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Sample records for aerosol volume concentration

  1. Estimating Marine Aerosol Particle Volume and Number from Maritime Aerosol Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Munchak, L. A.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass) are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The average solution MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the best solution dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data.

  2. Volume versus surface nucleation in freezing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurbjörnsson, Ómar F.; Signorell, Ruth

    2008-05-01

    The present study puts an end to the ongoing controversy regarding volume versus surface nucleation in freezing aerosols: Our study on nanosized aerosol particles demonstrates that current state of the art measurements of droplet ensembles cannot distinguish between the two mechanisms. The reasons are inherent experimental uncertainties as well as approximations used to analyze the kinetics. The combination of both can lead to uncertainties in the rate constants of two orders of magnitude, with important consequences for the modeling of atmospheric processes.

  3. High Concentration Standard Aerosol Generator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-31

    materials. In addition to material problems, many liquids are extremely flammable or explosive when aerosolized. This can be checked by putting a small...Hochriner. D. (1975) Stub 3A 440-445. St6ber, W. Flachsbart, H. and Hochramn, D. (1970) Staub 3^, 277. Yoshida. H. Fujii, K. Yomimoto, Y. Masuda. H. and

  4. Concentration, sources, and degradation of organic aerosol at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schneidemesser, Erika

    Characterization and understanding of the carbonaceous portion of the aerosol in the Arctic is limited. The objective of the research presented in this thesis was to improve the scope of knowledge pertaining to carbonaceous aerosols, in terms of atmospheric and snow concentrations, sources, and post-depositional processing. An extraction technique was developed to quantitatively identify a suite of organic compounds, typically observed in aerosol samples, at trace level concentrations in snow melt water samples. A field campaign of sampling and exposure experiments was carried out at Summit, Greenland. A 3-meter snow pit, sampled at 20 cm intervals, was analyzed for organic compounds and total organic carbon (TOC). The average concentration of TOC for the entire pit was 64 mug C kg-1. The quantified organic compounds comprised 6 to 24% of TOC throughout the layers. Median concentrations of the water insoluble individual organic compounds ranged from 0.14 ng kg-1 (hopane) to 2200 ng kg-1 (alkanoic acid) at any one depth. High-volume aerosol samples were collected over a six month period and analyzed for organics. Median concentrations ranged from 0.00045 ng kg-1 (hopane) to 0.23 ng kg-1 (levoglucosan) in the air samples. Source apportionment results from the aerosol samples indicate anthropogenic influence at Summit from biomass burning, fossil fuels, and vegetative detritus. The majority (>90%) of the organic carbon in the aerosol was estimated to be secondary organic aerosol. To investigate the post-depositional processing of organic compounds in snow, contaminant labeled snow was produced and exposed for up to 72 hours on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet at Summit. Degradation of alkanes, acids, and PAHs to a threshold concentration was observed. The threshold concentration, at which no further degradation was observed, ranged from 10 to 60% of the original (non-exposed) snow concentrations, depending on the reaction rate. This would indicate that a

  5. Intercomparison of aerosol instruments: number concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, E O; Sinclair, D; Tu, K W; Hinchliffe, L; Franklin, H

    1982-05-01

    An intercomparison of aerosol instruments conducted February 23-27, 1981, at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) focused on five instruments: the Pollak and TSI condensation nucleus counters; the Active Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer (ASAS-X); and two aerosol electrometers. Test aerosols of sodium chloride and ammonium fluorescein generated by nebulization/electrostatic classification were used to obtain 195 lines of comparison data. Concentrations measured by the ASAS-X and the TSI aerosol electrometer averaged respectively 1.388 and 1.581 times that measured by the Pollak. These ratios were very stable during the week and there was little effect of particle size or material. Most other comparisons were equally stable. However, a review of past work at EML and elsewhere led to the disturbing conclusion that these ratios may change from year to year, or from season to season. A filter sample was taken from microscopy, concurrent with readings from the ASAS-X and the TSI condensation nucleus counters. In this sample, the two instruments differed by 20%. Within its 20% uncertainty, the filter result matched both the TSI and ASAS-X readings.

  6. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOEpatents

    Masquelier, Donald A.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Willeke, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  7. Systematic aerosol characterization by combining GOME-2 UV Aerosol Indices with trace gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M.; Stammes, P.; Wagner, T.

    2012-04-01

    The task of determining aerosol type using passive remote sensing instruments is a daunting one. First, because the variety in aerosol (optical) properties is very large; and second, because the effect of aerosols on the detected top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectrum is smooth and mostly featureless. In addition, spectrometers like GOME-2 have a coarse spatial resolution, which makes aerosol characterization even more difficult due to interferences with clouds. On account of these problems, we do not attempt to derive aerosol properties from single measurements: instead, we combine time series of UV Aerosol Index and trace gas concentrations to derive the dominating aerosol type for each season. Aside from the Index values and trace gas concentrations themselves, the correlation between UV Aerosol Indices (which are indicative of aerosol absorption) with NO2, HCHO, and CHOCHO columns - or absence of it - provides clues to the (main) source of the aerosols in the investigated region and time range. For example: a high correlation of HCHO and Absorbing Aerosol Index points to aerosols from biomass burning, highly correlated CHOCHO, HCHO, and SCattering Index indicate biogenic secondary organic aerosols, and coinciding high NO2 concentrations with high SCattering Index values are associated with industrial and urban aerosols. We here present case studies for several regions to demonstrate the suitability of our approach. Then, we introduce a method to systematically derive the dominating aerosol type on a global scale on time scales varying from monthly to yearly.

  8. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H.; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1 h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5–10 μg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m3. The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction. PMID:19879288

  9. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-05-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5-10 microg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m(3). The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction.

  10. Effects of aerosol organics on cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentration and first indirect aerosol effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. X.; Lee, Y.- N.; Daum, Peter H.; Jayne, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

    2008-11-03

    Abstract. Aerosol microphysics, chemical composition, and CCN properties were measured on the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the Marine Stratus/ Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) conducted over the coastal waters between Point Reyes National Seashore and Monterey Bay, California, in July 2005. Aerosols measured during MASE included free tropospheric aerosols, marine boundary layer aerosols, and aerosols with high organic concentration within a thin layer above the cloud. Closure analysis was carried out for all three types of aerosols by comparing the measured CCN concentrations at 0.2% supersaturation to those predicted based on size distribution and chemical composition using K¨ohler theory. The effect of aerosol organic species on predicted CCN concentration was examined using a single hygroscopicity parameterization.

  11. Effect of aerosol number concentration on cloud droplet dispersion: An LES study and implications for aerosol indirect forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Through three-dimensional LES simulations of marine stratocumulus we explore the factors that control the cloud spectral relative dispersion (ratio of cloud droplet spectral width to the mean radius of the distribution) as a function of aerosol number concentration and the extent to which the relative dispersion either enhances or mitigates the Twomey effect. We find that relative dispersion decreases with increasing aerosol number concentration (for aerosol number concentrations less than about 1000 cm- 3) because smaller droplets resulting from higher aerosol number concentrations inhibit precipitation and lead to: (1) less spectral broadening by suppressed collision and coalescence processes; and (2) more spectral narrowing by droplet condensational growth at higher updraft velocity, because reduced drizzle latent heating at cloud top results in increased boundary layer turbulent kinetic energy production by buoyancy and thereby stronger turbulence. Increased spectral broadening owing to increased cloud-top entrainment mixing, also as a result of increased boundary layer turbulence, is relatively insignificant compared with (1) and (2). The coefficient k, an important parameter that relates cloud droplet effective radius and volume mean radius in large-scale models, is a function of skewness and relative dispersion of the distribution and is negatively correlated with relative dispersion. Increasing k with increasing aerosol number concentration leads to maximum enhancement of the cloud susceptibility (the change of cloud optical depth due to change of cloud droplet number concentration) over that attributable to the Twomey effect alone by about 4.2% and 39% for simulated FIRE and ASTEX cases, respectively.

  12. SAGE Aerosol Measurements. Volume 2: 1 January - 31 December 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) satellite system, launched on February 18, 1979, provides profiles of aerosol extinction at wavelengths of 1.00 and 0.45 micron, ozone concentration, and nitrogen dioxide concentration. Data taken during sunset events in the form of zonal averages and seasonal averages of the aerosol extinction at 1.00 and 0.45 micron, ratios of the aerosol extinction to the molecular extinction at 1.00 micron, and ratios of the aerosol extinction at 0.45 micron to the aerosol extinction at 1.00 micron are presented. The averages for l980 are shown in tables and in profile and contour plots (as a function of altitude and latitude). In addition, temperature data provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the time and location of each SAGE measurement are averaged and shown in a similar format.

  13. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  14. Unexpectedly high ultrafine aerosol concentrations above East Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, R. S.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Schofield, R.; Keywood, M.; Ward, J.; Wilson, S. R.

    2016-02-01

    Better characterisation of aerosol processes in pristine, natural environments, such as Antarctica, have recently been shown to lead to the largest reduction in uncertainties in our understanding of radiative forcing. Our understanding of aerosols in the Antarctic region is currently based on measurements that are often limited to boundary layer air masses at spatially sparse coastal and continental research stations, with only a handful of studies in the vast sea-ice region. In this paper, the first observational study of sub-micron aerosols in the East Antarctic sea ice region is presented. Measurements were conducted aboard the icebreaker Aurora Australis in spring 2012 and found that boundary layer condensation nuclei (CN3) concentrations exhibited a five-fold increase moving across the polar front, with mean polar cell concentrations of 1130 cm-3 - higher than any observed elsewhere in the Antarctic and Southern Ocean region. The absence of evidence for aerosol growth suggested that nucleation was unlikely to be local. Air parcel trajectories indicated significant influence from the free troposphere above the Antarctic continent, implicating this as the likely nucleation region for surface aerosol, a similar conclusion to previous Antarctic aerosol studies. The highest aerosol concentrations were found to correlate with low-pressure systems, suggesting that the passage of cyclones provided an accelerated pathway, delivering air masses quickly from the free troposphere to the surface. After descent from the Antarctic free troposphere, trajectories suggest that sea-ice boundary layer air masses travelled equatorward into the low-albedo Southern Ocean region, transporting with them emissions and these aerosol nuclei which, after growth, may potentially impact on the region's radiative balance. The high aerosol concentrations and their transport pathways described here, could help reduce the discrepancy currently present between simulations and observations of

  15. Lidar detection of high concentrations of ozone and aerosol transported from northeastern Asia over Saga, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Osamu; Sakai, Tetsu; Izumi, Toshiharu; Nagai, Tomohiro; Morino, Isamu; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Deushi, Makoto; Yumimoto, Keiya; Maki, Takashi; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Akaho, Taiga; Okumura, Hiroshi; Arai, Kohei; Nakatsuru, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Yokota, Tatsuya

    2017-02-01

    To validate products of the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT), we observed vertical profiles of aerosols, thin cirrus clouds, and tropospheric ozone with a mobile-lidar system that consisted of a two-wavelength (532 and 1064 nm) polarization lidar and a tropospheric ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We used these lidars to make continuous measurements over Saga (33.24° N, 130.29° E) during 20-31 March 2015. High ozone and high aerosol concentrations were observed almost simultaneously in the altitude range 0.5-1.5 km from 03:00 to 20:00 Japan Standard Time (JST) on 22 March 2015. The maximum ozone volume mixing ratio was ˜ 110 ppbv. The maxima of the aerosol extinction coefficient and optical depth at 532 nm were 1.2 km-1 and 2.1, respectively. Backward trajectory analysis and the simulations by the Model of Aerosol Species IN the Global AtmospheRe (MASINGAR) mk-2 and the Meteorological Research Institute Chemistry-Climate Model, version 2 (MRI-CCM2), indicated that mineral dust particles from the Gobi Desert and an air mass with high ozone and aerosol (mainly sulfate) concentrations that originated from the North China Plain could have been transported over the measurement site within about 2 days. These high ozone and aerosol concentrations impacted surface air quality substantially in the afternoon of 22 March 2015. After some modifications of its physical and chemical parameters, MRI-CCM2 approximately reproduced the high ozone volume mixing ratio. MASINGAR mk-2 successfully predicted high aerosol concentrations, but the predicted peak aerosol optical thickness was about one-third of the observed value.

  16. Validation of LIRIC aerosol concentration retrievals using airborne measurements during a biomass burning episode over Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Amiridis, Vassilis; Allan, James D.; Papayannis, Alexandros; Solomos, Stavros; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Nenes, Athanasios; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Vasilescu, Jeni; Nicolae, Doina; Coe, Hugh; Bacak, Asan; Chaikovsky, Anatoli

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we validate the Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) retrievals of the aerosol concentration in the fine mode, using the airborne aerosol chemical composition dataset obtained over the Greater Athens Area (GAA) in Greece, during the ACEMED campaign. The study focuses on the 2nd of September 2011, when a long-range transported smoke layer was observed in the free troposphere over Greece, in the height range from 2 to 3 km. CIMEL sun-photometric measurements revealed high AOD ( 0.4 at 532 nm) and Ångström exponent values ( 1.7 at 440/870 nm), in agreement with coincident ground-based lidar observations. Airborne chemical composition measurements performed over the GAA, revealed increased CO volume concentration ( 110 ppbv), with 57% sulphate dominance in the PM1 fraction. For this case, we compare LIRIC retrievals of the aerosol concentration in the fine mode with the airborne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) measurements. Our analysis shows that the remote sensing retrievals are in a good agreement with the measured airborne in-situ data from 2 to 4 km. The discrepancies observed between LIRIC and airborne measurements at the lower troposphere (below 2 km), could be explained by the spatial and temporal variability of the aerosol load within the area where the airborne data were averaged along with the different time windows of the retrievals.

  17. Improved large-volume sampler for the collection of bacterial cells from aerosol.

    PubMed

    White, L A; Hadley, D J; Davids, D E; Naylor, R

    1975-03-01

    A modified large-volume sampler was demonstrated to be an efficient device for the collection of mono-disperse aerosols of rhodamine B and poly-disperse aerosols of bacterial cells. Absolute efficiency for collection of rhodamine B varied from 100% with 5-mum particles to about 70% with 0.5-mum particles. The sampler concentrated the particles from 950 liters of air into a flow of between 1 and 2 ml of collecting fluid per min. Spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger were collected at an efficiency of about 82% compared to the collection in the standard AGI-30 sampler. In the most desirable collecting fluids tested, aerosolized cells of Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, and Aerobacter aerogenes were collected at comparative efficiencies of approximately 90, 80, and 90%, respectively. The modified sampler has practical application in the study of aerosol transmission of respiratory pathogens.

  18. Concentration Effects on the Thermophoresis of Aerosol Spheres.

    PubMed

    Keh; Ho

    1999-08-01

    The thermophoretic motion of a homogeneous suspension of identical spherical particles of arbitrary thermal conductivity and surface properties is considered under conditions of small Knudsen, Peclet, and Reynolds numbers. The effects of interaction of the individual particles are taken into explicit account by employing a unit cell model which is known to provide good predictions for the sedimentation of monodisperse suspensions of spherical particles. The appropriate equations of conservation of energy and momentum are solved for each cell, in which a spherical particle is envisaged to be surrounded by a concentric shell of suspending fluid, and the thermophoretic migration velocity of the particle is calculated for various cases. Analytical expressions of this mean particle velocity are obtained in closed form as functions of the volume fraction of the particles. Comparisons between the ensemble-averaged thermophoretic velocity of a test particle in a dilute suspension and our cell-model results are made. A parallel analysis for the sedimentation of aerosol spheres is also presented. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. MCS precipitation and downburst intensity response to increased aerosol concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavner, M.; Cotton, W. R.; van den Heever, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are important contributors to rainfall in the High Plains of the United States as well as producers of severe weather such as hail, tornados and straight-line wind events known as derechos. Past studies have shown that changes in aerosol concentrations serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) alter the MCS hydrometeor characteristics which in turn modify precipitation yield, downdraft velocity, cold-pool strength, storm propagation and the potential for severe weather to occur. In this study, the sensitivity of MCS precipitation characteristics and convective downburst velocities associated with a derecho to changes in CCN concentrations were examined by simulating a case study using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The case study of the 8 May 2009 "Super-Derecho" MCS was chosen since it produced a swath of widespread wind damage in association with an embedded large-scale bow echo, over a broad region from the High Plains of western Kansas to the foothills of the Appalachians. The sensitivity of the storm to changes in CCN concentrations was examined by conducting a set of three simulations which differed in the initial aerosol concentration based on output from the 3D chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem. Results from this study indicate that while increasing CCN concentrations led to an increase in precipitation rates, the changes to the derecho strength were not linear. A moderate increase in aerosol concentration reduced the derecho strength, while the simulation with the highest aerosol concentrations increased the derecho intensity. These changes are attributed to the impact of enhanced CCN concentration on the production of convective downbursts. An analysis of aerosol loading impacts on these MCS features will be presented.

  20. Estimation of columnar concentrations of absorbing and scattering fine mode aerosol components using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongjoo; Ghim, Young Sung

    2016-11-01

    Columnar concentrations of absorbing and scattering components of fine mode aerosols were estimated using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data for a site downwind of Seoul. The study period was between March 2012 and April 2013 including the period of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON)-Asia campaign in March to May 2012. The Maxwell Garnett mixing rule was assumed for insoluble components embedded in a host solution, while the volume average mixing rule was assumed for the aqueous solution of soluble components. During the DRAGON-Asia campaign the surface concentrations of major components of fine particles were measured. The columnar mass fractions of black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), mineral dust (MD), and ammonium sulfate (AS) were 1.5, 5.9, 6.6, and 52%, respectively, which were comparable to the mass fractions measured at the surface for BC, OC, and secondary inorganic aerosols at 2.3, 18, and 55%. The vertical distributions of BC and AS were investigated by employing the concept of a column height. While the column height for BC was similar to the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height, that for AS was 4.4 times higher than the PBL height and increased with air temperature from March to May. The monthly variations of the columnar mass concentrations during the study period were generally well explained in term of meteorology and emission characteristics. However, certain variations of MD were different from those typically observed primarily because only fine mode aerosols were considered.

  1. Development of a continuous aerosol mass concentration measurement device.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Thomas, D; Contal, P; Subra, I

    2003-08-01

    A dynamic aerosol mass concentration measurement device has been developed for personal sampling. Its principle consists in sampling the aerosol on a filter and monitoring the change of pressure drop over time (Delta P). Ensuring that the linearity of the Delta P = f(mass of particles per unit area of filter) relationship has been well established, the change of concentration can be deduced. The response of the system was validated in the laboratory with a 3.5 microm alumina aerosol (mass median diameter) generated inside a 1-m(3) ventilated enclosure. As the theory predicted that the mass sensitivity of the system would vary inversely with the square of the particle diameter, only sufficiently fine aerosols were able to be measured. The system was tested in the field in a mechanical workshop in the vicinity of an arc-welding station. The aerosol produced by welding is indeed particularly well-adapted due to the sub-micronic size of the particles. The device developed, despite this limitation, has numerous advantages over other techniques: robustness, compactness, reliability of calibration, and ease of use.

  2. Source contributions to carbonaceous aerosol concentrations in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaein I.; Park, Rokjin J.; Woo, Jung-Hun; Han, Young-Ji; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2011-02-01

    We estimated the source contributions to carbonaceous aerosol concentration in Korea on the basis of Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) anthropogenic emissions and satellite-derived biomass burning emissions by using a nested version of GEOS-Chem with a spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.667° for the period March 2006-February 2007. First, we evaluated the model by comparing the simulated and observed aerosol concentrations at East Asia Network (EANET) sites and at a site in Korea. The results indicate that the model reproduces the variability and magnitudes of the observed SO 42-, NO 3-, and NH 4+ concentrations in Korea and those of the observed PM 10 concentrations in East Asia. However, the organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) aerosol concentrations estimated by the model are lower than those observed in Korea by a factor of 2, especially in winter. This underestimation is likely due to extremely low domestic anthropogenic emissions and lack in seasonal variation. Source adjustments using a simple fitting and the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) monthly allocation factors for seasonal variation yield significantly improved model results ( R2 increased from 0.58 to 0.84), which can then be used to estimate the source contributions to the OC and BC concentrations in Korea. We found that domestic anthropogenic emissions are the most important factors, contributing 74% (9% from fossil fuels and 65% from biofuels) and 78% (42% from fossil fuels and 36% from biofuels) to the OC and BC concentrations, respectively, on an annual mean basis in Korea. The trans-boundary transport of Chinese sources is another important factor, contributing 13% and 20% to the OC and BC concentrations, respectively. The contributions of wildfires and biogenic sources to the annual mean carbonaceous aerosol concentration in Korea are relatively small (4% and 6%, respectively).

  3. Size and concentration measurement of an industrial aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, D.; Baron, P.; Willeke, K.

    1986-07-01

    Several real-time particle sizing instruments were evaluated for measuring the size distribution and concentration of the aerosol produced during the high speed grinding of gray iron castings. Aerosol was sampled in the airstream entrained by the motion of a spinning grinding wheel in a pilot grinding operation. Measurement methods based on differing physical principles were selected for evaluation and compared: particle inertia (aerodynamic particle sizer and quartz crystal microbalance cascade impactor); light scattering (laser aerosol spectrometer); and projected-area microscopy (scanning electron microscope). Inferences of aerodynamic diameter based on measurements by the laser aerosol spectrometer consistently undersized that determined by the aerodynamic particle sizer by a factor of 1.5. Estimates of aerodynamic diameters from projected area diameters determined by scanning electron microscopy differed from those obtained by the aerodynamic particle sizer by a factor of 2. Differences appeared to be a non-linear function of particle diameter. Estimates of respirable mass determined from mass-weighted particle size spectra varied by a factor of 6 between the largest estimate (scanning electron microscope) and the smallest estimate (laser aerosol spectrometer).

  4. Size and concentration measurement of an industrial aerosol.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D; Baron, P; Willeke, K

    1986-07-01

    Several real-time particle sizing instruments were evaluated for measuring the size distribution and concentration of the aerosol produced during the high speed grinding of gray iron castings. Aerosol was sampled in the airstream entrained by the motion of a spinning grinding wheel in a pilot grinding operation. Measurement methods based on differing physical principles were selected for evaluation and compared: particle inertia (aerodynamic particle sizer and quartz crystal microbalance cascade impactor); light scattering (laser aerosol spectrometer); and projected-area microscopy (scanning electron microscope). Inferences of aerodynamic diameter based on measurements by the laser aerosol spectrometer consistently undersized that determined by the aerodynamic particle sizer by a factor of 1.5. Estimates of aerodynamic diameters from projected area diameters determined by scanning electron microscopy differed from those obtained by the aerodynamic particle sizer by a factor of 2. Differences appeared to be a non-linear function of particle diameter. Estimates of respirable mass determined from mass-weighted particle size spectra varied by a factor of 6 between the largest estimate (scanning electron microscope) and the smallest estimate (laser aerosol spectrometer).

  5. Design and Fabrication of an Aerosol Concentrator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-08

    MBEran GpVt 08C IO NO 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITL S. VVIREOP ePORT A PERIOD COVERED Interim report on a continuing ~ESIGN AND ,BRICATION OF AN...electronic tachometer , and a variable speed controller. Our motor is a hand-held router motor, model 90114, manufactured by the Stanley Power Tool Company (P.O...be obtained from Lordco Supply (Erie, PA 16505). Since the concentrator is run at various speeds, we incorporated an electronic tachometer into the

  6. Volume and surface area size distribution, water mass and model fitting of GCE/CASE/WATOX marine aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sievering, H.; Boatman, J.

    1990-06-01

    As a part of the Global Change Expedition/Coordinated Air-Sea Experiment/Western Atlantic Ocean Experiment (GCE/CASE/WATOX), size distributions of marine aerosols were measured at two altitudes of about 2750 and 150 m above sea level (asl) over the size range 0.1 ˜ 32 μm. Lognormal fitting was applied to the corrected aerosol size spectra to determine the volume and surface area size distributions of the CASE-WATOX marine aerosols. Each aerosol size distribution was fitted with three lognormal distributions representing fine-, large-, and giant-particle modes. Water volume fraction and dry particle size of each aerosol size distribution were also calculated using empirical formulas for particle size as a function of relative humidity and particle type. Because of the increased influence from anthropogenic sources in the continental United States, higher aerosol volume concentrations were observed in the fine-particle mode near-shore off the east coast; 2.11 and 3.63 μm3 cm-3 for free troposphere (FT) and marine boundary layer (MBL), compared with the open-sea Bermuda area values; 0.13 and 0.74 μm3 cm-3 for FT and MBL. The large-particle mode exhibits the least variations in volume distributions between the east coast and open-sea Bermuda area, having a volume geometric median diameter (VGMD) between 1.4 and 1.6 μm and a geometric standard deviation between 1.57 and 1.68. For the giant-particle mode, larger VGMD and volume concentrations were observed for marine aerosols nearshore off the east coast than in the open-sea Bermuda area because of higher relative humidity and higher surface wind speed conditions. Wet VGMD and aerosol water volume concentrations at 15 m asl ship level were determined by extrapolating from those obtained by analysis of the CASE-WATOX aircraft aerosol data. Abundance of aerosol water in the MBL serves as an important pathway for heterogeneous conversion of SO2 in sea salt aerosol particles.

  7. Concentrations and size distributions of Antarctic stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, G. V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Neish, E.; Schultz, M.

    1989-01-01

    Particle Measuring Systems laser particle spectrometer (ASAS-X and FSSP) probes were used to measure aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions during 11 ER-2 flights between Punta Arenas (53 deg S) and Antarctica (up to 72 deg S) from August 17 to September 22, 1987. The time resolution was 10 s, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 2 km. The data were divided into two size classes (0.05-0.25 and 0.53-5.5 micron radius) to separate the small particle from the coarse particle populations. Results show that the small-particle concentrations are typical for a background aerosol during volcanic quiescence. This concentration is generally constant along a flight track; in only one instance a depletion of small particles during a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) encounter was measured, suggesting a nucleation of type I PSC particles on background aerosols. Temporary increases of the coarse particle concentrations indicated the presence of tenuous polar stratospheric clouds that were encountered most frequently at the southernmost portion of a flight track and when the aircraft descended to lower altitudes. During 'particle events', particle modes were found at 0.6-micron radius, corresponding to type I PSCs, and occasionally, at 2.0-micron radius corresponding to type II PSCs.

  8. Direct gravimetric determination of aerosol mass concentration in central antarctica.

    PubMed

    Annibaldi, Anna; Truzzi, Cristina; Illuminati, Silvia; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In Antarctica, experimental difficulties due to extreme conditions have meant that aerosol mass has rarely been measured directly by gravimetry, and only in coastal areas where concentrations were in the range of 1-7 μg m(-3). The present work reports on a careful differential weighing methodology carried out for the first time on the plateau of central Antarctica (Dome C, East Antarctica). To solve problems of accurate aerosol mass measurements, a climatic room was used for conditioning and weighing filters. Measurements were carried out in long stages of several hours of readings with automatic recording of temperature/humidity and mass. This experimental scheme allowed us to sample from all the measurements (up to 2000) carried out before and after exposure, those which were recorded under the most stable humidity conditions and, even more importantly, as close to each other as possible. The automatic reading of the mass allowed us in any case to obtain hundreds of measurements from which to calculate average values with uncertainties sufficiently low to meet the requirements of the differential weighing procedure (±0.2 mg in filter weighing, between ±7% and ±16% both in aerosol mass and concentration measurements). The results show that the average summer aerosol mass concentration (aerodynamic size ≤10 μm) in central Antarctica is about 0.1 μg m(-3), i.e., about 1/10 of that of coastal Antarctic areas. The concentration increases by about 4-5 times at a site very close to the station.

  9. Trace metal concentration in Trade Wind aerosols collected over Barbados and Miami.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, J. M.; Millero, F. J.; Prospero, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    African mineral dust aerosols are transported by trade winds to Barbados and often reach Miami. The trace metals contained in these aerosols play an important role in biogeochemical processes and thus the global carbon cycle. High-volume bulk aerosols were collected in the summer dust season (June-September) of 2003 and 2004 in Miami and Barbados on Whatman-41 filters and microwave digested using a modified version of EPA method 3051. Aliquots of digested samples were tested for trace metal concentrations by ICP-MS. Excellent agreement with gravimetrically determined ashed weights was observed with dust concentrations calculated based on Al crustal abundance. As a major component, aluminum averaged 8.7% content in agreement to 8.1% crustal abundance, and was used to examine other trace metals. Al, Fe, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Tl, Ba, Cd, Pb and REE's were examined and deviations from average crustal abundance are discussed in relationship to temporal variation and meteorological conditions. In addition, trace metal pollutants in Miami aerosols were examined relative to the relatively clean samples offered by Barbados.

  10. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Greg; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Clothiaux, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output. This requires long-term measurements in many regions, as model success in one region or season does not apply to all regions and seasons. AERONET is an automated network of more than 180 surface radiometers located throughout the world. The sky radiance measurements obtained by AERONET are inverted to provide column-averaged aerosol refractive indices and size distributions for the AERONET database, which we use to derive column-averaged black carbon concentrations and specific absorptions that are constrained by the measured radiation field. This provides a link between AERONET sky radiance measurements and the elemental carbon concentration of transport models without the need for an optics module in the transport model. Knowledge of both the black carbon concentration and aerosol absorption optical depth (i.e., input and output of the optics module) will enable improvements to the transport model optics module.

  11. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols I: uranium concentration in aerosols as a function of time and particle size.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Traub, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing DU were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time, particularly within the first minute after a shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s after perforation, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% after 30 min. The initial and maximum uranium concentrations were lower in the Bradley vehicle than those observed in the Abrams tank, and the concentration levels decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in a cyclone sampler, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h after perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages ranged from 38 to 72% for the Abrams tank with conventional armor. In most cases, it varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Neither the Abrams tank with DU armor nor the Bradley vehicle results were specifically correlated with particle size and can best be represented by their average uranium mass concentrations of 65

  12. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman L. I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2012-01-04

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a boundary layer (BL) contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (D{sub p} > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25 % of aerosol with D{sub p} > 100 nm are interstitial (not activated). A direct comparison of pre-cloud and in-cloud aerosol yields a higher estimate. Artifacts in the measurement of interstitial aerosol due to droplet shatter and evaporation are discussed. Within each of 102 constant altitude cloud transects, CDNC and interstitial aerosol were anti-correlated. An examination of one cloud as a case study shows that the

  13. ModelE2-TOMAS development and evaluation using aerosol optical depths, mass and number concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Shindell, D. T.

    2014-09-01

    The TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional microphysics model (TOMAS) has been integrated into the state-of-the-art general circulation model, GISS ModelE2. TOMAS has the flexibility to select a size resolution as well as the lower size cutoff. A computationally efficient version of TOMAS is used here, which has 15 size bins covering 3 nm to 10 μm aerosol dry diameter. For each bin, it simulates the total aerosol number concentration and mass concentrations of sulphate, pure elementary carbon (hydrophobic), mixed elemental carbon (hydrophilic), hydrophobic organic matter, hydrophilic organic matter, sea salt, mineral dust, ammonium, and aerosol-associated water. This paper provides a detailed description of the ModelE2-TOMAS model and evaluates the model against various observations including aerosol precursor gas concentrations, aerosol mass and number concentrations, and aerosol optical depths. Additionally, global budgets in ModelE2-TOMAS are compared with those of other global aerosol models, and the TOMAS model is compared to the default aerosol model in ModelE2, which is a bulk aerosol model. Overall, the ModelE2-TOMAS predictions are within the range of other global aerosol model predictions, and the model has a reasonable agreement with observations of sulphur species and other aerosol components as well as aerosol optical depth. However, ModelE2-TOMAS (as well as the bulk aerosol model) cannot capture the observed vertical distribution of sulphur dioxide over the Pacific Ocean possibly due to overly strong convective transport. The TOMAS model successfully captures observed aerosol number concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Anthropogenic aerosol burdens in the bulk aerosol model running in the same host model as TOMAS (ModelE2) differ by a few percent to a factor of 2 regionally, mainly due to differences in aerosol processes including deposition, cloud processing, and emission parameterizations. Larger differences are found for naturally

  14. Capstone depleted uranium aerosol biokinetics, concentrations, and doses.

    PubMed

    Guilmette, Raymond A; Miller, Guthrie; Parkhurst, Mary Ann

    2009-03-01

    One of the principal goals of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was to quantify and characterize DU aerosols generated inside armored vehicles by perforation with a DU penetrator. This study consequently produced a database in which the DU aerosol source terms were specified both physically and chemically for a variety of penetrator-impact geometries and conditions. These source terms were used to calculate radiation doses and uranium concentrations for various scenarios as part of the Capstone Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA). This paper describes the scenario-related biokinetics of uranium, and summarizes intakes, chemical concentrations to the organs, and E(50) and HT(50) for organs and tissues based on exposure scenarios for personnel in vehicles at the time of perforation as well as for first responders. For a given exposure scenario (duration time and breathing rates), the range of DU intakes among the target vehicles and shots was not large, about a factor of 10, with the lowest being for a ventilated operational Abrams tank and the highest being for an unventilated Abrams with DU penetrator perforating DU armor. The ranges of committed effective doses were more scenario-dependent than were intakes. For example, the largest range, a factor of 20, was shown for scenario A, a 1 min exposure, whereas, the range was only a factor of two for the first-responder scenario (E). In general, the committed effective doses were found to be in the tens of mSv. The risks ascribed to these doses are discussed separately.

  15. The Influence of High Aerosol Concentration on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Khaykin, M.N.; Kadygrove, E.N.; Golitsyn, G.S.

    2005-03-18

    Investigations of the changing in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) radiation balance as cased by natural and anthropogenic reasons is an important topic of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The influence of aerosol on temperature stratification of ABL while its concentration was extremely high within a long period of time was studied experimentally. The case was observed in Moscow region (Russia) with the transport of combustion products from peat-bog and forest fires in July-September, 2002. At this time the visibility was some times at about 100-300 m. Aerosol concentration measured by Moscow University Observatory and A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics field station in Zvenigorod (55.7 N; 36.6 E) for several days was in 50-100 times more than background one (Gorchakov at al 2003). The high aerosol concentration can change the radiation balance at ABL, and so to change thermal stratification in ABL above the mega lopolis. For the analysis the data were used of synchronous measurements by MTP-5 (Microwave Temperature Profiler operating at wavelength 5 mm) in two locations, namely: downtown Moscow and country-side which is 50 km apart to the West (Zvenigorod station). (Kadygrov and Pick 1998; Westwater at al 1999; Kadygrov at al 2002). Zvenigorod station is located in strongly continental climate zone which is in between of the climates of ARM sites (NSANorth Slope of Alaska and SGP-Southern Great Plains). The town of Zvenigorod has little industry, small traffic volume and topography conductive to a good air ventilation of the town. For these reasons Zvenigorod can be considered as an undisturbed rural site. For the analysis some days were chosen with close meteorological parameters (average temperature, humidity, wind, pressure and cloud form) but strongly differing in aerosol concentration level.

  16. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, L.I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2011-06-21

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate in agreement with the dominant pollution source being SO{sub 2} from Cu smelters and power plants. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a BL contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (Dp > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25% of aerosol in the PCASP size range are interstitial (not activated). One hundred and two constant altitude cloud transects were identified and used to determine properties of interstitial aerosol. One transect is examined in detail as a case study. Approximately 25 to 50% of aerosol with D{sub p} > 110 nm were not activated, the difference between the two

  17. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, L. I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2011-06-01

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O3 and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate in agreement with the dominant pollution source being SO2 from Cu smelters and power plants. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 °C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a BL contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (Dp > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of ~150 cm-3, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that ~25 % of aerosol in the PCASP size range are interstitial (not activated). One hundred and two constant altitude cloud transects were identified and used to determine properties of interstitial aerosol. One transect is examined in detail as a case study. Approximately 25 to 50 % of aerosol with Dp > 110 nm were not activated, the difference between the two approaches possibly representing

  18. Effect of aerosol number concentration on cloud droplet dispersion: A large-eddy simulation study and implications for aerosol indirect forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Miao-Ling; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Through three-dimensional large-eddy simulations of marine stratocumulus we explore the factors that control the cloud spectral relative dispersion (ratio of cloud droplet spectral width to the mean radius of the distribution) as a function of aerosol number concentration and the extent to which the relative dispersion either enhances or mitigates the Twomey effect. We find that relative dispersion decreases with increasing aerosol number concentration (for aerosol number concentrations less than about 1000 cm-3) because smaller droplets resulting from higher aerosol number concentrations inhibit precipitation and lead to (1) less spectral broadening by suppressed collision and coalescence processes and (2) more spectral narrowing by droplet condensational growth at higher updraft velocity because reduced drizzle latent heating at cloud top results in increased boundary layer turbulent kinetic energy production by buoyancy and thereby stronger turbulence. Increased spectral broadening owing to increased cloud-top entrainment mixing, also as a result of increased boundary layer turbulence, is relatively insignificant compared with outcomes 1 and 2. The coefficient k, an important parameter that relates cloud droplet effective radius and volume mean radius in large-scale models, is a function of skewness and relative dispersion of the distribution and is negatively correlated with relative dispersion. Increasing k with increasing aerosol number concentration leads to maximum enhancement of the cloud susceptibility (the change of cloud optical depth due to change of cloud droplet number concentration) over that attributable to the Twomey effect alone by about 4.2% and 39% for simulated FIRE and ASTEX cases, respectively.

  19. Influence of the Surf Zone on the Marine Aerosol Concentration in a Coastal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, Gilles; van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Piazzola, Jacques; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta T.

    2017-01-01

    Sea-salt aerosol concentrations in the coastal zone are assessed with the numerical aerosol-transport model MACMod that applies separate aerosol source functions for open ocean and the surf zone near the sea-land transition. Numerical simulations of the aerosol concentration as a function of offshore distance from the surf zone compare favourably with experimental data obtained during a surf-zone aerosol experiment in Duck, North Carolina in autumn 2007. Based on numerical simulations, the effect of variations in aerosol production (source strength) and transport conditions (wind speed, air-sea temperature difference), we show that the surf-zone aerosols are replaced by aerosols generated over the open ocean as the airmass advects out to sea. The contribution from the surf-generated aerosol is significant during high wind speeds and high wave events, and is significant up to 30 km away from the production zone. At low wind speeds, the oceanic component dominates, except within 1-5 km of the surf zone. Similar results are obtained for onshore flow, where no further sea-salt aerosol production occurs as the airmass advects out over land. The oceanic aerosols that are well-mixed throughout the boundary layer are then more efficiently transported inland than are the surf-generated aerosols, which are confined to the first few tens of metres above the surface, and are therefore also more susceptible to the type of surface (trees or grass) that determines the deposition velocity.

  20. Investigation of the seasonal variations of aerosol physicochemical properties and their impact on cloud condensation nuclei number concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Timothy S.

    Aerosols are among the most complex yet widely studied components of the atmosphere not only due to the seasonal variability of their physical and chemical properties but also their effects on climate change. The three main aerosol types that are known to affect the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere are: mineral dust, anthropogenic pollution, and biomass burning aerosols. In order to understand how these aerosols affect the atmosphere, this dissertation addresses the following three scientific questions through a combination of surface and satellite observations: SQ1: What are the seasonal and regional variations of aerosol physico-chemical properties at four selected Asian sites? SQ2: How do these aerosol properties change during transpacific and intra-continental long range transport? SQ3: What are the impacts of aerosol properties on marine boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei number concentration? This dissertation uses an innovative approach to classify aerosol properties by region and season to address SQ1. This is useful because this method provides an additional dimension when investigating the physico-chemical properties of aerosols by linking a regional and seasonal dependence to both the aerosol direct and indirect effects. This method involves isolating the aerosol physico-chemical properties into four separate regions using AERONET retrieved Angstrom exponent (AEAOD) and single scattering co-albedo (o oabs) to denote aerosol size and absorptive properties. The aerosols events are then clustered by season. The method is first applied to four AERONET sites representing single mode aerosol dominant regions: weakly absorbing pollution (NASA Goddard), strongly absorbing pollution (Mexico City), mineral dust (Solar Village), and biomass burning smoke (Alta Floresta). The method is then applied to four Asian sites that represent complicated aerosol components. There are strong regional and seasonal influences of the four aerosol types over the

  1. Aerosol ion concentration dependence on atmospheric conditions in Chicago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosco, Tinamarie; Schmeling, Martina

    This study seeks to determine the influence of precursor trace gases and local meteorology, including lake breeze events, on the concentrations of secondary aerosol species in Chicago. For this, two particulate air samples per day were collected onto quartz fiber filters at the Loyola University Chicago Air Station (LUCAS) during the summer months of 2002 and 2003 and subsequently analyzed by ion chromatography for sulfate, nitrate and oxalate. In parallel, mixing ratios of ozone (O 3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO 2dbnd NO x) were monitored and weather parameters were recorded. In addition, backward trajectories were obtained to estimate air mass transport to Chicago. Ozone and NO x mixing ratios as well as sulfate, nitrate and oxalate concentrations varied substantially throughout the study, but three situations could be distinguished based on meteorology and chemistry. Case one had the lowest ozone, NO x and ion levels due to wind directions constantly from Lake Michigan. Case two comprised of days showing the highest pollutant levels because of to predominantly southwestern air currents and warm temperatures and case three experienced an air stagnation situation in the morning leading to high NO x mixing ratios and a subsequent lake breeze event. In the last case, elevated ozone mixing ratios and ion concentrations were observed after lake breeze onset indicating pollutant transport.

  2. The importance of aerosol mixing state and size-resolved composition on CCN concentration and the variation of the importance with atmospheric aging of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Cubison, M. J.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Collins, D. R.

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol microphysics, chemical composition, and CCN concentrations were measured at the T0 urban supersite in Mexico City during Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) in March 2006. The aerosol size distribution and composition often showed strong diurnal variation associated with traffic emissions and aging of aerosols through coagulation and local photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. CCN concentrations (N{sub CCN}) are derived using Kohler theory from the measured aerosol size distribution and various simplified aerosol mixing state and chemical composition, and are compared to concurrent measurements at five supersaturations ranging from 0.11% to 0.35%. The influence of assumed mixing state on calculated N{sub CCN} is examined using both aerosols observed during MILAGRO and representative aerosol types. The results indicate that while ambient aerosols often consist of particles with a wide range of compositions at a given size, N{sub CCN} may be derived within {approx}20% assuming an internal mixture (i.e., particles at a given size are mixtures of all participating species, and have the identical composition) if great majority of particles has an overall {kappa} (hygroscopicity parameter) value greater than 0.1. For a non-hygroscopic particle with a diameter of 100 nm, a 3 nm coating of sulfate or nitrate is sufficient to increase its {kappa} from 0 to 0.1. The measurements during MILAGRO suggest that the mixing of non-hygroscopic primary organic aerosol (POA) and black carbon (BC) particles with photochemically produced hygroscopic species and thereby the increase of their {kappa} to 0.1 take place in a few hours during daytime. This rapid process suggests that during daytime, a few tens of kilometers away for POA and BC sources, N{sub CCN} may be derived with sufficient accuracy by assuming an internal mixture, and using bulk chemical composition. The rapid mixing also indicates that, at least for very active

  3. Low filler volume concentration composite dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Lynell Joy

    One avenue for synthesizing a high energy density capacitor while circumventing the manufacturing problems and low breakdown strength associated with dense, sintered ceramics, is to incorporate low volume concentrations of well dispersed high permittivity filler, such as barium titanate, in conjunction with polymers, naturally high breakdown strength materials. The focus of this work was to examine the factors that influence the energy density of a composite: the breakdown strength and dielectric constant. First, the breakdown strength of composites synthesized with low filler volume concentrations of particles, barium titanate and titanium dioxide, in an epoxy matrix, was determined. The impact of commercial dispersants, phosphate esters and menhaden fish oil particle size, and solvent polarity on the electrical performance of the epoxy based composite was assessed by thermogravimetrie analysis, and Weibull distributions of the breakdown strength data. The surface of BaTiO3 was found to contain BaCO3 using X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Dispersion quality of acid washed BaTiO3 improved over as-received powder with comparable incorporation of dispersant and solvent system. T1O2 was used as a model to simulate the Ti-rich surface created after acid washing. A range of solids loading, from 5 to 40% volume, for a BaTiO3/epoxy composite system was used to determine the optimum trade-off in factors influencing energy density, dielectric constant or breakdown strength. The composites' components and electrical properties were characterized. Sample and electrode geometry were modified to impart a calculated dielectric constant without the influence of enhanced electric field lines.

  4. Vertical profiles of aerosol volume from high-spectral-resolution infrared transmission measurements. I. Methodology.

    PubMed

    Eldering, A; Irion, F W; Chang, A Y; Gunson, M R; Mills, F P; Steele, H M

    2001-06-20

    The wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction in the 800-1250-cm(-1) region has been derived from ATMOS (atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy) high-spectral-resolution IR transmission measurements. Using models of aerosol and cloud extinction, we have performed weighted nonlinear least-squares fitting to determine the aerosol-volume columns and vertical profiles of stratospheric sulfate aerosol and cirrus cloud volume. Modeled extinction by use of cold-temperature aerosol optical constants for a 70-80% sulfuric-acid-water solution shows good agreement with the measurements, and the derived aerosol volumes for a 1992 occultation are consistent with data from other experiments after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The retrieved sulfuric acid aerosol-volume profiles are insensitive to the aerosol-size distribution and somewhat sensitive to the set of optical constants used. Data from the nonspherical cirrus extinction model agree well with a 1994 mid-latitude measurement indicating the presence of cirrus clouds at the tropopause.

  5. Impacts of Wet Scavenging Parameterizations on Global Simulations of Aerosol Concentrations and Lifetimes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Martin, R.; Lohmann, U.; Pierce, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Wet scavenging processes strongly control aerosol three-dimensional distributions. In this study, we quantify the uncertainty in global simulations of aerosol vertical profiles and lifetimes, which may be attributed to uncertainties in both convective and stratiform wet scavenging parameterizations. For convective clouds, we show that different assumptions about the wet removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases can yield differences of about one order of magnitude in middle and upper tropospheric aerosol concentrations. For stratiform clouds, we demonstrate the impact of size-dependent aerosol wet scavenging as compared to the use of fixed prescribed scavenging coefficients. We quantify the difference in simulated aerosol concentrations, particularly at high latitudes, yielded by different assumptions about scavenging in mixed phase and ice clouds. We also examine the sensitivity of simulated global mean aerosol lifetimes to parameterizations for wet scavenging. Global simulations of the scavenging of aerosol-bound radionuclides following the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident are also presented. The simulated radionuclide lifetimes are compared to measurements. We present an interpretation of these constraints on global mean aerosol lifetimes. The sensitivity of simulated aerosol-bound radionuclide lifetimes to altitude and location of the radionuclide injection is also examined with consideration to the interplay of aerosol transport, mixing, and removal processes.

  6. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Volume from High Spectral Resolution Infrared Transmission Measurements: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, Annmarie; Kahn, Brian H.; Mills, Franklin P.; Irion, Fredrick W.; Steele, Helen M.; Gunson, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment are utilized to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density and extinction coefficient. Following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991, the ATMOS spectra obtained on three Space Shuttle missions (1992, 1993, and 1994) provide a unique opportunity to study the global stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer shortly after a major volcanic eruption and periodically during the decay phase. Synthetic sulfate aerosol spectra are fit to the observed spectra, and a global fitting inversion routine is used to derive vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density. Vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol volume density for the three missions over portions of the globe are presented, with the peak in aerosol volume density occurring from as low as 10 km (polar latitudes) to as high as 20 km (subtropical latitudes). Derived aerosol volume density is as high as 2-3.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-10% in 1992, decreasing to 0.2-0.5 (mu)m(exp 3) per cubic centimeter +/-20% in 1994, in agreement with other experiments. Vertical extinction profiles derived from ATMOS are compared with profiles from Improved Stratospheric And Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) and Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) that coincide in space and time and show good general agreement. The uncertainty of the ATMOS vertical profiles is similar to CLAES and consistently smaller than ISAMS at similar altitudes.

  7. The effect of formaldehyde and nitrogen-containing compounds on the size and volume of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millage, K.; Galloway, M. M.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol can interact with clouds in many ways, often resulting in the redistribution or absorption of solar energy or changes in precipitation efficiency. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in particular has been linked to climate change and a reduction in the number and size of cloud particles. The reactions of nitrogen containing compounds (primary amines, amino acids and ammonium sulfate) with carbonyl compounds (such as formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde) are potential sources of SOA. Aerosol containing formaldehyde and nitrogen-containing compounds (glycine, methylamine, arginine, or ammonium sulfate) was generated from buffered solutions (pH 5.4) using a nebulizer. The aerosol was then equilibrated into a chamber containing humid air (82-84% RH), and particle sizes were measured using a SMPS system over a period of 1 hour in order to examine how the size and volume of the aerosol particles changed. Formaldehyde concentrations were varied over multiple experiments. Arginine displayed a trend of increasing relative particle size with increasing formaldehyde concentration. Ammonium sulfate and formaldehyde displayed a decrease in relative particle sizes from 0:1 to 2:1 ratios of formaldehyde to ammonium sulfate, but then an increase in relative particle sizes with increasing amounts of formaldehyde. Similarly, glycine and methylamine initially displayed decreasing relative particle sizes, until reaching a 1:1 ratio of each to formaldehyde at which point the relative particle sizes steadily increased. These effects were likely caused by the evaporation of first-generation imine products.

  8. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3− aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; ...

    2015-09-25

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3−) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3more » and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. In addition, calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3− is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3− and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas–aerosol phase partitioning.« less

  9. Unexpectedly high ultrafine aerosol concentrations above East Antarctic sea-ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, R. S.; Klekociuk, A. R.; Schofield, R.; Keywood, M.; Ward, J.; Wilson, S. R.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of aerosols on clouds and their radiative properties is one of the largest uncertainties in our understanding of radiative forcing. A recent study has concluded that better characterisation of pristine, natural aerosol processes leads to the largest reduction in these uncertainties. Antarctica, being far from anthropogenic activities, is an ideal location for the study of natural aerosol processes. Aerosol measurements in Antarctica are often limited to boundary layer air-masses at spatially sparse coastal and continental research stations, with only a handful of studies in the sea ice region. In this paper, the first observational study of sub-micron aerosols in the East Antarctic sea ice region is presented. Measurements were conducted aboard the ice-breaker Aurora Australis in spring 2012 and found that boundary layer condensation nuclei (CN3) concentrations exhibited a five-fold increase moving across the Polar Front, with mean Polar Cell concentrations of 1130 cm-3 - higher than any observed elsewhere in the Antarctic and Southern Ocean region. The absence of evidence for aerosol growth suggested that nucleation was unlikely to be local. Air parcel trajectories indicated significant influence from the free troposphere above the Antarctic continent, implicating this as the likely nucleation region for surface aerosol, a similar conclusion to previous Antarctic aerosol studies. The highest aerosol concentrations were found to correlate with low pressure systems, suggesting that the passage of cyclones provided an accelerated pathway, delivering air-masses quickly from the free-troposphere to the surface. After descent from the Antarctic free troposphere, trajectories suggest that sea ice boundary layer air-masses travelled equator-ward into the low albedo Southern Ocean region, transporting with them emissions and these aerosol nuclei where, after growth, may potentially impact on the region's radiative balance. The high aerosol concentrations and

  10. Determination of radionuclide concentrations in ground level air using the ASS-500 high volume sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Frenzel, E.; Arnold, D.; Wershofen, H.

    1996-06-01

    A method for determination of radionuclide concentrations in air aerosol samples collected by the high volume aerosol sampler ASS-500 was elaborated. The aerosol sampling station ASS-500 is a Stand alone, all-weather proofed instrument. It is designed for representative sampling of airborne radionuclides from ground level air at a height of about 1.5 m above ground level. The ASS-500 station enables continuous air monitoring both normal and emergency Situations. The collection of aerosols on the Petrianov FPP-15-1.5 type filter out of an air volume of about 100,000 m{sup 3} (sampling period 1 wk) or of about 250,000 m{sup 3} (sampling period 3 wk) admits accurate spectrometric low level measurements of natural and artificial radionuclides. The achieved detection limit is 0.5 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} and 0.2 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} for {sup 137}Cs, respectively. A new developed air flow Meter system allows to enhance the collected air volume to about 150,000 m{sup 3} per week and lowers the detection limit to <0.4 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} for {sup 137}Cs for weekly collected aerosol samples. In Poland the CLOR uses 9 Stations ASS-500 at different sites as atmospheric radioactivity control system. On the basis of spectrometric measurements of natural and artificial radionuclides in the collected aerosol samples at the different sites, CLOR establishes a weekly report about the radiological situation at Poland for responsible authorities. The very low achievable detection limit of the Station ASS-500 due 10 the high air flow fate and the long possible sampling period were the key argument for other government radiation protection authorities in Europe to introduce the Station ASS-500 into their low level radionuclide atmospheric monitoring programs (Austria, Belarus, France, Germany, Iceland, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine).

  11. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  12. Warming-induced increase in aerosol number concentration likely to moderate climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paasonen, Pauli; Asmi, Ari; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kajos, Maija K.; Äijälä, Mikko; Junninen, Heikki; Holst, Thomas; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Arneth, Almut; Birmili, Wolfram; van der Gon, Hugo Denier; Hamed, Amar; Hoffer, András; Laakso, Lauri; Laaksonen, Ari; Richard Leaitch, W.; Plass-Dülmer, Christian; Pryor, Sara C.; Räisänen, Petri; Swietlicki, Erik; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku

    2013-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles influence the climate system directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation, and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Apart from black carbon aerosol, aerosols cause a negative radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and substantially mitigate the warming caused by greenhouse gases. In the future, tightening of controls on anthropogenic aerosol and precursor vapour emissions to achieve higher air quality may weaken this beneficial effect. Natural aerosols, too, might affect future warming. Here we analyse long-term observations of concentrations and compositions of aerosol particles and their biogenic precursor vapours in continental mid- and high-latitude environments. We use measurements of particle number size distribution together with boundary layer heights derived from reanalysis data to show that the boundary layer burden of cloud condensation nuclei increases exponentially with temperature. Our results confirm a negative feedback mechanism between the continental biosphere, aerosols and climate: aerosol cooling effects are strengthened by rising biogenic organic vapour emissions in response to warming, which in turn enhance condensation on particles and their growth to the size of cloud condensation nuclei. This natural growth mechanism produces roughly 50% of particles at the size of cloud condensation nuclei across Europe. We conclude that biosphere-atmosphere interactions are crucial for aerosol climate effects and can significantly influence the effects of anthropogenic aerosol emission controls, both on climate and air quality.

  13. Concentrations and sources of organic carbon aerosols in the free troposphere over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, Colette L.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Turquety, SolèNe; Hudman, Rynda C.; Weber, Rodney J.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Peltier, Richard E.; Atlas, Eliot L.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Warneke, Carsten; Holloway, John S.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Flocke, Frank M.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-12-01

    Aircraft measurements of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) aerosol over NE North America during summer 2004 (ITCT-2K4) are simulated with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to test our understanding of the sources of organic carbon (OC) aerosol in the free troposphere (FT). Elevated concentrations were observed in plumes from boreal fires in Alaska and Canada. WSOC aerosol concentrations outside of these plumes average 0.9 ± 0.9 μg C m-3 in the FT (2-6 km). The corresponding model value is 0.7 ± 0.6 μg C m-3, including 42% from biomass burning, 36% from biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and 22% from anthropogenic emissions. Previous OC aerosol observations over the NW Pacific in spring 2001 (ACE-Asia) averaged 3.3 ± 2.8 μg C m-3 in the FT, compared to a model value of 0.3 ± 0.3 μg C m-3. WSOC aerosol concentrations in the boundary layer (BL) during ITCT-2K4 are consistent with OC aerosol observed at the IMPROVE surface network. The model is low in the boundary layer by 30%, which we attribute to secondary formation at a rate comparable to primary anthropogenic emission. Observed WSOC aerosol concentrations decrease by a factor of 2 from the BL to the FT, as compared to a factor of 10 decrease for sulfate, indicating that most of the WSOC aerosol in the FT originates in situ. Despite reproducing mean observed WSOC concentrations in the FT to within 25%, the model cannot account for the variance in the observations (R = 0.21). Covariance analysis of FT WSOC aerosol with other measured chemical variables suggests an aqueous-phase mechanism for SOA generation involving biogenic precursors.

  14. Calculating Capstone depleted uranium aerosol concentrations from beta activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Szrom, Frances; Falo, Gerald A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Whicker, Jeffrey J; Alberth, David P

    2009-03-01

    Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the DU source term for the subsequent Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Values for the equilibrium fraction ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92. This paper describes the process used and adjustments necessary to calculate uranium mass from proportional counting measurements.

  15. A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S. ); Weiss, R.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin

    SciTech Connect

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Hering, Susanne V.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2007-06-25

    A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a variety of methods, resulting in both near real-time measurements as well as integrated filter based measurements. Comparisons of the different measurement methods show that it is crucial to account for gas phase adsorption artifacts when measuring organic carbon (OC). Measured concentrations affected by the emissions of organic compounds sorbed to indoor surfaces imply a higher degree of infiltration of outdoor organic carbon aerosols into the indoor environment for our unoccupied house. Analysis of the indoor and outdoor data for black carbon (BC) aerosols show that, on average, the indoor concentration of black carbon aerosols behaves in a similar manner to sulfate aerosols. In contrast, organic carbon aerosols are subject to chemical transformations indoors that, for our unoccupied home, resulted in lower indoor OC concentrations than would be expected by physical loss mechanisms alone. These results show that gas to particle partitioning of organic compounds, as well as gas to surface interactions within the residence, are an important process governing the indoor concentration to OC aerosols of outdoor origin.

  17. Middle East measurements of concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles for coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, Sergey; Kopeika, Norman S.; Blaunstein, Natan S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, an extension of the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) was proposed based on analysis of an extensive series of measurements at the Irish Atlantic Coast and at the French Mediterranean Coast. We confirm the relevance of that work for the distant eastern Meditteranean and extend several coefficients of that coastal model, proposed by Piazzola et al. for the Meditteranean Coast (a form of the Navy Aerosol Model), to midland Middle East coastal environments. This analysis is based on data collected at three different Middle East coastal areas: the Negev Desert (Eilat) Red Sea Coast, the Sea of Galilee (Tiberias) Coast, and the Mediterranean (Haifa) Coast. Aerosol size distributions are compared with those obtained through measurements carried out over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean Coasts, and Mediterranean, and Baltic Seas Coasts. An analysis of these different results allows better understanding of the similarities and differences between different coastal lake, sea, and open ocean zones. It is shown that in the coastal regions in Israel, compared to open ocean and other sea zones, larger differences in aerosol particle concentration are observed. The aerosol particle concentrations and their dependences on wind speed for these coastal zones are analyzed and discussed. We propose to classify the aerosol distribution models to either: 1. a coastal model with marine aerosol domination; 2. a coastal model with continental aerosol domination (referred to as midland coast in this work); or 3. a coastal model with balanced marine and continental conditions.

  18. On the contribution of organics to the North East Atlantic aerosol number concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, Jakub; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Monahan, Ciaran; Beddows, David; O'Dowd, Colin

    2012-12-01

    k-means statistical-cluster analysis of submicron aerosol size distributions is combined with coincident humidity tandem differential mobility analyser data, leading to five unique aerosol categories for hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs): low sea-salt background marine, high sea-salt background marine, coastal nucleation, open ocean nucleation and anthropogenically influenced scenarios. When considering only marine conditions, and generic aerosol species associated with this environment (e.g. non-sea-salt sulfate, sea-salt, partly soluble organic matter and water insoluble organic matter), the two-year annual average contribution to aerosol number concentration from the different generic species was made up as follows: 46% (30-54%) of partially modified ammonium sulfate particles; 23% (11-40%) of partially modified sea-salt; and the remaining 31% (25-35%) contribution attributed to two distinct organic species as evidenced by different, but low, HGFs. The analysis reveals that on annual timescales, ˜30% of the submicron marine aerosol number concentration is sourced from predominantly organic aerosol while 60% of the anthropogenic aerosol number is predominantly organic. Coastal nucleation events show the highest contribution of the lowest HGF mode (1.19), although this contribution is more likely to be influenced by inorganic iodine oxides. While organic mass internally mixed with inorganic salts will lower the activation potential of these mixed aerosol types, thereby potentially reducing the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), pure organic water soluble particles are still likely to be activated into cloud droplets, thereby increasing the concentration of CCN. A combination of dynamics and aerosol concentrations will determine which effect will prevail under given conditions.

  19. Winter monsoon variability and its impact on aerosol concentrations in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaein I; Park, Rokjin J

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the relationship between winter aerosol concentrations over East Asia and variability in the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) using GEOS-Chem 3-D global chemical transport model simulations and ground-based aerosol concentration data. We find that both observed and modeled surface aerosol concentrations have strong relationships with the intensity of the EAWM over northern (30-50°N, 100-140°E) and southern (20-30°N, 100-140°E) East Asia. In strong winter monsoon years, compared to weak winter monsoon years, lower and higher surface PM2.5 concentrations by up to 25% are shown over northern and southern East Asia, respectively. Analysis of the simulated results indicates that the southward transport of aerosols is a key process controlling changes in aerosol concentrations over East Asia associated with the EAWM. Variability in the EAWM is found to play a major role in interannual variations in aerosol concentrations; consequently, changes in the EAWM will be important for understanding future changes in wintertime air quality over East Asia.

  20. Recent Field Measurements of Ice Nuclei Concentration Relation to Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; McMeeking, G.; Prenni, A. J.; Hill, T. C.; Franc, G. D.; Sullivan, A. P.; Garcia, E.; Tobo, Y.; Prather, K. A.; Suski, K.; Cazorla, A.; Anderson, J. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    It is expected that atmospheric variability of ice nuclei concentrations is governed by a variety of factors related to aerosol physical and chemical properties. Not all particles contribute equally due to the special nature of ice nuclei. The "size requirement" of ice nuclei (Pruppacher and Klett, 1997), partly related to the typical aerosol compositions known to act as ice nuclei (e.g., mineral dust particles, certain biological particles), leads to the relation of ice nuclei number concentrations to larger aerosol concentrations in some cases, but we emphasize here the additional relation to aerosol chemistry. Recent atmospheric ice nuclei measurements focused on biomass burning, mineral dust, pollution and biological particles will be discussed to highlight new assessment of their source contributions on the basis of physical, chemical and biological analysis. Pruppacher, H. R., and J. D. Klett, 1997: Microphysics of Clouds and Precipitation (2nd Edition), Kluwer Academic Press, Dordrecht, 954 pp.

  1. Source appointment of fine particle number and volume concentration during severe haze pollution in Beijing in January 2013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yuesi; Hu, Bo; Ji, Dongsheng; Zhang, Junke; Wu, Fangkun; Wan, Xin; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-04-01

    Extreme haze episodes repeatedly shrouded Beijing during the winter of 2012-2013, causing major environmental and health problems. To better understand these extreme events, particle number size distribution (PNSD) and particle chemical composition (PCC) data collected in an intensive winter campaign in an urban site of Beijing were used to investigate the sources of ambient fine particles. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis resolved a total of eight factors: two traffic factors, combustion factors, secondary aerosol, two accumulation mode aerosol factors, road dust, and long-range transported (LRT) dust. Traffic emissions (54%) and combustion aerosol (27%) were found to be the most important sources for particle number concentration, whereas combustion aerosol (33%) and accumulation mode aerosol (37%) dominated particle volume concentrations. Chemical compositions and sources of fine particles changed dynamically in the haze episodes. An enhanced role of secondary inorganic species was observed in the formation of haze pollution. Regional transport played an important role for high particles, contribution of which was on average up to 24-49% during the haze episodes. Secondary aerosols from urban background presented the largest contributions (45%) for the rapid increase of fine particles in the severest haze episode. In addition, the invasion of LRT dust aerosols further elevated the fine particles during the extreme haze episode. Our results showed a clear impact of regional transport on the local air pollution, suggesting the importance of regional-scale emission control measures in the local air quality management of Beijing.

  2. On the submicron aerosol distributions and CCN number concentrations in and around the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Yum, S. S.; Shim, S.; Kim, W. J.; Park, M.; Kim, J.-H.; Kim, M.-H.; Yoon, S.-C.

    2014-08-01

    Total number concentrations of particles having a diameter larger than 10 nm (NCN), cloud condensation nuclei at several supersaturation (S) values (NCCN) and number size distributions of particles with 10-414 nm diameter were measured in Seoul between 2004 and 2010. Overall average values of NCN and geometric mean diameter were 17 811 ± 5581 cm-3 and 48 ± 6 nm. Average NCCN at 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8% S were 4145 ± 2016, 5323 ± 2453 and 6067 ± 2780 cm-3 and corresponding NCCN / NCN were 0.26 ± 0.11, 0.33 ± 0.11 and 0.37 ± 0.12. There is a clear seasonal variation in aerosol concentration, which seems to be due to the monsoon. NCN and NCCN are also found to depend on the volume of traffic and the height of the planetary boundary layer, respectively. During aircraft campaigns in 2009 and 2011, NCN and NCCN at 0.6% S (N0.6%) were measured in and around the Korean Peninsula. During the 2011 campaign, the aerosol scattering coefficient was also measured. NCN and N0.6% in the lower altitudes were generally higher than at higher altitudes, except for cases when particle formation and growth events were thought to occur at higher altitudes. NCN and N0.6% generally show a positive correlation with aerosol scattering coefficients but this correspondence tends to vary with altitude. Occasional instances of low (< 0.3) N0.6% / NCN in the boundary layer are demonstrated to be associated with particle formation and growth events. With the support of ground measurements, it is confirmed that a particle formation and growth event did indeed occur over the Yellow Sea on a flight day, and the areal extent of this event is estimated to be greater than 100 km × 450 km. With the combination of the current and several relevant previous studies, a composite map of NCN and NCCN in and around the Korean Peninsula is produced. Overall, the exhibited concentrations are typical of values measured over polluted regions elsewhere on the globe. Moreover, there is a generally decreasing trend

  3. On the submicron aerosol distributions and CCN number concentrations in and around the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Yum, S. S.; Shim, S.; Kim, W. J.; Park, M.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Yoon, S. C.

    2014-03-01

    Total number concentrations of particles having diameter larger than 10 nm (NCN), cloud condensation nuclei at several supersaturation (S) values (NCCN), and the number size distribution of particles for 10-414 nm particle diameter range were measured in Seoul between 2004 and 2010. Overall average values of NCN and geometric mean diameter are 17 811 ± 5581 cm-3 and 48 ± 6 nm, respectively. Average NCCN at 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8% S are 4145 ± 2016, 5323 ± 2453 and 6067 ± 2780 cm-3, respectively and corresponding NCCN / NCN are 0.26 ± 0.11, 0.33 ± 0.11 and 0.37 ± 0.12. There is a clear seasonal variation of aerosol concentration, which seems to be due to the monsoon. NCN and NCCN are also found to be dependent on the volume of traffic and the height of planetary boundary layer, respectively. During the two aircraft campaigns in 2009 and 2011, NCN and NCCN at 0.6% S were measured in and around the Korean Peninsula. During the 2011 campaign, aerosol scattering coefficient was also measured. NCN and NCCN 0.6 in the lower altitudes were generally higher than at higher altitudes, except for the cases when particle formation and growth events are thought to occur at higher altitudes. NCN and NCCN 0.6 show generally a positive correlation with aerosol scattering coefficients but its correspondence tends to vary with altitude. Occasional instances of low (< 0.3) NCCN 0.6 / NCN in the boundary layer are demonstrated to be associated with particle formation and growth events. With the support of ground measurements, it is confirmed that a particle formation and growth event indeed occurred on a flight day over the Yellow Sea and the areal extent of the event is estimated to be greater than 100 km × 450 km. With the combination of the current and several relevant previous studies, a composite map of NCN and NCCN in and around the Korean Peninsula is produced. Overall, the exhibited concentrations are typical of the values measured over the polluted regions elsewhere in the

  4. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  5. Determination of saturation pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of semi-volatile aerosols: the integrated volume mentod

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the integrated volume method for estimating saturation pressure and enthalpy of vaporization of a whole aerosol distribution. We measure the change of total volume of an aerosol distribution between a reference state and several heated states, with the heating...

  6. Process evaluation of sea salt aerosol concentrations at remote marine locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struthers, H.; Ekman, A. M.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    Sea salt, an important natural aerosol, is generated by bubbles bursting at the surface of the ocean. Sea salt aerosol contributes significantly to the global aerosol burden and radiative budget and are a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei in remote marine areas (Monahan et al., 1986). Consequently, changes in marine aerosol abundance is expected to impact on climate forcing. Estimates of the atmospheric burden of sea salt aerosol mass derived from chemical transport and global climate models vary greatly both in the global total and the spatial distribution (Texor et al. 2006). This large uncertainty in the sea salt aerosol distribution in turn contributes to the large uncertainty in the current estimates of anthropogenic aerosol climate forcing (IPCC, 2007). To correctly attribute anthropogenic climate change and to veraciously project future climate, natural aerosols including sea salt must be understood and accurately modelled. In addition, the physical processes that determine the sea salt aerosol concentration are susceptible to modification due to climate change (Carslaw et al., 2010) which means there is the potential for feedbacks within the climate/aerosol system. Given the large uncertainties in sea salt aerosol modelling, there is an urgent need to evaluate the process description of sea salt aerosols in global models. An extremely valuable source of data for model evaluation is the long term measurements of PM10 sea salt aerosol mass available from a number of remote marine observation sites around the globe (including the GAW network). Sea salt aerosol concentrations at remote marine locations depend strongly on the surface exchange (emission and deposition) as well as entrainment or detrainment to the free troposphere. This suggests that the key parameters to consider in any analysis include the sea surface water temperature, wind speed, precipitation rate and the atmospheric stability. In this study, the sea salt aerosol observations

  7. The importance of aerosol composition and mixing state on predicted CCN concentration and the variation of the importance with atmospheric processing of aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Cubison, M.; Aiken, A.; Jimenez, J.; Collins, D.; Gaffney, J.; Marley, N.

    2010-03-15

    The influences of atmospheric aerosols on cloud properties (i.e., aerosol indirect effects) strongly depend on the aerosol CCN concentrations, which can be effectively predicted from detailed aerosol size distribution, mixing state, and chemical composition using Köhler theory. However, atmospheric aerosols are complex and heterogeneous mixtures of a large number of species that cannot be individually simulated in global or regional models due to computational constraints. Furthermore, the thermodynamic properties or even the molecular identities of many organic species present in ambient aerosols are often not known to predict their cloud-activation behavior using Köhler theory. As a result, simplified presentations of aerosol composition and mixing state are necessary for large-scale models. In this study, aerosol microphysics, CCN concentrations, and chemical composition measured at the T0 urban super-site in Mexico City during MILAGRO are analyzed. During the campaign in March 2006, aerosol size distribution and composition often showed strong diurnal variation as a result of both primary emissions and aging of aerosols through coagulation and local photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The submicron aerosol composition was ~1/2 organic species. Closure analysis is first carried out by comparing CCN concentrations calculated from the measured aerosol size distribution, mixing state, and chemical composition using extended Köhler theory to concurrent CCN measurements at five supersaturations ranging from 0.11% to 0.35%. The closure agreement and its diurnal variation are studied. CCN concentrations are also derived using various simplifications of the measured aerosol mixing state and chemical composition. The biases associated with these simplifications are compared for different supersaturations, and the variation of the biases is examined as a function of aerosol age. The results show that the simplification of internally mixed, size

  8. SAGE aerosol measurements. Volume 1: February 21, 1979 to December 31, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) satellite system, launched on February 18, 1979, provides profiles of aerosol extinction, ozone concentration, and nitrogen dioxide concentration between about 80 N and 80 S. Zonal averages, separated into sunrise and sunset events, and seasonal averages of the aerosol extinction at 1.00 microns and 0.45 microns ratios of the aerosol extinction to the molecular extinction at 1.00 microns, and ratios of the aerosol extinction at 0.45 microns to the aerosol extinction at 1.00 microns are given. The averages for 1979 are shown in tables and in profile and contour plots (as a function of altitude and latitude). In addition, temperature data provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the time and location of each SAGE measurement are averaged and shown in a similar format. Typical values of the peak aerosol extinction were 0.0001 to 0.0002 km at 1.00 microns depth values for the 1.00 microns channel varied between 0.001 and 0.002 over all latitudes.

  9. Effect of stratospheric aerosols on direct sunlight and implications for concentrating solar power.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Daniel M

    2009-04-15

    Light scattering calculations and data show that stratospheric aerosols reduce direct sunlight by about 4 W for every watt reflected to outer space. The balance becomes diffuse sunlight. One consequence of deliberate enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer would be a significant reduction in the efficiency of solar power generation systems using parabolic or other concentrating optics. There also would be a reduction in the effectiveness of passive solar design.

  10. The Role of Atmospheric Aerosol Concentration on Deep Convective Precipitation: Cloud-resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Mastsui, T.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 20011. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds NRC [2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect, is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. ln this paper, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with detailed spectral-bin microphysics was used to examine the effect of aerosols on three different deep convective cloud systems that developed in different geographic locations: South Florida, Oklahoma and the Central Pacific. In all three cases, rain reaches the ground earlier for the low CCN (clean) case. Rain suppression is also evident in all three cases with high CCN (dirty) case. However, this suppression only occurs during the first hour of the simulations. During the mature stages of the simulations, the effects of increasing aerosol concentration range from rain suppression in the Oklahoma case, to almost no effect in the Florida case, to rain enhancement in the Pacific case. These results show the complexity of aerosol interactions with convection.

  11. Characterization of a Quadrotor Unmanned Aircraft System for Aerosol-Particle-Concentration Measurements.

    PubMed

    Brady, James M; Stokes, M Dale; Bonnardel, Jim; Bertram, Timothy H

    2016-02-02

    High-spatial-resolution, near-surface vertical profiling of atmospheric chemical composition is currently limited by the availability of experimental platforms that can sample in constrained environments. As a result, measurements of near-surface gradients in trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations have been limited to studies conducted from fixed location towers or tethered balloons. Here, we explore the utility of a quadrotor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) as a sampling platform to measure vertical and horizontal concentration gradients of trace gases and aerosol particles at high spatial resolution (1 m) within the mixed layer (0-100 m). A 3D Robotics Iris+ autonomous quadrotor UAS was outfitted with a sensor package consisting of a two-channel aerosol optical particle counter and a CO2 sensor. The UAS demonstrated high precision in both vertical (±0.5 m) and horizontal positions (±1 m), highlighting the potential utility of quadrotor UAS drones for aerosol- and trace-gas measurements within complex terrain, such as the urban environment, forest canopies, and above difficult-to-access areas such as breaking surf. Vertical profiles of aerosol particle number concentrations, acquired from flights conducted along the California coastline, were used to constrain sea-spray aerosol-emission rates from coastal wave breaking.

  12. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  13. Emission controls versus meteorological conditions in determining aerosol concentrations in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhao, C.; Zhang, M.; Wang, Y.

    2011-06-01

    A series of emission control measures were undertaken in Beijing and the adjacent provinces in China during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on 8-24 August 2008. This provides a unique opportunity for investigating the effectiveness of emission controls on air pollution in Beijing. We conducted a series of numerical experiments over East Asia for the period of July to September 2008 using a coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem). Model can generally reproduce the observed variation of aerosol concentrations. Consistent with observations, modeled concentrations of aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, total particulate matter) in Beijing were decreased by 30-50 % during the Olympic period compared to the other periods in July and August in 2008 and the same period in 2007. Model results indicate that emission controls were effective in reducing the aerosol concentrations by comparing simulations with and without emission controls. However, our analysis suggests that meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction and precipitation) are at least as important as emission controls in producing the low aerosol concentrations appearing during the Olympic period. Transport from the regions surrounding Beijing determines the temporal variation of aerosol concentrations in Beijing. Based on the budget analysis, we suggest that to improve the air quality over Beijing, emission control strategy should focus on the regional scale instead of the local scale.

  14. Emission controls versus meteorological conditions in determining aerosol concentrations in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhao, C.; Zhang, M.

    2011-12-01

    A series of emission control measures were undertaken in Beijing and the adjacent provinces in China during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on 8-24 August 2008. This provides a unique opportunity for investigating the effectiveness of emission controls on air pollution in Beijing. We conducted a series of numerical experiments over East Asia for the period of July to September 2008 using a coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem). Model can generally reproduce the observed variation of aerosol concentrations. Consistent with observations, modeled concentrations of aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, total particulate matter) in Beijing were decreased by 30-50% during the Olympic period compared to the other periods in July and August in 2008 and the same period in 2007. Model results indicate that emission controls were effective in reducing the aerosol concentrations by comparing simulations with and without emission controls. In addition to emission controls, our analysis suggests that meteorological conditions (e.g. wind direction and precipitation) were also important in producing the low aerosol concentrations appearing during the Olympic period. Transport from the regions surrounding Beijing determined the daily variation of aerosol concentrations in Beijing. Based on the budget analysis, we suggest that to improve the air quality over Beijing, emission control strategy should focus on the regional scale instead of the local scale.

  15. Emission Controls Versus Meteorological Conditions in Determining Aerosol Concentrations in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yi; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Meigen

    2011-12-12

    A series of emission control measures were undertaken in Beijing and the adjacent provinces in China during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games on August 8th-24th, 2008. This provides a unique opportunity for investigating the effectiveness of emission controls on air pollution in Beijing. We conducted a series of numerical experiments over East Asia for the period of July to September 2008 using a coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem). Model can generally reproduce the observed variation of aerosol concentrations. Consistent with observations, modeled concentrations of aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, total particulate matter) in Beijing were decreased by 30-50% during the Olympic period compared to the other periods in July and August in 2008 and the same period in 2007. Model results indicate that emission controls were effective in reducing the aerosol concentrations by comparing simulations with and without emission controls. However, our analysis suggests that meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction and precipitation) are at least as important as emission controls in producing the low aerosol concentrations appearing during the Olympic period. Transport from the regions surrounding Beijing determines the temporal variation of aerosol concentrations in Beijing. Based on the budget analysis, we suggest that emission control strategy should focus on the regional scale instead of the local scale to improve the air quality over Beijing.

  16. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol optical thickness and chlorophyll concentration from multiwavelength measurement over East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chong; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Hashimoto, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    A flexible inversion algorithm is proposed for simultaneously retrieving aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and surface chlorophyll a (Chl) concentration from multiwavelength observation over the ocean. In this algorithm, forward radiation calculation is performed by an accurate coupled atmosphere-ocean model with a comprehensive bio-optical ocean module. Then, a full-physical nonlinear optimization approximation approach is used to retrieve AOT and Chl. For AOT retrieval, a global three-dimensional spectral radiation-transport aerosol model is used as the a priori constraint to increase the retrieval accuracy of aerosol. To investigate the algorithm's availability, the retrieval experiment is conducted using simulated radiance data to demonstrate that the relative errors in simultaneously determining AOT and Chl can be mostly controlled to within 10% using multiwavelength and angle covering in and out of sunglint. Furthermore, the inversion results are assessed using the actual satellite observation data obtained from Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI)/Greenhouse gas Observation SATellite GOSAT and MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)/Aqua instruments through comparison to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol and ocean color (OC) products over East China Sea. Both the retrieved AOT and Chl compare favorably to the reported AERONET values, particularly when using the CASE 2 ocean module in turbid water, even when the retrieval is performed in the presence of high aerosol loading and sunglint. Finally, the CAI and MODIS images are used to jointly retrieve the spatial distribution of AOT and Chl in comparison to the MODIS AOT and OC products.

  17. Influence of the external mixing state of atmospheric aerosol on derived CCN number concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, H.; McFiggans, G.; Henning, S.; Stratmann, F.

    2010-05-01

    We derived the range of particle hygroscopicities ($\\kappa$) that occurs in the atmosphere, based on literature data of measured hygroscopic growth or based on chemical composition. The derived $\\kappa$-values show that the atmospheric aerosol often is an external mixture with respect to hygroscopicity. Mean $\\kappa$ were derived for urban, rural, and marine aerosols for the different hygroscopic modes. Using these $\\kappa$ and exemplary particle number size distributions for the different aerosols, the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (NCCN) was derived for two cases, (1) accounting for the less hygroscopic fraction of particles and (2) assuming all particles to have $\\kappa$ of the more hygroscopic mode. NCCN derived from measured particle hygroscopicity is overestimated for case (2). Overestimation of NCCN is largest for fresh continental aerosol and less pronounced for marine aerosol. With $\\kappa$ derived from bulk aerosol composition data, only the hygroscopicity of more soluble aerosol particles is captured. Bulk or even size-resolved composition data will be insufficient to predict NCCN under many conditions unless independent information about particle mixing state is available.

  18. Spatial variability of carbonaceous aerosol concentrations in East and West Jerusalem.

    PubMed

    von Schneidemesser, Erika; Zhou, Iiabin; Stone, Elizabeth A; Schauer, James I; Shpund, Jacob; Brenner, Shmuel; Qasrawi, Radwan; Abdeen, Ziad; Sarnat, Jeremy A

    2010-03-15

    Carbonaceous aerosol concentrations and sources were compared during a year long study at two sites in East and West Jerusalem that were separated by a distance of approximately 4 km. One in six day 24-h PM(2.5) elemental and organic carbon concentrations were measured, along with monthly average concentrations of particle-phase organic compound tracers for primary and secondary organic aerosol sources.Tracer compounds were used in a chemical mass balance ICMB) model to determine primary and secondary source contributions to organic carbon. The East Jerusalem sampling site at Al Quds University experienced higher concentrations of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) compared to the West Jerusalem site at Hebrew University. The annual average concentrations of OC and EC at the East Jerusalem site were 5.20 and 2.19 μg m(-3), respectively, and at the West Jerusalem site were 4.03 and 1.14 μg m(-3), respectively. Concentrations and trends of secondary organic aerosol and vegetative detritus were similar at both sites, but large differences were observed in the concentrations of organic aerosol from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, which was the cause of the large differences in OC and EC concentrations observed at the two sites.

  19. In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Mass Concentration and Spectral Absorption in Xianghe, SE of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Z.; Martins, V.; Li, Z.

    2005-12-01

    China's rapid industrialization over the last few decades has affected air quality in many regions of China, and even the regional climate. As a part of the EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment) study, Nuclepore filters were collected in two size ranges (PM10 and PM2.5) at 12 hour intervals since January 2005 at Xianghe, about 70 km southeast of Beijing. Each filter was analyzed for mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption efficiencies. Mass concentrations during the winter months (January-March) ranged from 9 to 459 μg/m3 in the coarse mode with an average concentration of 122 μg/m3, and from 11 to 203 μg/m3 in the fine mode with an average concentration of 45 μg/m3. While some of the extreme values are likely linked to local emissions, regional air pollution episodes also played important roles. Absorption efficiency measurements at 550 nm show very high values compared to measurements performed in the United States during the CLAMS experiment. The spectral mass absorption efficiency was measured from 350 to 2500 nm and shows large differences between the absorption properties of soil dust, black carbon, and organic aerosols. The strong spectral differences observed can be related to differences in refractive indices from the several collected species and particle size effects. The absorption properties from aerosols measured in China show large absorption efficiencies, compared to aerosols measured in the US, possibly linked to different technology practices used in these countries. For organic plus black carbon aerosols, where the refractive index seems to be relatively constant, the absorption efficiency spectral dependence for fine mode aerosols falls between 1/λ and 1/λ2. The coarse mode absorption shows much less spectral dependence.

  20. Measurement of elemental concentration of aerosols using spark emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Diwakar, Prasoon K; Kulkarni, Pramod

    A coaxial microelectrode system has been used to collect and analyse the elemental composition of aerosol particles in near real-time using spark emission spectroscopy. The technique involves focused electrostatic deposition of charged aerosol particles onto the flat tip of a microelectrode, followed by introduction of spark discharge. A pulsed spark discharge was generated across the electrodes with input energy ranging from 50 to 300 mJ per pulse, resulting in the formation of controlled pulsed plasma. The particulate matter on the cathode tip is ablated and atomized by the spark plasma, resulting in atomic emissions which are subsequently recorded using a broadband optical spectrometer for element identification and quantification. The plasma characteristics were found to be very consistent and reproducible even after several thousands of spark discharges using the same electrode system. The spark plasma was characterized by measuring the excitation temperature (~7000 to 10 000 K), electron density (~10(16) cm(-3)), and evolution of spectral responses as a function of time. The system was calibrated using particles containing Pb, Si, Na and Cr. Absolute mass detection limits in the range 11 pg to 1.75 ng were obtained. Repeatability of spectral measurements varied from 2 to 15%. The technique offers key advantages over similar microplasma-based techniques such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, as: (i) it does not require any laser beam optics and eliminates any need for beam alignment, (ii) pulse energy from dc power supply in SIBS system can be much higher compared to that from laser source of the same physical size, and (iii) it is quite conducive to compact, field-portable instrumentation.

  1. Measurement of elemental concentration of aerosols using spark emission spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Diwakar, Prasoon K.

    2015-01-01

    A coaxial microelectrode system has been used to collect and analyse the elemental composition of aerosol particles in near real-time using spark emission spectroscopy. The technique involves focused electrostatic deposition of charged aerosol particles onto the flat tip of a microelectrode, followed by introduction of spark discharge. A pulsed spark discharge was generated across the electrodes with input energy ranging from 50 to 300 mJ per pulse, resulting in the formation of controlled pulsed plasma. The particulate matter on the cathode tip is ablated and atomized by the spark plasma, resulting in atomic emissions which are subsequently recorded using a broadband optical spectrometer for element identification and quantification. The plasma characteristics were found to be very consistent and reproducible even after several thousands of spark discharges using the same electrode system. The spark plasma was characterized by measuring the excitation temperature (~7000 to 10 000 K), electron density (~1016 cm−3), and evolution of spectral responses as a function of time. The system was calibrated using particles containing Pb, Si, Na and Cr. Absolute mass detection limits in the range 11 pg to 1.75 ng were obtained. Repeatability of spectral measurements varied from 2 to 15%. The technique offers key advantages over similar microplasma-based techniques such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, as: (i) it does not require any laser beam optics and eliminates any need for beam alignment, (ii) pulse energy from dc power supply in SIBS system can be much higher compared to that from laser source of the same physical size, and (iii) it is quite conducive to compact, field-portable instrumentation. PMID:26491209

  2. Aerosol effects on ozone concentrations in Beijing: a model sensitivity study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yuanhang; Zheng, Shaoqing; He, Youjiang

    2012-01-01

    Most previous O3 simulations were based only on gaseous phase photochemistry. However, some aerosol-related processes, namely, heterogeneous reactions occurring on the aerosol surface and photolysis rate alternated by aerosol radiative influence, may affect O3 photochemistry under high aerosol loads. A three-dimensional air quality model, Models-3/Community Multi-scale Air Quality-Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization, and Dissolution, was employed to simulate the effects of the above-mentioned processes on O3 formation under typical high O3 episodes in Beijing during summer. Five heterogeneous reactions, i.e., NO2, NO3, N2O5, HO2, and O3, were individually investigated to elucidate their effects on 03 formation. The results showed that the heterogeneous reactions significantly affected O3 formation in the urban plume. NO2 heterogeneous reaction increased O3 to 90 ppb, while HO2 heterogeneous reaction decreased O3 to 33 ppb. In addition, O3 heterogeneous loss decreased O3 to 31 ppb. The effects of NO2, NO3, and N2O5 heterogeneous reactions showed opposite O3 concentration changes between the urban and extra-urban areas because of the response of the reactions to the two types of O3 formation regimes. When the aerosol radiative influence was included, the photolysis rate decreased and O3 decreased significantly to 73 ppb O3. The two aerosol-related processes should be considered in the study of O3 formation because high aerosol concentration is a ubiquitous phenomenon that affects the urban- and regional air quality in China.

  3. Aerosol formation by ozonolysis of α- and β-pinene with initial concentrations below 1 ppb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saathoff, Harald; Naumann, Karl-Heinz; Möhler, Ottmar

    2014-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are a large fraction of the tropospheric aerosol especially over tropical continental regions. The dominant SOA forming compounds are monoterpenes of which pinene is the most abundant. The reactions of monoterpenes with OH radicals, NO3 radicals, and ozone yield secondary organic aerosol mass in highly variable yields. Despite the various studies on SOA formation the influence of temperature and precursor concentrations on SOA yields are still major uncertainties in tropospheric aerosol models. In previous studies we observed a negative temperature dependence of SOA yields for SOA from ozonolysis α-pinene and limonene (Saathoff et al., 2009). However, this study as well as most of the literature data for measured SOA yields is limited to terpene concentrations of several ppb and higher (e.g. Bernard et al., 2012), hence about an order of magnitude higher than terpene concentrations even near their sources. Monoterpene concentrations in and above tropical or boral forests reach values up to a few tenth of a ppb during daytime decreasing rapidly with altitude in the boundary layer (Kesselmeier et al. 2000; Boy et al., 2004). Therefore we investigated the yield of SOA material from the ozonolysis of α- and β-pinene under simulated tropospheric conditions in the large aerosol chamber AIDA on time scales of several hours and for terpene concentrations between 0.1 and 1 ppb. The temperatures investigated were 243, 274, and 296 K with relative humidities ranging from 25% to 41%. The organic aerosol was generated by controlled oxidation with an excess of ozone (220-930 ppb) and the aerosol yield is calculated from size distributions measured with differential mobility analysers (SMPS, TSI, 3071 & 3080N) in the size range between 2 and 820 nm. On the basis of the measured initial particle size distribution, particle number concentration (CPC, TSI, 3775, 3776, 3022), and

  4. Spatial variability of aerosol and black carbon concentrations in the troposphere of the Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valerii S.; Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Paris, Jean D.; Nédéléc, Philippe; Chernov, Dmitry G.; Shmargunov, Vladimir P.

    2015-11-01

    A cycle of flights of the Optik TU-134 Flying Laboratory of IAO SB RAS over regions of Western Siberia and the Russian Arctic (55.0-74.8°N, 61.3-82.9°E) was carried out on October 15-17 of 2014 within the framework of the YAK-AEROSIB Russian—French Project. The mass concentrations of submicron aerosol and Black Carbon (BC) in the troposphere up to a height of 8.5 km were measured in the flights. The ranges of variability were 0.3-20 μg/m3 for the aerosol concentration and 0.02-1 μg/m3 for the BC concentration. In the subpolar latitudes of 71-74.8°N, the lower levels of aerosol (0.8-6 μg/m3) and BC (0.02-0.3 μg/m3) were observed. The comparison of the results of airborne sensing in 2008 and 2014 has shown that in the Western Subartic the aerosol and BC concentrations in the vertical profiles up to six times exceeded those observed in the Eastern Subarctic (0.3-1 μg/m3 and 10-50 ng/m3). The excess of the mean integral BC concentrations and the aerosol optical depth was, on average, 2-2.5 times (0.16 mg/m2; 0.02). In the region of the Kara Sea at heights of 0.5-2 and 4-6 km, the excess of the aerosol content in the western sector in comparison with the eastern one was, on average, 2 times, while for the black carbon the excess achieved 7 times at heights of 1-2 km (0.25- 0.035 μg/m3). The mean integral concentrations of aerosol and black carbon ˜ 1.3 times exceeded those in the clearer eastern region of the sea (0.31 mg/m2; 0.049). The obtained estimates indicate the decrease of the aerosol and BC concentrations in the subpolar latitudes of the Russian Federation from the west to the east.

  5. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; Kuang, Chongai; Barbosa, Henrique M J; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Chi, Xuguang; Comstock, Jennifer; Ditas, Florian; Lavric, Jost; Manninen, Hanna E; Mei, Fan; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L; Saturno, Jorge; Schmid, Beat; Souza, Rodrigo A F; Springston, Stephen R; Tomlinson, Jason M; Toto, Tami; Walter, David; Wimmer, Daniela; Smith, James N; Kulmala, Markku; Machado, Luiz A T; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O; Petäjä, Tuukka; Martin, Scot T

    2016-11-17

    The nucleation of atmospheric vapours is an important source of new aerosol particles that can subsequently grow to form cloud condensation nuclei in the atmosphere. Most field studies of atmospheric aerosols over continents are influenced by atmospheric vapours of anthropogenic origin (for example, ref. 2) and, in consequence, aerosol processes in pristine, terrestrial environments remain poorly understood. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions, but the origin of small aerosol particles that grow into cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon boundary layer remains unclear. Here we present aircraft- and ground-based measurements under clean conditions during the wet season in the central Amazon basin. We find that high concentrations of small aerosol particles (with diameters of less than 50 nanometres) in the lower free troposphere are transported from the free troposphere into the boundary layer during precipitation events by strong convective downdrafts and weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. This rapid vertical transport can help to maintain the population of particles in the pristine Amazon boundary layer, and may therefore influence cloud properties and climate under natural conditions.

  6. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; Kuang, Chongai; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Chi, Xuguang; Comstock, Jennifer; Ditas, Florian; Lavric, Jost; Manninen, Hanna E.; Mei, Fan; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Saturno, Jorge; Schmid, Beat; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami; Walter, David; Wimmer, Daniela; Smith, James N.; Kulmala, Markku; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-11-01

    The nucleation of atmospheric vapours is an important source of new aerosol particles that can subsequently grow to form cloud condensation nuclei in the atmosphere. Most field studies of atmospheric aerosols over continents are influenced by atmospheric vapours of anthropogenic origin (for example, ref. 2) and, in consequence, aerosol processes in pristine, terrestrial environments remain poorly understood. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions, but the origin of small aerosol particles that grow into cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon boundary layer remains unclear. Here we present aircraft- and ground-based measurements under clean conditions during the wet season in the central Amazon basin. We find that high concentrations of small aerosol particles (with diameters of less than 50 nanometres) in the lower free troposphere are transported from the free troposphere into the boundary layer during precipitation events by strong convective downdrafts and weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. This rapid vertical transport can help to maintain the population of particles in the pristine Amazon boundary layer, and may therefore influence cloud properties and climate under natural conditions.

  7. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; Kuang, Chongai; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Chi, Xuguang; Comstock, Jennifer; Ditas, Florian; Lavric, Jost; Manninen, Hanna E.; Mei, Fan; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Saturno, Jorge; Schmid, Beat; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami; Walter, David; Wimmer, Daniela; Smith, James N.; Kulmala, Markku; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-10-24

    The nucleation of atmospheric vapours is an important source of new aerosol particles that can subsequently grow to form cloud condensation nuclei in the atmosphere. Most field studies of atmospheric aerosols over continents are influenced by atmospheric vapours of anthropogenic origin and, in consequence, aerosol processes in pristine, terrestrial environments remain poorly understood. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions, but the origin of small aerosol particles that grow into cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon boundary layer remains unclear. Here we present aircraft- and ground-based measurements under clean conditions during the wet season in the central Amazon basin. We find that high concentrations of small aerosol particles (with diameters of less than 50 nanometres) in the lower free troposphere are transported from the free troposphere into the boundary layer during precipitation events by strong convective downdrafts and weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. Lastly, this rapid vertical transport can help to maintain the population of particles in the pristine Amazon boundary layer, and may therefore influence cloud properties and climate under natural conditions.

  8. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; ...

    2016-10-24

    The nucleation of atmospheric vapours is an important source of new aerosol particles that can subsequently grow to form cloud condensation nuclei in the atmosphere. Most field studies of atmospheric aerosols over continents are influenced by atmospheric vapours of anthropogenic origin and, in consequence, aerosol processes in pristine, terrestrial environments remain poorly understood. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions, but the origin of small aerosol particles that grow into cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon boundary layer remains unclear. Here we present aircraft- andmore » ground-based measurements under clean conditions during the wet season in the central Amazon basin. We find that high concentrations of small aerosol particles (with diameters of less than 50 nanometres) in the lower free troposphere are transported from the free troposphere into the boundary layer during precipitation events by strong convective downdrafts and weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. Lastly, this rapid vertical transport can help to maintain the population of particles in the pristine Amazon boundary layer, and may therefore influence cloud properties and climate under natural conditions.« less

  9. Sensitivity of warm-frontal processes to cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igel, Adele L.; Van Den Heever, Susan C.; Naud, Catherine M.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Posselt, Derek J.

    2013-01-01

    An extratropical cyclone that crossed the United States on 9-11 April 2009 was successfully simulated at high resolution (3-km horizontal grid spacing) using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. The sensitivity of the associated warm front to increasing pollution levels was then explored by conducting the same experiment with three different background profiles of cloud-nucleating aerosol concentration. To the authors' knowledge, no study has examined the indirect effects of aerosols on warm fronts. The budgets of ice, cloud water, and rain in the simulation with the lowest aerosol concentrations were examined. The ice mass was found to be produced in equal amounts through vapor deposition and riming, and the melting of ice produced approximately 75% of the total rain. Conversion of cloud water to rain accounted for the other 25%. When cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations were increased, significant changes were seen in the budget terms, but total precipitation remained relatively constant. Vapor deposition onto ice increased, but riming of cloud water decreased such that there was only a small change in the total ice production and hence there was no significant change in melting. These responses can be understood in terms of a buffering effect in which smaller cloud droplets in the mixed-phase region lead to both an enhanced vapor deposition and decreased riming efficiency with increasing aerosol concentrations. Overall, while large changes were seen in the microphysical structure of the frontal cloud, cloud-nucleating aerosols had little impact on the precipitation production of the warm front.

  10. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    2013-10-21

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  11. Fire and biofuel annual contributions to aerosol mass concentrations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Logan, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    Fires are a potentially major but poorly quantified factor for air quality degradation in the United States. Although episodic effects are well established, little attention has been paid to the more diffuse, nationwide effects of fires on seasonal and annual aerosol concentrations of relevance for air quality and visibility standards. Effects of biofuel use, both residential and industrial, have also received little attention. We use here correlations with non-soil potassium (ns-K) at the nationwide IMPROVE network of surface sites for 2001- 2004 to estimate total contributions to total carbonaceous (TC) aerosol concentrations from wildfires, prescribed fires, and residential and industrial biofuels. We find that the year-to-year variation of fires largely drives the observed interannual variability in TC. We present estimates of biomass burning contributions to regional aerosol concentrations in the western and eastern United States and further examine their implications for the national ambient air quality standard of fine aerosol concentrations and for the application of natural visibility condition by the U.S. EPA Regional Haze Rule.

  12. AEROSOL CONCENTRATIONS DURING THE 1999 FRESNO EXPOSURE STUDIES AS FUNCTIONS OF SIZE, SEASON, AND METEOROLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1999 Fresno exposure studies took place in February (winter season) and April/May (spring season) for two periods of four weeks. During that time, nearly-continuous measurements of outdoor aerosol concentrations were made with a scanning mobility spectrometer (TSI SNIPS) an...

  13. The Role of Atmospheric Aerosol Concentration on Deep Convective Precipitation: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds NRC [2001]." The aerosol effect on Clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect, is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. In this paper, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with detailed spectral-bin microphysics was used to examine the effect of aerosols on three different deep convective cloud systems that developed in different geographic locations: South Florida, Oklahoma and the Central Pacific, In all three cases, rain reaches the ground earlier for the low CCN (clean) case. Rain suppression is also evident in all three cases with high CCN (dirty) case. However, this suppression only occurs during the first hour of the simulations. During the mature stages of the simulations, the effects of increasing aerosol concentration range from rain suppression in the Oklahoma case, to almost no effect in the Florida case, to rain enhancement in the Pacific case. These results show the complexity of aerosol interactions with convection. The model results suggest that evaporative cooling is a key process in determining whether high CCN reduces or enhances precipitation. Stronger evaporative cooling can produce a stronger cold pool and thus stronger low-level convergence through interactions

  14. Effects of climate change on aerosol concentrations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megaritis, Athanasios G.; Fountoukis, Christos; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2013-04-01

    High concentrations of particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in size (PM2.5), ozone and other major constituents of air pollution, have adverse effects on human health, visibility and ecosystems (Seinfeld and Pandis, 2006), and are strongly influenced by meteorology. Emissions control policy is currently made assuming that climate will remain constant in the future. However, climate change over the next decades is expected to be significant (IPCC, 2007) and may impact local and regional air quality. Determining the sensitivity of the concentrations of air pollutants to climate change is an important step toward estimating future air quality. In this study we applied PMCAMx (Fountoukis et al., 2011), a three dimensional chemical transport model, over Europe, in order to quantify the individual effects of various meteorological parameters on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations. A suite of perturbations in various meteorological factors, such as temperature, wind speed, absolute humidity and precipitation were imposed separately on base case conditions to determine the sensitivities of PM2.5 concentrations and composition to these parameters. Different simulation periods (summer, autumn 2008 and winter 2009) are used to examine also the seasonal dependence of the air quality - climate interactions. The results of these sensitivity simulations suggest that there is an important link between changes in meteorology and PM2.5 levels. We quantify through separate sensitivity simulations the processes which are mainly responsible for the final predicted changes in PM2.5 concentration and composition. The predicted PM2.5 response to those meteorology perturbations was found to be quite variable in space and time. These results suggest that, the changes in concentrations caused by changes in climate should be taken into account in long-term air quality planning. References Fountoukis C., Racherla P. N., Denier van der Gon H. A. C., Polymeneas P., Charalampidis P. E

  15. Concentration characteristics of bromine and iodine in aerosols in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunchuan; Sun, Mingxing; Wu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yongdi; Guo, Yaqi; Wu, Ji

    2010-11-01

    Aerosol samples (TSP and PM 10) during each season were collected at a national monitoring point in Shanghai in 2008. Halogens (Br, I) were determined in samples along with sodium (Na) by ICP-MS and ICP-OES after microwave digestion. In this report we focused on the concentration characteristics of halogen elements Br and I and their seasonal distributions. The mean annual concentrations of total Br and I were 24 ng m -3 and 12 ng m -3 for TSP, 21 ng m -3 and 9 ng m -3 for PM 10, respectively. Concentrations of Br and I in TSP and PM 10 were lowest in summer but an increase occurred in autumn and winter. Water-soluble Br and I accounted for about 32% of the total Br and I in aerosols, and about 68% of Br and I was non soluble which may be non-soluble organic species. These non-soluble organic species are present in aerosols in the possible binding forms as mineral dust, natural organic matter, and adsorption to black carbon or mineral material such as iron oxides. Soluble Br and I in PM 10 extracted by a dilute acid solution (HNO 3 + H 2SO 4) increased by 22% and 18%, respectively, compared with water-soluble Br and I. A positive correlation with Na and sea water enrichment factors for Br and I indicated that bromine and iodine in aerosols originated mostly from marine sources in Shanghai.

  16. Black Carbon Concentration from Worldwide Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent N.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-01-01

    The carbon emissions inventories used to initialize transport models and general circulation models are highly parameterized, and created on the basis of multiple sparse datasets (such as fuel use inventories and emission factors). The resulting inventories are uncertain by at least a factor of 2, and this uncertainty is carried forward to the model output. [Bond et al., 1998, Bond et al., 2004, Cooke et al., 1999, Streets et al., 2001] Worldwide black carbon concentration measurements are needed to assess the efficacy of the carbon emissions inventory and transport model output on a continuous basis.

  17. High Volume Air Sampling for Viral Aerosols: A Comparative Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    low, with the cotton swabbing only recovering 27.7 percent of the BA on the surface (Rose, Jensen, Peterson, Banerjee, & Arduino , 2004). A follow-on...BA were present on the surface (Hodges, Rose, Peterson, Noble-Wang, & Arduino , 2006). These lower sensitivities at low concentrations could be a...monitored during each sample collection period. Ambient pressure data was obtained hourly for Edmonton, AB from the Canadian Weather Service

  18. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  19. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  20. Simulations of organic aerosol concentrations during springtime in the Guanzhong Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tian; Li, Guohui; Cao, Junji; Bei, Naifang; Shen, Zhenxing; Zhou, Weijian; Liu, Suixin; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yichen; Huang, Ru-jin; Tie, Xuexi; Molina, Luisa T.

    2016-08-01

    The organic aerosol (OA) concentration is simulated in the Guanzhong Basin, China from 23 to 25 April 2013 utilizing the WRF-CHEM model. Two approaches are used to predict OA concentrations: (1) a traditional secondary organic aerosol (SOA) module; (2) a non-traditional SOA module including the volatility basis-set modeling method in which primary organic aerosol (POA) is assumed to be semivolatile and photochemically reactive. Generally, the spatial patterns and temporal variations of the calculated hourly near-surface ozone and fine particle matters agree well with the observations in Xi'an and surrounding areas. The model also yields reasonable distributions of daily PM2.5 and elemental carbon (EC) compared to the filter measurements at 29 sites in the basin. Filter-measured organic carbon (OC) and EC are used to evaluate OA, POA, and SOA using the OC / EC ratio approach. Compared with the traditional SOA module, the non-traditional module significantly improves SOA simulations and explains about 88 % of the observed SOA concentration. Oxidation and partitioning of POA treated as semivolatile constitute the most important pathway for the SOA formation, contributing more than 75 % of the SOA concentrations in the basin. Residential emissions are the dominant anthropogenic OA source, constituting about 50 % of OA concentrations in urban and rural areas and 30 % in the background area. The OA contribution from transportation emissions decreases from 25 % in urban areas to 20 % in the background area, and the industry emission OA contribution is less than 6 %.

  1. Aerosol-Radiation Feedback and PM10 Air Concentrations Over Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Małgorzata; Kryza, Maciej; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Wałaszek, Kinga; Dore, Anthony J.; Ojrzyńska, Hanna; Kapłon, Jan

    2017-02-01

    We have implemented the WRF-Chem model version 3.5 over Poland to quantify the direct and indirect feedback effects of aerosols on simulated meteorology and aerosol concentrations. Observations were compared with results from three simulations at high spatial resolutions of 5 × 5 km: (1) BASE—without any aerosol feedback effects; (2) DIR—with direct aerosol-radiative effects (3) INDIR—with direct and indirect aerosol-radiative effects. We study the overall effect during January 2011 as well as selected episodes of the highest differences in PM10 concentrations between the three simulations. For the DIR simulation, the decrease in monthly mean incoming solar radiation (SWDOWN) appears for the entire study area. It changes geographically, from about -8.0 to -2.0 W m-2, respectively for the southern and northern parts of the country. The highest changes do not correspond to the highest PM10 concentration. Due to the solar radiation changes, the surface mean monthly temperature (T2) decreases for 96 % of the area of Poland, but not more than 1.0 °C. Monthly mean PBLH changes by more than ±5 m for 53 % of the domain. Locally the differences in PBLH between the DIR and BASE are higher than ± 20 m. Due to the direct effect, for 84 % of the domain, the mean monthly PM10 concentrations increase by up to 1.9 µg m-3. For the INDIR simulation the spatial distribution of changes in incoming solar radiation as well as air temperature is similar to the DIR simulation. The decrease of SWDOWN is noticed for the entire domain and for 23 % of the domain is higher than -5.0 W m-2. The absolute differences of PBLH are slightly higher for INDIR than DIR but similarly distributed spatially. For daily episodes, the differences between the simulations are higher, both for meteorology and PM10 concentrations, and the pattern of changes is usually more complex. The results indicate the potential importance of the aerosol feedback effects on modelled meteorology and PM10

  2. Ambient aerosol concentrations of sugars and sugar-alcohols at four different sites in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Dye, C.; Kiss, G.

    2007-08-01

    Sugars and sugar-alcohols are demonstrated to be important constituents of the ambient aerosol water-soluble organic carbon fraction, and to be tracers for primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). In the present study, levels of four sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, trehalose) and three sugar-alcohols (arabitol, inositol, mannitol) in ambient aerosols have been quantified using a novel HPLC/HRMS-TOF (High Performance Liquid Chromatography in combination with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - Time of Flight) method to assess the contribution of PBAP to PM>sub>10 and PM2.5. Samples were collected at four sites in Norway at different times of the year in order to reflect the various contributing sources and the spatial and seasonal variation of the selected compounds. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were present at all sites investigated, underlining the ubiquity of these highly polar organic compounds. The highest concentrations were reported for sucrose, reaching a maximum concentration of 320 ng m-3 in PM10 and 55 ng m-3 in PM2.5. The mean concentration of sucrose was up to 10 times higher than fructose, glucose and the dimeric sugar trehalose. The mean concentrations of the sugar-alcohols were typically lower, or equal, to that of the monomeric sugars and trehalose. Peak concentrations of arabitol and mannitol did not exceed 30 ng m-3 in PM10, and for PM2.5 all concentrations were below 6 ng m-3. Sugars and sugar-alcohols were associated primarily with coarse aerosols except during wintertime at the suburban site in Elverum, where a shift towards sub micron aerosols was observed. It is proposed that this shift was due to the intensive use of wood burning for residential heating at this site during winter, confirmed by high concurrent concentrations of levoglucosan. Elevated concentrations of sugars in PM2.5 were observed during spring and early summer at the rural background site Birkenes. It is hypothesized that this was due to ruptured pollen.

  3. [Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol concentration in snow and ice of glaciers in Tianshan Mountains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Jie; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Wang, Fei-Teng; Li, Zhong-Qin

    2012-03-01

    The snow and ice samples, collected at Glacier No. 1 at the headwaters of Urumqi River (UG1) and Glacier No. 51 at Haxilegen of Kuytun River (HG51) in 2002 and 2004, were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and element carbon (EC) by thermal/ optical reflectance (TOR). The spatio-temporal characteristics and environmental significance of OC and EC concentration were discussed in details. The concentration order of total carbon (TC) was: snowpack of west branch on UG1 (1 943 ng x g(-1)) > snowpack of east branch on UG1 (989 ng x g(-1)) > snowpack of HG51 (150 ng x g(-1)) > glacier ice of east branch on UG1 (77 ng x g(-1)), and the concentration order of OC and EC lay similar as TC. The concentration of OC and EC in snowpack of Tianshan Mountains were 557 ng x g(-1) and 188 ng x g(-1), respectively. Concentration peak of carbonaceous aerosol usually appeared near the dust layer at the bottom section of snowpack, but the some sudden events could increase the concentration in the surface snow. Because of the seasonality of carbon emission (e. g. heating and agricultural activities) and transportation (e. g. atmospheric circulation), the concentration of carbonaceous aerosol increased from July to November with fluctuations. Difference on the order of magnitude might exist between the concentration in snow (firn) and glacier ice, which was influenced by the glacier surroundings, sampling situation and other factors. EC on the surface snow affected the albedo significantly, and an average albedo reduction of 0.22 in the wavelength of 300-700 nm was simulated by SNICAR (snow, ice, and aerosol radiative) model.

  4. Contribution of feldspar and marine organic aerosols to global ice nucleating particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Murray, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Theodore W.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Browse, Jo; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Ardon-Dryer, Karin; Bertram, Allan K.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Ceburnis, Darius; DeMott, Paul J.; Mason, Ryan H.; O'Dowd, Colin D.; Rinaldi, Matteo; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2017-03-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are known to affect the amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, thereby influencing many of their properties. The atmospheric INP concentration changes by orders of magnitude from terrestrial to marine environments, which typically contain much lower concentrations. Many modelling studies use parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation and cloud ice processes that do not account for this difference because they were developed based on INP measurements made predominantly in terrestrial environments without considering the aerosol composition. Errors in the assumed INP concentration will influence the simulated amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, leading to errors in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux and ultimately the climate sensitivity of the model. Here we develop a global model of INP concentrations relevant for mixed-phase clouds based on laboratory and field measurements of ice nucleation by K-feldspar (an ice-active component of desert dust) and marine organic aerosols (from sea spray). The simulated global distribution of INP concentrations based on these two species agrees much better with currently available ambient measurements than when INP concentrations are assumed to depend only on temperature or particle size. Underestimation of INP concentrations in some terrestrial locations may be due to the neglect of INPs from other terrestrial sources. Our model indicates that, on a monthly average basis, desert dusts dominate the contribution to the INP population over much of the world, but marine organics become increasingly important over remote oceans and they dominate over the Southern Ocean. However, day-to-day variability is important. Because desert dust aerosol tends to be sporadic, marine organic aerosols dominate the INP population on many days per month over much of the mid- and high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. This study advances our understanding of which aerosol species need to be included in order to

  5. Influence of a high aerosol concentration on the thermal structure of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, M. N.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Kadygrov, E. N.

    2006-12-01

    The influence of increased concentrations of submicron aerosol produced by forest fires on thermal characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in Moscow and its remote vicinity (the town of Zvenigorod) are analyzed on the basis of regular remote measurements of the ABL temperature profile with the use of MTP-5 profilers. In the air basin of a large city, additional aerosol and accompanying pollutants in early morning hours (at small heights of the Sun) most frequently did not cause substantial changes in the ABL thermal structure. In the locality remote from the megalopolis (Zvenigorod), the atmospheric pollution by aerosol led to noticeable changes in the ABL thermal characteristics. Especially strong changes were observed in the daytime, during the maximum supply of solar radiation. In morning hours, the heating rate of the lower 100-m layer of the polluted air exceeded the heating rate of a relatively pure air by more than one degree. In higher layers, the differences between the rates of temperature changes in a relatively clean atmosphere and in an atmosphere polluted by aerosol (in the suburb) were insignificant.

  6. Effect of high concentrations of inorganic seed aerosols on secondary organic aerosol formation in the m-xylene/NO x photooxidation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zifeng; Hao, Jiming; Takekawa, Hideto; Hu, Lanhua; Li, Junhua

    High concentrations (>15 μm 3 cm -3) of CaSO 4, Ca(NO 3) 2 and (NH 4) 2SO 4 were selected as surrogates of dry neutral, aqueous neutral and dry acidic inorganic seed aerosols, respectively, to study the effects of inorganic seeds on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in irradiated m-xylene/NO x photooxidation systems. The results indicate that neither ozone formation nor SOA formation is significantly affected by the presence of neutral aerosols (both dry CaSO 4 and aqueous Ca(NO 3) 2), even at elevated concentrations. The presence of high concentrations of (NH 4) 2SO 4 aerosols (dry acidic) has no obvious effect on ozone formation, but it does enhance SOA generation and increase SOA yields. In addition, the effect of dry (NH 4) 2SO 4 on SOA yield is found to be positively correlated with the (NH 4) 2SO 4 surface concentration, and the effect is pronounced only when the surface concentration reaches a threshold value. Further, it is proposed that the SOA generation enhancement is achieved by particle-phase heterogeneous reactions induced and catalyzed by the acidity of dry (NH 4) 2SO 4 seed aerosols.

  7. Concentration of Enteroviruses from Large Volumes of Water

    PubMed Central

    Sobsey, Mark D.; Wallis, Craig; Henderson, Marilyn; Melnick, Joseph L.

    1973-01-01

    An improved method for concentrating viruses from large volumes of clean waters is described. It was found that, by acidification, viruses in large volumes of water could be efficiently adsorbed to epoxy-fiber-glass and nitrocellulose filters in the absence of exogenously added salts. Based upon this finding, a modified version of our previously described virus concentration system was developed for virus monitoring of clean waters. In this procedure the water being tested is acidified by injection of N HCl prior to passage through a virus adsorber consisting of a fiber-glass cartridge depth filter and an epoxy-fiber-glass membrane filter in series. The adsorbed viruses are then eluted with a 1-liter volume of pH 11.5 eluent and reconcentrated by adsorption to and elution from a small epoxy-fiber-glass filter series. With this method small quantities of poliovirus in 100-gallon (378.5-liter) volumes of tapwater were concentrated nearly 40,000-fold with an average virus recovery efficiency of 77%. Images PMID:16349972

  8. Concentrations and composition of aerosols and particulate matter in surface waters along the transatlantic section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Novigatsky, A. N.; Redzhepova, Z. U.; Dara, O. M.

    2016-07-01

    Along the transatlantic section from Ushuaia to Gdańsk (March 26-May 7, 2015; cruise 47 of R/V Akademik Ioffe), data were obtained on the concentrations of aerosols in the near-water layer of the atmosphere and of particulate matter in surface waters, as well as of organic compounds within the considered matter (Corg, chlorophyll a, lipids, and hydrocarbons). The concentrations of aerosols amounted to 1237-111 739 particles/L for the fraction of 0.3-1 μm and to 0.02-34.4 μg/m2/day for the matter collected by means of the network procedure. The distribution of aerosols is affected by circumcontinental zoning and by the fluxes from arid areas of African deserts. The maximum concentration of the treated compounds were found in the river-sea frontal area (the runoff of the Colorado River, Argentina), as well as when nearing the coasts, especially in the English Channel.

  9. Fungal Spore Concentrations and Ergosterol Content in Aerosol Samples in the Caribbean During African Dust Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Figueroa, G.; Bolaños-Rosero, B.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Fungal spores are a major component of primary biogenic aerosol particles that are emitted to the atmosphere, are ubiquitous, and play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, climate, and public health. Every year, during summer months, African dust (AD) particles are transported to the Caribbean region causing an increase in the concentrations of particulate matter in the atmosphere. AD is one of the most important natural sources of mineral particulate matter at the global scale, and many investigations suggest that it has the ability to transport dust-associated biological particles through long distances. The relationship between AD incursions and the concentration of fungal spores in the Caribbean region is poorly understood. In order to investigate the effects of AD incursions on fungal spore's emissions, fungal spore concentrations were monitored using a Burkard spore trap at the tropical montane cloud forest of Pico del Este at El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico. The presence of AD was supported with satellite images of aerosol optical thickness, and with the results from the air masses backward trajectories calculated with the NOAA HYSPLIT model. Basidiospores and Ascospores comprised the major components of the total spore's concentrations, up to a maximum of 98%, during both AD incursions and background days. A considerably decrease in the concentration of fungal spores during AD events was observed. Ergosterol, biomarker for measuring fungal biomass, concentrations were determined in aerosols that were sampled at a marine site, Cabezas de San Juan Nature Reserve, in Fajardo Puerto Rico, and at an urban site, Facundo Bueso building at the University of Puerto Rico. Additional efforts to understand the relationship between the arrival of AD to the Caribbean and a decrease in spore's concentrations are needed in order to investigate changes in local spore's vs the contribution of long-range spores transported within the AD.

  10. Variations of the aerosol concentration and chemical composition over the arid steppe zone of Southern Russia in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonova, M. S.; Gubanova, D. P.; Iordanskii, M. A.; Lebedev, V. A.; Maksimenkov, L. O.; Minashkin, V. M.; Obvintsev, Y. I.; Chketiani, O. G.

    2016-12-01

    Variations in the surface aerosol over the arid steppe zone of Southern Russia have been measured. The parameters of atmospheric aerosol (mass concentration, both dispersed and elemental compositions) and meteorological parameters were measured in Tsimlaynsk raion (Rostov oblast). The chemical composition of aerosol particles in the atmospheric surface layer has been determined, and the coefficients of enrichment of elements with respect to clarkes in the Earth's crust have been calculated. It is shown that, in summer, arid aerosols are transported from both alkaline and sandy soils of Kalmykia to the air basin over the observation zone. Aerosol particles in the surface air layer over this region have been found to contain the products of combustion of oil, coal, and ethylized fuel. These combustion products make a small contribution to the total mass concentration of atmospheric aerosol; however, they are most hazardous to the health of people because of their sizes and heavy-metal contents. A high concentration of submicron sulfur-containing aerosol particles of chemocondensation nature has been recorded. Sources of aerosol of both natural and anthropogenic origins in southern Russia are discussed.

  11. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is aware of the potential toxicological hazards to humans that might be associated with prolonged spacecraft missions. Despite major engineering advances in controlling the atmosphere within spacecraft, some contamination of the air appears inevitable. NASA has measured numerous airborne contaminants during space missions. As the missions increase in duration and complexity, ensuring the health and well-being of astronauts traveling and working in this unique environment becomes increasingly difficult. As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for contaminants, and to review SMACs for various space-craft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee On Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMACs for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMACs for approximately 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the SMAC reports for 12 chemical contaminants that have been reviewed for

  12. Long-Term Observations on Aerosol Elemental Carbon and Mass Concentrations in Winter-Time in New Delhi: Implications for Local Source Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, S. G.; Singh, K.; Singh, N.; Gupta, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    Fossil-fuel and bio-fuel burning are the two major sources identified for high carbonaceous aerosol loadings in several mega cities in India. In the last decade, according to a report from the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB, 1999), the vehicular emission (mostly diesel-powered engines) was contributed to ~67% of the total air pollution load in New Delhi. Therefore, a policy decision was taken by the government, and most of the diesel-powered engines were converted to compressed natural gas (CNG) -powered engines by 2003. To better understand the effect of these changes on air quality, we collected high volume aerosol samples (total suspended particles, TSP) mostly for a day basis at our institute building in New Delhi almost everyday during winter season (November to January) from 2002 to 2008. We found very high mean aerosol loading, i.e., 488±47 μg m-3 in 2002 winter, which dropped significantly to 280±73 μg m-3 in 2003 winter. Thereafter, a steadily increased trend of aerosol mass loadings was observed, i.e., 339±112, 339±120, 412±107 and 444±55 μg m-3 in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 winters, respectively. Similar trend was also observed for elemental carbon (EC) concentration in TSP, which was peaked in 2002 (47±11 μg m-3) and minimized in 2003 (32±6 μg m-3), and then gradually increased to 41±8 μg m-3 in 2007 winter. These decline trends of aerosol mass and EC concentrations in 2003 can be explained well, because of the conversion of diesel engine to CNG engines of public transport facilities. However, again increase in aerosol mass and EC concentrations possibly because of a high increase in road traffic in recent years. According to the economic survey of New Delhi 2008-09, the number of vehicles (which includes all types of engines, i.e., petrol, diesel and CNG) has grown from ~3.3 millions in 1997-98 to ~5.6 millions in 2007-08. The influence of engine types and vehicle population on aerosol loading can also be explained well by SO2 and

  13. Future Projections of Aerosol Optical Depth, Radiative Forcing, and Climate Response Due to Declining Aerosol Emissions in the Representative Concentration Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely expected that global emissions of atmospheric aerosols and their precursors will decrease strongly throughout the remainder of the 21st century, due to emission reduction policies enacted based on human health concerns. However, the resulting decrease in atmospheric aerosol burden will have unintended climate consequences. Since aerosols generally exert a net cooling influence on the climate, their removal will lead to an unmasking of global warming as well as other changes to the climate system. Aerosol and precursor global emissions decrease by as much as 80% by the year 2100, according to projections in four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. We use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 3 (GFDL CM3) to simulate future climate over the 21st century with and without aerosol emission changes projected by the RCPs in order to isolate the radiative forcing and climate response due to the aerosol reductions. We find that up to 1 W m-2 of radiative forcing may be unmasked globally by 2100 due to reductions in aerosol and precursor emissions, leading to average global temperature increases up to 1 K and global precipitation rate increases up to 0.09 mm d-1 (3%). Regionally and locally, climate impacts are much larger, as RCP8.5 projects a 2.1 K warming over China, Japan, and Korea due to reduced aerosol emissions. Our results highlight the importance of crafting emissions control policies with both climate and air pollution benefits in mind. The expected unmasking of additional global warming from aerosol reductions highlights the importance of robust greenhouse gas mitigation policies and may require more aggressive policies than anticipated.

  14. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-08-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  15. MODELING THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE EMISSIONS ON ATMOSPHERIC OZONE AND SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL CONCENTRATIONS ACROSS THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the modeled effects of natural and anthropogenic chlorine emissions on the atmospheric concentrations of ozone and secondary organic aerosol across the United States. The model calculations include anthropogenic molecular chlorine emissions, anthropogenic hypo...

  16. Local aerosol concentrations and optical characteristics influenced by the Indonesian forest fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Jianfei; Minomura, Mitsuo; Kuze, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Nobuo

    1998-08-01

    Indonesian forest fire took place on Kalimantan and Sumatera islands in 1997 and continuously influenced the atmospheric conditions of South-East Asia nearly throughout the last half of that year. The color composed images of visible, near IR and IR channels from NOAA AVHRR daily data, arbitrarily assigned to red, green and blue respectively, were synthesized for distinguishing the smoke area. The data of three periods, the beginning, mid, and ending parts of the fire, were collected and analyzed in order to show the variation of atmosphere with the development of fire. A retrieval algorithm was established by use of Mie theory calculation and the radiative transfer codes. Local aerosol concentrations and properties over ocean parts between the two islands were derived. It is found that the aerosol optical thickness increased in accordance with the exacerbation of the fires. The changes of angstrom exponents show that smaller particle amounts were raised by the effects of burning.

  17. Is It Possible to Distinguish Between Dust and Salt Aerosol Over Waters with Unknown Chlorophyll Concentrations Using Spectral Remote Sensing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R. C.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol has uncertain impacts on the global climate system, as well as on atmospheric and bio-geo-chemical processes of regional and local scales. EOS-MODIS is one example of a satellite sensor designed to improve understanding of the aerosols' type, size and distribution at all temporal and spatial scales. Ocean scientists also plan to use data from EOS-MODIS to assess the temporal and spatial coverage of in-water chlorophyll. MODIS is the first sensor planned to observe the combined ocean-atmosphere system with a wide spectral range (from 410 to 2200 nm). Dust aerosol and salt aerosol have similar spectral signals for wavelengths longer than 550 nm, but because dust selectively absorbs blue light, they have divergent signals in the blue wavelength regions (412 to 490 nm). Chlorophyll also selectively absorbs blue radiation, so that varying chlorophyll concentrations produces a highly varying signal in the blue regions, but less variability in the green, and almost no signal in the red to mid-infrared regions. Thus, theoretically, it may be difficult to differentiate dust and salt in the presence of unknown chlorophyll in the ocean. This study attempts to address the cases in which aerosol and chlorophyll signals can and cannot be separated. For the aerosol spectra, we use the aerosol lookup table from the operational MODIS aerosol-over-ocean algorithm, and for chlorophyll spectra, we use the SeaBAM data set (created for SeaWiFS). We compare the signals using Principal Component Analysis and attempt to retrieve both chlorophyll and aerosol properties using a variant of the operational MODIS aerosol-over-ocean algorithm. Results show that for small optical depths, less than 0.5, it is not possible to differentiate between dust and salt and to determine the chlorophyll concentration at the same time. For larger aerosol optical depths, the chlorophyll signals are comparatively insignificant, and we can hope to distinguish between dust and salt.

  18. Relating Aerosol Profile and Column Measurements to Surface Concentrations: What Have We Learned from Discover-AQ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    One research goal of the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission was to determine sufficient column profile measurements to relate column integrated quantities such as Aerosol Optical Depth to surface concentrations. I will review the relationship between AOD and PM2.5 at the surface. DISCOVER-AQ in Baltimore, the San Joaquin Valley, Houston and Denver revealed quite different conditions for determining this relationship. In each case, the surface reflectivity made determination of aerosol optical depth challenging, but upward looking columns of aerosol optical depth from sunphotometers provided confirmation of the AOD results from space. In Baltimore, AOD fields reflected PM2.5 concentrations well. In California, however, the low boundary layer heights and dominance of nitrate and organic aerosols made the AOD fields less predictive of PM2.5. In California and Colorado, hydration of the aerosol varied dramatically with aerosol type (especially smoke and dust) and revealed that without an understanding of the degree of aerosol hydration with aerosol composition, the relationship between AOD and PM2.5 will continue to be a challenge. Model predictions in the Baltimore-Washington study are relatively disappointing in helping define the needed physics between the optical and microphysical properties. An overview of the measurements from DISCOVER-AQ which will help define the needed information in a more general case in the future will be given.

  19. Susceptibility of Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to pyrethrin aerosol: effects of aerosol particle size, concentration, and exposure conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of laboratory studies were conducted to assess effect of droplet size on efficacy of pyrethrin aerosol against adults of Tribolium confusum Jacqueline DuVal, the confused flour beetle. A vertical flow aerosol exposure chamber that generated a standardized particle size diameter was used for...

  20. A European aerosol phenomenology -4: Harmonized concentrations of carbonaceous aerosol at 10 regional background sites across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, F.; Alastuey, A.; Areskoug, H.; Ceburnis, D.; Čech, J.; Genberg, J.; Harrison, R. M.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Kiss, G.; Laj, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Perez, N.; Quincey, P.; Schwarz, J.; Sellegri, K.; Spindler, G.; Swietlicki, E.; Theodosi, C.; Yttri, K. E.; Aas, W.; Putaud, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Although particulate organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) are important constituents of the suspended atmospheric particulate matter (PM), measurements of OC and EC are much less common and more uncertain than measurements of e.g. the ionic components of PM. In the framework of atmospheric research infrastructures supported by the European Union, actions have been undertaken to determine and mitigate sampling artefacts, and assess the comparability of OC and EC data obtained in a network of 10 atmospheric observatories across Europe. Positive sampling artefacts (from 0.4 to 2.8 μg C/m3) and analytical discrepancies (between -50% and +40% for the EC/TC ratio) have been taken into account to generate a robust data set, from which we established the phenomenology of carbonaceous aerosols at regional background sites in Europe. Across the network, TC and EC annual average concentrations range from 0.4 to 9 μg C/m3, and from 0.1 to 2 μg C/m3, respectively. TC/PM10 annual mean ratios range from 0.11 at a Mediterranean site to 0.34 at the most polluted continental site, and TC/PM2.5 ratios are slightly greater at all sites (0.15-0.42). EC/TC annual mean ratios range from 0.10 to 0.22, and do not depend much on PM concentration levels, especially in winter. Seasonal variations in PM and TC concentrations, and in TC/PM and EC/TC ratios, differ across the network, which can be explained by seasonal changes in PM source contributions at some sites.

  1. Temporal variations in sources and concentrations of black and organic carbon aerosols in the LA Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouteva, G.; Kearney, J.; Fahrni, S.; Santos, G. M.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2012-12-01

    Temporal variations in sources and concentrations of black and organic carbon aerosols in the LA Basin Black carbon (BC), derived from incomplete combustion of fossil and biogenic fuels and vegetation fires, is a crucial component of the aerosol pool, but sources as well as atmospheric transport and lifetime remain poorly constrained by measurements. We characterized the composition of carbonaceous aerosols emitted from urban areas by quantifying the temporal variations in the concentrations and sources of BC and organic carbon (OC) in PM-10 and PM-2.5 from two locations in the Los Angeles basin. Using the radiocarbon signatures in BC and OC allowed us to apportion emissions into fossil and modern contributions. We separated and quantified BC and OC using a modified Sunset OC-EC analyzer coupled to a vacuum line and cryogenically trapped the evolving CO2 (Zhang et al. In Prep.). The instrument and method were tested with well-defined radiocarbon standards to determine background, accuracy and precision. The purified CO2 was converted to graphite and measured at the Keck-AMS facility on unknown samples as small as ≥5 μg C. Preliminary results suggest that radiocarbon content can be used to apportion BC into fossil and modern sources. BC concentrations are on the order of 6-31% total carbon, with 48 to 96% fossil contribution. In the OC fraction we detected several super-modern samples, suggesting local production of radiocarbon, e.g. from medical waste incinerators. Thus, the radiocarbon-based approach cannot be used to quantify sources of OC and bulk carbonaceous aerosols in urban areas. Our measurements contribute to a comprehensive quantification of temporal and spatial variations in urban BC, a key uncertainty in constraining BC sources and transport in North America. References: Zhang YL, Perron N, Zotter P, Minguillón MC, Wacker L, Prévôt ASH, Baltensperger U, Szidat S. In Prep. On the isolation of OC and EC and the optimal strategy of radiocarbon

  2. Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations for selected airborne contaminants, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMAC's) for contaminants, and to review SMAC's for various spacecraft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee on Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMAC's for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMAC's for 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the first 11 SMAC reports that have been reviewed for their application of the guidelines developed in the first phase of this activity and approved by the subcommittee.

  3. A CLOSURE STUDY OF AEROSOL MASS CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF VALUES OBTAINED WITH FILTERS AND BY DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF MASS DISTRIBUTIONS. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare measurements of aerosol mass concentrations obtained gravimetrically using Teflon coated glass fiber filters and by integrating mass distributions measured with the differential mobility analyzer–aerosol particle mass analyzer (DMA–APM) technique (Aero...

  4. Daily concentration variations of nitrate in the atmospheric aerosols voer Sakai, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Mizohata, Akira; Ito, Norio

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric aerosols have been sampled on a quartz fiber filter on a daily basis in Sakai, Japan since 1986. The obtained filter samples were extracted with distilled water, and ionic species concentrations were quantitatively determined by using ion chromatography. In this paper study of the nitrate concentration was described. Analysis showed that the mean concentration for period January 1986 to December 1993 was 2.4 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Monthly mean was in the range of 0.9 to 3.9 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, and highest in April and lowest in August. Especially the concentrations for period March to June 1991 were remarkably high because of the Kuwait oil well fire due to the Gulf War. Annual mean was increasing over a long period of time. Explaining this trend and the seasonal variations, we considered air mass trajectories.

  5. Estimation of surface-level PM concentration from satellite observation taking into account the aerosol vertical profiles and hygroscopicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwanchul; Lee, Kwon H; Kim, Ji I; Noh, Youngmin; Shin, Dong H; Shin, Sung K; Lee, Dasom; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young J; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Surface-level PM10 distribution was estimated from the satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products, taking the account of vertical profiles and hygroscopicity of aerosols over Jeju, Korea during March 2008 and October 2009. In this study, MODIS AOD data from the Terra and Aqua satellites were corrected with aerosol extinction profiles and relative humidity data. PBLH (Planetary Boundary Layer Height) was determined from MPLNET lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficient profiles. Through statistical analysis, better agreement in correlation (R = 0.82) between the hourly PM10 concentration and hourly average Sunphotometer AOD was the obtained when vertical fraction method (VFM) considering Haze Layer Height (HLH) and hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) was used. The validity of the derived relationship between satellite AOD and surface PM10 concentration clearly demonstrates that satellite AOD data can be utilized for remote sensing of spatial distribution of regional PM10 concentration.

  6. An observational study of night time aerosol concentrations in the lower atmosphere at a tropical coastal station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran, K.; Rajeev, K.; Sen Gupta, K.

    1997-09-01

    Aerosol number densities in the lower troposphere measured by a bistatic CW lidar are used to study their altitude structure in the nocturnal mixing region and its association with stratified turbulence. In the early night hours the aerosol concentration shows a maximum just above the daytime Thermal Internal Boundary Layer. This maximum disappears in the late night hours. The integrated aerosol content in the first 1 km shows a general decrease during the post-midnight hours. Stratified aerosol layers are observed in the nocturnal mixing region during the post-midnight period. The association between these stratified aerosol layers and the prevailing atmospheric stability condition in this region is studied using the altitude profiles of different meteorological parameters obtained from pilot balloon and tethered balloonsonde observations.

  7. The effect of sea ice loss on sea salt aerosol concentrations and the radiative balance in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struthers, H.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Glantz, P.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Mårtensson, E. M.; Seland, Ø.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2011-04-01

    Understanding Arctic climate change requires knowledge of both the external and the local drivers of Arctic climate as well as local feedbacks within the system. An Arctic feedback mechanism relating changes in sea ice extent to an alteration of the emission of sea salt aerosol and the consequent change in radiative balance is examined. A set of idealized climate model simulations were performed to quantify the radiative effects of changes in sea salt aerosol emissions induced by prescribed changes in sea ice extent. The model was forced using sea ice concentrations consistent with present day conditions and projections of sea ice extent for 2100. Sea salt aerosol emissions increase in response to a decrease in sea ice, the model results showing an annual average increase in number emission over the polar cap (70-90° N) of 86 × 106 m-2 s-1 (mass emission increase of 23 μg m-2 s-1). This in turn leads to an increase in the natural aerosol optical depth of approximately 23%. In response to changes in aerosol optical depth, the natural component of the aerosol direct forcing over the Arctic polar cap is estimated to be between -0.2 and -0.4 W m-2 for the summer months, which results in a negative feedback on the system. The model predicts that the change in first indirect aerosol effect (cloud albedo effect) is approximately a factor of ten greater than the change in direct aerosol forcing although this result is highly uncertain due to the crude representation of Arctic clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions in the model. This study shows that both the natural aerosol direct and first indirect effects are strongly dependent on the surface albedo, highlighting the strong coupling between sea ice, aerosols, Arctic clouds and their radiative effects.

  8. Concentration Effects and Ion Properties Controlling the Fractionation of Halides during Aerosol Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Marcelo I.; Athalye, Richa R.; Rodriguez, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    During the aerosolization process at the sea surface, halides are incorporated into aerosol droplets, where they may play an important role in tropospheric ozone chemistry. Although this process may significantly contribute to the formation of reactive gas phase molecular halogens, little is known about the environmental factors that control how halides selectively accumulate at the air-water interface. In this study, the production of sea spray aerosol is simulated using electrospray ionization (ESI) of 100 nM equimolar solutions of NaCl, NaBr, NaI, NaNO2, NaNO3, NaClO4, and NaIO4. The microdroplets generated are analyzed by mass spectrometry to study the comparative enrichment of anions (f (Isub x-)) and their correlation with ion properties. Although no correlation exists between f (sub x-) and the limiting equivalent ionic conductivity, the correlation coefficient of the linear fit with the size of the anions R(sub x-), dehydration free-energy ?Gdehyd, and polarizability alpha, follows the order: (R(sub x-)(exp -2)) > (R(sub x-)(exp -1)) >(R(sub x-) > delta G(sub dehyd) > alpha. The same pure physical process is observed in H2O and D2O. The factor f (sub x-) does not change with pH (6.8-8.6), counterion (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) substitution effects, or solvent polarity changes in methanol - and ethanol-water mixtures (0 <= xH2O <= 1). Sodium polysorbate 20 surfactant is used to modify the structure of the interface. Despite the observed enrichment of I- on the air-water interface of equimolar solutions, our results of seawater mimic samples agree with a model in which the interfacial composition is increasingly enriched in I- < Br- < Cl- over the oceanic boundary layer due to concentration effects in sea spray aerosol formation.

  9. Impact of atmospheric boundary layer depth variability and wind reversal on the diurnal variability of aerosol concentration at a valley site.

    PubMed

    Pal, S; Lee, T R; Phelps, S; De Wekker, S F J

    2014-10-15

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) plays a key role in affecting the variability of atmospheric constituents such as aerosols, greenhouse gases, water vapor, and ozone. In general, the concentration of any tracers within the ABL varies due to the changes in the mixing volume (i.e. ABL depth). In this study, we investigate the impact on the near-surface aerosol concentration in a valley site of 1) the boundary layer dilution due to vertical mixing and 2) changes in the wind patterns. We use a data set obtained during a 10-day field campaign in which a number of remote sensing and in-situ instruments were deployed, including a ground-based aerosol lidar system for monitoring of the ABL top height (zi), a particle counter to determine the number concentration of aerosol particles at eight different size ranges, and tower-based standard meteorological instruments. Results show a clearly visible decreasing trend of the mean daytime zi from 2900 m AGL (above ground level) to 2200 m AGL during a three-day period which resulted in increased near-surface pollutant concentrations. An inverse relationship exists between the zi and the fine fraction (0.3-0.7 μm) accumulation mode particles (AMP) on some days due to the dilution effect in a well-mixed ABL. These days are characterized by the absence of daytime upvalley winds and the presence of northwesterly synoptic-driven winds. In contrast, on the days with an onset of an upvalley wind circulation after the morning transition, the wind-driven local transport mechanism outweighs the ABL-dilution effect in determining the variability of AMP concentration. The interplay between the ABL depth evolution and the onset of the upvalley wind during the morning transition period significantly governs the air quality in a valley and could be an important component in the studies of mountain meteorology and air quality.

  10. Acid and organic aerosol coatings on magnetic nanoparticles increase iron concentrations in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Dailey, Lisa A; Richards, Judy H; Jang, Myoseon

    2009-07-01

    Numerous industrial applications for man-made nanoparticles have been proposed. Interactions of nanoparticles with agents in the atmosphere may impact human health. We tested the postulate that in vitro exposures of respiratory epithelial cells to airborne magnetic nanoparticles (MNP; Fe(3)O(4)) with and without a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and an inorganic acid could affect iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and interleukin (IL)-8 release. Cell iron concentrations were increased after exposures to MNP and values were further elevated with co-exposures to either SOA or inorganic acid. Increased expression of ferritin and elevated levels of RNA for DMT1, proteins for iron storage and transport respectively, followed MNP exposures, but values were significant for only those with co-exposures to inorganic acid and organic aerosols. Cell iron concentration corresponded to a measure of oxidative stress in the airway epithelial cells; MNP with co-exposures to SOA and inorganic acid increased both available metal and indices of oxidant generation. Finally, the release of a proinflammatory cytokine (i.e. IL-8) by the exposed cells similarly increased with cell iron concentration. We conclude that MNP can interact with a SOA and an inorganic acid to present metal in a catalytically reactive state to cultured respiratory cells. This produces an oxidative stress to affect a release of IL-8.

  11. Asian aerosols in North America: Extracting the chemical composition and mass concentration of the Asian continental aerosol plume from long-term aerosol records in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancuren, Richard A.

    2003-10-01

    Empirical assessment of the frequency and intensity of dust transport from Asia to North America has found that the dust regularly impacts elevated sites in the western United States, revealing a pattern of consistent, frequent transport above the marine boundary layer. Using the dust as a marker for Asian transport, a subset of Asian-influenced samples was identified within a decade of routine aerosol samples from two sites in the western cordillera of North America: Crater Lake, Oregon, and Mount Lassen, California. This subset was used to guide a statistical analysis to isolate Asian aerosol against the "background" of local contaminants. The analysis was then generalized to all samples during the transport season (March-October) for 1989-1999. A mixture of dust and combustion products dominates the Asian aerosol with typical concentration around 5 μg/m3 and mass median diameter between 2 and 3 μm. Major fine particle (<2.5 μm diameter) constituent fractions are ˜30% mineral, 28% organic compounds, 4% elemental carbon, 10% sulfate, <5% nitrate, and <1% sea salt. A second, possibly Asian, component of aged biomass smoke and sea salt is also present, with typical concentration (when present) around 1.5 μg/m3. Averaged over the transport season the dusty Asian aerosol and the smoky aerosol comprise 60 and 6%, respectively, of total particle mass (<10 μm diameter) and 72 and 13% of fine particle mass at these sites. These data indicate that the Asian continental plume is a significant contributor to aerosol loading at remote high-altitude sites across western North America. This implies a significant influence for Asian emissions on free troposphere aerosols over North America and suggests that they need to be explicitly accounted for in aerosol analyses ranging from climate studies to aerosol regulatory programs.

  12. A critical review of ultralow-volume aerosols of insecticide applied with vehicle-mounted generators for adult mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Mount, G A

    1998-09-01

    This review of ultralow-volume (ULV) ground aerosols for adult mosquito control includes discussion on application volume, aerosol generators, droplet size, meteorology, swath, dispersal speed, assay methods, insecticide efficacy, and nontarget effects. It summarizes the efficacy of ULV insecticidal aerosols against many important pest and disease-bearing species of mosquitoes in a wide range of locations and habitats in the United States and in some countries of Asia and the Americas. Fourteen conclusions were drawn from the review. 1) ULV ground aerosol applications of insecticide are as efficacious against adult mosquitoes as high- or low-volume aerosols. 2) ULV aerosols with an optimum droplet size spectrum can be produced by several types of nozzles including vortex, pneumatic, and rotary. Droplet size of a particular insecticide formulation is dependent primarily on nozzle air pressure or rotation speed and secondarily on insecticide flow rate. 3) Label flow rates of insecticide for ULV aerosol application can be delivered accurately during routine operations with speed-correlated metering systems within a calibrated speed range, usually not exceeding 20 mph. 4) The most economical and convenient method of droplet size determination for ULV aerosols of insecticide is the waved-slide technique. 5) The efficacy of ULV ground aerosols against adult mosquitoes is related to droplet size because it governs air transport and impingement. The optimum droplet size for mosquito adulticiding is 8-15 microns volume median diameter (VMD) on the basis of laboratory wind-tunnel tests and field research with caged mosquitoes. 6) In general, ULV aerosols should be applied following sunset when mosquitoes are active and meteorological conditions are favorable for achieving maximum levels of control. Application can be made during daytime hours when conditions permit, but rates may have to be increased. The critical meteorological factors are wind velocity and direction

  13. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Zare, A.; Cozzi, F.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Skov, H.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Ström, J.; Tunved, P.; Krejci, R.; Glasius, M.

    2014-08-01

    Sources, composition and occurrence of secondary organic aerosols in the Arctic were investigated at Zeppelin Mountain, Svalbard, and Station Nord, northeastern Greenland, during the full annual cycle of 2008 and 2010, respectively. Speciation of organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates - from both anthropogenic and biogenic precursors were in focus. A total of 11 organic acids (terpenylic acid, benzoic acid, phthalic acid, pinic acid, suberic acid, azelaic acid, adipic acid, pimelic acid, pinonic acid, diaterpenylic acid acetate and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid), 12 organosulfates and 1 nitrooxy organosulfate were identified in aerosol samples from the two sites using a high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) coupled to a quadrupole Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer. At Station Nord, compound concentrations followed a distinct annual pattern, where high mean concentrations of organosulfates (47 ± 14 ng m-3) and organic acids (11.5 ± 4 ng m-3) were observed in January, February and March, contrary to considerably lower mean concentrations of organosulfates (2 ± 3 ng m-3) and organic acids (2.2 ± 1 ng m-3) observed during the rest of the year. At Zeppelin Mountain, organosulfate and organic acid concentrations remained relatively constant during most of the year at a mean concentration of 15 ± 4 ng m-3 and 3.9 ± 1 ng m-3, respectively. However during four weeks of spring, remarkably higher concentrations of total organosulfates (23-36 ng m-3) and total organic acids (7-10 ng m-3) were observed. Elevated organosulfate and organic acid concentrations coincided with the Arctic haze period at both stations, where northern Eurasia was identified as the main source region. Air mass transport from northern Eurasia to Zeppelin Mountain was associated with a 100% increase in the number of detected organosulfate species compared with periods of air mass transport from the Arctic Ocean, Scandinavia and Greenland. The results from this

  14. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H.; Mao, P.; Zhao, Y.; Nielsen, C. P.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-01

    China is experiencing severe carbonaceous aerosol pollution driven mainly by large emissions resulting from intensive use of solid fuels. To gain a better understanding of the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations at the national scale, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal, spatial, and size distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols, and propose possible improvements in emission estimation for the future. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29 % from 2000 (2127 Gg) to 2012 (2749 Gg) and EC by 37 % (from 1356 to 1857 Gg). The residential, industrial, and transportation sectors contributed an estimated 74-78, 17-21, and 4-6 % of the total emissions of OC, respectively, and 49-55, 30-34, and 14-18 % of EC. Updated emission factors (EFs) based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, led to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while higher OC / EC ratios are found in southern sites, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher OC / EC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, higher concentrations of OC, EC, and SOC are observed in colder seasons, while SOC / OC is reduced, particularly at rural and remote sites

  15. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H.; Mao, P.; Zhao, Y.; Nielsen, C. P.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-01

    China is experiencing severe carbonaceous aerosol pollution driven mainly by large emissions resulting from intensive use of solid fuels. To gain a better understanding of the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations at the national scale, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal, spatial, and size distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols, and propose possible improvements in emission estimation for the future. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29% from 2000 (2127 Gg) to 2012 (2749 Gg) and EC by 37% (from 1356 to 1857 Gg). The residential, industrial, and transportation sectors contributed an estimated 76 ± 2, 19 ± 2 and 5 ± 1% of the total emissions of OC, respectively, and 52 ± 3, 32 ± 2 and 16 ± 2% of EC. Updated emission factors based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, lead to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while larger OC/EC and SOC/OC ratios are found in southern cities, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher SOC/OC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, higher concentrations of OC, EC, and SOC are observed in colder seasons, while SOC/OC is reduced, particularly at rural and

  16. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Zare, A.; Cozzi, F.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Skov, H.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Ström, J.; Tunved, P.; Krejci, R.; Glasius, M.

    2014-02-01

    Sources, composition and occurrence of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the Arctic were investigated at Zeppelin Mountain, Svalbard, and Station Nord, northeast Greenland, during the full annual cycle of 2008 and 2010 respectively. We focused on the speciation of three types of SOA tracers: organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates from both anthropogenic and biogenic precursors, here presenting organosulfate concentrations and compositions during a full annual cycle and chemical speciation of organosulfates in Arctic aerosols for the first time. Aerosol samples were analysed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to a quadrupole Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer (HPLC-q-TOF-MS). A total of 11 organic acids (terpenylic acid, benzoic acid, phthalic acid, pinic acid, suberic acid, azelaic acid, adipic acid, pimelic acid, pinonic acid, diaterpenylic acid acetate (DTAA) and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA)), 12 organosulfates and one nitrooxy organosulfate were identified at the two sites. Six out of the 12 organosulfates are reported for the first time. Concentrations of organosulfates follow a distinct annual pattern at Station Nord, where high concentration were observed in late winter and early spring, with a mean total concentration of 47 (±14) ng m-3, accounting for 7 (±2)% of total organic matter, contrary to a considerably lower organosulfate mean concentration of 2 (±3) ng m-3 (accounting for 1 (±1)% of total organic matter) observed during the rest of the year. The organic acids followed the same temporal trend as the organosulfates at Station Nord; however the variations in organic acid concentrations were less pronounced, with a total mean organic acid concentration of 11.5 (±4) ng m-3 (accounting for 1.7 (±0.6)% of total organic matter) in late winter and early spring, and 2.2 (±1) ng m-3 (accounting for 0.9 (±0.4)% of total organic matter) during the rest of the year. At Zeppelin Mountain

  17. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations in China, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal and spatial distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29% from 2000 (2127 Gg) to 2012 (2749 Gg) and EC by 37% (from 1356 to 1857 Gg). Updated emission factors based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, lead to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while SOC/OC ratios are found in southern cities, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher OC/EC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, smaller SOC/OC is found for cold seasons, particularly at rural and remote sites, attributed partly to weaker atmospheric oxidation and SOC formation in winter. Enhanced SOC formation from oxidization and anthropogenic activities like biomass combustion is judged to have crucial effects on severe haze events characterized by high particle concentrations. Several observational studies indicate an increasing trend in ambient OC/EC (but not in OC or EC individually) from 2000 to 2010, confirming increased atmospheric oxidation of OC across the country. Combining the results of

  18. Source apportionment of elevated BaP concentrations in PM10 aerosols in an alpine valley in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans; Jankowski, Nicole; Sampaio Cordeiro Wagner, Lylian

    2010-05-01

    INTRODUCTION: In a village situated at 1215 m a.s.l. in a natural preserve in an Austrian alpine valley elevated BaP concentrations have been measured in the last years. A highly frequented highway leading from Italy to Germany passes near the village. Monthly means of particulate BaP concentrations show a clear seasonal trend with values below 1 ng/m³ during the warmer months and with concentrations up to 9 ng/m³ in the cold season. Annual averages in the years 2000 - 2005 ranged between 1.4 and 2.8 ng/m³ - much higher than the EU target value of 1 ng/m³. We used a macrotracer model developed at the Vienna University of Technology to determine the contributions of the sources for BaP emissions, which were mainly space heating with wood and traffic from the highway. EXPERIMENTAL: The macrotracer concept is a nine component model to derive source contribution and explains 80-100% of PM10 aerosols in Austria. The amount of traffic exhaust is derived by using EC as tracer, whereas EC produced by wood burning is subtracted, the amount of wood smoke is derived by the anhydro-sugar levoglucosan and the ratio between the anhydro-sugars levoglucosan and mannosan. For the source apportionment of BaP the applied factors reflect on the one hand the composition of the automotive fleet in Austria and on the other hand the composition of the fire wood in the region. Filter samples collected with a high volume sampler in winter were analyzed for PM10 aerosol mass, total, organic, elemental and carbonate carbon, HULIS, anhydro-sugars, polyols and ions (major ions and organic acids) and PAHs. In the same way emission samples taken at a motor test stand and at a test stand for wood combustion were analyzed (Schmidl et al. 2008). The saccharides were determined using high pH anion exchange and pulsed amperometry (HPAE-PAD). Details of the analytical method are given in Iinuma et al., 2009. Elemental and organic carbon were determined with a thermal-optical instrument (Sunset lab

  19. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    To protect space crews from air contaminants, NASA requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide guidance for developing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) and review NASA's development of exposure guidelines for specific chemicals. The NRC convened the Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines to address this task. The committee published Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants (NRC 1992). The reason for the review of chemicals in Volume 5 is that many of them have not been examined for more than 10 years, and new research necessitates examining the documents to ensure that they reflect current knowledge. New knowledge can be in the form of toxicologic data or in the application of new approaches for analysis of available data. In addition, because NASA anticipates longer space missions beyond low Earth orbit, SMACs for 1,000-d exposures have also been developed.

  20. Evaluation of the tropospheric aerosol number concentrations simulated by two versions of the global model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Kazil, J.; Feichter, J.

    2009-04-01

    Since its first version developed by Stier et al. (2005), the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM has gone through further development and updates. The changes in the model include (1) a new time integration scheme for the condensation of the sulfuric acid gas on existing particles, (2) a new aerosol nucleation scheme that takes into account the charged nucleation caused by cosmic rays, and (3) a parameterization scheme explicitly describing the conversion of aerosol particles to cloud nuclei. In this work, simulations performed with the old and new model versions are evaluated against some measurements reported in recent years. The focus is on the aerosol size distribution in the troposphere. Results show that modifications in the parameterizations have led to significant changes in the simulated aerosol concentrations. Vertical profiles of the total particle number concentration (diameter > 3nm) compiled by Clarke et al. (2002) suggest that, over the Pacific in the upper free troposphere, the tropics are associated with much higher concentrations than the mid-latitude regions. This feature is more reasonably reproduced by the new model version, mainly due to the improved results of the nucleation mode aerosols. In the lower levels (2-5 km above the Earth's surface), the number concentrations of the Aitken mode particles are overestimated compared to both the Pacific data given in Clarke et al. (2002) and the vertical profiles over Europe reported by Petzold et al. (2007). The physical and chemical processes that have led to these changes are identified by sensitivity tests. References: Clarke and Kapustin: A Pacific aerosol survey - part 1: a decade of data on production, transport, evolution and mixing in the troposphere, J. Atmos. Sci., 59, 363-382, 2002. Petzold et al.: Perturbation of the European free troposphere aerosol by North American forest fire plumes during the ICARTT-ITOP experiment in summer 2004, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 5105-5127, 2007

  1. Control of aerosol contaminants in indoor air: combining the particle concentration reduction with microbial inactivation.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin; Honda, Takeshi; Kim, Ki Youn; Toivola, Mika; Rao, K S Ramchander; Reponen, Tiina

    2007-01-15

    An indoor air purification technique, which combines unipolar ion emission and photocatalytic oxidation (promoted by a specially designed RCI cell), was investigated in two test chambers, 2.75 m3 and 24.3 m3, using nonbiological and biological challenge aerosols. The reduction in particle concentration was measured size selectively in real-time, and the Air Cleaning Factor and the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) were determined. While testing with virions and bacteria, bioaerosol samples were collected and analyzed, and the microorganism survival rate was determined as a function of exposure time. We observed that the aerosol concentration decreased approximately 10 to approximately 100 times more rapidly when the purifier operated as compared to the natural decay. The data suggest that the tested portable unit operating in approximately 25 m3 non-ventilated room is capable to provide CADR-values more than twice as great than the conventional closed-loop HVAC system with a rating 8 filter. The particle removal occurred due to unipolar ion emission, while the inactivation of viable airborne microorganisms was associated with photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 90% of initially viable MS2 viruses were inactivated resulting from 10 to 60 min exposure to the photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 75% of viable B. subtilis spores were inactivated in 10 min, and about 90% or greater after 30 min. The biological and chemical mechanisms that led to the inactivation of stress-resistant airborne viruses and bacterial spores were reviewed.

  2. Changes in the concentration and composition of anthropogenic and biogenic aerosols in the Finnish Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yli-Tuomi, Tarja

    In this study, historical samples of Arctic haze collected between 1964 and 1978 from northern Finland have been analyzed. The aim has been to determine the sources of the particles, as well as the temporal variation in the source contributions and the source regions. There is no other long-term data available from this early time period and overall, more information about the occurrence, nature, origin and transport of anthropogenic and biogenic aerosols in the European Arctic is needed in order to protect the vulnerable Arctic environment. In addition, evidence for climate/biosphere interaction observed in a previous study of the Arctic aerosol has been sought. The chemical composition data was analyzed with a Multilinear Engine using two different models, pure bilinear and a mixed 2-way/3-way model. The results of receptor modeling were connected with back trajectory data in a Potential Source Contribution Function analysis to determine the likely source areas. Nine sources, namely silver emissions, coal combustion, biomass burning, nonferrous smelters (two sources), crustal elements from remote sources, excess silicon from local sources, sea salt particles and biogenic sulfur emissions from marine algae were found. Although the emissions from industrial areas in the Kola Peninsula have an effect on the concentration of anthropogenic pollutants at Kevo, the highest concentrations during winter are transported from the sources in the mid-latitudes. The yearly strength of the biogenic sulfur emissions showed no dependence on the Northern Hemisphere temperature anomaly and thus, a climatic feedback loop can not be confirmed.

  3. Gas-phase CO2 subtraction for improved measurements of the organic aerosol mass concentration and oxidation degree by an aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Collier, S; Zhang, Q

    2013-12-17

    The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) has been widely used for real-time characterization of the size-resolved chemical composition of sub-micrometer aerosol particles. The first step in AMS sampling is the pre-concentration of aerosols while stripping away the gas-phase components, which contributes to the high sensitivity of this instrument. The strength of the instrument lies in particle phase measurement; however, ion signals generated from gas-phase species can influence the interpretation of the particle-phase chemistry data. Here, we present methods for subtracting the varying contributions of gas-phase carbon dioxide (CO2) in the AMS spectra of aerosol particles, which is critical for determining the mass concentration and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratio of organic aerosol. This report gives details on the gaseous CO2 subtraction analysis performed on a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) data set acquired from sampling of fresh and diluted vehicle emissions. Three different methods were used: (1) collocated continuous gas-phase CO2 measurement coupled with periodic filter tests consisting of sampling the same particle-free air by the AMS and the CO2 analyzer, (2) positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis to separate the gas- and particle-phase signals of CO2(+) at m/z 44, and (3) use of the particle time-of-flight (PTOF) size-resolved chemical information for separation of gas- and particle-phase signals at m/z 44. Our results indicate that these three different approaches yield internally consistent values for the gas/particle apportionment of m/z 44, but methods 2 and 3 require certain conditions to be met to yield reliable results. The methods presented are applicable to any situation where gas-phase components may influence the PM signal of interest.

  4. Global Distribution of Cloud Droplet Number Concentration, Autoconversion Rate, and Aerosol Indirect Effect Under Diabatic Droplet Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, Donifan; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella; Nenes, Athanasios

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a global assessment of the sensitivity of droplet number to diabatic activation (i.e., including effects from entrainment of dry air) and its first-order tendency on indirect forcing and autoconversion. Simulations were carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) atmospheric and transport model using climatological metereorological fields derived from the former NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO), the NASA Finite volume GCM (FVGCM) and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies version II (GISS) GCM. Cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is calculated using a physically based prognostic parameterization that explicitly includes entrainment effects on droplet formation. Diabatic activation results in lower CDNC, compared to adiabatic treatment of the process. The largest decrease in CDNC (by up to 75 percent) was found in the tropics and in zones of moderate CCN concentration. This leads to a global mean effective radius increase between 0.2-0.5 micrometers (up to 3.5 micrometers over the tropics), a global mean autoconversion rate increase by a factor of 1.1 to 1.7 (up to a factor of 4 in the tropics), and a 0.2-0.4 W m(exp -2) decrease in indirect forcing. The spatial patterns of entrainment effects on droplet activation tend to reduce biases in effective radius (particularly in the tropics) when compared to satellite retrievals. Considering the diabatic nature of ambient clouds, entrainment effects on CDNC need to be considered in GCM studies of the aerosol indirect effect.

  5. Seasonality of the mass concentration and chemical composition of aerosols around an urbanized basin in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. C.-K.; Hsu, W.-C.; Chang, S.-Y.; Chen, W.-N.; Chen, M.-J.; Huang, W.-R.; Huang, S.-H.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Chang, S.-C.; Lee, C.-T.; Liu, S.-C.

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated seasonal variations in the mass concentration and chemical composition of ambient aerosols observed at three stations (coastal, mountainous, and downtown sites) in northern Taiwan from March 2009 to February 2012. The results show that the major aerosol components include ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, sea salt, dust, organic carbon, and elemental carbon, whereas the mass fraction of each species depends on the sampling location and season. A significant correlation (r = 0.7-0.8) was observed in aerosol concentrations measured at the respective stations, indicating that aerosol concentrations were dominated by regional-scale factors. Ammonium, sulfate, and nitrate consistently reached respective peak values in the spring in conjunction with dust particle levels. This shows that the transport of dust and particulate air pollutants from the Asian continent has affected the atmospheric environment in this area. Distinct seasonality was observed for sea salt and secondary organic carbon (SOC): sea salt levels peaked in the autumn, whereas SOC levels peaked in the summer, implying that their sources were regulated by independent seasonal factors. Correlation between sea salt concentration and surface wind speed was derived from coastal measurements and showed a high value for the wind speed sensitivity parameter of around 0.37 for our location. In addition, it was revealed that the SOC concentration in aerosols was positively correlated with oxidant photolysis index (Ox × UVB), suggesting that the SOC seasonality was dominated by hydroxyl radical production.

  6. Worldwide impact of aerosol's time scale on the predicted long-term concentrating solar power potential.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A; Gueymard, Christian A; Santos-Alamillos, Francisco J; Pozo-Vázquez, David

    2016-08-10

    Concentrating solar technologies, which are fuelled by the direct normal component of solar irradiance (DNI), are among the most promising solar technologies. Currently, the state-of the-art methods for DNI evaluation use datasets of aerosol optical depth (AOD) with only coarse (typically monthly) temporal resolution. Using daily AOD data from both site-specific observations at ground stations as well as gridded model estimates, a methodology is developed to evaluate how the calculated long-term DNI resource is affected by using AOD data averaged over periods from 1 to 30 days. It is demonstrated here that the use of monthly representations of AOD leads to systematic underestimations of the predicted long-term DNI up to 10% in some areas with high solar resource, which may result in detrimental consequences for the bankability of concentrating solar power projects. Recommendations for the use of either daily or monthly AOD data are provided on a geographical basis.

  7. Solar concentrator technology development for space based applications, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintz, A.; Castle, C. H.; Reimer, R. R.

    1992-12-01

    Thermoelectric conversion using a radio-isotope heat source has been used where outer planetary space craft are too far away for absorbing significant solar energy. Solar dynamic power (SDP) conversion is one technology that offers advantages for applications within the inner planet region. Since SDP conversion efficiency can be 2 to 3 times higher than photovoltaic, the collecting surfaces are much reduced in area and therefore lighter. This becomes an advantage in allocating more weight to launched payloads. A second advantage results for low earth orbit applications. The reduced area results in lower drag forces on the spacecraft and requires less reboost propellant to maintain orbit. A third advantage occurs because of the sun-to-shade cycling while in earth orbit. Photovoltaic systems require batteries to store energy for use when in the shade, and battery life for periods of 10 to 15 years is not presently achievable. For these reasons the Solar Dynamics and Thermal Systems Branch at NASA LeRC has funded work in developing SDP systems. The generic SDP system uses a large parabolic solar concentrator to focus solar energy onto a power conversion device. The concentrators are large areas and must therefore be efficient and have low specific weights. Yet these surfaces must be precise and capable of being stowed in a launch vehicle and then deployed and sometimes unfurled in space. There are significant technical challenges in engineering such structures, and considerable investigation has been made to date. This is the second of two volumes reporting on the research done by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University to assist NASA LeRC in evaluating this technology. This volume includes the appendices of selected data sets, drawings, and procedures. The objective of the grant was to restore the solar concentrator development technology of the 1960s while improving it with advances that have occurred since then. This report summarizes the

  8. Solar concentrator technology development for space based applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pintz, A.; Castle, C. H.; Reimer, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermoelectric conversion using a radio-isotope heat source has been used where outer planetary space craft are too far away for absorbing significant solar energy. Solar dynamic power (SDP) conversion is one technology that offers advantages for applications within the inner planet region. Since SDP conversion efficiency can be 2 to 3 times higher than photovoltaic, the collecting surfaces are much reduced in area and therefore lighter. This becomes an advantage in allocating more weight to launched payloads. A second advantage results for low earth orbit applications. The reduced area results in lower drag forces on the spacecraft and requires less reboost propellant to maintain orbit. A third advantage occurs because of the sun-to-shade cycling while in earth orbit. Photovoltaic systems require batteries to store energy for use when in the shade, and battery life for periods of 10 to 15 years is not presently achievable. For these reasons the Solar Dynamics and Thermal Systems Branch at NASA LeRC has funded work in developing SDP systems. The generic SDP system uses a large parabolic solar concentrator to focus solar energy onto a power conversion device. The concentrators are large areas and must therefore be efficient and have low specific weights. Yet these surfaces must be precise and capable of being stowed in a launch vehicle and then deployed and sometimes unfurled in space. There are significant technical challenges in engineering such structures, and considerable investigation has been made to date. This is the second of two volumes reporting on the research done by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University to assist NASA LeRC in evaluating this technology. This volume includes the appendices of selected data sets, drawings, and procedures. The objective of the grant was to restore the solar concentrator development technology of the 1960s while improving it with advances that have occurred since then. This report summarizes the

  9. Ozone and aerosol tropospheric concentrations variability analyzed using the ADRIMED measurements and the WRF and CHIMERE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, L.; Mailler, S.; Siour, G.; Bessagnet, B.; Turquety, S.; Rea, G.; Briant, R.; Mallet, M.; Sciare, J.; Formenti, P.; Meleux, F.

    2015-06-01

    During the months of June and July 2013, over the Euro-Mediterranean area, the ADRIMED (Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) project was dedicated to characterize the ozone and aerosol concentrations in the troposphere. It is first shown that this period was not highly polluted compared to previous summers in this region, with a moderate ozone production, no significant vegetation fire events and several precipitation periods scavenging the aerosol. The period is modeled with the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) and CHIMERE models, and their ability to quantify the observed pollution transport events is presented. The CHIMERE model simulating all kinds of sources (anthropogenic, biogenic, mineral dust, vegetation fires); the aerosol speciation, not available with the measurements, is presented: during the whole period, the aerosol was mainly constituted by mineral dust, sea salt and sulfates close to the surface and mainly by mineral dust in the troposphere. Compared to the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) size distribution, it is shown that the model underestimates the coarse mode near mineral dust sources and overestimates the fine mode in the Mediterranean area, highlighting the need to improve the model representation of the aerosol size distribution both during emissions, long-range transport and deposition.

  10. On the concentration structure of high-concentration constant-volume fluid mud gravity currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. R.; Testik, F. Y.

    2013-01-01

    An exhaustive laboratory experimental campaign was undertaken in order to elucidate the concentration structure of two-dimensional constant-volume non-Newtonian fluid mud gravity currents. Two sets of experiments were conducted in a lock-exchange tank. The first set of experiments involved measuring the vertical concentration profiles using a siphoning technique; the second set involved auxiliary visual observations. The first set of experiments consisted of 32 experimental runs for four different experimental conditions, with an array of siphoned samples being withdrawn throughout the head and body of the gravity current. From these samples, vertical concentration profiles occurring in constant-volume fluid mud gravity currents were classified and the underlying physical processes that led to the occurrence of observed profiles were discussed. Furthermore, the functional form of the vertical concentration profiles within the head of relatively low-initial-concentration gravity currents was proposed. The relatively high-initial-concentration gravity currents revealed the presence of a lutocline in the current head and body, the presence of which was observed for constant-flux release gravity currents. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of a lutocline in constant-volume gravity currents. Abrupt transitions, a phenomenon in which the bulk of the suspended sediment in the propagating gravity current drops out, were observed through the concentration profiles and through 15 auxiliary visual experimental runs. It was found that abrupt transitions were caused by the presence of a lutocline. The entrainment of ambient water resulting in the dilution of the gravity current at different concentration contours has been quantified. In a previous work by the authors of this study, it was shown that the initial reduced gravity is directly proportional to the growth rate of the visual area of the two-dimensional current. The analysis of our experimental observations

  11. Relationship between column aerosol optical properties and surface aerosol gravimetric concentrations during the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network - Northeast ASIA 2012 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Seo, S.; Choi, M.; Kim, W. V.; Holben, B. N.; Lee, S.; Kim, J.

    2012-12-01

    One of the main objectives of Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Network (DRAGON) campaign in Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission is to understand the relationship between the column optical properties of the atmosphere and the surface level air quality in terms of aerosols and gases. This study aims to identify the important parameters that affecting the relationship between those variables during the DRAGON - northeast Asia 2012 campaign. Column aerosol optical properties from ten Cimel sun photometers at DRAGON sites in Seoul, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) and particulate matter (PM10) sampling from 40 NIER (National Institute of Environmental Research of South Korea) measurement sites in Seoul during the period of 1st March - 31th May 2012 were employed in this study. The key parameters in relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and PM are reported to be aerosol vertical profile and hygroscopicity of the aerosols. The meteorological conditions including relative humidity, surface temperature, and wind speed that could affect those parameters were investigated.

  12. Regulation of body fluid volume and electrolyte concentrations in spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Krauhs, J. M.; Leach, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Despite a number of difficulties in performing experiments during weightlessness, a great deal of information has been obtained concerning the effects of spaceflight on the regulation of body fluid and electrolytes. Many paradoxes and questions remain, however. Although body mass, extracellular fluid volume, and plasma volume are reduced during spaceflight and remain so at landing, the changes in total body water are comparatively small. Serum or plasma sodium and osmolality have generally been unchanged or reduced during the spaceflight, and fluid intake is substantially reduced, especially during the first of flight. The diuresis that was predicted to be caused by weightlessness, has only rarely been observed as an increased urine volume. What has been well established by now, is the occurrence of a relative diuresis, where fluid intake decreases more than urine volume does. Urinary excretion of electrolytes has been variable during spaceflight, but retention of fluid and electrolytes at landing has been consistently observed. The glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated during the SLS missions, and water and electrolyte loading tests have indicated that renal function is altered during readaptation to Earth's gravity. Endocrine control of fluid volumes and electrolyte concentrations may be altered during weightlessness, but levels of hormones in body fluids do not conform to predictions based on early hypotheses. Antidiuretic hormone is not suppressed, though its level is highly variable and its secretion may be affected by space motion sickness and environmental factors. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone are generally elevated at landing, consistent with sodium retention, but inflight levels have been variable. Salt intake may be an important factor influencing the levels of these hormones. The circadian rhythm of cortisol has undoubtedly contributed to its variability, and little is known yet about the influence of spaceflight on circadian

  13. Indoor/outdoor radon decay products associated aerosol particle-size distributions and their relation to total number concentrations.

    PubMed

    Moriizumi, Jun; Yamada, Shinya; Xu, Yang; Matsuki, Satoru; Hirao, Shigekazu; Yamazawa, Hiromi

    2014-07-01

    The activity size distributions of indoor and outdoor radioactive aerosol associated with short-lived radon decay products were observed at Nagoya, Japan, for some periods from 2010 to 2012, following the indoor observation by Mostafa et al. [Mostafa, A. M. A., Tamaki, K., Moriizumi, J., Yamazawa, H. and Iida, T. The weather dependence of particle size distribution of indoor radioactive aerosol associated with radon decay products. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 146: (1-3), 19-22 (2011)]. The tendency of smaller indoor activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) after rainfalls showed in the previous study was not consistently obtained, while the consistent tendency of less indoor radioactive particles with diameters in the accumulation mode was observed again after rainfalls. The indoor aerosols showed activity size distributions similar to the outdoor ones. Non-radioactive aerosol particle concentrations measured with a laser particle counter suggested a somewhat liner relationship with AMAD.

  14. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 3: Assessment Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, C.; Hughes, E. D.; Niederauer, G. F.; Wilkening, H.; Travis, J. R.; Spore, J. W.; Royl, P.; Baumann, W.

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best- estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume

  15. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 2: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, B. D.; Mueller, C.; Necker, G. A.; Travis, J. R.; Spore, J. W.; Lam, K. L.; Royl, P.; Wilson, T. L.

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III

  16. An Investigation of Size-Dependent Concentration of Trace Elements in Aerosols Emitted from the Oil-Fired Heating Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sentell, R. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Aerosols emitted from two oil-fired heating plants were aerodynamically separated into eight size groups and were analyzed using the photon-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique. It was found that Zn, Mo, Ag, and Pb, and (to a lesser extent) Cd, have a tendency to concentrate preferentially on the smaller aerosols. All of these elements, in certain chemical forms, are known to be toxic. Zinc and molybdenum, although present in low concentrations in the parent fuels, show the strongest tendencies to be concentrated in finer aerosols. Selenium, previously reported to show a very strong tendency to concentration in finer fly ash from coal-fired power plants shows little preference for surface residence. Vanadium, which occurs in significant concentration in the oil fuels for both plants, also shows little preference for surface concentration. Even though the absolute concentrations of the toxic elements involved are well below the safety levels established by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), it would be advisable to raise the heights of the heating-plant exhaust chimneys well above the neighborhood buildings to insure more efficient aerosol dispersal.

  17. Light Absorption in the Stratosphere: Trend, Soot Aerosol Concentration and Contribution by...

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Verma, S.; Strwwa, A. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Hamill, P.; Vay, S.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The light absorption coefficient, Beta(a) of the stratospheric aerosol is an important quantity that determines its radiative effects. When combined with the aerosol scattering coefficient, Beta(a) it becomes possible to evaluate the aerosol single scatter albedo, omega = Beta(s)/(Beta(s) + Beta(a)) which is essential for modeling the overall radiative effects of the stratospheric aerosol. Pollack1 determined that omega = 0.98 is a critical value that separates stratospheric cooling from warming.

  18. Ambient aerosol chlorine concentrations and artefacts during the MEGAPOLI Paris campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furger, Markus; Visser, Suzanne; Slowik, Jay; Crippa, Monica; Poulain, Laurent; Sciare, Jean; Flechsig, Uwe; Prévôt, André; Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    Trace elements, especially those that are toxic, can affect the environment in significant ways. Studying them is advantageous with respect to a refinement of source apportionment when measured with high time resolution and appropriate size segregation. This approach is especially useful in urban environments with numerous time-variant emission sources distributed across a relatively narrow space. Two field campaigns took place in the framework of the MEGAPOLI project in Paris, France: one in the summer of 2009 (1-31 July), the other in the winter of 2010 (11 Jan - 10 Feb). Rotating drum impactors (RDI) were operated at an urban and a suburban site in each campaign. The RDI segregated the aerosols into three size ranges (PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1.0 and PM1.0-0.3) and sampled with 2-hour time resolution. The samples were analyzed with synchrotron radiation-induced X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF) at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (SLS), where a broad range of elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn) was analyzed for each size range. Time series of the analyzed elements for the different sites and campaigns were prepared to characterize the aerosol trace element composition and temporal behavior for different weather situations and urban environments. Quality assurance was performed partly by intercomparison with independent measurements. An exceptional behavior was observed for chlorine (Cl), where periods with zero RDI concentration alternated with periods of normal load. Zero concentrations were not observed in particle-into-liquid (PILS) measurements. This identifies the observed behavior as a RDI sampling artefact. Nevertheless, the non-zero periods of Cl concentrations are still a gain in information compared to conventional sampling techniques, mainly due to the high time resolution.

  19. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3 aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; Ault, A.; Bondy, A.; Takahama, S.; Modini, R. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Knote, C.; Laskin, A.; Wang, B.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-09-25

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. In addition, calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas–aerosol phase partitioning.

  20. Black Carbon, Metal Concentrations and Lead Isotopes Ratios in Aerosols as Tracers of Human and Natural Activities in Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinot, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric brown clouds (ABC) observed as widespread layers of brownish haze are regional scale plumes of air pollutants with a hot spot of emission located in East Asia. ABC are mainly composed of aerosol particles such as Black Carbon (BC) emitted to the atmosphere during biomass burning and fossil fuels combustion. The atmospheric lifetime of BC ranges from a few days in wet season up to one month in dry season. The use of stable lead isotopes and 21 elements as tracers of air pollution was applied to identify and characterized the main sources of anthropogenic activities in Asian region. Aerosol samples from Haiphong (North Vietnam) were collected by a high volume sampler for a period of one year from October 2012 to October 2013. Vietnam's 207Pb/206Pb ratios were almost identical to those found for China. Ratios of 207Pb/206Pb ranged from 0.837 to 0.871 which agrees with values previously reported for the last 10 years in China (0.841 - 0.879). No significant variation in isotope ratio was observed during the sampling period, which suggests that there was no large seasonal variation in the isotope ratios of airborne lead. Trajectory analysis showed that almost two third of the air masses originated from East Northeast which implies that China was a major source of lead in atmosphere. Enrichment factor calculations indicated a large influence of coal activity (EF(Al) As = 1982 ± 796, EF(Al) Cd = 972 ± 659, EF(Al) Sb = 1358 ± 930) but the difference between combustion and mining exploitation could not be evidenced. Significant correlations were found between two others groups of elements: As, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Al, Fe K, Co. Wind dilution was effective on metals concentration variation. During the cold and dry season (winter) ambient concentrations were high and variable, during the warm and wet season (summer) concentrations were stable and low. Taken together, these factors also identified industrial and lithogenic activities in the region.

  1. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; Kuang, Chongai; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Chi, Xuguang; Comstock, Jennifer; Ditas, Florian; Lavric, Jost; Manninen, Hanna E.; Mei, Fan; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Saturno, Jorge; Schmid, Beat; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami; Walter, David; Wimmer, Daniela; Smith, James N.; Kulmala, Markku; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-10-24

    A necessary prerequisite of cloud formation, aerosol particles represent one of the largest uncertainties in computer simulations of climate change1,2, in part because of a poor understanding of processes under natural conditions3,4. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions5-7. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in clean Amazonia are mostly produced by the growth of smaller particles in the boundary layer8-10, whereas these smaller particles themselves 31 appear to be produced elsewhere5,11. Key questions are in what part of the atmosphere they might 32 be produced and what could be the transport processes that deliver them to the boundary layer, where they grow into CCN. Here, using recent aircraft measurements above central Amazonia, we show high concentrations of small particles in the lower free troposphere. The particle size spectrum shifts towards larger sizes with decreasing altitude, implying particle growth as air descends from the free troposphere towards Earth's surface. Complementary measurements at ground sites show that free tropospheric air having high concentrations of small particles (diameters of less than 50 nm) is transported into the boundary layer during precipitation events, both by strong convective downdrafts and by weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. This vertical transport helps maintain the population of small particles and ultimately CCN in the boundary layer, thereby playing an important role in controlling the climate state under natural conditions. In contrast, this mechanism becomes masked under polluted conditions, which sometimes prevail at times in Amazonia as well as over other tropical continental regions5,12.

  2. Generation and characterization of stable, highly concentrated titanium dioxide nanoparticle aerosols for rodent inhalation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Biswas, Pratim; Messing, Maria E.; Gibson, Neil; Geiser, Marianne; Wenk, Alexander; Sahu, Manoranjan; Deppert, Knut; Cydzik, Izabela; Wigge, Christoph; Schmid, Otmar; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela

    2011-02-01

    The intensive use of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles in many different applications necessitates studies on their risk assessment as there are still open questions on their safe handling and utilization. For reliable risk assessment, the interaction of TiO2 nanoparticles (NP) with biological systems ideally needs to be investigated using physico-chemically uniform and well-characterized NP. In this article, we describe the reproducible production of TiO2 NP aerosols using spark ignition technology. Because currently no data are available on inhaled NP in the 10-50 nm diameter range, the emphasis was to generate NP as small as 20 nm for inhalation studies in rodents. For anticipated in vivo dosimetry analyses, TiO2 NP were radiolabeled with 48V by proton irradiation of the titanium electrodes of the spark generator. The dissolution rate of the 48V label was about 1% within the first day. The highly concentrated, polydisperse TiO2 NP aerosol (3-6 × 106 cm-3) proved to be constant over several hours in terms of its count median mobility diameter, its geometric standard deviation, and number concentration. Extensive characterization of NP chemical composition, physical structure, morphology, and specific surface area was performed. The originally generated amorphous TiO2 NP were converted into crystalline anatase TiO2 NP by thermal annealing at 950 °C. Both crystalline and amorphous 20-nm TiO2 NP were chain agglomerated/aggregated, consisting of primary particles in the range of 5 nm. Disintegration of the deposited TiO2 NP in lung tissue was not detectable within 24 h.

  3. Solar concentrator technology development for space based applications, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pintz, A.; Castle, C. H.; Reimer, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermoelectric conversion using a radio-isotope heat source has been used where outer planetary space craft are too far away for absorbing significant solar energy. Solar dynamic power (SDP) conversion is one technology that offers advantages for applications within the inner planet region. Since SDP conversion efficiency can be 2 to 3 times higher than photovoltaic, the collecting surfaces are much reduced in area and therefore lighter. This becomes an advantage in allocating more weight to launched payloads. A second advantage results for low earth orbit applications. The reduced area results in lower drag forces on the spacecraft and requires less reboost propellant to maintain orbit. A third advantage occurs because of the sun-to-shade cycling while in earth orbit. Photovoltaic systems require batteries to store energy for use when in the shade, and battery life for periods of 10 to 15 years is not presently achievable. For these reasons the Solar Dynamics and Thermal Systems Branch at NASA LeRC has funded work in developing SDP systems. The generic SDP system uses a large parabolic solar concentrator to focus solar energy onto a power conversion device. The concentrators are large areas and must therefore be efficient and have low specific weights. Yet these surfaces must be precise and capable of being stowed in a launch vehicle and then deployed and sometimes unfurled in space. There are significant technical challenges in engineering such structures, and considerable investigation has been made to date. This is the first of two volumes reporting on the research done by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University to assist NASA LeRC in evaluating this technology. The objective of the grant was to restore the solar concentrator development technology of the 1960s while improving it with advances that have occurred since then. This report summarizes the work done from January 1989 through December 1991.

  4. Solar concentrator technology development for space based applications, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintz, A.; Castle, C. H.; Reimer, R. R.

    1992-12-01

    Thermoelectric conversion using a radio-isotope heat source has been used where outer planetary space craft are too far away for absorbing significant solar energy. Solar dynamic power (SDP) conversion is one technology that offers advantages for applications within the inner planet region. Since SDP conversion efficiency can be 2 to 3 times higher than photovoltaic, the collecting surfaces are much reduced in area and therefore lighter. This becomes an advantage in allocating more weight to launched payloads. A second advantage results for low earth orbit applications. The reduced area results in lower drag forces on the spacecraft and requires less reboost propellant to maintain orbit. A third advantage occurs because of the sun-to-shade cycling while in earth orbit. Photovoltaic systems require batteries to store energy for use when in the shade, and battery life for periods of 10 to 15 years is not presently achievable. For these reasons the Solar Dynamics and Thermal Systems Branch at NASA LeRC has funded work in developing SDP systems. The generic SDP system uses a large parabolic solar concentrator to focus solar energy onto a power conversion device. The concentrators are large areas and must therefore be efficient and have low specific weights. Yet these surfaces must be precise and capable of being stowed in a launch vehicle and then deployed and sometimes unfurled in space. There are significant technical challenges in engineering such structures, and considerable investigation has been made to date. This is the first of two volumes reporting on the research done by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University to assist NASA LeRC in evaluating this technology. The objective of the grant was to restore the solar concentrator development technology of the 1960s while improving it with advances that have occurred since then. This report summarizes the work done from January 1989 through December 1991.

  5. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, G. G.; Lefer, B. L.; Hall, S. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Corr, C. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, S.

    2012-08-01

    Urban air pollution absorbs and scatters solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus has a potentially large effect on tropospheric photochemical rates. We present the first detailed comparison between UV actinic fluxes (AF) measured in highly polluted conditions and simulated with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measured AF values are typically smaller than the model by up to 25% in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, for pollution-free and cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 67% and NO2 for 25% of AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the AF perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols enhance AF above the PBL and reduce AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA < 0.6) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the AF.

  6. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, G. G.; Lefer, B. L.; Hall, S. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Corr, C. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, S.

    2013-01-01

    Urban air pollution absorbs and scatters solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and thus has a potentially large effect on tropospheric photochemical rates. We present the first detailed comparison between actinic fluxes (AF) in the wavelength range 330-420 nm measured in highly polluted conditions and simulated with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measured AF values are typically smaller than the model by up to 25% in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, for pollution-free and cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68% and NO2 for 25% of AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the AF perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols enhance AF above the PBL and reduce AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA < 0.6) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the AF.

  7. Characterizing the influence of anthropogenic emissions and transport variability on sulfate aerosol concentrations at Mauna Loa Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Lauren E.

    Sulfate aerosol in the atmosphere has substantial impacts on human health and environmental quality. Most notably, atmospheric sulfate has the potential to modify the earth's climate system through both direct and indirect radiative forcing mechanisms (Meehl et al., 2007). Emissions of sulfur dioxide, the primary precursor of sulfate aerosol, are now globally dominated by anthropogenic sources as a result of widespread fossil fuel combustion. Economic development in Asian countries since 1990 has contributed considerably to atmospheric sulfur loading, particularly China, which currently emits approximately 1/3 of global anthropogenic SO2 (Klimont et al., 2013). Observational and modeling studies have confirmed that anthropogenic pollutants from Asian sources can be transported long distances with important implications for future air quality and global climate change. Located in the remote Pacific Ocean (19.54°N, 155.58°W) at an elevation of 3.4 kilometers above sea level, Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) is an ideal measurement site for ground-based, free tropospheric observations and is well situated to experience influence from springtime Asian outflow. This study makes use of a 14-year data set of aerosol ionic composition, obtained at MLO by the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Daily filter samples of total aerosol concentrations were made during nighttime downslope (free-tropospheric) transport conditions, from 1995 to 2008, and were analyzed for aerosol-phase concentrations of the following species: nitrate (NO3-), sulfate (SO42-), methanesulfonate (MSA), chloride (Cl-), oxalate, sodium (Na+), ammonium (NH 4+), potassium (K+), magnesium (Mg 2+), and calcium (Ca2+). An understanding of the factors controlling seasonal and interannual variations in aerosol speciation and concentrations at this site is complicated by the relatively short lifetimes of aerosols, compared with greenhouse gases which have also been sampled over long time periods at MLO. Aerosol filter

  8. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  9. Efficacy of High-volume Evacuator in Aerosol Reduction: Truth or Myth? A Clinical and Microbiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Desarda, Hitesh; Gurav, Abhijit; Dharmadhikari, Chandrakant; Shete, Abhijeet; Gaikwad, Subodh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Basic periodontal treatment aims at eliminating supra- and sub-gingival plaque and establishing conditions which will allow effective self-performed plaque control. This aim is primarily achieved with sonic and ultrasonic scalers. However, generation of bacterial aerosols during these procedures is of great concern to patients, the dentist and the dental assistant. The aim of this study was to compare the reduction in aerosol with and without high-volume evacuator through a microbiological study. Materials and methods. For this clinical study a fumigated closed operatory was selected. Maxillary incisors and canines were selected as an area for scaling. Piezoelectric ultrasonic scaling was performed in the absence and in the presence of a high-volume evacuator at 12 and 20 inches from the patient's oral cavity. In both groups scaling was carried out for 10 minutes. Nutrient agar plates were exposed for a total of 20 minutes. After this procedure, nutrient agar plates were incubated in an incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The next day the nutrient agar plates were examined for colony forming units by a single microbiologist. Results. The results showed no statistically significant differences in colony forming units (CFU) with and without the use of a high-volume evacuator either at 12 or 20 inches from the patient's oral cavity. Conclusion. It was concluded that high-volume evacuator, when used as a separate unit without any modification, is not effective in reducing aerosol counts and environmental contamination. PMID:25346838

  10. Efficacy of High-volume Evacuator in Aerosol Reduction: Truth or Myth? A Clinical and Microbiological Study.

    PubMed

    Desarda, Hitesh; Gurav, Abhijit; Dharmadhikari, Chandrakant; Shete, Abhijeet; Gaikwad, Subodh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Basic periodontal treatment aims at eliminating supra- and sub-gingival plaque and establishing conditions which will allow effective self-performed plaque control. This aim is primarily achieved with sonic and ultrasonic scalers. However, generation of bacterial aerosols during these procedures is of great concern to patients, the dentist and the dental assistant. The aim of this study was to compare the reduction in aerosol with and without high-volume evacuator through a microbiological study. Materials and methods. For this clinical study a fumigated closed operatory was selected. Maxillary incisors and canines were selected as an area for scaling. Piezoelectric ultrasonic scaling was performed in the absence and in the presence of a high-volume evacuator at 12 and 20 inches from the patient's oral cavity. In both groups scaling was carried out for 10 minutes. Nutrient agar plates were exposed for a total of 20 minutes. After this procedure, nutrient agar plates were incubated in an incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The next day the nutrient agar plates were examined for colony forming units by a single microbiologist. Results. The results showed no statistically significant differences in colony forming units (CFU) with and without the use of a high-volume evacuator either at 12 or 20 inches from the patient's oral cavity. Conclusion. It was concluded that high-volume evacuator, when used as a separate unit without any modification, is not effective in reducing aerosol counts and environmental contamination.

  11. Spinning-disk generation and drying of monodisperse solid aerosols with output concentrations sufficient for single-breath inhalation studies.

    PubMed

    Byron, P R; Hickey, A J

    1987-01-01

    The air-driven spinning-disk aerosol generator was modified to allow the production of monodisperse dry spherical aerosols of disodium fluorescein (as model solute) in high output concentrations. Output concentrations were determined by filtration. Optical and aerodynamic size distributions were determined microscopically (after electrostatic precipitation) and by cascade impaction. The generator housing allowed the entrainment of 25-microns primary aqueous solution droplets in a 10-L X min-1 downward flow of dry, filtered air. Internal equipment surfaces were machined flush and polished to minimize aerosol losses. Primary droplets were dried within a stainless steel pipe encased in a tube furnace. Water vapor was removed by diffusion drying. Disk-driven air, satellite droplets, and additional dilution air were vented to waste without using a vacuum. Generator yields were increased by reducing the size of the satellite droplet extraction gap. Aerosols were generated reproducibly by delivering aqueous solutions at a rate of 0.2 mL X min-1 to the center of the disk and spinning at 1000 rps. Dry aerosols, with mass median aerodynamic diameters of 2, 4.9, and 9 microns, were produced in concentrations of 0.89, 5.48, and 54.6 micrograms X L-1 from aqueous solutions containing 0.0374, 0.584, and 3.4% solute by weight. Geometric standard deviations were less than 1.2 in all cases. Concentrations are several times higher than others in the literature and are suitable for single-breath inhalation studies of therapeutic aerosol deposition and effect.

  12. Global Estimates of Average Ground-Level Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations from Satellite-Based Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R. V.; Brauer, M.; Kahn, R.; Levy, R.; Verduzco, C.; Villeneuve, P.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to airborne particles can cause acute or chronic respiratory disease and can exacerbate heart disease, some cancers, and other conditions in susceptible populations. Ground stations that monitor fine particulate matter in the air (smaller than 2.5 microns, called PM2.5) are positioned primarily to observe severe pollution events in areas of high population density; coverage is very limited, even in developed countries, and is not well designed to capture long-term, lower-level exposure that is increasingly linked to chronic health effects. In many parts of the developing world, air quality observation is absent entirely. Instruments aboard NASA Earth Observing System satellites, such as the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), monitor aerosols from space, providing once daily and about once-weekly coverage, respectively. However, these data are only rarely used for health applications, in part because the can retrieve the amount of aerosols only summed over the entire atmospheric column, rather than focusing just on the near-surface component, in the airspace humans actually breathe. In addition, air quality monitoring often includes detailed analysis of particle chemical composition, impossible from space. In this paper, near-surface aerosol concentrations are derived globally from the total-column aerosol amounts retrieved by MODIS and MISR. Here a computer aerosol simulation is used to determine how much of the satellite-retrieved total column aerosol amount is near the surface. The five-year average (2001-2006) global near-surface aerosol concentration shows that World Health Organization Air Quality standards are exceeded over parts of central and eastern Asia for nearly half the year.

  13. Measured and modelled cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration in São Paulo, Brazil: the importance of aerosol size-resolved chemical composition on CCNhack concentration prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, G. P.; Brito, J.; Morales, C. A.; Andrade, M. F.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-07-01

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol size distribution and non-refractory chemical composition were performed from 16 to 31 October 2012 in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), Brazil. CCN measurements were performed at 0.23, 0.45, 0.68, 0.90 and 1.13% water supersaturation and were subsequently compared with the Köhler theory, considering the chemical composition. Real-time chemical composition has been obtained by deploying, for the first time in the SPMA, an aerosol chemical ionization monitor (ACSM). CCN closure analyses were performed considering internal mixtures. Average aerosol composition during the studied period yielded (arithmetic mean~± standard deviation) 4.81 ± 3.05, 3.26 ± 2.10, 0.30 ± 0.27, 0.52 ± 0.32, 0.37 ± 0.21 and 0.04 ± 0.04 μg m-3 for organics, BC, NH4, SO4, NO3 and Cl, respectively. Particle number concentration was 12 813 ± 5350 cm-3, with a dominant nucleation mode. CCN concentrations were on average 1090 ± 328 and 3570 ± 1695 cm-3 at SS = 0.23% and SS = 1.13%, respectively. Results show an increase in aerosol hygroscopicity in the afternoon as a result of aerosol photochemical processing, leading to an enhancement of both organic and inorganic secondary aerosols in the atmosphere, as well as an increase in aerosol average diameter. Considering the bulk composition alone, observed CCN concentrations were substantially overpredicted when compared with the Köhler theory (44.1 ± 47.9% at 0.23% supersaturation and 91.4 ± 40.3% at 1.13% supersaturation). Overall, the impact of composition on the calculated CCN concentration (NCCN) decreases with decreasing supersaturation, partially because using bulk composition introduces less bias for large diameters and lower critical supersaturations, defined as the supersaturation at which the cloud droplet activation will take place. Results suggest that the consideration of only inorganic fraction improves the calculated NCCN. Introducing a size-dependent chemical

  14. [Concentration distribution of metal elements in atmospheric aerosol under different weather conditions in Qingdao Coastal Region].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Jian-Hua; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Xiang-Yu; Shen, Heng-Qing; Liu, Ming-Xu

    2014-10-01

    To know the influence of different weather conditions on the concentration of metal elements in aerosols in the coastal region, total suspended particles (TSP) samples were collected from April to May 2012, and August 2012 to March 2013 in the Qingdao coastal region, and common trace metals were analyzed by using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results showed that Al, Ca, Fe, Na, K and Mg were the dominant metal elements in TSP, and the sum of the six elements accounted for 94.2% of the sum of all metals. TSP and metal elements had significant monthly variations, Fe, Al, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Ba, Mn, Ti, Sr and Li had the highest concentration in November and January, while Be, Sc, Co, Ni and Cr showed the highest value in January. Na had the highest concentration in August, November and February, and the lowest in December. Pb had the highest concentration in January and February, and the lowest in August and December. Enrichment factors indicated that Be, Co, Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Sr and Ti were mainly affected by natural sources; Li, Cr, Ni, Zn, Ba and Na were affected by natural sources and part of anthropogenic sources; Pb was mainly from anthropogenic sources. Different weather conditions had great impact on TSP and metal elements concentrations, all the measured metals had the highest concentrations in smog except Ti. Compared with the sunny day, the concentration of atmospheric particulate Ti decreased, while the other elements increased by 1 to 4 times in smog. Li, Be, Cr, Ni, Al, Fe, Mg and Mn had little variation in concentration in foggy day, and the concentration of Pb and Na increased considerably. The concentration of Co, Ca and Ti reduced obviously in fog. Except for Cr, Co and Ti, the other elements increased by 1 to 3 times in haze. Most of the elements had the minimal enrichment factors in sunny day, while the other had the maximal enrichment factor in

  15. A comparison of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields and composition from ozonolysis of monoterpenes at varying concentrations of NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, D. C.; Farmer, D. K.; Desyaterik, Y.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene, β-pinene, Δ3-carene, and limonene was investigated using a dark flow-through reaction chamber. SOA mass yields were calculated for each monoterpene from ozonolysis with varying NO2 concentrations. Kinetics modeling of the first generation gas-phase chemistry suggests that differences in observed aerosol yields for different NO2 concentrations are consistent with NO3 formation and subsequent competition between O3 and NO3 to oxidize each monoterpene. α-pinene was the only monoterpene studied that showed a systematic decrease in both aerosol number concentration and mass concentration with increasing [NO2]. β-pinene and Δ3-carene produced fewer particles at higher [NO2], but both retained moderate mass yields. Limonene exhibited both higher number concentrations and greater mass concentrations at higher [NO2]. SOA from each experiment was collected and analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS, enabling comparisons between product distributions for each system. In general, the systems influenced by NO3 oxidation contained more high molecular weight products (MW >400 amu), suggesting the importance of oligomerization mechanisms in NO3-initiated SOA formation. α-pinene, which showed anomalously low aerosol mass yields in the presence of NO2, showed no increase in these oligomer peaks, suggesting that lack of oligomer formation is a likely cause of α-pinene's near 0% yields with NO3. Through direct comparisons of mixed-oxidant systems, this work suggests that NO3 is likely to dominate nighttime oxidation pathways in most regions with both biogenic and anthropogenic influences. Therefore, accurately constraining SOA yields from NO3 oxidation, which vary substantially with the VOC precursor, is essential in predicting nighttime aerosol production.

  16. A qualitative comparison of secondary organic aerosol yields and composition from ozonolysis of monoterpenes at varying concentrations of NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, D. C.; Farmer, D. K.; Desyaterik, Y.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene, β-pinene, Δ3-carene, and limonene was investigated using a dark flow-through reaction chamber. SOA mass yields were calculated for each monoterpene from ozonolysis with varying NO2 concentrations. Kinetics modeling of the first-generation gas-phase chemistry suggests that differences in observed aerosol yields for different NO2 concentrations are consistent with NO3 formation and subsequent competition between O3 and NO3 to oxidize each monoterpene. α-Pinene was the only monoterpene studied that showed a systematic decrease in both aerosol number concentration and mass concentration with increasing [NO2]. β-Pinene and Δ3-carene produced fewer particles at higher [NO2], but both retained moderate mass yields. Limonene exhibited both higher number concentrations and greater mass concentrations at higher [NO2]. SOA from each experiment was collected and analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS, enabling comparisons between product distributions for each system. In general, the systems influenced by NO3 oxidation contained more high molecular weight products (MW > 400 amu), suggesting the importance of oligomerization mechanisms in NO3-initiated SOA formation. α-Pinene, which showed anomalously low aerosol mass yields in the presence of NO2, showed no increase in these oligomer peaks, suggesting that lack of oligomer formation is a likely cause of α-pinene's near 0 % yields with NO3. Through direct comparisons of mixed-oxidant systems, this work suggests that NO3 is likely to dominate nighttime oxidation pathways in most regions with both biogenic and anthropogenic influences. Therefore, accurately constraining SOA yields from NO3 oxidation, which vary substantially with the volatile organic compound precursor, is essential in predicting nighttime aerosol production.

  17. Technical note: An improved approach to determining background aerosol concentrations with PILS sampling on aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Christine S.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Ryan Fulgham, S.; Murschell, Trey; Borch, Thomas; Smith, James N.; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-into-Liquid Samplers (PILS) have become a standard aerosol collection technique, and are widely used in both ground and aircraft measurements in conjunction with off-line ion chromatography (IC) measurements. Accurate and precise background samples are essential to account for gas-phase components not efficiently removed and any interference in the instrument lines, collection vials or off-line analysis procedures. For aircraft sampling with PILS, backgrounds are typically taken with in-line filters to remove particles prior to sample collection once or twice per flight with more numerous backgrounds taken on the ground. Here, we use data collected during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) to demonstrate that not only are multiple background filter samples are essential to attain a representative background, but that the chemical background signals do not follow the Gaussian statistics typically assumed. Instead, the background signals for all chemical components analyzed from 137 background samples (taken from ∼78 total sampling hours over 18 flights) follow a log-normal distribution, meaning that the typical approaches of averaging background samples and/or assuming a Gaussian distribution cause an over-estimation of background samples - and thus an underestimation of sample concentrations. Our approach of deriving backgrounds from the peak of the log-normal distribution results in detection limits of 0.25, 0.32, 3.9, 0.17, 0.75 and 0.57 μg m-3 for sub-micron aerosol nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), ammonium (NH4+), sulfate (SO42-), potassium (K+) and calcium (Ca2+), respectively. The difference in backgrounds calculated from assuming a Gaussian distribution versus a log-normal distribution were most extreme for NH4+, resulting in a background that was 1.58× that determined from fitting a log-normal distribution.

  18. Role of aldehyde chemistry and NOx concentrations in secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Chan, M. N.; Surratt, J. D.; Chhabra, P. S.; Loza, C. L.; Crounse, J. D.; Yee, L. D.; Flagan, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-08-01

    Aldehydes are an important class of products from atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons. Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), the most abundantly emitted atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbon, produces a significant amount of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via methacrolein (a C4-unsaturated aldehyde) under urban high-NOx conditions. Previously, we have identified peroxy methacryloyl nitrate (MPAN) as the important intermediate to isoprene and methacrolein SOA in this NOx regime. Here we show that as a result of this chemistry, NO2 enhances SOA formation from methacrolein and two other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, specifically acrolein and crotonaldehyde, a NOx effect on SOA formation previously unrecognized. Oligoesters of dihydroxycarboxylic acids and hydroxynitrooxycarboxylic acids are observed to increase with increasing NO2/NO ratio, and previous characterizations are confirmed by both online and offline high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques. Molecular structure also determines the amount of SOA formation, as the SOA mass yields are the highest for aldehydes that are α, β-unsaturated and contain an additional methyl group on the α-carbon. Aerosol formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232) is insignificant, even under high-NO2 conditions, as PAN (peroxy acyl nitrate, RC(O)OONO2) formation is structurally unfavorable. At atmospherically relevant NO2/NO ratios (3-8), the SOA yields from isoprene high-NOx photooxidation are 3 times greater than previously measured at lower NO2/NO ratios. At sufficiently high NO2 concentrations, in systems of α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, SOA formation from subsequent oxidation of products from acyl peroxyl radicals+NO2 can exceed that from RO2+HO2 reactions under the same inorganic seed conditions, making RO2+NO2 an important channel for SOA formation.

  19. Role of aldehyde chemistry and NOx concentrations in secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Chan, M. N.; Surratt, J. D.; Chhabra, P. S.; Loza, C. L.; Crounse, J. D.; Yee, L. D.; Flagan, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    Aldehydes are an important class of products from atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons. Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), the most abundantly emitted atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbon, produces a significant amount of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via methacrolein (a C4-unsaturated aldehyde) under urban high-NOx conditions. Previously, we have identified peroxy methacryloyl nitrate (MPAN) as the important intermediate to isoprene and methacrolein SOA in this NOx regime. Here we show that as a result of this chemistry, NO2 enhances SOA formation from methacrolein and two other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, specifically acrolein and crotonaldehyde, a NOx effect on SOA formation previously unrecognized. Oligoesters of dihydroxycarboxylic acids and hydroxynitrooxycarboxylic acids are observed to increase with increasing NO2/NO ratio, and previous characterizations are confirmed by both online and offline high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques. Molecular structure also determines the amount of SOA formation, as the SOA mass yields are the highest for aldehydes that are α, β-unsaturated and contain an additional methyl group on the α-carbon. Aerosol formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232) is insignificant, even under high-NO2 conditions, as PAN (peroxy acyl nitrate, RC(O)OONO2) formation is structurally unfavorable. At atmospherically relevant NO2/NO ratios, the SOA yields from isoprene high-NOxphotooxidation are 3 times greater than previously measured at lower NO2/NO ratios. At sufficiently high NO2 concentrations, in systems of α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, SOA formation from subsequent oxidation of products from acyl peroxyl radicals+NO2 can exceed that from RO2+HO2 reactions under the same inorganic seed conditions, making RO2+NO2 an important channel for SOA formation.

  20. Observations of accumulation mode aerosol composition and soot carbon concentrations by means of a high-temperature volatility technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael H.; O'Dowd, Colin D.

    1996-08-01

    A high-temperature volatility system has been deployed for the measurement of the composition and concentration of the accumulation mode aerosol (0.05 μm < r < 1 μm) within the atmospheric boundary layer. This instrumentation comprises a volatility system based around a Particle Measuring Systems ASASP-X optical particle counter, which was operated together with an aethalometer for the direct observation of soot carbon concentrations. By cycling the heater tube through a range of temperatures from near ambient to over 1000°C, size-differentiated information upon aerosol composition may be obtained. Furthermore, by careful selection of analysis temperatures, discrimination is possible between elemental carbon and the more volatile fractions of the soot carbon aerosol. Observations made over the North Sea near the Dutch coast and in the central United Kingdom are presented for differing environmental conditions with soot carbon concentrations ranging from about 100 to over 6000 ng m-3. For polluted conditions over the North Sea the volatility technique clearly showed the dominance of soot carbon particles over other aerosol components with a narrow carbon particle distribution of mode radius around 0.06 μm accounting for about 80% of all particles with radii below 0.1 μm. Under polluted conditions, only about 25% of the total soot carbon aerosol comprised elemental carbon (with the remainder consisting of more volatile material), whereas this proportion rose to around 50% in the lower carbon loadings found in a cleaner maritime air mass. The use of soot carbon loadings as a tracer of anthropogenic aerosol inputs to oceanic regions is explored on the basis of measurements from a NE Atlantic cruise.

  1. Study of satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth spatial resolution effect on particulate matter concentration prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandgren, J.; Mei, L.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) spatial resolution effect is investigated for the linear correlation between satellite retrieved AOD and ground level particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5). The Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm was developed for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for obtaining AOD with a high spatial resolution of 1 km and provides a good dataset for the study of the AOD spatial resolution effect on the particulate matter concentration prediction. 946 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground monitoring stations across the contiguous US have been used to investigate the linear correlation between AOD and PM2.5 using AOD at different spatial resolutions (1, 3 and 10 km) and for different spatial scales (urban scale, meso-scale and continental scale). The main conclusions are: (1) for both urban, meso- and continental scale the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD increased significantly with increasing spatial resolution of the AOD, (2) the correlation between AOD and PM2.5 decreased significantly as the scale of study region increased for the eastern part of the US while vice versa for the western part of the US, (3) the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD is much more stable and better over the eastern part of the US compared to western part due to the surface characteristics and atmospheric conditions like the fine mode fraction.

  2. The potential of LIRIC to validate the vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration estimated by an air quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Filoglou, Maria; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyros; Melas, Dimitris; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Balis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by a retrieval algorithm that uses combined sunphotometer and LIDAR data (LIRIC) were used in order to validate the mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. LIDAR and CIMEL measurements of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki were used for this validation.The aerosol mass concentration profiles of the fine and coarse mode derived by CAMx were compared with the respective profiles derived by the retrieval algorithm. For the coarse mode particles, forecasts of the Saharan dust transportation model BSC-DREAM8bV2 were also taken into account. Each of the retrieval algorithm's profiles were matched to the models' profile with the best agreement within a time window of four hours before and after the central measurement. OPAC, a software than can provide optical properties of aerosol mixtures, was also employed in order to calculate the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values for 355nm and 532nm for each of the model's profiles aiming in a comparison with the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values derived by the retrieval algorithm for each measurement. The comparisons between the fine mode aerosol concentration profiles resulted in a good agreement between CAMx and the retrieval algorithm, with the vertical mean bias error never exceeding 7 μgr/m3. Concerning the aerosol coarse mode concentration profiles both CAMx and BSC-DREAM8bV2 values are severely underestimated, although, in cases of Saharan dust transportation events there is an agreement between the profiles of BSC-DREAM8bV2 model and the retrieval algorithm.

  3. Gravity-wave effects on tracer gases and stratospheric aerosol concentrations during the 2013 ChArMEx campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chane Ming, Fabrice; Vignelles, Damien; Jegou, Fabrice; Berthet, Gwenael; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Gheusi, François; Kuleshov, Yuriy

    2016-07-01

    Coupled balloon-borne observations of Light Optical Aerosol Counter (LOAC), M10 meteorological global positioning system (GPS) sondes, ozonesondes, and GPS radio occultation data, are examined to identify gravity-wave (GW)-induced fluctuations on tracer gases and on the vertical distribution of stratospheric aerosol concentrations during the 2013 ChArMEx (Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) campaign. Observations reveal signatures of GWs with short vertical wavelengths less than 4 km in dynamical parameters and tracer constituents, which are also correlated with the presence of thin layers of strong local enhancements of aerosol concentrations in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere. In particular, this is evident from a case study above Ile du Levant (43.02° N, 6.46° E) on 26-29 July 2013. Observations show a strong activity of dominant mesoscale inertia GWs with horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 370-510 km and 2-3 km respectively, and periods of 10-13 h propagating southward at altitudes of 13-20 km during 27-28 July. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses also show evidence of mesoscale inertia GWs with similar horizontal characteristics above the eastern part of France. Ray-tracing experiments indicate the jet-front system as the main source of observed GWs. Using a simplified linear GW theory, synthetic vertical profiles of dynamical parameters with large stratospheric vertical wind maximum oscillations of ±40 mms-1 are produced for the dominant mesoscale GW observed at heights of 13-20 km. Parcel advection method reveals signatures of GWs in the ozone mixing ratio and the tropospheric-specific humidity. Simulated vertical wind perturbations of the dominant GWs and small-scale perturbations of aerosol concentration (aerosol size of 0.2-0.7 µm) are revealed to be in phase in the lower stratosphere. Present results support the importance of vertical wind perturbations in the GW-aerosol relationship

  4. Opposite seasonality of the aerosol optical depth and the surface particulate matter concentration over the north China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wenjun; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoye; Sheng, Lifang; Wang, Wencai

    2016-02-01

    Great difference exists in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) between summer and winter over the North China Plain (NCP). Monthly mean AOD at 550 nm derived from the MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) products during 2000-2014 over the area of 30-40° N and 110-125° E exhibits an annual maximum in June (0.855 ± 0.130) and a minimum in December (0.381 ± 0.032). This seasonality of AOD is in the opposite phase with the surface particulate matter (PM) concentration (higher in winter and lower in summer). The possible causes for the higher AOD in June (compared with December) include (a) a higher boundary layer height (BLH) that results in more efficient transport and mixing of aerosol particles to a higher altitude (corresponding to a lower particle concentration near surface) as revealed by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations profile, (b) a higher relative humidity (RH) due to the inshore monsoon circulation that leads to enhancement of aerosol extinction, (c) emission from the regional open stalk burning in the summer harvest season (as seen from MODIS fire products), and (d) the typical eastward open topographical basin over NCP. Under the assumption that the aerosol and water vapor are well mixed within the boundary layer, analysis on multi-year average shows that the differences in BLH, RH and surface PM concentration can explain up to 81% of the variance of monthly averaged AOD over NCP. A preliminarily hypothesis is also suggested to interpret the shift of AOD pattern from winter to summer with an abrupt increase of AOD from May to June, as well as an increase of surface PM2.5 concentration over NCP during the early phase of northward progress of the East Asia summer monsoon front.

  5. On the concentration and size distribution of sub-micron aerosol in the Galápagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorribas, M.; Gómez Martín, J. C.; Hay, T. D.; Mahajan, A. S.; Cuevas, C. A.; Agama Reyes, M. V.; Paredes Mora, F.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2015-12-01

    During the CHARLEX campaign in the Galápagos Islands, a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer was deployed on San Cristobal Island in July-August 2011 to carry out size-resolved measurements of the concentration of submicron aerosols. To our knowledge these are the first measurements of aerosol concentrations in this unique environment. The particles with marine origin displayed a tri-modal number size distribution with peak diameters of 0.016 μm, 0.050 μm and 0.174 μm and a cloud-processed intermodal minimum at 0.093 μm. The mean total aerosol number concentration for the marine contribution was 470 ± 160 cm-3. A low particle concentration of 70 ± 50 cm-3 for the nucleation size range was measured, but no evidence of new particle production in the atmospheric marine boundary layer (MBL) was observed. The concentration of the Aitken size mode was found to be related to aerosol entrainment from the free troposphere off the coast of Chile followed by transport within the MBL to the Galápagos Islands. Cloud processing may activate the particles in the Aitken size range, growing through 'in-cloud' sulphate production and increasing the particle concentration in the accumulation size range. The 0.093 μm cloud processed minima suggests that the critical supersaturation at which the particle is activated to a cloud droplet is in the 0.14-0.21% range. The daytime marine particle background concentration was influenced by human activity around the sampling site, as well as by new particle formation triggered by biogenic emissions from the vegetation cover of the island's semiarid lowlands. Effective CCN formation may play a role in the formation and properties of the stratus clouds, which permanently cover the top of the windward side of the islands and establish one of their characteristic climatic bands.

  6. Concentrations and sources of aerosol ions and trace elements during ANTCI-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Zeng, T.; Davis, D.; Wang, Y.; Khaing, H.; Nesbit, C.; Huey, G.

    As part of the Antarctic Tropospheric Chemistry Investigation (ANTCI), bulk aerosol-particle samples collected at the South Pole were analyzed for nitrate, sulfate, methanesulfonate (MSA), selected trace elements and radionuclides. The samples were collected in the same manner as in the Investigation of Sulfur Chemistry in the Antarctic Troposphere (ISCAT) campaigns of 1998 and 2000. The ANTCI mean sulfate (124 ng m -3) and MSA (9.1 ng m -3) concentrations were comparable to those during ISCAT, but high MSA and sodium and high MSA/sulfate in late November/early December indicated pervasive maritime influences during that time. Trajectory analyses indicate that the Weddell Sea and the Southern Ocean near Wilkes Land were probable sources for the ocean-derived sulfate. The transport of marine air occurs mainly in the buffer layer or free troposphere, and the rapid oxidation of biogenic sulfur to SO 2 appears to be the basis for the observed low MSA/sulfate ratios. Elements typically associated with mineral dust (Al, Fe, K) and other elements with continental sources (Pb, Sb, Zn) had higher concentrations during ANTCI than ISCAT. The mean filterable nitrate (f-NO 3-) concentration (280 ng m -3) also was conspicuously higher than during ISCAT (39 and 150 ng m -3). Several peaks in f-NO 3- were synchronous with those for MSA and sulfate, but some samples had high f-NO 3- but neither high MSA nor sulfate. While there is some evidence that nitrate or nitric acid is transported to SP from distant sources, local emissions of nitrogen oxides from the snow are a far more important source overall.

  7. On-line analysis of urban particulate matter focusing on elevated wintertime aerosol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Phillip V; Evans, Greg J; Tsai, Julia; Owega, Sandy; Fila, Michael S; Malpica, Oscar; Brook, Jeffrey R

    2002-08-15

    A 10-day winter sampling campaign was conducted in downtown Toronto for particulate matter (PM) air pollution in the fine (<2.5 microm) size range. An aerosol laser ablation mass spectrometer (LAMS), a tapered-element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) were operated in parallel to characterize the PM on-line. In this study, the LAMS observed differences in the chemical composition between three separate episodes with higher PM2.5 mass and APS counts. LAMS results showed that in one instance of elevated PM, organic amines were present in the particulates. Temporal analyses of this episode revealed chemical transformations as the amines, characterized by m/z peaks 58(C3HeN)+, 86(C5H2N)+, and nitrates, increased in number concentration while Ca and hydrocarbon particle classes concurrently decreased. On another day, sulfates were found to have increased significantly. The third event was only 4 h in duration and exhibited an increase in the number of submicron-sized K/hydrocarbons and sulfate-containing particles. In this last event, the hydrocarbons and a K to Fe ratio enrichment indicated there was likely a contribution from a combustion source. This work offers some of the first insights into single particle size and chemistry in a cold winter climate.

  8. Comparison of Satellite Observations of Aerosol Optical Depth to Surface Monitor Fine Particle Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Mary M.; AlSaadi, Jassim A.; Neil, Doreen O.; Pierce, Robert B.; Pippin, Margartet R.; Roell, Marilee M.; Kittaka, Chieko; Szykman, James J.

    2004-01-01

    Under NASA's Earth Science Applications Program, the Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications (IDEA) project examined the relationship between satellite observations and surface monitors of air pollutants to facilitate a more capable and integrated observing network. This report provides a comparison of satellite aerosol optical depth to surface monitor fine particle concentration observations for the month of September 2003 at more than 300 individual locations in the continental US. During September 2003, IDEA provided prototype, near real-time data-fusion products to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) directed toward improving the accuracy of EPA s next-day Air Quality Index (AQI) forecasts. Researchers from NASA Langley Research Center and EPA used data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument combined with EPA ground network data to create a NASA-data-enhanced Forecast Tool. Air quality forecasters used this tool to prepare their forecasts of particle pollution, or particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), for the next-day AQI. The archived data provide a rich resource for further studies and analysis. The IDEA project uses data sets and models developed for tropospheric chemistry research to assist federal, state, and local agencies in making decisions concerning air quality management to protect public health.

  9. SAM 2 Measurements of the Polar Stratospheric Aerosol, volume 2. April 1979 to October 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Steele, H. M.; Hamill, P.

    1982-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor is abroad the Earth orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft proving extinction measurements of the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosol with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages of aerosol data and corresponding temperature profiles for the time and place of each SAM II measurement (April 29, 1979, to October 27, 1979) is presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time were plotted and weekly aerosol optical depths were calculated. Seasonal variations and variations in space (altitude and longitude) for both polar regions are easily seen. Typical values of aerosol extinction at the SAM II wavelength of 1.0 micron for the time priod were 1 to 3 x 10 to the -4th power km -1 in the main stratospheric aerosol layer. Optical depths for the stratosphere were about 0.002. Polar stratospheric clouds at altitudes between the tropopause and 20 km were observed during the Antarctic winter at various times and locations. A ready-to-use format containing a representative sample of the second 6 months of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies is presented.

  10. Sensitivity of modelled sulfate aerosol and its radiative effect on climate to ocean DMS concentration and air-sea flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesdal, Jan-Erik; Christian, James R.; Monahan, Adam H.; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-09-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is a well-known marine trace gas that is emitted from the ocean and subsequently oxidizes to sulfate in the atmosphere. Sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere have direct and indirect effects on the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Thus, as a potential source of sulfate, ocean efflux of DMS needs to be accounted for in climate studies. Seawater concentration of DMS is highly variable in space and time, which in turn leads to high spatial and temporal variability in ocean DMS emissions. Because of sparse sampling (in both space and time), large uncertainties remain regarding ocean DMS concentration. In this study, we use an atmospheric general circulation model with explicit aerosol chemistry (CanAM4.1) and several climatologies of surface ocean DMS concentration to assess uncertainties about the climate impact of ocean DMS efflux. Despite substantial variation in the spatial pattern and seasonal evolution of simulated DMS fluxes, the global-mean radiative effect of sulfate is approximately linearly proportional to the global-mean surface flux of DMS; the spatial and temporal distribution of ocean DMS efflux has only a minor effect on the global radiation budget. The effect of the spatial structure, however, generates statistically significant changes in the global-mean concentrations of some aerosol species. The effect of seasonality on the net radiative effect is larger than that of spatial distribution and is significant at global scale.

  11. Synergistic interaction of ozone and respirable aerosols on rat lungs. II. Synergy between ammonium sulfate aerosol and various concentrations of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, D.L.; Guth, D.J.; Last, J.A.

    1986-07-01

    Pulmonary responses after continuous exposure of rats to concentrations of ozone (O3) ranging from 0.12 to 0.64 ppm were quantified by measuring tissue collagen synthesis rate, tissue protein and DNA content, and various constituents of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. After 7 days of exposure to 0.64 ppm of O3, lung collagen synthesis rate and tissue content of protein and DNA were elevated. After shorter durations of exposure to 0.64 ppm of O3, significant elevations were observed in the protein content and the activities of lactate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase from lavage fluid. After exposure of rats to 0.20 ppm of O3 for 7 days, changes could be detected in both lung collagen synthesis rate and tissue protein content. Total lavagable protein content, a sensitive indicator for O3-induced effects upon the lung, was significantly elevated in lungs of rats exposed to 0.12 or 0.20 ppm of O3. To examine whether a synergistic interaction occurred between 0.20 or 0.64 ppm of O3 and acid aerosols, rats were continuously exposed to O3 with and without concurrent exposure to 5 mg/m3 of ammonium sulfate. A synergistic interaction between 0.20 ppm of O3 and ammonium sulfate aerosol was observed by measurement of total lavagable protein and of lung collagen synthesis rate. These results demonstrate that ammonium sulfate aerosol interacts synergistically with O3 at concentrations of O3 that approach ambient levels.

  12. Aerosols and gases concentrations observed at Stelvio National Park (Italian Alps) during summer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, T. C.; Marinoni, A.; Cristofanelli, P.; Bonafè, U.; Calzolari, F.; Duchi, R.; Laj, P.; Villani, P.; Bonasoni, P.

    2012-04-01

    Three summer fields campaigns were carried out during 2009, 2010 and 2011 in two sites in the area of Stelvio National Park (SNP), Central Italian Alps. Those activities were performed in the frame of the SHARE - Stelvio project (Station at High Altitude for Research on the Environment). SNP includes an extensive impervious territory of valleys and high mountains, up to 3900 m asl. Two high altitude sampling sites, Rifugio Guasti (3285 m asl) and Forni glacier ( 2700 m asl), have been picked out for collecting the main atmospheric parameters: the first site hosted the field campaign in 2009 and 2010 and was located at Cevedale pass, at the border between Lombardia and Trentino-Alto Adige regions, while in 2011 the measurements were carried out on Forni glacier surface, in a N-S oriented valley, through SHARE-box, a portable and autonomous unit for atmospheric measurements developed in the framework of SHARE project. Because of different location Rifugio Guasti is an ideal site to monitor long range transport on Southern slope of Alpine range, while Forni glacier is more affected by local influence of valley and glacier breezes. Monitored parameters concerned (i) meteorology, such as air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, air pressure, (ii) chemical and physical properties of the aerosols (number concentrations, size distribution and chemical composition) and (iii) , gases concentration (CO2, O3). This work is aimed at describing the behaviour of these compounds, in terms of concentration observed over different time scales, such hourly and daily, in order to investigate the impact of transport processes (i.e. air masses transports arisen from both "thermal" breezes or synoptic circulation) on aerosols and gases variability at SNP. The Alps face the Po Valley, one of the more populated and industrialized region in Europe. This is one of the most probable source of polluted air masses which spread towards high altitude sites, such as Alps and

  13. A method for retrieving vertical distribution of aerosol mass concentration in atmosphere from results of lidar sensing at Nd:YAG laser wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2011-03-01

    A method for retrieving the vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosol concentration from the results of lidar sensing at Ng:YAG laser wavelengths is developed based on the found multiple regressions between the optical location characteristics of aerosol at wavelengths of 0.355, 0.532, and 1.064 nm, as well as between the aerosol backscattering coefficient at these wavelengths and the concentration of aerosol particles. The method does not require solving ill-posed inverse problems and minimizes the use of a priori information. The reliability and generality of regressions obtained are confirmed by their good agreement with the AERO-NET data. The method efficiency is demonstrated by numerical experiments on retrieving profiles of back-scattering coefficients and concentration that corresponds to different optical models of aerosol.

  14. Comparison of POLDER Derived Aerosol Optical Thickness to Surface Monitor Fine Particle Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, J.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Chiapello, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Particulate Matter (PM) mass measured at the ground level is a common way to quantify the amount of aerosol particles in the atmosphere and is used as a standard to evaluate air quality. Satellite remote sensing is well suited for a daily monitoring of the aerosol load. However, there are no straightforward relationship between aerosol optical properties derived from the satellite sensor and the PM mass at the ground. This paper is focused on the use of Polarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectance (POLDER-2) derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT) for the monitoring of PM2.5. We present a correlation study between PM2.5 data collected in the frame of the French Environmental protection agency, aerosol optical properties derived from Sun photometer measurements, and POLDER derived-AOT over the land. POLDER AOT retrieval algorithm over the land is based on the use of the measurement of the linear polarized light in the 670 nm and 865 nm channels. We show that only the fine fraction (below 0.3 μm) of the aerosol size distribution contributes to the signal in polarization and then to the POLDER derived-AOT and then is well suited for monitoring of fine particle. The correlation between POLDER AOT and PM2.5 is significant (R between 0.6 and 0.7) over several sites. We present a tentative evaluation of Air Quality Categories from satellite data.

  15. Retrieval of spatial field of atmospheric aerosol concentration according to data from local measurements: A modification of the method of back trajectory statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubny, V. A.; Nagovitsyna, E. S.

    2013-07-01

    The well-known method of the back trajectory statistics (BTS) is used to develop a new approach to estimating atmospheric pollution fields according to local measurements. On the basis of instrumental measurements at one or a few monitoring points and information on atmospheric dynamics (in this work, back trajectories of the motion of air particles), the BTS method makes it possible to estimate the spatial structure of fields of a measured quantity. Results from solving a simplified demonstration of estimating the spatial distribution of the volume concentration of a fine aerosol fraction are presented; these results were obtained on the basis of an analysis of photometric measurements in the period of 2004-2010 at six AERO-NET monitoring sites on the territory of Russia: Zvenigorod, Moscow, Yekaterinburg, Tomsk, Yakutsk, and Ussuriisk.

  16. SAM 2 measurements of the polar stratospheric aerosol. Volume 9: October 1982-April 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Mcmaster, L.R.; Powell, K.A.

    1991-02-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor aboard Nimbus 7 is providing 1.0 micron extinction measurements of Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosols with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages including corresponding temperature profiles provided by NOAA for the time and place of each SAM II measurement are presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time are plotted, and aerosol optical depths are calculated for each week. Typical values of aerosol extinction and stratospheric optical depth in the Arctic are unusually large due to the presence of material from the El Chichon volcano eruption in the Spring of 1982. For example, the optical depth peaked at 0.068, more than 50 times background values. Typical values of aerosol extinction and stratospheric optical depth in the Antarctic varied considerably during this period due to the transport and arrival of the material from the El Chichon eruption. For example, the stratospheric optical depth varied from 0.002 in October 1982, to 0.021 in January 1983. Polar stratospheric clouds were observed during the Arctic winter, as expected. A representative sample is provided of the ninth 6-month period of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies.

  17. Concentrations of iodine isotopes ((129)I and (127)I) and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from Northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Daraoui, A; Riebe, B; Walther, C; Wershofen, H; Schlosser, C; Vockenhuber, C; Synal, H-A

    2016-04-01

    New data about (129)I, (127)I concentrations and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from the trace survey station of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig, Northern Germany, are presented and discussed in this paper. The investigated samples were collected on a weekly basis during the years 2011 to 2013. Iodine was extracted from aerosol filters using a strong basic solution and was separated from the matrix elements with chloroform and was analysed by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for (129)I and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for (127)I. The concentrations of (127)I and (129)I in aerosol filters ranged from 0.31 to 3.71 ng m(-3) and from 0.06 to 0.75 fg m(-3), respectively. The results of (129)I/(127)I isotopic ratios were in the order 10(-8) to 10(-7). The (129)I originated directly from gaseous emissions and indirectly from liquid emissions (via sea spray) from the reprocessing plants in Sellafield and La Hague. In comparison with the results of (131)I after the Fukushima accident, no contribution of (129)I from this accident was detectable in Central Europe due to the high background originating from the (129)I releases of the European reprocessing plants. (129)I atmospheric activity concentrations were compared with those of an anthropogenic radionuclide ((85)Kr). We did not find any correlation between (129)I and (85)Kr, both having nuclear reprocessing plant as the main source.

  18. n-Alkanoic monocarboxylic acid concentrations in urban and rural aerosols: Seasonal dependence and major sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannigrahi, Ardhendu S.; Pettersson, Jan B. C.; Langer, Sarka; Arrhenius, Karine; Hagström, Magnus; Janhäll, Sara; Hallquist, Mattias; Pathak, Ravi Kant

    2014-06-01

    We report new data on the abundance and distribution of n-monocarboxylic acids (n-MCAs) in fine- and coarse-mode aerosols in rural and urban areas of Sweden, and determine their possible sources. Overall, C6-C16n-MCAs accounted for ~ 0.5-1.2% of the total PM10 (particulate matter ≤ 10 μm) mass. In general, the C12-C16 fraction was the most abundant (> 75%), with the exception of wintertime samples from a rural site, where C6-C11 acids accounted for 65% of the total C6-C16n-MCA mass. Positive matrix factorization analysis revealed four major sources of n-MCAs: traffic emissions, wood combustion, microbial activity, and a fourth factor that was dominated by semi-volatile n-MCAs. Traffic emissions were important in the urban environment in both seasons and at the rural site during winters, and were a major source of C9-C11 acids. Wood combustion was a significant source at urban sites during the winter and also to some extent at the rural site in both seasons. This is consistent with the use of wood for domestic heating but may also be related to meat cooking. Thus, during the winter, traffic, wood combustion and microbial activity were all important sources in the urban environment, while traffic was the dominant source at the rural site. During the summer, there was considerable day-to-day variation in n-MCA concentrations but microbial activity was the dominant source. The semi-volatile low molecular weight C6-C8 acids accounted for a small (~ 5-10%) fraction of the total mass of n-MCAs. This factor is unlikely to be linked to a single source and its influence instead reflects the partitioning of these compounds between the gas and particle phases. This would explain their greater contribution during the winter.

  19. Vertical profile of elemental concentrations in aerosol particles in the Bermuda area during GCE/CASE/WATOX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, G.; Sievering, H.

    1990-06-01

    During the 1988 Global Change Expedition/Coordinated Air-Sea Experiment/Western Atlantic Ocean Experiment (GCE/CASE/WATOX) joint effort, research was conducted to determine elemental concentrations in atmospheric aerosol particles near Bermuda, to construct a three-level (15, 150, and 2600 m ASL) vertical profile of these concentrations, and to ascertain the source of the particles. Samples were collected by the NOAA King Air aircraft and NOAA ship Mt. Mitchell on July 24-28, 1988. Concentration determinations were made for 16 elements through the use of an X ray fluorescence instrument designed for analysis of small-mass samples. A layering effect was found; concentrations of several elements at 150 m were more than twice their respective concentrations at 15 m and 2600 m. Enrichment factors, V/Mn ratio, and correlations between concentrations suggest a Saharan mineral source, despite air mass back trajectories that show no direct continental input for up to 10 days prior to sample collection. Estimated total mineral aerosol concentrations at 15 m, 150 m, and 2600 m are 1.5, 4.1, and 2.1 μg m-3.

  20. Development of a high-volume concentrated ambient particles system (CAPS) for human and animal inhalation toxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Demokritou, Philip; Gupta, Tarun; Ferguson, Stephen; Koutrakis, Petros

    2003-02-01

    A two-stage, high-volume, ambient particle concentrator was developed and characterized. This versatile system, depending on its operational parameters, can be used to fractionate and concentrate particles in three size ranges (PM(10-2.5), PM(10-1), PM(2.5-1)). The performance of this concentrated ambient particle system (CAPS), as well as its individual virtual impaction stages, was investigated as a function of several parameters, including minor-to-total flow ratios and acceleration nozzle Reynolds number. During these laboratory tests, performance parameters such as concentration enrichment factor (CF), particle losses, collection efficiency curves, cutpoint, and pressure drop were measured. The main objective of these investigations was to optimize the ability of the system to concentrate ambient PM(2.5-10) and PM(1-10) particles. PM(2.5-10) particles were concentrated by a factor of 70 to 150. The flow rate of the concentrated aerosol can range between 12.5 and 50 LPM (L/min). Other features of the system include relatively low-pressure drops in the major and minor flows, low particle losses, and a compact design. Performance evaluation of the system also confirmed that separation and concentration of the PM(2.5-10) particles occurred without any significant distortion of the size distribution, during the concentration process. Similar results were obtained for the PM(1-10) size range. For this size range, concentration enrichment was 70 times, and again, no particle size distribution distortion was observed. The overall performance of this versatile system makes it suitable for inhalation toxicological studies.

  1. All-dielectric light concentrator to subwavelength volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergeles, S. S.; Sarychev, A. K.; Tartakovsky, G.

    2017-02-01

    Concentration of light into a nanospot is essential for the heat assisted magnetic recording, biomedical imaging, sensing, and nanolasing. We propose a novel all-dielectric optical field concentrator, which focuses the light, pumped through the waveguide, into a hot nanospot, which is much smaller than the wavelength. The dissipative loss, which is characteristic to a plasmonic nanoantenna, is absent in the dielectric concentrator. Therefore, the detrimental thermal effects almost vanish, which gives an opportunity to use the concentrator for the heat-assisted magnetic recording. The electric field is much enhanced in the proposed new device at the vertex of the dielectric beak, which is attached to the dielectric resonator. The resonator in turn is pumped through the special waveguide. The electric field enhancement and concentration is achieved by longitudinal polarization of the beak vertex, which is exposed to em electric field generated by the pumped resonator. The spatial scale of the hot spot, where the field concentrates, is determined by the curvature of the vertex and can be of few nanometers. We take as a design concept the cylindrical waveguide, the spherical resonator, and the elliptic beak. The rectangular, 2.5-dimensional design of the light concentrator is also considered.

  2. Simulation of Long-term Changes in the Surface Ozone and Aerosol Concentrations Based on the Solar Activity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belan, Boris; Antokhin, Pavel; Arshinov, Mikhail; Belan, Sergey; Slyadneva, Tatyana; Tolmachev, Gennadii

    2010-05-01

    Based on the long-term data obtained during previous studies we have found an interrelationship the surface ozone and aerosol content with solar activity. Variation of the concentration of both these atmospheric components have a period close to 11 years that has a 2(3)-year phase lag with respect to solar activity. Analyzing possible causes of such behaviour we discarded hypotheses of the anthropogenic origin of the trend and post-volcanic influence of El Chichon and Penatubo eruptions. It turned out, that variation of aerosol number concentration correlates with atmospheric circulation forms (W, E, and C), which are governed by solar activity. Then we analysed sequentially an ozone mechanism and variations of incoming ultraviolet radiation to determine possible causes of this phenomenon. As a result we found an intermediate process, which consists in the influence of increasing UV radiation on plants. At the beginning of UV radiation increase it is observed suppression of the vegetation. After 1- or 2-year adaptation period its productivity becomes stronger that leads to the emission of additional amount of ozone and aerosol precursors. This hypothesis has been verified using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and gave good results. Prediction of the long-term changes in the surface ozone and aerosol concentrations has been done based on this hypothesis. This work was funded by Presidium of RAS (Program No. 16), Brunch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No 5), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No 08-05-92499), and Federal Agency for Science and Innovation (State Contract № 02.518.11.7153).

  3. AGLITE: a multi-wavelength lidar for measuring emitted aerosol concentrations and fluxes and air motion from agricultural facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Bingham, Gail E.; Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Swasey, Jason A.; Hancock, Jed J.; Crowther, Blake G.; Cornelsen, Scott S.; Marchant, Christian; Cutts, James N.; Huish, David C.; Earl, Curtis L.; Andersen, Jan M.; Cox, McLain L.

    2006-12-01

    AGLITE is a multi-wavelength lidar developed for the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and its program on particle emissions from animal production facilities. The lidar transmitter is a 10 kHz pulsed NdYAG laser at 355, 532 and 1064 nm. We analyze lidar backscatter and extinction to extract aerosol physical properties. All-reflective optics and dichroic and interferometric filters permit all wavelengths to be measured simultaneously, day or night, using photon counting by MTs, an APD, and fast data acquisition. The lidar housing is a transportable trailer suitable for all-weather operation at any accessible site. We direct the laser and telescope FOVs to targets of interest in both azimuth and elevation. The lidar has been applied in atmospheric studies at a swine production farm in Iowa and a dairy in Utah. Prominent aerosol plumes emitted from the swine facility were measured as functions of temperature, turbulence, stability and the animal feed cycle. Particle samplers and turbulence detectors were used by colleagues specializing in those fields. Lidar measurements also focused on air motion as seen by scans of the farm volume. The value of multi-wavelength, eye-safe lidars for agricultural aerosol measurements has been confirmed by the successful operation of AGLITE.

  4. Use of high-volume outdoor smog chamber photo-reactors for studying physical and chemical atmospheric aerosol formation and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter has a large impact on climate, biosphere behaviour and human health. Its study is complex because of large number of species are present at low concentrations and the continuous time evolution, being not easily separable from meteorology, and transport processes. Closed systems have been proposed by isolating specific reactions, pollutants or products and controlling the oxidizing environment. High volume simulation chambers, such as EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE), are an essential tool used to simulate atmospheric photochemical reactions. This communication describes the last results about the reactivity of prominent atmospheric pollutants and the subsequent particulate matter formation. Specific experiments focused on organic aerosols have been developed at the EUPHORE photo-reactor. The use of on-line instrumentation, supported by off-line techniques, has provided well-defined reaction profiles, physical properties, and up to 300 different species are determined in particulate matter. The application fields include the degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollutants, and pesticides under several atmospheric conditions, studying their contribution on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The studies performed at the EUPHORE have improved the mechanistic studies of atmospheric degradation processes and the knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particulate matter formed during these processes.

  5. SAM II measurements of the polar stratospheric aerosol. Volume 6: April to October 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Brandl, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor is aboard the Earth-orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft providing extinction measurements of the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosols with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages of these aerosol data and corresponding temperature profiles (Apr. 1981 to Oct. 1981) are presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time are plotted and weekly aerosol optical depths are calculated. Stratospheric optical depths are 0.002 to 0.003 for the Antarctic region and 0.006 to 0.007 at the beginning to 0.003 to 0.004 at the end of the time period for the Arctic region. Polar stratospheric clouds at altitudes between the tropopause and 20 km were observed during the Antarctic winter. A ready-to-use format containing a representative sample of the sixth 6 months of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies is reported.

  6. CCN concentrations and BC warming influenced by maritime ship emitted aerosol plumes over southern Bay of Bengal

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, M. V.; Devi, Archana

    2016-01-01

    Significant quantities of carbon soot aerosols are emitted into pristine parts of the atmosphere by marine shipping. Soot impacts the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system by absorbing solar-terrestrial radiation and modifies the microphysical properties of clouds. Here we examined the impact of black carbon (BC) on net warming during monsoon season over southern Bay-of-Bengal, using surface and satellite measurements of aerosol plumes from shipping. Shipping plumes had enhanced the BC concentrations by a factor of four around the shipping lane and exerted a strong positive influence on net warming. Compiling all the data, we show that BC atmospheric heating rates for relatively-clean and polluted-shipping corridor locations to be 0.06 and 0.16 K/day respectively within the surface layer. Emissions from maritime ships had directly heated the lower troposphere by two-and-half times and created a gradient of around 0.1 K/day on either side of the shipping corridor. Furthermore, we show that ship emitted aerosol plumes were responsible for increase in the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by an order of magnitude that of clean air. The effects seen here may have significant impact on the monsoonal activity over Bay-of-Bengal and implications for climate change mitigation strategies. PMID:27480275

  7. CCN concentrations and BC warming influenced by maritime ship emitted aerosol plumes over southern Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, M. V.; Devi, Archana

    2016-08-01

    Significant quantities of carbon soot aerosols are emitted into pristine parts of the atmosphere by marine shipping. Soot impacts the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system by absorbing solar-terrestrial radiation and modifies the microphysical properties of clouds. Here we examined the impact of black carbon (BC) on net warming during monsoon season over southern Bay-of-Bengal, using surface and satellite measurements of aerosol plumes from shipping. Shipping plumes had enhanced the BC concentrations by a factor of four around the shipping lane and exerted a strong positive influence on net warming. Compiling all the data, we show that BC atmospheric heating rates for relatively-clean and polluted-shipping corridor locations to be 0.06 and 0.16 K/day respectively within the surface layer. Emissions from maritime ships had directly heated the lower troposphere by two-and-half times and created a gradient of around 0.1 K/day on either side of the shipping corridor. Furthermore, we show that ship emitted aerosol plumes were responsible for increase in the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by an order of magnitude that of clean air. The effects seen here may have significant impact on the monsoonal activity over Bay-of-Bengal and implications for climate change mitigation strategies.

  8. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... 53—Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size... Concentration (µg/m 3) Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement (µg/m 3) Ideal Sampler Fractional...

  9. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... 53—Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size... Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement (µg/m3) Ideal Sampler Fractional...

  10. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... 53—Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size... Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement (µg/m3) Ideal Sampler Fractional...

  11. Aircraft measurements of ozone, NOx, CO, and aerosol concentrations in biomass burning smoke over Indonesia and Australia in October 1997: Depleted ozone layer at low altitude over Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Yukitomo; Sawa, Yousuke; Makino, Yukio; Jensen, Jørgen B.; Gras, John L.; Ryan, Brian F.; Diharto, Sri; Harjanto, Hery

    The 1997 El Niño unfolded as one of the most sever El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in this century and it coincided with massive biomass burning in the equatorial western Pacific region. To assess the influence on the atmosphere, aircraft observations of trace gases and aerosol were conducted over Kalimantan in Indonesia and Australia. Over Kalimantan in Indonesia, high concentrations of O3, NOx, CO, and aerosols were observed during the flight. Although the aerosol and NOx decreased with altitude, the O3 had the maximum concentration (80.5 ppbv) in the middle layer of the smoke haze and recorded very low concentrations (˜20 ppbv) in the lower smoke layer. This feature was not observed in the Australian smoke. We proposed several hypotheses for the low O3 concentration at low levels over Kalimantan. The most likely are lack of solar radiation and losses at the surface of aerosol particles.

  12. Ultrafine calcium aerosol: Generation and use as a sorbent for sulfur in coal combustion. Volume 1, Experimental work: Final report, August 1, 1988--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.K.; Nahar, N.U.; Stewart, G.D.; Prudich, M.E.

    1991-11-01

    Studies conducted at Ohio University and elsewhere have demonstrated that ultrafine aerosols, which have the highest surface area per unit mass, have enhanced potential to efficiently remove sulfur dioxide form combustion gases. Therefore it is proposed to generate a very fine aerosol calcium-rich sorbent (or similar aerosols) for gas conditioning. The aerosol will be generated by vaporization of the sorbent compound and subsequent homogeneous nucleation. In experimental studies liquids as well as solids will be converted into ultrafine aerosols by using suitable aerosol generator. The aerosol generator could be a simple bubbler or a flame spray jet using powders of calcium ``Compounds. Studies will then be carried out, to determine the dynamics of sulfur dioxide capture by the ultrafine aerosol. The primary objective of this research was to generate fine aerosols and to use them for coal combustion SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} gas removal purposes. From the background study on the dry scrubbing system, it can be concluded that the most important experimental parameters are addition ratio, reactor temperature, residence time, total inlet flow rate and inlet SO{sub 2} concentration. Addition ratio is the inlet molar ratio of calcium to sulfur. Before any experimentation, it was necessary to decide and investigate the values of each of the parameters. Each of these parameters were investigated individually and the effects on SO{sub 2} removal were determined.

  13. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomos, N.; Filioglou, M.; Poupkou, A.; Liora, N.; Dimopoulos, S.; Melas, D.; Chaikovsky, A.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC), that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E) from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  14. Ultra-low-volume ground aerosols of technical malathion for the control of Aedes aegypti L

    PubMed Central

    Pant, C. P.; Mount, G. A.; Jatanasen, Sujarti; Mathis, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    The efficacy of malathion aerosols applied from the ground was evaluated for the control of Ae. aegypti. Several techniques for applying the aerosols to an inhabited locality were investigated, and it was found that excellent control of adult mosquitos could be obtained with a dosage of 438 ml/ha. Two treatments carried out 3 days apart enabled the adult mosquito population to be reduced by 99%, and it took about 2 weeks to regain its pretreatment level. Schedules of treatment and strategies to be applied during an epidemic are discussed. PMID:5317014

  15. Trace Gas/Aerosol Boundary Concentrations and their Impacts on Continental-scale AQMEII Modelling Domains

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over twenty modeling groups are participating in the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) in which a variety of mesoscale photochemical and aerosol air quality modeling systems are being applied to continental-scale domains in North America and Europe fo...

  16. Daily variation of organic aerosol concentration and composition in Seoul, Korea during KORUS pre-campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, H. J.; Lee, J.; Choi, A. Y.; Park, S. M.; Park, J. S.; Song, I. H.; Hong, Y. D.

    2015-12-01

    Daily variation of Organic Aerosol (OA) as well as organic tracer compounds have been observed in aerosol samples collected during KORUS-AQ (Korea-US Air Quality Study) pre-campaign (From May 18 to June 12) in Seoul, Korea. NR-PM1 bounded OA was measured by HR-TOF-AMS (Aerodyne) and the temporal variation, composition of OA by family group characterization, and oxidation state of OA was studied. And to distinguish the source characteristics (such as HOA, COA, NOA, SV-OOA, LV-OOA, etc…) of the organic, AMS-PMF model will be used.For the observation of organic tracer compounds, solvent extractable fractions were analyzed by GC-MS. More than 80 organic compounds were detected in the aerosol samples and grouped by source characterized classes, including vehicular emission tracers, biomass burning tracers, coal emission tracers, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers. The main objective of this study is evaluation of the validity of OA fractionation based on the AMS measurement. So, we will compare daily variation of OA composition measured by AMS with daily variation of organic tracer compounds. Further, we will specify source characteristics estimated using AMS-PMF model by comparing the results of source apportionment of OA using PMF of organic tracer compounds.

  17. Regional background aerosols over the Balearic Islands over the last 3 years: ground-based concentrations, atmospheric deposition and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerro, Jose Carlos; Pey, Jorge; Bujosa, Carles; Caballero, Sandra; Alastuey, Andres; Sicard, Michael; Artiñano, Begoña; Querol, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    In the context of the ChArMEx (The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment, https://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) initiative, a 3-year study over a regional background environment (Can Llompart, CLP) in Mallorca has been conducted. Ground-based PM mass concentrations, gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters were continuously registered from 2010 to 2012. Since the beginning of the campaign, PM10 daily samples for chemical determinations were obtained every 4 days, and dry and wet deposition samples were collected every week. Moreover, additional instruments (condensation particle counter, multi-angle absorption photometer, airpointer, sequential high and low volume samplers) were deployed during intensive filed campaigns in 2011 and 2012, as well as the sampling frequency was intensified. In the laboratory, PM samples were analyzed for inorganic compounds, and organic and elemental carbon following different approaches. In addition, n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, antiso-alkanes, levoglucosan, alkanoic acids and cholesterol were determined by GC-MS chromatography in a selection of 30 samples. Mean PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 concentrations in the period 2010-2012 reached 17, 11, and 8 µg/m3 respectively. Mass concentrations displayed marked seasonal trends, with much higher background levels in summer due to stagnant conditions over the western Mediterranean and increased frequency of Saharan dust events. Likewise, diverse-intensity peaks of coarse PM due to African dust inputs were observed along the year. On average, African dust in PM10 accounted for 1.0-1.5 µg/m3. Sporadic pollution events, characterized by most of the particles in the fine mode, were related to the transport of anthropogenic polluted air masses from central and eastern Europe. Wet and dry atmospheric deposition samples are being analyzed to quantify the deposition fluxes for different soluble and insoluble compounds. On average, PM10 composition is made up of organic matter (23%), mineral components (17

  18. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of dilute fluid-particle flows in aerosol concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Sridhar

    2003-07-01

    In this study, commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software, CFX-4.4 has been used for the simulations of aerosol transport through various aerosol-sampling devices. Aerosol transport was modeled as a classical dilute and dispersed two-phase flow problem. Eulerian-Lagrangian framework was adopted wherein the fluid was treated as the continuous phase and aerosol as the dispersed phase, with a one-way coupling between the phases. Initially, performance of the particle transport algorithm implemented in the code was validated against available experimental and numerical data in the literature. Code predictions were found to be in good agreement against experimental data and previous numerical predictions. As a next step, the code was used as a tool to optimize the performance of a virtual impactor prototype. Suggestions on critical geometrical details available in the literature, for a virtual impactor, were numerically investigated on the prototype and the optimum set of parameters was determined. Performance curves were generated for the optimized design at various operating conditions. A computational model of the Linear Slot Virtual Impactor (LSVI) fabricated based on the optimization study, was constructed using the worst-case values of the measured geometrical parameters, with offsets in the horizontal and vertical planes. Simulations were performed on this model for the LSVI operating conditions. Behavior of various sized particles inside the impactor was illustrated with the corresponding particle tracks. Fair agreement was obtained between code predictions and experimental results. Important information on the virtual impactor performance, not known earlier, or, not reported in the literature in the past, obtained from this study, is presented. In the final part of this study, simulations on aerosol deposition in turbulent pipe flow were performed. Code predictions were found to be completely uncorrelated to experimental data. The

  19. Aircraft observations of aerosol and trace gas concentrations in the tropical troposphere up to 12 km during the INCA campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minikin, A.; Baehr, J.; Krejci, R.; Schlager, H.; van Velthoven, P.; Seifert, M.; Ström, J.; Petzold, A.; Schumann, U.

    2003-04-01

    During the EU funded project INCA (Interhemispheric differences in cirrus properties from anthropogenic emissions) the DLR Falcon 20, a German research aircraft with a maximum ceiling of 13~km, carried out measurements of aerosol and trace gas concentrations during transfer from Europe to South America and back in order to obtain meridional cross sections between 50^o~N and 50^o~S. At tropical latitudes the southbound transfer flights were directed along the west coast of South America, whereas the northbound transfer flights passed over Brazil and the central Atlantic Ocean. We report on observational data of number concentrations of Aitken and accumulation mode particles, the fractionation between volatile and non-volatile particles, as well as mixing ratios of carbon monoxide, reactive nitrogen species and ozone. In the tropics aerosol number concentrations above 9~km altitude increase by one order of magnitude, if compared to the sub-tropics and mid-latitudes, most pronounced for refractory particles. These elevated aerosol concentrations occur where 3-dimensional back trajectories originate from the central South American continent (Amazon basin) and have undergone systematic uplifting. The very high fraction of refractory particles, up to 50--60~% of total condensation nuclei, may indicate a strong contribution of continental ground sources. The INCA measurements confirm earlier TROPOZ II observations of an extended upper tropospheric layer of enhanced CO and NO over tropical South America during the wet season. Vertical distributions show a striking increase of CO mixing ratios above 6~km. Corresponding increases of NO and NOy and decreases of ozone were also found. During INCA an anticyclonic flow over tropical South America was persistent in the upper troposphere. This upper-level anticyclone is associated with intense convective activity over the Amazon basin and redistributes the convectively lifted air masses over a large area in the tropical middle

  20. Time-resolved mass concentration, composition and sources of aerosol particles in a metropolitan underground railway station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salma, Imre; Weidinger, Tamás; Maenhaut, Willy

    Aerosol samples were collected using a stacked filter unit (SFU) for PM10-2.0 and PM2.0 size fractions on the platform of a metropolitan underground railway station in downtown Budapest. Temporal variations in the PM10 mass concentration and wind speed and direction were determined with time resolutions of 30 and 4 s using a tapered-element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) and a wind monitor, respectively. Sample analysis involved gravimetry for particulate mass, and particle-induced X-ray emission spectrometry (PIXE) for elemental composition. Diurnal variation of the PM10 mass concentration exhibited two peaks, one at approximately 07:00 h and the other at approximately 17:00 h. The mean±SD PM10 mass concentration for working hours was 155±55 μg m -3. Iron, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Cr concentrations were higher than in outdoor air by factors between 5 and 20, showing substantial enrichment compared to both the average crustal rock composition and the average outdoor aerosol composition. Iron accounted for 40% and 46% of the PM10-2.0 and PM2.0 masses, respectively, and 72% of the PM10 mass was associated with the PM10-2.0 size fraction. The aerosol composition in the metro station (in particular the abundance of the metals mentioned above) is quite different from the average outdoor downtown composition. Mechanical wear and friction of electric conducting rails and bow sliding collectors, ordinary rails and wheels, as well as resuspension, were identified as the primary sources. Possible health implications based on comparison to various limit values and to data available for other underground railways are discussed.

  1. Relationship and variations of aerosol number and PM 10 mass concentrations in a highly polluted urban environment—New Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönkkönen, P.; Uma, R.; Srinivasan, D.; Koponen, I. K.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hämeri, K.; Suresh, R.; Sharma, V. P.; Kulmala, M.

    Measurements of the aerosol number concentration and the PM 10 mass concentrations of urban background aerosols in different seasons were performed in New Delhi 2002, including the simultaneous measurements of NO 2, SO 2 and CO concentrations. The results indicate an interesting relationship between the aerosol number and the PM 10 mass concentrations. The number concentration increases with the mass concentration up to 300 μg m -3. However, after this point, the number concentration decreases even if the mass concentration increases. An explanation for this nonlinear behavior is proposed through a dynamic model involving the coagulation sink concept. The linear relationship between the mass and the number concentration in ambient air is valid if the mass concentration is relatively low. A high sink, however, means that the number concentration cannot be high—resulting in a decline in the number vs. mass plot. Clear diurnal, weekly and seasonal variations in concentrations were observed. High number concentrations of aerosols were observed in the mornings (7-8 a.m.) and in the evenings (7-10 p.m.). The number concentration was highest in March and lowest in June and the mass concentration was highest in November and lowest in June. The number concentration was higher during weekdays, but the mass concentration was higher during weekends. The number concentration correlates with the NO 2 concentration, which indicates that one major source of aerosol particles for the monitored site in New Delhi may be vehicular emission, but also domestic use of fossil fuels and biofuels cannot be neglected.

  2. Long-term comparative study of columnar and surface mass concentration aerosol properties in a background environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennouna, Y. S.; Cachorro, V. E.; Mateos, D.; Burgos, M. A.; Toledano, C.; Torres, B.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between columnar and surface aerosol properties is not a straightforward problem. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (AE), and ground-level Particulate Matter (PMX, x = 10 or 2.5 μm) data have been studied from a climatological point of view. Despite the different meanings of AOD and PMx both are key and complementary quantities that quantify aerosol load in the atmosphere and many studies intend to find specific relationships between them. Related parameters such as AE and PM ratio (PR = PM2.5/PM10), giving information about the predominant particle size, are included in this study on the relationships between columnar and surface aerosol parameters. This study is based on long measurement records (2003-2014) obtained at two nearby background sites from the AERONET and EMEP networks in the north-central area of Spain. The climatological annual cycle of PMx shows two maxima along the year (one in late-winter/early-spring and another in summer), but this cycle is not followed by the AOD which shows only a summer maximum and a nearly bell shape. However, the annual means of both data sets show strong correlation (R = 0.89) and similar decreasing trends of 40% (PM10) and 38% (AOD) for the 12-year record. PM10 and AOD daily data are moderately correlated (R = 0.58), whereas correlation increases for monthly (R = 0.74) and yearly (R = 0.89) means. Scatter plots of AE vs. AOD and PR vs. PM10 have been used to characterize aerosols over the region. The PR vs. AE scatterplot of daily data shows no correlation due to the prevalence of intermediate-sized particles. As day-to-day correlation is low (especially for high turbidity events), a binned analysis was also carried out to establish consistent relationships between columnar and surface quantities, which is considered to be an appropriate approach for environmental and climate studies. In this way the link between surface concentrations and columnar remote sensing data is shown to

  3. Seasonal evolution of anionic, cationic and non-ionic surfactant concentrations in coastal aerosols from Askö, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Violaine; Nozière, Barbara; Baduel, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Surfactants present in atmospheric aerosols are expected to enhance the activation into cloud droplets by acting on one of the two key parameters of the Köhler equation: the surface tension, σ. But because the magnitude of this effect and its regional and temporal variability are still highly uncertain [1,2], various approaches have been developed to evidence it directly in the atmosphere. This work presents the analysis of surfactants present in PM2.5 aerosol fractions collected at the coastal site of Askö, Sweden (58° 49.5' N, 17° 39' E) from July to October 2010. The total surfactant fraction was extracted from the samples using an improved double extraction technique. Surface tension measurements performed with the pendant drop technique [3] indicated the presence of very strong surfactants (σ ~ 30 - 35 mN/m) in these aerosols. In addition, these extractions were combined with colorimetric methods to determine the anionic, cationic and non-ionic surfactant concentrations [4,5], and provided for the first time interference-free surfactant concentrations in atmospheric aerosols. At this site, the total surfactant concentration in the PM2.5 samples varied between 7 to 150 mM and was dominated by anionic and non-ionic ones. The absolute surface tension curves obtained for total surfactant fraction displayed Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) in the range 50 - 400 uM, strongly suggesting a biological origin for the surfactants. The seasonal evolution of these concentrations and their relationships with environmental or meteorological parameters at the site will be discussed. [1] Ekström, S., Nozière, B. et al., Biogeosciences, 2010, 7, 387 [2] Baduel, C., Nozière, B., Jaffrezo, J.-L., Atmos. Environ., 2012, 47, 413 [3] Nozière, B., Baduel, C., Jaffrezo, J.-L., Nat. Commun., 2014, 5, 1 [4] Latif, M. T.; Brimblecombe, P. Environ. Sci. Technol., 2004, 38, 6501 [5] Pacheco e Silva et al., Method to measure surfactant in fluid, 2013, US 2013/0337568 A1

  4. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  5. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m 3)...

  6. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  7. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  8. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m 3)...

  9. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration... Concentration Measurement of PM 2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution Particle Aerodynamic Diameter (µm) Test Sampler Fractional Sampling Effectiveness Interval Mass Concentration (µg/m3) Estimated...

  10. Regional Comparisons of Satellite (AVHRR) and Space Shuttle (MAPS) Derived Estimates of CO and Aerosol Concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vulcan, D. V.; Christopher, S. A.; Welch, R. M.; Connors, V. S.

    1996-01-01

    Biomass burning is considered to be a major source of trace gas species and aerosol particles which play a vital role in tropospheric chemistry and climate. Anthropogenic biomass burning has largely expanded in the last 15 years, due to increased deforestation practices in the Amazon Basin, as well as to clear land for shifting cultivation in South America, southern Asia, and Africa. Biomass burning produces large amounts of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), water, hydrocarbons, nitrous oxides, and smoke particles.

  11. Production Mechanisms, Number Concentration, Size Distribution. Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Petters, Markus; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bates. Tim; O'Dowd, Colin; Reid, Jeff; Lewis, Ernie R.; Gantt, Brett; Anguelova, Magdalena D.; Bhave, Prakash V.; Bird, James; Callaghan, Adrian H.; Ceburnis, Darius; Chang, Rachel; Clark, Antony; deLeeuw, Gerrit; Deane, Grant; DeMott, Paul J.; Elliot, Scott; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Fairall, Chris W.; Hawkins, Lelia; Hu, Yongxiang; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Over forty scientists from six countries convened in Raleigh, NC on June 4-6 2012 to review the status and prospects of sea spray aerosol research. Participants were researchers from the oceanography and atmospheric science communities, including academia, private industry, and government agencies. The recommendations from the working groups are summarized in a science prioritization matrix that is meant to prioritize the research agenda and identify areas of investigation by the magnitude of their impact on proposed science questions. Str

  12. AGLITE: a multiwavelength lidar for aerosol size distributions, flux, and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Bingham, Gail E.; Swasey, Jason A.; Hancock, Jed J.; Crowther, Blake G.; Cornelsen, Scott S.; Marchant, Christian; Cutts, James N.; Huish, David C.; Earl, Curtis L.; Andersen, Jan M.; Cox, McLain L.

    2006-05-01

    We report on the design, construction and operation of a new multiwavelength lidar developed for the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture and its program on particle emissions from animal production facilities. The lidar incorporates a laser emitting simultaneous, pulsed Nd laser radiation at 355, 532 and 1064 nm at a PRF of 10 kHz. Lidar backscatter and extinction data are modeled to extract the aerosol information. All-reflective optics combined with dichroic and interferometric filters permit all the wavelength channels to be measured simultaneously, day or night, using photon counting by PMTs, an APD, and high speed scaling. The lidar is housed in a transportable trailer for all-weather operation at any accessible site. The laser beams are directed in both azimuth and elevation to targets of interest. We describe application of the lidar in a multidisciplinary atmospheric study at a swine production farm in Iowa. Aerosol plumes emitted from the hog barns were prominent phenomena, and their variations with temperature, turbulence, stability and feed cycle were studied, using arrays of particle samplers and turbulence detectors. Other lidar measurements focused on air motion as seen by long duration scans of the farm region. Successful operation of this lidar confirms the value of multiwavelength, eye-safe lidars for agricultural aerosol measurements.

  13. Pan-Arctic enhancements of light absorbing aerosol concentrations due to North American boreal forest fires during summer 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.; Andrews, E.; Burkhart, J. F.; Forster, C.; Herber, A.; Hoch, S. W.; Kowal, D.; Lunder, C.; Mefford, T.; Ogren, J. A.; Sharma, S.; Spichtinger, N.; Stebel, K.; Stone, R.; StröM, J.; TøRseth, K.; Wehrli, C.; Yttri, K. E.

    2006-11-01

    During summer of 2004, about 2.7 million hectare of boreal forest burned in Alaska, the largest annual area burned on record, and another 3.1 million hectare burned in Canada. This study explores the impact of emissions from these fires on light absorbing aerosol concentration levels, aerosol optical depths (AOD), and albedo at the Arctic stations Barrow (Alaska), Alert (Canada), Summit (Greenland), and Zeppelin/Ny Ålesund on Spitsbergen (Norway). The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was run backward from these sites to identify periods that were influenced by forest fire pollution plumes. It is shown that the fires led to enhanced values of particle light absorption coefficients (σap) at all of these sites. Barrow, about 1000 km away from the fires, was affected by several fire pollution plumes, one leading to spectacularly high 3-hour mean σap values of up to 32 Mm-1, more than the highest values measured in Arctic Haze. AOD measurements for a wavelength of 500 nm saturated but were estimated at above 4-5 units, unprecedented in the station records. Fire plumes were transported through the atmospheric column over Summit continuously for 2 months, during which all measured AOD values were enhanced, with maxima up to 0.4-0.5 units. Equivalent black carbon concentrations at the surface at Summit were up to 600 ng m-3 during two major episodes, and Alert saw at least one event with enhanced σap values. FLEXPART results show that Zeppelin was located in a relatively unaffected part of the Arctic. Nevertheless, there was a 4-day period with daily mean σap > 0.3 Mm-1, the strongest episode of the summer half year, and enhanced AOD values. Elevated concentrations of the highly source-specific compound levoglucosan positively confirmed that biomass burning was the source of the aerosols at Zeppelin. In summary, this paper shows that boreal forest fires can lead to elevated concentrations of light absorbing aerosols throughout the entire Arctic. Enhanced

  14. Direct gravimetric measurements of the mass of the antarctic aerosol collected by high volume sampler: PM10 summer seasonal variation at Terra Nova Bay.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Lambertucci, Luca; Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldi, Anna; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    An on-site procedure was set up for direct gravimetric measurement of the mass of aerosol collected using high volume impactors (aerodynamic size cut point of 10 microm, PM10); this knowledge has hitherto been unavailable. Using a computerized microbalance in a clean chemistry laboratory, under controlled temperature (+/-0.5 degrees C) and relative humidity (+/-1%), continuous, long time filter mass measurements (hours) were carried out before and after exposure, after a 48 h minimun equilibration at the laboratory conditions. The effect of the electrostatic charge was exhausted in 30-60 min, after which stable measurements were obtained. Measurements of filters exposed for 7-11 days (1.13 m3 min(-1)) in a coastal site near Terra Nova Bay (December 2000 - February 2001), gave results for aerosol mass in the order of 10-20 mg (SD approximately 2 mg), corresponding to atmospheric concentrations of 0.52-1.27 microg m(-3). Data show a seasonal behaviour in the PM10 content with an increase during December - early January, followed by a net decrease. The above results compare well with estimates obtained from proxy data for the Antarctic Peninsula (0.30 microg m(-3)), the Ronne Ice Shelf (1.49 microg m(-3)), and the South Pole (0.18 microg m(-3), summer 1974-1975, and 0.37 microg m(-3), average summer seasons 1975-1976 and 1977-1978), and from direct gravimetric measurements recently obtained from medium volume samplers at McMurdo station (downwind 3.39 microg m(-3), upwind 4.15 microg m(-3)) and at King George Island (2.5 microg m(-3), summer, particle diameter <20 microm). This finding opens the way to the direct measurement of the chemical composition of the Antarctic aerosol and, in turn, to a better knowledge of the snow/air relationships as required for the reconstruction of the chemical composition of past atmospheres from deep ice core data.

  15. Causes of seasonal and daily variations in aerosol sea-salt concentrations at a coastal Antarctic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. S.; Wolff, E. W.

    Two years worth of daily aerosol data has been collected from Halley station, Antarctica, between February 1991 and February 1993. The seasonal cycle of sea-salt aerosol was found to peak during the winter months, with an annual mean of 162 ng m -3. Specific site characteristics are used to explain this relatively low value. The winter sea-salt source does not appear to be solely due to the presence of open water. Comparison of individual high salt concentration events in the data, with 3 hourly meteorological records, shows that sea-salt loadings are not linked to high wind speeds, but more moderate ones. The high sea-salt loadings are associated with a change in wind direction that opens up an area of water and then switches to bring sea-salt inland. It is hypothesised that the exposed areas of sea water, which are rapidly frozen in winter creating areas of local, freshly formed ice with a surface covering of concentrated brine, are the source of the winter sea-salt. Fractionation of the sea-salt component in individual high concentration events, is used to reinforce the theory that a surface skim of highly saline brine, on fresh ice, is the winter sea-salt source. The presence of frost flowers is thought to aid incorporation of sea-salt into the atmosphere. Implications for the interpretation of sea-salt data in ice cores are highlighted.

  16. Mapping of PM10 surface concentrations derived from satellite observations of aerosol optical thickness over South-Eastern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péré, J.-C.; Pont, V.; Mallet, M.; Bessagnet, B.

    2009-01-01

    This work aims at developing a methodology based on in-situ experimental observations in order to use satellite retrievals as a tool for monitoring air particulate pollution. This methodology is applied during summer time on the South-Eastern France, which is one of the most polluted zones over Europe, enclosing further large cities and industrial sites. In a first time, we consider correlations between daily mean AERONET AOT and PM10 concentrations at five sites located as well close to as far from pollution sources. Our results show significant correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.68 to 0.79, following the site studied. Several factors like aerosol vertical distribution or hygroscopic growth factor could affect the link between PM10 ground measurements and aerosol optical thickness. To statistically strengthen this approach, we gather data sets from three types of sites (urban, near urban and rural) and establish a linear relationship between daily mean AOT measured from AERONET and PM10 mass concentrations. Secondly and thanks to good agreements between AOT measured from AERONET and AOT retrieved from the MODIS sensor, we calculate estimated concentrations of PM10 by using MODIS retrievals above the South-Eastern France. Uncertainties about this approach are discussed.

  17. Global Estimates of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations from Satellite-Based Aerosol Optical Depth: Development and Application

    PubMed Central

    van Donkelaar, Aaron; Martin, Randall V.; Brauer, Michael; Kahn, Ralph; Levy, Robert; Verduzco, Carolyn; Villeneuve, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic and health impact studies of fine particulate matter with diameter < 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are limited by the lack of monitoring data, especially in developing countries. Satellite observations offer valuable global information about PM2.5 concentrations. Objective In this study, we developed a technique for estimating surface PM2.5 concentrations from satellite observations. Methods We mapped global ground-level PM2.5 concentrations using total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite instruments and coincident aerosol vertical profiles from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Results We determined that global estimates of long-term average (1 January 2001 to 31 December 2006) PM2.5 concentrations at approximately 10 km × 10 km resolution indicate a global population-weighted geometric mean PM2.5 concentration of 20 μg/m3. The World Health Organization Air Quality PM2.5 Interim Target-1 (35 μg/m3 annual average) is exceeded over central and eastern Asia for 38% and for 50% of the population, respectively. Annual mean PM2.5 concentrations exceed 80 μg/m3 over eastern China. Our evaluation of the satellite-derived estimate with ground-based in situ measurements indicates significant spatial agreement with North American measurements (r = 0.77; slope = 1.07; n = 1057) and with noncoincident measurements elsewhere (r = 0.83; slope = 0.86; n = 244). The 1 SD of uncertainty in the satellite-derived PM2.5 is 25%, which is inferred from the AOD retrieval and from aerosol vertical profile errors and sampling. The global population-weighted mean uncertainty is 6.7 μg/m3. Conclusions Satellite-derived total-column AOD, when combined with a chemical transport model, provides estimates of global long-term average PM2.5 concentrations. PMID:20519161

  18. A System to Create Stable Nanoparticle Aerosols from Nanopowders

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yaobo; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle aerosols released from nanopowders in workplaces are associated with human exposure and health risks. We developed a novel system, requiring minimal amounts of test materials (min. 200 mg), for studying powder aerosolization behavior and aerosol properties. The aerosolization procedure follows the concept of the fluidized-bed process, but occurs in the modified volume of a V-shaped aerosol generator. The airborne particle number concentration is adjustable by controlling the air flow rate. The system supplied stable aerosol generation rates and particle size distributions over long periods (0.5-2 hr and possibly longer), which are important, for example, to study aerosol behavior, but also for toxicological studies. Strict adherence to the operating procedures during the aerosolization experiments ensures the generation of reproducible test results. The critical steps in the standard protocol are the preparation of the material and setup, and the aerosolization operations themselves. The system can be used for experiments requiring stable aerosol concentrations and may also be an alternative method for testing dustiness. The controlled aerosolization made possible with this setup occurs using energy inputs (may be characterized by aerosolization air velocity) that are within the ranges commonly found in occupational environments where nanomaterial powders are handled. This setup and its operating protocol are thus helpful for human exposure and risk assessment. PMID:27501179

  19. Relationship of ground-level aerosol concentration and atmospheric electric field at three observation sites in the Arctic, Antarctic and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicki, Marek; Odzimek, Anna; Neska, Mariusz

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol number concentrations in the particle size range from 10 nm to 1 μm and vertical electric field strength in the surface layer was measured between September 2012 and December 2013 at three observation sites: mid-latitude station Swider, Poland, and, for the first time, in Hornsund in the Arctic, Spitsbergen, and the Antarctic Arctowski station in the South Shetland Islands. The measurements of aerosol concentrations have been performed simultaneously with measurements of the electric field with the aim to assess the local effect of aerosol on the electric field Ez near the ground at the three stations which at present form a network of atmospheric electricity observatories. Measurements have been made regardless of weather conditions at Swider and Arctowski station and mostly on fair-weather days at Hornsund station. The monthly mean particle number concentrations varied between 580 and 2100 particles cm- 3 at Arctowski, between 90 and 1270 particles cm- 3 in Hornsund, and between 6700 and 14,000 particles cm- 3 in the middle latitude station Swider. Average diurnal variations of the ground-level electric field Ez and particle number concentrations in fair-weather conditions were independent of each other for Arctowski and Hornsund stations. At Swider station the diurnal variation is usually characterized by an increase of aerosol concentration in the evening which results in the increased electric field. The assumption of neglecting the influence of varying aerosol concentration on the variation of the electric field in the polar regions, often adopted in studies, is confirmed here by the observations at Arctowski and Hornsund. The results of aerosol observations are also compared with modelled aerosol concentrations for global atmospheric electric circuit models.

  20. Pre- and Postnatal Polychlorinated Biphenyl Concentrations and Longitudinal Measures of Thymus Volume in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Sonneborn, Dean; Palkovicova, Lubica; Kocan, Anton; Drobna, Beata; Trnovec, Tomas; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previously, we reported an association between higher maternal polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations and smaller thymus volume in newborns in a birth cohort residing in eastern Slovakia. Objective: In the present report we address whether thymus volume at later ages is influenced by prenatal and early postnatal PCB exposure. Methods: At the time of delivery, 1,134 mother–infant pairs were enrolled. Maternal and 6- and 16-month infant blood samples were collected and analyzed for 15 PCB congeners. Thymus volume was measured in infants shortly after birth and at ages 6 and 16 months using ultrasonography. Results: Higher maternal PCB concentration was associated with reduced thymus volume at birth [a 0.21 SD reduction in thymus volume for an increase in total maternal PCB concentration from the 10th to the 90th percentile; 95% confidence interval (CI): –0.37, –0.05], whereas maternal PCB concentration was not predictive of 6- and 16-month thymus volume. Six-month infant PCB concentration was associated with a 0.40 SD decrease in 6-month thymus volume (95% CI: –0.76, –0.04). There was also some suggestion that thymus volume at 16 months was positively associated with concurrent infant PCB concentration. Conclusions: The potential adverse effects of in utero PCB exposure on thymic development may extend beyond the neonatal period. Results from this highly exposed cohort provide suggestive evidence that postnatal PCB concentrations may be influential, but a smaller set of 6-month PCB measurements limited statistical power at that time point. Implications regarding impaired immunologic maturation or long-term clinical implications remain to be determined. PMID:22275729

  1. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: measurements and model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Palancar, G. G.; Lefer, B. L.; Hall, S. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Corr, C. A.; Herndon, S. C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, S.

    2013-01-24

    Ultraviolet (UV) actinic fluxes (AF) measured with three Scanning Actinic Flux Spectroradiometers (SAFS) are compared with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model v.5 in order to assess the effects of aerosols and NO2 concentrations on the radiation. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measurements are typically smaller by up to 25 % in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, than actinic flux modeled for clean, cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68%, NO2 for 25%, and residual uncertainties for 7% of these AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the actinic flux perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols caused enhanced AF above the PBL and reduced AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA<0.7) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Finally, additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the actinic flux.

  2. A Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) for Rapid Measurement of High-concentration Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hee-Siew; Chen, Da-Ren; Pui, David Y. H.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a fast-response nanometer aerosol size analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 s. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (Po210), an extended-length nanometer differential mobility analyzer (Nano-DMA), and an electrometer (TSI 3068). This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 s per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time-induced smearing. The nASA thus offers a fast response for aerosol size distribution measurements in high-concentration conditions and also eliminates the need for applying a de-smearing algorithm to resulting data. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr. Also, as was demonstrated in tests to characterize the soot emissions from the J85-GE engine of a T-38 aircraft, the broad dynamic concentration range of the nASA makes it particularly suitable for studies of combustion or particle formation processes. Further details of the nASA performance as well as results from calibrations, laboratory tests and field applications are presented below.

  3. A Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) for Rapid Measurement of High-Concentration Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Hee-Siew; Chen, Da-Ren; Pui, David Y. H.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a fast-response Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 seconds. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (P0210), an extended-length Nanometer Differential Mobility Analyzer (Nano-DMA), and an electrometer (TSI 3068). This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 second per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time-induced smearing. The nASA thus offers a fast response for aerosol size distribution measurements in high-concentration conditions and also eliminates the need for applying a de-smearing algorithm to resulting data. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr. Also, as was demonstrated in tests to characterize the soot emissions from the J85-GE engine of a T38 aircraft, the broad dynamic concentration range of the nASA makes it particularly suitable for studies of combustion or particle formation processes. Further details of the nASA performance as well as results from calibrations, laboratory tests and field applications are presented.

  4. Simulations of organic aerosol concentrations in Mexico City using the WRF-CHEM model during the MCMA-2006/MILAGRO campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Karydis, V. A.; Pandis, S. N.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Molina, L. T.

    2011-04-01

    Organic aerosol concentrations are simulated using the WRF-CHEM model in Mexico City during the period from 24 to 29 March in association with the MILAGRO-2006 campaign. Two approaches are employed to predict the variation and spatial distribution of the organic aerosol concentrations: (1) a traditional 2-product secondary organic aerosol (SOA) model with non-volatile primary organic aerosols (POA); (2) a non-traditional SOA model including the volatility basis-set modeling method in which primary organic components are assumed to be semi-volatile and photochemically reactive and are distributed in logarithmically spaced volatility bins. The MCMA (Mexico City Metropolitan Area) 2006 official emission inventory is used in simulations and the POA emissions are modified and distributed by volatility based on dilution experiments for the non-traditional SOA model. The model results are compared to the Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) observations analyzed using the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) technique at an urban background site (T0) and a suburban background site (T1) in Mexico City. The traditional SOA model frequently underestimates the observed POA concentrations during rush hours and overestimates the observations in the rest of the time in the city. The model also substantially underestimates the observed SOA concentrations, particularly during daytime, and only produces 21% and 25% of the observed SOA mass in the suburban and urban area, respectively. The non-traditional SOA model performs well in simulating the POA variation, but still overestimates during daytime in the urban area. The SOA simulations are significantly improved in the non-traditional SOA model compared to the traditional SOA model and the SOA production is increased by more than 100% in the city. However, the underestimation during daytime is still salient in the urban area and the non-traditional model also fails to reproduce the high level of SOA concentrations in the suburban area

  5. Simulations of organic aerosol concentrations in Mexico City using the WRF-CHEM model during the MCMA-2006/MILAGRO campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Karydis, V. A.; Pandis, S. N.; Molina, L. T.

    2010-12-01

    Organic aerosol concentrations are simulated using the WRF-CHEM model in Mexico City during the period from 24 to 29 March in association with the MILAGRO-2006 campaign. Two approaches are employed to predict the variation and spatial distribution of the organic aerosol concentrations: (1) a traditional 2-product secondary organic aerosol (SOA) model with non-volatile primary organic aerosols (POA); (2) a non-traditional SOA model including the volatility basis-set modeling method in which primary organic components are assumed to be semi-volatile and photochemically reactive and are distributed in logarithmically spaced volatility bins. The MCMA 2006 official emission inventory is used in simulations and the POA emissions are modified and distributed by volatility based on dilution experiments for the non-traditional SOA model. The model results are compared to the Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) observations analyzed using the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) technique at an urban background site (T0) and a suburban background site (T1) in Mexico City. The traditional SOA model frequently underestimates the observed POA concentrations during rush hours and overestimates the observations in the rest of the time in the city. The model also substantially underestimates the observed SOA concentrations, particularly during daytime, and only produces 21% and 25% of the observed SOA mass in the suburban and urban area, respectively. The non-traditional SOA model performs well in simulating the POA variation, but still overestimates during daytime in the urban area. The SOA simulations are significantly improved in the non-traditional SOA model compared to the traditional SOA model and the SOA production is increased by more than 100% in the city. However, the underestimation during daytime is still salient in the urban area and the non-traditional model also fails to reproduce the high level of SOA concentrations in the suburban area. In the non-traditional SOA model

  6. A New Electropositive Filter for Concentrating Enterovirus and Norovirus from Large Volumes of Water - MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detection of enteric viruses in environmental water usually requires the concentration of viruses from large volumes of water. The 1MDS electropositive filter is commonly used for concentrating enteric viruses from water but unfortunately these filters are not cost-effective...

  7. Effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time, and seed particles on secondary organic aerosol chemical composition and yield

    DOE PAGES

    Lambe, A. T.; Chhabra, P. S.; Onasch, T. B.; ...

    2015-03-18

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0 × 108 to 2.2 × 1010 molec cm-3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2 × 106 to 2 × 107 molec cm-3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in themore » chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. In most cases, for a specific SOA type the most-oxidized chamber SOA and the least-oxidized flow reactor SOA have similar mass spectra, oxygen-to-carbon and hydrogen-to-carbon ratios, and carbon oxidation states at integrated OH exposures between approximately 1 × 1011 and 2 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, or about 1–2 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. This observation suggests that in the range of available OH exposure overlap for the flow reactor and chambers, SOA elemental composition as measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer is similar whether the precursor is exposed to low OH concentrations over long exposure times or high OH concentrations over short exposure times. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of

  8. In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Mass Concentration and Spectral Absorption at Three Location in and Around Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Z.; Martins, V.; Li, Z.

    2006-12-01

    As a result of population growth and increasing industrialization, air pollution in heavily populated urban areas is one of the central environmental problems of the century. As a part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) study, Nuclepore filters were collected in two size ranges (PM10 and PM2.5) at 12 hour intervals at three location in Mexico during March, 2006. Sampling stations were located at the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (T0), at the Rancho La Bisnago in the State of Hidalgo (T2) and along the Gulf Coast in Tampico (Tam). Each filter was analyzed for mass concentration, aerosol scattering and absorption efficiencies. Mass concentrations at T0 ranged from 47 to 179 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 96 μg/m3, and from 20 to 93 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 41 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at T2 ranged from 12 to 154 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 51 μg/m3, and from 7 to 50 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 25 μg/m3. Mass concentrations at Tam ranged from 34 to 80 μg/m3 for PM10 with an average concentration of 52 μg/m3, and from 8 to 23 μg/m3 for PM2.5 with an average concentration of 13 μg/m3. While some of the extreme values are likely linked to local emissions, regional air pollution episodes also played important roles. Each of the sampling stations experienced a unique atmospheric condition. The site at T0 was influenced by urban air pollution and dust storms, the site at T2 was significantly less affected by air pollution but more affected by regional dust storms and local dust devils while Tam was influenced by air pollution, dust storms and the natural marine environment. The spectral mass absorption efficiency was measured from 350 to 2500 nm and shows large differences between the absorption properties of soil dust, black carbon, and organic aerosols. The strong spectral differences observed can be related to differences in

  9. Apparatus and method for collection and concentration of respirable particles into a small fluid volume

    DOEpatents

    Simon, Jonathan N.; Brown, Steve B.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the collection of respirable particles and concentration of such particles into a small fluid volume. The apparatus captures and concentrates small (1-10 .mu.m) respirable particles into a sub-millileter volume of fluid. The method involves a two step operation, collection and concentration: wherein collection of particles is by a wetted surface having small vertical slits that act as capillary channels; and concentration is carried out by transfer of the collected particles to a small volume (sub-milliliter) container by centrifugal force whereby the particles are forced through the vertical slits and contact a non-wetted wall surface, and are deflected to the bottom where they are contained for analysis, such as a portable flow cytometer or a portable PCR DNA analysis system.

  10. [Use of laser flow-type fluorescence aerosol particle counter to evaluate the concentration of microbes in the surface air under high dust content].

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Iu T; Vorob'ev, S A; Khramov, E N; Vorob'eva, E A; Kuznetsov, A P; Kiselev, O S

    2000-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of a laser flow-type fluorescence aerosol particle counter to evaluate the concentrations of microbes in the surface air under high dust content. Various circuits of flow-type optic aerosol recorders are analyzed. Flow spectral luminescence analysis of some particles flow while exciting the fourth harmonics of a pulse laser on yttrium-aluminium garnet with neodymium by ultraviolet radiation is shown to be the most optimum method for indication of individual aerosol particles. Experiments were conducted on the authors' model of a pilot plant based on this method. The model of a laser flow-type optic analyzer was developed for experimental studies that give a clear display of biological aerosols in complex aerosols. The laser flow-type analyzer-based unit developed may provide a fluorescence signal of aerosol particles in the flow of a sample and that light diffusion signal from them at an exciting light wavelength of 266 nm. Experiments with BVC aerosols and soil dust particles were conducted in different regions of Russia. They showed it possible to detect and to rapidly calculate soil microorganisms by laser flow-type fluorescence assay of individual particles when excited by ultraviolet radiation.

  11. Predictions of size-resolved aerosol concentrations of ammonium, chloride and nitrate at a bayside site using EQUISOLV II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Scott W.; Evans, Melissa C.; Poor, Noreen D.

    Measured ambient air concentrations of ammonium, chloride and nitrate were compared with concentrations produced by EQUISOLV II, an aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium model. The monitoring equipment was located ˜50 m from Old Tampa Bay at the eastern end of the Gandy Bridge in Tampa, FL. Size-segregated ion concentrations of ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, fluoride, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate were determined from 6- and 1-day integrated cascade impactor samples obtained in May and August 2001, respectively. EQUISOLV II was initialized with these ion concentrations by size bin, and by gas phase concentrations of the volatile species, acquired with a collocated annular denuder system. The model redistributed the ions between the size bins until gas and particle concentrations reached equilibrium. The model calculated predominantly fine particle ammonium and coarse particle chloride and nitrate. For the May sampling period, when the average relative humidity was below 65%, the model predicted the formation of seven solids KNO 3, K 2SO 4, (NH 4) 2SO 4, Na 2SO 4, NaCl, NaNO 3, and CaSO 4·2H 2O. The amounts of ammonium in the fine fraction and of nitrate and chloride in the coarse fraction were predicted within the combined measurement and modeling uncertainty in the majority of cases.

  12. Evaluating the Role of Boundary Layer Processes on Diurnal Aerosol Concentrations in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. R.; de Wekker, S.

    2009-12-01

    Forecasting air quality in mountainous terrain is a challenging topic. In this study, we aim to understand the diurnal variability of particulate matter, CO, and CO2 in the Shenandoah National Park (SNP) located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. We focus on the effect of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics on the diurnal aerosol variability using a combination of observations and numerical modeling. Boundary layer dynamics in mountainous terrain is complicated by a variety of factors such as terrain-induced wind flows. These flows can have a significant impact on atmospheric chemistry but are not well resolved in current air quality forecasting models. In this research, we seek to 1) measure and simulate the diurnal evolution of the ABL at a mountaintop site in the Blue Ridge Mountains, 2) investigate the effect of ABL dynamics on aerosol and CO concentrations on clear days, and 3) investigate the transport of aerosols and pollutants by local, regional, and synoptic-scale flows to the mountaintop using the FLEXPART particle dispersion model and WRF-CHEM model. WRF-CHEM will be run with and without chemistry to isolate the effects of boundary layer dynamics and aerosol formation on diurnal aerosol variability. The results of this study will be incorporated into a diagnostic air quality forecast model for SNP. Measurements come from a 17-m walkup tower that was established in May 2008 along a ridgeline at an elevation of 1037m (38.61°N, 78.35°W) at Pinnacles in the north-central section of SNP. The tower is outfitted with a suite of instruments, including temperature/humidity sensors, cup and sonic anemometers, radiation sensors, a closed-path CO/CO2 gas analyzer, and particle counter. Also, a portable eye-safe LIDAR system is located on-site. In addition, ozone data are collected at a site located nearby. Preliminary results from select clear days in fall, 2008 indicate that ABL height is an important factor governing CO and CO2 concentrations at

  13. Relationship between extracellular osmolarity, NaCl concentration and cell volume in rat glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice; Ouanounou, Gilles; Dubois, Jean Marc

    2011-06-01

    The cell volume, which controls numerous cellular functions, is theoretically linearly related with the inverse osmolarity. However, deviations from this law have often been observed. In order to clarify the origin of these deviations we electronically measured the mean cell volume of rat glioma cells under three different experimental conditions, namely: at different osmolarities and constant NaCl concentration; at different NaCl concentrations and constant osmolarity and at different osmolarities caused by changes in NaCl concentration. In each condition, the osmolarity was maintained constant or changed with NaCl or mannitol. We showed that the cell volume was dependent on both the extracellular osmolarity and the NaCl concentration. The relationship between cell volume, osmolarity and NaCl concentration could be described by a new equation that is the product of the Boyle-van't Hoff law and the Michaelis-Menten equation at a power of 4. Together, these results suggest that in hyponatriemia, the cell volume deviates from the Boyle-van't Hoff law because either the activity of aquaporin 1, expressed in glioma cells, is decreased or the reduced NaCl influx decreases the osmotically obliged influx of water.

  14. Assessing the use of VIIRS Aerosol Intermediate Product for AOD retrieval and PM25 concentrations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, B.; Nazmi, C.; Moshary, F.; Lightstone, S.

    2015-12-01

    In previous work, it was shown that MODIS AOD retreivals over urban areas have overbiases that can be removed if proper account is made of the surface land classification. In fact, both direct methods where improvements to urban model albedos were implemented as well as post processing approaches using Neural Networks (NN's) were shown to be useful in reducing biases and retreival uncertainty. In this paper, we make a preliminary study of these approaches to the VIIRS Intermediate Aerosol Optical Depth Product and demonstrate that VIIRS Biases can also be substantially reduced. Comparisons with MODIS will be made and direct use of the high resolution product will be used to assess potential PM25 estimation.

  15. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg; Korolev, Alexei; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Lawson, R. P.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Wolde, Mengistu; Laskin, Alexander; Freer, Matthew

    2012-08-14

    Cloud and aerosol data acquired by the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Convair-580 aircraft in, above, and below single-layer arctic stratocumulus cloud during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 were used to test three aerosol indirect effects hypothesized to act in mixed-phase clouds: the riming indirect effect, the glaciation indirect effect, and the cold second indirect effect. The data showed a correlation of R= 0.75 between liquid drop number concentration, Nliq, inside cloud and ambient aerosol number concentration NPCASP below cloud. This, combined with increasing liquid water content LWC with height above cloud base and the nearly constant profile of Nliq, suggested that liquid drops were nucleated from aerosol at cloud base. No strong evidence of a riming indirect effect was observed, but a strong correlation of R = 0.69 between ice crystal number concentration Ni and NPCASP above cloud was noted. Increases in ice nuclei (IN) concentration with NPCASP above cloud combined with the subadiabatic LWC profiles suggest possible mixing of IN from cloud top consistent with the glaciation indirect effect. The higher Nice and lower effective radius rel for the more polluted ISDAC cases compared to data collected in cleaner single-layer stratocumulus conditions during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment is consistent with the operation of the cold second indirect effect. However, more data in a wider variety of meteorological and surface conditions, with greater variations in aerosol forcing, are required to identify the dominant aerosol forcing mechanisms in mixed-phase arctic clouds.

  16. Highly time-resolved trace element concentrations in aerosols during the Megapoli Paris campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furger, Markus; Visser, Suzanne; Slowik, Jay G.; Crippa, Monica; Poulain, Laurent; Appel, Karen; Flechsig, Uwe; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Trace elements contribute typically only a few percent to the total mass of air pollutants, however, they can affect the environment in significant ways, especially those that are toxic. Furthermore, they are advantageous with respect to a refinement of source apportionment when measured with high time resolution and appropriate size segregation. This approach is especially advantageous in an urban environment with numerous time-variant emission sources distributed across a relatively narrow space, as is typically the setting of a megacity. Two 1-month long field campaigns took place in the framework of the Megapoli project in Paris, France, in the summer of 2009 and in the winter of 2010. Rotating drum impactors (RDI) were operated at two sites in each campaign, one urban, the other one suburban. The RDI segregated the aerosols into three size ranges (PM10-2.5, PM2.5-1 and PM1-0.1) and sampled with 2-hour time resolution. The samples were analyzed with synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF) at the synchrotron facilities of Paul Scherrer Institute (SLS) and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (HASYLAB), where a broad range of elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Sr, Zr, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, Pb) was analyzed for each size range. Time series of the analyzed elements for the different sites and campaigns were prepared to characterize the aerosol trace element composition and temporal behavior for the different weather situations and urban environments. They allow for the distinction of regional vs. local sources and transport, and provide a basis for source apportionment calculations. Local and regional contributions of traffic, including re-suspension, break wear and exhaust, wood burning, marine and other sources will be discussed. Indications of long-range transport from Polish coal emissions in the city center of Paris were also found.

  17. Saharan dust aerosol over the central Mediterranean Sea: PM10 chemical composition and concentration versus optical columnar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M.; Sferlazzo, D. M.; Becagli, S.; Bommarito, C.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; di Sarra, A.; Ghedini, C.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Lucarelli, F.; Meloni, D.; Monteleone, F.; Nava, S.; Pace, G.; Piacentino, S.; Rugi, F.; Severi, M.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to determine the mineral contribution to PM10 in the central Mediterranean Sea, based on 7 yr of daily PM10 samplings made on the island of Lampedusa (35.5° N, 12.6° E). The chemical composition of the PM10 samples was determined by ion chromatography for the main ions, and, on selected samples, by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for the total content of crustal markers. Aerosol optical depth measurements were carried out in parallel to the PM10 sampling. The average PM10 concentration at Lampedusa over the period June 2004-December 2010 is 31.5 μg m-3, with low interannual variability. The annual means are below the EU annual standard for PM10, but 9.9% of the total number of daily data exceeds the daily threshold value established by the European Commission for PM (50 μg m-3, European Community, EC/30/1999). The Saharan dust contribution to PM10 was derived by calculating the contribution of Al, Si, Fe, Ti, non-sea-salt (nss) Ca, nssNa, and nssK oxides in samples in which PIXE data were available. Cases in which crustal content exceeded the 75th percentile of the crustal oxide content distribution were identified as elevated dust events. Using this threshold, we obtained 175 events. Fifty-five elevated dust events (31.6%) displayed PM10 higher than 50 μg m-3, with dust contributing by 33% on average. The crustal contribution to PM10 has an annual average value of 5.42 μg m-3, and reaches a value as high as 67.9 μg m-3 (corresponding to 49% of PM10) during an intense Saharan dust event. The crustal content estimated from a single tracer, such as Al or Ca, is in good agreement with the one calculated as the sum of the metal oxides. Conversely, larger crustal contents are derived by applying the EU guidelines for demonstration and subtraction of exceedances in PM10 levels due to high background of natural aerosol. The crustal aerosol amount and contribution to PM10 showed a very small seasonal dependence; conversely, the dust columnar

  18. Volume concentration and size dependence of diffuse reflectance in a fractal soft tissue model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S K; Banerjee, Srilekha

    2005-06-01

    Employing a fractal model for the particle size distribution, we examine the possibility of relating the size/volume concentration changes in the tissue to its diffuse reflectance. It is noted that for the practically interesting range of fractal dimension values alpha, the curves depicting the variation of diffuse reflectance (the ratio of diffuse reflectance at two suitably chosen source detector separations) with alpha at fixed volume concentration Tv, are single valued. The same is true if alpha is fixed and Tv is varied. This crucial observation shows that it should be possible to identify changes in the size/volume concentration of the tissue from the diffuse reflectance measurement at two source detector separations when either alpha or Tv is a priori known. Similar results have been obtained for ratio of fluence measured at two suitably chosen depths within the tissue.

  19. Temporal Variation of Aerosol Properties at a Rural Continental Site and Study of Aerosol Evolution through Growth Law Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jian; Collins, Don; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Ferrare, Richard A.; Gasparini, Roberto; Jonsson, Haflidi; Ogren, John; Sheridan, Patrick; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol size distributions were measured by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft during 16 flights at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern central Oklahoma as part of the Aerosol Intensive Operation period in May, 2003. During the same period a second SMPS was deployed at a surface station and provided continuous measurements. Combined with trace gas measurements at the SGP site and back-trajectory analysis, the aerosol size distributions provided insights into the sources of aerosols observed at the SGP site. High particle concentrations, observed mostly during daytime, were well correlated with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) mixing ratios, suggesting nucleation involving sulfuric acid is likely the main source of newly formed particles at the SGP. Aerosols within plumes originating from wildfires in Central America were measured at the surface site. Vertically compact aerosol layers, which can be traced back to forest fires in East Asia, were intercepted at altitudes over 3000 meters. Analyses of size dependent particle growth rates for four periods during which high cloud coverage was observed indicate growth dominated by volume controlled reactions. Sulfate accounts for 50% to 72% of the increase in aerosol volume concentration; the rest of the volume concentration increase was likely due to secondary organic species. The growth law analyses and meteorological conditions indicate that the sulfate was produced mainly through aqueous oxidation of SO2 in clouds droplets and hydrated aerosol particles.

  20. ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF LOW VOLUME RESIDENTIAL SAMPLES FOR SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a poster on results for organic speciation analysis for Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on Se...

  1. Global and regional evolution of short-lived radiatively-active gases and aerosols in the Representative Concentration Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Kyle, G. Page; Meinshausen, Malte; Riahi, Keywan; Smith, Steven J.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Conley, Andrew; Vitt, Francis

    2011-08-05

    In this paper, we discuss the results of 2000-2100 simulations with a chemistry-climate model, focusing on the changes in atmospheric composition (troposphere and stratosphere) following the emissions associated with the Representative Concentration Pathways. We show that tropospheric ozone is projected to decrease (RCP3PD and RCP4.5) or increase (RCP8.5) between 2000 and 2100. Surface ozone in 2100 is projected to change little compared from 2000 conditions, a much-reduced impact from the projections based on the A2 scenario. Aerosols are projected to strongly decrease in the 21st century, a reflection of their projected decrease in emissions. Similarly, sulfate deposition is projected to strongly decrease. However, nitrogen deposition is projected to increase over certain regions because of the projected increase NH3 emissions.

  2. Variation in Nectar Volume and Sugar Concentration of Allium ursinum L. ssp. ucrainicum in Three Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Ágnes; Molnár, Réka; Morschhauser, Tamás; Hahn, István

    2012-01-01

    Floral nectar volume and concentration of ramson (Allium ursinum L. ssp. ucrainicum) were investigated in three different habitats, including two types of sessile oak-hornbeam association on brown forest soil with clay illuviation and a silver lime-flowering ash rock forest association on rendzina. Daily nectar production ranged from 0.1 to 3.8 μL per flower with sugar concentrations of 25 to 50%. Mean nectar volumes and concentrations showed significant differences between freely exposed flowers and covered flowers, which had been isolated from flower visitors 24 h prior to nectar studies. Both the amount and quality of nectar were affected by microclimatic conditions and soil properties and varied between populations at different habitats. In the silver lime-flowering ash rock-forest association mean nectar volumes and concentrations were lower than in a typical sessile oak-hornbeam association on three occasions, the difference being significant in two cases. During full bloom, the date of sampling did not have a profound effect on either nectar volume or concentration. PMID:22619588

  3. Variation in nectar volume and sugar concentration of Allium ursinum L. ssp. ucrainicum in three habitats.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Agnes; Molnár, Réka; Morschhauser, Tamás; Hahn, István

    2012-01-01

    Floral nectar volume and concentration of ramson (Allium ursinum L. ssp. ucrainicum) were investigated in three different habitats, including two types of sessile oak-hornbeam association on brown forest soil with clay illuviation and a silver lime-flowering ash rock forest association on rendzina. Daily nectar production ranged from 0.1 to 3.8 μL per flower with sugar concentrations of 25 to 50%. Mean nectar volumes and concentrations showed significant differences between freely exposed flowers and covered flowers, which had been isolated from flower visitors 24 h prior to nectar studies. Both the amount and quality of nectar were affected by microclimatic conditions and soil properties and varied between populations at different habitats. In the silver lime-flowering ash rock-forest association mean nectar volumes and concentrations were lower than in a typical sessile oak-hornbeam association on three occasions, the difference being significant in two cases. During full bloom, the date of sampling did not have a profound effect on either nectar volume or concentration.

  4. Effects of turbulence on mixed-phase deep convective clouds under different basic-state winds and aerosol concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunho; Baik, Jong-Jin; Han, Ji-Young

    2014-12-01

    The effects of turbulence-induced collision enhancement (TICE) on mixed-phase deep convective clouds are numerically investigated using a 2-D cloud model with bin microphysics for uniform and sheared basic-state wind profiles and different aerosol concentrations. Graupel particles account for the most of the cloud mass in all simulation cases. In the uniform basic-state wind cases, graupel particles with moderate sizes account for some of the total graupel mass in the cases with TICE, whereas graupel particles with large sizes account for almost all the total graupel mass in the cases without TICE. This is because the growth of ice crystals into small graupel particles is enhanced due to TICE. The changes in the size distributions of graupel particles due to TICE result in a decrease in the mass-averaged mean terminal velocity of graupel particles. Therefore, the downward flux of graupel mass, and thus the melting of graupel particles, is reduced due to TICE, leading to a decrease in the amount of surface precipitation. Moreover, under the low aerosol concentration, TICE increases the sublimation of ice particles, consequently playing a partial role in reducing the amount of surface precipitation. The effects of TICE are less pronounced in the sheared basic-state wind cases than in the uniform basic-state wind cases because the number of ice crystals is much smaller in the sheared basic-state wind cases than in the uniform basic-state wind cases. Thus, the size distributions of graupel particles in the cases with and without TICE show little difference.

  5. Microphysical, chemical and optical aerosol properties in the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikas, Ülle; Reinart, Aivo; Pugatshova, Anna; Tamm, Eduard; Ulevicius, Vidmantas

    2008-11-01

    The microphysical structure, chemical composition and prehistory of aerosol are related to the aerosol optical properties and radiative effect in the UV spectral range. The aim of this work is the statistical mapping of typical aerosol scenarios and adjustment of regional aerosol parameters. The investigation is based on the in situ measurements in Preila (55.55° N, 21.00° E), Lithuania, and the AERONET data from the Gustav Dalen Tower (58 N, 17 E), Sweden. Clustering of multiple characteristics enabled to distinguish three aerosol types for clear-sky periods: 1) clean maritime-continental aerosol; 2) moderately polluted maritime-continental aerosol; 3) polluted continental aerosol. Differences between these types are due to significant differences in aerosol number and volume concentration, effective radius of volume distribution, content of SO 4- ions and Black Carbon, as well as different vertical profiles of atmospheric relative humidity. The UV extinction, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and the Ångstrom coefficient α increased with the increasing pollution. The value α = 1.96 was observed in the polluted continental aerosol that has passed over central and eastern Europe and southern Russia. Reduction of the clear-sky UV index against the aerosol-free atmosphere was of 4.5%, 27% and 41% for the aerosol types 1, 2 and 3, respectively.

  6. Equilibrium and dynamic osmotic behaviour of aqueous solutions with varied concentration at constant and variable volume.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Ivan L; Manev, Emil D; Sazdanova, Svetla V; Kolikov, Kiril H

    2013-01-01

    Osmosis is essential for the living organisms. In biological systems the process usually occurs in confined volumes and may express specific features. The osmotic pressure in aqueous solutions was studied here experimentally as a function of solute concentration (0.05-0.5 M) in two different regimes: of constant and variable solution volume. Sucrose, a biologically active substance, was chosen as a reference solute for the complex tests. A custom made osmotic cell was used. A novel operative experimental approach, employing limited variation of the solution volume, was developed and applied for the purpose. The established equilibrium values of the osmotic pressure are in agreement with the theoretical expectations and do not exhibit any evident differences for both regimes. In contrast, the obtained kinetic dependences reveal striking divergence in the rates of the process at constant and varied solution volume for the respective solute concentrations. The rise of pressure is much faster at constant solution volume, while the solvent influx is many times greater in the regime of variable volume. The results obtained suggest a feasible mechanism for the way in which the living cells rapidly achieve osmotic equilibrium upon changes in the environment.

  7. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with

  8. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  9. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  10. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  11. Evaluation of indoor aerosol control devices and their effects on radon progeny concentrations. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.; Offermann, F.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-11-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles, and their concomitant effects on radon progeny concentrations have been investigated. The experiments were conducted in a room-size chamber using cigarette smoke and radon injection from an external source. Of the devices examined the electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters had significant particle removal rates, while the particle removal rates for several small panel-filters, an ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans were found to be essentially negligible. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in reducing radon progeny concentrations. At the low particle concentrations, deposition of the unattached radon progeny on room surfaces was found to be a significant removal mechanism. Deposition rates of attached and unattached progeny have been estimated from these data, and were used to calculate the equilibrium factors for total and unattached progeny concentrations as a function of particle concentration. While particle removal reduces total airborne radon progeny concentrations, the relative alpha decay dose to the lungs appears to change very little as the particle concentration decreases due to the greater radiological importance of unattached progeny.

  12. Effects of turbulence on warm clouds and precipitation with various aerosol concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunho; Baik, Jong-Jin; Han, Ji-Young

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of turbulence-induced collision enhancement (TICE) on warm clouds and precipitation by changing the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration using a two-dimensional dynamic model with bin microphysics. TICE is determined according to the Taylor microscale Reynolds number and the turbulent dissipation rate. The thermodynamic sounding used in this study is characterized by a warm and humid atmosphere with a capping inversion layer, which is suitable for simulating warm clouds. For all CCN concentrations, TICE slightly reduces the liquid water path during the early stage of cloud development and accelerates the onset of surface precipitation. However, changes in the rainwater path and in the amount of surface precipitation that are caused by TICE depend on the CCN concentrations. For high CCN concentrations, the mean cloud drop number concentration (CDNC) decreases and the mean effective radius increases due to TICE. These changes cause an increase in the amount of surface precipitation. However, for low CCN concentrations, changes in the mean CDNC and in the mean effective radius induced by TICE are small and the amount of surface precipitation decreases slightly due to TICE. A decrease in condensation due to the accelerated coalescence between droplets explains the surface precipitation decrease. In addition, an increase in the CCN concentration can lead to an increase in the amount of surface precipitation, and the relationship between the CCN concentration and the amount of surface precipitation is affected by TICE. It is shown that these results depend on the atmospheric relative humidity.

  13. First measurements of reactive α-dicarbonyl concentrations on PM2.5 aerosol over the Boreal forest in Finland during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 - source apportionment and links to aerosol aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, C. J.; Corrigan, A. L.; Johnson, A. M.; Song, W.; Keronen, P.; Königstedt, R.; Williams, J.; Russell, L. M.; Petäjä, T.; Fischer, H.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-07-01

    The first dataset for summertime boreal forest concentrations of two atmospherically relevant α-dicarbonyl compounds, glyoxal (Gly) and methylglyoxal (Mgly) on PM2.5 aerosol was obtained during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 field measurement intensive in Hyytiälä, Finland. Anthropogenic influences over the course of the campaign were identified using trace gas signatures and aerosol particle chemical composition analysis. The data evaluation allowed the identification of different events such as urban pollution plumes, biomass burning and sawmill emissions as sources of high Gly and Mgly concentrations. Mean aerosol concentrations during periods of biogenic influence were 0.81 ng m-3 for Gly and 0.31 ng m-3 for Mgly. Mgly was generally less abundant in PM2.5, probably due to its shorter photolysis lifetime and less effective partitioning into the particle phase due to its smaller effective Henry's Law constant compared to Gly. This is in contrast with previous urban studies which show significantly more Mgly than Gly. Peak concentrations for Gly coincided with nearby sources, e.g. high VOC emissions from nearby sawmills, urban pollution plumes from the city of Tampere located 50 km southwest of the sampling site and biomass burning emissions from wildfires. Calculated ratios of Gly in PM2.5 and total organic matter in PM1 aerosols indicate higher values in less aged aerosols. Irreversible processing of Gly in the particle phase, e.g. via oxidation by OH radicals, organo sulfate or imidazole formation are processes currently discussed in the literature which could likely explain these findings.

  14. First measurements of reactive α-dicarbonyl concentrations on PM2.5 aerosol over the boreal forest in Finland during HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 - source apportionment and links to aerosol aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, C. J.; Corrigan, A. L.; Johnson, A. M.; Song, W.; Keronen, P.; Königstedt, R.; Williams, J.; Russell, L. M.; Petäjä, T.; Fischer, H.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    The first dataset for summertime boreal forest concentrations of two atmospherically relevant α-dicarbonyl compounds, glyoxal (Gly) and methylglyoxal (Mgly) on PM2.5 aerosol was obtained during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 field measurement intensive in Hyytiälä, Finland. Identification of anthropogenic influences over the course of the campaign, using trace gas signatures and aerosol particle chemical composition analysis, allowed the identification of different events such as urban pollution plumes, biomass burning and sawmill emissions as sources of high Gly and Mgly concentrations. Mean aerosol concentrations during periods of biogenic influence were 0.81 ng m-3 for Gly and 0.31 ng m-3 for Mgly. Mgly was generally less abundant in PM2.5, probably due to its shorter photolysis lifetime and less effective partitioning into the particle phase due to its smaller effective Henry's Law constant compared to Gly. This is in contrast with previous urban studies which show significantly more Mgly than Gly. Peak concentrations for Gly coincided with nearby sources, e.g. high VOC emissions from nearby sawmills, urban pollution plumes from the city of Tampere located 50 km southwest of the sampling site and biomass burning emissions from wildfires. Calculated ratios of Gly in PM2.5 and total organic matter in PM1 aerosols indicate higher values in less aged aerosols. Irreversible processing of Gly in the particle phase, e.g. via oxidation by OH radicals, organo sulfate or imidazole formation are processes currently discussed in the literature which could likely explain these findings.

  15. Effect of solute concentration on intracellular water volume and hydraulic conductivity of human blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, W J

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular water volume of human blood platelets was determined using tritiated water. The cells responded as osmometers over an observed range of solute concentration from 0.292 to 2.180 osmol kg-1. Only 87% of intracellular water was apparently osmotically active (i.e. Ponder's R was 0.87). Changes in cell volume induced by small step changes in external osmolality were followed photometrically and the time constant for the exponential approach of cell volume to its new equilibrium value was determined. Hydraulic conductivity (LP) was calculated from the time constant and was 1.41 X 10(-6) cm atm-1 s-1 under isotonic conditions at 37 degrees C. LP was inversely dependent on extracellular solute concentration, but it was independent of the direction of movement of water across the plasma membrane. PMID:3746695

  16. Evidence for anthropogenic impact on number concentration and sulfate content of cloud-processed aerosol particles over the North-Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dingenen, Rita; Raes, Frank; Jensen, Niels R.

    1995-10-01

    Aerosol properties were measured during two transects over the North Atlantic between Halifax (Nova Scotia, Canada) and the Moroccan coast. Measurements of the chemical composition of total aerosol, of the black carbon concentration and of the number size distributions with particle diameter Dp in the range 16 nm < Dp < 1 μm were made. The e-folding lifetime of the black carbon aerosol, coming from the northeast American continent and transported eastward over the ocean, was estimated to be 15 hours. The non-sea-salt (nss) fraction of the sulfate concentrations encountered during this campaign spans a 3 order of magnitude range (0.02 μm m-3 to 19 μm m-3) and shows a high correlation with black carbon. The measured bimodal aerosol size distributions were analysed in order to yield number concentrations of the nuclei and the accumulation mode (ACM), the latter being interpreted as cloud-processed particles and thus as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). A strong positive correlation was found between ACM number concentration and nss-sulfate load over the whole concentration range, i.e. for clean to polluted air masses. Furthermore, our regression between nss-sulfate and ACM number concentration also agrees well with results from other investigators where CCN or cloud droplet concentrations were related to nss-sulfate at a variety of geographical locations and degrees of pollution. The composite data set shows that the nss-sulfate-CCN relationship from baseline conditions to anthropogenically conditioned aerosol, happens via a smooth transition which can be described by a linear regression on a logarithmic scale.

  17. Relationship between Plasma Albumin Concentration and Plasma Volume in 5 Inbred Rat Strains.

    PubMed

    Rose, Rajiv; Klemcke, Harold G

    2015-09-01

    Using the Evans Blue procedure, we previously found strain-related differences in plasma volumes in 5 inbred rat strains. Because albumin binds strongly with Evans blue, this protein is important in the Evans blue method of plasma volume determination. Therefore, we speculated that interstrain differences in plasma albumin concentration (PAC) could distort calculated plasma volumes. To address this concern, we used ELISA techniques to measure PAC in these inbred rat strains. In study A, the blood volume was measured by using Evans blue dye, and albumin was measured at the start of hemorrhage. In study B, blood volume was not measured, and albumin was measured twice, near the start and end of hemorrhage (approximately 14 min apart). Neither study revealed any interstrain differences in PAC, which decreased after hemorrhage in all 5 strains. No correlation was found between PAC and plasma volume, survival time, blood lactate, or blood base excess. Percentage changes in PAC during hemorrhage were greater in salt-sensitive compared with Lewis rats. Moreover, these percentage changes were associated with survival time in Fawn hooded hypertensive rats. Our data show that the plasma volumes we measured previously were not misrepresented due to variations in PAC.

  18. Impact of global climate change on ozone, particulate matter, and secondary organic aerosol concentrations in California: A model perturbation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Jeremy R.; Dabdub, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Air quality simulations are performed to determine the impact of changes in future climate and emissions on regional air quality in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) of California. The perturbation parameters considered in this study include (1) temperature, (2) absolute humidity, (3) biogenic VOC emissions due to temperature changes, and (4) boundary conditions. All parameters are first perturbed individually. In addition, the impact of simultaneously perturbing more than one parameter is analyzed. Air quality is simulated with meteorology representative of a summertime ozone pollution episode using both a baseline 2005 emissions inventory and a future emissions projection for the year 2023. Different locations within the modeling domain exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to the perturbations considered. Afternoon domain wide average ozone concentrations are projected to increase by 13-18% as a result of changes in future climate and emissions. Afternoon increases at individual locations range from 10 to 36%. The change in afternoon particulate matter (PM) levels is a strong function of location in the basin, ranging from -7.1% to +4.7% when using 2005 emissions and -8.6% to +1.7% when using 2023 emissions. Afternoon secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentrations for the entire domain are projected to decrease by over 15%, and the change in SOA levels is not a strong function of the emissions inventory utilized. Temperature increases play the dominant role in determining the overall impact on ozone, PM, and SOA concentrations in both the individual and combined perturbation scenarios.

  19. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  20. The variation of nitric acid vapor and nitrate aerosol concentrations near the island of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.

    1992-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO + NO[sub 2]) are estimated to be half of the global emissions to the atmosphere. To understand the effect of increasing anthropogenic reactive nitrogen inputs to the global atmosphere, one needs to monitor their long-term variations. This dissertation examines the variations of total nitrate (nitric acid vapor and nitrate aerosol) at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii. During the Mauna Loa Observatory Photochemistry Experiment (MLOPEX) in May, 1988, six different air types were identified at MLO with statistical analysis. They were: (1) volcano influenced air, (2) stratosphere-like air, (3) boundary-layer air with recent anthropogenic influence, (4) photochemical haze, (5) marine boundary-layer air, (6) well-aged and modified marine air. Samples that might be influenced by marine air or human activity from local islands were eliminated with three meterological criteria (wind direction, condensation nuclei, and dew point). To examine the negative sampling artifacts of nitric acid vapor due to ground loss, mixing ratio gradients with height were measured during August of 1991. The observed gradients of nitric acid vapor indicated that the long-term samplers at 8 m at MLO may underestimate the free tropospheric nitric acid vapor mixing ratio by about 20%. The three year mean and median of free tropospheric total nitrate during long-term measurements were 113 pptv and 93 pptv, respectively. Each year, the total nitrate mixing ratios at MLO during the spring and summer were increased by more than a factor of two higher than fall and winter. NO[sub y] from remote continents (Asia and North America) are likely sources of these increased total nitrate at MLO during these seasons. However, other processes govern the total nitrate mixing ratios, e.g., degree of mixing between free tropospheric air and boundary air at source regions, stratospheric injection, and wet removal of total nitrate.

  1. Adjustment of urinary concentration to urinary volume in relation to erythrocyte and plasma concentrations: an evaluation of urinary heavy metals and organic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, S.; Aono, H.; Murata, K.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of urinary volume on adjusted and nonadjusted urinary excretion of 11 heavy metals and organic substances were examined in relation to plasma and erythrocyte concentrations in 19 metal workers under conditions of water restriction and loading. Blood lead concentrations in these workers ranged from 25 to 59 micrograms/dl. The results indicated that: urinary volume significantly affects not only nonadjusted urinary concentration for all substances, but also affects timed excretion and concentrations adjusted to urinary specific gravity and to urinary creatinine for most substances; the concentration adjusted to urinary volume is, on the other hand, independent of urinary volume; and urinary excretion of lead and mercury is related more closely to erythrocyte concentration than to plasma concentration. This last finding reflects complex renal excretory mechanisms for these heavy metals.

  2. Regional and global impacts of Criegee intermediates on atmospheric sulphuric acid concentrations and first steps of aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Percival, Carl J; Welz, Oliver; Eskola, Arkke J; Savee, John D; Osborn, David L; Topping, David O; Lowe, Douglas; Utembe, Steven R; Bacak, Asan; McFiggans, Gordon; Cooke, Michael C; Xiao, Ping; Archibald, Alexander T; Jenkin, Michael E; Derwent, Richard G; Riipinen, Ilona; Mok, Daniel W K; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M; Taatjes, Craig A; Shallcross, Dudley E

    2013-01-01

    Carbonyl oxides ("Criegee intermediates"), formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes, are key species in tropospheric oxidation of organic molecules and their decomposition provides a non-photolytic source of OH in the atmosphere (Johnson and Marston, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2008, 37, 699, Harrison et al, Sci, Total Environ., 2006, 360, 5, Gäb et al., Nature, 1985, 316, 535, ref. 1-3). Recently it was shown that small Criegee intermediates, C.I.'s, react far more rapidly with SO2 than typically represented in tropospheric models, (Welz, Science, 2012, 335, 204, ref. 4) which suggested that carbonyl oxides could have a substantial influence on the atmospheric oxidation of SO2. Oxidation of 502 is the main atmospheric source of sulphuric acid (H2SO4), which is a critical contributor to aerosol formation, although questions remain about the fundamental nucleation mechanism (Sipilä et al., Science, 2010, 327, 1243, Metzger et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2010 107, 6646, Kirkby et al., Nature, 2011, 476, 429, ref. 5-7). Non-absorbing atmospheric aerosols, by scattering incoming solar radiation and acting as cloud condensation nuclei, have a cooling effect on climate (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Cambridge University Press, 2007, ref. 8). Here we explore the effect of the Criegees on atmospheric chemistry, and demonstrate that ozonolysis of alkenes via the reaction of Criegee intermediates potentially has a large impact on atmospheric sulphuric acid concentrations and consequently the first steps in aerosol production. Reactions of Criegee intermediates with SO2 will compete with and in places dominate over the reaction of OH with SO2 (the only other known gas-phase source of H2SO4) in many areas of the Earth's surface. In the case that the products of Criegee intermediate reactions predominantly result in H2SO4 formation, modelled particle nucleation rates can be substantially increased by the improved

  3. Detection of Free Tropospheric Air Masses With High So2 and Aerosol Concentrations: Evidence For New Aerosol Particle Formation By H2so4/h2o Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katragkou, E.; Wilhelm, S.; Kiendler, A.; Arnold, F.; Minikin, A.; Schlager, H.; van Velthoven, P.

    Sulfur dioxide and aerosol measurements were performed in the free troposphere (FT) and the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) above continental Europe. The measure- ments took place on board of the German research aircraft "Falcon" in 18 April 2001 as a part of the SCAVEX campaign. A novel aircraft based CIMS (Chemical Ion- ization Mass Spectrometry) instrument equipped with an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with a low detection limit (50pptv) and a high time resolution (1.3s) operated by MPI-K was used to perform the SO2 measurements. For the aerosol measurements DLR-IPA operated a Condensation Particle Size Analyzer, detecting particles with diameters d > 4, 7, 9 and 20nm and a PCASP-100X aerosol spectrometer probe (d > 100nm). In the measurements made mostly around 5000m altitude SO2 rich air masses were occasionally observed with SO2 VMR of up to 2900pptv. The strong SO2 pollu- tion was due to fast vertical transport of polluted continental PBL air and small-scale deep convection, as indicated by the 5-day backward 3D trajectories. These observa- tions of strong SO2 pollution have interesting implications for aerosol processes, in- cluding efficient formation of gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) and new aerosol particles. They also imply fast growth of freshly nucleated aerosol particles, which increases the chance for new particles to grow to the size of a CCN. Our analysis indicates the occurrence of new particle formation by H2SO4/H2O nucleation and fast new particle growth by H2SO4/H2O condensation and self-coagulation in the different air masses encountered during the flight.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Outdoor Coarse Particulate Matter Mass Concentrations Measured with a New Coarse Particulate Sampler during the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) provided data to compare outdoor residential coarse particulate matter (PM10-2.5) concentrations in six different areas of Detroit with data from a central monitoring site. Daily and seasonal influences on the spa...

  5. MAPPING ANNUAL MEAN GROUND-LEVEL PM2.5 CONCENTRATIONS USING MULTIANGLE IMAGING SPECTRORADIOMETER AEROSOL OPTICAL THICKNESS OVER THE CONTIGUOUS UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a simple approach to estimating ground-level fine particle (PM2.5, particles smaller than 2.5 um in diameter) concentration using global atmospheric chemistry models and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements from the Multi- angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)...

  6. INDOOR/OUTDOOR AEROSOL CONCENTRATION RATIOS DURING THE 1999 FRESNO PARTICULATE MATTER EXPOSURE STUDIES AS A FUNCTION OF SIZE, SEASON, AND TIME OF DAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1999 Fresno particulate matter exposure studies tools place in February (winter season) and April/May (spring season) for two periods of four weeks. During that time, near-continuous measurements of indoor and outdoor aerosol concentrations were made with a scanning mobilit...

  7. Impacts of alternative fuels in aviation on microphysical aerosol properties and predicted ice nuclei concentration at aircraft cruise altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, B.; D'Ascoli, E.; Sauer, D. N.; Kim, J.; Scheibe, M.; Schlager, H.; Moore, R.; Anderson, B. E.; Ullrich, R.; Mohler, O.; Hoose, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decades air traffic has been substantially growing affecting air quality and climate. According to the International Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO), in the next few years world passenger and freight traffic is expected to increase annually by 6-7% and 4-5%, respectively. One possibility to reduce aviation impacts on the atmosphere and climate might be the replacement of fossil fuels by alternative fuels. However, so far the effects of alternative fuels on particle emissions from aircraft engines and their ability to form contrails remain uncertain. To study the effects of alternative fuels on particle emissions and the formation of contrails, the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) field experiment was conducted in California. In May 2014, the DLR Falcon 20 and the NASA HU-25 jet aircraft were instrumented with an extended aerosol and trace gas payload probing different types of fuels including JP-8 and JP-8 blended with HEFA (Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids) while the NASA DC8 aircraft acted as the source aircraft for ACCESS-2. Emission measurements were taken in the DC8 exhaust plumes at aircraft cruise level between 9-12 km altitude and at distances between 50 m and 20 km behind the DC8 engines. Here, we will present results from the ACCESS-2 aerosol measurements which show a 30-60% reduction of the non-volatile (mainly black carbon) particle number concentration in the aircraft exhaust for the HEFA-blend compared to conventional JP-8 fuel. Size-resolved particle emission indices show the largest reductions for larger particle sizes suggesting that the HEFA blend contains fewer and smaller black carbon particles. We will combine the airborne measurements with a parameterization of deposition nucleation developed during a number of ice nucleation experiments at the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe and discuss the impact of alternative fuels on the abundance of potential ice nuclei at cruise conditions.

  8. Changes in concentration, composition and source contribution of atmospheric organic aerosols by shifting coal to natural gas in Urumqi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Gehui; Wu, Can; Wang, Jiayuan; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Lu; Han, Yanni; Liu, Lang; Cao, Cong; Cao, Junji; He, Qing; Liu, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Size-segregated aerosols were collected in Urumqi, a megacity in northwest China, during two heating seasons, i.e., before (heating season І: January-March 2012) and after (heating season II: January-March 2014) the project "shifting coal to natural gas", and determined for n-alkanes, PAHs and oxygenated PAHs to investigate the impact of replacement of coal by natural gas on organic aerosols in the urban atmosphere. Our results showed that compared to those in heating season I concentrations of n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs decreased by 74%, 74% and 82% in heating season II, respectively. Source apportionment analysis suggested that coal combustion, traffic emission and biomass burning are the major sources of the determined organics during the heating seasons in Urumqi. Traffic emission is the main source for n-alkanes in the city. Coal combustion is the dominant source of PAHs and OPAHs in heating season І, but traffic emission becomes their major source in heating season ІI. Relative contributions of coal combustion to n-alkanes, PAHs and OPAHs in Urumqi decreased from 21 to 75% in heating season I to 4.0-21% in heating season II due to the replacement of coal with natural gas for house heating. Health risk assessment further indicated that compared with that in heating season I the number of lung cancer related to PAHs exposure in Urumqi decreased by 73% during heating season II due to the project implementation. Our results suggest that replacing coal by clean energy sources for house heating will significantly mitigate air pollution and improve human health in China.

  9. Sources of Size Segregated Sulfate Aerosols in the Arctic Summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremaninezhadgharelar, R.; Norman, A. L.; Abbatt, J.; Levasseur, M.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols drive significant radiative forcing and affect Arctic climate. Despite the importance of these particles in Arctic climate change, there are some key uncertainties in the estimation of their effects and sources. Aerosols in six size fractions between <0.49 to 7.0 microns in diameter were collected on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic, during July 2014. A cascade impactor fitted to a high volume sampler was used for this study and was modified to permit collection of SO2 after aerosols were removed from the gas stream. The isotopic composition of sulfate aerosols and SO2 was measured and apportionment calculations have been performed to quantify the contribution of biogenic as well as anthropogenic sources to the growth of different aerosol size fractions in the atmosphere. The presence of sea salt sulfate aerosols was especially high in coarse mode aerosols as expected. The contribution of biogenic sulfate concentration in this study was higher than anthropogenic sulfate. Around 70% of fine aerosols (<0.49 μm) and 86% of SO2 were from biogenic sources. Concentrations of biogenic sulfate for fine aerosols, ranging from 18 to 625 ng/m3, were five times higher than total biogenic sulfate concentrations measured during Fall in the same region (Rempillo et al., 2011). A comparison of the isotope ratio for SO2 and fine aerosols offers a way to determine aerosol growth from local SO2 oxidation. For some samples, the values for SO2 and fine aerosols were close together suggesting the same source for SO2 and aerosol sulfur.Aerosols drive significant radiative forcing and affect Arctic climate. Despite the importance of these particles in Arctic climate change, there are some key uncertainties in the estimation of their effects and sources. Aerosols in six size fractions between <0.49 to 7.0 microns in diameter were collected on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic, during July 2014. A cascade impactor

  10. Evaluation of residual functional lung volume on Tc-99m DTPA aerosol ventilation and Tc-99m MAA perfusion scintigraphy in primary ciliary dyskinesia (Kartagener syndrome).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chang, Chin-Chuan; Lai, Yung-Chuang; Lu, Chia-Ying; Dai, Zen-Kong

    2008-12-01

    Kartagener syndrome is diagnosed as sinusitis, bronchitis (bronchiectasis), and situs inversus by the clinical features. It is a subclass of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) disease. A 12-year-old girl who had frequent upper and lower airway infections since birth, which was confirmed as Kartagener syndrome by HRCT imaging. We present the residual functional lung volume and mucociliary clearance findings seen on Tc-99m DTPA aerosol ventilation and Tc-99m MAA perfusion scintigraphy.

  11. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume concentrations of steady-state secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were measured in several hydrocarbon/NOx irradiation experiments. These measurements were used to estimate the thermal behavior of the particles that may be formed in the atmosphere. These laborator...

  12. Two-hundredfold volume concentration of dilute cell and particle suspensions using chip integrated multistage acoustophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Maria; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-11-21

    Concentrating cells is a frequently performed step in cell biological assays and medical diagnostics. The commonly used centrifuge exhibits limitations when dealing with rare cell events and small sample volumes. Here, we present an acoustophoresis microfluidic chip utilising ultrasound to concentrate particles and cells into a smaller volume. The method is label-free, continuous and independent of suspending fluid, allowing for low cost and minimal preparation of the samples. Sequential concentration regions and two-dimensional acoustic standing wave focusing of cells and particles were found critical to accomplish concentration factors beyond one hundred times. Microparticles (5 μm in diameter) used to characterize the system were concentrated up to 194.2 ± 9.6 times with a recovery of 97.1 ± 4.8%. Red blood cells and prostate cancer cells were concentrated 145.0 ± 5.0 times and 195.7 ± 36.2 times, respectively, with recoveries of 97.2 ± 3.3% and 97.9 ± 18.1%. The data demonstrate that acoustophoresis is an effective technique for continuous flow-based concentration of cells and particles, offering a much needed intermediate step between sorting and detection of rare cell samples in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  13. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Schill, Steven R; Collins, Douglas B; Lee, Christopher; Morris, Holly S; Novak, Gordon A; Prather, Kimberly A; Quinn, Patricia K; Sultana, Camille M; Tivanski, Alexei V; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2015-06-24

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle-particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle-particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate.

  14. DMS atmospheric concentrations and sulphate aerosol indirect radiative forcing: a sensitivity study to the DMS source representation and oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, O.; Moulin, C.; Belviso, S.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Cosme, E.; von Kuhlmann, R.; Lawrence, M. G.; Pham, M.; Reddy, M. S.; Sciare, J.; Venkataraman, C.

    2003-01-01

    The global sulphur cycle has been simulated using a general circulation model with a focus on the source and oxidation of atmospheric dimethylsulphide (DMS). The sensitivity of atmospheric DMS to the oceanic DMS climatology, the parameterisation of the sea-air transfer and to the oxidant fields have been studied. The importance of additional oxidation pathways (by O3 in the gas- and aqueous-phases and by BrO in the gas phase) not incorporated in global models has also been evaluated. While three different climatologies of the oceanic DMS concentration produce rather similar global DMS fluxes to the atmosphere at 24-27 Tg S yr -1, there are large differences in the spatial and seasonal distribution. The relative contributions of OH and NO3 radicals to DMS oxidation depends critically on which oxidant fields are prescribed in the model. Oxidation by O3 appears to be significant at high latitudes in both hemispheres. Oxidation by BrO could be significant even for BrO concentrations at sub-pptv levels in the marine boundary layer. The impact of such refinements on the DMS chemistry onto the indirect radiative forcing by anthropogenic sulphate aerosols is also discussed.

  15. Size segregated mass concentration and size distribution of near surface aerosols over a tropical Indian semi-arid station, Anantapur: Impact of long range transport.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra Kumar, K; Narasimhulu, K; Balakrishnaiah, G; Suresh Kumar Reddy, B; Rama Gopal, K; Reddy, R R; Moorthy, K Krishna; Suresh Babu, S

    2009-10-15

    Regular measurements of size segregated as well as total mass concentration and size distribution of near surface composite aerosols, made using a ten-channel Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) cascade impactor during the period of September 2007-May 2008 are used to study the aerosol characteristics in association with the synoptic meteorology. The total mass concentration varied from 59.70+/-1.48 to 41.40+/-1.72 microg m(-3), out of which accumulation mode dominated by approximately 50%. On a synoptic scale, aerosol mass concentration in the accumulation (submicron) mode gradually increased from an average low value of approximately 26.92+/-1.53 microg m(-3) during the post monsoon season (September-November) to approximately 34.95+/-1.32 microg m(-3) during winter (December-February) and reaching a peak value of approximately 43.56+/-1.42 microg m(-3) during the summer season (March-May). On the contrary, mass concentration of aerosols in the coarse (supermicron) mode increased from approximately 9.23+/-1.25 microg m(-3)during post monsoon season to reach a comparatively high value of approximately 25.89+/-1.95 microg m(-3) during dry winter months and a low value of approximately 8.07+/-0.76 microg m(-3) during the summer season. Effective radius, a parameter important in determining optical (scattering) properties of aerosol size distribution, varied between 0.104+/-0.08 microm and 0.167+/-0.06 microm with a mean value of 0.143+/-0.01 microm. The fine mode is highly reduced during the post monsoon period and the large and coarse modes continue to remain high (replenished) so that their relative dominance increases. It can be seen that among the two parameters measured, correlation of total mass concentration with air temperature is positive (R(2)=0.82) compared with relative humidity (RH) (R(2)=0.75).

  16. Introducing the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-SAM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Timmreck, C.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-04-01

    We are presenting a new global aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2 to study the aerosol dynamics in the UTLS under background and volcanic conditions. The microphysical core modul SAM2 treats the formation, the evolution and the transport of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The aerosol size distribution and the weight percentage of the sulphuric acid solution is calculated dependent on the concentrations of H2SO4 and H2O, their vapor pressures, the atmospheric temperature and pressure. The fixed sectional method is used to resolve an aerosol distribution between 1 nm and 2.6 micron in particle radius. Homogeneous nucleation, condensation and evaporation, coagulation, water-vapor growth, sedimentation and sulphur chemistry are included. The module is applied in the middle-atmosphere MAECHAM5 model, resolving the atmosphere up to 0.01 hPa (~80 km) in 39 layers. It is shown here that MAECHAM5-SAM2 well represents in-situ measured size distributions of stratospheric background aerosol in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. Distinct differences can be seen when derived integrated aerosol parameters (surface area, effective radius) are compared with aerosol climatologies based on the SAGE II satellite instrument (derived by the University of Oxford and the NASA AMES laboratory). The bias between the model and the SAGE II data increases as the moment of the aerosol size distribution decreases. Thus the modeled effective radius show the strongest bias, followed by the aerosol surface area density. Correspondingly less biased are the higher moments volume area density and the mass density of the global stratospheric aerosol coverage. This finding supports the key finding No. 2 of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (2006), where it was shown that during periods of very low aerosol load in the stratosphere, the consistency between in-situ and satellite measurements, which exist in a volcanically perturbed stratosphere, breaks down and significant

  17. Concentrations of mineral aerosol from desert to plains across the central Rocky Mountains, western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Munson, Seth M.; Fernandez, Daniel; Goldstein, Harland L.; Neff, Jason C.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral dusts can have profound effects on climate, clouds, ecosystem processes, and human health. Because regional dust emission and deposition in western North America are not well understood, measurements of total suspended particulate (TSP) from 2011 to 2013 were made along a 500-km transect of five remote sites in Utah and Colorado, USA. The TSP concentrations in μg m-3 adjusted to a 24-h period were relatively high at the two westernmost, dryland sites at Canyonlands National Park (mean = 135) and at Mesa Verde National Park (mean = 99), as well as at the easternmost site on the Great Plains (mean = 143). The TSP concentrations at the two intervening montane sites were less, with more loading on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains (Telluride, mean = 68) closest to the desert sites compared with the site on the eastern slope (Niwot Ridge, mean = 58). Dust concentrations were commonly highest during late winter-late spring, when Pacific frontal storms are the dominant causes of regional wind. Low concentrations (<7 wt%) of organic matter indicated that rock-derived mineral particles composed most TSP. Most TSP mass was carried by particle sizes larger than 10 μm (PM>10), as revealed by relatively low average daily concentrations of fine (<5 μg m-3; PM2.5) and coarse (<10 μg m-3; PM2.5-10) fractions monitored at or near four sites. Standard air-quality measurements for PM2.5 and PM10 apparently do not capture the large majority of mineral-particulate pollution in the remote western interior U.S.

  18. Concentrations of mineral aerosol from desert to plains across the central Rocky Mountains, western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Munson, Seth M.; Fernandez, Daniel; Goldstein, Harland L.; Neff, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Mineral dusts can have profound effects on climate, clouds, ecosystem processes, and human health. Because regional dust emission and deposition in western North America are not well understood, measurements of total suspended particulate (TSP) from 2011 to 2013 were made along a 500-km transect of five remote sites in Utah and Colorado, USA. The TSP concentrations in μg m−3 adjusted to a 24-h period were relatively high at the two westernmost, dryland sites at Canyonlands National Park (mean = 135) and at Mesa Verde National Park (mean = 99), as well as at the easternmost site on the Great Plains (mean = 143). The TSP concentrations at the two intervening montane sites were less, with more loading on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains (Telluride, mean = 68) closest to the desert sites compared with the site on the eastern slope (Niwot Ridge, mean = 58). Dust concentrations were commonly highest during late winter-late spring, when Pacific frontal storms are the dominant causes of regional wind. Low concentrations (<7 wt%) of organic matter indicated that rock-derived mineral particles composed most TSP. Most TSP mass was carried by particle sizes larger than 10 μm (PM>10), as revealed by relatively low average daily concentrations of fine (<5 μg m−3; PM2.5) and coarse (<10 μg m−3; PM2.5–10) fractions monitored at or near four sites. Standard air-quality measurements for PM2.5 and PM10 apparently do not capture the large majority of mineral-particulate pollution in the remote western interior U.S.

  19. Aerosol and Trace Gas Sources in Northern China: Changes in Concentrations Before and After the Official "Heating Season" Help Characterize Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Marufu, L. T.; Dickerson, R. R.; Li, Z.; Stehr, J. W.; Chen, H.; Wang, P.

    2006-05-01

    In March 2005, as a part of the project EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment), in-situ measurements of trace gases and aerosol optical properties were made at Xianghe, a rural surface site about 70 km east-southeast, generally downwind, of Beijing metropolitan area. CO, SO2, NO/NOy, O3, aerosol absorption coefficient, and aerosol scattering coefficients were determined simultaneously using the University of Maryland light aircraft instrument package. Pollutant ratios have been calculated to characterize the emission sources around the site. A dramatic drop in the NOy/CO ratio found around March 13/14 suggesting a sudden shutoff of a large fraction of the high- temperature combustion sources in the region. This observed change in concentrations occurred simultaneously with the transition from "heating season" to "non-heating season" in Northern China. Over the course of just a few days (around March 15), all boilers used to provide heat for cities and towns in this region are shut down in accordance with a governmental guideline. Most of these boilers operate with coal, and by using ratios of NOy/CO, SO2/CO, aerosol scattering/CO, and aerosol absorption/CO during and after the "heating season", emissions from these small to medium sized coal-fired boilers can be characterized. Results indicate that these residential and small-scale industrial heaters are a major source of NOy and SO2. Besides elevating the regional atmospheric pollutant level, the trace gases and aerosols emitted also have potential effects in other aspects such as the biogeochemical cycle of N and the agricultural production in this region.

  20. Biogenic sulfur emissions and aerosols over the tropical South Atlantic: 3. Atmospheric dimethylsulfide, aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.; Elbert, Wolfgang; de Mora, Stephen J.

    1995-06-01

    We measured dimethylsulfide in air (DMSa) and the number concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols, including the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), during February-March 1991 over the tropical South Atlantic along 19°S (F/S Meteor, cruise 15/3). Aerosol number/size distributions were determined with a laser-optical particle counter, condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations with a TSI 3020, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with a Hudson-type supersaturation chamber. Aerosol samples were collected on two-stage stacked filters and analyzed by ion chromatography for soluble ion concentrations. Black carbon in aerosols was measured by visible light absorption and used to identify and eliminate periods with anthropogenic pollution from the data set. Meteorological analysis shows that most of the air masses sampled had spent extended periods over remote marine areas in the tropical and subtropical region. DMSa was closely correlated with the sea-to- air DMS flux calculated from DMS concentrations in seawater and meteorological data. Sea salt made the largest contribution to aerosol mass and volume but provided only a small fraction of the aerosol number concentration. The submicron aerosol had a mean composition close to ammonium bisulfate, with the addition of some methanesulfonate. Aerosol (CN and CCN) number and non-sea-salt sulfate concentrations were significantly correlated with DMS concentration and flux. This suggests that DMS oxidation followed by aerosol nucleation and growth in the marine boundary layer is an important, if not dominating, source of CN and possibly CCN. The degree of correlation between DMS and particle concentrations in the marine boundary layer may be strongly influenced by the different time scales of the processes regulating these concentrations. Our results provide strong support for several aspects of the CLAW hypothesis, which proposes the existence of a feedback loop linking DMS

  1. Airborne measurements of biomass burning aerosol distribution and composition in the springtime Arctic 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T.; Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Thomson, D. S.; Brock, C. A.; Cozic, J.; Warneke, C.; Degouw, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Bahreini, R.; Brioude, J.

    2008-12-01

    The springtime Arctic troposphere in 2008 was characterized by high concentrations of biomass burning aerosol. During the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC) campaign, airborne measurements of aerosol composition by the NOAA single particle mass spectrometer instrument (PALMS) identified biomass burning particles using an established composition tracer. Fires in northern Asia produced biomass burning aerosol that were transported to the Arctic within 3-12 days. Concentrations of biomass burning aerosols were elevated not only within well defined plumes, but also regionally throughout the Arctic. Above the boundary layer, biomass burning particles dominated the total aerosol volume and were largely responsible for the Arctic Haze observed during the period of study. The composition of plume aerosols varied according to source region, transport time, and anthropogenic influence.

  2. Cytosolic protein concentration is the primary volume signal in dog red cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    It is not known whether the activation of Na/H exchange by shrinkage in dog red cells is due to the packing of cell contents or a change in cell configuration. To make this distinction we prepared resealed ghosts that resembled intact cells in hemoglobin concentration and surface area, but had one-third their volume. A shrinkage-induced, amiloride-sensitive Na flux in the ghosts was activated at a much smaller volume in the ghosts than in the intact cells, but at the same concentration (by weight) of dry solids in both preparations. Na/H exchange in ghosts containing a mixture of 40% albumin and 60% hemoglobin (weight/weight) was activated by osmotic shrinkage at a dry solid concentration similar to that of intact cells or of ghosts containing only hemoglobin. We conclude that the process of Na/H exchange activation by cell shrinkage originates with an increase in the concentration of intracellular protein and not with a change in membrane configuration or tension. The macromolecular crowding that accompanies the reduction in cell volume probably alters the activities of key enzymes that in turn modulate the Na/H exchanger. PMID:1662684

  3. Measured In Situ Atmospheric Ambient Aerosol Size-Distributions, Particle Concentrations, and Turbulence Data for RSA TA-6 Test Range, Redstone Arsenal, AL, April-May 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Concentrations, and Turbulence Data for RSA TA-6 Test Range, Redstone Arsenal , AL, April–May 2015 by Kristan Gurton, Stephanie Cunningham, and...Aerosol Size-Distributions, Particle Concentrations, and Turbulence Data for RSA TA-6 Test Range, Redstone Arsenal , AL, April–May 2015 by Kristan...Redstone Arsenal , AL Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. ii REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188

  4. Local emission of primary air pollutants and its contribution to wet deposition and concentrations of aerosols and gases in ambient air in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Masahide; Hiraki, Takatoshi; Tomoyose, Nobutaka; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Noguchi, Izumi; Murano, Kentaro; Mukai, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    We studied wet deposition by precipitation and the concentrations of aerosols and gases in ambient air in relation to the primary air pollutants discharged from domestic areas. The concentrations of aerosols and gases were influenced by nearby emissions except for non-sea-salt SO, which is transported long distances. The area facing the Sea of Japan showed much larger wet deposition than other areas, although the domestic emissions of the primary air pollutants there were small and showed a peak in wet deposition from October to March, as distinct from April to September in other areas. We performed the correlation analyses between wet deposition of each component and the product of the concentrations of corresponding aerosols and gases in ambient air and the two-thirds power of the precipitation. From the results, following scavenging processes were suggested. • Sulfate and ammonium were scavenged in precipitation as particulate matter such as (NH4)2SO4 and NH4HSO4. • Nitrate was scavenged mainly in precipitation through gaseous HNO3. • Ammonium was complementarily scavenged in precipitation through aerosols such as (NH4)2SO4 and NH4HSO4 and through gaseous NH3.

  5. Accurate mass replacement method for the sediment concentration measurement with a constant volume container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yunyun; Chen, Tianqin; Yan, Jun; Lei, Tingwu

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of sediment concentration in water is of great importance in soil erosion research and soil and water loss monitoring systems. The traditional weighing method has long been the foundation of all the other measuring methods and instrument calibration. The development of a new method to replace the traditional oven-drying method is of interest in research and practice for the quick and efficient measurement of sediment concentration, especially field measurements. A new method is advanced in this study for accurately measuring the sediment concentration based on the accurate measurement of the mass of the sediment-water mixture in the confined constant volume container (CVC). A sediment-laden water sample is put into the CVC to determine its mass before the CVC is filled with water and weighed again for the total mass of the water and sediments in the container. The known volume of the CVC, the mass of sediment-laden water, and sediment particle density are used to calculate the mass of water, which is replaced by sediments, therefore sediment concentration of the sample is calculated. The influence of water temperature was corrected by measuring water density to determine the temperature of water before measurements were conducted. The CVC was used to eliminate the surface tension effect so as to obtain the accurate volume of water and sediment mixture. Experimental results showed that the method was capable of measuring the sediment concentration from 0.5 up to 1200 kg m‑3. A good liner relationship existed between the designed and measured sediment concentrations with all the coefficients of determination greater than 0.999 and the averaged relative error less than 0.2%. All of these seem to indicate that the new method is capable of measuring a full range of sediment concentration above 0.5 kg m‑3 to replace the traditional oven-drying method as a standard method for evaluating and calibrating other methods.

  6. Comparison of Bulk Carbon Concentrations and Optical Properties of Carbonaceous Aerosols in the North Slope Alaska from Summer 2012 and Summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheesley, R. J.; Barrett, T. E.; Moffett, C.; Gunsch, M.; Pratt, K.

    2015-12-01

    With recent drilling permits being issued for exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea, there is a need for characterization of carbonaceous aerosols in the Arctic both prior to and during the exploratory drilling phase. A month-long field sampling campaign will be conducted in Barrow, AK, at the confluence of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas, from August to September 2015. Total suspended particulate (TSP) aerosol samples will be collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) climate research facility in Barrow, AK, USA. Samples will be analyzed for organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) on a Sunset carbon analyzer utilizing the NIOSH 5040 method. Samples will also be analyzed for water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) using a water extraction method and subsequent analysis on a Shimadzu Total Carbon Analyzer. Optical properties of the aqueous extracts will also be measured using an Agilent ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometer. OC, EC and WSOC concentrations will then be compared to aerosol samples collected at the same location in summer 2012, prior to the onset of exploratory drilling in the Chukchi Sea. Back trajectory (BT) analysis will be performed for each sampling campaign to help assess the impact of source region on the carbonaceous aerosol budget and to identify any changes in source region between the two campaigns. A comparison of samples from the same location and season both prior to and post drilling will allow for a more accurate characterization and tracking of the potential impacts of new aerosol emission sources in the region.

  7. Ground level environmental protein concentrations in various ecuadorian environments: potential uses of aerosolized protein for ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staton, Sarah J.R.; Woodward, Andrea; Castillo, Josemar A.; Swing, Kelly; Hayes, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Large quantities of free protein in the environment and other bioaerosols are ubiquitous throughout terrestrial ground level environments and may be integrative indicators of ecosystem status. Samples of ground level bioaerosols were collected from various ecosystems throughout Ecuador, including pristine humid tropical forest (pristine), highly altered secondary humid tropical forest (highly altered), secondary transitional very humid forest (regrowth transitional), and suburban dry montane deforested (suburban deforested). The results explored the sensitivity of localized aerosol protein concentrations to spatial and temporal variations within ecosystems, and their value for assessing environmental change. Ecosystem specific variations in environmental protein concentrations were observed: pristine 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3, highly altered 0.07 ± 0.05 μg/m3, regrowth transitional 0.17 ± 0.06 μg/m3, and suburban deforested 0.09 ± 0.04 μg/m3. Additionally, comparisons of intra-environmental differences in seasonal/daily weather (dry season 0.08 ± 0.03 μg/m3 and wet season 0.10 ± 0.04 μg/m3), environmental fragmentation (buffered 0.19 ± 0.06 μg/m3 and edge 0.15 ± 0.06 μg/m3), and sampling height (ground level 0.32 ± 0.09 μg/m3 and 10 m 0.24 ± 0.04 μg/m3) demonstrated the sensitivity of protein concentrations to environmental conditions. Local protein concentrations in altered environments correlated well with satellite-based spectral indices describing vegetation productivity: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) (r2 = 0.801), net primary production (NPP) (r2 = 0.827), leaf area index (LAI) (r2 = 0.410). Moreover, protein concentrations distinguished the pristine site, which was not differentiated in spectral indices, potentially due to spectral saturation typical of highly vegetated environments. Bioaerosol concentrations represent an inexpensive method to increase understanding of environmental changes, especially in densely vegetated

  8. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the gas-phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the regional chemistry transport model WRF-Chem, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48% and 63% respectively over the continental US Dry deposition of gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (-40% vs. -8% for anthropogenics, -52% vs. -11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas-phase (61% for anthropogenics, 76% for biogenics). A number of sensitivity studies shows that this is a robust feature of the modeling system. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = 105 M atm-1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 25% / 10% compared to our best estimate. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm-1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower

  9. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the gas phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the WRF-Chem regional chemistry transport model, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48 and 63% respectively over the continental US. Dry deposition of gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (-40 vs. -8% for anthropogenics, and -52 vs. -11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas phase (61% for anthropogenics and 76% for biogenics). Results are sensitive to assumptions made in the dry deposition scheme, but gas-phase deposition of SVOCs remains crucial even under conservative estimates. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm-1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in

  10. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE PAGES

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-01-06

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the gas phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the WRF-Chem regional chemistry transport model, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48 and 63% respectively over the continental US. Dry deposition ofmore » gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (−40 vs. −8% for anthropogenics, and −52 vs. −11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas phase (61% for anthropogenics and 76% for biogenics). Results are sensitive to assumptions made in the dry deposition scheme, but gas-phase deposition of SVOCs remains crucial even under conservative estimates. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm−1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility

  11. Atmospheric trace metals over the Atlantic and South Indian Oceans: Investigation of metal concentrations and lead isotope ratios in coastal and remote marine aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Melanie; Baker, Alex R.; Jickells, Tim D.

    Atmospheric concentrations of trace metals over the oceans are investigated through analysis of aerosol samples collected during cruises from the UK to the Falkland Islands and from South Africa to Australia. The readily soluble concentrations of Cu (4-256 pmol m -3), Ni (0.1-54 pmol m -3), Ba (0.2-60 pmol m -3), Zn (6-316 pmol m -3), Cd (0.01-0.29 pmol m -3) and Pb (0.4-22 pmol m -3) were measured in the aerosols, along with total concentrations of crustal elements (Fe, Al and Mn) to evaluate the crustal contributions. Air mass back trajectories suggested most of the aerosol samples had spent several days over the ocean prior to collection. The highest metal concentrations were observed in aerosols close to South Africa, Australia and major cities in South America, although these concentrations were lower than had been reported previously in the literature. Apart from Ba, which had a major crustal source, the trace metals were enriched relative to crustal sources in most samples, including some collected thousands of kilometers from emission sources. The mean trace metal concentrations in the remote Indian Ocean were lower than those measured in the Atlantic Ocean. Even lower concentrations are reported in the literature for the remote Pacific Ocean. In contrast to previous studies, no clear north-south gradient is observed in the concentrations of the trace metals in the aerosols. Lead isotope measurements were also carried out on aerosol samples using a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to assist in source apportionment. Clear differences were noted in the isotope ratios collected on either side of the Indian Ocean with Australian lead ore dominating over much of the eastern and mid-southern Indian Ocean. Samples collected over the western Indian Ocean and Atlantic Ocean under South African influence had lead isotopes quite different from those seen in South African cities in the past, and are closer in ratio to the coal signature of

  12. Aerosol species concentrations and source apportionment of ammonia at Rocky Mountain National Park.

    PubMed

    Malm, William C; Schichtel, Bret A; Barna, Michael G; Gebhart, Kristi A; Rodriguez, Marco A; Collett, Jeffrey L; Carrico, Christian M; Benedict, Katherine B; Prenni, Anthony J; Kreidenweis, Sonia M

    2013-11-01

    Changes in ecosystem function at Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) are occurring because of emissions of nitrogen and sulfate species along the Front Range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, as well as sources farther east and west. The nitrogen compounds include both oxidized and reduced nitrogen. A year-long monitoring program of various oxidized and reduced nitrogen species was initiated to better understand their origins as well as the complex chemistry occurring during transport from source to receptor. Specifically the goals of the study were to characterize the atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen species in gaseous, particulate, and aqueous phases (precipitation and clouds) along the east and west sides of the Continental Divide; identify the relative contributions to atmospheric nitrogen species in RMNP from within and outside of the state of Colorado; identify the relative contributions to atmospheric nitrogen species in RMNP from emission sources along the Colorado Front Range versus other areas within Colorado; and identify the relative contributions to atmospheric nitrogen species from mobile sources, agricultural activities, and large and small point sources within the state of Colorado. Measured ammonia concentrations are combined with modeled releases of conservative tracers from ammonia source regions around the United States to apportion ammonia to its respective sources, using receptor modeling tools.

  13. Aerosol optical properties measurement by recently developed cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Xu, Xuezhe; Zhang, Qilei; Fang, Bo; Qian, Xiaodong; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    Development of appropriate and well-adapted measurement technologies for real-time in-situ measurement of aerosol optical properties is an important step towards a more accurate and quantitative understanding of aerosol impacts on climate and the environment. Aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, ω), the ratio between the scattering (αscat) and extinction (αext) coefficients, is an important optical parameter that governs the relative strength of the aerosol scattering and absorption capacity. Since the aerosol extinction coefficient is the sum of the absorption and scattering coefficients, a commonly used method for the determination of SSA is to separately measure two of the three optical parameters - absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients - with different instruments. However, as this method involves still different instruments for separate measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients under different sampling conditions, it might cause potential errors in the determination of SSA value, because aerosol optical properties are very sensitive to the sampling conditions such as temperature and relative humidity (RH). In this paper, we report on the development of a cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) and an integrating sphere (IS) for direct in-situ measurement of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients on the exact same sample volume. The cavity-enhanced albedometer holds great promise for high-sensitivity and high-precision measurement of ambient aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients (hence absorption coefficient and SSA determination) and for absorbing trace gas concentration. In addition, simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients enable a potential application for the retrieval of particle number size distribution and for faster retrieval of aerosols' complex RI. The albedometer was deployed to

  14. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS - diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Karanasiou, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.

    2013-04-01

    Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb) were obtained by time (1 h) and size (PM2.5 particulate matter < 2.5 μm) resolved aerosol samples analysed by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) measurements. In the Marie Curie European Union framework of SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies), the approach used is the simultaneous sampling at two monitoring sites in Barcelona (Spain) during September-October 2010: an urban background site (UB) and a street canyon traffic road site (RS). Elements related to primary non-exhaust traffic emission (Fe, Cu), dust resuspension (Ca) and anthropogenic Cl were found enhanced at the RS, whereas industrial related trace metals (Zn, Pb, Mn) were found at higher concentrations at the more ventilated UB site. When receptor modelling was performed with positive matrix factorization (PMF), nine different aerosol sources were identified at both sites: three types of regional aerosols (regional sulphate (S) - 27%, biomass burning (K) - 5%, sea salt (Na-Mg) - 17%), three types of dust aerosols (soil dust (Al-Ti) - 17%, urban crustal dust (Ca) - 6%, and primary traffic non-exhaust brake dust (Fe-Cu) - 7%), and three types of industrial aerosol plumes-like events (shipping oil combustion (V-Ni) - 17%, industrial smelters (Zn-Mn) - 3%, and industrial combustion (Pb-Cl) - 5%, percentages presented are average source contributions to the total elemental mass measured). The validity of the PMF solution of the PIXE data is supported by very good correlations with external single particle mass spectrometry measurements. Some important conclusions can be drawn about the PM2.5 mass fraction simultaneously measured at the UB and RS sites: (1) the regional aerosol sources impact both

  15. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Pöhlker, C.; Prenni, A. J.; DeMott, P. J.; Mason, R. H.; Robinson, N. H.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Tobo, Y.; Després, V. R.; Garcia, E.; Gochis, D. J.; Harris, E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Ruzene, C.; Schmer, B.; Sinha, B.; Day, D. A.; Andreae, M. O.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gallagher, M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Bertram, A. K.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-01-01

    Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a forest ecosystem increases dramatically during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2-6 μm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteraceae, Pseudomonadaceae). In addition to known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides), we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum). Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  16. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. Alex; Pöhlker, Christopher; Prenni, Anthony; DeMott, Paul; Mason, Ryan; Robinson, Niall; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Tobo, Yutaka; Després, Viviane; Garcia, Elvin; Gochis, David; Sinha, Bärbel; Day, Douglas; Andreae, Meinrat; Jimenez, Jose; Gallagher, Martin; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Bertram, Allan; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a forest ecosystem increases dramatically during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2-6 µm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteraceae, Pseudomonadaceae). In addition to known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides), we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum). Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  17. Relationship between acetaldehyde concentration in mouth air and tongue coating volume

    PubMed Central

    YOKOI, Aya; MARUYAMA, Takayuki; YAMANAKA, Reiko; EKUNI, Daisuke; TOMOFUJI, Takaaki; KASHIWAZAKI, Haruhiko; YAMAZAKI, Yutaka; MORITA, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acetaldehyde is the first metabolite of ethanol and is produced in the epithelium by mucosal ALDH, while higher levels are derived from microbial oxidation of ethanol by oral microflora such as Candida species. However, it is uncertain whether acetaldehyde concentration in human breath is related to oral condition or local production of acetaldehyde by oral microflora. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the relationship between physiological acetaldehyde concentration and oral condition in healthy volunteers. Material and Methods Sixty-five volunteers (51 males and 14 females, aged from 20 to 87 years old) participated in the present study. Acetaldehyde concentration in mouth air was measured using a portable monitor. Oral examination, detection of oral Candida species and assessment of alcohol sensitivity were performed. Results Acetaldehyde concentration [median (25%, 75%)] in mouth air was 170.7 (73.5, 306.3) ppb. Acetaldehyde concentration in participants with a tongue coating status score of 3 was significantly higher than in those with a score of 1 (p<0.017). After removing tongue coating, acetaldehyde concentration decreased significantly (p<0.05). Acetaldehyde concentration was not correlated with other clinical parameters, presence of Candida species, smoking status or alcohol sensitivity. Conclusion Physiological acetaldehyde concentration in mouth air was associated with tongue coating volume. PMID:25760268

  18. Impact of sampling volume on the probability density function of steady state concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwede, Ronnie L.; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Nowak, Wolfgang; Neuweiler, Insa

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, statistical theory has been used to compute the ensemble mean and variance of solute concentration in aquifer formations with second-order stationary velocity fields. The merit of accurately estimating the mean and variance of concentration, however, remains unclear without knowing the shape of the probability density function (pdf). In a setup where a conservative solute is continuously injected into a domain, the concentration is bounded between zero and the concentration value in the injected solution. At small travel distances close to the fringe of the plume, an observation point may fall into the plume or outside, so that the statistical concentration distribution clusters at the two limiting values. Obviously, this results in non-Gaussian pdf's of concentration. With increasing travel distance, the lateral plume boundaries are smoothed, resulting in increased probability of intermediate concentrations. Likewise, averaging the concentration in a larger sampling volume, as typically done in field measurements, leads to higher probabilities of intermediate concentrations. We present semianalytical results of concentration pdf's for measurements with point-like or larger support volumes based on stochastic theory applied to stationary media. To this end, we employ a reversed auxiliary transport problem, in which we use analytical expressions for first and second central spatial lateral moments with an assumed Gaussian pdf for the uncertainty of the first lateral moment and Gauss-like shapes in individual cross sections. The resulting concentration pdf can be reasonably fitted by beta distributions. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations of flow and steady state transport in 3-D heterogeneous domains. In both methods the shape of the concentration pdf changes with distance to the contaminant source: Near the source, the distribution is multimodal, whereas it becomes a unimodal beta distribution far away from the contaminant source

  19. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Prenni, A. J.; DeMott, P. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Mason, R. H.; Robinson, N. H.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Tobo, Y.; Després, V. R.; Garcia, E.; Gochis, D. J.; Harris, E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Ruzene, C.; Schmer, B.; Sinha, B.; Day, D. A.; Andreae, M. O.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gallagher, M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Bertram, A. K.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-07-01

    Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties, and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a North American forest ecosystem increases significantly during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2-6 μm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including groups containing human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae). In addition to detecting known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides), we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum). Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN, and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  20. Estimating Size-Resolved Surface Particulate Matter Concentrations Using MISR High-Resolution Size-Fractionated Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, M.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Garay, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    There is significant public health interest in gaining a better understanding of the health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) of different composition and size, yet ground-based monitoring data for such PM species is extremely limited. Due to their spatial and temporal coverage, satellite observations of total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) have increasingly been used to estimate surface concentrations of PM. While techniques for using satellite observations of AOD to predict surface concentrations of PM2.5 have been established, predicting surface concentrations of different particle sizes and species is more challenging. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument has the unique capability of estimating both total column AOD as well as total column size fractionated (small, medium and large) AOD. Using MISR AOD and AOD size fractionated products derived from high-resolution (275 m) observations reported at a spatial scale of 4.4 km in combination with national Air Quality System (AQS) monitoring data over the 2008-2009 period, we examine the association between size-fractionated MISR AOD and surface measurements of PM at different sizes (PM2.5 and PM10) and PM2.5 species (EC, OC, SO42-, NH4+) over the greater Los Angeles area. While there was a limited sample size of speciated PM data, the strongest univariate association found was between AOD and PM2.5 SO42- (R2=0.76). Incorporating meteorological data from weather stations in the area resulted in improvements to the models associating AOD with PM2.5 and PM10 mass. We found that PM2.5 was best predicted by a spatio-temporal model of AOD that also included dew point temperature and wind speed (R2=0.61), and that PM10 was best predicted by a spatio-temporal model of large fraction AOD that also included atmospheric pressure and wind speed (R2=0.65). These flexibly specified spatio-temporal models enabled reliable predictions of surface PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations at a 4.4km

  1. Airship measurements of aerosol size distributions, cloud droplet spectra, and trace gas concentrations in the marine boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, G.M.; Hoppel, W.A. )

    1993-11-01

    The use of an airship as a platform to conduct atmospheric chemistry, aerosol, and cloud microphysical research is described, and results from demonstration flights made off the Oregon coast are presented. The slow speed of the airship makes it an ideal platform to do high-spatial resolution profiling both vertically and horizontally, and to measure large aerosol and cloud droplet distributions without the difficulties caused by high-speed aircraft sampling. A unique set of data obtained during the demonstration flights show the effect that processing marine boundary layer aerosol through stratus clouds has on the aerosol size distribution. Evidence of new particle formation (nucleation of particles) was also observed on about half the days on which flights were made. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Rapid concentration of Bacillus and Clostridium spores from large volumes of milk, using continuous flow centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Agoston, Réka; Soni, Kamlesh A; McElhany, Katherine; Cepeda, Martha L; Zuckerman, Udi; Tzipori, Saul; Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla; Pillai, Suresh D

    2009-03-01

    Deliberate or accidental contamination of foods such as milk, soft drinks, and drinking water with infectious agents or toxins is a major concern to health authorities. There is a critical need to develop technologies that can rapidly and efficiently separate and concentrate biothreat agents from food matrices. A key limitation of current centrifugation and filtration technologies is that they are batch processes with extensive hands-on involvement and processing times. The objective of our studies was to evaluate the continuous flow centrifugation (CFC) technique for the rapid separation and concentration of bacterial spores from large volumes of milk. We determined the effectiveness of the CFC technology for concentrating approximately 10(3) bacterial spores in 3.7 liters (1 gal) of whole milk and skim milk, using Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Clostridium sporogenes spores as surrogates for biothreat agents. The spores in the concentrated samples were enumerated by using standard plating techniques. Three independent experiments were performed at 10,000 rpm and 0.7 liters/min flow rate. The mean B. subtilis spore recoveries were 71.3 and 56.5% in skim and whole milk, respectively, and those for B. atrophaeus were 55 and 59.3% in skim and whole milk, respectively. In contrast, mean C. sporogenes spore recoveries were 88.2 and 78.6% in skim and whole milk, respectively. The successful use of CFC to concentrate these bacterial spores from 3.7 liters of milk in 10 min shows promise for rapidly concentrating other spores from large volumes of milk.

  3. Seasonal changes in Fe species and soluble Fe concentration in the atmosphere in the Northwest Pacific region based on the analysis of aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Kanai, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Zheng, G.; Marcus, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) can be a significant source of nutrition for phytoplankton inhabiting remote oceans, which in turn has a large influence on the Earth's climate. The bioavailability of Fe in aerosols depends mainly on the fraction of soluble Fe (= [FeSol]/[FeTotal], where [FeSol] and [FeTotal] are the atmospheric concentrations of soluble and total Fe, respectively). However, the numerous factors affecting the soluble Fe fraction have not been fully understood. In this study, the Fe species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentrations in aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan were investigated over a year (nine samples from December 2002 to October 2003) to identify the factors affecting the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean. The soluble Fe concentration in aerosols is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate originated from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. Moreover, the soluble Fe concentration is also correlated with the enrichment factors of vanadium and nickel emitted by fossil fuel combustion. These results suggest that the degree of Fe dissolution is influenced by the magnitude of anthropogenic activity, such as fossil fuel combustion. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was performed in this study to identify the Fe species in aerosols. The fitting of XAFS spectra coupled with micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) determined the main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba to be illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, the soluble Fe fraction in each sample measured by leaching experiments is closely correlated with the Fe(III) sulfate fraction determined by the XAFS spectrum fitting, suggesting that Fe(III) sulfate is the main soluble Fe in the ocean. Another possible factor that can control the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean is the total Fe(III) concentration in the atmosphere, which was high in spring due to the high

  4. Seasonal changes in Fe species and soluble Fe concentration in the atmosphere in the Northwest Pacific region based on the analysis of aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Furukawa, T.; Kanai, Y.; Uematsu, M.; Zheng, G.; Marcus, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric iron (Fe) can be a significant source of nutrition for phytoplankton inhabiting remote oceans, which in turn has a large influence on the Earth's climate. The bioavailability of Fe in aerosols depends mainly on the fraction of soluble Fe (= [FeSol]/[FeTotal], where [FeSol] and [FeTotal] are the atmospheric concentrations of soluble and total Fe, respectively). However, the numerous factors affecting the soluble Fe fraction have not been fully understood. In this study, the Fe species, chemical composition, and soluble Fe concentrations in aerosols collected in Tsukuba, Japan were investigated over a year (nine samples from December 2002 to October 2003) to identify the factors affecting the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean. The soluble Fe concentration in aerosols is correlated with those of sulfate and oxalate originated from anthropogenic sources, suggesting that soluble Fe is mainly derived from anthropogenic sources. Moreover, the soluble Fe concentration is also correlated with the enrichment factors of vanadium and nickel emitted by fossil fuel combustion. These results suggest that the degree of Fe dissolution is influenced by the magnitude of anthropogenic activity, such as fossil fuel combustion. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was performed in order to identify the Fe species in aerosols. Fitting of XAFS spectra coupled with micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (μ-XRF) showed the main Fe species in aerosols in Tsukuba to be illite, ferrihydrite, hornblende, and Fe(III) sulfate. Moreover, the soluble Fe fraction in each sample measured by leaching experiments is closely correlated with the Fe(III) sulfate fraction determined by the XAFS spectrum fitting, suggesting that Fe(III) sulfate is the main soluble Fe in the ocean. Another possible factor that can control the amount of soluble Fe supplied into the ocean is the total Fe(III) concentration in the atmosphere, which was high in spring due to the high mineral

  5. Preparation of small volume, leuko and erythrocyte very poor platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Valbonesi, M; Angelini, G; Malfanti, L; Lercari, G; Fella, M; Calderisi, S; Anselmo, A; Balistreri, M

    1986-05-01

    Recently developed automated discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) separators can produce leuko- and erythrocyte-poor platelet concentrates (PC). According to general experience with these machines it is difficult to obtain more than 4 X 10(11) platelets, though a second program set up by Coffe et al. appears to produce PC containing approximately 5 X 10(11) platelets suspended in a plasma volume of 390 ml. At our center we employed a new Dideco cell separator equipped with the surge pump and a technique developed for the production of small volume, RBC and WBC-very poor PC. In 60 routine procedures we obtained the following results: mean processing time 87 +/- 11 minutes; final volume of PC 136 +/- 19 ml, with a mean platelet yield of 5.21 X 10(11) platelets. WBC contamination was 1.8 X 10(8) (93% lymphocytes) and RBC were 3.1 X 10(8). Plasma volume as well as WBC and RBC contamination were reduced by recirculating PC after the 6th pass. The demand for single donor platelet concentrates (PC) is increasing progressively. Recently developed automated cell separators can produce leukocyte (WBC) and erythrocyte (RBC) poor PC. With these machines it may be difficult to obtain PC containing at least 4 X 10(11) platelets and less than 1 X 10(9) leukocytes (1, 2, 3) since donor variables such as hematocrit, precounts, buffy coat formation and initial plasma light transmission are of paramount importance for the efficiency of the program. At our center a prototype discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) cell separator equipped with the surge pump was studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-4 Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated...

  7. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized âTypicalâ Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-5 to Subpart F of Part... of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-5 Table F-5 to Subpart F of...

  8. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-6 to Subpart F of Part 53... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-6 Table F-6 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated...

  9. 40 CFR Table F-4 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-4 Table F-4 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated...

  10. 40 CFR Table F-5 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized “Typical” Coarse Aerosol Size...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized âTypicalâ Coarse Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-5 to Subpart F of Part... of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-5 Table F-5 to Subpart F of...

  11. 40 CFR Table F-6 to Subpart F of... - Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Estimated Mass Concentration Measurement of PM2.5 for Idealized Fine Aerosol Size Distribution F Table F-6 to Subpart F of Part 53... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. F, Table F-6 Table F-6 to Subpart F of Part 53—Estimated...

  12. American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) `95

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Fourteenth annual meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research was held October 9-13, 1995 at Westin William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, PA. This volume contains the abstracts of the papers and poster sessions presented at this meeting, grouped by the session in which they were presented as follows: Radiation Effects; Aerosol Deposition; Collision Simulations and Microphysical Behavior; Filtration Theory and Measurements; Materials Synthesis; Radioactive and Nuclear Aerosols; Aerosol Formation, Thermodynamic Properties, and Behavior; Particle Contamination Issues in the Computer Industry; Pharmaceutical Aerosol Technology; Modeling Global/Regional Aerosols; Visibility; Respiratory Deposition; Biomass and Biogenic Aerosols; Aerosol Dynamics; Atmospheric Aerosols.

  13. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  14. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xu; Mickley, Loretta J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Kaplan, Jed O.

    2013-10-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21st century (2046-2065), based on results from 15 climate models following the A1B scenario. We develop fire prediction models by regressing meteorological variables from the current and previous years together with fire indexes onto observed regional area burned. The regressions explain 0.25-0.60 of the variance in observed annual area burned during 1980-2004, depending on the ecoregion. We also parameterize daily area burned with temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. This approach explains ˜0.5 of the variance in observed area burned over forest ecoregions but shows no predictive capability in the semi-arid regions of Nevada and California. By applying the meteorological fields from 15 climate models to our fire prediction models, we quantify the robustness of our wildfire projections at midcentury. We calculate increases of 24-124% in area burned using regressions and 63-169% with the parameterization. Our projections are most robust in the southwestern desert, where all GCMs predict significant (p < 0.05) meteorological changes. For forested ecoregions, more GCMs predict significant increases in future area burned with the parameterization than with the regressions, because the latter approach is sensitive to hydrological variables that show large inter-model variability in the climate projections. The parameterization predicts that the fire season lengthens by 23 days in the warmer and drier climate at midcentury. Using a chemical transport model, we find that wildfire emissions will increase summertime surface organic carbon aerosol over the western United States by 46-70% and black carbon by 20-27% at midcentury, relative to the present day. The pollution is most enhanced during extreme episodes: above the 84th percentile of concentrations, OC increases by ˜90% and BC by ˜50%, while visibility decreases from 130 km to 100 km in 32 Federal Class 1 areas in

  15. Simulation of Regional-scale Nucleation Events and Prediction of Aerosol Number Concentration in a Regional Air Quality Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Adams, P.; Pandis, S.

    2006-12-01

    Nanoparticles can perturb Earth's climate by growing to cloud condensation nuclei sizes and also may be harmful to human health. Accurate simulation of the nucleation, growth, and removal of multicomponent nanoparticles demands enormous computational resources. Most regional-scale three-dimensional chemical transport models do not include nanoparticles and do not conserve number concentrations. A major challenge associated with the simulation of nucleation events is the uncertainty regarding the controlling nucleation mechanism under typical atmospheric conditions. Previous work indicates that nucleation events in the Pittsburgh area are well predicted using ternary (H2O-H2SO4-NH3) nucleation theory, which was successful in predicting on which days nucleation events occurred during summer and winter, as well as the beginning and end of the events. To predict the composition and growth of nanoparticles, we have developed a computationally efficient new approach based on the Two-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics module. This model simulates inorganic and organic components of the nanoparticles describing both the number and the mass distribution of the particulate matter from approximately 1 nm to 10 micrometers. The model explains why nanoparticles were observed to be acidic during nucleation events that appear to involve ammonia. The simulation suggests that nanoparticles produced by ternary nucleation can be acidic due to depletion of ammonia vapor during the growth of the particles out of the nucleation sizes. The low CPU time requirements of the model using TOMAS make it suitable for incorporation in three- dimensional chemical transport models. The nucleation/coagulation/growth model has been added to the PMCAMx regional air quality model and is used for the investigation of nucleation events in the Eastern U.S. We can estimate number budget in the Eastern U.S. and predict frequency/size of nucleation events.

  16. Global upper ocean heat storage response to radiative forcing from changing solar irradiance and increasing greenhouse gas/aerosol concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Warren B.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Lean, Judith

    1998-09-01

    We constructed gridded fields of diabatic heat storage changes in the upper ocean from 20°S to 60°N from historical temperature profiles collected from 1955 to 1996. We filtered these 42 year records for periods of 8 to 15 years and 15 to 30 years, producing depth-weighted vertical average temperature (DVT) changes from the sea surface to the top of the main pycnocline. Basin and global averages of these DVT changes reveal decadal and interdecadal variability in phase across the Indian, Pacific, Atlantic, and Global Oceans, each significantly correlated with changing surface solar radiative forcing at a lag of 0+/-2 years. Decadal and interdecadal changes in global average DVT are 0.06°+/-0.01°K and 0.04°K+/-0.01°K, respectively, the same as those expected from consideration of the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation balance (i.e., 0.3°K per Wm-2) in response to 0.1% changes in surface solar radiative forcing of 0.2 Wm-2 and 0.15 Wm-2, respectively. Global spatial patterns of DVT changes are similar to temperature changes simulated in coupled ocean-atmosphere models, suggesting that natural modes of Earth's variability are phase-locked to the solar irradiance cycle. A trend in global average DVT of 0.15°K over this 42 year record cannot be explained by changing surface solar radiative forcing. But when we consider the 0.5 Wm-2 increase in surface radiative forcing estimated from the increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas and aerosol (GGA) concentrations over this period [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 1995], the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation balance yields this observed change. Moreover, the sum of solar and GGA surface radiative forcing can explain the relatively sharp increase in global and basin average DVT in the late 1970's.

  17. Analysis of spatial and seasonal distributions of MODIS aerosol optical properties and ground-based measurements of mass concentrations in the Yellow Sea region in 2009.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Sung; Chung, Yong-Seung; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-retrieved data on aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) using a moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) were used to analyze large-scale distributions of atmospheric aerosols in East Asia. AOD was relatively high in March (0.44 ± 0.25) and low in September (0.24 ± 0.21) in the East Asian region in 2009. Sandstorms originating from the deserts and dry areas in northern China and Mongolia were transported on a massive scale during the springtime, thus contributing to the high AOD in East Asia. However, whereas PM10 with diameters ≤10 μm was the highest in February at Anmyon, Cheongwon, and Ulleung, located leeward about halfway through the Korean Peninsula, AOD rose to its highest in May. The growth of hygroscopic aerosols attendant on increases in relative humidity prior to the Asian monsoon season contributed to a high AOD level in May. AE typically appears at high levels (1.30 ± 0.37) in August due to anthropogenic aerosols originating from the industrial areas in eastern China, while AOD stays low in summer due to the removal process caused by rainfall. The linear correlation coefficients of the MODIS AOD and ground-based mass concentrations of PM10 at Anmyon, Cheongwon, and Ulleung were measured at 0.4~0.6. Four cases (6 days) of mineral dustfall from sandstorms and six cases (12 days) of anthropogenically polluted particles were observed in the central area of the Korean Peninsula in 2009. PM10 mass concentrations increased at both Anmyon and Cheongwon in the cases of mineral dustfall and anthropogenically polluted particles. Cases of dustfall from sandstorms and anthropogenic polluted particles, with increasing PM10 mass concentrations, showed higher AOD values in the Yellow Sea region.

  18. WRF-Chem Simulation of Air Quality in China: Sensitivity Analyses of PM Concentrations to Emissions, Atmospheric Transport, and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, M.; Saikawa, E.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Takigawa, M.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate air quality in China in April 2007, using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry version 3.5 (WRF-Chem) at a spatial resolution of 20km × 20km with 31 vertical levels. The model domain covers the entire East Asian region with 399 × 299 grid cells. The initial and lateral chemical boundary conditions are taken from a present-day simulation of the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) global chemistry-climate model AM3. The Regional Acid Deposition version 2 (RADM2) atmospheric chemical mechanism is used for gas-phase chemistry and the Model Aerosol Dynamics for Europe with the Secondary Organic Aerosol Model (MADE/SORGAM) and aqueous chemistry is used for aerosol chemistry. The emissions of gaseous pollutants (CO, NOx, NH3, VOCs, and SO2) and particulate matter (BC, OC, PM2.5, and PM10) are taken from the Regional Emission Inventory in Asia (REAS) version 2. Dust and sea salt emissions are simulated online, where dust parameters are optimized using observed particular matter (PM10) concentrations in 73 cities in China. We add gravitational settlement for dust and sea salt in vertical levels. The preliminary results show that the model predicts PM10 reasonably well compared to the ground measurement data. The bias in modeled PM10 concentrations in South and Northwest­­­­­­­ China is less than 10%. We will present results of sensitivity analyses that assess the impact of emissions, atmospheric transport, and secondary organic aerosol formation on PM concentrations.

  19. Retrieval of aerosol composition using ground-based remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yisong; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao

    2016-04-01

    The chemical composition and mixing states of ambient aerosol are the main factors deciding aerosol microphysical and optical properties, and thus have significant impacts on regional or global climate change and air quality. Traditional approaches to detect atmospheric aerosol composition include sampling with laboratory analysis and in-situ measurements. They can accurately acquire aerosol components, however, the sampling or air exhausting could change the status of ambient aerosol or lead to some mass loss. Additionally, aerosol is usually sampled at the surface level so that it is difficult to detect the columnar aerosol properties. Remote sensing technology, however, can overcome these problems because it is able to detect aerosol information of entire atmosphere by optical and microphysical properties without destructing the natural status of ambient aerosol. This paper introduces a method to acquire aerosol composition by the remote sensing measurements of CIMEL CE318 ground-based sun-sky radiometer. A six component aerosol model is used in this study, including one strong absorbing component Black Carbon (BC), two partly absorbing components Brown Carbon (BrC) and Mineral Dust (MD), two scattering components Ammonia Sulfate-like (AS) and Sea Salt (SS), and Aerosol Water uptake (AW). Sensitivity analysis are performed to find the most sensitive parameters to each component and retrieval method for each component is accordingly developed. Different mixing models such as Maxwell-Garnett (MG), Bruggeman (BR) and Volume Average (VA) are also studied. The residual minimization method is used by comparing remote sensing measurements and simulation outputs to find the optimization of aerosol composition (including volume fraction and mass concentration of each component). This method is applied to measurements obtained from Beijing site under different weather conditions, including polluted haze, dust storm and clean days, to investigate the impacts of mixing

  20. Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particle Concentrations and Size Distributions Measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Treutlein, B.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-12-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs), which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (< 1 µm), but not for coarse particles (1 - 20 µm). Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August - December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3x10-2 cm-3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number [1]. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1 µg m-3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 µm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 µm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6 x 10-2 cm-3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 µm, ~5 µm, and ~13 µm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of

  1. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Treutlein, B.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs), which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm), but not for coarse particles (1-20 μm). Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August-December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10-2 cm-3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1 μg m-3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10-2 cm-3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in

  2. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Treutlein, B.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-04-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) to measure Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAPs), which provide an estimate of viable bioaerosol particles and can be regarded as an approximate lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (<1 μm), but not for coarse particles (1-20 μm). Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August-December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10-2 cm-3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1μg m-3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10-2 cm-3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle (24-h) with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical

  3. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  4. The impact of sequential ultra-low volume ground aerosol applications of malathion on the population dynamics of Aedes aegypti (L.).

    PubMed

    Focks, D A; Kloter, K O; Carmichael, G T

    1987-05-01

    The efficacy of sequential, ultra-low volume ground aerosol applications of malathion at current U.S. label rates was evaluated as an emergency control measure for adult populations of Aedes aegypti (L.) in New Orleans, Louisiana. Replicates of 11 sequential aerosol treatments applied 12 hr apart during a 5.5-day period reduced mean adult captures and oviposition rates during the treatment period 73% and 75%, respectively. We hypothesize that oviposition was not completely suppressed because females with a developing egg burden remained sequestered during treatment periods or were more tolerant to the pesticide. We further concluded that adults could not be totally suppressed because of continued emergence. After treatment, adult densities recovered to pretreatment and control levels within approximately 1 week. A simulation study of the results suggested that, under the conditions of closely spaced housing and abundant vegetation that is typical of much of New Orleans, a single aerosol killed an average of 88% of the males and only 30% of the females present.

  5. Infiltration of supermicron aerosols into a simulated space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, De-Ling; Luey, Kenneth T.

    2010-08-01

    Purging is a common scheme to protect sensitive surfaces of payloads and spacecraft from airborne contaminant intrusion during ground assembly, integration, and launch vehicle encapsulation. However, the purge for space volumes must be occasionally interrupted. Thus it is important to gain insights into the transport of ambient particles penetrating through vent holes and entering the interior of a confined space system, such as a space telescope, during a purge outage. This study presents experimental work performed to measure time-dependent aerosol concentration changes during a purge outage. The laboratory results from the aerosol experiments were compared with a mass balance based mechanistic model which had been experimentally validated for aerosols ranging from 0.5 to 2 μm. The experimental data show that the steady-state aerosol concentration inside a simulated space telescope (SST) is governed by the surrounding particle concentration, SST air exchange rate, and the particle deposition rate.

  6. Effect of training on blood volume and plasma hormone concentrations in the elderly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. F.; Convertino, V. A.; Wood, C. E.; Graves, J. E.; Lowenthal, D. T.; Pollock, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of 6 months of endurance training on resting plasma (PV) and blood volume (BV), and resting hormone and electrolyte concentrations in the elderly. Thirty-eight elderly men and women (ages 60-82 yr) were assigned to endurance exercise training (N = 29) or to control (N = 9) groups. Resting plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone, vasopressin, aldosterone, norepinephrine, epinephrine, sodium, potassium, and protein were measured at the start (T1) and end (T2) of 26 wk of training. PV measurement was performed using the Evan's blue dye technique. Endurance training consisted of uphill treadmill walking or stairclimbing exercise 3 times.wk-1, 30-45 min.d-1, at 75-84% of maximal heart rate reserve. The exercise group increased VO2max by 11.2% (P < or = 0.05) and increased resting PV and BV by 11.2% and 12.7% (P < or = 0.05), respectively. Hormone and electrolyte levels in the exercise group remained unchanged; all variables were unchanged in the control group. These results are similar to findings in younger individuals. Because plasma hormone concentrations were maintained despite a chronically elevated BV, endurance training in healthy, elderly subjects may be associated with a resetting of volume receptors.

  7. Investigation of dry powder inhaler (DPI) resistance and aerosol dispersion timing on emitted aerosol aerodynamic particle sizing by multistage cascade impactor when sampled volume is reduced from compendial value of 4 L.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Hlack; Arp, Jan; Chambers, Frank; Copley, Mark; Glaab, Volker; Hammond, Mark; Solomon, Derek; Bradford, Kerry; Russell, Theresa; Sizer, Yvonne; Nichols, Steven C; Roberts, Daryl L; Shelton, Christopher; Greguletz, Roland; Mitchell, Jolyon P

    2014-10-01

    Compendial methods determining dry powder inhaler (DPI)-emitted aerosol aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) collect a 4-L air sample containing the aerosol bolus, where the flow, which propagates through the cascade impactor (CI) measurement system from the vacuum source, is used to actuate the inhaler. A previous article described outcomes with two CIs (Andersen eight-stage cascade impactor (ACI) and Next-Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI)) when the air sample volume was ≤4 L with moderate-resistance DPIs. This article extends that work, examining the hypothesis that DPI flow resistance may be a factor in determining outcomes. APSD measurements were made using the same CI systems with inhalers representing low and high flow resistance extremes (Cyclohaler® and HandiHaler® DPIs, respectively). The ratio of sample volume to internal dead space (normalized volume (V*)) was varied from 0.25 to 1.98 (NGI) and from 0.43 to 3.46 (ACI). Inhaler resistance was a contributing factor to the rate of bolus transfer; the higher resistance DPI completing bolus relocation to the NGI pre-separator via the inlet when V* was as small as 0.25, whereas only ca. 50% of the bolus mass was collected at this condition with the Cyclohaler® DPI. Size fractionation of the bolus from either DPI was completed within the ACI at smaller values of V* than within the NGI. Bolus transfer from the Cyclohaler® capsule and from the HandiHaler® to the ACI system were unaffected by the different flow rise time observed in the two different flow controller systems, and the effects the ACI-based on APSD measurements were marginal.

  8. Determining the Volume of Additive Solution and Residual Plasma in Whole Blood Filtered and Buffy Coat Processed Red Cell Concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Acker, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Residual plasma in transfused red cell concentrates (RCCs) has been associated with adverse transfusion outcomes. Despite this, there is no consensus on the standard procedure for measuring residual plasma volume. Methods The volumes of residual plasma and additive solution were measured in RCCs processed using two separation methods: whole blood filtration (WBF) and buffy coat (BC)/RCC filtration. The concentration of mannitol and albumin in RCC components was measured using colorimetric assays. Mannitol concentration was used to calculate additive solution volume. Residual plasma volume was calculated using two methods. Results Calculated RCC supernatant volumes were much lower in BC-processed components compared to WBF-processed components (BC = 97 ± 6 ml, WBF = 109 ± 4 ml; p < 0.05). Calculated additive solution volumes were greater in WBF- than in BC-processed components (BC = 81 ± 4 ml, WBF = 105 ± 2 ml; p < 0.05). Absolute residual plasma volume varied significantly based on the calculation method used. Conclusion Disparity between plasma volume calculation methods was observed. Efforts should be made to standardize residual plasma volume measurement methods in order to accurately assess the impact of residual plasma on transfusion outcomes. PMID:27330533

  9. The impact of monthly variation of the Pacific-North America (PNA) teleconnection pattern on wintertime surface-layer aerosol concentrations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jin; Liao, Hong; Li, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    The Pacific-North America teleconnection (PNA) is the leading general circulation pattern in the troposphere over the region of North Pacific to North America during wintertime. This study examined the impacts of monthly variations of the PNA phase (positive or negative phase) on wintertime surface-layer aerosol concentrations in the United States (US) by analyzing observations during 1999-2013 from the Air Quality System of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-AQS) and the model results for 1986-2006 from the global three-dimensional Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). The composite analyses on the EPA-AQS observations over 1999-2013 showed that the average concentrations of PM2.5, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosols over the US were higher in the PNA positive phases (25 % of the winter months examined, and this fraction of months had the highest positive PNA index values) than in the PNA negative phases (25 % of the winter months examined, and this fraction of months had the highest negative PNA index values) by 1.0 µg m-3 (8.7 %), 0.01 µg m-3 (0.5 %), 0.3 µg m-3 (29.1 %), 0.1 µg m-3 (11.9 %), 0.6 µg m-3 (13.5 %), and 0.2 µg m-3 (27.8 %), respectively. The simulated geographical patterns of the differences in concentrations of all aerosol species between the PNA positive and negative phases were similar to observations. Based on the GEOS-Chem simulation, the pattern correlation coefficients were calculated to show the impacts of PNA-induced variations in meteorological fields on aerosol concentrations. The PNA phase was found (i) to influence sulfate concentrations mainly through changes in planetary boundary layer height (PBLH), precipitation (PR), and temperature; (ii) to influence nitrate concentrations mainly through changes in temperature; and (iii) to influence concentrations of ammonium, organic carbon, and black carbon mainly through changes in PR and PBLH. Results from

  10. Intrascleral concentration vs depth profile of mitomycin-C after episcleral application: impact of applied concentration and volume of mitomycin-C solution.

    PubMed

    Vass, C; Georgopoulos, M; el Menyawi, I; Radda, S; Nimmerrichter, P

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of different concentrations and volumes of Mitomycin-C (MMC) on the intrascleral concentration vs depth profile of MMC in an experimental model. The episcleral sides of scleral quadrants of human donor eyes were exposed for 1 min to sponges (corneal light shield, Merocel Corp.) soaked with MMC. After irrigation with 40 ml saline a central 8 mm diameter scleral disk was horizontally dissected with a cryotome. MMC concentrations of six layers of 140 microns thickness were analysed by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. In Experiment 1 (11 eyes) the sponges were soaked with 50 microliters of 10, 100 and 200 micrograms ml-1 MMC solutions. In Experiment 2 (12 eyes) the sponges were soaked with 10, 30, 50 and 80 microliters of a 200 micrograms ml-1 isotonic MMC solution. In Experiment 1 the MMC concentrations (microgram g-1) of layer 1 were 0.35 (+/- 0.20; 10 micrograms ml-1 group) and 9.22 (+/- 2.92; 200 micrograms ml-1 group). In Experiment 2 the MMC concentrations were 2.57 (+/- 1.17; 10 microliters group), 7.35 (+/- 2.49; 30 microliters group) and 11.67 (+/- 3.25; 80 microliters group). The scleral MMC concentrations were significantly influenced by the applied concentrations (layers 1-5) and by the applied volumes (all layers) of MMC solution. The intrascleral MMC concentration increased linearly with increasing concentration and not linearly with increasing volume of the applied MMC solution. To achieve more predictable scleral concentrations of MMC after trabeculectomy with MMC it seems advisable to control both the concentration and the volume of the MMC solution used to soak the sponge.

  11. CHANGES IN OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR AEROSOL CONCENTRATION UNIFORMITY FOR PM2.5 AND PM10 SAMPLER TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical note documents changes in the standard operating procedures used at the Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) aerosol testing wind tunnel facility for testing of particulate matter monitoring methods of PM2.5 and PM10. These changes are relative to the op...

  12. Estimation of thickness of concentration boundary layers by osmotic volume flux determination.

    PubMed

    Jasik-Ślęzak, Jolanta S; Olszówka, Kornelia M; Slęzak, Andrzej

    2011-06-01

    The estimation method of the concentration boundary layers thicknesses (δ) in a single-membrane system containing non-electrolytic binary or ternary solutions was devised using the Kedem-Katchalsky formalism. A square equation used in this method contains membrane transport (L(p), σ, ω) and solution (D, C) parameters as well as a volume osmotic flux (J(v)). These values can be determined in a series of independent experiments. Calculated values δ are nonlinearly dependent on the concentrations of investigated solutions and the membrane system configuration. These nonlinearities are the effect of a competition between spontaneously occurring diffusion and natural convection. The mathematical model based on Kedem-Katchalsky equations and a concentration Rayleigh number (R(C)) was presented. On the basis of this model we introduce the dimensionless parameter, called by us a Katchalsky number (Ka), modifies R(C) of membrane transport. The critical value of this number well describes a moment of transition from the state of diffusion into convective diffusion membrane transport.

  13. The capability of satellite borne remote sensors to measure stratospheric trace constituents. Volume 2: Ozone and aerosol related missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Stratospheric trace constituent measurement requirements are separated into two somewhat overlapping areas. In the first area, it is assumed that the only problem of interest is ozone; its chemistry chain, environmental effects and measurement requirements. In like manner, in the second area it is assumed that the only problem of interest is stratospheric aerosols; their chemistry, effects and measurement requirements.

  14. Boundary layer aerosol size distribution, mass concentration and mineralogical composition in Morocco and at Cape Verde Islands during SAMUM I-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandler, K.; Lieke, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) is dedicated to the understanding of the radiative effects of mineral dust. Two major field experiments were performed: A first joint field campaign took place at Ouarzazate and near Zagora, southern Morocco, from May 13 to June 7, 2006. Aircraft and ground based measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were carried out to collect a data set of surface and atmospheric columnar information within a major dust source. This data set combined with satellite data provides the base of the first thorough columnar radiative closure tests in Saharan dust. A second field experiment was conducted during January-February 2008, in the Cape Verde Islands region, where about 300 Tg of mineral dust are transported annually from Western Africa across the Atlantic towards the Caribbean Sea and the Amazon basin. Along its transport path, the mineral dust is expected to influence significantly the radiation budget - by direct and indirect effects - of the subtropical North Atlantic. We are lacking a radiative closure in the Saharan air plume. One focus of the investigation within the trade wind region is the spatial distribution of mixed dust/biomass/sea salt aerosol and their physical and chemical properties, especially with regard to radiative effects. We report on measurements of size distributions, mass concentrations and mineralogical composition conducted at the Zagora (Morocco) and Praia (Cape Verde islands) ground stations. The aerosol size distribution was measured from 20 nm to 500

  15. Anxiolytic, Psychostimulant, and Analgesic Effects of Various Volumes of Ethanol Solution in Different Concentrations, but in the Same Dose.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Alekseeva, E V; Bogdanova, N G; Kolpakov, A A; Nazarova, G A

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of ethanol (dose 2 g/kg) in various concentrations (5, 13, and 40%) and different volumes (40, 15.5, and 5 ml/kg) on the level of anxiety, locomotor activity, and pain sensitivity in rats. Administration of 40 ml/kg water to animals was followed by a significant increase in the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Administration of water in a volume of 5 or 15.5 ml/kg had little effect on the level of anxiety. The greater was the volume of intragastrically administered ethanol, the stronger was the anxiolytic effect. The psychostimulant and analgesic effects of ethanol were more pronounced after administration of medium volumes and intermediate concentrations of ethanol-containing solutions. Since administration of these solutions cannot produce maximum blood concentration of ethanol, we believe that the observed effects are mainly related to the direct effect of ethanol on the stomach tissue.

  16. Effects of regional limb perfusion volume on concentrations of amikacin sulfate in synovial and interstitial fluid samples from anesthetized horses.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Jennifer L; Hardy, Joanne; Cohen, Noah D

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of volume of IV regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) on amikacin concentrations in synovial and interstitial fluid of horses. ANIMALS 8 healthy adult horses. PROCEDURES Each forelimb was randomly assigned to receive IVRLP with 4 mL of amikacin sulfate solution (250 mg/mL) plus 56 mL (total volume, 60 mL) or 6 mL (total volume, 10 mL) of lactated Ringer solution. Horses were anesthetized, and baseline synovial and interstitial fluid samples were collected. A tourniquet was placed, and the assigned treatment was administered via the lateral palmar digital vein. Venous blood pressure in the distal portion of the limb was recorded. Additional synovial fluid samples were collected 30 minutes (just before tourniquet removal) and 24 hours after IVRLP began; additional interstitial fluid samples were collected 6 and 24 hours after IVRLP began. RESULTS 30 minutes after IVRLP began, mean amikacin concentration in synovial fluid was significantly greater for the large-volume (459 μg/mL) versus small-volume (70 μg/mL) treatment. Six hours after IVRLP, mean concentration in interstitial fluid was greater for the large-volume (723 μg/mL) versus small-volume (21 μg/mL) treatment. Peak venous blood pressure after large-volume IVRLP was significantly higher than after small-volume IVRLP, with no difference between treatments in time required for pressure to return to baseline. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Study findings suggested that large-volume IVRLP would deliver more amikacin to metacarpophalangeal joints of horses than would small-volume IVRLP, without a clinically relevant effect on local venous blood pressure, potentially increasing treatment efficacy.

  17. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  18. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol - a laboratory and field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Brüggemann, M.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2012-08-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was increased by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ~40 ng m-3 for pinonic acid) by using the miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (mVACES) upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards - pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total sub-micron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94) demonstrates soft ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene) cannot account for all of the measured fragments, which illustrates the complexity of ambient aerosol and possibly indicates unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursor in the boreal forest.

  19. Diurnal and seasonal variations of meteorology and aerosol concentrations in the foothills of the nepal himalayas (Nagarkot: 1,900 m asl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Rudra K.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Connolly, Paul J.

    2016-02-01

    A 10-months long monitoring experiment to investigate the diurnal and seasonal variation of aerosol size distribution at Nagarkot (1,900 m asl) in the Kathmadu Valley was carried out as part of a study on katabatic and anabatic influence on pollution dispersion mechanisms. Seasonal means show total aerosol number concentration was highest during post-monsoon season (775 ± 417 cm-3) followed by pre-monsoon (644 ± 429 cm-3) and monsoon (293 ± 205 cm-3) periods. Fine particle concentration (0.25 μm ≤ DP ≤ 2.5 μm) dominated in all seasons, however, contribution by coarse particles (3.0 μm ≤ DP ≤ 10.0 μm) is more significant in the monsoon season with contributions from particles larger than 10.0 μm being negligible. Our results show a regular diurnal pattern of aerosol concentration in the valley with a morning and an evening peak. The daily twin peaks are attributed to calm conditions followed by transitional growth and break down of the valley boundary layer below. The peaks are generally associated with enhancement of the coarse particle fraction. The evening peak is generally higher than the morning peak, and is caused by fresh evening pollution from the valley associated with increased local activities coupled with recirculation of these trapped pollutants. Relatively clean air masses from neighbouring valleys contribute to the smaller morning peak. Gap flows through the western passes of the Kathmandu Valley, which sweep away the valley pollutants towards the eastern passes modulated by the mountain - valley wind system, are mainly responsible for the dominant pollutant circulation patterns exhibited within the valley.

  20. Concentrations and changes of chemical elements in aerosol particulate matter as indicators of air quality in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, A. I.; Al-Mutlaq, K. F.; Simoneit, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    : Samples of air particulate matter (PM) were collected for the determination of chemical elements from June 2006 to May 2007. PM samples were taken in two size modes (PM2.5 and PM10) using MiniVolume air samplers on rooftops of various buildings (15-25 m above ground) in the city of Riyadh. The samples were subjected to XRF analysis to determine both major (Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Si, P, S and Fe) and trace elements (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Ba). The results show that the concentrations of both were higher in PM10 compared to PM2.5 indicating that the major source of the atmospheric PM was local dust. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of high concentrations of PM was in the south and southeast of the city and the lowest was found in the center and north eastern part of the city. This spatial PM distribution was attributed different factors such as wind direction and velocity, existence of cement factories in the southeast of the city, the presence of buildings and trees, and paved streets in the city center that reduce the amount of dust resuspended into the atmosphere. The air quality of the city was found to range from moderate to highly unhealthy for PM2.5 and from good to highly unhealthy for PM10. The enrichment factors for the measured elements were examined and revealed two groups based on their regional distribution. The first group showed no significant spatial changes indicating it has a common source throughout the sampling grid. The second group (mainly S and Ni) showed significant changes as expected from anthropogenic inputs. The S is possibly a combination of a mineralogical (CaSO4) and fossil fuel combustion origin. The source of Ni is probably in emissions from fossil fuel combustion.

  1. Intercomparison of high-volume PM10 samplers at a site with high-particulate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Purdue, L.J.; Rodes, C.E.; Rehme, K.A.; Holland, D.M.; Bond, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    Commercially available high-volume PM10 samplers were intercompared at a site in Phoenix characterized by high concentrations of coarse particles. Over a 21-day period, Sierra Andersen 321A (SA 321A) samplers gave PM10 measurements 58% higher than the Wedding IP10 (WED) samplers and 16% higher than a SA 321A sampler that had an oil coating on the internal impaction surfaces of the inlet. WED samplers that were subjected to a simple brush-cleaning procedure after each sampling period gave PM10 results 16% higher than the WED samplers not subjected to cleaning. The oiled SA 321A sampler gave PM10 values 15% higher than the cleaned WED samplers. The results demonstrate that the SA 321A overestimates PM10 when sampling in an environment with high coarse-particle concentrations. The over collection results from pass-through of large particles, and can be minimized by oiling the internal impaction surfaces of the inlet. The WED sampler underestimates PM10 after several days of sampling in such an environment.

  2. Secondary acidification: Changes in gas-aerosol partitioning of semivolatile nitric acid and enhancement of its deposition due to increased emission and concentration of SOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, Mizuo; Ueda, Hiromasa; Nakayama, Shinji

    2008-02-01

    Secondary acidification, or the indirect enhancement of semivolatile air pollutant deposition associated with increased SO42- concentrations, is shown to occur in general air pollution using data collected from six stations of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET) in Japan. This effect was first detected as a result of volcanic SO2 plumes in our previous studies. Results indicate that as SO42- concentration increases, gas-aerosol partitioning of nitric acid shifts to the gas phase, increasing the HNO3 gas concentration. Since the dry and wet deposition rates of HNO3 gas are very high, deposition can be enhanced even when the emission of NOx remains unchanged. In western Japan, the indirect effect for wet deposition is most apparent from spring to autumn, when the Asian continental outflow carries sulfate-rich contaminated air masses. However, it is not pronounced in air masses containing abundant sea-salt particles and related cation components in aerosols. In areas such as forests or farmlands with low surface resistance, dry deposition of nitric acid is more pronounced than wet deposition as the dry deposition velocity of HNO3 gas is high. Increased dry deposition of t-NO3 due to the indirect effect and consequent vegetation damage is thus of considerable concern in such regions. The deposition of other semivolatile components, such as hydrochloric acid and ammonia, can be altered and can also induce secondary acidification.

  3. Absorption characteristics of aerosols over the northwestern region of India: Distinct seasonal signatures of biomass burning aerosols and mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Suresh Babu, S.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Manoj, M. R.; Chaubey, Jai Prakash

    2013-07-01

    Continuous measurements of aerosol black carbon (BC) mass concentrations made over a period of 3 years from a semi-arid, near-coastal, remote and sparsely inhabited location along with satellite-based data of aerosol absorption index, optical depth and extinction profiles in western India are used to characterize the distinct nature of aerosols near the surface and in the free troposphere and their seasonality. Despite being far remote and sparsely inhabited, significant levels of BC are observed in the ambient during winter (1.45 ± 0.71 μg m-3) attributed to biomass burning aerosols, advected to the site from the north and west; while during summer the concentrations are far reduced (0.23 ± 0.11 μg m-3) and represent the apparent background concentrations. The spectral absorption coefficients suggest the BC during summer be mostly of fossil fuel combustions. The strong convective boundary layer dynamics produces significant diurnal variation during winter and modulates to a lesser extent the seasonal variation. Examination of aerosol (absorption) index from OMI data for the study period showed a seasonal pattern that is almost opposite to that seen at the surface; with high aerosol index in summer, showing a significant difference between the surface and columnar aerosol types in summer. MISR and MODIS-derived columnar AOD follow the OMI pattern. Analysis of the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and volume depolarization ratio (VDR), derived from CALIPSO data indicates the presence of strong dust layers with VDR ˜ 0.3 in the altitude region 4-6 km, contributing to the high aerosol index in the OMI data, while the surface measurements show absorptive properties representing fossil fuel BC aerosols.

  4. Background culturable bacteria aerosol in two large public buildings using HVAC filters as long term, passive, high-volume air samplers.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Nicholas J; Kuehn, Thomas H; Kim, Seung Won; Raynor, Peter C; Anantharaman, Senthilvelan; Ramakrishnan, M A; Goyal, Sagar M

    2008-04-01

    Background culturable bacteria aerosols were collected and identified in two large public buildings located in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Seattle, Washington over a period of 5 months and 3 months, respectively. The installed particulate air filters in the ventilation systems were used as the aerosol sampling devices at each location. Both pre and final filters were collected from four air handing units at each site to determine the influence of location within the building, time of year, geographical location and difference between indoor and outdoor air. Sections of each loaded filter were eluted with 10 ml of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The resulting solutions were cultured on blood agar plates and incubated for 24 h at 36 degrees C. Various types of growth media were then used for subculturing, followed by categorization using a BioLog MicroStation (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) and manual observation. Environmental parameters were gathered near each filter by the embedded on-site environmental monitoring systems to determine the effect of temperature, humidity and air flow. Thirty nine different species of bacteria were identified, 17 found only in Minneapolis and 5 only in Seattle. The hardy spore-forming genus Bacillus was the most commonly identified and showed the highest concentrations. A significant decrease in the number of species and their concentration occurred in the Minneapolis air handling unit supplying 100% outdoor air in winter, however no significant correlations between bacteria concentration and environmental parameters were found.

  5. Retrieval of aerosol composition using ground-based remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Li, Z.; Xu, H.; Chen, X.; Li, K.; Lv, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition and mixing status of ambient aerosol are the main factors deciding aerosol microphysical and optical properties, and thus have significant impacts on regional or global climate change and air quality. Traditional approaches to detect atmospheric aerosol composition include sampling with laboratory analysis and in-situ measurement. They can accurately acquire aerosol components, however, the sampling or air exhausting could change the status of aerosol or have some mass loss. Additionally, aerosol is usually sampled at the surface level so that it is difficult to detect the columnar aerosol properties. Remote sensing technology, however, can overcome these problems because it investigate aerosol information by optical and microphysical properties without destructing the natural status of ambient aerosol. This paper introduce a method to acquire aerosol composition by the remote sensing measurements of CIMEL CE318 ground-based sun-sky radiometer. A six component aerosol model is used in this study, including one strong absorbing component Black Carbon (BC), two partly absorbing components Brown Carbon (BrC) and Mineral Dust (MD), two scattering components Ammonia Sulfate-like (AS) and Sea Salt (SS), and Aerosol Water uptake (AW). Sensitivity analysis are performed to find the most sensitive parameters to each component and retrieval method for each component is accordingly developed. The residual minimization method is used by comparing remote sensing measurements and simulation outputs to find the optimization of aerosol composition (including volume fraction and mass concentration of each component). This method is applied to real measurements obtained from Beijing site under different weather conditions, including polluted haze, dust storm and clean days, to investigate the impacts of mixing states of aerosol particles on aerosol composition retrieval.

  6. Inferring the composition and concentration of aerosols by combining the AERONET, MPLNET and CALIOP data: comparison with in-situ measurements and utilization to evaluate and improve GCM results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, D.; Ginoux, P. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2009-12-01

    We present a method to derive the concentration of aerosol components using the spectral measurements of AOD (aerosol optical depth) and single scattering albedo along with their size distribution and extinction profile available from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) and MPLNET (Micro-pulse Lidar Network) stations as well as the space borne CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar [Ganguly et al., 2009a; 2009b]. The technique involves finding the best combination of aerosol concentration by minimizing differences between measured and calculated spectral variation in AOD and single scattering albedo along with the size distribution of aerosols over specific locations. Lidar data on extinction profile provides the vertical constraint on the distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Relative humidity from NCEP reanalysis is used to compute the hygroscopic growth factors and associated changes in the optical properties of aerosol components at all vertical levels. The technique has been successfully applied over different regions around the world such as North America, Southern Africa and South Asia. The results have been validated using in-situ measurements of aerosol composition available from the first two regions. Finally, we show how these results are being used to evaluate and improve the GFDL-AM2/AM3 climate model simulations. We believe our technique could also be used for the retrieval of air quality by calculating PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations. This could improve the existing methods by providing a better relation between surface measurements of PM2.5 concentration and satellite data. References: Ganguly, D., P. Ginoux, V. Ramaswamy, O. Dubovik, J. Welton, E. A. Reid and B. N. Holben (2009a), Inferring the composition and concentration of aerosols by combining AERONET and MPLNET data: comparison with other measurements and utilization to evaluate GCM output, J. Geophys. Res., 114, D16203, doi:10.1029/2009JD011895. Ganguly, D., P

  7. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  8. Intracellular ion concentrations and cell volume during cholinergic stimulation of eccrine secretory coil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takemura, T.; Sato, F.; Saga, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, K. )

    1991-02-01

    Methacholine (MCh)-induced changes in intracellular concentrations of Na, K, and Cl (( Na)i, (K)i, and (Cl)i, respectively) and in cellular dry mass (a measure of cell shrinkage) were examined in isolated monkey eccrine sweat secretory coils by electron probe X-ray microanalysis using the peripheral standard method. To further confirm the occurrence of cell shrinkage during MCh stimulation, the change in cell volume of dissociated clear and dark cells were directly determined under a light microscope equipped with differential interference contrast (DIC) optics. X-ray microanalysis revealed a biphasic increase in cellular dry mass in clear cells during continuous MCh stimulation; an initial increase of dry mass to 158% (of control) followed by a plateau at 140%, which correspond to the decrease in cell volume of 37 and 29%, respectively. The latter agrees with the MCh-induced cell shrinkage of 29% in dissociated clear cells. The MCh-induced increase in dry mass in myoepithelial cells was less than half that of clear cells. During the steady state of MCh stimulation, both (K+)i and (Cl)i of clear cells decreased by about 45%, whereas (Na)i increased in such a way to maintain the sum of (Na) i + (K)i constant. There was a small (12-15 mM) increase in (Na)i and a decrease in (K)i in myoepithelial cells during stimulation with MCh. Dissociated dark cells failed to significantly shrink during MCh stimulation. The decrease in (Cl)i in the face of constant (Na)i + (K)i suggests the accumulation of unknown anion(s) inside the clear cell during MCh stimulation.

  9. Comparison of aerosol optical properties at the sub-arctic stations ALOMAR-Andenes, Abisko and Sodankylä in late spring and summer 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, E.; Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V.; de Leeuw, G.; De Frutos, A.; Gausa, M.; Holben, B.

    2012-04-01

    Aerosol concentration and aerosol type, retrieved from observations with CIMEL sun-photometers at three sub-arctic locations at the Scandinavian Peninsula are presented. The observations were made at ALOMAR-Andenes in Norway, Abisko in Sweden and Sodankylä in Finland. This field campaign took place in late spring and summer 2007 as part of the activities of the International Polar Year (IPY) within the POLARCAT project at ALOMAR and Abisko. Aerosol properties were characterized using the relationship between the aerosol optical depth and the Ångström Exponent. The characteristics of the predominant aerosol type and microphysics are largely determined by the location of the site (continental or coastal). During summer the fine mode particles dominate, as indicated by the fine mode volume fraction and the Ångström Exponent. The aerosol concentration was on average very low, except during an event in which long-range transported aerosols (dust and pollution) were detected.

  10. Aerosols of Mongolian arid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golobokova, L.; Marinayte, I.; Zhamsueva, G.

    2012-04-01

    Sampling was performed in July-August 2005-2010 at Station Sain Shand (44°54'N, 110°07'E) in the Gobi desert (1000 m a.s.l.), West Mongolia. Aerosol samples were collected with a high volume sampler PM 10 (Andersen Instruments Inc., USA) onto Whatman-41 filters. The substance was extracted from the filters by de-ionized water. The solution was screened through an acetate-cellulose filter with 0.2 micron pore size. Ions of ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium, as well as sulphate ions, nitrate ions, hydrocarbonate, chloride ions were determined in the filtrate by means of an atomic adsorption spectrometer Carl Zeiss Jena (Germany), a high performance liquid chromatographer «Milichrome A-02» (Russia), and an ionic chromatographer ICS-3000 (Dionex, USA). The PAH fraction was separated from aerosol samples using hexane extraction at room temperature under UV environment. The extract was concentrated to 0.1-0.2 ml and analysed by a mass-spectrometer "Agilent, GC 6890, MSD 5973 Network". Analysis of concentrations of aerosols components, their correlation ratios, and meteorological modeling show that the main factor affecting chemical composition of aerosols is a flow of contaminants transferred by air masses to the sampling area mainly from the south and south-east, as well as wind conditions of the area, dust storms in particular. Sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium are major ions in aerosol particles at Station Sain Shand. Dust-borne aerosol is known to be a sorbent for both mineral and organic admixtures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) being among superecotoxicants play an important role among resistant organic substances. PAH concentrations were determined in the samples collected in 2010. All aerosol samples contained dominant PAHs with 5-6 benzene rings ( (benze(k)fluoranthen, benze(b)flouranthen, benze(a)pyren, benze(?)pyren, perylene, benze(g,h,i)perylene, and indene(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene). Their total quantity varied between 42 and 90

  11. Comparative changes in plasma protein concentration, hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise, bedrest and + Gz acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of experiments which indicate that under conditions of a constant red cell volume the proportional changes in hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise are never equal. On the basis of direct measurements and calculated changes of plasma volume it is concluded that during maximal exercise there is a small loss of protein from the plasma. It is clear that changes in content of blood constituents can only be evaluated correctly after determination of changes in plasma volume.

  12. The Impact of Monthly Variation of the Pacific-North America (PNA) Teleconnection Pattern on Wintertime Surface-layer Aerosol Concentrations in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, J.; Liao, H.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific-North America teleconnection (PNA) is the leading general circulation pattern in the troposphere over the region of North Pacific to North America during wintertime. The PNA exhibits positive (negative) phases with positive (negative) anomalies in geopotential height in the vicinity of Hawaii and over the intermountain region of North America, and negative (positive) anomalies in geopotential height over south of the Aleutian Islands and the Gulf Coast region of the United States. This study examined the impacts of monthly variation of the PNA phase on wintertime surface-layer aerosol concentrations in the United States by analyzing observations during 1999-2013 from the Air Quality System of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA-AQS) and the model results for 1986-2006 from the global three-dimensional Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). The composite analyses on the EPA-AQS observations over 1999-2003 showed that the average PM2.5 concentrations were higher in the PNA positive phases than in the PNA negative phases by 1.0 μg m-3 (8.6%), 2.1μg m-3 (24.1%), and 1.1 μg m-3 (10.6%) in the eastern, western, and whole of United States, respectively. Relative to the PNA negative phases, the number of exceedance days (days with the PM2.5 concentrations exceeding 35 μg m-3) in the PNA positive phases increased by 5-8 days month-1 in California and the contiguous Great Salt Lake and by 2-3 days month-1 in Iowa. The simulated geographical patterns of the differences in concentrations of PM2.5, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, OC, and BC between the PNA positive and negative phases were similar to observations. The PNA influences surface-layer aerosol concentrations in the United States by changing meteorological variables such as temperature, precipitation, planetary boundary layer height, relative humidity, and wind speed. We found that that the PNA-induced variation in planetary boundary layer height was the most dominant

  13. Concentration, distribution and variation of polar organic aerosol tracers in Ya'an, a middle-sized city in western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Dai, Dongjue; Deng, Shihuai; Feng, Jialiang; Zhao, Min; Wu, Jun; Liu, Lu; Yang, Xiaohui; Wu, Sishi; Qi, Hui; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yanzong

    2013-02-01

    PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm) and TSP (total suspended particulates) aerosol samples were collected in Ya'an, a middle-sized city with extensive wood resources in Southwestern China, to characterize the contribution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) to the regional troposphere, the composition of the organic tracers as well as factors affecting their concentrations. A total of 34 samples were gathered on the Campus of Sichuan Agricultural University (SAU, urban site, in the city zone of Ya'an), while 49 samples were collected at Baima Spring Scenic Area (BSSA, forest site, situated about 30 km to the northeast of SAU) during June to July, 2010. Using GC/MS analysis with prior trimethylsilylation, organic tracers including isoprene oxidation products (2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols and 2-methylglyceric acid), α-/β-pinene oxidation products (norpinic acid, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, 3-hydroxy-4,4-dimethylglutaric acid, and 3-methyl-1,2,3- butanetricarboxylic acid), a sesquiterpene oxidation product (β-caryophyllinic acid), sugars (glucose and fructose), sugar alcohols (arabitol, mannitol, erythritol, sorbitol and xylitol), anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) and malic acid were determined. The factors that could potentially affect the SOA tracer concentrations, i.e. trace gases (SO2, NOx, O3, NH3), aerosol acidity and meteorological parameters, were monitored. The results showed that the concentrations of total isoprene oxidation products were 72 and 82 ng/m3 at the two sampling locations, with 29 ± 18, 37 ± 9, 6 ± 2 ng/m3 at SAU and 57 ± 34, 33 ± 33, 4 ± 2 ng/m3 at BSSA for 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols and 2-methylglyceric acid respectively. Compared with the concentrations of isoprene oxidation products, those of α-/β-pinene oxidation products and β-caryophyllinic acid were much lower, being 6 ± 33 and 0.5 ± 1.9 ng/m3 at SAU, and 9 ± 14 and 1.0 ± 1.2 ng/m3 at BSSA, respectively. The unique

  14. Source bioaerosol concentration and rRNA gene-based identification of microorganisms aerosolized at a flood irrigation wastewater reuse site.

    PubMed

    Paez-Rubio, Tania; Viau, Emily; Romero-Hernandez, Socorro; Peccia, Jordan

    2005-02-01

    Reuse of partially treated domestic wastewater for agricultural irrigation is a growing practice in arid regions throughout the world. A field sampling campaign to determine bioaerosol concentration, culturability, and identity at various wind speeds was conducted at a flooded wastewater irrigation site in Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico. Direct fluorescent microscopy measurements for total microorganisms, culture-based assays for heterotrophs and gram-negative enteric bacteria, and small-subunit rRNA gene-based cloning were used for microbial characterizations of aerosols and effluent wastewater samples. Bioaerosol results were divided into two wind speed regimens: (i) below 1.9 m/s, average speed 0.5 m/s, and (ii) above 1.9 m/s, average speed 4.5 m/s. Average air-borne concentration of total microorganisms, culturable heterotrophs, and gram-negative enteric bacteria were, respectively, 1.1, 4.2, and 6.2 orders of magnitude greater during the high-wind-speed regimen. Small-subunit rRNA gene clone libraries processed from samples from air and the irrigation effluent wastewater during a high-wind sampling event indicate that the majority of air clone sequences were more than 98% similar to clone sequences retrieved from the effluent wastewater sample. Overall results indicate that wind is a potential aerosolization mechanism of viable wastewater microorganisms at flood irrigation sites.

  15. Fallout volume and litter type affect (137)Cs concentration difference in litter between forest and stream environments.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Masaru; Gomi, Takashi; Negishi, Junjiro N

    2016-11-01

    It is important to understand the changes in the (137)Cs concentration in litter through leaching when considering that (137)Cs is transferred from basal food resources to animals in forested streams. We found that the difference of (137)Cs activity concentration in litter between forest and stream was associated with both litter type and (137)Cs fallout volume around Fukushima, Japan. The (137)Cs activity concentrations in the litter of evergreen conifers tended to be greater than those in the litter of broad-leaved deciduous trees because of the absence of deciduous leaves during the fallout period in March 2011. Moreover, (137)Cs activity concentrations in forest litter were greater with respect to the (137)Cs fallout volume. The (137)Cs activity concentrations in stream litter were much lower than those in forest litter when those in forest litter were higher. The (137)Cs leaching patterns indicated that the differences in (137)Cs activity concentration between forest and stream litter could change with changes in both fallout volume and litter type. Because litter is an important basal food resource in the food webs of both forests and streams, the (137)Cs concentration gradient reflects to possible (137)Cs transfer from lower to higher trophic animals. Our findings will improve our understanding of the spatial heterogeneity and variability of (137)Cs concentrations in animals resident to the contaminated landscape.

  16. Fog and Cloud Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M. A.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, G. T.; Krotkov, N. A.; Carn, S. A.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2011-01-01

    Large fine mode (sub-micron radius) dominated aerosols in size distributions retrieved from AERONET have been observed after fog or low-altitude cloud dissipation events. These column-integrated size distributions have been obtained at several sites in many regions of the world, typically after evaporation of low altitude cloud such as stratocumulus or fog. Retrievals with cloud processed aerosol are sometimes bimodal in the accumulation mode with the larger size mode often approx.0.4 - 0.5 microns radius (volume distribution); the smaller mode typically approx.0.12 to aprrox.0.20 microns may be interstitial aerosol that were not modified by incorporation in droplets and/or aerosol that are less hygroscopic in nature. Bimodal accumulation mode size distributions have often been observed from in situ measurements of aerosols that have interacted with clouds, and AERONET size distribution retrievals made after dissipation of cloud or fog are in good agreement with particle sizes measured by in situ techniques for cloud-processed aerosols. Aerosols of this type and large size range (in lower concentrations) may also be formed by cloud processing in partly cloudy conditions and may contribute to the shoulder of larger size particles in the accumulation mode retrievals, especially in regions where sulfate and other soluble aerosol are a significant component of the total aerosol composition. Observed trends of increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD) as fine mode radius increased suggests higher AOD in the near cloud environment and therefore greater aerosol direct radiative forcing than typically obtained from remote sensing, due to bias towards sampling at low cloud fraction.

  17. 1984-1995 Evolution of Stratospheric Aerosol Size, Surface Area, and Volume Derived by Combining SAGE II and CLAES Extinction Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Bauman, Jill J.

    2000-01-01

    This SAGE II Science Team task focuses on the development of a multi-wavelength, multi- sensor Look-Up-Table (LUT) algorithm for retrieving information about stratospheric aerosols from global satellite-based observations of particulate extinction. The LUT algorithm combines the 4-wavelength SAGE II extinction measurements (0.385 <= lambda <= 1.02 microns) with the 7.96 micron and 12.82 micron extinction measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) instrument, thus increasing the information content available from either sensor alone. The algorithm uses the SAGE II/CLAES composite spectra in month-latitude-altitude bins to retrieve values and uncertainties of particle effective radius R(sub eff), surface area S, volume V and size distribution width sigma(sub g).

  18. Atmospheric aerosol and gaseous pollutant concentrations in Bucharest area using first datasets from the city AQ monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaceanu, Cristina; Iorga, Gabriela

    2010-05-01

    City of Bucharest is the largest and most populated (about 2.8 million inhabitants) city in the Romanian Plain and encounters environmental problems and meteorology typical for several cities in southeastern Europe. City environment includes intense emissions arising from traffic (about 1 million cars per day), five thermo-electrical power-generation stations, that use both natural gas and oil derivatives for power generation and domestic heating, and from industrial sources (more than 800 small and medium plants). In the present work we performed an extensive analysis of the air pollution state for the Bucharest area (inside and outside the city) using filter measurement aerosol data PM10 and PM2.5. Data spanning over first year of continuous sampling (2005) were taken from the city Air Quality Monitoring Network, which consists of eight sampling stations: three industrial and two traffic, one EPA urban background, one suburban and one regional station located outside of Bucharest. The objective was to assess the PM10 recorded levels and their degree of compliance with the EU-legislated air quality standards and to provide a statistical investigation of the factors controlling seasonal and spatial variations of PM levels. PM10 relationships with other measured air pollutants (SO2, CO, NOx) and meteorological parameters (temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity and direction) were investigated by statistical analysis. Back trajectory modeling and wind direction frequency distributions were used to identify the origin of the polluted air masses. Contribution of combustion (slopes) and non-combustion (intercepts) sources to PM10 recorded levels was quantified by linear analysis, for two seasonal periods: cold (15 October-14 April) and warm (15 April-14 October). PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were compared with corresponding values in other European urban areas. Main conclusions are as follows: Traffic and industrial sites contribute to the

  19. Radiocarbon-insights into temporal variations in the sources and concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the Los Angeles and Salt Lake City Metropolitan Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, Claudia; Mouteva, Gergana; Simon, Fahrni; Guaciara, Santos; James, Randerson

    2014-05-01

    activity and Santa Ana winds from March to August 2013. In SLC, we seasonally collected 48h-PM2.5 samples from October 2012 to February 2014. We isolated and quantified BC and OC using a thermo-optical analyzer (RT 3080, Sunset Laboratory, Tigard, OR, USA) with the Swiss_4S protocol, and measured the 14C content of BC and OC with accelerator mass spectrometry at UCI's KCCAMS facility. We also measured the concentration and stable isotope composition of total (organic) carbon and nitrogen on the aerosol filters with EA-IRMS (Carlo Erba coupled to Finnigan DeltaPlus). Preliminary results suggest that in LA, PM10-BC concentrations are on the order of 2-8 ug C/m3. Black carbon is 14C-depleted (FM 0.04-0.21) - indicating that fossil sources dominate emissions. In comparison, OC concentrations were higher (12-17 ugC/m3) and more enriched in 14C (FM 0.54-0.83). In SLC, PM2.5-BC concentrations range from <1 to 3 ug C/m3, with the highest concentrations observed during wintertime inversions. The BC fraction is strongly 14C -depleted (FM 0.06 to 0.12) - indicating a dominance of fossil BC emissions throughout the year. Together, our measurements contribute to a comprehensive quantification of temporal and spatial variations in urban BC, a key uncertainty in constraining BC sources and transport in western North America.

  20. Concentrating-collector mass-production feasibility. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-02

    The Performance Prototype Trough (PPT) Concentrating Collector consists of four 80-foot modules in a 320-foot row. The collector was analyzed, including cost estimates and manufacturing processes to produce collectors in volumes from 100 to 100,000 modules per year. The four different reflector concepts considered were the sandwich reflector structure, sheet metal reflector structure, molded reflector structure, and glass laminate structure. The sheet metal and glass laminate structures are emphasized with their related structure concepts. A preliminary manufacturing plan is offered that includes: documentation of the manufacturing process with production flow diagrams; labor and material costs at various production levels; machinery and equipment requirements including preliminary design specifications; and capital investment costs for a new plant. Of five reflector designs considered, the two judged best and considered at length are thin annealed glass and steel laminate on steel frame panel and thermally sagged glass. Also discussed are market considerations, costing and selling price estimates, design cost analysis and make/buy analysis. (LEW)

  1. Online atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (APCI-IT-MSn) for measuring organic acids in concentrated bulk aerosol - a laboratory and field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A. L.; Äijälä, M.; Brüggemann, M.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Williams, J.; Hoffmann, T.

    2013-02-01

    The field application of an aerosol concentrator in conjunction with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometer (APCI-IT-MS) at the boreal forest station SMEAR II at Hyytiälä, Finland, is demonstrated in this study. APCI is a soft-ionization technique allowing online measurements of organic acids in the gas and particle phase. The detection limit for the acid species in the particle phase was improved by a factor of 7.5 to 11 (e.g. ∼40 ng m3 for pinonic acid) by using the miniature versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (mVACES) upstream of the mass spectrometer. The APCI-IT-MS was calibrated in the negative ion mode with two biogenic organic acid standards - pinic acid and pinonic acid. Pinic acid was used as a surrogate for the quantification of the total amount of organic acids in the ambient aerosol based on the total signal intensities in the negative ion mode. The results were compared with the total organic signal of a C-ToF-AMS during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign. The campaign average contribution of organic acids measured by APCI-IT-MS to the total submicron organic aerosol mass was estimated to be about 60%, based on the response of pinic acid. Very good correlation between APCI-IT-MS and C-ToF-AMS (Pearson's R = 0.94) demonstrates soft-ionization mass spectrometry as a complimentary technique to AMS with electron impact ionization. MS2 studies of specific m/z ratios recorded during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 field campaign were compared to MS2 studies of selected monoterpene oxidation products formed in simulation chamber experiments. The comparison of the resulting fragments shows that oxidation products of the main VOCs emitted at Hyytiälä (α-pinene and Δ3-carene) cannot account for all of the measured fragments. Possible explanations for those unaccounted fragments are the presence of unidentified or underestimated biogenic SOA precursors, or that different products are formed by a different oxidant

  2. Simultaneous determination of trace heavy metals in ambient aerosols by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Talebi, S M; Malekiha, M

    2008-07-01

    The simultaneous determination of heavy metals associated with airborne particulate matter in the atmosphere of the city Isfahan (Iran) was performed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after pre-concentration with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate. The preconcentration procedure developed found instrumental to determine the trace heavy metals associated with ambient aerosols collected at a short sampling period or collected from rural areas where the concentrations of these metals are much less than those in urban areas. Several samples were analyzed by both flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) as a conventional method and the proposed method. The results obtained by the two methods were found in good agreement. The method was applied to the determination of atmospheric level of heavy metals in rural area and also for study of variation in levels of heavy metals in urban atmosphere during the days and nights.

  3. VERSATILE AEROSOL CONCENTRATION ENRICHMENT SYSTEM (VACES) FOR SIMULTANEOUS IN VIVO AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF TOXIC EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE AND COARSE AMBIENT PARTICLES. PART II: FIELD EVALUATION. (R827352C001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents results from a field evaluation of a mobile versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES), designed to enhance the ambient concentrations of ultrafine (less than 0.18 small m...</p>
      </li>

      <li>
      <p><a target=VERSATILE AEROSOL CONCENTRATION ENRICHMENT SYSTEM (VACES) FOR SIMULTANEOUS IN-VIVO AND IN-VITRO EVALUATION OF TOXIC EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE AMBIENT PARTICLES. PART II. FIELD EVALUATION. (R826232)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    This study presents results from a field evaluation of a mobile versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES), designed to enhance the ambient concentrations of ultrafine (less than 0.18 VERSATILE AEROSOL CONCENTRATION ENRICHMENT SYSTEM (VACES) FOR SIMULTANEOUS IN VIVO AND IN VITRO EVALUATION OF TOXIC EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE AND COARSE AMBIENT PARTICLES. PART I: DEVELOPMENT AND LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION. (R827352C001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents the development and bench-testing of a versatile aerosol concentration enrichment system (VACES) capable of simultaneously concentrating ambient particles of the coarse, fine and ultrafine size fractions for conducting in vivo and in vitro studies. The VACE...

  4. Investigation of vertical and horizontal transport processes and their influence on the concentration of aerosols and ozone over the greater Berlin area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, E.; Kerschbaumer, A.; Beekmann, M.; Neißner, F.

    2003-04-01

    Urban emissions of particulate matter and precursors of ozone are very important in relation to the EU-council directives and national pollution abatement strategies. Knowledge about the contribution of anthropogenic urban sources and about long range transport of polluted air to local concentrations is needed for any reduction strategy. Thus, within the German Atmospheric Research Program AFO2000 a project has been started to investigate the formation and transport of PM10/PM2.5 in the greater Berlin area by sampling and analysing PM, using LIDAR as well as physico-chemical measurements to determine density, partical size distribution and chemical composition of the aerosol. Participants are: Freie Universität Berlin, Institute for Meteorology BTU Cottbus, Air Chemistry Department Elight Laser Systems GmbH Freie Universität Berlin, Physics Department Environmental Administration, Berlin Government with an additional PM campaign Measurements at central Berlin monitoring stations exceed standard PM10 tresholds. Therefore, it is important to get a better knowledge about PM sources within and outside the city. Long term applications of the chemical transport model with an aerosol-module REM3/Calgrid is used to explain transport, formation and deposition processes. Backward and forward trajectories are used to determine source/receptor relationships between the observations and European wide emission maps for ozone, precursors and PM10 and PM2,5 by correlation between observed primary aerosols in Berlin and possible sources. The measurements obtained within the project are also used to validate REM3/Calgrid with special respect to SO4, NO3, NH4 and ozone precursors.

  5. Temporal variability of mineral dust in southern Tunisia: analysis of 2 years of PM10 concentration, aerosol optical depth, and meteorology monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouet, Christel; Taieb Labiadh, Mohamed; Bergametti, Gilles; Rajot, Jean Louis; Marticorena, Béatrice; Sekrafi, Saâd; Ltifi, Mohsen; Féron, Anaïs; des Tureaux, Thierry Henry

    2016-04-01

    The south of Tunisia is a region very prone to wind erosion. During the last decades, changes in soil management have led to an increase in wind erosion. In February 2013, a ground-based station dedicated to the monitoring of mineral dust (that can be seen in this region as a proxy of the erosion of soils by wind) was installed at the Institut des Régions Arides (IRA) of Médenine (Tunisia) to document the temporal variability of mineral dust concentrations. This station allows continuous measurements of surface PM10 concentration (TEOM™), aerosol optical depth (CIMEL sunphotometer), and total atmospheric deposition of insoluble dust (CARAGA automatic sampler). The simultaneous monitoring of meteorological parameters (wind speed and direction, relative humidity, air temperature, atmospheric pressure, and precipitations) allows to analyse the factors controlling the variations of mineral dust concentration from the sub-daily to the annual scale. The results from the two first years of measurements of PM10 concentration are presented and discussed. In average on year 2014, PM10 concentration is 56 μg m-3. However, mineral dust concentration highly varies throughout the year: very high PM10 concentrations (up to 1,000 μg m-3 in daily mean) are frequently observed during wintertime and springtime, hardly ever in summer. These episodes of high PM10 concentration (when daily average PM10 concentration is higher than 240 μg m-3) sometimes last several days. By combining local meteorological data, air-masses trajectories, sunphotometer measurements, and satellite imagery, the part of the high PM10concentration due to local emissions and those linked to an advection of dusty air masses by medium and long range transport from the Sahara desert is quantified.

  6. Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2013-02-07

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short

  7. Decadal trend of black carbon and refractory carbonaceous aerosol in the western rim of the North Pacific Ocean: atmospheric concentration and the retrieved record of deposition flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyasu, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Noguchi, Izumi; Akiyama, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2013-04-01

    The long-term trend of light absorbing carbonaceous aerosols (or black carbon: BC) or refractory carbonaceous aerosol (or elemental carbon: EC) concentration is reported at European background sites such as Mace Head, and that of aerosol absorption coefficient are monitored in many GAW sites. On the contrary, such long-term data are relatively scarce at around the western part of the North Pacific Ocean. Thus, to understand the long-term variation of in the area, BC in fine aerosol fraction has been measured at Chichi-jima Islands, Japan. Chichi-jima Island is located 1000 km south of the Japanese mainland, and 1800 km west of the coast line of the Asian continent. BC has been measured with an Aethalometer (Magee, AE-16 and AE-30) since December, 1998 with 1 hr time resolution. Mass flowmeter embedded inside the Aethalometer is calibrated with a rotational dry gas-meter once a year. Monthly averaged BC concentration shows an obvious seasonal variation, i.e. high concentration during late autumn-winter-spring period resulting from the transport from East Asia, with maximum daily concentration above 500 ng m-3. In summer, daily concentration was usually less than 20 ng m-3, due to the clean background airmass originating from the North Pacific Anticyclone. Decadal trend of the annual averaged BC concentration showed a increasing trend from 2000 to 2007 and started to decrease after 2008, which roughly coincides with the reported emission trend of SO2 in China (Lu et al., 2010). In addition, total (i.e., wet + dry) deposition record of refractory carbon at two sites in the northern Japan (Rishiri Island: a remote island site, and Sapporo City: an urban site) are retrieved. At these sites, the local government have been measuring the chemical components in precipitation water collected by deposition gauges. In the deposition gauge, a membrane filter made of cellulose-acetate is fixed at the bottom of the funnel to remove water-insoluble particles from the precipitated

  8. High-accuracy measurements of N2O concentration and isotopic composition of low and high concentration samples with small volume injections using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Nabil; Palmer, Melissa; Huang, Kuan

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) gas is among the major contributors to global warming and ozone depletion in stratosphere. Quantitative estimate of N2O production in various pathways and N2O fluxes across different reservoirs is the key to understanding the role of N2O in the global change. To achieve this goal, accurate and concurrent measurement of both N2O concentration ([N2O]) and its associated isotopic ratios (δ 15Nα , δ 15{N}β & δ 18O) is desired. Recent developments in Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) have enabled high-precision measurements of [N2O] and Site-Preference-δ 15N (SP-δ 15N) and δ 18O of a continuous gas flow. However, many N2O samples are discrete with limited volume ( 2 ppm), and are not suitable for direct continuous measurements by CRDS. Here we present results of a small sample introduction and handling device, labelled as Small Sample Isotope Module (SSIM), coupled to and automatically coordinated with a Picarro isotopic N2O CRDS analyzer to handle and measure high concentration and/or small volume samples. The SSIM requires 20 ml of sample volume per analysis at STP, and transfers the sample to the CRDS for high-precision concentration and isotope ratio measurements. When the injected sample is

  9. Long-term observations of tropospheric particle number size distributions and equivalent black carbon mass concentrations in the German Ultrafine Aerosol Network (GUAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birmili, Wolfram; Weinhold, Kay; Rasch, Fabian; Sonntag, André; Sun, Jia; Merkel, Maik; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Bastian, Susanne; Schladitz, Alexander; Löschau, Gunter; Cyrys, Josef; Pitz, Mike; Gu, Jianwei; Kusch, Thomas; Flentje, Harald; Quass, Ulrich; Kaminski, Heinz; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.; Meinhardt, Frank; Schwerin, Andreas; Bath, Olaf; Ries, Ludwig; Gerwig, Holger; Wirtz, Klaus; Fiebig, Markus

    2016-08-01

    The German Ultrafine Aerosol Network (GUAN) is a cooperative atmospheric observation network, which aims at improving the scientific understanding of aerosol-related effects in the troposphere. The network addresses research questions dedicated to both climate- and health-related effects. GUAN's core activity has been the continuous collection of tropospheric particle number size distributions and black carbon mass concentrations at 17 observation sites in Germany. These sites cover various environmental settings including urban traffic, urban background, rural background, and Alpine mountains. In association with partner projects, GUAN has implemented a high degree of harmonisation of instrumentation, operating procedures, and data evaluation procedures. The quality of the measurement data is assured by laboratory intercomparisons as well as on-site comparisons with reference instruments. This paper describes the measurement sites, instrumentation, quality assurance, and data evaluation procedures in the network as well as the EBAS repository, where the data sets can be obtained (doi:10.5072/guan).

  10. Daily variation of radon gas and its short-lived progeny concentration near ground level and estimation of aerosol residence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Mohery; A, M. Abdallah; A, Ali; S, S. Baz

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of radon (222Rn) gas and its short-lived progenies 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Po were continuously monitored every four hours at the ground level in Jeddah city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The measurements were performed three times every week, starting from November 2014 to October 2015. A method of electrostatic precipitation of positively charged 218Po and 214Po by a positive voltage was applied for determining 222Rn gas concentration. The short-lived 222Rn progeny concentration was determined by using a filter holder connected with the alpha-spectrometric technique. The meteorological parameters (relative air humidity, air temperature, and wind speed) were determined during the measurements of 222Rn and its progeny concentrations. 222Rn gas as well as its short-lived progeny concentration display a daily and seasonal variation with high values in the night and early morning hours as compared to low values at noon and in the afternoon. The observed monthly atmospheric concentrations showed a seasonal trend with the highest values in the autumn/winter season and the lowest values in the spring/summer season. Moreover, and in parallel with alpha-spectrometric measurements, a single filter-holder was used to collect air samples. The deposited activities of 214Pb and the long-lived 222Rn daughter 210Pb on the filter were measured with the gamma spectrometric technique. The measured activity concentrations of 214Pb by both techniques were found to be relatively equal largely. The highest mean seasonally activity concentrations of 210Pb were observed in the autumn/winter season while the lowest mean were observed in the spring/summer season. The mean residence time (MRT) of aerosol particles in the atmospheric air could be estimated from the activity ratios of 210Pb/214Pb. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research (DSR), King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Grant No. 291/965/1434).

  11. Typical coronary appearance of dilated cardiomyopathy versus left ventricular concentric hypertrophy: coronary volumes measured by multislice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Shirai, Nobuyuki; Nakanishi, Koki; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Iguchi, Tomokazu; Hasegawa, Takao; Nakata, Shinji; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2013-03-01

    Several coronary angiographic studies have reported that enlarged and tortuous epicardial coronary arteries are characteristic of patients with left ventricular concentric hypertrophy (LVCH). Recently, we showed that small volumes opacified by contrast medium can be accurately measured by 64-multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and that there is a direct relationship between the coronary artery volume and left ventricular (LV) mass. However, the relationship of coronary artery volume with LV mass in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is unknown. The present study was designed to investigate this issue. Thirteen patients with DCM and 18 patients with LVCH who underwent MSCT angiography were included in this analysis. The coronary arteries were segmented on a workstation, and the appropriate window settings obtained from the results of the phantom experiments were applied to the volume-rendered images to calculate the total coronary artery volume (right and left coronary arteries). The absolute coronary lengths and volumes in patients with LVCH and DCM were greater than those in controls. The coronary artery volumes adjusted for LV mass in patients with DCM were found to be smaller than those in patients with LVCH or in controls, and these values did not differ between patients with LVCH and controls (DCM 4.1 ± 0.9, LVCH 5.4 ± 1.4, controls 5.5 ± 2.3 ml/100 g of LV mass, P < 0.005; DCM vs LVCH, P < 0.01; and DCM vs control, P < 0.0005). This study showed that the increase in the coronary artery volume in patients with LVCH matched the increase in LV mass, but a decreased coronary volume with regard to LV mass was characteristic of patients with DCM.

  12. Black carbon in aerosol during BIBLE B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liley, J. Ben; Baumgardner, D.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Blake, D. R.; Koike, M.; Machida, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kawakami, S.; Shirai, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2003-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment (BIBLE) A and B campaigns over the tropical western Pacific during springtime deployed a Gulfstream-II aircraft with systems to measure ozone and numerous precursor species. Aerosol measuring systems included a MASP optical particle counter, a condensation nucleus (CN) counter, and an absorption spectrometer for black carbon. Aerosol volume was very low in the middle and upper troposphere during both campaigns, and during BIBLE A, there was little aerosol enhancement in the boundary layer away from urban areas. In BIBLE B, there was marked aerosol enhancement in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere. Mixing ratios of CN in cloud-free conditions in the upper troposphere were in general higher than in the boundary layer, indicating new particle formation from gaseous precursors. High concentrations of black carbon were observed during BIBLE B, with mass loadings up to 40 μg m-3 representing as much as one quarter of total aerosol mass. Strong correlations with hydrocarbon enhancement allow the determination of a black carbon emission ratio for the fires at that time. Expressed as elemental carbon, it is about 0.5% of carbon dioxide and 6% of carbon monoxide emissions from the same fires, comparable to methane production, and greater than that of other hydrocarbons.

  13. Black carbon in aerosol during BIBLE B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liley, J. Ben; Baumgardner, D.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Blake, D. R.; Koike, M.; Machida, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kawakami, S.; Shirai, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2002-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment (BIBLE) A and B campaigns over the tropical western Pacific during springtime deployed a Gulfstream-II aircraft with systems to measure ozone and numerous precursor species. Aerosol measuring systems included a MASP optical particle counter, a condensation nucleus (CN) counter, and an absorption spectrometer for black carbon. Aerosol volume was very low in the middle and upper troposphere during both campaigns, and during BIBLE A, there was little aerosol enhancement in the boundary layer away from urban areas. In BIBLE B, there was marked aerosol enhancement in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere. Mixing ratios of CN in cloud-free conditions in the upper troposphere were in general higher than in the boundary layer, indicating new particle formation from gaseous precursors. High concentrations of black carbon were observed during BIBLE B, with mass loadings up to 40 μg m-3 representing as much as one quarter of total aerosol mass. Strong correlations with hydrocarbon enhancement allow the determination of a black carbon emission ratio for the fires at that time. Expressed as elemental carbon, it is about 0.5% of carbon dioxide and 6% of carbon monoxide emissions from the same fires, comparable to methane production, and greater than that of other hydrocarbons.

  14. Differences in aerosolization of Rift Valley fever virus resulting from choice of inhalation exposure chamber: implications for animal challenge studies

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, Laura M.; Powell, Diana S.; Caroline, Amy L.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aerosol characteristics of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) were evaluated to achieve reproducible infection of experimental animals with aerosolized RVFV suitable for animal efficacy studies. Spray factor (SF), the ratio between the concentrations of the aerosolized agent to the agent in the aerosol generator, is used to compare performance differences between aerosol exposures. SF indicates the efficiency of the aerosolization process; a higher SF means a lower nebulizer concentration is needed to achieve a desired inhaled dose. Relative humidity levels as well as the duration of the exposure and choice of exposure chamber all impacted RVFV SF. Differences were also noted between actual and predicted minute volumes for different species of nonhuman primates. While NHP from Old World species (Macaca fascicularis, M. mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops) generally had a lower actual minute volume than predicted, the actual minute volume for marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) was higher than predicted (150% for marmosets compared with an average of 35% for all other species examined). All of these factors (relative humidity, chamber, duration, and minute volume) impact the ability to reliably and reproducibly deliver a specific dose of aerosolized RVFV. The implications of these findings for future pivotal efficacy studies are discussed. PMID:24532259

  15. Contribution of new particle formation to the total aerosol concentration at the high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröstl, Jasmin; Herrmann, Erik; Frege, Carla; Bianchi, Federico; Molteni, Ugo; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Steinbacher, Martin; Weingartner, Ernest; Dommen, Josef; Gysel, Martin; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-10-01

    Previous modeling studies hypothesized that a large fraction of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is attributed to new particle formation (NPF) in the free troposphere. Despite the potential importance of this process, only few long-term observations have been performed to date. Here we present the results of a 12 month campaign of NPF observations at the high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (JFJ, 3580 m above sea level (asl)). Our results show that NPF significantly adds to the total aerosol concentration at the JFJ and only occurs via previous precursor entrainment from the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Freshly nucleated particles do not directly grow to CCN size (90 nm) within observable time scales (maximum 48 h). The contribution of NPF to the CCN concentration is low within this time frame compared to other sources, such as PBL entrainment of larger particles. A multistep growth mechanism is proposed which allows previously formed Aitken mode particles to add to the CCN concentration. A parametrization is derived to explain formation rates at the JFJ, showing that precursor concentration, PBL influence, and global radiation are the key factors controlling new particle formation at the site.

  16. Three years of aerosol mass, black carbon and particle number concentrations at Montsec (southern Pyrenees, 1570 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, A.; Pey, J.; Minguillón, M. C.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.

    2014-04-01

    Time variation of mass particulate matter (PM1 and PM1&minus10), black carbon (BC) and number of particles (N3: number of particles with an aerodynamic diameter higher than 3 nm, and N10: higher than 10 nm) concentrations at the high-altitude site of Montsec (MSC) in the southern Pyrenees was interpreted for the period 2010-2012. At MSC, PM10 (12 μg m-3) and N7 (2140 # cm-3) three-year arithmetic average concentrations were higher than those measured at other high-altitude sites in central Europe during the same period (PM10: 3-9 μg m-3 and N: 634-2070 # cm-3). By contrast, BC concentrations at MSC (0.2 μg m-3) were equal to or even lower than those measured at these European sites (0.2-0.4 μg m-3). These differences were attributed to the higher relevance of Saharan dust transport and to the higher importance of the biogenic precursor emissions and new particle formation (NPF) processes, and to the lower influence of anthropogenic emissions at MSC. The different time variation of PM and BC concentrations compared with that of N suggests that these aerosol parameters were governed by diverse factors at MSC. Both PM and BC concentrations showed marked differences for different meteorological scenarios, with enhanced concentrations under North African air outbreaks (PM1&minus10: 13 μg m-3, PM1: 8 μg m-3 and BC: 0.3 μg m-3) and low concentrations when Atlantic advections occurred (PM1-10: 5 μg m-3, PM1: 4 μg m-3 and BC: 0.1 μg m-3). PM and BC concentrations increased in summer, with a secondary maximum in early spring, and were at their lowest in winter, due to the contrasting origin of the air masses in the warmer seasons (spring and summer) and in the colder seasons (autumn and winter). The maximum in the warmer seasons was attributed to long-range transport processes that mask the breezes and regional transport breaking the daily cycles of these pollutants. By contrast, PM and BC concentrations showed clear diurnal cycles, with maxima at midday in the

  17. Three years of aerosol mass, black carbon and particle number concentrations at Montsec (southern~Pyrenees, 1570 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, A.; Pey, J.; Minguillón, M. C.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.

    2013-10-01

    Time variation of mass particulate matter (PM1 and PM1-10), black carbon (BC) and particle number (N) concentrations at the high altitude site of Montsec (MSC) in the southern Pyrenees was interpreted for the period 2010-2012. The MSC site registered higher PM10 (12 μg m-3) and N > 7 nm (2209 # cm-3) concentrations than those measured at other high altitude sites in central Europe (PM10: 3-9 μg m-3 and N: 634-2070 # cm-3). By contrast, BC concentrations at MSC (0.2 μg m-3) were equal or even lower than those measured at these European sites (0.2-0.4 μg m-3). These differences were attributed to the lower influence of anthropogenic emissions and to the higher relevance of Saharan dust transport and new particle formation (NPF) processes at MSC. The different time variation of PM and BC concentrations compared with that of N suggests that these aerosol parameters were governed by diverse factors at MSC. Both PM and BC concentrations showed marked differences for different meteorological scenarios, with enhanced concentrations under North African outbreaks (PM1-10: 13 μg m-3, PM1: 8 μg m-3 and BC: 0.3 μg m-3) and low concentrations when Atlantic advections occurred (PM1-10: 5 μg m-3, PM1: 4 μg m-3 and BC: 0.1 μg m-3). Because of the contrasting origin of the air masses in the warmer seasons (spring and summer) and in the colder seasons (autumn and winter), PM and BC concentrations showed a marked increase in summer, with a secondary maximum in early spring, and were at their lowest during winter. The maximum in the warmer seasons was attributed to long-range transport processes which mask the breezes and regional transport breaking the daily cycles of these pollutants. By contrast, PM and BC concentrations showed clear diurnal cycles with maxima at midday in the colder seasons. A statistically significant weekly variation was also obtained for the BC concentrations, displaying a progressive increase from Tuesday to Saturday, followed by a significant

  18. Impacts of ENSO events on cloud radiative effects in preindustrial conditions: Changes in cloud fraction and their dependence on interactive aerosol emissions and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Russell, Lynn M.; Xu, Li; Lou, Sijia; Lamjiri, Maryam A.; Somerville, Richard C. J.; Miller, Arthur J.; Cayan, Daniel R.; DeFlorio, Michael J.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Ying; Singh, Balwinder; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Rasch, Philip J.

    2016-06-01

    We use three 150 year preindustrial simulations of the Community Earth System Model to quantify the impacts of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events on shortwave and longwave cloud radiative effects (CRESW and CRELW). Compared to recent observations from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data set, the model simulation successfully reproduces larger variations of CRESW and CRELW over the tropics. The ENSO cycle is found to dominate interannual variations of cloud radiative effects. Simulated cooling (warming) effects from CRESW (CRELW) are strongest over the tropical western and central Pacific Ocean during warm ENSO events, with the largest difference between 20 and 60 W m-2, with weaker effects of 10-40 W m-2 over Indonesian regions and the subtropical Pacific Ocean. Sensitivity tests show that variations of cloud radiative effects are mainly driven by ENSO-related changes in cloud fraction. The variations in midlevel and high cloud fractions each account for approximately 20-50% of the interannual variations of CRESW over the tropics and almost all of the variations of CRELW between 60°S and 60°N. The variation of low cloud fraction contributes to most of the variations of CRESW over the midlatitude oceans. Variations in natural aerosol concentrations explained 10-30% of the variations of both CRESW and CRELW over the tropical Pacific, Indonesian regions, and the tropical Indian Ocean. Changes in natural aerosol emissions and concentrations enhance 3-5% and 1-3% of the variations of cloud radiative effects averaged over the tropics.

  1. Recent Rainfall and Aerosol Chemistry From Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landing, W. M.; Shelley, R.; Kadko, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    This project was devoted to testing the use of Be-7 as a tracer for quantifying trace element fluxes from the atmosphere to the oceans. Rainfall and aerosol samples were collected between June 15, 2011 and July 27, 2013 at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) located near the eastern end of the island of Bermuda. Collectors were situated near ground level, clear of surrounding vegetation, at a meteorological monitoring station in front of the BIOS laboratory, about 10 m above sea level. This is a Bermuda Air Quality Program site used for ambient air quality monitoring. To quantify the atmospheric deposition of Be-7, plastic buckets were deployed for collection of fallout over ~3 week periods. Wet deposition was collected for trace element analysis using a specially modified "GEOTRACES" N-CON automated wet deposition collector. Aerosol samples were collected with a Tisch TE-5170V-BL high volume aerosol sampler, modified to collect 12 replicate samples on acid-washed 47mm diameter Whatman-41 filters, using procedures identical to those used for the US GEOTRACES aerosol program (Morton et al., 2013). Aerosol and rainfall samples were analyzed for total Na, Mg, Al, P, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Pb, Th, and U using ICPMS. Confirming earlier data from Bermuda, strong seasonality in rainfall and aerosol loading and chemistry was observed, particularly for aerosol and rainfall Fe concentrations when Saharan dust arrives in July/August with SE trajectories.

  2. Optimal use of buffer volumes for the measurement of atmospheric gas concentration in multi-point systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescatti, Alessandro; Marcolla, Barbara; Goded, Ignacio; Gruening, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    Accurate multi-point monitoring systems are required to derive atmospheric measurements of greenhouse gas concentrations both for the calculation of surface fluxes with inversion transport models and for the estimation of non-turbulent components of the mass balance equation (i.e. advection and storage fluxes) at eddy covariance sites. When a single analyser is used to monitor multiple sampling points, the deployment of buffer volumes (BVs) along sampling lines can reduce the uncertainty due to the discrete temporal sampling of the signal. In order to optimize the use of buffer volumes we explored various set-ups by simulating their effect on time series of high-frequency CO2 concentration collected at three Fluxnet sites. Besides, we proposed a novel scheme to calculate half-hourly weighted arithmetic means from discrete point samples, accounting for the probabilistic fraction of the signal generated in the averaging period. Results show that the use of BVs with the new averaging scheme reduces the mean absolute error (MAE) up to 80 % compared to a set-up without BVs and up to 60 % compared to the case with BVs and a standard, non-weighted averaging scheme. The MAE of CO2 concentration measurements was observed to depend on the variability of the concentration field and on the size of BVs, which therefore have to be carefully dimensioned. The optimal volume size depends on two main features of the instrumental set-up: the number of measurement points and the time needed to sample at one point (i.e. line purging plus sampling time). A linear and consistent relationship was observed at all sites between the sampling frequency, which summarizes the two features mentioned above, and the renewal frequency associated with the volume. Ultimately, this empirical relationship can be applied to estimate the optimal volume size according to the technical specifications of the sampling system.

  3. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 32; Estimates of AOD Trends (2002 - 2012) Over the World's Major Cities Based on the MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provencal, Simon; Kishcha, Pavel; Elhacham, Emily; daSilva, Arlindo M.; Alpert, Pinhas; Suarez, Max J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office has extended the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) tool with five atmospheric aerosol species (sulfates, organic carbon, black carbon, mineral dust and sea salt). This inclusion of aerosol reanalysis data is now known as MERRAero. This study analyses a ten-year period (July 2002 - June 2012) MERRAero aerosol reanalysis applied to the study of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and its trends for the aforementioned aerosol species over the world's major cities (with a population of over 2 million inhabitants). We found that a proportion of various aerosol species in total AOD exhibited a geographical dependence. Cities in industrialized regions (North America, Europe, central and eastern Asia) are characterized by a strong proportion of sulfate aerosols. Organic carbon aerosols are dominant over cities which are located in regions where biomass burning frequently occurs (South America and southern Africa). Mineral dust dominates other aerosol species in cities located in proximity to the major deserts (northern Africa and western Asia). Sea salt aerosols are prominent in coastal cities but are dominant aerosol species in very few of them. AOD trends are declining over cities in North America, Europe and Japan, as a result of effective air quality regulation. By contrast, the economic boom in China and India has led to increasing AOD trends over most cities in these two highly-populated countries. Increasing AOD trends over cities in the Middle East are caused by increasing desert dust.

  4. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate

  5. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E.; Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120°, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20%±15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law size distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, a, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for λ = 0.87 μm). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with α. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distributions before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate particles with rm

  6. DETECTION BY PCR OF HUMAN ENTERIC VIRUSES CONCENTRATED FROM LARGE VOLUMES OF WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Viruses are recovered and concentrated from water by passage through a positively charged cartridge filter. Following virus elution from the cartridge filter with beef extract and concentration of the beef extract solution, viruses are usually assayed by cell culture. However...

  7. Detection of biological aerosols by luminescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Peter J.; Tieman, Darlene; Coon, Phillip A.; Paterno, Dorothea A.; Milton, Maurice M.

    1999-12-01

    Luciferin-Luciferase (L-L) luminescence techniques were used to successfully measure adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (pg/ml) in concentrated aerosol samples containing either vegetative bacterial cells or spores. Aerosols were collected with wet and dry sampling devices. Evaluation for the presence of total bio-mass from bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP was achieved by suspending the collected aerosol samples in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pipeting a 50-(mu) l aliquot of the PBS suspension into a FiltravetteTM, and then adding bacterial releasing agent (BRA). The sample was then reacted with L-L, and the resulting Relative Luminescence Units (RLU's), indicative of ATP from all sources, were measured. Bacterial cells were enumerated with the additional application of a wash with somatic cell releasing agent (SRA) to remove any interferences and non-bacterial sources of ATP prior to BRA application. This step removes interfering substances and non-bacterial sources of ATP. For spore analysis, an equi-volume sample of the PBS suspension was added to an equi-volume of trypticase soy broth (TSB), incubated at 37 C for 15 minutes, and processed using methods identical to bacterial cell analysis. Using these technique we were able to detect Bacillus subtilin variation niger, formerly known as Bacillus globigii (BG), in aerosol samples at concentrations greater than or equal to 105 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Results of field and chamber trials show that one can detect the presence of bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP. One can also differentiate spore and vegetative bacterial cells. These techniques may be appropriate to situations where the measurement of bacterial aerosols is needed.

  8. Concentration of Bacterial Aerosols Associated with Particles: Observations at a Southwestern Coastal Site of Japan in the Spring of 2013-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Zhang, D.

    2015-12-01

    Airborne bacteria are the major group of bioaerosols in the air and are considered to have important climate effects by acting as ice nuclei. To investigate the dependence of bacteria on particles in the air, we enumerated bacterial cells in size-segregated airborne particle samples that were collected at a rural seaside site on the southwestern coast of Japan during dust and non-dust periods in the spring of 2013-2014. Proportion of particle-attached bacteria was 75-84% of total airborne bacterial concentration during dust periods and 27-76% during non-dust periods, both of which were equal to approximately 12% of >1 µm aerosol particle concentrations. The concentration of particle-attached bacteria was 3.2 times higher during dust periods, compared with that during non-dust periods. The viability, which is referring to the ratio of viable cells to total cells, of particle-attached bacteria was 33-82% during dust periods and 45-98% during non-dust periods. The predominance of particle-associated viable/non-viable bacteria during dust periods demonstrates a potential of bacteria to cooperate with dust in influencing the climate, ecosystems, and health where they arrive.

  9. Mount Saint Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Fong, W.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  10. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.

    1982-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  11. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K.G.; Ferry, G.V.; Hayes, D.M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples show that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  12. Impacts of Stabilized Criegee Intermediates, surface uptake processes and higher aromatic secondary organic aerosol yields on predicted PM2.5 concentrations in the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Qi; Cureño, Iris V.; Chen, Gang; Ali, Sajjad; Zhang, Hongliang; Malloy, Meagan; Bravo, Humberto A.; Sosa, Rodolfo

    2014-09-01

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) with the SAPRC-99 gas phase photochemical mechanism and the AERO5 aerosol module was applied to model gases and particulate matter (PM) concentrations in the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone (MCMZ) and the surrounding regions for March 2006 using the official 2006 emission inventories, along with emissions from biogenic sources, biomass burning, windblown dust, the Tula Industrial Complex and the Popocatépetl volcano. The base case model was capable of reproducing the observed hourly concentrations of O3 and attaining CO, NO2 and NOx performance similar to previous modeling studies. Although the base case model performance of hourly PM2.5 and PM10 meets the model performance criteria, under-prediction of high PM2.5 concentrations in late morning indicates that secondary PM, such as sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), might be under-predicted. Several potential pathways to increase SOA and secondary sulfate were investigated, including Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCIs) from ozonolysis reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons and their reactions with SO2, the reactive uptake processes of SO2, glyoxal and methylglyoxal on particle surface and higher SOA formation due to higher mass yields of aromatic SOA precursors. Averaging over the entire episode, the glyoxal and methylglyoxal reactive uptake and higher aromatics SOA yields contribute to ∼0.9 μg m-3 and ∼1.25 μg m-3 of SOA, respectively. Episode average SOA in the MCMZ reaches ∼3 μg m-3. The SCI pathway increases PM2.5 sulfate by 0.2-0.4 μg m-3 or approximately 10-15%. The relative amount of sulfate increase due to SCI agrees with previous studies in summer eastern US. Surface SO2 uptake significantly increases sulfate concentration in MCMZ by 1-3 μg m-3 or approximately 50-60%. The higher SOA and sulfate leads to improved PM2.5 and PM10 model performance.

  13. Pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation under different inhaled concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in pigs undergoing hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Alexandre Hideaki; Otsuki, Denise Aya; Hamaji, Marcelo Waldir M; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Ida, Keila Kazue; Fantoni, Denise T; Auler, José Otavio Costa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inhalant anesthesia induces dose-dependent cardiovascular depression, but whether fluid responsiveness is differentially influenced by the inhalant agent and plasma volemia remains unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation in pigs undergoing hemorrhage. METHODS: Twenty-five pigs were randomly anesthetized with isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic data were registered sequentially at minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M1), 1.25 (M2), and 1.00 (M3). Then, following withdrawal of 30% of the estimated blood volume, these data were registered at a minimum alveolar concentrations of 1.00 (M4) and 1.25 (M5). RESULTS: The minimum alveolar concentration increase from 1.00 to 1.25 (M2) decreased the cardiac index and increased the central venous pressure, but only modest changes in mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were observed in all groups from M1 to M2. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure was only observed with desflurane. Following blood loss (M4), pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation and central venous pressure increased (p<0.001) and mean arterial pressure decreased in all groups. Under hypovolemia, the cardiac index decreased with the increase of anesthesia depth in a similar manner in all groups. CONCLUSION: The effects of desflurane, sevoflurane and isoflurane on pulse pressure variation and stroke volume variation were not different during normovolemia or hypovolemia. PMID:26735220

  14. Surfactants in atmospheric aerosols and rainwater around lake ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Razak, Intan Suraya; Latif, Mohd Talib; Jaafar, Shoffian Amin; Khan, Md Firoz; Mushrifah, Idris

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the composition of surfactants in atmospheric aerosols and rainwater in the vicinity of Lake Chini, Malaysia. Samples of atmospheric aerosol and rainwater were collected between March and September 2011 using a high volume air sampler (HVAS) and glass bottles equipped with funnel. Colorimetric analysis was undertaken to determine the concentration of anionic surfactants as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) and cationic surfactants as disulphine blue active substances (DBAS). The water-soluble ionic compositions were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for cations (Na, K, Mg and Ca) and ion chromatography equipped with a conductivity detector for anions (F(-), Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-)) and the Nessler Method was used to obtain the NH4(+) concentrations. The source apportionment of MBAS and DBAS in atmospheric aerosols was identified using a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR). The results revealed that the concentrations of surfactants in atmospheric aerosols and rainwater were dominated by anionic surfactants as MBAS. The concentration of surfactants as MBAS and DBAS was dominated in fine mode compared to coarse mode aerosols. Using PCA/MLR analysis, two major sources of atmospheric surfactants to Lake Chini were identified as soil dust (75 to 93%) and biomass burning (2 to 22%).

  15. Influence of air mass origin on aerosol properties at a remote Michigan forest site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanReken, T. M.; Mwaniki, G. R.; Wallace, H. W.; Pressley, S. N.; Erickson, M. H.; Jobson, B. T.; Lamb, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    The northern Great Lakes region of North America is a large, relatively pristine area. To date, there has only been limited study of the atmospheric aerosol in this region. During summer 2009, a detailed characterization of the atmospheric aerosol was conducted at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) as part of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX). Measurements included particle size distribution, water-soluble composition, and CCN activity. Aerosol properties were strongly dependent on the origin of the air masses reaching the site. For ∼60% of the study period, air was transported from sparsely populated regions to the northwest. During these times aerosol loadings were low, with mean number and volume concentrations of 1630 cm-3 and 1.91 μm3 cm-3, respectively. The aerosol during clean periods was dominated by organics, and exhibited low hygroscopicities (mean κ = 0.18 at s = 0.3%). When air was from more populated regions to the east and south (∼29% of the time), aerosol properties reflected a stronger anthropogenic influence, with 85% greater particle number concentrations, 2.5 times greater aerosol volume, six times more sulfate mass, and increased hygroscopicity (mean k = 0.24 at s = 0.3%). These trends are have the potential to influence forest-atmosphere interactions and should be targeted for future study.

  16. Effects of sulfuric acid aerosol on cardiopulmonary function of dogs, sheep, and humans.

    PubMed

    Sackner, M A; Ford, D; Fernandez, R; Cipley, J; Perez, D; Kwoka, M; Reinhart, M; Michaelson, E D; Schreck, R; Wanner, A

    1978-09-01

    Submicronic aerosol of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) originates from the burning of fossil fuels and discharge of vapor from the automobile engine equipped with the catalytic converter. This study was conducted to determine whether brief exposure to this aerosol in high concentrations adversely affects the cardiopulmonary system. In all studies, submicronic aerosol of sodium chloride was used as a control. Anesthetized dogs that breathed H2SO4 aerosol in concentrations up to 8 mg per m3 showed no effects on respiratory resistance, static lung compliance, and functional residual capacity. A 4-hour exposure to H2SO4 aerosol (4 mg per m3) produced no significant changes in mechanics of breathing, functional residual capacity, pulmonary and systemic arterial blood pressures, cardiac output, heart rate, and arterial blood gas tensions. Conscious sheep that breathed H2SO4 aerosol in concentrations up to 14 mg per m3 for 20 min had no alteration of tracheal mucous velocity in an immediate 3-hour follow-up period or 5 to 10 days later. Conscious sheep that breathed H2SO4 aerosol (4 mg per m3) for 4 hours had no significant alteration of tracheal mucous velocity immediately and 2 hours thereafter. Both normal and asthmatic adults breathing H2SO4 aerosol in concentrations up to 1 mg per m3 for 10 min showed no significant alteration of lung volumes, distribution of ventilation, ear oximetry, dynamic mechanics of breathing, oscillation mechanics of the chest-lung system, pulmonary capill