molecular structure on SOA yields appears to be consistent with recent laboratory observations. The simulated SOA composition shows, however, an unexpected major contribution from multifunctional organic nitrates. Most SOA contributors simulated for the oxidation of the various homologous series are far too reduced to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). On a carbon basis, the OOA yields never exceeded 10% regardless of carbon chain length, molecular structure or ageing time. This version of the model appears clearly unable to explain a large production of OOA from alkane precursors. PMID:24600999

  2. Investigation of the two-element airfoil with flap structure for the vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Li, C.

    2013-12-01

    The aerodynamic performance of Vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is not as simple as its structure because of the large changing range of angle of attack. We have designed a new kind of two-element airfoil for VAWT on the basis of NACA0012. CFD calculation has been confirmed to have high accuracy by comparison with the experiment data and Xfoil result. The aerodynamic parameter of two-element airfoil has been acquired by CFD calculation in using the Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model and the Simple scheme. The relationship between changings of angle of attack and flap's tilt angle has been found and quantified. The analysis will lay the foundation for further research on the control method for VAWT.

  3. Natural convection mass transfer on a vertical steel structure submerged in a molten aluminum pool

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Yang, B.C.; Shiah, S.W.; Cho, D.H.; Tan, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    The process of dissolution mass transport along a vertical steel structure submerged in a large molten aluminum pool is studied theoretically. A mathematical model is developed from the conservation laws and thermodynamic principles, taking full account of the density variation in the dissolution boundary layer due to concentration differences. Also accounted for are the influence of the solubility of the wall material on species transfer and the motion of the solid/liquid interface at the dissolution front. The governing equations are solved by a combined analytical-numerical technique to determine the characteristics of the dissolution boundary layer and the rate of natural convection mass transfer. Based upon the numerical results, a correlation for the average Sherwood number is obtained. It is found that the Sherwood number depends strongly on the saturated concentration of the substrate at the moving dissolution front but is almost independent of the freestream velocity.

  4. Structural design and fabrication of the Sandia 34-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Wind Energy Research Division of Sandia National Laboratories has been funded by the Wind/Ocean Technology Division of the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and build a 34-meter diameter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). The turbine design incorporates the results of recent VAWT research in aerodynamics and structural dynamics. Initial system concept studies identified several blade options that met the required power rating of 500 kW. The final blade and rotor configurations were chosen based on finite element calculations that determined the turbine modes of response, their frequency of vibration, and stress levels. For parked survival turbine components were designed to with stand the loading of a 150 mph (67.0 m/s) wind coupled with maximum cable tensions. Specific areas of design discussed include the rotor, cables, bearings, brakes, and foundations. Construction of the turbine is in progress at this time and anticipated completion of the project is late spring of 1987.

  5. Initial structural response measurements for the Sandia 34-meter VAWT (vertical axis wind turbine) Test Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, T.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has designed and constructed a 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) Test Bed. The machine will be used to advance research in aerodynamics and structural dynamics, improve fatigue life prediction capabilities, and investigate control algorithms and systems concepts. The Test Bed has extensive instrumentation including 70 strain gauges to measure blade and tower response. Immediately after the blades were mounted, blade gravity stresses were measured and a modal analysis on the stationary rotor was performed to determine zero rpm modal frequencies. Assembly and start-up tests have been completed, and testing is in the machine characterization phase. Resonance surveys are underway to fully characterize the modal frequencies and mode shapes of the rotor, drive train and support cables. Measured gravity stresses, centrifugal stresses, and modal frequencies are compared to predicted values. 11 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  6. High performance vertical tunneling diodes using graphene/hexagonal boron nitride/graphene hetero-structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hwan Lee, Seung; Lee, Jia; Ho Ra, Chang; Liu, Xiaochi; Hwang, Euyheon; Sup Choi, Min; Hee Choi, Jun; Zhong, Jianqiang; Chen, Wei; Jong Yoo, Won

    2014-02-03

    A tunneling rectifier prepared from vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) materials composed of chemically doped graphene electrodes and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunneling barrier was demonstrated. The asymmetric chemical doping to graphene with linear dispersion property induces rectifying behavior effectively, by facilitating Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high forward biases. It results in excellent diode performances of a hetero-structured graphene/h-BN/graphene tunneling diode, with an asymmetric factor exceeding 1000, a nonlinearity of ∼40, and a peak sensitivity of ∼12 V{sup −1}, which are superior to contending metal-insulator-metal diodes, showing great potential for future flexible and transparent electronic devices.

  7. GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers with periodic gain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kenjo; Kozuka, Yugo; Ikeyama, Kazuki; Horikawa, Kosuke; Furuta, Takashi; Akagi, Takanobu; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Iwaya, Motoaki; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-05-01

    We have achieved room-temperature CW operations of GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) with periodic gain structures (PGSs). The PGS-VCSEL consisted of 4.5λ-thick optical cavity length and two GaInN 5-quantum-well (QW) active regions separated with a Mg-doped GaN intermediate layer. The uniform carrier injection into the two active regions was also investigated using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). It is found that the use of an optimum Mg concentration in the intermediate layers improves the uniform carrier injection in the two active regions. From these results, we realized the CW operation of VCSELs with PGSs grown on AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). The VCSEL under CW operation showed a threshold current density of 16.5 kA/cm2 and its operation wavelength was 409.9 nm.

  8. Growth and structural discrimination of cortical neurons on randomly oriented and vertically aligned dense carbon nanotube networks

    PubMed Central

    Nick, Christoph; Yadav, Sandeep; Joshi, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Summary The growth of cortical neurons on three dimensional structures of spatially defined (structured) randomly oriented, as well as on vertically aligned, carbon nanotubes (CNT) is studied. Cortical neurons are attracted towards both types of CNT nano-architectures. For both, neurons form clusters in close vicinity to the CNT structures whereupon the randomly oriented CNTs are more closely colonised than the CNT pillars. Neurons develop communication paths via neurites on both nanoarchitectures. These neuron cells attach preferentially on the CNT sidewalls of the vertically aligned CNT architecture instead than onto the tips of the individual CNT pillars. PMID:25247139

  9. The vertical structure of the circulation and dynamics in Hudson Shelf Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lentz, Steven J.; Butman, Bradford; Harris, Courtney K.

    2014-01-01

    Hudson Shelf Valley is a 20–30 m deep, 5–10 km wide v-shaped submarine valley that extends across the Middle Atlantic Bight continental shelf. The valley provides a conduit for cross-shelf exchange via along-valley currents of 0.5 m s−1 or more. Current profile, pressure, and density observations collected during the winter of 1999–2000 are used to examine the vertical structure and dynamics of the flow. Near-bottom along-valley currents having times scales of a few days are driven by cross-shelf pressure gradients setup by wind stresses, with eastward (westward) winds driving onshore (offshore) flow within the valley. The along-valley momentum balance in the bottom boundary layer is predominantly between the pressure gradient and bottom stress because the valley bathymetry limits current veering. Above the bottom boundary layer, the flow veers toward an along-shelf (cross-valley) orientation and a geostrophic balance with some contribution from the wind stress (surface Ekman layer). The vertical structure and strength of the along-valley current depends on the magnitude and direction of the wind stress. During offshore flows driven by westward winds, the near-bottom stratification within the valley increases resulting in a thinner bottom boundary layer and weaker offshore currents. Conversely, during onshore flows driven by eastward winds the near-bottom stratification decreases resulting in a thicker bottom boundary layer and stronger onshore currents. Consequently, for wind stress magnitudes exceeding 0.1 N m−2, onshore along-valley transport associated with eastward wind stress exceeds the offshore transport associated with westward wind stress of the same magnitude.

  10. Vertical stratification of ichneumonid wasp communities: the effects of forest structure and life-history traits.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Filippo; Cerretti, Pierfilippo; Mason, Franco; Minari, Emma; Marini, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    Parasitoid wasp communities of the canopy of temperate forests are still largely unexplored. Very little is known about the community composition of parasitoids between canopy and understory and how much of this difference is related to forest structure or parasitoid biological strategies. In this study we investigated upon the difference in the community composition of the parasitic wasps Ichneumonidae between canopy and understory in a lowland temperate forest in northern Italy. We used general linear models to test whether parasitic strategy modifies species vertical stratification and the effect of forest structure. We also tested differences in β-diversity between canopy and understory traps and over time within single forest layers. We found that stand basal area was positively related to species richness, suggesting that the presence of mature trees can influence local wasp diversity, providing a higher number of microhabitats and hosts. The ichneumonid community of the canopy was different from that of the understory, and the β-diversity analysis showed higher values for the canopy, due to a higher degree of species turnover between traps. In our analyses, the vertical stratification was different between groups of ichneumonids sharing different parasitic strategies. Idiobiont parasitoids of weakly or deeply concealed hosts were more diverse in the understory than in the canopy while parasitoids of spiders were equally distributed between the two layers. Even though the ichneumonid community was not particularly species-rich in the canopy of the temperate forests, the extension of sampling to that habitat significantly increased the number of species recorded. PMID:24996133

  11. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-10-01

    Clouds forming during the summer monsoon over the Indian subcontinent affect its evolution through their radiative impact as well as the release of latent heat. While the latter is previously studied to some extent, comparatively little is known about the radiative impact of different cloud types and the vertical structure of their radiative heating/cooling effects. Therefore, the main aim of this study is to partly fill this knowledge gap by investigating and documenting the vertical distributions of the different cloud types associated with the Indian monsoon and their radiative heating/cooling using the active radar and lidar sensors onboard CloudSat and CALIPSO. The intraseasonal evolution of clouds from May to October is also investigated to understand pre-to-post monsoon transitioning of their radiative heating/cooling effects. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating (CRH) follows the northward migration and retreat of the monsoon from May to October. Throughout this time period, stratiform clouds radiatively warm the middle troposphere and cool the upper troposphere by more than ±0.2 K day-1 (after weighing by cloud fraction), with the largest impacts observed in June, July and August. During these months, the fraction of high thin cloud remains high in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Deep convective towers cause considerable radiative warming in the middle and upper troposphere, but strongly cool the base and inside of the TTL. This cooling is stronger during active (-1.23 K day-1) monsoon periods compared to break periods (-0.36 K day-1). The contrasting radiative warming effect of high clouds in the TTL is twice as large during active periods than in break periods. These results highlight the increasing importance of CRH with altitude, especially in the TTL. Stratiform (made up of alto- and nimbostratus clouds) and deep convection clouds radiatively cool the surface by approximately -100 and -400 W m-2 respectively while warming the

  12. Vertical Subsurface Flow Mixing and Horizontal Anisotropy in Coarse Fluvial Aquifers: Structural Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggenberger, P.; Huber, E.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed descriptions of the subsurface heterogeneities in coarse fluvial aquifer gravel often lack in concepts to distinguish between the essence and the noise of a permeability structure and the ability to extrapolate site specific hydraulic information at the tens to several hundred meters scale. At this scale the heterogeneity strongly influences the anisotropies of the flow field and the mixing processes in groundwater. However, in many hydrogeological models the complexity of natural systems is oversimplified. Understanding the link between the dynamics of the surface processes of braided-river systems and the resulting subsurface sedimentary structures is the key to characterizing the complexity of horizontal and vertical mixing processes in groundwater. From the different depositional elements of coarse braided-river systems, the largest permeability contrasts can be observed in the scour-fills. Other elements (e.g. different types of gravel sheets) show much smaller variabilities and could be considered as a kind of matrix. Field experiments on the river Tagliamento (Northeast Italy) based on morphological observation and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys, as well as outcrop analyses of gravel pit exposures (Switzerland) allowed us to define the shape, sizes, spatial distribution and preservation potential of scour-fills. In vertical sections (e.g. 2D GPR data, vertical outcrop), the spatial density of remnant erosional bounding surfaces of scours is an indicator for the dynamics of the braided-river system (lateral mobility of the active floodplain, rate of sediment net deposition and spatial distribution of the confluence scours). In case of combined low aggradation rate and low lateral mobility the deposits may be dominated by a complex overprinting of scour-fills. The delineation of the erosional bounding surfaces, that are coherent over the survey area, is based on the identification of angular discontinuities of the reflectors. Fence diagrams

  13. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical and Microphysical Properties During a Rare Case of Long-range Transport of Mixed Biomass Burning-polluted Dust Aerosols from the Russian Federation-kazakhstan to Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannis, Alexandros; Argyrouli, Athina; Kokkalis, Panayotis; Tsaknakis, Georgios; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Solomos, Stavros; Kazadzis, Stylianos; Samaras, Stefanos; Böckmann, Christine; Raptis, Panagiotis; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2016-06-01

    Multi-wavelength aerosol Raman lidar measurements with elastic depolarization at 532 nm were combined with sun photometry during the HYGRA-CD campaign over Athens, Greece, on May-June 2014. We retrieved the aerosol optical [3 aerosol backscatter profiles (baer) at 355-532-1064 nm, 2 aerosol extinction (aaer) profiles at 355-532 nm and the aerosol linear depolarization ratio (δ) at 532 nm] and microphysical properties [effective radius (reff), complex refractive index (m), single scattering albedo (ω)]. We present a case study of a long distance transport (~3.500-4.000 km) of biomass burning particles mixed with dust from the Russian Federation-Kazakhstan regions arriving over Athens on 21-23 May 2014 (1.7-3.5 km height). On 23 May, between 2-2.75 km we measured mean lidar ratios (LR) of 35 sr (355 nm) and 42 sr (532 nm), while the mean Ångström exponent (AE) aerosol backscatter-related values (355nm/532nm and 532nm/1064nm) were 2.05 and 1.22, respectively; the mean value of δ at 532 nm was measured to be 9%. For that day the retrieved mean aerosol microphysical properties at 2-2.75 km height were: reff=0.26 μm (fine mode), reff=2.15 μm (coarse mode), m=1.36+0.00024i, ω=0.999 (355 nm, fine mode), ω=0.992(355 nm, coarse mode), ω=0.997 (532 nm, fine mode), and ω=0.980 (532 nm, coarse mode).

  14. Resolving Organized Aerosol Structures (Rolls and Layers) with Airborne Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) During MILAGRO/INTEX Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Howell, S.; Shinozuka, Y.; Brekhovskikh, V.; McNaughton, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/HIGEAR] deployed a wide range of aerosol instrumentation aboard the C-130 and the NASA DC-8 as part of MILAGRO/INTEX. These were designed to provide rapid information on aerosol composition, state of mixing (internal or external), spectral optical properties (scattering and absorption), the humidity dependence of light scattering-f(RH), and the role of condensed species in changing the absorption properties of black carbon (BC) and inferred properties of organic carbon (OC). These measurements included size distributions from about 7 nm up to about 10,000 nm and their volatility at 150, 300 and 400 C; size selected response to heating (volatility) to resolve the state of mixing of the aerosol; continuous measurements of the light scattering and absorption at 3 wavelengths; measurements of the f(RH). We also flew the first airborne deployment of the new Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS, TSI Inc.) that provided information on rapid (1Hz) size variations in the Aitken mode. This revealed small scale structure of the aerosol and allowed us to examine size distributions varying over space and time associated with mixing processes previously unresolved etc. Rapid measurements during profiles also revealed variations in size over shallow layers. Other dynamic processes included rapid size distribution measurements within orographically induced aerosol layers and size distribution evolution of the nanoparticles formed by nucleation (C-130 flights 5, 6 and 9). Evidence for fluctuations induced by underlying changes in topography was also detected. These measurements also frequently revealed the aerosol variability in the presence of boundary layer rolls aligned along the wind in the Marine Boundary Layer (Gulf region) both with and without visible cloud streets (DC-8 flight 4 and C-130 flight 7). This organized convection over 1-2 km scales influences the mixing processes (entrainment, RH

  15. Vertical and horizontal structure of atmospheric waves observed with the Indonesian regional CPEA radar network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Sridharan, S.; Tsuda, T.; Vincent, R.; Kozu, T.

    Although the global structure of tides and planetary waves in the middle atmosphere including MLT Mesosphere Lower Thermosphere has extensively been studied with ground-based and satellite observations structures of atmospheric waves within thousands of km are rarely reported by observations Such structures of a regional scale should reflect locality and are expected to include information of wave sources as well as interactions with smaller scale waves We have carried out meteor MF radar observations in the MLT region at three locations Kototabang 100E 0S West Sumatra Pontianak 109E 0N West Kalimantan and Pameungpeuk 107 5E 7 5S West Jawa in Indonesia as an activity of CPEA Coupling Processes of Equatorial Atmosphere project The diurnal variaiton of wind velocities over the equator at Pontianak and Kototabang with an average amplitude of 10 - 20 m s at 86 - 90 km showed significant difference indicating strong effect of non-migrating diurnal tides The significant phase difference between the two site 9 deg distance suggesting existence of high zonal wave number 4 waves Enhancement of diurnal variation of MLT wind seems to correlate with the enhancement of diurnal oscillation in the OLR outgoing longwave radiation of the Asia-Pacific area Vertical propagation of tides and other atmospheric waves are also addressed by comparing OLR data radiosonde observations during CPEA campaigns and other observational data

  16. Active bacterial community structure along vertical redox gradients in Baltic Sea sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Janet; Edlund, Anna; Hardeman, Fredrik; Jansson, Janet K.; Sjoling, Sara

    2008-05-15

    Community structures of active bacterial populations were investigated along a vertical redox profile in coastal Baltic Sea sediments by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis. According to correspondence analysis of T-RFLP results and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community structures at three redox depths (179 mV, -64 mV and -337 mV) differed significantly. The bacterial communities in the community DNA differed from those in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled DNA, indicating that the growing members of the community that incorporated BrdU were not necessarily the most dominant members. The structures of the actively growing bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to organic carbon followed by total nitrogen and redox potentials. Bacterial identification by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from clones of BrdU-labeled DNA and DNA from reverse transcription PCR (rt-PCR) showed that bacterial taxa involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling were metabolically active along the redox profiles. Several sequences had low similarities to previously detected sequences indicating that novel lineages of bacteria are present in Baltic Sea sediments. Also, a high number of different 16S rRNA gene sequences representing different phyla were detected at all sampling depths.

  17. Micro-size antenna structure with vertical nanowires for wireless power transmission and communication.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jong-Gu; Jeong, Yeri; Shin, Jeong Hee; Choi, Ji-Woong; Sohn, Jung Inn; Cha, Seung Nam; Jang, Jae Eun

    2014-11-01

    For biomedical implanted devices, a wireless power or a signal transmission is essential to protect an infection and to enhance durability. In this study, we present a magnetic induction technique for a power transmission without any wire connection between transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) in a micro scale. Due to a micro size effect of a flat spiral coil, a magnetic inductance is not high. To enhance the magnetic inductance, a three dimensional magnetic core is added to an antenna structure, which is consisted of ZnO nano wires coated by a nickel (Ni) layer. ZnO nano wires easily supply a large effective surface area with a vertical structural effect to the magnetic core structure, which induces a higher magnetic inductance with a ferro-magnetic material Ni. The magnetic induction antenna with the magnetic core shows a high inductance value, a low reflection power and a strong power transmission. The power transmission efficiencies are tested under the air and the water medium are almost the same values, so that the magnetic induction technique is quite proper to body implanted systems. PMID:25958501

  18. Determination of material constants of vertically aligned carbon nanotube structures in compressions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yupeng; Kang, Junmo; Choi, Jae-Boong; Nam, Jae-Do; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2015-06-19

    Different chemical vapour deposition (CVD) fabrication conditions lead to a wide range of variation in the microstructure and morphologies of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which actually determine the compressive mechanical properties of CNTs. However, the underlying relationship between the structure/morphology and mechanical properties of CNTs is not fully understood. In this study, we characterized and compared the structural and morphological properties of three kinds of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays from different CVD fabrication methods and performed monotonic compressive tests for each VACNT array. The compressive stress-strain responses and plastic deformation were first compared and analyzed with nanotube buckling behaviours. To quantify the compressive properties of the VACNT arrays, a strain density energy function was used to determine their intrinsic material constants. Then, the structural and morphological effects on the quantified material constants of the VACNTs were statistically investigated and analogized to cellular materials with an open-cell model. The statistical analysis shows that density, defect degree, and the moment of inertia of the CNTs are key factors in the improvement of the compressive mechanical properties of VACNT arrays. This approach could allow a model-driven CNT synthesis for engineering their mechanical behaviours. PMID:26011574

  19. Determination of material constants of vertically aligned carbon nanotube structures in compressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kang, Junmo; Choi, Jae-Boong; Nam, Jae-Do; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2015-06-01

    Different chemical vapour deposition (CVD) fabrication conditions lead to a wide range of variation in the microstructure and morphologies of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which actually determine the compressive mechanical properties of CNTs. However, the underlying relationship between the structure/morphology and mechanical properties of CNTs is not fully understood. In this study, we characterized and compared the structural and morphological properties of three kinds of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays from different CVD fabrication methods and performed monotonic compressive tests for each VACNT array. The compressive stress-strain responses and plastic deformation were first compared and analyzed with nanotube buckling behaviours. To quantify the compressive properties of the VACNT arrays, a strain density energy function was used to determine their intrinsic material constants. Then, the structural and morphological effects on the quantified material constants of the VACNTs were statistically investigated and analogized to cellular materials with an open-cell model. The statistical analysis shows that density, defect degree, and the moment of inertia of the CNTs are key factors in the improvement of the compressive mechanical properties of VACNT arrays. This approach could allow a model-driven CNT synthesis for engineering their mechanical behaviours.

  20. Residual circulation in eastern Long Island Sound: Observed transverse-vertical structure and exchange transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codiga, Daniel L.; Aurin, Dirk A.

    2007-01-01

    Residual currents in eastern Long Island Sound (LIS) are investigated using direct velocity measurements from an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a ferry. Circulation at the site has major influence on exchange of water and water-borne materials between LIS and the coastal ocean. Ferry sampling enables sufficient averaging to isolate the residual motion from stronger tidal currents, and captures its spatial structure. Mean along-estuary currents based on about 2 years of sampling reveal a vigorous estuarine exchange circulation (peak 25-30 cm s -1 at depth), with flow eastward out of the estuary in the upper water column of the southern half and inward westward movement strengthening with depth over the central and north section. Application of volume conservation implies there is a strong eastward current out of the estuary in the shallowest 7 m where no measurements were made, as expected for estuarine exchange flow. Water from the Connecticut River, entering LIS on the north shore nearby to the west, does not appear to exit the estuary directly eastward along the north shore unless this occurs wholly in the shallow layer not sampled. Transverse currents have complex structure with generally northward (southward) flow where shallow outward (deep inward) motion occurs. An idealized semi-analytic solution for transverse-vertical structure of along- and across-estuary flow has limited success accounting for observed currents, despite inclusion of bathymetric, frictional, and rotational influences; this suggests the importance in LIS of dynamics it omits, in particular stratification, or does not represent with sufficient realism, such as complex bathymetry. Estimated annual-mean exchange volume transport, based on the better-sampled deep inward component, is 22,700±5000 m 3 s -1. This is comparable to previous estimates from some salt budget and hydrographic analyses, and implies advection contributes substantially to the total salt transport, contrary

  1. Vertical structure of aeolian turbulence in a boundary layer with sand transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zoe S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Recently we have found that Reynolds shear stress shows a significant variability with measurement height (Lee and Baas, 2016), and so an alternative parameter for boundary layer turbulence may help to explain the relationship between wind forcing and sediment transport. We present data that were collected during a field study of boundary layer turbulence conducted on a North Atlantic beach. High-frequency (50 Hz) 3D wind velocity measurements were collected using ultrasonic anemometry at thirteen different measurement heights in a tight vertical array between 0.11 and 1.62 metres above the surface. Thanks to the high density installation of sensors a detailed analysis of the boundary layer flow can be conducted using methods more typically used in studies where data is only available from one or just a few measurement heights. We use quadrant analysis to explore the vertical structure of turbulence and track the changes in quadrant signatures with measurement elevation and over time. Results of quadrant analysis, at the 'raw' 50 Hz timescale, demonstrates the tendency for event clustering across all four quadrants, which implies that at-a-point quadrant events are part of larger-scale turbulent structures. Using an HSV colour model, applied to the quadrant analysis data and plotted in series, we create colour maps of turbulence, which can provide a clear visualisation of the clustering of event activity at each height and illustrate the shape of the larger coherent flow structures that are present within the boundary layer. By including a saturation component to the colour model, the most significant stress producing sections of the data are emphasised. This results in a 'banded' colour map, which relates to clustering of quadrant I (Outward Interaction) and quadrant IV (Sweep) activity, separate from clustering of quadrant II (Burst) and quadrant III (Inward Interaction). Both 'sweep-type' and 'burst-type' sequences are shown to have a diagonal structure

  2. Using horizontal and vertical building structure to constrain indirect sensor orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Markus

    This paper presents a method to integrate linear horizontal, vertical and right-angled scene structures into the bundle adjustment of image sequences. An increasing number of airborne image acquisition systems is available and equipped with non-metric small- or medium-frame cameras and no or insufficiently accurate INS devices. In cases where the data is to be used for the production of geo-spatial data, where a certain accuracy and precision is required, an indirect sensor orientation, possibly including self-calibration, needs to be performed. The idea which led to the presented approach is to reduce the number of GCPs necessary for this task by applying the mentioned scene structures. The method directly uses the linear structures, visible at man-made objects as fictive observations within the adjustment, while self-calibration of intrinsic camera parameters and lens distortion is included as well. Experiments with two datasets demonstrate that, through this method, only limited GCP information is required to obtain satisfactory results. In fact, in one experiment using oblique images, several scene constraints were provided and only the datum was defined by ground control. The residuals at check points from this setup were similar to the traditional case where several well-distributed GCPs were available in the scene. In the second experiment the ability of this approach to support the bundle adjustment was shown for a UAV dataset. Although no GCP and camera calibration information was available, the visual inspection of adjusted object points and the residuals at horizontal structures confirmed the ability of the method to align an image block with the structure, as embodied in the defined scene constraints. Despite the convincing outcome of the experiments, it needs to be mentioned that some manual work is still involved in defining the constraints. In future work the issue of automation will be addressed.

  3. Vertical structure and biological activity in the bottom nepheloid layer of the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, D. W.; Mayer, L. M.; Dortch, Q.; Spinrad, R. W.

    1992-02-01

    The bottom nepheloid layer (BNL) was investigated at a number of hydrographically different sites in the Gulf of Maine during August 1987. Observations were based on hydrographic measurements made from a surface ship and closely-spaced, near-bottom samples collected using a submersible. The BNL generally occurred as a turbid layer which extended 15-30 m above the bottom (m.a.b.), as indicated by in situ light transmission and increased concentrations of total suspended particulate matter (SPM). Phytoplankton pigments, electron transport activity (ETS), extracellular proteolytic enzyme activity (EPA), concentrations of particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (POC and PON), and protein were generally elevated in the BNL. They also displayed vertical distribution patterns in relation to near-bottom depth zones of increased abundances of zooplankton, bacteria and autotrophic and heterotrophic nanoplankton. We describe two zones of biological significance in the BNL. The first, at about 20 m.a.b. at most stations, was associated with greater zooplankton biomass (80 μm) and copepod abundances than those depth strata either above or below, and appeared to be related to a higher quality of food particles near the top of the BNL. A second zone was seen 1-3 m.a.b. at most stations in association with the greatest levels of SPM. This deeper zone was generally of a poorer food quality, as reflected by ratios of protein-N to total-N and showed increases in cell-specific EPA. We discuss the areal variability of the BNL in the Gulf of Maine as well as the biological enhancement and vertical structure as likely influenced by both physical and biological processes.

  4. Seasonality and vertical structure of microbial communities in an ocean gyre.

    PubMed

    Treusch, Alexander H; Vergin, Kevin L; Finlay, Liam A; Donatz, Michael G; Burton, Robert M; Carlson, Craig A; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2009-10-01

    Vertical, seasonal and geographical patterns in ocean microbial communities have been observed in many studies, but the resolution of community dynamics has been limited by the scope of data sets, which are seldom up to the task of illuminating the highly structured and rhythmic patterns of change found in ocean ecosystems. We studied vertical and temporal patterns in the microbial community composition in a set of 412 samples collected from the upper 300 m of the water column in the northwestern Sargasso Sea, on cruises between 1991 and 2004. The region sampled spans the extent of deep winter mixing and the transition between the euphotic and the upper mesopelagic zones, where most carbon fixation and reoxidation occurs. A bioinformatic pipeline was developed to de-noise, normalize and align terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data from three restriction enzymes and link T-RFLP peaks to microbial clades. Non-metric multidimensional scaling statistics resolved three microbial communities with distinctive composition during seasonal stratification: a surface community in the region of lowest nutrients, a deep chlorophyll maximum community and an upper mesopelagic community. A fourth microbial community was associated with annual spring blooms of eukaryotic phytoplankton that occur in the northwestern Sargasso Sea as a consequence of winter convective mixing that entrains nutrients to the surface. Many bacterial clades bloomed in seasonal patterns that shifted with the progression of stratification. These richly detailed patterns of community change suggest that highly specialized adaptations and interactions govern the success of microbial populations in the oligotrophic ocean. PMID:19494846

  5. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 1. Interplay between vertical structure and photosynthetic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation acclimation to changing climate, in particular elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), has been observed to include modifications to the biochemical and ecophysiological functioning of leaves and the structural components of the canopy. These responses have the potential to significantly modify plant carbon uptake and surface energy partitioning, and have been attributed with large-scale changes in surface hydrology over recent decades. While the aggregated effects of vegetation acclimation can be pronounced, they often result from subtle changes in canopy properties that require the resolution of physical, biochemical and ecophysiological processes through the canopy for accurate estimation. In this paper, the first of two, a multilayer canopy-soil-root system model developed to capture the emergent vegetation responses to environmental change is presented. The model incorporates both C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways, and resolves the vertical radiation, thermal, and environmental regimes within the canopy. The tight coupling between leaf ecophysiological functioning and energy balance determines vegetation responses to climate states and perturbations, which are modulated by soil moisture states through the depth of the root system. The model is validated for three growing seasons each for soybean (C3) and maize (C4) using eddy-covariance fluxes of CO2, latent, and sensible heat collected at the Bondville (Illinois) Ameriflux tower site. The data set provides an opportunity to examine the role of important environmental drivers and model skill in capturing variability in canopy-atmosphere exchange. Vertical variation in radiative states and scalar fluxes over a mean diurnal cycle are examined to understand the role of canopy structure on the patterns of absorbed radiation and scalar flux magnitudes and the consequent differences in sunlit and shaded source/sink locations through the canopies. An analysis is made of the impact of

  6. Using computerized tomography to determine ionospheric structures. Part 2, A method using curved paths to increase vertical resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1993-08-01

    A method is presented to unfold the two-dimensional vertical structure in electron density by using data on the total electron content for a series of paths through the ionosphere. The method uses a set of orthonormal basis functions to represent the vertical structure and takes advantage of curved paths and the eikonical equation to reduce the number of iterations required for a solution. Curved paths allow a more thorough probing of the ionosphere with a given set of transmitter and receiver positions. The approach can be directly extended to more complex geometries.

  7. Paleoproterozoic structural evolution of the Man-Leo Shield (West Africa). Key structures for vertical to transcurrent tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lompo, Martin

    2010-08-01

    In the Man-Leo Shield, Paleoproterozoic (Birimian) belts crop out in nine countries of West Africa. Dominant domains include: (i) greenstone belts composed of plutono-volcanic, volcano-clastic and sedimentary rocks, deformed and weakly metamorphosed under regional greenschist facies conditions; (ii) widespread granitoid batholiths. The domains display a basin and dome-like architecture, and are overprinted by partitioned structures from successively shallower crustal depth. Analyses of key ductile and brittle structures has shown that the structural evolution of Man-Leo Shield is characterized by early vertical magmato-tectonics and subsequently, horizontal transcurrent tectonics with progression from ductile to brittle behavior. Basin and dome-like architectures, and the formation of an ubiquitous vertical foliation (MF) formed during emplacement of early amphibole-bearing (PAG) granite plutons at ca. 2.2 Ga by diapirism during NW-SE crustal shortening. Subsequent to a late stage of predominantly NW-SE shortening that created steeply-dipping mylonite zones (Mz1), transcurrent faults became predominant. The formation of transcurrent faults began transpressively, with development of N-S trending regional-scale mylonite zones (Mz1), and a steeply-plunging stretching lineation that probably formed during emplacement of PAG-type granitoids ca. 2.15 Ga. NNE-SSW transpressive sinistral horsetail faults and many NW-SE trending tension veins are interpreted to have formed at this stage. After cooling of the upper crust ca. 2.1 Ga, transcurrent faults became strike-slip in character with formation of dominantly NE-SW dextral faults (Mz2) and the passive emplacement of biotite (PBG) granitoids. Clockwise rotation of the extensional stress axis ( σ3) from NNE-SSW trending to ENE-SSW trending assisted the propagation of dextral NE-SW and sinistral NW-SE extensional en echelon horsetail faults. WNW-ESE trending extension jogs (Egz) are interpreted to have been initiated under

  8. Vertical and Horizontal Wind Structure Prior to and During the 1997/1998 ENSO Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamec, David

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of ECMWF and satellite wind products are used to investigate low frequency fluctuations in the wind fields immediately preceding and during the 1997/1998 ENSO event. An extended EOF analysis of the horizontal and vertical wind structure that allows for the study of propagating features indicates that the dominant mode of variability established in the lower levels of the atmosphere is a convergence in the central tropical Pacific. At mid-levels, the westerlies increase with time over most of the equatorial Pacific, and there are closed cyclonic features on either side of the equator. At upper levels, the flow tends to become divergent across the equatorial Pacific, and there is a strong flow from the northwest Pacific across Indonesia that then turns to the west along the equator in the Indian Ocean. The addition of satellite data for improved surface wind estimates reveal that the Indian Ocean winds were anomalously strong during the winter preceding the initiation of the ENSO event. An analysis of the momentum convergence flux at the surface indicates a very strong anomaly 9 months prior to the ENSO event that begins in the western Indian Ocean and propagates to the east, arriving over the Pacific warm pool area coincident with the beginning of the El Nino. Changes in the near surface thermal and water vapor structure over the Indian Ocean during this period will also be discussed.

  9. Influence of aerosol loading, water vapor and surface topography trends on the regional hydrology of the Indo-Ganges basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, V.; Cadeddu, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite based measurements show high concentrations of aerosols (aerosol optical depth) over the Indo-Ganges basin. However, little is known about the vertical structure and distribution of the aerosols in this region. In addition the direct (microphysical) and indirect (radiative) influence of aerosols on the regional water vapor characteristics and cloud formation over different land cover and surface elevations remains uncertain. Previous studies have shown that carbonaceous aerosol can absorb incoming solar radiation, warming the aerosol layer and hence reduce the solar radiation reaching the surface. This in turn reduces the surface temperature, heat and moisture fluxes and increases the stability of the boundary layer resulting in slower regional hydrological cycle. However, on a microphysical scale the aerosols, as cloud condensation nuclei, tend to enhance the cloud formation, although the resulting cloud droplets are slower to coalesce and to form into precipitation. This study utilizes a combination of ground based measurements collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment's (GVAX) and satellite based measurements collected by remote sensors (MODIS, CALIPSO) to carefully evaluate the potential effects of aerosol on the regional hydrology of the Ganges Valley. The study investigates how aerosol and water vapor properties (spatial and vertical distribution, aerosol speciation, etc.) differ between the Ganges valley, lowlands, and neighboring mountainous region and whether this difference enhances or suppresses the regional convective initiation and precipitation.

  10. Vertical structures induced by propeller moonlets: Comparison of hydrodynamical model and N-body box simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Seiß, M.; Salo, H.; Spahn, F.

    2014-04-01

    Small moonlets in Saturn's rings induce propeller called structures into the surrounding ring material. Images of Saturn's rings, taken by the Cassini spacecraft near Saturn's equinox in 2009, show shadows cast by these propellers [1], offering the opportunity to study their vertical structure. We compare results from an extended hydrodynamical propeller model with results from local N-body box simulations of propeller structures. In the hydrodynamical model, maximal propeller heights are determined from the gravitational scattering of the ring particles by the moonlet. Afterwards the disturbed balance of viscous heating and collisional cooling is considered as main mechanism of the propeller height relaxation [2]. For the N-body box simulations we use the code by Salo [3], which was also applied in the propeller simulations of [4] and [5]. We find that the exponential height relaxation predicted by the hydrodynamical modelling is confirmed by N-body simulations of non-self gravitating ring particles. By projecting the propeller height evolution of the hydrodynamical model into observations of the shadows cast by the Earhart propeller, we determine the exponential cooling constant of the height relaxation. With this cooling constant we estimate collision frequencies of about 6 collisions per particle per orbit in the propeller gap region or about 11 collisions per particle per orbit in the propeller wake region of the Earhart propeller. The N-body simulations lead to maximal propeller heights between 60 to 70 percent of the Hill radius of the corresponding moonlet. Moonlet sizes estimated by this relation are in fair agreement with size estimates from radial propeller scalings [5, 6] for propeller structures with observed shadows.

  11. Use of the NASA GEOS-5 SEAC4RS Meteorological and Aerosol Reanalysis for assessing simulated aerosol optical properties as a function of smoke age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Buchard, V.; Govindaraju, R.; Chen, G.; Hair, J. W.; Russell, P. B.; Shinozuka, Y.; Wagner, N.; Lack, D.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model, which includes an online aerosol module, provided chemical and weather forecasts during the SEAC4RS field campaign. For post-mission analysis, we have produced a high resolution (25 km) meteorological and aerosol reanalysis for the entire campaign period. In addition to the full meteorological observing system used for routine NWP, we assimilate 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from MODIS (both Aqua and Terra satellites), ground-based AERONET sun photometers, and the MISR instrument (over bright surfaces only). Daily biomass burning emissions of CO, CO2, SO2, and aerosols are derived from MODIS fire radiative power retrievals. We have also introduced novel smoke "age" tracers, which provide, for a given time, a snapshot histogram of the age of simulated smoke aerosol. Because GEOS-5 assimilates remotely sensed AOD data, it generally reproduces observed (column) AOD compared to, for example, the airborne 4-STAR instrument. Constraining AOD, however, does not imply a good representation of either the vertical profile or the aerosol microphysical properties (e.g., composition, absorption). We do find a reasonable vertical structure for aerosols is attained in the model, provided actual smoke injection heights are not much above the planetary boundary layer, as verified with observations from DIAL/HRSL aboard the DC8. The translation of the simulated aerosol microphysical properties to total column AOD, needed in the aerosol assimilation step, is based on prescribed mass extinction efficiencies that depend on wavelength, composition, and relative humidity. Here we also evaluate the performance of the simulated aerosol speciation by examining in situ retrievals of aerosol absorption/single scattering albedo and scattering growth factor (f(RH)) from the LARGE and AOP suite of instruments. Putting these comparisons in the context of smoke age as diagnosed by the model helps us to

  12. The global response to vertical diabatic heating structures associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation derived from TRMM estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J.; Woolnough, S.; Inness, P.

    2013-12-01

    The anomalous global atmospheric circulation associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is examined using composite vertical anomalous diabatic heating structures based on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) estimates and reanalysis datasets and integrating a primitive equations model. Variations in the dynamical response from the observational and reanalysis products are investigated in relation to the detailed structure of the vertical structure of heating of the MJO, with specific focus of the role of the westward tilting with altitude in the heating, clearly evident in three reanalysis heating structures but is less well pronounced in the TRMM heating structures. It was found that the atmospheric response to the reanalysis heatings were far more consistent compared to the responses from the TRMM heating estimates. Examination of the moisture flux during the main active phase of the MJO revealed a surplus in moisture convergence ahead of the anomalous heating from each of the reanalysis integrations, which was found to be directly attributed to the vertical tilt in heating structure. In contrast, the response to the TRMM heatings showed no phase shift in moisture convergence in relation to the convective heating and was understood to be a consequence of the weaker representation of vertical tilting in heating structure. It was suggested that the westward tilt in heating could therefore play an important role in promoting convection east of the main heating region. The dynamical response to composite vertical diabatic heating structures associated with the MJO from simulations with Unified Model (UM) HadGEM3 with standard and enhanced (x1.5) entrainment rates are also examined to investigate the relationship between the dynamical response to the heating profile and quality of MJO simulations.

  13. Optical properties and vertical distribution of pollution aerosols in the Mediterranean basin in summertime: airborne observations from the Charmex SOP0, SOP1, and SOP2 campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, Claudia; Beekmann, Matthias; Chevallier, Servanne; Denjean, Cyrielle; Doppler, Lionel; Gaimoz, Cecile; Grand, Noel; Loisil, Rodrigue; Mallet, Marc; Pelon, Jacques; Ravetta, Francois; Sartelet, Karine; Schnitt, Sabrina; Triquet, Sylvain; Zapf, Pascal; Formenti, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean basin is a very complex area where high concentrations of atmospheric aerosols of different origin and types may be found. The North-Western part of the Mediterranean basin, due to its closeness with high polluted industrialized areas and coastal high populated cities, is frequently affected by severe pollution episodes. The strength of these episodes is particularly intense during summer when stable meteorological conditions favour the accumulation of pollutants in the lowermost atmospheric layers. Three intensive airborne campaigns (TRAQA, TRansport and Air QuAlity, June-July 2012), ADRIMED (Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region, June 2013) and SAFMED (Secondary Aerosol Formation in the MEDiterranean, July 2013) have been conducted over the North-Western and Central Mediterranean basin with the SAFIRE ATR-42 aircraft in the framework of the ChArMex Special Observing Periods 0 and 1. During the different campaigns the ATR-42 was equipped with a large set of instruments for the measurements of the aerosol physico-chemical (GRIMM, SMPS, PCASP, USHAS, FSSP for size distribution, and three lines for filter sampling on polycarbonate and quartz membranes in order to derive the bulk aerosol composition) and optical properties (TSI nephelometer, Magee Sci. aethalomether, and CAPS for scattering, absorption, and extinction coefficients at several wavelengths in the visible). Lidar backscatter profiles at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, meteorological parameters, upward and downward shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes, and atmospheric composition (H2O, CO2, CO, and O3) were also measured from aircraft instrumentation. In this work we present data on the aerosol physico-chemical and optical properties obtained during the 25 scientific flights of TRAQA, ADRIMED, and SAFMED performed in correspondence of pollution episodes. During the campaigns the Western Mediterranean basin was interested by different synoptic

  14. Vertical structure of the phytoplankton community associated with a coastal plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wawrik, B.; Paul, J.H.; Campbell, L.; Griffin, D.; Houchin, L.; Fuentes-Ortega, A.; Muller-Karger, F.

    2003-01-01

    Low salinity plumes of coastal origin are occasionally found far offshore, where they display a distinct color signature detectable by satellites. The impact of such plumes on carbon fixation and phytoplankton community structure in vertical profiles and on basin wide scales is poorly understood. On a research cruise in June 1999, ocean-color satellite-images (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor, SeaWiFS) were used in locating a Mississippi River plume in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Profiles sampled within and outside of the plume were analyzed using flow cytometry, HPLC pigment analysis and primary production using 14C incorporation. Additionally, RubisCO large subunit (rbcL) gene expression was measured by hybridization of extracted RNA using 3 full-length RNA gene probes specific for individual phytoplankton clades. We also used a combination of RT-PCR/PCR and TA cloning in order to generate cDNA and DNA rbcL clone libraries from samples taken in the plume. Primary productivity was greatest in the low salinity surface layer of the plume. The plume was also associated with high Synechococcus counts and a strong peak in Form IA rbcL expression. Form IB rbcL (green algal) mRNA was abundant at the subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM), whereas Form ID rbcL (chromophytic) expression showed little vertical structure. Phylogenetic analysis of cDNA libraries demonstrated the presence of Form IA rbcL Synechococcus phylotypes in the plume. Below the plume, 2 spatially separated and genetically distinct rbcL clades of Prochlorococcus were observed. This indicated the presence of the high- and low-light adapted clades of Prochlorococcus. A large and very diverse clade of Prymnesiophytes was distributed throughout the water column, whereas a clade of closely related prasinophytes may have dominated at the SCM. These data indicate that the Mississippi river plume may dramatically alter the surface picoplankton composition of the Gulf of Mexico, with Synechococcus displacing

  15. The vertical turbulence structure of the coastal marine atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tjernstroem, M.; Smedman, A.S. )

    1993-03-15

    The vertical turbulence structure in the marine atmosphere along a shoreline has been investigated using data from tower and aircraft measurements performed along the Baltic coast in the southeast of Sweden. Two properties make the Baltic Sea particularly interesting. It is surrounded by land in all directions within moderate advection distances, and it features a significant annual lag in sea surface temperature as compared with inland surface temperature. The present data were collected mostly during spring or early summer, when the water is cool, i.e., with a stably or neutrally stratified marine boundary layer usually capped by an inversion. Substantial daytime heating over the land area results in a considerable horizontal thermal contrast. Measurements were made on a small island, on a tower with a good sea fetch, and with an airborne instrument package. The profile data from the aircraft is from 25 slant soundings performed in connection to low level boundary layer flights. The results from the profiles are extracted through filtering techniques on individual time (space) series (individual profiles), applying different normalization and finally averaging over all or over groups of profiles. The land-based data are from a low tower situated on the shoreline of a small island with a wide sector of unobstructed sea fetch. Several factors are found that add to the apparent complexity of the coastal marine environment: the state of the sea appears to have a major impact on the turbulence structure of the surface layer, jet-shaped wind speed profiles were very common at the top of the boundary layer (in about 50% of the cases) and distinct layers with increased turbulence were frequently found well above the boundary layer (in about 80% of the cases). The present paper will concentrate on a description of the experiment, the analysis methods, and a general description of the boundary layer turbulence structure over the Baltic Sea. 40 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Unique effects of aerosol OT lamellar structures on the dynamics of guest molecules.

    PubMed

    De, Dipanwita; Datta, Anindya

    2013-06-25

    The behavior of lamellar structures of Aerosol OT (AOT) as hosts, vis-à-vis the flexible normal micelles and rigid nanochannels of Nafion membranes, has been investigated with two different fluorophores, [2,2'-bipyridyl]-3,3'-diol (BP(OH)2) and coumarin 102 (C102). Surprisingly, for BP(OH)2, a rise time is observed at intermediate emission wavelengths and not in the red edge of the fluorescence spectrum. A shoulder at 525 nm is observed in time resolved emission spectra (TRES) at initial times of BP(OH)2 in AOT lamellar structures. This feature is the signature of the monoketo (MK) tautomer, observed for the first time in a microheterogeneous medium. Also, the usually ultrafast single proton transfer in BP(OH)2 is retarded to an considerable extent in lamellar structures. The potential of this medium in promoting unusual intermediates is thus highlighted. This property may be ascribed to the rigidity of lamellar structures, compared to hosts such as regular micelles. However, studies using another fluorophore, coumarin 102 (C102), brings out the fact that these structures are significantly different from the rigid host, Nafion, as well. The absence of excited state proton transfer (ESPT) in this molecule in AOT lamellar structures indicates that it is not protonated, unlike in Nafion. Thus, the interfacial pH of lamellar structures is found to be significantly greater than that of Nafion nanochannels. From the time dependent Stokes shift (TDSS) of the emission spectra of C102, the relaxation time (0.85 ns) of interfacial water in lamellar structures is found to be an order of magnitude faster than that observed in Nafion nanochannels, in which H3O(+) ions have been substituted by different cations. Hence, this study demonstrates that AOT lamellar structures are rather unique hosts and that they behave very differently from conventional rigid and flexible hosts such as normal micelles and Nafion, respectively. PMID:23713719

  17. Three Dimensional Aerosol Climatology over India and the North Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, A.; Zhang, C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical models are indispensable tools to study aerosol effects on climate, including both aerosol direct and indirect radiative effects and their role in precipitation. But, agreement among the models has not been achieved, and thus it is not possible to accurately and confidently attain estimates of aerosol effects on climate. The lack of reliable knowledge on global three-dimensional (3D) aerosol climatology has prevented us from assessing the degree to which the disagreement in their aerosol climatic effects may come from differences of aerosol vertical structures in their simulations. To that end, we created a six year, global 3D extinction coefficient dataset for each aerosol species identifiable by the Level 2, Version 3, 5 km Aerosol Profile product from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) as a tool to improve 3D model representations. Here we describe the 3D structure of aerosol in the Middle East, India, and the Northern Indian Ocean and some of the interesting dynamical features responsible for the vertical structure and external mixing of aerosol species. One interesting feature in the 3D structure during boreal summer is a well-defined EC core located 0 - 10°N, 40°E - 90°E (Somalia across the Indian subcontinent), centered at 3 km. This is controlled by a shallow meridional circulation about the core. Additionally, the Somali Low-Level Jet exists at this location, but is usually located below the core (~850 mb). Another interesting feature is a strong EC core located 0 - 15°N, 60°E - 90°E below 0.5 km. Polluted dust (external mixture of dust and smoke) and marine aerosol are collocated in this area with maximum AODs of ~0.5 and ~0.2 respectively. Due to the wind stress over ocean, collocation of aerosol species, altitude, and lack of transport pathway for polluted dust, it is possible that this is an example of aerosol misclassification by

  18. Vertical cloud structure observed from shipborne radar and lidar: Midlatitude case study during the MR01/K02 cruise of the research vessel Mirai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Takemura, Toshihiko; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Kuroiwa, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Shimizu, Atsushi; Emori, Seita; Kamei, Akihide; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2007-04-01

    We observed the vertical distribution of clouds over the Pacific Ocean near Japan in May 2001 using lidar and a 95-GHz radar on the Research Vessel Mirai. Cloud analyses derived from synergy use of radar and lidar observations showed that there were two local maxima of cirrus cloud frequency of occurrence at 7 and 10.5 km and the drizzle frequency of occurrence was about the half compared with that of clouds below 4 km. The number of layers could be also measured using these schemes. Single, double, triple, and quadruple (or more) cloud layers had a 48, 23, 7, and 2% probability of occurrence, respectively. The average number of cloud layers when clouds existed was 1.54. The vertical structure of clouds observed with the radar/lidar system was compared to clouds in the aerosol transport model SPRINTARS, which is based on the CCSR-NIES Atmospheric General Circulation Model. The cloud fraction, radar reflectivity factor, and lidar backscattering coefficient were simulated by the model and compared to those by the observations using height-time cross-sections where the radar sensitivity was taken into account. The overall pattern of cloud fraction was well reproduced, although the model underestimated (overestimated) mean cloud fraction below 8 km (above 8 km). Cloud microphysics in the model could also be validated through comparison of derived model radar and lidar signals in grid mean with observations. The model overestimated ice particle size above 10 km, and simulated particle sizes in water clouds of 10 μm were larger than observed.

  19. Aerosol-assisted controlled packing of silica nanocolloids: templateless synthesis of mesoporous silicates with structural tunability and complexity.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyungmin; Choi, Chang Hyuck; Kim, Myoung Yeob; Choi, Minkee

    2015-01-01

    A template-free synthesis method for mesoporous and macro-/mesoporous hierarchically porous silicates with remarkable structural tunability and complexity is presented. SiO2 nanocolloids having diameters of 3.0-29 nm were prepared as a primary building block by using extended Stöber synthesis, and they were subsequently assembled by an aerosol-assisted drying. The silica pore structure can be rationally controlled depending on the initial diameter of SiO2 colloids and the aerosol-assembly temperature that determines the packing density of SiO2 colloids (i.e., amounts of packing defects) in the resultant materials. The present method could produce mesoporous silica spheres with remarkable pore-structural tunability (291 < BET surface area <807 m(2) g(-1), 0.42 < pore volume <0.92 cm(3) g(-1), 3.1 < pore size <26 nm). Hierarchically porous materials can also be synthesized by the evaporation-induced phase separation of solvent medium during the aerosol-assisted assembly of SiO2 colloids. By adding aluminum and Pt precursors into the SiO2 colloid suspensions before the aerosol-assisted assembly, mesoporous aluminosilicates supporting uniform Pt nanoclusters (∼2 nm) can also be synthesized. This indicates that the synthesis strategy can be used for the direct synthesis of functional silicate materials. PMID:25517201

  20. Detecting cloud vertical structures from radiosondes and MODIS over Arctic first-year sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X.; Hanesiak, J.; Barber, D.

    2007-01-01

    The cloud vertical structure (CVS) of Arctic clouds is analyzed with data mainly from radiosondes launched between November 2003 and June 2004 during the Canadian Arctic Shelf Exchange Study (CASES). The feasibility of using a radiosonde-based cloud detection method [Minnis, P., Yi, Y. Huang, J., and Ayers, K. 2005: Relationships between radiosonde and RUC-2 meteorological conditions and cloud occurrence determined from ARM data, J. Geophys. Res., 110, D23204, doi:10.1029/2005JD006005. MN05 hereafter] is evaluated. At temperatures between - 35 and 5 °C, the minimum probability (Pr) calculated from MN05 to detect a cloud layer is 68%. The infeasibility of MN05 in determining Arctic cirrus clouds is speculated to be due to the different freezing mechanisms at low temperatures (< - 40 °C) in polluted continental and clean Arctic environments. Based on these facts we present a modified scheme to determine CVS in this paper. 1) for low clouds, 51.6% of all samples are with cloud base height (CBH) < 500 m; 66.5% with cloud top height (CTH) < 1500 m and 80.6% with CTH < 2500 m; 54.7% with cloud vertical thickness (CVT) < 500 m and 73.6% with CVT < 1000 m; 2) for middle clouds, the CBH is almost evenly distributed between 1.8 and 4 km but 68% of all CTHs are at heights between 2000 and 5000 m. 17% of CTHs are above 8000 m and 47% CVTs are thinner than 1000 m and 67% thinner than 2000 m; 3) for high clouds, the frequency distributions of both CBH and CTH decrease with increasing height from 5000 to 8000 m but there are 41% CBHs between 9000 and 11,500 m. The MODIS-derived cloud top pressure (CTP) is compared with data from radiosondes. In general the MODIS CTP agrees well with that from radiosondes between the 400 and 700 hPa layer. MODIS underestimates CTP at heights between 700 and 950 hPa and overestimates CTP at lower layers (> 950 hPa). The underestimate and overestimate of atmospheric temperatures above and under the 950 hPa isobaric layer respectively is thought to

  1. Vertical Structure and Physical Processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: A Model Evaluation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolnough, S. J.; Waliser, D. E.; Klingaman, N. P.; Jiang, X.; Petch, J.; Xavier, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    The fundamental physics of the generation, maintenance and propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation are intensely debated. Many theories focus on instabilities arising from interactions between components of the vertical diabatic heating from convection and the large-scale circulation. Most general circulation models (GCMs) exhibit biases in diabatic-heating profiles against observed or reanalysis products, but those products also exhibit considerable discrepancies with one another. The Vertical structure and physical processes of the MJO project is a novel model-evaluation project, designed to assess relationships between diabatic processes in GCMs and their representations of the MJO. A key advantage of the project is the acquisition of temperature, moisture and momentum tendencies from each of the model sub-grid physics schemes. The project has three components, designed to take advantage of known links between biases in short-range forecasts and climate simulations: (1) 20-year AMIP-type simulations to assess the representation of the MJO in each GCM; (2) 2-day hindcasts of two YoTC MJO events to investigate the timestep-level behaviour of physical parameterisations; (3) 20-day hindcasts of the same events to identify links between degradations in forecast skill and the representation of diabatic processes. Analysis of the three component has identified several over-arching conclusions. First, many process-oriented MJO diagnostics derived from past studies using one or several GCMs fail to distinguish between the GCMs in this project that simulate the MJO well and those that do so poorly, whether for initialised hindcasts or 20-year simulations. Second, there is little correlation between GCM hindcast skill for these cases and the fidelity of the MJO representation in climate simulations. Third, all three components have demonstrated that a reliable representation of the moistening profile, particularly lower- and mid-tropospheric moistening during the

  2. A Study of the Vertical Structure of Tropical (20 deg S-20 deg N) Optically Thin Clouds from SAGE II Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Minnis, Patrick; McCormick, M. Patrick; Kent, Geoffrey S.; Yue, Glenn K.; Young, David F.; Skeens, Kristi M.

    1998-01-01

    The tropical cloud data obtained by the satellite instrument of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II from October 1984 to May 1991 have been used to study cloud vertical distribution, including thickness and multilayer structure, and to estimate cloud optical depth. The results indicate that the SAGE-II-observed clouds are generally optically thin clouds, corresponding to a range of optical depth between approximately 8 x 10(exp -4) and 3 x 10(exp -1) with a mean of about 0.035. Two-thirds are classified as subvisual cirrus and one-third thin cirrus. Clouds between 2- to 3-km thick occur most frequently. Approximately 30% of the SAGE II cloud measurements are isolated single-layer clouds, while 65% are high clouds contiguous with an underlying opaque cloud that terminates the SAGE II profile. Thin clouds above detached opaque clouds at altitudes greater than 6.5 km occur less often. Only about 3% of the SAGE II single-layer clouds are located above the tropopause, while 58% of the cloud layers never reach the tropopause. More than one-third of the clouds appear at the tropopause. This study also shows that clouds occur more frequently and extend higher above the tropopause over the western Pacific than than over the eastern Pacific, especially during northern winter. The uncertainty of the derived results due to the SAGE II sampling constraints, data processing, and cloud characteristics is discussed.

  3. Vertical Velocity Measurements in Warm Stratiform Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of vertical air motion in warm boundary layer clouds are key for quantitatively describing cloud-scale turbulence and for improving our understanding of cloud and drizzle microphysical processes. Recently, a new technique that produces seamless measurements of vertical air velocity in the cloud and sub-cloud layers for both drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus clouds has been developed. The technique combines radar Doppler spectra-based retrievals of vertical air motion in cloud and light drizzle conditions with a novel neural network analysis during heavily drizzling periods. Observations from Doppler lidars are used to characterize sub-cloud velocities and to evaluate the performance of the technique near the cloud base. The technique is applied to several cases of stratiform clouds observed by the ARM Mobile Facility during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod. The observations clearly illustrate coupling of the sub-cloud and cloud layer turbulent structures.

  4. Vertical Structures of Anvil Clouds of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Observed by CloudSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, J.; Houze, R. A., Jr.; Heymsfield, A.

    2011-01-01

    A global study of the vertical structures of the clouds of tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) has been carried out with data from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Tropical MCSs are found to be dominated by cloud-top heights greater than 10 km. Secondary cloud layers sometimes occur in MCSs, but outside their primary raining cores. The secondary layers have tops at 6--8 and 1--3 km. High-topped clouds extend outward from raining cores of MCSs to form anvil clouds. Closest to the raining cores, the anvils tend to have broader distributions of reflectivity at all levels, with the modal values at higher reflectivity in their lower levels. Portions of anvil clouds far away from the raining core are thin and have narrow frequency distributions of reflectivity at all levels with overall weaker values. This difference likely reflects ice particle fallout and therefore cloud age. Reflectivity histograms of MCS anvil clouds vary little across the tropics, except that (i) in continental MCS anvils, broader distributions of reflectivity occur at the uppermost levels in the portions closest to active raining areas; (ii) the frequency of occurrence of stronger reflectivity in the upper part of anvils decreases faster with increasing distance in continental MCSs; and (iii) narrower-peaked ridges are prominent in reflectivity histograms of thick anvil clouds close to the raining areas of connected MCSs (superclusters). These global results are consistent with observations at ground sites and aircraft data. They present a comprehensive test dataset for models aiming to simulate process-based upper-level cloud structure around the tropics.

  5. Vertical Structures of Anvil Clouds of Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems Observed by CloudSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hence, Deanna A.; Houze, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    A global study of the vertical structures of the clouds of tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) has been carried out with data from the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar. Tropical MCSs are found to be dominated by cloud-top heights greater than 10 km. Secondary cloud layers sometimes occur in MCSs, but outside their primary raining cores. The secondary layers have tops at 6 8 and 1 3 km. High-topped clouds extend outward from raining cores of MCSs to form anvil clouds. Closest to the raining cores, the anvils tend to have broader distributions of reflectivity at all levels, with the modal values at higher reflectivity in their lower levels. Portions of anvil clouds far away from the raining core are thin and have narrow frequency distributions of reflectivity at all levels with overall weaker values. This difference likely reflects ice particle fallout and therefore cloud age. Reflectivity histograms of MCS anvil clouds vary little across the tropics, except that (i) in continental MCS anvils, broader distributions of reflectivity occur at the uppermost levels in the portions closest to active raining areas; (ii) the frequency of occurrence of stronger reflectivity in the upper part of anvils decreases faster with increasing distance in continental MCSs; and (iii) narrower-peaked ridges are prominent in reflectivity histograms of thick anvil clouds close to the raining areas of connected MCSs (superclusters). These global results are consistent with observations at ground sites and aircraft data. They present a comprehensive test dataset for models aiming to simulate process-based upper-level cloud structure around the tropics.

  6. A Block-Structured KIVA Program for Engines with Vertical or Canted Valves

    1999-08-23

    KIVA3VRELEASE2 is a computer program for the numerical calculation of transient, two and three-dimensional, chemically reactive flows with sprays. It is a newer version of the earlier KIVA3 (1993) that has now been extended to model vertical of canted valves in the cylinder head of a gasoline or diesel engine. KIVA3, in turn, was based on the earlier KIVA2 (1989) and uses the same numerical solution procedure and solves the same sort of equations. KIVA3VRELEASE2more » uses a block-structured mesh with connectivity defined through indirect addressing. The departure from a single rectangular structure in logical space allows complex geometries to be modeled with significantly greater efficiency because large regions of deactivated cells are no longer necessary. Cell-face boundary conditions permit greater flexibility and simplification in the application of boundary conditions. KIVA3VRELEASE2 contains a number of significant changes. New features enhance the robustness, efficiency, and usefullness of the overall program for engine modeling. Automatic restart of the cycle with a reduced timestep in case of iteration limit or temperature overflow will reduce code crashes. A new option provides automatic deactivation of a port region when it is closed from the cylinder and reactivation when it communicates with the cylinder. Corrections in the code improve accuracy; extensions to the particle-based liquid wall film model makes the model more complete and a spli injection option has been added. A new subroutine monitors the liquid and gaseous fuel phases and energy balance data and emissions are monitored and printed. New features have been added to the grid generator K3PREP and the graphics post processor, K3POST.« less

  7. A Block-Structured KIVA Program for Engines with Vertical or Canted Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Amsden, LANL

    1999-08-23

    KIVA3VRELEASE2 is a computer program for the numerical calculation of transient, two and three-dimensional, chemically reactive flows with sprays. It is a newer version of the earlier KIVA3 (1993) that has now been extended to model vertical of canted valves in the cylinder head of a gasoline or diesel engine. KIVA3, in turn, was based on the earlier KIVA2 (1989) and uses the same numerical solution procedure and solves the same sort of equations. KIVA3VRELEASE2 uses a block-structured mesh with connectivity defined through indirect addressing. The departure from a single rectangular structure in logical space allows complex geometries to be modeled with significantly greater efficiency because large regions of deactivated cells are no longer necessary. Cell-face boundary conditions permit greater flexibility and simplification in the application of boundary conditions. KIVA3VRELEASE2 contains a number of significant changes. New features enhance the robustness, efficiency, and usefullness of the overall program for engine modeling. Automatic restart of the cycle with a reduced timestep in case of iteration limit or temperature overflow will reduce code crashes. A new option provides automatic deactivation of a port region when it is closed from the cylinder and reactivation when it communicates with the cylinder. Corrections in the code improve accuracy; extensions to the particle-based liquid wall film model makes the model more complete and a spli injection option has been added. A new subroutine monitors the liquid and gaseous fuel phases and energy balance data and emissions are monitored and printed. New features have been added to the grid generator K3PREP and the graphics post processor, K3POST.

  8. Collection and analysis of inorganic and water soluble organic aerosols over Maryland and Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, L. C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Phinney, K.; Conny, J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols aloft have slower removal than those near the ground, in part, because dry and wet deposition rates result in longer lifetimes and greater range of influence. Knowledge of deposition rates and range of transport for different species are important for developing local and regional air quality policy. Currently, the vertical distribution of organic aerosols (OA's) and their polar, oxidized fraction is largely unknown. Comprehensive methods to analyze aerosol composition collected in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere are lacking. During DISCOVER AQ 2011, both the NASA P3 and Cessna 402B collected aerosols, through shrouded aerosol inlets, onto Teflon and quartz fiber filters. Collection occurred in both the boundary layer and lower free troposphere over Maryland and Virginia, USA. After extraction with water and optimizing separation via ion chromatography, commonly identified secondary organic aerosols can be separated based on their functionality as mono-, di-, or polycarboxylic acids. Inorganic aerosol components can simultaneously be separated and identified with the same method. Individual organic acid compound analysis with detection limits in the low ppb range can be achieved when conductivity/ultraviolet/ and mass spectrometric detectors are placed in tandem. Additionally, thermo optical analysis can be used to determine the mass fraction of water soluble organic carbon versus the total collected mass. This research is designed to provide information on the vertical distribution of particulate organic carbon in the atmosphere, its optical properties, information on aerosol transport in the lower free troposphere, and to provide water soluble organic aerosol structural characterization.

  9. Chitinolytic and pectinolytic community in the vertical structure of chernozem's zone ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukacheva, E.; Manucharova, N.

    2012-04-01

    Chitin is a long-chain polymer of a N-acetylglucosamine and is found in many places throughout the natural world. Pectin is a structural heteropolysaccharide contained in the primary cell walls of terrestrial plants. Roots of the plants and root crops contain pectin. Chitin and pectin are widely distributed throughout the natural world. For this reason it is important to investigate the structural and functional properties of complex organisms, offering degradation of these biopolymers in the terrestrial and soil ecosystems. It is known that ecosystems have their own structure. It is possible to allocate some vertical tiers: phylloplane, litter (soil covering), soil. We investigated chitinolytic and pektinolytic microbial communities dedicated to different layers of the ecosystem of the chernozem zone. Quantity of eukaryote and procaryote organisms increased in the test samples with chitin and pectin. Increasing of eukaryote in samples with pectin was more then in samples with chitin. Also should be noted the significant increasing of actinomycet`s quantity in the samples with chitin in comparison with samples with pectin. The variety and abundance of bacteria in the litter samples increased an order of magnitude as compared to other options investigated. Further prokaryote community was investigated by method FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). FISH is a cytogenetic technique developed that is used to detect and localize the presence or absence of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. Quantity of Actinomycets and Firmicutes was the largest among identified cells with metabolic activity in soil samples. Should be noted significant increasing of the quantity of Acidobateria and Bacteroidetes in pectinolytic community and Alphaproteobacteria in chitinolytic community. In considering of the phylogenetic structure investigated communities in samples of the litter should be noted increase in the segment of Proteobacteria. Increasing of this group of

  10. Impact of vertical structure on water mass circulation in a tropical lagoon (Ebrié, Ivory Coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenon, Isabelle; Audouin, Olivier; Pouvreau, Nicolas; Maurin, Jean-Christophe

    2009-09-01

    A one-dimensional vertical model has been developed to simulate the water mass circulation along the vertical structure in all deep coastal areas. The model has hydrodynamic and transport components solved using finite difference scheme. The one-dimensional vertical model results are coupled to the vertically averaged two-dimensional model results at each point of a horizontal grid. A theoretical salinity profile is introduced for each vertically integrated value obtained from the 2DH model results. A viscosity profile, simulating a viscosity value close to zero at the surface and with large viscosity gradients, is applied along the water column. The model is applied to the Vridi channel, connecting the Ebrié lagoon to the sea (Ivory Coast). The response of the Ebrié lagoon is studied in terms of inflow and outflow of water in the system through the Vridi channel. Due to the abrupt variation of the surface slope, vertical velocities along the water column show an anticlockwise spiral from bottom to surface during a tidal cycle. Due to the bottom friction and to the vertical viscosity profile, velocities decrease from surface to bottom. However, the freshwater inflow slows down the tidal propagation during the flood and causes the surface velocity to be smaller than the bottom velocity at mid-tide. Close to the bottom, velocities follow an anticlockwise movement due to the tidal propagation. At the water surface, velocities follow only an alternative movement of either ebb or flood, along the channel direction. No cross shore velocities can develop at the surface in the channel.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of aerosol-jet printed strain sensors for multifunctional composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Da; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Mei; Liang, Richard; Wang, Ben

    2012-11-01

    Traditional multifunctional composite structures are produced by embedding parasitic parts, such as foil sensors, optical fibers and bulky connectors. As a result, the mechanical properties of the composites, especially the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), could be largely undermined. In the present study, we demonstrated an innovative aerosol-jet printing technology for printing electronics inside composite structures without degrading the mechanical properties. Using the maskless fine feature deposition (below 10 μm) characteristics of this printing technology and a pre-cure protocol, strain sensors were successfully printed onto carbon fiber prepregs to enable fabricating composites with intrinsic sensing capabilities. The degree of pre-cure of the carbon fiber prepreg on which strain sensors were printed was demonstrated to be critical. Without pre-curing, the printed strain sensors were unable to remain intact due to the resin flow during curing. The resin flow-induced sensor deformation can be overcome by introducing 10% degree of cure of the prepreg. In this condition, the fabricated composites with printed strain sensors showed almost no mechanical degradation (short beam shearing ILSS) as compared to the control samples. Also, the failure modes examined by optical microscopy showed no difference. The resistance change of the printed strain sensors in the composite structures were measured under a cyclic loading and proved to be a reliable mean strain gauge factor of 2.2 ± 0.06, which is comparable to commercial foil metal strain gauge.

  12. Resolving detailed molecular structures in complex organic mixtures and modeling their secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman-Rendall, Kevin A. S.; Zhuang, Yang R.; Amirav, Aviv; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) remains an ongoing challenge towards developing detailed and accurate inputs for modeling secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Traditional techniques based on gas chromatography/electron impact-mass spectrometry induce excessive fragmentation, making it difficult to speciate and quantify isomers precisely. The goal of this study is to identify individual organic isomers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beam (SMB-GC/MS, also known as GC/MS with Cold EI) and to incorporate speciated isomers into an SOA model that accounts for the specific structures elucidated. Two samples containing atmospherically relevant UCMs are analyzed. The relative isomer distributions exhibit remarkably consistent trends across a wide range of carbon numbers. Constitutional isomers of different alkanes are speciated and individually quantified as linear, branched - for the first time by position of branching - multiply branched, or unsaturated - by degree of ring substitution and number of rings. Relative amounts of exact molecular structures are used as input parameters in an SOA box model to study the effects of molecular structures on SOA yields and volatility evolution. Highly substituted cyclic, mono-substituted cyclic, and linear species have the highest SOA yields while branched alkanes formed the least SOA. The rate of functionalization of a representative UCM is found to be in agreement with current volatility basis set (VBS) parameterizations based on detailed knowledge of composition and known oxidation mechanisms, confirming the validity of VBS parameters currently used in air quality models.

  13. The vertical photoconductor: A novel device structure suitable for HgCdTe two-dimensional infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siliquini, J. F.; Faraone, L.

    1997-06-01

    A novel photoconductive device structure is proposed and described that has been designed specifically as a sensing element for high density two-dimensional infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) applications. Although the design concept can be applied to a variety of epitaxially grown HgCdTe material, optimum performance can be achieved using n-type HgCdTe semiconductor material consisting of epitaxially grown heterostructure layers in which a two-dimensional mosaic of vertical design photoconductors are fabricated. The heterostructure layers provide high performance devices at greatly reduced power dissipation levels, while the vertical design allows for the high density integration of photoconductors in a two-dimensional array geometry with high fill factor. The salient feature of the proposed device structure is that the bias field is applied in the vertical direction such that it is parallel to the impinging infrared radiation. A comprehensive one-dimensional model is presented for the vertical design photoconductor, which is subsequently used to determine the optimum design parameters in order to achieve maximum responsivity at the lowest possible power dissipation level. It is found that the proposed device structure has the potential to be used in the fabrication of long wavelength IRFPAs approaching 10 6 pixels using 25 × 25 μm 2 detector elements. Furthermore, this is achieved with individual device detectivities that are background limited and for a total array power dissipation of less than 0.1 W using a pulsed biasing scheme. Performance issues such as response uniformity, pixel yield, fill factor, crosstalk, power dissipation, detector impedance, array architecture, and maximum array size are discussed in relation to the suitability of the proposed vertical photoconductor structure for use in IRFPA modules. When considering IRFPA operability, it is found that in many cases the proposed technology has the potential to deliver significant advantages, such

  14. Vertical structure of boundary layer convection during cold-air outbreaks at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonggang; Geerts, Bart; Chen, Yaosheng

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer convection (BLC) is common over high-latitude oceans and adjacent coastal regions when a cold airmass becomes exposed to a sufficient fetch of open water. The vertical structure of mixed-phase BLC clouds and precipitation is examined using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program data set collected at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow, Alaska. BLC may occur at this location in autumn, when cold air masses originating at higher latitudes advect southward over the still ice-free coastal waters north of Alaska. This study identifies such BLC and documents its occurrence and characteristics. Instruments used for this study include profiling Ka band radars, a depolarization backscatter profiling lidar, a scanning X band radar, a microwave radiometer, a ceilometer, surface meteorological probes, and radiosondes. Six criteria are applied to objectively identify the BLC events, using data collected between 2004 and 2013. BLC episodes are relatively common at the NSA site, but almost exclusively in the month of October, and most episodes are relatively short, less than 10 h in duration. Liquid water is commonly found in these mixed-phase BLC clouds, with a typical liquid water path of 150 g/m2, and snowfall rates average ~3 mm h-1 (water equivalent), in some cases over 10 mm h-1, notwithstanding the low cloud echo tops (~1.0-1.5 km). In one rather weak but persistent episode fall speed estimates derived from the profiling Ka band radar indicates the presence of rimed particles, confirming the convective nature of this precipitation.

  15. Mesoscale eddies in the South Atlantic Bight and the Gulf Stream Recirculation region: Vertical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelao, Renato M.

    2014-03-01

    Sea level anomalies from altimeters are combined with decade-long potential temperature and salinity profiles from Argo floats to investigate the vertical structure of mesoscale eddies in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) and the Gulf Stream Recirculation region. Eddy detection and eddy tracking algorithms are applied to the satellite observations, and hydrography profiles from floats that surfaced inside eddies are used to construct three-dimensional composites of cyclones and anticyclones. Eddies are characterized by large temperature and salinity anomalies at 500-1000 m depth and near the surface, and by small anomalies at 200-400 m below the surface at the depth of the North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water. Anomalies associated with anticyclones are generally larger and found deeper in the water column compared to those due to the presence of cyclones. Geostrophic velocities around eddies generally exceed their translation speed in the top 1000 m of the water column. As such, these eddies can trap water in their interior as they propagate westward. Combining the volume of water inside eddies above their trapping depths with the number of eddies that propagate into the SAB each year, it is estimated that cyclones and anticyclones transport 3.5 ± 0.9 Sv and 4.1 ± 1.7 Sv onshore toward the Gulf Stream, respectively. The total volume transport of 7.6 ± 2.2 Sv represents an important fraction of previous estimates of the onshore transport in the Gulf Stream Recirculation gyre. Since eddies are characterized by large temperature and salinity anomalies, they also contribute significantly to the onshore transport of heat and salt.

  16. Precursor wave structure, prereversal vertical drift, and their relative roles in the development of post sunset equatorial spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil; Sobral, José; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of large-scale wave structure in the equatorial bottomside F region that are present during daytime as precursor to post sunset development of the spread F/plasma bubble irregularities are investigated in this paper. Digisonde data from three equatorial sites in Brazil (Fortaleza, Sao Luis and Cachimbo) for a period of few months at low to medium/high solar activity phases are analyzed. Small amplitude oscillations in the F layer true heights, representing wave structure in polarization electric field, are identified as upward propagating gravity waves having zonal scale of a few hundred kilometers. Their amplitudes undergo amplification towards sunset, and depending on the amplitude of the prereversal vertical drift (PRE) they may lead to post sunset generation of ESF/plasma bubble irregularities. On days of their larger amplitudes they appear to occur in phase coherence on all days, and correspondingly the PRE vertical drift velocities are larger than on days of the smaller amplitudes of the wave structure that appear at random phase on the different days. The sustenance of these precursor waves structures is supported by the relatively large ratio (approaching unity) of the F region-to- total field line integrated Pedersen conductivities as calculated using the SUPIM simulation of the low latitude ionosphere. This study examines the role of the wave structure relative to that of the prereversal vertical drift in the post sunset spread F irregularity development.

  17. Observational study of formation mechanism, vertical structure, and dust emission of dust devils over the Taklimakan Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chong; Zhao, Tianliang; Yang, Xinghua; Liu, Feng; Han, Yongxiang; Luan, Zhaopeng; He, Qing; Rood, Mark; Yuen, Wangki

    2016-04-01

    A field observation of dust devils was conducted at Xiaotang over the Taklimakan Desert (TD), China, from 7 to 14 July 2014. The measurements of dust devil opacity with the digital optical method and the observed atmospheric boundary layer conditions were applied to investigate the dust devils' formation mechanism, vertical structure, and dust emissions. The critical conditions in the atmospheric boundary layer for dust devil formation were revealed with the land-air surface temperature difference of higher than 15°C, the enhanced momentum flux and sensible heat flux up to 0.54 kg m-1 s-2 and 327 W m-2, respectively, the weak vertical wind shear with the low wind shear index α < 0.10, and the unstable stratification in the lower atmosphere. Based on observed dust opacities, it is identified that a typical dust devil was vertically structured with central updrafts and peripheral downdrafts of dust particles with the asymmetrically horizontal distribution of dust in a rotating dust column. The vertical flux of near-surface dust emissions was also estimated in a range from 5.4 × 10-5 to 9.6 × 10-5 kg m-2 s-1 for a typical dust devil event over TD.

  18. Radiative Impacts of Elevated Aerosol Layers from Different Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, D. N.; Weinzierl, B.; Gasteiger, J.; Heimerl, K.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles are omnipresent in the Earth's atmosphere and have important impacts on weather and climate by their effects on the atmospheric radiative balance. With the advent of more and more sophisticated representations of atmospheric processes in earth system models, the lack of reliable input data on aerosols leads to significant uncertainties in the prediction of future climate scenarios. In recent years large discrepancies in radiative forcing estimates from aerosol layers in modeling studies have been revealed emphasizing the need for detailed and systematic observations of aerosols. Airborne in-situ measurements represent an important pillar for validating both model results and retrievals of aerosol distributions and properties from remote sensing methods on global scales. However, detailed observations are challenging and therefore are subject to substantial uncertainties themselves. Here we use data from airborne in-situ measurements of elevated aerosol layers from various field experiments in different regions of the world. The data set includes Saharan mineral dust layers over Africa, the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean from the SALTRACE and the SAMUM campaigns as well as long-range transported biomass burning aerosol layers from wild fires in the Sahel region and North America measured over the tropical Atlantic Ocean, Europe and the Arctic detected during SAMUM2, CONCERT2011, DC3 and ACCESS 2012. We aim to characterize the effects of the measured aerosol layers, in particular with respect to ageing, mixing state and vertical structure, on the overall atmospheric radiation budget as well as local heating and cooling rates. We use radiative transfer simulations of short and long-wave radiation and aerosol optical properties derived in a consistent way from the in-situ observations of microphysical properties using T-matrix calculations. The results of this characterization will help to improve the parameterization of the effects of elevated

  19. Observed development of the vertical structure of the marine boundary layer during the LASIE experiment in the Ligurian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempreviva, A. M.; Schiano, M. E.; Pensieri, S.; Semedo, A.; Tomé, R.; Bozzano, R.; Borghini, M.; Grasso, F.; Soerensen, L. L.; Teixeira, J.; Transerici, C.

    2010-01-01

    In the marine environment, complete datasets describing the surface layer and the vertical structure of the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL), through its entire depth, are less frequent than over land, due to the high cost of measuring campaigns. During the seven days of the Ligurian Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (LASIE), organized by the NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC) in the Mediterranean Sea, extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements were collected from instruments placed on a spar buoy and a ship. Standard surface meteorological measurements were collected by meteorological sensors mounted on the buoy ODAS Italia1 located in the centre of the Gulf of Genoa. The evolution of the height (zi) of the MABL was monitored using radiosondes and a ceilometer on board of the N/O Urania. Here, we present the database and an uncommon case study of the evolution of the vertical structure of the MABL, observed by two independent measuring systems: the ceilometer and radiosondes. Following the changes of surface flow conditions, in a sequence of onshore - offshore - onshore wind direction shifting episodes, during the mid part of the campaign, the overall structure of the MABL changed. Warm and dry air from land advected over a colder sea, induced a stably stratified Internal Boundary Layer (IBL) and a consequent change in the structure of the vertical profiles of potential temperature and relative humidity.

  20. Examining the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation for different cloud types in CAM5 using satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Klein, S. A.; Ma, H.; Boyle, J. S.; Caldwell, P.

    2013-12-01

    Climate models have difficulties in correctly simulating clouds and precipitation. It is critical to know the internal structure of clouds and precipitation since it is the vertical distribution of condensate that determines the characteristics of the cloud radiative forcing and lends insight into the vertical structure of condensation heating, which have large impact on the evolution of cloud systems. Cloudsat and CALIPSO provide the unprecedented data that allow us to look at detailed cloud and precipitation structures. In this study, the simulated radar reflectivities and lidar signals are compared to satellite observations, and the vertical structures of clouds and precipitation simulated in CAM5 are examined using case studies. Impact of precipitation distributions on the simulator output is explored. Our focus is to evaluate how well the model simulated clouds and precipitation over different important cloud regimes. The cases for different cloud types selected include deep convection in the ITCZ, extratropical frontal system, stratocumulus, trade cumulus, and mixed-phase cloud. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This abstract is LLNL-ABS-641836.

  1. Balloon-borne observations of the development and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Harder, J. W.; Rolf, S. R.; Rosen, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The vertical distribution of ozone measured at McMurdo Station, Antarctica using balloon-borne sensors on 33 occasions during November 6, 1986 - August 25, 1986 is described. These observations suggest a highly structured cavity confined to the 12-20 km altitude region. In the 17-19 km altitude range, the ozone volume mixing ratio declined from about 2 ppm at the end of August to about 0.5 ppm by mid-October. The average decay in this region can be described as exponential with a half life of about 25 days. While total ozone, as obtained from profile integration, declined only about 35 percent, the integrated ozone between 14 and 18 km declined more than 70 percent. Vertical ozone profiles in the vortex revealed unusual structure with major features from 1 to 5 km thick which had suffered ozone depletions as great as 90 percent.

  2. Circulation, heat exchange and vertical structure of the Hornsund - the Svalbard Archipelago fiord.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakacki, Jaromir; Przyborska, Anna; Kosecki, Szymon; Sundfjord, Arild

    2015-04-01

    The Hornsund fjord is located in the southwestern part of Spitsbergen- the biggest island of the Svalbard Archipelago. The fjord is influenced by two major currents in this area. The first one is the current carrying the cold and less saline waters around the southern Spitsbergen tip, often called the Sørkapp Current or the South Cape Current. The second is the well-known West Spitsbergen Current (WSC), carrying salty and warm Atlantic Waters through Fram Strait into the Arctic Ocean. From a biological point of view, Hornsund can be treated as a young unstable system or cold system, which suggests that it is under an influence of the South Cape Current. Because of limited measurements in this area, the hydrodynamic model MIKE3D has been implemented for this fjord to diagnose which current has the main influence on Hornsund. The fjord domain was extended into the shelf area. At the lateral boundary of the extended domain, data from the ROMS simulation of the Svalbard area made by the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research (IMR) with resolution of 800 m have been used. Atmospheric data from European Centre for Medium Weather Forecast (ECMWF) were employed as well as from the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS, 1 and 0.5 degrees) reanalysis that uses metrological data from Polish Polar Station located in Hornsund. Based on 5 years of simulation (2005-2010) seasonal and annual general circulation in the fjord has been described. Estimation of the heat transport between fjord and ocean, and between fjord and atmosphere will permit to establish the heat budget and help to evaluate the influence of the South Cape Current and WSC on the fjord ecosystem development. An influence of the fresh water fluxes and vertical structure of water masses and their transformations will be also discussed. This work was partially performed in the frame of the projects GAME (DEC-2012/04/A/NZ8/00661) and AWAKE2 (Pol-Nor/198675/17/2013)

  3. HARLIE Aerosol and Cloud Structure and Wind Observations during HARGLO and IHOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.; Wilkersorf, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    The Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE) is a conical-scanning, 1-micron wavelength lidar that has been adapted for ground-based applications and used to infer horizontal wind information by tracking the motions of aerosol and cloud scattering structures. In addition, HARLIE's rapid continuous scanning enables boundary layer statistics and a new cloud lidar data product that gives cloud coverage as a function of altitude with high temporal resolution. HARLIE has been used in several field campaigns while developing the techniques for wind, boundary layer (BL), and cloud data products. These campaigns involved a variety of wind measuring instruments including rawindsondes, cloud-tracked winds from video imagery, Doppler lidars and Doppler radars. HARGLO-2 was one of these campaigns and was dedicated to wind profile intercomparisons over a 1-week period in November of 2001. The most recent of these campaigns was the International H20 Project (IHOP) located in the Southern Great Plains of the US during May and June of 2002.

  4. Transverse Mode Structure and Pattern Formation in Oxide Confined Vertical Cavity Semiconductor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hegarty, S.P.; Hou, H.Q.; Huyet, G.; McInerney, J.G.; Porta, P.

    1999-07-06

    We analyze the transverse profiles of oxide-confined vertical cavity laser diodes as a function of aperture size. For small apertures we demonstrate that thermal lensing can be the dominant effect in determining the transverse resonator properties. We also analyze pattern formation in lasers with large apertures where we observe the appearance of tilted waves.

  5. Comparing the Cloud Vertical Structure Derived from Several Methods Based on Radiosonde Profiles and Ground-based Remote Sensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Suros, M.; Calbo, J.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-08-27

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, is an important characteristic in order to describe the impact of clouds in a changing climate. In this work several methods to estimate the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering number and position of cloud layers, with a ground based system which is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ on the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study these methods are applied to 125 radiosonde profiles acquired at the ARM Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of year 2009 and endorsed by GOES images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The overall agreement for the methods ranges between 44-88%; four methods produce total agreements around 85%. Further tests and improvements are applied on one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low resolution vertical profiles, which could be useful in atmospheric modeling. The total agreement, even when using low resolution profiles, can be improved up to 91% if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  6. Comparing the cloud vertical structure derived from several methods based on measured atmospheric profiles and active surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Surós, M.; Calbó, J.; González, J. A.; Long, C. N.

    2013-06-01

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, is an important characteristic in order to describe the impact of clouds in a changing climate. In this work several methods to estimate the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering number and position of cloud layers, with a ground based system which is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ on the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study these methods are applied to 125 radiosonde profiles acquired at the ARM Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of year 2009 and endorsed by GOES images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The overall agreement for the methods ranges between 44-88%; four methods produce total agreements around 85%. Further tests and improvements are applied on one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low resolution vertical profiles, which could be useful in atmospheric modeling. The total agreement, even when using low resolution profiles, can be improved up to 91% if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  7. Simulation of the aerosol effect on the microphysical properties of shallow stratocumulus clouds over East Asia using a bin-based meso-scale cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, I.-J.; Iguchi, T.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Nakajima, T.

    2010-10-01

    A bin-based meso-scale cloud model has been employed to explore the aerosol influence on the cloud microphysical properties and precipitation efficiency of shallow stratocumulus in East Asia in March 2005. We newly constructed aerosol size distributions and hygroscopicity parameters for five aerosol species that reproduced observed aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations in the target period, and thereby used in model simulation of the cloud microphysical properties and precipitation efficiency. It is found that the simulated results were satisfactorily close to the satellite-based observation. Significant effects of aerosols as well as of the meteorological condition were found in the simulated cloud properties and precipitation as confirmed by comparing maritime and polluted aerosol cases and by a sensitivity test with interchanging the aerosol conditions for two cases. Cloud droplets in the polluted condition tended to exhibit relatively narrower cloud drop spectral widths with a bias toward smaller droplet sizes than those in maritime condition, supporting the dispersion effect. The polluted aerosol condition also had a tendency of thinner and higher cloud layers than maritime aerosol condition under relatively humid meteorological condition, possibly due to enhanced updraft. In our cases, vertical structures of cloud droplet number and size were affected predominantly by the change in aerosol conditions, whereas in the structures of liquid water content and cloud fraction were influenced by both meteorological and aerosol conditions. Aerosol change made little differences in cloud liquid water, vertical cloud structure, and updraft/downdraft velocities between the maritime and polluted conditions under dry atmospheric condition. Quantitative evaluations of the sensitivity factor between aerosol and cloud parameters revealed a large sensitivity values in the target area compared to the previously reported values, indicating the strong

  8. Vertical structure of the wind field during the Special Observing Period I of the Global Weather Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paegle, J. N.; Paegle, J.; Zhen, Z.; Sampson, G.

    1986-01-01

    The vertical structure of the global atmosphere is analyzed for selected periods of the Special Observing Period I (SOP-I) for the Global Weather Experiment (GWE). The analysis consists of projection of the stream-function and velocity potential at 200 and 850 mb on spherical harmonics and of the wind and height fields on the normal modes of a linearized form of the primitive equations for a basic state at rest. The kinematic vertical structure is discussed in terms of correlation coefficients of the 200 mb and 850 mb winds and analysis of the internal and external normal modes of the primitive equations. The reliability of the results is checked by applying the same analysis methods to data sets obtained from three different institutions: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF), and Goddard Laboratory for the Atmospheres (GLA). It is found that, on a global basis, vertically reversing circulations are as important as the equivalent barotropic structures. For the verticaly reversing components, the gravity and mixed Rossby-gravity modes have contributions of the same order of magnitude as those of the Rossby modes in tropical latitudes.

  9. The code MaexPro for calculation of aerosol extinction in the marine and coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, G. A.

    2010-04-01

    In the paper the description of the last version of code MaexPro (Marine aerosol extinction Profile) for calculation spectral and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficient α(λ), aerosol sizes distribution, area distribution, volumes distribution, modes aerosol extinction spectra is submitted. Code MaexPro is a computer program under constant development to estimate of EO systems signal power at a location place in which a fetch is key entrance parameter. The program carries out calculation α(λ), as functions of atmospheric effects using standard meteorological parameters, aerosol microphysical structure, a spectral band and a height of the sensor location. Spectral behavior α(λ) can be submitted as graphically, and as tables. Commands overplot for superposition or change of figures; profiles extrapolation; a lens; all kinds of possible copying; the data presentation, convenient for an input in code MODTRAN, and etc. are stipulated. The code MaexPro is a completely mouse-driven PC Windows program with a user-friendly interface. Calculation time of spectral and vertical profiles of α(λ) depends on the necessary wave length resolution, radius of aerosol particles and the location place height, and does not exceed tens seconds for each new meteorological condition. Other calculations characteristics, such as aerosol sizes distribution, area distribution, volumes distribution, modes aerosol extinction spectra, are performed in a few seconds.

  10. Vertical Cloud Structure Of The 2009 Jupiter Impact Based On HST/WFC3 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sanz-Requena, J. F.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Wong, M.; Hueso, R.; Hammel, H. B.; Orton, G. S.; Fletcher, L. N.; de Pater, I.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Clarke, J. T.; Noll, K.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2010-10-01

    The impact of a body of unknown origin with Jupiter in July 2009 (Sánchez-Lavega et al., Astrophys. J. Lett, Vol. 715, L155. 2010) produced an intense perturbation of the planet's atmosphere at the visible levels. The perturbation was caused by dense aerosol material; this strongly absorbing material expanded steadily as it was advected by the local winds. This phenomenon was observed at high spatial resolution by the Hubble Space Telescope in July, August, September and November 2009 with recently installed Wide Field Camera 3. In this work, we present radiative transfer modeling of the observed reflectivity in the near UV (200nm) to near IR (950nm) range. The geometrical and spectral variations of reflectivity elucidate the main particle properties (optical thickness, size, imaginary refractive index) and their temporal evolution. The aerosol particles that formed during the impact have a mean radius of about 1 micron and are located high in the atmosphere (above 10 mbar), in good agreement ith ground-based observations in deep methane absorption bands in the near infrared. The density of this particle layer decreases with time until it approaches that of the pre-impact atmosphere. These results are also discussed in terms of what we know from other impacts in Jupiter (1994's SL9 event and 2010's bolide). Acknowledgements: SPH, ASL and RH are supported by the Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  11. Features of the vertical phytoplankton structure in the deep-sea parts of the Caspian Sea in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pautova, L. A.; Kravchishina, M. D.; Vostokov, S. V.; Zernova, V. V.; Silkin, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    The new features of the vertical phytoplankton distribution in the central and southern deep-water parts of the Caspian Sea are identified on the basis of long-term observations (2004-2012, 419 samples). Systematic study of phytoplankton in the Middle Caspian for nine years has shown that the interannual variability in the dominant summer phytoplankton complex is due to traditional species of diatoms and dinoflagellates and also coccolithophores, a new systematic group for the Caspian Sea (June 2010). It was first determined that summer phytoplankton of the deep-water parts in the Middle and Southern Caspian is similar in species, quantitative, and spatial (vertical) structure. A zone of higher phytoplankton productivity was first found in the area of the Absheron Sill. Two types of communities and their boundary were first distinguished in the vertical structure of summer phytoplankton of the deep-sea parts: warm-water and cold-water (below the thermocline). The boundary between them corresponds to the lower boundary of the seasonal thermocline (maximum depths up to 50-60 m) with the highest wet total phytoplankton biomass and chlorophyll a concentrations. The intensity of stratification of the water column by temperature mainly causes the vertical phytoplankton structure. The anomalously large deep-sea accumulations of diatoms cells containing chlorophyll (remains of winter-spring blooms) were first found in the near-bottom layers of the northern slope of the Derbent Depression. Their presence at the depths of 300-400 m is probably caused by the slope cascading. The lower boundary (500 m) of phytoplankton abundance in the Caspian Sea with chlorophyll-containing cells of fresh water green algae were registered by the authors for the first time in the central areas of the Derbent and South Caspian depressions. This phenomenon was caused by the contribution of cold Caucasus rivers through a system of submarine canyons from the shelf to the deep sea areas.

  12. The Effects of Black Carbon and Sulfate Aerosols in ChinaRegions on East Asia Monsoons

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bai; Liu, Yu; Sun, Jiaren

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we examine the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China on East Asia monsoons and its precipitation processes by using the CAM3.0 model. It is demonstrated that sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China both have the effects to weaken East Asia monsoons in both summer and winter seasons. However, they certainly differ from each other in affecting vertical structures of temperature and atmospheric circulations. Their differences are expected because of their distinct optical properties, i.e., scattering vs. absorbing. Even for a single type of aerosol, its effects on temperature structures and atmospheric circulations are largely season-dependent. Applications of T-test on our results indicate that forcing from black carbon aerosols over China is relatively weak and limited. It is also evident from our results that the effects of synthetic aerosols (sulfate and black carbon together) on monsoons are not simply a linear summation between these two types of aerosols. Instead, they are determined by their integrated optical properties. Synthetic aerosols to a large degree resemble effects of sulfate aerosols. This implies a likely scattering property for the integration of black carbon and sulfate aerosols in China.

  13. Retrieval of Aerosol Profiles using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Selami; Frieß, Udo; Apituley, Arnoud; Henzing, Bas; Baars, Holger; Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Adam, Mariana; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Zieger, Paul; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a well established measurement technique to derive atmospheric trace gas profiles. Using MAX-DOAS measurements of trace gases with a known vertical profile, like the oxygen-dimer O4, it is possible to retrieve information on atmospheric aerosols. Based on the optimal estimation method, we have developed an algorithm which fits simultaneously measured O4 optical densities and relative intensities at several wavelengths and elevation angles to values simulated by a radiative transfer model. Retrieval parameters are aerosol extinction profile and optical properties such as single scattering albedo, phase function and Angström exponent. In 2008 and 2009 several intercomparison campaigns with established aerosol measurement techniques took place in Cabauw/Netherlands, Melpitz/Germany, Ispra/Italy and Leipzig/Germany, where simultaneous DOAS, lidar, Sun photometer and Nephelometer measurements were performed. Here we present results of the intercomparisons for cloud free conditions. The correlation of the aerosol optical thickness retrieved by the DOAS technique and the Sun photometer shows coefficients of determination from 0.96 to 0.98 and slopes from 0.94 to 1.07. The vertical structure of the DOAS retrieved aerosol extinction profiles compare favourably with the structures seen by the backscatter lidar. However, the vertical spatial development of the boundary layer is reproduced with a lower resolution by the DOAS technique. Strategies for the near real-time retrieval of trace gas profiles, aerosol profiles and optical properties will be discussed as well.

  14. The Role of Boundary Layer Aerosol in the Vertical Development of Precipitation and Electrification: Another Look at the Contrast Between Lightning over Land and Over Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Madden, N.; Labrada, C.; Gerlach, J.; Atkinson, L.

    1999-01-01

    Comparisons are made between the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration in the boundary layer and radar/electrical observations of the vertical development of precipitation and lightning in both the 'break period' and 'monsoon' regimes in tropical Brazil. The initial radar echoes and the maximum flash rates are found to be higher when the CCN concentration is higher, characteristic of the 'break period' conditions. One possible explanation for both observations is the survival of cloud droplets against coalescence and their attainment of the mixed phase region aloft.

  15. Predicting the vertical structure of tidal current and salinity in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ford, Michael; Wang, Jia; Cheng, Ralph T.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional laterally averaged numerical estuarine model is developed to study the vertical variations of tidal hydrodynamic properties in the central/north part of San Francisco Bay, California. Tidal stage data, current meter measurements, and conductivity, temperature, and depth profiling data in San Francisco Bay are used for comparison with model predictions. An extensive review of the literature is conducted to assess the success and failure of previous similar investigations and to establish a strategy for development of the present model. A σ plane transformation is used in the vertical dimension to alleviate problems associated with fixed grid model applications in the bay, where the tidal range can be as much as 20–25% of the total water depth. Model predictions of tidal stage and velocity compare favorably with the available field data, and prototype salinity stratification is qualitatively reproduced. Conclusions from this study as well as future model applications and research needs are discussed.

  16. Atmospheric Chemistry: Nature's plasticized aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of atmospheric aerosol particles affects their reactivity and growth rates. Measurements of aerosol properties over the Amazon rainforest indicate that organic particles above tropical rainforests are simple liquid drops.

  17. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Márquez, Francisco; López, Vicente; Morant, Carmen; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Domingo, Concepción; Elizalde, Eduardo; Zamora, Félix

    2010-01-01

    Arrmore » ays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800°C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.« less

  18. The vertical structure of the F ring of Saturn from ring-plane crossings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharringhausen, Britt R.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2013-11-01

    We present a photometric model of the rings of Saturn which includes the main rings and an F ring, inclined to the main rings, with a Gaussian vertical profile of optical depth. This model reproduces the asymmetry in brightness between the east and west ansae of the rings of Saturn that was observed by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) within a few hours after the Earth ring-plane crossing (RPX) of 10 August 1995. The model shows that during this observation the inclined F ring unevenly blocked the east and west ansae of the main rings. The brightness asymmetry produced by the model is highly sensitive to the vertical thickness and radial optical depth of the F ring. The F-ring model that best matches the observations has a vertical full width at half maximum of 13 ± 7 km and an equivalent depth of 10 ± 4 km. The model also reproduces the shape of the HST profiles of ring brightness vs. distance from Saturn, both before and after the time of ring-plane crossing. Smaller asymmetries observed before the RPX, when the Earth was on the dark side of the rings, cannot be explained by blocking of the main rings by the F ring or vice versa and are probably instead due to the intrinsic longitudinal variation exhibited by the F ring.

  19. Assessing Vertical Distribution of Trace Species as related to Transport and Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Shook, M.; Scarino, A. J.; Silverman, M. L.; Kleb, M. M.; Crawford, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign conducted extensive vertical sampling of traces gases and aerosols during four separate deployments: Baltimore, MD (2011); California Central Valley (2013); Houston, TX (2013); and Denver, CO (2014). The campaign's primary objective is to better understand how column measurements can be used to infer surface conditions. In order to achieve this objective, it is necessary to understand the factors that control the vertical distribution of trace species that are highly relevant to air quality issues. Leveraging the over 400 vertical profiles from the Baltimore and Houston deployments, we will contrast the DISCOVER-AQ vertical observations of CO2, CO, O3, NOx, CH2O, and aerosol properties from these coastal regions. After determining airmass origin and atmospheric vertical structure for each of the profiles, the vertical structure of these trace species will be compared to assess the impact and relative importance of vertical transport, advection, and local emissions.

  20. The atmospheric aerosol dynamics on Lidar and Sunphotometer data over Yakutsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolashkin, Semyen; Timofeeva, Galina; Sakerin, Sergey; Titov, Semyen; Marichev, Valery

    The lidar and sunphotometer investigations of atmospheric aerosol layers vertical structure and dynamics have been carried out in Yakutsk (62N). Also the season and annual variations of the total atmospheric aerosol and water vapor concentration near Yakutsk have been carried out and the main features are developed. The atmosphere is cleaner on aerosol composition on fall and winter periods, but spring and summer period is differed by maximally hazing and variability of the aerosol optical depth. The investigation of seasonal feature of water vapor concentration in the atmosphere for 2004-2006 years showed an expected view of the seasonal distribution with maximum in the summer season, because of high activity of the lower atmosphere in summer and more intensive evaporation in the warm period. Some results on investigation of the influence of the solar corpuscular and geomagnetic activity on aerosol composition of atmosphere on the subauroral latitudes are discussed.

  1. Lidar Investigation of Aerosol Pollution Distribution near a Coal Power Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsev, TS.; Kolarov, G.

    1992-01-01

    Using aerosol lidars with high spatial and temporal resolution with the possibility of real-time data interpretation can solve a large number of ecological problems related to the aerosol-field distribution and variation and the structure of convective flows. Significantly less expensive specialized lidars are used in studying anthropogenic aerosols in the planetary boundary layer. Here, we present results of lidar measurements of the mass-concentration field around a coal-fired power plant with intensive local aerosol sources. We studied the pollution evolution as a function of the emission dynamics and the presence of retaining layers. The technique used incorporates complex analysis of three types of lidar mapping: horizontal map of the aerosol field, vertical cross-section map, and a series of profiles along a selected path. The lidar-sounding cycle was performed for the time of atmosphere's quasi-stationarity.

  2. Nitrogen addition and harvest frequency rather than initial plant species composition determine vertical structure and light interception in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ute; Isselstein, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In biodiversity experiments based on seeded experimental communities, species richness and species composition exert a strong influence on canopy structure and can lead to an improved use of aboveground resources. In this study, we want to explore whether these findings are applicable to agriculturally managed permanent grassland. Vertical layered profiles of biomass, leaf area (LA) and light intensity were measured in a removal-type biodiversity experiment (GrassMan) to compare the canopy structure in grassland vegetation of different plant species composition (called sward types). Additionally, the altered sward types were subjected to four different management regimes by a combination of the factors fertilization (unfertilized, NPK fertilized) and cutting frequency (one late cut or three cuts). In spite of large compositional differences (ratio grasses : non-leguminous forbs : leguminous forbs ranging from 93 : 7 : 0 to 39 : 52 : 9), the vegetation of the same management regime hardly differed in its canopy structure, whereas the different management regimes led to distinct vertical profiles in the vegetation. However, the allocation of biomass in response to cutting and fertilization differed among the sward types. Vegetation dominated by grasses was denser and had more LA when fertilized compared with vegetation rich in dicots which merely grew taller. In functionally more diverse vegetation, light interception was not increased compared with vegetation consisting of more than 90 % of grasses in terms of biomass. Management had a much stronger influence on structure and light interception than plant species composition in this grassland experiment. PMID:26199402

  3. VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF A SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN TURBULENT, MAGNETIZED INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Alex S.; Matthew Haffner, L.; Ryan Joung, M.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Benjamin, Robert A.; Klingenberg, Christian; Waagan, Knut

    2012-05-10

    Stellar feedback drives the circulation of matter from the disk to the halo of galaxies. We perform three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a vertical column of the interstellar medium with initial conditions typical of the solar circle in which supernovae drive turbulence and determine the vertical stratification of the medium. The simulations were run using a stable, positivity-preserving scheme for ideal MHD implemented in the FLASH code. We find that the majority ( Almost-Equal-To 90%) of the mass is contained in thermally stable temperature regimes of cold molecular and atomic gas at T < 200 K or warm atomic and ionized gas at 5000 K < T < 10{sup 4.2} K, with strong peaks in probability distribution functions of temperature in both the cold and warm regimes. The 200-10{sup 4.2} K gas fills 50%-60% of the volume near the plane, with hotter gas associated with supernova remnants (30%-40%) and cold clouds (<10%) embedded within. At |z| {approx} 1-2 kpc, transition-temperature (10{sup 5} K) gas accounts for most of the mass and volume, while hot gas dominates at |z| > 3 kpc. The magnetic field in our models has no significant impact on the scale heights of gas in each temperature regime; the magnetic tension force is approximately equal to and opposite the magnetic pressure, so the addition of the field does not significantly affect the vertical support of the gas. The addition of a magnetic field does reduce the fraction of gas in the cold (<200 K) regime with a corresponding increase in the fraction of warm ({approx}10{sup 4} K) gas. However, our models lack rotational shear and thus have no large-scale dynamo, which reduces the role of the field in the models compared to reality. The supernovae drive oscillations in the vertical distribution of halo gas, with the period of the oscillations ranging from Almost-Equal-To 30 Myr in the T < 200 K gas to {approx}100 Myr in the 10{sup 6} K gas, in line with predictions by Walters and Cox.

  4. Lorentz resonances and the vertical structure of dusty rings - Analytical and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, Les; Burns, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    The Schaffer and Burns (1987) linear theory of Lorentz resonances (LRs) in planetary rings is extended in order to accurately compute LR locations and to elucidate the nature of grain trajectories within the LR zones. Using the perturbation theory and energy arguments, it is shown that an increase in the inclination or eccentricity of a grain must be accompanied by a shift in the mean orbital radius of the particle. This shift alters the epicyclic frequencies in such a way that the infinite response of the linear resonance theory is suppressed. Chaotic motion is found for the range of charge-to-mass ratios that cause the vertical and horizontal LRs to overlap.

  5. Self-assembly of gold nanorods into vertically aligned, rectangular microplates with a supercrystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Junyan; Li, Zhe; Ye, Xiaozhou; Ma, Yurong; Qi, Limin

    2013-12-01

    Vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates with a well-defined rectangular shape were fabricated in a large area through self-assembly of gold nanorods by a novel bulk solution evaporation method. This evaporative self-assembly strategy involving continuous movement of the contact line can prevent the coffee-ring effect, thus allowing uniform deposition of discrete GNR superstructures over a large area and favoring the formation of GNR supercrystals with geometrically symmetric shapes. A mechanism based on the continuing nucleation and growth of smectic GNR superstructures accompanying the movement of the contact line was put forward for the formation of the unique GNR supercrystal arrays. Based on this mechanism, a micropatterned substrate was designed to control the nucleation location and growth direction, leading to the spontaneous self-assembly of nearly parallel arrays of vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates of GNRs. The obtained rectangular-plate-shaped GNR supercrystals exhibited interesting anisotropic optical reflection properties, which were revealed by polarized light microscopy.Vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates with a well-defined rectangular shape were fabricated in a large area through self-assembly of gold nanorods by a novel bulk solution evaporation method. This evaporative self-assembly strategy involving continuous movement of the contact line can prevent the coffee-ring effect, thus allowing uniform deposition of discrete GNR superstructures over a large area and favoring the formation of GNR supercrystals with geometrically symmetric shapes. A mechanism based on the continuing nucleation and growth of smectic GNR superstructures accompanying the movement of the contact line was put forward for the formation of the unique GNR supercrystal arrays. Based on this mechanism, a micropatterned substrate was designed to control the nucleation location and growth direction, leading to the spontaneous self-assembly of

  6. Role of vertical structure of cloud microphysical properties on cloud radiative forcing over the Asian monsoon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Kiran, V.; Rajeevan, M.; Gadhavi, H.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Five years (2006-2010) of clouds and earth's radiant energy system (CERES) and CloudSat data have been analyzed to examine the role of vertical structure of cloud microphysical properties on cloud radiative forcing (CRF) parameters at the top-of-the atmosphere over the Asian monsoon region during the summer monsoon season (June-September) and the Pacific warm pool region during April. Vertical profile of cloud properties (optical depth, cloud liquid water content and cloud ice water content) derived from CloudSat data has been used for the present analysis. Shortwave, longwave and net CRF derived from the CERES data have been used. The results suggest an imbalance between shortwave cloud radiative forcing and longwave cloud radiative forcing over the Asian monsoon region consistent with the results reported earlier. The present analysis suggests that over the Bay-of-Bengal (BoB), vertical profile of cloud microphysical properties determine more than 50 % of variance in CRF. However, over the Pacific warm pool region, cloud microphysical property profiles does not contribute significantly to variance in net CRF (<10 %). Over the BoB, large asymmetry between shortwave and longwave CRF is caused by large amounts of cloud liquid water content in the layer between the surface and 9 km. The present study highlights the importance of accurate representation of cloud microphysical properties in determining the influence of clouds on the radiative balance over the top-of-the atmosphere.

  7. Aerosol measurements in the IR: from limb to nadir?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, A.; Irion, F. W.; Mills, F. P.; Steele, H. M.; Gunson, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol concentration have been derived from the ATMOS solar occultation dataset. The EOS instrument TES has motivated studies of the feasibility of quantifying aerosols in nadir and limb emission measurements.

  8. Aerosol Climate Interactions in Climate System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehl, J. T.

    2002-12-01

    Aerosols are widely recognized as an important process in Earth's climate system. Observations over the past decade have improved our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosols. Recently, field observations have highlighted the pervasiveness of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere. These aerosols are of particular interest, since they alter the vertical distribution of shortwave radiative heating between the surface and atmosphere. Given this increased knowledge of aerosols from various field programs, interest is focusing on how to integrate this understanding into global climate models. These types of models provide the best tool available to comprehensively study the potential effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system. Results from climate system model simulations that include aerosol effects will be presented to illustrate key aerosol climate interactions. These simulations employ idealized and realistic distributions of absorbing aerosols. The idealized aerosol simulations provide insight into the role of aerosol shortwave absorption on the global hydrologic cycle. The realistic aerosol distributions provide insight into the local response of aerosol forcing in the Indian subcontinent region. Emphasis from these simulations will be on the hydrologic cycle, since water availability is of emerging global environmental concern. This presentation will also consider what more is needed to significantly improve our ability to model aerosol processes in climate system models. Uncertainty in aerosol climate interactions remains a major source of uncertainty in our ability to project future climate change. Focus will be on interactions between aerosols and various physical, chemical and biogeochemical aspects of the Earth system.

  9. Aerosol based direct-write micro-additive fabrication method for sub-mm 3D metal-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Taibur; Renaud, Luke; Heo, Deuk; Renn, Michael; Panat, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    The fabrication of 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale is highly important in order to realize low-loss passives and GHz wavelength antennas with applications in wearable and Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices. The inherent 2D nature of lithographic processes severely limits the available manufacturing routes to fabricate 3D structures. Further, the lithographic processes are subtractive and require the use of environmentally harmful chemicals. In this letter, we demonstrate an additive manufacturing method to fabricate 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale. A UV curable dielectric is dispensed from an Aerosol Jet system at 10-100 µm length scale and instantaneously cured to build complex 3D shapes at a length scale  <1 mm. A metal nanoparticle ink is then dispensed over the 3D dielectric using a combination of jetting action and tilted dispense head, also using the Aerosol Jet technique and at a length scale 10-100 µm, followed by the nanoparticle sintering. Simulation studies are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of using such structures as mm-wave antennas. The manufacturing method described in this letter opens up the possibility of fabricating an entirely new class of custom-shaped 3D structures at a sub-mm length scale with potential applications in 3D antennas and passives.

  10. KIVA-3V: A block-structured KIVA program for engines with vertical or canted valves

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes an extended version of KIVA-3, known as KIVA-3V, that can model any number of vertical or canted valves in the cylinder head of an internal combustion (IC) engine. The valves are treated as solid objects that move through the mesh using the familiar snapper technique used for piston motion in KIVA-3. Because the valve motion is modeled exactly, and the valve shapes are as exact as the grid resolution will allow, the accuracy of the valve model is commensurate with that of the rest of the program. Other new features in KIVA-3V include a particle-based liquid wall film model, a new sorting subroutine that is linear in the number of nodes and preserves the original storage sequence, a mixing-controlled turbulent combustion model, and an optional RNG {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. All features and capabilities of the original KIVA-3 have been retained. The grid generator, K3PREP, has been expanded to support the generation of grids with valves, along with the shaping of valve ports and runners. Graphics output options have also been expanded. The report discusses the new features, and includes four examples of grids with vertical and canted valves that are representative of IC engines in use today.

  11. Self-assembly of gold nanorods into vertically aligned, rectangular microplates with a supercrystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junyan; Li, Zhe; Ye, Xiaozhou; Ma, Yurong; Qi, Limin

    2014-01-21

    Vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates with a well-defined rectangular shape were fabricated in a large area through self-assembly of gold nanorods by a novel bulk solution evaporation method. This evaporative self-assembly strategy involving continuous movement of the contact line can prevent the coffee-ring effect, thus allowing uniform deposition of discrete GNR superstructures over a large area and favoring the formation of GNR supercrystals with geometrically symmetric shapes. A mechanism based on the continuing nucleation and growth of smectic GNR superstructures accompanying the movement of the contact line was put forward for the formation of the unique GNR supercrystal arrays. Based on this mechanism, a micropatterned substrate was designed to control the nucleation location and growth direction, leading to the spontaneous self-assembly of nearly parallel arrays of vertically aligned, supercrystalline microplates of GNRs. The obtained rectangular-plate-shaped GNR supercrystals exhibited interesting anisotropic optical reflection properties, which were revealed by polarized light microscopy. PMID:24292548

  12. Comparing the cloud vertical structure derived from several methods based on radiosonde profiles and ground-based remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Surós, M.; Calbó, J.; González, J. A.; Long, C. N.

    2014-08-01

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, are important characteristics in order to describe the impact of clouds on climate. In this work, several methods for estimating the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering the number and position of cloud layers, with a ground-based system that is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ in the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study, these methods are applied to 193 radiosonde profiles acquired at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of the year 2009 and endorsed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The perfect agreement (i.e., when the whole CVS is estimated correctly) for the methods ranges between 26 and 64%; the methods show additional approximate agreement (i.e., when at least one cloud layer is assessed correctly) from 15 to 41%. Further tests and improvements are applied to one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low-resolution vertical profiles, like those from the outputs of reanalysis methods or from the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Global Telecommunication System. The perfect agreement, even when using low-resolution profiles, can be improved by up to 67% (plus 25% of the approximate agreement) if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  13. Comparing the cloud vertical structure derived from several methods based on measured atmospheric profiles and active surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Surós, M.; Calbó, J.; González, J. A.; Long, C. N.

    2014-04-01

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, is an important characteristic in order to describe the impact of clouds on climate. In this work several methods to estimate the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering number and position of cloud layers, with a ground based system which is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ on the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study these methods are applied to 193 radiosonde profiles acquired at the ARM Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of year 2009 and endorsed by GOES images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The perfect agreement (i.e. when the whole CVS is correctly estimated) for the methods ranges between 26-64%; the methods show additional approximate agreement (i.e. when at least one cloud layer is correctly assessed) from 15-41%. Further tests and improvements are applied on one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low resolution vertical profiles, like those from the outputs of reanalysis methods or from the WMO's Global Telecommunication System. The perfect agreement, even when using low resolution profiles, can be improved up to 67% (plus 25% of approximate agreement) if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  14. Retrieving aerosol microphysical properties by Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for different aerosol types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Valenzuela, A.; Lyamani, H.; Chaikovsky, A.; Wandinger, U.; Ansmann, A.; Dubovik, O.; Grudo, J. O.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2014-04-01

    LIRIC (Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code) is applied to combined lidar and Sun photometer data from Granada station corresponding to different case studies. The main aim of this analysis is to evaluate the stability of LIRIC output volume concentration profiles for different aerosol types, loadings, and vertical distributions of the atmospheric aerosols. For this purpose, in a first part, three case studies corresponding to different atmospheric situations are analyzed to study the influence of the user-defined input parameters in LIRIC when varied in a reasonable range. Results evidence the capabilities of LIRIC to retrieve vertical profiles of microphysical properties during daytime by the combination of the lidar and the Sun photometer systems in an automatic and self-consistent way. However, spurious values may be obtained in the lidar incomplete overlap region depending on the structure of the aerosol layers. In a second part, the use of a second Sun photometer located in Cerro Poyos, in the same atmospheric column as Granada but at higher altitude, allowed us to obtain LIRIC retrievals from two different altitudes with independent Sun photometer measurements in order to check the self-consistency and robustness of the method. Retrievals at both levels are compared, providing a very good agreement (differences below 5 µm3/cm3) in those cases with the same aerosol type in the whole atmospheric column. However, some assumptions such as the height independency of parameters (sphericity, size distribution, or refractive index, among others) need to be carefully reviewed for those cases with the presence of aerosol layers corresponding to different types of atmospheric aerosols.

  15. Analysis of the origin of peak aerosol optical depth in springtime over the Gulf of Tonkin.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiaoli; Xu, Jun; Li, Yixue; Han, Feng; Du, Xiaohui; Mao, Jingying; Chen, Yunbo; He, Youjiang; Meng, Fan; Dai, Xuezhi

    2016-02-01

    By aggregating MODIS (moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer) AOD (aerosol optical depth) and OMI (ozone monitoring instrument) UVAI (ultra violet aerosol index) datasets over 2010-2014, it was found that peak aerosol loading in seasonal variation occurred annually in spring over the Gulf of Tonkin (17-23 °N, 105-110 °E). The vertical structure of the aerosol extinction coefficient retrieved from the spaceborne lidar CALIOP (cloud-aerosol lidar with orthogonal polarization) showed that the springtime peak AOD could be attributed to an abrupt increase in aerosol loading between altitudes of 2 and 5 km. In contrast, aerosol loading in the low atmosphere (below 1 km) was only half of that in winter. Wind fields in the low and high atmosphere exhibited opposite transportation patterns in spring over the Gulf of Tonkin, implying different sources for each level. By comparing the emission inventory of anthropogenic sources with biomass burning, and analyzing the seasonal variation of the vertical structure of aerosols over the Northern Indo-China Peninsula (NIC), it was concluded that biomass burning emissions contributed to high aerosol loading in spring. The relatively high topography and the high surface temperature in spring made planetary boundary layer height greater than 3 km over NIC. In addition, small-scale cumulus convection frequently occurred, facilitating pollutant rising to over 3 km, which was a height favoring long-range transport. Thus, pollutants emitted from biomass burning over NIC in spring were raised to the high atmosphere, then experienced long-range transport, leading to the increase in aerosol loading at high altitudes over the Gulf of Tonkin during spring. PMID:26969552

  16. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ∼3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from 'low' to 'high' as the bias is increased.

  17. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Payette, C.; Gupta, J. A.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ˜3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from "low" to "high" as the bias is increased.

  18. Angle-resolved x-ray absorption near edge structure study of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongrui; Zhang, Liang; Resasco, Daniel E.; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Requejo, Félix G.

    2007-03-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) forest was studied by using angular-dependent C K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) with linearly polarized x-ray beam. The XANES analysis found a crust of entangled nanotubes on top of the forest formed at the first stage of the forest growth, which shapes the morphology of the entire forest and constricts the nanotubes to grow to the same length. It indicates that this type of SWNT forest has a different growth mechanism from the multiwalled carbon nanotube forest.

  19. Aggravated efficiency droop in vertical-structured gallium nitride light-emitting diodes induced by high temperature aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lilin; Yang, Jianfu; Ling, Minjie; Zhong, Jianwei; Teng, Dongdong; Wang, Gang

    2013-02-01

    The present work demonstrates that aging at higher temperatures significantly aggravates "efficiency droop" in the n-side-up vertical-structured GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The observed luminous efficiency droop is over 40% at the measuring current of 350 mA. This phenomenon closely relates with creeping of Au80Sn20 eutectic bonds. On one hand, the plastic deformation accumulated during creeping at higher aging temperatures will make the LED epilayers tensile strained at room temperature. The tensile strain induces a change of the internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The maximum variation of IQE related with strain states was around 20%. On the other hand, creeping under the thermal-mismatching induced tensile stress activates voids' nucleation and growth in the solder bonds. The distribution profile of voids in solder bonds will be mapped on the multiple quantum-well structure in vertical-structured LED chips. Local current densities can be much higher than the average current density used in the calculation of LED's efficiencies. Therefore, the efficiency roll-off value will shift toward the smaller bias direction and the total internal quantum efficiency will decrease as current increases.

  20. Update on the structural design of the Sandia 34-M Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.F.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, as lead Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VWAT) technology development in the USA, has been funded by the Wind/Oceans Technologies Division of the DOE to design and build a 34-M research-oriented VAWT. The machine will incorporate step-tapered blades with natural laminar flow blade sections, and will be capable of operating as either a constant rpm or a continuously-variable rpm machine. Design changes in the last year have reduced the predicted blade flatwise mean stresses by 56% and have reduced the rotor weight by 10,400 kg (23,000 lbs.). Flutter and aeroelastic damping analyses have been completed, instrumentation defined, and initial testing plans developed. The long lead time components of the turbine have been ordered, with deliveries to start in March, 1986. First turn of the turbine is planned for October, 1986.

  1. Design considerations of a MOS-bipolar Darlington structure: The vertical insulated base transistor (IBT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godignon, P.; Fernández, J.; Flores, D.; Hidalgo, S.; Rebollo, J.; Millán, J.; Chante, J. P.

    1996-12-01

    The analysis of a vertical insulated base transistor (MOS-bipolar Darlington power device with cellular layout) is discussed. The device operation is investigated in the framework of a schematic representation of the output characteristics and by means of 2D numerical simulation. A new design using a P --diffusion interconnecting the P-type regions is proposed to improve the device breakdown voltage. Several cellular and stripe geometries were implemented with a double metal layer technology. Experiments corroborate the simulation results pointing out that the IBT shows a low on-resistance and fast switching times. For the sake of comparison of their electrical characteristics VDMOS and IGBTs were also fabricated with the same process.

  2. Field Emission Characteristics of the Structure of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Bundles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Hung; Sie, Cong-Lin; Chen, Ching-An; Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Shih, Yi-Ting; Chang, Hsin-Yueh; Su, Wei-Jhih; Lee, Kuei-Yi

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we performed thermal chemical vapor deposition for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) bundles for a field emitter and applied photolithography for defining the arrangement pattern to simultaneously compare square and hexagonal arrangements by using two ratios of the interbundle distance to the bundle height (R) of field emitters. The hexagon arrangement with R = 2 had the lowest turn-on electric field (E to) and highest enhancement factor, whereas the square arrangement with R = 3 had the most stable field emission (FE) characteristic. The number density can reveal the correlation to the lowest E to and highest enhancement factor more effectively than can the R or L. The fluorescent images of the synthesized VACNT bundles manifested the uniformity of FE currents. The results of our study indicate the feasibility of applying the VACNT field emitter arrangement to achieve optimal FE performance. PMID:26183388

  3. High power 808 nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser with multi-ring-shaped-aperture structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y. Q.; Shang, C. Y.; Feng, Y.; Yan, C. L.; Zhao, Y. J.; Wang, Y. X.; Wang, X. H.; Liu, G. J.

    2011-02-01

    The carrier conglomeration effect has been one of the main problems in developing electrically pumped high power vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with large aperture. We demonstrate a high power 808 nm VCSEL with multi-ring-shaped-aperture (MRSA) to weaken the carrier conglomeration effect. Compared with typical VCSEL with single large aperture (SLA), the 300-μm-diameter VCSEL with MRSA has more uniform near field and far field patterns. Moreover, MRSA laser exhibits maximal CW light output power 0.3 W which is about 3 times that of SLA laser. And the maximal wall-plug efficiency of 17.4% is achieved, higher than that of SLA laser by 10%.

  4. Kinematical and Chemical Vertical Structure of the Galactic Thick Disk. I. Thick Disk Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Méndez, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    The variation of the kinematical properties of the Galactic thick disk with Galactic height Z is studied by means of 412 red giants observed in the direction of the south Galactic pole up to 4.5 kpc from the plane. We confirm the non-null mean radial motion toward the Galactic anticenter found by other authors, but we find that it changes sign at |Z| = 3 kpc, and the proposed inward motion of the local standard of rest alone cannot explain these observations. The rotational velocity decreases with |Z| by -30 km s-1 kpc-1, but the data are better represented by a power law with index 1.25, similar to that proposed from the analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. All the velocity dispersions increase with |Z|, but the vertical gradients are small. The dispersions grow proportionally, with no significant variation of the anisotropy. The ratio σU/σW = 2 suggests that the thick disk could have formed from a low-latitude merging event. The vertex deviation increases with Galactic height, reaching ~20° at |Z| = 3.5 kpc. The tilt angle also increases, and the orientation of the ellipsoid in the radial-vertical plane is constantly intermediate between the alignment with the cylindrical and the spherical coordinate systems. The tilt angle at |Z| = 2 kpc coincides with the expectations of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics, but an extension of the calculations to higher |Z| is required to perform a conclusive test. Finally, between 2.5 and 3.5 kpc we detect deviations from the linear trend of many kinematical quantities, suggesting that some kinematical substructure could be present. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (proposal IDs 075.B-0459(A), 077.B-0348(A)). This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan and the duPont Telescopes, located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  5. Sampling the Vertical Moisture Structure of an Atmospheric River Event Using Airborne GPS Radio Occultation Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, J. S.; Malloy, K.; Murphy, B.; Sussman, J.; Zhang, W.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are of high concern in California, bringing significant rain to the region over extended time periods of up to 5 days, potentially causing floods, and more importantly, contributing to the Sierra snowpack that provides much of the regional water resources. The CalWater project focuses on predicting the variability of the West Coast water supply, including improving AR forecasting. Unfortunately, data collection over the ocean remains a challenge and impacts forecasting accuracy. One novel technique to address this issue includes airborne GPS radio occultation (ARO), using broadcast GPS signals from space to measure the signal ray path bending angle and refractivity to retrieve vertical water vapor profiles. The Global Navigation Satellite System Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) system was developed for this purpose for recording and processing high-sample rate (10MHz) signals in the lower troposphere. Previous studies (Murphy et al, 2014) have shown promising results in acquiring airborne GPS RO data, comparing it to dropsondes and numerical weather models. CalWater launched a field campaign in the beginning of 2015 which included testing GISMOS ARO on the NOAA GIV aircraft for AR data acquisition, flying into the February 6th AR event that brought up to 35 cm of rain to central California. This case study will compare airborne GPS RO refractivity profiles to the NCEP-NCAR final reanalysis model and dropsonde profiles. We will show the data distribution and explain the sampling characteristics, providing high resolution vertical information to the sides of the aircraft in a manner complementary to dropsondes beneath the flight track. We will show how this method can provide additional reliable data during the development of AR storms.

  6. A WRF-CMAQ study on spring time vertical ozone structure in Southeast Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangshang; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    A WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ modeling system was used to simulate vertical profiles of ozone, temperature and wind as well as surface ozone and meteorology during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP) in May 2009. WRF and CMAQ sensitivity studies were conducted to define a proper combination of model configurations. With objective analysis WRF showed considerable skills in simulating temperature and wind profiles. CMAQ did well in replicating daily regional average ozone, with only minor overprediction for most of the days. According to the surface ozone statistics and the ozone biases along the vertical profiles, the model displayed little sensitivity to the two CMAQ model options: (i) fixed night time PBL height vs. WRF calculated night time PBL heights, and (ii) the combination of the Euler-backward iterative chemistry schemes and Yamartino advection (EBI/YAMO) vs. the Sparse-Matrix Vectorized Gear chemistry and Parabolic Method advection (SMV-GEAR/PPM) schemes. CMAQ shows substantial underprediction of ozone in the upper troposphere, but demonstrated fair skills in reproducing the ozone profile in the lower to middle troposphere, with typically a few ppb negative biases which tend to increase with height. However, the model usually cannot reproduce high variability in the ozone profiles due to the fixed default profiles and lack of data assimilation capability. While the default CMAQ static profile setup for boundary condition (BC) does not properly reflect the actual dynamic atmosphere, it remains a reasonable choice, since using downscaled real-time global chemistry model BCs demands considerable efforts and would still depend on the performance of the global model.

  7. Measuring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc using asteroseismology and SAGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, L.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Schlesinger, K. J.; Stello, D.; Huber, D.; Serenelli, A. M.; Schönrich, R.; Cassisi, S.; Pietrinferni, A.; Hodgkin, S.; Milone, A. P.; Feltzing, S.; Asplund, M.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a vertical age gradient in the Milky Way disc has been indirectly known for long. Here, we measure it directly for the first time with seismic ages, using red giants observed by Kepler. We use Strömgren photometry to gauge the selection function of asteroseismic targets, and derive colour and magnitude limits where giants with measured oscillations are representative of the underlying population in the field. Limits in the 2MASS system are also derived. We lay out a method to assess and correct for target selection effects independent of Galaxy models. We find that low-mass, i.e. old red giants dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the Galactic plane they exhibit a wide range of ages and metallicities. Parametrizing this as a vertical gradient returns approximately 4 Gyr kpc-1 for the disc we probe, although with a large dispersion of ages at all heights. The ages of stars show a smooth distribution over the last ≃10 Gyr, consistent with a mostly quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about 2. We also find a flat age-metallicity relation for disc stars. Finally, we show how to use secondary clump stars to estimate the present-day intrinsic metallicity spread, and suggest using their number count as a new proxy for tracing the ageing of the disc. This work highlights the power of asteroseismology for Galactic studies; however, we also emphasize the need for better constraints on stellar mass-loss, which is a major source of systematic age uncertainties in red giant stars.

  8. Global stratospheric aerosol distribution as measured by the OMPS/LP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.; Rault, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) was launched on board NPP/SUOMI in October 2011 to continue monitoring the global distribution of the Earth's middle atmosphere ozone and aerosol. The present paper will be concerned with the stratospheric aerosol product retrieved with the OMPS Limb Profiler (heritage: SOLSE/LORE, OSIRIS, SCIAMACHY, SAGE III). The retrieval algorithm will be described together with early results. The retrieved products will be compared with data of CALIPSO and OSIRIS. The vertical profile of aerosol extinction is retrieved over a range of wavelengths (typically 500-900nm), from which a moment of the size distribution (namely the Angstrom coefficient) is inferred. Results will be shown in the form of (a) curtain profiles of aerosol extinction over an altitude range covering the UTLS region ~ 10-35km (sampling rate of one measurement per km in vertical direction and one measurement per one degree latitude), (b) curtain profiles of Angstrom coefficients, (c) weekly global maps of vertical optical depth (the OMPS/LP revisit time is about 5 days). The global distribution of aerosols retrieved by the OMPS/LP in 2012 shows the presence of stable or slowly time-varying structures of stratospheric aerosol, with four distinct geographical features: - the Northern latitudes exhibit large aerosol loading distributed in 4 layers: large particles near tropopause, smaller particles around 15km, larger particles near 18km and a reservoir of small particles above 20km - the middle latitudes (~30 degrees N,S) are characterized by low aerosol loading - the equatorial region shows large aerosol loading with large particles near the tropopause - the southern region (< -30 degrees) exhibits low aerosol loading and small particles Particle size information inferred from retrieved values of the Angstrom coefficient could provide valuable information on aerosol dynamics. Early results show larger stratospheric particles over land masses than over the oceans

  9. Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-05-01

    Data from three independent and extensive field programs in the Straits of Florida, the Mid-Atlantic Bight, and near the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge are reanalyzed and compared with results from other historical studies to highlight the downstream evolution of several characteristics of the Gulf Stream's mean flow and variability. The three locations represent distinct dynamical regimes: a tightly confined jet in a channel; a freely meandering jet; and a topographically controlled jet on a boundary. Despite these differing dynamical regimes, the Gulf Stream in these areas exhibits many similarities. There are also anticipated and important differences, such as the loss of the warm core of the current by 42°N and the decrease in the cross-frontal gradient of potential vorticity as the current flows northward. As the Gulf Stream evolves it undergoes major changes in transport, both in magnitude and structure. The rate of inflow up to 60°W and outflow thereafter are generally uniform, but do exhibit some remarkable short-scale variations. As the Gulf Stream flows northward the vertical coherence of the flow changes, with the Florida Current and North Atlantic Current segments of the Gulf Stream exhibiting distinct upper and deep flows that are incoherent, while in the Mid-Atlantic Bight the Gulf Stream exhibits flows in three layers each of which tends to be incoherent with the other layers at most periods. These coherence characteristics are exhibited in both Eulerian and stream coordinates. The observed lack of vertical coherence indicates that great caution must be exercised in interpreting proxies for Gulf Stream structure and flow from vertically-limited or remote observations.

  10. Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    Data from three independent and extensive field programs in the Straits of Florida, the Mid-Atlantic Bight, and near the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge are reanalyzed and compared with results from other historical studies to highlight the downstream evolution of several characteristics of the Gulf Stream's mean flow and variability. The three locations represent distinct dynamical regimes: a tightly confined jet in a channel; a freely meandering jet; and a topographically controlled jet on a boundary. Despite these differing dynamical regimes, the Gulf Stream in these areas exhibits many similarities. There are also anticipated and important differences, such as the loss of the warm core of the current by 42°N and the decrease in the cross-frontal gradient of potential vorticity as the current flows northward. As the Gulf Stream evolves it undergoes major changes in transport, both in magnitude and structure. The rate of inflow up to 60°W and outflow thereafter are generally uniform, but do exhibit some remarkable short-scale variations. As the Gulf Stre